WorldWideScience

Sample records for basal thumb prostheses

  1. Outcomes following double knot suspension arthroplasty for basal joint arthritis of the thumb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various surgical options used in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the basal joint of the thumb that are refractory to non-surgical management. This study was conducted to provide short term functional outcomes using the mentioned technique in treating basal joint arthritis of the thumb. Methods: We treated basal joint arthritis of the thumb by trapeziumectomy and volar oblique ligament reconstruction using flexor carpi radialis tendon and suspension interposition arthroplasty using the entire tendon split along its length and tied as a double knot at the base of the thumb metacarpal. Through a questionnaire based survey, we reviewed 24 thumbs in 24 patients with basal joint arthritis of the thumb who were followed up with the hand therapist. Postal questionnaires were sent to these patients to record DASH scores and satisfaction. Results: The mean time from surgery to discharge by the hand therapist following rehabilitation was 10 weeks. The DASH score averaged 25 points at 12 weeks postoperatively. There was statistical significance (p-value=0.0001) between the DASH score compared with time spent with the hand therapist. The postoperative net difference in grip strength and pinch grip compared with non-operated had was 9 kg and 3 kg respectively and the net difference in web span was 2 cm. Conclusion: We suggest this technique of suspension arthroplasty is a safe and effective method in treating basal joint arthritis of the thumb with good short-term functional outcomes and minimal complications. (author)

  2. Holder for standardized radiodiagnostic demonstration of ulnar, volar and radial capsuloligamentous lesions of the basal thumb joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have constructed a device for standardised radiodiagnostics of ulnar, volar and radial capsulo-ligamentous lesions of the basal thumb joint. Used as hyperextensometer at the basal joint of the index finger the device is of equal value in objective diagnostics of ligamentous laxity. (orig.)

  3. Partial arthroscopic trapeziectomy with ligament reconstruction to treat primary thumb basal joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmoineaux, P; Delaroche, C; Beaufils, P

    2012-11-01

    Since the outcome of partial trapeziectomy is not always satisfactory, we proposed using arthroscopy to perform partial trapeziectomy and to perform ligament reconstruction with the abductor pollicis longus tendon. A tendon strip was left intact at its insertion at the base of the first metacarpal and then slipped into the trapeziectomy space. It was fixed into a blind tunnel at the base of the second metacarpal with a bioabsorbable interference screw. Forty-nine patients were surgically treated between 2006 and 2009. With an average follow-up of 3.6 years, 83.5% of patients were satisfied with the procedure; 96% of thumbs were stable and 74% were pain free. The average recovery time was 4.5 months. There were four cases of radial nerve branch irritation and one case of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis; there were no cases of complex regional pain syndrome. This minimally-invasive technique is a less-aggressive treatment approach for thumb carpometacarpal joint arthritis, which simplify postoperative recovery. PMID:23098774

  4. Pre- and post-operative comorbidities in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis of the thumb, and trigger digit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Gong, H S; Lee, H J; Lee, Y H; Rhee, S H; Baek, G H

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 633 hands in 362 patients who had idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome and underwent carpal tunnel release between 1999 and 2009. Electrophysiological studies and simple radiographs of the wrist, cervical spine, and basal joint of the thumb were routinely checked, and patients were also assessed for the presence of trigger digit or de Quervain's disease before and after surgery. Among 362 patients, cervical arthritis was found in 253 patients (70%), and C5-C6 arthritis was the most common site. Basal joint arthritis of the thumb was observed in 216 (34%) of the 633 hands. Trigger digit or de Quervain's disease was observed in 85 of the 633 hands (13%) before surgery, and developed in 67 hands (11%) after surgery. Cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis, and trigger digit commonly coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Patient education about these disorders is very important when they coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:22553311

  5. Thumb Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...

  6. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... A joint is where bones connect and move. Arthritis is thinning of the cartilage, which is the ...

  7. Robotic Thumb Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor); Goza, S. Michael (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An improved robotic thumb for a robotic hand assembly is provided. According to one aspect of the disclosure, improved tendon routing in the robotic thumb provides control of four degrees of freedom with only five tendons. According to another aspect of the disclosure, one of the five degrees of freedom of a human thumb is replaced in the robotic thumb with a permanent twist in the shape of a phalange. According to yet another aspect of the disclosure, a position sensor includes a magnet having two portions shaped as circle segments with different center points. The magnet provides a linearized output from a Hall effect sensor.

  8. Unfavourable results in thumb reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir M Kumta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of thumb reconstruction parallels the history of hand surgery. The attributes that make the thumb unique, and that the reconstructive surgeon must assess and try to restore when reconstructing a thumb, are: Position, stability, strength, length, motion, sensibility and appearance. Deficiency in any of these attributes can reduce the utility of the reconstructed thumb. A detailed assessment of the patient and his requirements needs to be performed before embarking on a thumb reconstruction. Most unsatisfactory results can be attributed to wrong choice of procedure. Component defects of the thumb are commonly treated by tissue from adjacent fingers, hand or forearm. With refinements in microsurgery, the foot has become a major source of tissue for component replacement in the thumb. Bone lengthening, osteoplastic reconstruction, pollicisation, and toe to hand transfers are the commonest methods of thumb reconstruction. Unfavourable results can be classified as functional and aesthetic. Some are common to all types of procedures. However each type of reconstruction has its own unique set of problems. Meticulous planning and execution is essential to give an aesthetic and functionally useful thumb. Secondary surgeries like tendon transfers, bone grafting, debulking, arthrodesis, may be required to correct deficiencies in the reconstruction. Attention needs to be paid to the donor site as well.

  9. [Root arthrosis of the thumb].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautefeuille, P; Duquesnoy, B

    1991-12-15

    Root arthrosis of the thumb results from a degenerative lesion of the trapezometacarpal joint. It is particularly frequent in menopausal women. The often prolonged pain it produces sometimes raises therapeutic problems. Treatment is always medical at first, but when it fails several surgical operations will ensure permanent painlessness. PMID:1808686

  10. Protective prostheses during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current applications and complications in the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of oral malignancy are reviewed. Prostheses are used for decreasing radiation to vital structures not involved with the lesion but located in the field of radiation. With a program of oral hygiene and proper dental care, protective prostheses can help decrease greatly the morbidity seen with existing radiotherapy regimens

  11. Sushi hand roll dressing for thumb polydactyly

    OpenAIRE

    Yen Chi-Hung; Ho Pak-Cheong; Hung Leung-Kim

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Surgery for thumb polydactyly is a commonly performed orthopaedic procedure in Asia Pacific region. Despite extensive publications on topical dressing methods and dressing materials in paediatric wounds, there is no single design that affords a secure and yet comfortable post-operative wound dressing for thumb polydactyly. We have devised a new dressing method, which can easily be fabricated for such purpose from readily available materials in operation theatre.

  12. Sushi hand roll dressing for thumb polydactyly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Chi-Hung

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surgery for thumb polydactyly is a commonly performed orthopaedic procedure in Asia Pacific region. Despite extensive publications on topical dressing methods and dressing materials in paediatric wounds, there is no single design that affords a secure and yet comfortable post-operative wound dressing for thumb polydactyly. We have devised a new dressing method, which can easily be fabricated for such purpose from readily available materials in operation theatre.

  13. Motion Analysis of Thumb in Cellular Phone Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naotaka Sakai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The thumb motion of 10 normal subjects during cellular phone use was measured using a reflective marker detection system to compare the maximum, minimum and range of flexion angles of the interphalangeal (IP, metacarpophalangeal (MP and carpometacarpal (CM joints. Two micro-reflective markers 3 mm in diameter were each placed on the dorsal surface of the distal phalanx, basal phalanx and metacarpal bone of the thumb. Three markers were placed on the dorsal hand in order to define the dorsal hand plane. Each subject pushed the 12 keys of a folding cellular phone with an 85-mm-long and 40-mm-wide keypad, sequentially from ‘1’ to ‘#’, and the pushing motion was recorded by six infrared video cameras for 12 seconds, using the VICON 612 system. The mean maximum flexion angle of the MP joint was significantly (p < .05 larger than the CM joint, and the mean minimum flexion angle of the CM joint was significantly (p < .01 smaller than the IP and MP joints. The mean range of motion of the IP joint was significantly (p < .05 larger than the MP and the CM joints. In a comparison of different key-pushing motions, only the CM joint was significantly (p < .05 larger in its range of motion. In conclusion, thumb motion on pushing the keys of the cellular phone was produced mainly by the MP and the CM joints. In addition, the ability to reach keys in different areas of the cellular phone keypad is regulated by changing the flexion angle of the CM joint.

  14. Cortical Microstimulation for Neural Prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatraman, Subramaniam

    2010-01-01

    Brain-controlled prostheses have the potential to improve the quality of life of a large number of paralyzed persons by allowing them to control prosthetic limbs simply by thought. An essential requirement for natural use of such neural prostheses is that the user should be provided with somatosensory feedback from the artificial limb. This can be achieved by electrically stimulating small populations of neurons in the cortex; a process known as cortical microstimulation. This dissertation de...

  15. Thumb motor performance varies with thumb and wrist posture during single-handed mobile phone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Matthieu B; Young, Justin G; Jindrich, Devin L; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2012-09-21

    Design features of mobile computing technology such as device size and key location may affect thumb motor performance during single-handed use. Since single-handed use requires the thumb posture to vary with key location, we hypothesize that motor performance is associated with thumb and wrist joint postures. A repeated measures laboratory experiment of 10 right-handed participants measured thumb and wrist joint postures during reciprocal tapping tasks between two keys for different key pairs among 12 emulated keys. Fitts' effective index of performance and joint postures at contact with each key were averaged across trials for each key. Thumb motor performance varied for different keys, with poorest performances being associated with excessive thumb flexion such as when tapping on keys closest to the base of the thumb in the bottom right corner of the phone. Motor performance was greatest when the thumb was in a typical resting posture, neither significantly flexed nor fully extended with slight CMC joint abduction and supination, such as when tapping on keys located in the top right and middle left areas on the phone. Grip was also significantly affected by key location, with the most extreme differences being between the top left and bottom right corners of the phone. These results suggest that keypad designs aimed at promoting performance for single-handed use should avoid placing frequently used functions and keys close to the base of the thumb and instead should consider key locations that require a thumb posture away from its limits in flexion/extension, as these postures promote motor performance. PMID:22858316

  16. Hypoplastic thumb type IIIB: An alternative method for surgical repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Onur Basat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypoplastic thumb is the second most common congenital deformity of the thumb. Thumb hypoplasia is characterized by diminished thumb size, metacarpal adduction, metacarpophalangeal joint instability, and thenar muscle hypoplasia. In the literature, different classification types of hypoplastic thumb have been used and different treatment methods described. In this case we presented an alternative palliative treatment method for a ten-year-old patient with modified Blauth's classification type IIIB hypoplastic thumb and one-year follow-up results. [Hand Microsurg 2014; 3(2.000: 59-61

  17. MR imaging findings of trigger thumb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chen, Karen C.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Trigger finger (or trigger thumb), also known as sclerosing tenosynovitis, is a common clinical diagnosis that rarely presents for imaging. Because of this selection bias, many radiologists may not be familiar with the process. Furthermore, patients who do present for imaging frequently have misleading examination indications. To our knowledge, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of trigger thumb have not been previously reported in the literature. In this article, we review the entity of trigger thumb, the anatomy involved, and associated imaging findings, which include flexor pollicis longus tendinosis with a distinct nodule, A1 pulley thickening, and tenosynovitis. In addition, in some cases, an abnormal Av pulley is apparent. In the rare cases of trigger finger that present for MR imaging, accurate diagnosis by the radiologist can allow initiation of treatment and avoid further unnecessary workup. (orig.)

  18. Paediatric trigger thumb: our experiences and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Yuksel Kankaya; Kadri Ozer; Nezih Sungur; Ozlem Colak Aslan; Adile Turan; Ugur Kocer

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to report our experiences and surgical results in paediatric trigger thumb and to review the literature about paediatric trigger thumb. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of our paediatric trigger thumb patients who underwent open surgery. Our study includes 19 thumbs of 13 children with a mean age of 30 months. Analysis into gender, age of onset, age of surgery, family history and postoperative complications were carried out. Biopsies of A1 an...

  19. Thumb Reconstruction Using Foucher’s Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kola, Nardi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extensive pulp defects of the thumb, with the exposure of tendon or bone, are challenging reconstructive problems. Surgical treatment includes the use of local, regional, and free flaps. AIM: This paper is focused in Foucher’s neuro vascular flap. First DMCA or Foucher’s pedicle flap is a successful thumb reconstruction method, especially in patients not disturbed by its cosmetic appearance. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The first dorsal metacarpal artery (FDMCA) arises from the radial artery in the first intermetacarpal space, just distal to the tendon of the extensor pollicis longus. Pulp area of the thumb is the area where Foucher’s flap is more utilizable. This technique has other applications such as first web reconstruction, thumb lengthening, and following resection of tumors on the dorsum of the hand. RESULTS: We have in study 7 cases with work related trauma in two years period of time, between 2012 and 2014. We had only one partial flap survival and all the other flaps survived entirely. We have also taken in consideration subjective satisfaction with a range score from 4 to 10, cold intolerance, flap area and donor site sensibility with a range score from low to medium to normal. CONCLUSION: Careful pedicle discovery, secured elevation, pedicle strangulation prevention are very important for flap survival.

  20. Thumb Infection Caused by Streptococcus pseudoporcinus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Mahlen, Steven D.; Clarridge, Jill E.

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus pseudoporcinus, a recently described organism found in the genitourinary tract of women, was isolated from a thumb wound in a male patient subsequent to trauma. This case describes a rarely reported non-genitourinary tract clinical isolate of S. pseudoporcinus.

  1. Renewable Resource Economics - Optimal Rules of Thumb

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, A.E.; P F Lesse

    1984-01-01

    In this article the supply of roundwood is discussed within the framework of renewable resource economics. Quantitative guidelines for forestry are derived and tested against possible disturbances to plantation management conditions. It is shown that certain rules of thumb for renewable resource management are robust with respect to a broad set of incidental disturbances, e.g., weather conditions, market fluctuations, etc.

  2. Combined free toe and free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap for reconstruction of the thumb and thumb web space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X J; Tong, J; Wang, Y

    2000-08-01

    To repair a complexly injured hand with composite loss of the thumb and the thumb web space in one stage, the combined transfer of a free second toe and a free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap was designed. It was used to simultaneously reconstruct the thumb and thumb web space of the injured hand in five cases. All flaps survived and there were no complications at any donor site after the reconstructions. In follow-up averaging 35.6 months, the final functional and cosmetic outcomes of the reconstructed thumbs and thumb web spaces were satisfactory. Results demonstrated that the combined transfer of a free second toe and a free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap is a valid method for simultaneous reconstruction of the thumb and the thumb web space of the injured hand. PMID:10993088

  3. Tracing the origin of the panda's thumb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Juan; Pérez-Ramos, Alejandro; Valenciano, Alberto; Alba, David M.; Ercoli, Marcos D.; Hontecillas, Daniel; Montoya, Plinio; Morales, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the relative development of the carnivoran radial sesamoids to untangle the evolution of this iconic structure. In the pandas (both giant and red), this `false thumb' is known to perform a grasping role during bamboo feeding in both the red and giant pandas. An original locomotor role has been inferred for ailurids, but this remains to be ascertained for ursids. A large sample of radial sesamoids of Indarctos arctoides from the Miocene of Batallones-3 (Spain) indicates that this early ailuropodine bear displayed a relatively hypertrophied radial sesamoid, with a configuration more similar to that of the red panda and other carnivorans than to that of giant pandas. This false thumb is the first evidence of this feature in the Ursidae, which can be linked to a more herbivorous diet. Moreover, in the two extant pandas, the false thumb should not be interpreted as an anatomical convergence, but as an exaptive convergence regarding its use during the bamboo feeding, which changes the evolutionary view of this singular structure.

  4. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA, calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality.

  5. Neural Prostheses and Brain Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Fallon, James B.; Irvine, Dexter R. F.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    The success of modern neural prostheses is dependent on a complex interplay between the devices’ hardware and software and the dynamic environment in which the devices operate: the patient’s body or ‘wetware’. Over 110,000 severe/profoundly deaf individuals presently receive information enabling auditory awareness and speech perception from cochlear implants. The cochlear implant therefore provides a useful case study for a review of the complex interactions between hardware, software and wet...

  6. [Tracheostomy cannulas and voice prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, B; Dommerich, S

    2009-05-01

    Tracheostomy cannulas and voice prosthesis are mechanical aids for patients, who for different reasons underwent either tracheostomies or laryngectomies. In this review, indications, surgical procedures, and consequencies of the preceeding surgical intervention are reported for a better understanding of the specific requirements for the artificial aids. In spite of the increasing number of percutaneous dilatation tracheostomies, e. g. in intensive care units, a classical tracheostomy with epithelialized connections between trachea and skin still represents the method of choice for all cases, in which a longer lasting access to the trachea is requested. Special tubes made of different materials, offering different physical qualities are used to keep the tracheostomy open and guarantee an easy access to the lower respiratory tract. For each individual patient the most adequate device must be found out. Voice prostheses allow a fast and effective vocal rehabilitation after laryngectomy. As many models are on the market with differences in terms of material, principle and design of the underlying valve mechanism, size etc., again, in each individual patient the most suitable prosthesis has to be chosen. In combination with special heat and moisture exchangers (HME), such prostheses not only allow a good vocal but also pulmonary rehabilitation. The duration of such prostheses depend on material properties but also on formation of biofilms (mostly consisting of bacteria and fungi) that can destroy the valve mechanism. Whenever possible, and additional valve mechanism covering the opening of the tracheostomy should be used in order to avoid the necessity to close this opening manually during phonation. Each doctor taking care of patients with speech prostheses after laryngectomy should know exactly what to do in case the device fails or gets lost. PMID:19353461

  7. Neural prostheses and brain plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, James B.; Irvine, Dexter R. F.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2009-12-01

    The success of modern neural prostheses is dependent on a complex interplay between the devices' hardware and software and the dynamic environment in which the devices operate: the patient's body or 'wetware'. Over 120 000 severe/profoundly deaf individuals presently receive information enabling auditory awareness and speech perception from cochlear implants. The cochlear implant therefore provides a useful case study for a review of the complex interactions between hardware, software and wetware, and of the important role of the dynamic nature of wetware. In the case of neural prostheses, the most critical component of that wetware is the central nervous system. This paper will examine the evidence of changes in the central auditory system that contribute to changes in performance with a cochlear implant, and discuss how these changes relate to electrophysiological and functional imaging studies in humans. The relationship between the human data and evidence from animals of the remarkable capacity for plastic change of the central auditory system, even into adulthood, will then be examined. Finally, we will discuss the role of brain plasticity in neural prostheses in general.

  8. TEFLON VS TITANIUM PROSTHESES IN STAPES SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Vishwakarma; Simple Patadia; Pratibha Goswami; Kalpesh Patel; Dipesh Darji

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Otosclerosis is one of the most leading causes of conductive hearing loss with intact tympanic membrane in adults. Stapes prostheses have seen many changes in its shape, design and material. Both Teflon and Titanium prostheses used in this study having different method of application are reviewed in detail. OBJECTIVE: To compare the outcomes of use of Teflon and Titanium prostheses in stapedotomy surgery in patients with conductive hearing loss. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective ...

  9. [Total trapezometacarpal prostheses: concepts and classification study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comtet, J J; Rumelhart, C

    2001-02-01

    This paper is an attempt to classify the different types of trapezio-metacarpal total prostheses according to their bio-mechanical principle and to compare the bio-mechanics of these prostheses to that of the normal trapeziometacarpal joint. The trapeziometacarpal joint has two approximate centres of rotation (one in the proximal metacarpal, one in the trapezium), two degrees of freedom and two arc of mobility about 70 degrees. The mechanical model of the trapeziometacarpal joint is a universal-joint called "cardan" with three constraint forces (one axial compression force, and two shear forces, radial and posterior) and one constraint moment around the longitudinal axis. The trapeziometacarpal prostheses may be classified in two main categories: the most frequently used are the "ball and socket" prostheses. Several prostheses, including the surface replacement prostheses have the mechanical characteristics of an universal joint (cardan). Ball and socket prostheses have one centre of rotation, 3 degrees of freedom, three constraint forces in three directions and no constraint moment when "cardan" or surface prostheses have two centres of rotation and 2 degrees of freedom; three constraint forces and one constraint moment. Trapeziometacarpal prostheses may also be classified according to their arc of mobility, or according to their mode of primary fixation (cemented, non-cemented), "press-fit", expansion and to their secondary fixation (hydroxyapatite). PMID:11291318

  10. Rapid prototyping of ossicular replacement prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsianikov, A.; Chichkov, B.; Adunka, O.; Pillsbury, H.; Doraiswamy, A.; Narayan, R. J.

    2007-05-01

    Materials used in ossicular replacement prostheses must demonstrate appropriate biological compatibility, acoustic transmission, stability, and stiffness properties. Prostheses prepared using Teflon ®, titanium, Ceravital and other conventional materials have demonstrated several problems, including migration, perforation of the tympanic membrane, difficulty in shaping the prostheses, and reactivity with the surrounding tissues. We have used two-photon polymerization for rapid prototyping of Ormocer ® middle-ear bone replacement prostheses. Ormocer ® surfaces fabricated using two-photon polymerization exhibited acceptable cell viability and cell growth profiles. The Ormocer ® prosthesis was able to be inserted and removed from the site of use in the frozen human head without fracture. Our results demonstrate that two-photon polymerization is able to create ossicular replacement prostheses and other medical devices with a larger range of sizes, shapes and materials than other microfabrication techniques.

  11. Triphalangeal Thumb Reduction Osteotomy Through a Versatile Spiral Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrabai, Hamza M; Farr, Sebastian; Girsch, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Triphalangeal thumb (TPT) is a congenital condition characterized by the presence of an additional phalanx. Variable degrees of thumb deformity, malalignment, and excessive length are common features. Impairment of hand function has been reported with TPT probably secondary to anomalistic long thumb incompatible with fine hand skills. Abnormal thumb appearance moreover represents a major psychological concern from patient's perspective. Both removal of the extra phalanx and phalangeal reduction osteotomy with resection of the unhealthy extra interphalangeal joint are established methods for correction of the associated excessive thumb length. In our experience, however, previous surgical approaches have not been able to sufficiently reduce the skin and soft tissue surplus, which exists after reduction osteotomy through classic circular incisions. We thus feel that conduction of TPT reconstruction through a spiral incision provides a safe and generous anatomic exposure required for simultaneous reduction of skeletal and soft tissue components. PMID:26926846

  12. Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood in stool Blood in urine Confusion Constipation Depression Diarrhea Exercise Falls Fatigue Fever Fluids (lack of) and dehydration Grooming and appearance Hair loss Hiccups Infection, increased risk Itching Leg ...

  13. Hydrodynamic analysis of different thumb positions in swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Daniel A.; Rouboa, Abel I.; Alves, Francisco B.; Vilas-Boas, João P.; Machado, Leandro; Reis, Victor M.; Silva, António J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the hydrodynamic characteristics of a true model of a swimmer hand with the thumb in different positions using numerical simulation techniques. A three-dimensional domain was created to simulate the fluid flow around three models of a swimmer hand, with the thumb in different positions: thumb fully abducted, partially abducted, and adducted. These three hand models were obtained through computerized tomography scans of an Olympic swimmer hand. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent® code. The forces estimated in each of the three hand models were decomposed into drag and lift coefficients. Angles of attack of hand models of 0°, 45° and 90°, with a sweep back angle of 0° were used for the calculations. The results showed that the position with the thumb adducted presented slightly higher values of drag coefficient compared with thumb abducted positions. Moreover, the position with the thumb fully abducted allowed increasing the lift coefficient of the hand at angles of attack of 0° and 45°. These results suggested that, for hand models in which the lift force can play an important role, the abduction of the thumb may be better, whereas at higher angles of attack, in which the drag force is dominant, the adduction of the thumb may be preferable. Key points Numerical simulation techniques can provide answers to problems which have been unobtainable using experimental methods. The computer tomography scans allowed the creation of a complete and true digital anatomic model of a swimmer hand. The position with the thumb adducted presented slightly higher values of drag coefficient than the positions with the thumb abducted. The position with the thumb fully abducted allowed increasing the lift coefficient of the hand at angles of attack of 0 and 45 degrees. For hand positions in which the lift force can play an important role the abduction of the thumb may be better whereas at

  14. TEFLON VS TITANIUM PROSTHESES IN STAPES SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Vishwakarma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Otosclerosis is one of the most leading causes of conductive hearing loss with intact tympanic membrane in adults. Stapes prostheses have seen many changes in its shape, design and material. Both Teflon and Titanium prostheses used in this study having different method of application are reviewed in detail. OBJECTIVE: To compare the outcomes of use of Teflon and Titanium prostheses in stapedotomy surgery in patients with conductive hearing loss. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study SETTING: Tertiary referral centre METHODS: A prospective study of 50 patients of otosclerosis, who underwent stapedotomy at B.J.Medical College, Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, with Teflon/Titanium prostheses, from June 2009-February 2012 was done. Follow up was done for a minimum period of 6 months. Revision cases were excluded. A comparison of prostheses was concluded by differences in AB (Air Bone Gap. RESULT: Postoperative ABG of 20db or less was seen in 96% in both groups. The mean postoperative ABGap was 8.2 dB and 11.5 dB for Teflon and Titanium group respectively. There was no statistically significance difference noted in ABGap between Teflon and Titanium pistons at 95% confidence limit at P<0.05. There was significant improvement of AC thresholds at each frequency except for above 4 kHz, in postoperative period. CONCLUSION: Both prostheses provide equal benefit to patients and there is no statistically significant difference between the uses of Teflon/Titanium prostheses. Long term results are still to be analyzed.

  15. Performance sustaining intracortical neural prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyujukian, Paul; Kao, Jonathan C.; Fan, Joline M.; Stavisky, Sergey D.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Neural prostheses, or brain-machine interfaces, aim to restore efficient communication and movement ability to those suffering from paralysis. A major challenge these systems face is robust performance, particularly with aging signal sources. The aim in this study was to develop a neural prosthesis that could sustain high performance in spite of signal instability while still minimizing retraining time. Approach. We trained two rhesus macaques implanted with intracortical microelectrode arrays 1-4 years prior to this study to acquire targets with a neurally-controlled cursor. We measured their performance via achieved bitrate (bits per second, bps). This task was repeated over contiguous days to evaluate the sustained performance across time. Main results. We found that in the monkey with a younger (i.e., two year old) implant and better signal quality, a fixed decoder could sustain performance for a month at a rate of 4 bps, the highest achieved communication rate reported to date. This fixed decoder was evaluated across 22 months and experienced a performance decline at a rate of 0.24 bps yr-1. In the monkey with the older (i.e., 3.5 year old) implant and poorer signal quality, a fixed decoder could not sustain performance for more than a few days. Nevertheless, performance in this monkey was maintained for two weeks without requiring additional online retraining time by utilizing prior days’ experimental data. Upon analysis of the changes in channel tuning, we found that this stability appeared partially attributable to the cancelling-out of neural tuning fluctuations when projected to two-dimensional cursor movements. Significance. The findings in this study (1) document the highest-performing communication neural prosthesis in monkeys, (2) confirm and extend prior reports of the stability of fixed decoders, and (3) demonstrate a protocol for system stability under conditions where fixed decoders would otherwise fail. These improvements to decoder

  16. Get Outside, Get Moving to Prevent 'Gamer's Thumb'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Outside, Get Moving to Prevent 'Gamer's Thumb' Playing video games hour after hour can trigger repetitive stress injuries, ... anyone who spends a lot of time playing video games. But taking breaks can be just what the ...

  17. Prognostic value of thumb pain sensation in birth brachial plexopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O. Heise

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic value of absent thumb pain sensation in newborns and young infants with birth brachial plexopathy. METHODS: We evaluated 131 patients with birth brachial plexopathy with less than two months of age. Pain sensation was evoked by thumb nail bed compression to evaluate sensory fibers of the upper trunk (C6. The patients were followed-up monthly. Patients with less than antigravity elbow flexion at six months of age were considered to have a poor outcome. RESULTS: Thirty patients had absent thumb pain sensation, from which 26 showed a poor outcome. Sensitivity of the test was 65% and specificity was 96%. CONCLUSION: Evaluation of thumb pain sensation should be included in the clinical assessment of infants with birth brachial plexopathy.

  18. Diagnosis and therapy of subclinically infected prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, C L; Stein, P C; Dobke, M K; Virden, C P; Frank, D H

    1993-11-01

    We believe 5 to 7 percent of prosthetic devices are "subclinically" infected by Staphylococcus epidermidis. These infections are manifested by chronic pain, migration and late extrusion of the devices. To examine this problem, we cultured penile and mammary prostheses. For the experimental arm, we cultured painful penile and mammary prostheses that were being removed because of symptoms (pain). For patients in a control group, we cultured penile prostheses being replaced because of mechanical failure (no pain) and mammary tissue expanders that were temporarily installed. Actual parts of the device were cultured in Trypticase Soy Broth. There were 14 and 12 painful penile and mammary prostheses, 13 and ten, respectively, were cultured positive, for an infection rate of 88 percent. The primary organism identified was S. epidermidis. The nonpainful penile prostheses (zero of five and three of 22 mammary prostheses) grew S. epidermidis. The differences were highly significant (p < 0.001), suggesting that the painful prosthesis is infected. In an attempt to resolve the problem of the painful prosthesis, ten prosthesis were removed and exchanged for new devices. Patients received preoperative and postoperative antibiotics. All ten had positive cultures and nine of ten were successfully exchanged (no pain). PMID:8211603

  19. Deep Habits, Rule-of-Thumb Consumers, and Fiscal Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Daeha Cho; Kwang Hwan Kim

    2013-01-01

    Procyclical movements in private consumption and countercyclical markup are the most prominent feature to an increase in government spending. In this paper, we model deep habits and rule-of-thumb consumers to match this feature. We demonstrate that when ruleof-thumb consumers meet deep habits in consumption, our model improves the two models that are widely used in the literature to investigate the effect of government spending. First, it generates a more realistic markup response. Second, it...

  20. Clinico-statistical study on radiotherapy prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Takaaki; Taniguchi, Hisashi; Sunahara, Yuichi; Shinozuka, Osamu; Suzuki, Ruri; Ohyama, Takashi; Takeda, Masamune [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1996-06-01

    Various radiotherapy prostheses, including spacer, protector, carrier and mold, are frequently used for oral and maxillofacial cancer patients because they enhance the treatment efficacy of radiotherapy and protect adjacent normal tissue from irradiation. Therefore a clinical investigation was carried out on 310 cases of radiotherapy prostheses applied in our clinic from 1981 to 1995. The results were as follows: Sex ratio (male: female) of patients was 1.67: 1 and the number of the patients at the age of 60-69 was the largest. Spacer accounted for 81.0% of prostheses, followed by mold (10.6%), protector (5.5%) and carrier (2.9%). As for the site of malignant tumor, the tongue was 77.1% of all cases. External irradiation was already performed on 23.3% of all cases. Abutment teeth remained in 85.9% of 304 cases in which the prostheses were applied intraorally. The average time to make the prostheses was 12.4 days. As for the retention of the prosthesis to the mouth, a ball clasp was used most frequently in spacer and carrier, and overlay type was applied most frequently in mold and protector. As for the retention of shield to carrier in mold cases, mechanical interlocking of the resin parts of carrier and shield was 75.8% of the cases. (author)

  1. Clinico-statistical study on radiotherapy prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various radiotherapy prostheses, including spacer, protector, carrier and mold, are frequently used for oral and maxillofacial cancer patients because they enhance the treatment efficacy of radiotherapy and protect adjacent normal tissue from irradiation. Therefore a clinical investigation was carried out on 310 cases of radiotherapy prostheses applied in our clinic from 1981 to 1995. The results were as follows: Sex ratio (male: female) of patients was 1.67: 1 and the number of the patients at the age of 60-69 was the largest. Spacer accounted for 81.0% of prostheses, followed by mold (10.6%), protector (5.5%) and carrier (2.9%). As for the site of malignant tumor, the tongue was 77.1% of all cases. External irradiation was already performed on 23.3% of all cases. Abutment teeth remained in 85.9% of 304 cases in which the prostheses were applied intraorally. The average time to make the prostheses was 12.4 days. As for the retention of the prosthesis to the mouth, a ball clasp was used most frequently in spacer and carrier, and overlay type was applied most frequently in mold and protector. As for the retention of shield to carrier in mold cases, mechanical interlocking of the resin parts of carrier and shield was 75.8% of the cases. (author)

  2. Quantifying thumb opposition kinematics using dynamic computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhof, F D; Brugman, E; D'Agostino, P; Dourthe, B; van Lenthe, G H; Stockmans, F; Jonkers, I; Vereecke, E E

    2016-06-14

    Current motion capture techniques all have shortcomings when applied to the 3D quantitative evaluation of thumb base motion. Dynamic CT might overcome these shortcomings but, so far, robustness of this technique in more than one specimen has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of the current study is to further evaluate the use of dynamic CT for quantification of thumb motion in a larger cadaveric study using a protocol which is feasible in a clinical context. A dynamic CT scan was acquired from six cadaveric human forearms, while a motion simulator imposed thumb opposition. After image acquisition and segmentation, carpal bone motion was quantified using helical axes. To enable comparisons between specimens, intersection points of the instantaneous helical axis with an anatomically defined plane were determined. Precision of the dynamic CT method, measured as variation in distances between silicon nitride beads between frames of a dynamic scan, was 0.43mm (+/-0.09mm) when fixed to the skin and 0.13mm (+/-0.04mm) when embedded into the bone. Absolute deviation between known and measured distances were not larger than 0.34mm. We could demonstrate and quantify that thumb opposition is associated with motion at the trapeziometacarpal and scaphotrapezotrapezoidal joints. High consistency in motion patterns between specimen were found, while the radiation dose was limited. We conclude that dynamic CT can be used to visualize and quantify 3D thumb kinematics, making it a promising method to explore kinematics in vivo. PMID:27198890

  3. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epithelioma, is the most common form of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially ... other health issues. Infiltrating or morpheaform basal cell carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive ...

  4. Bilateral microvascular second toe transfer for bilateral post-traumatic thumb amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendra Nehete; Anita Nehete; Sandeep Singla; Harshad Adhav

    2012-01-01

    In bilateral thumb amputations, the functional impairment is serious and every attempt should be made to reconstruct the thumb. We report a case of bilateral post traumatic thumb amputation, reconstructed with bilateral second toe transfer. Only two such cases have been reported in literature so far. Though there are various modalities for the reconstruction of thumb, microvascular toe transfer has its own merits. The convalescent period is minimal with excellent function. It is bilaterally s...

  5. Hypoplasia of the thumb. Clinical presentation and reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the genesis of the partial or total absence of the thumb they are genetic, environmental factors or a combination of both. It is take part of a syndrome or to be isolated and frequently associated with problems of radial longitudinal deficiency of the forearm. Objective. The purpose of this study is shown the experience, the focus of the processing and the results obtained since the point esthetic and functional view. The most it accepted classification is the proposal by Blauth that helps to determine the forecast and the processing. Materials and methods. it is a work type series of cases in 22 children with hypoplasia of the thumb, with a minimum of 12 months, (average 28 months). In 15 cases there were association of radial dysplasia or another anomaly among them 4 patients with VATER, and the 7 remaining they corresponded to hypoplasia of the thumb as only entity. We carried out tendon transfer, with opening of the first comisure in 2 patients with hypoplasia type II. In 3 patients, with hypoplasia type III A, one carries out corner opening, transfer of the superficial flexor of the 4 finger to correct instability of the articulation MF and opposition of the thumb, and transfer for extension of the thumb. In 17 cases one carries out politicization of the index. Results. The outcome was evaluated in: non pinch, lateral pinch and fingertip pinch; the grade of opposition like good, minimal and non opposition, and the aesthetic result according to the satisfaction of the parents in bad, regular and good. The five children reconstructed with transfers of tendons and comisure opening had good result. In 17 children with politicization one patient had a necrosis, of the 16 remaining a good or acceptable result was obtained. Discussion. It is not easy to follow a good system of measure of the functional results. We find that a practical way to evaluate was the clip, opposition and aesthetics. Previous to the surgeries it is required to evaluate alterations

  6. Levers in removable dental prostheses 

    OpenAIRE

    A. Monzavi; R Mosharaf

    1997-01-01

     Teeth and periodontal ligaments can resist more efficiently opposing vertical forces parallel to their axial axis in comparison to horizontal forces. Thus, in designing dental prostheses and preserving interocclusal relationships we should notice to eliminate horizontal forces on teeth. A partial prosthesis can rotate in vertical, horizontal and Sagittal axis and by understanding levers and designing appropriate frameworks these rotations can be avoided.

  7. Regenerative Electrode Interfaces for Neural Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cort H; Zoratti, Marissa J; Langhals, Nicholas B; Purcell, Erin K

    2016-04-01

    Neural prostheses are electrode arrays implanted in the nervous system that record or stimulate electrical activity in neurons. Rapid growth in the use of neural prostheses in research and clinical applications has occurred in recent years, but instability and poor patency in the tissue-electrode interface undermines the longevity and performance of these devices. The application of tissue engineering strategies to the device interface is a promising approach to improve connectivity and communication between implanted electrodes and local neurons, and several research groups have developed new and innovative modifications to neural prostheses with the goal of seamless device-tissue integration. These approaches can be broadly categorized based on the strategy used to maintain and regenerate neurons at the device interface: (1) redesign of the prosthesis architecture to include finer-scale geometries and/or provide topographical cues to guide regenerating neural outgrowth, (2) incorporation of material coatings and bioactive molecules on the prosthesis to improve neuronal growth, viability, and adhesion, and (3) inclusion of cellular grafts to replenish the local neuron population or provide a target site for reinnervation (biohybrid devices). In addition to stabilizing the contact between neurons and electrodes, the potential to selectively interface specific subpopulations of neurons with individual electrode sites is a key advantage of regenerative interfaces. In this study, we review the development of regenerative interfaces for applications in both the peripheral and central nervous system. Current and future development of regenerative interfaces has the potential to improve the stability and selectivity of neural prostheses, improving the patency and resolution of information transfer between neurons and implanted electrodes. PMID:26421660

  8. Prostheses, cyborgs and cyberspace - the cyberpunk trinity:

    OpenAIRE

    Sever, Staša

    2013-01-01

    This article will explore three elements that have collectively become the sine qua non of our lives: prostheses, cyborgs and cyberspace. The main concern of the article is to show the close connection between the technology-saturated reality of today and the literature of cyberpunk as the prototypical representative of merging the human and the technological. This will enable us to explore the interaction between literature and reality in the formation of the cyborg of today.

  9. Biomechanical Energy Harvester Design For Active Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akın Oğuz Kaptı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the factors restricting the functions of active prostheses is limited charge times and weights of the batteries. Therefore, some biomechanical energy harvesting studies are conducted for reducing the dependence on batteries and developing the systems that produce energy by utilizing one's own actions during daily living activities. In this study, as a new approach to meet energy needs of active-controlled lower limb prostheses, the design of a biomechanical energy harvester that produces electrical energy from the movements of the knee joint during gait were carried out. This harvester is composed of the generator, planetary gear system and one-way clutch that transmit just the knee extension. Low weight, low additional metabolic power consumption requirement and high electrical power generation are targeted in design process. The total reduction ratio of the transmission is 104, and the knee joint reaction torque applied by the system is 6 Nm. Average electrical powers that can be obtained are 17 W and 5,8 W for the swing extension phase and the entire cycle, respectively. These values seem to be sufficient for charging the battery units of many prostheses and similar medical systems, and portable electronic devices such as mobile phones, navigation devices and laptops.

  10. Reconstruction of the thumb with external fixer of bony lengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thumb amputation represents one of the most anti functional, unsightly and psychological disabilities of the hand. We describe the surgical technique, the bone distraction phases, additional surgeries and external fixation. We review prospectively our experience in the Military Hospital in Bogota, Colombia, from 1996 until 2003: 9 patients, men, amputation level: 1C to 4, we used a monolateral external fixator; Distraction speed: 0,75 mm/d, mean lengthening 3,9 cms, mean time with de fixation: 6 months. Bone consolidation: 100%, mild functional activity according to the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and arm score (DASH). We recommended this surgical technique, because it is easy, reproducible, and allows a functional recuperation of the thumb

  11. Extending the Vocabulary of Touch Events with ThumbRock

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnet, David; Appert, Caroline; Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Compared with mouse-based interaction on a desktop interface, touch-based interaction on a mobile device is quite limited: most applications only support tapping and dragging to perform simple gestures. Finger rolling provides an alternative to tapping but uses a recognition process that relies on either per-user calibration, ex- plicit delimiters or extra hardware, making it difficult to integrate into current touch-based mobile devices. This paper introduces ThumbRock, a ready-to-use micro ...

  12. Traumatic Thumb Radial Sagittal Band Injury Mimicking EPL Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Ravi M; Moore, Peter; McCarten, Gregory M

    2016-06-01

    We present the case of a closed traumatic disruption of the thumb radial sagittal band (RSB) that sonographically mimicked rupture of the extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon. This injury was treated with primary repair of the RSB and lead to a good functional outcome for the patient. This case report highlights how early recognition and treatment can lead to a good functional outcome. PMID:27454647

  13. FEATURE EXTRACTION FOR EMG BASED PROSTHESES CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Aishwarya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of prosthetic limb would be more effective if it is based on Surface Electromyogram (SEMG signals from remnant muscles. The analysis of SEMG signals depend on a number of factors, such as amplitude as well as time- and frequency-domain properties. Time series analysis using Auto Regressive (AR model and Mean frequency which is tolerant to white Gaussian noise are used as feature extraction techniques. EMG Histogram is used as another feature vector that was seen to give more distinct classification. The work was done with SEMG dataset obtained from the NINAPRO DATABASE, a resource for bio robotics community. Eight classes of hand movements hand open, hand close, Wrist extension, Wrist flexion, Pointing index, Ulnar deviation, Thumbs up, Thumb opposite to little finger are taken into consideration and feature vectors are extracted. The feature vectors can be given to an artificial neural network for further classification in controlling the prosthetic arm which is not dealt in this paper.

  14. Stimulation and recording electrodes for neural prostheses

    CERN Document Server

    Pour Aryan, Naser; Rothermel, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    This book provides readers with basic principles of the electrochemistry of the electrodes used in modern, implantable neural prostheses. The authors discuss the boundaries and conditions in which the electrodes continue to function properly for long time spans, which are required when designing neural stimulator devices for long-term in vivo applications. Two kinds of electrode materials, titanium nitride and iridium are discussed extensively, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The influence of the counter electrode on the safety margins and electrode lifetime in a two electrode system is explained. Electrode modeling is handled in a final chapter.

  15. Two-handed grip on a mobile phone affords greater thumb motor performance, decreased variability, and a more extended thumb posture than a one-handed grip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Matthieu B; Asakawa, Deanna S; Jindrich, Devin L; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2016-01-01

    Holding a mobile computing device with two hands may affect thumb motor performance, joint postures, and device stability compared to holding the device and tapping the touchscreen with the thumb of the holding hand. We tested the hypotheses that holding a touchscreen mobile phone with two hands lead to increased thumb motor performance, different thumb postures, and decreased device movement relative to using one hand. Ten right-handed participants completed reciprocal thumb tapping tasks between emulated keys on a smartphone in either a one- (portrait) or two-handed (landscape) grip configuration. Effective index of performance measured from Fitts' Law was 9% greater (p < 0.001), movement time 7% faster (p < 0.001), and taps were 4% more precise (p < 0.016) for the two-handed grip. Tapping with a two-handed grip involved significantly different wrist and thumb postures than a one-handed grip. Variability of the computing device's movement was 36-63% lower for the two-handed grip compared to the one-handed grip condition (p < 0.001). The support for our hypotheses suggests that a two-handed grip results in increased performance and more extended wrist and thumb postures than a single-handed grip. Device designs that allow two-handed grips may afford increased performance relative to a one-handed grip. PMID:26360191

  16. The Effect of an Open Carpal Tunnel Release on Thumb CMC Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Thomas W.; Dell, Paul C.; Conrad, Bryan P; Tanner, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We have observed worsening thumb pain following carpal tunnel release (CTR) in some patients. Our purpose was to determine the effect of open CTR on thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) biomechanics. Methods. Five fresh-frozen cadaver arms with intact soft tissues were used. Each specimen was secured to a jig which fixed the forearm at 45° supination, and the wrist at 20° dorsiflexion, with thumb pointing up. The thumb was axially loaded with a force of 130 N. We measured 3D translation and r...

  17. Bilateral microvascular second toe transfer for bilateral post-traumatic thumb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Nehete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In bilateral thumb amputations, the functional impairment is serious and every attempt should be made to reconstruct the thumb. We report a case of bilateral post traumatic thumb amputation, reconstructed with bilateral second toe transfer. Only two such cases have been reported in literature so far. Though there are various modalities for the reconstruction of thumb, microvascular toe transfer has its own merits. The convalescent period is minimal with excellent function. It is bilaterally symmetric and aesthetically superior to the osteoplastic reconstruction. The technical details are discussed, and the long term functional and aesthetic results are presented.

  18. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Request Permissions Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/2016 What is Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome? Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is ...

  19. Reconstruction of the thumb with osteofasciocutaneous reverse flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevtović Dobrica

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experiences of the thumb reconstruction with osteofasciocutaneous reverse flap (OFCR flap. In the period between 1987 and 2000 the OFCR flap was used in 15 patients. The youngest of them was 18 and the oldest was 38 years of age. The average age was 25.4. All the patients had post-traumatic amputations. Defects on proximal phalangae and a part of metacarpal bone occurred in two cases. In one case there was an amputation on the base level of proximal phalanx and the metacarpophalangeal (MPH joint was preserved. In all cases of reconstruction the OFCR flap was used, which included antebrachial skin nerves that were anastomosed with digital nerve. The flap nutrition was carried out through the reverse circulation of a. radialis, and the venous drainage through the comitant vein of a. radialis. Superficial veins were not anastomosed. Secondary defects were covered with a free skin graft. All the flaps survived. The bone graft was healed in the period of eight weeks. The sensibility of this flap was regained in the period of three to six months after the surgery. The distance of two-point discrimination (TPD was increased for 30% compared to the same region on the other hand after six months. The opposition of the reconstructed thumb to the other fingers was possible, as well as abduction, adduction and normal grasp. The method of reconstruction of the amputated thumb with the OFCR flap was better than other classical methods because it allowed the reconstruction of all the structures in one surgical operation. The sensibility that was regained represented good protection from injuries. There were no functional damages on the secondary defect. The esthetic result was not good due to the lack of a fingernail.

  20. [Reconstruction of the thumb using a forearm osseofasciocutaneous reverse flap].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevtović, Dobrica; Dordević, Boban; Gacević, Milomir; Sijan, Goran

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the experiences of the thumb reconstruction with osteofasciocutaneous reverse flap (OFCR flap). In the period between 1987 and 2000 the OFCR flap was used in 15 patients. The youngest of them was 18 and the oldest was 38 years of age. The average age was 25.4. All the patients had posttraumatic amputations. Defects on proximal phalangae and a part of metacarpal bone occurred in two cases. In one case there was an amputation on the base level of proximal phalanx and the metacarpophalangeal (MPH) joint was preserved. In all cases of reconstruction the OFCR flap was used, which included antebrachial skin nervs that were anastomosed with digital nerv. The flap nutrition was carried out through the reverse circulation of a. radialis, and the venous drainage through the comitant vein of a. radialis. Superficial veins were not anastomosed. Secondary defects were covered with a free skin graft. All the flaps survived. The bone graft was healed in the period of eight weeks. The sensibility of this flap was regained in the period of three to six months after the surgery. The distance of two-point discrimination (TPD) was increased for 30% compared to the same region on the other hand after six months. The opposition of the reconstructed thumb to the other fingers was possible, as well as abduction, adduction and normal grasp. The method of reconstruction of the amputated thumb with the OFCR flap was better than other classical methods because it allowed the reconstruction of all the structures in one surgical operation. The sensibility that was regained represented good protection from injuries. There were no functional damages on the secondary defect. The esthetic result was not good due to the lack of a fingernail. PMID:12557617

  1. Finite element analysis of thumb carpometacarpal joint implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, C.

    1995-11-01

    The thumb carpometacarpal joint is frequently replaced in women who have developed severe osteoarthritis of the hand. A new, privately developed implant design consists of two components, trapezial and metacarpal, each with a saddle-shaped articulating surface. A three dimensional finite element model of this implant has been developed to analyze stresses on the device. The first simulations using the model involve loading the implant with forces normal to the trapezial component. Preliminary results show contact stress distributions at the particulating surfaces of the implant.

  2. Dysfunctional Putamen Modulation during Bimanual Finger-to-thumb Movement in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Yan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting middle-aged and elderly people. PD can be viewed as "circuit disorder", indicating that large scale cortico-subcortical pathways were involved in its pathophysiology. The brain network in an experimental context is emerging as an important biomarker in disease diagnosis and prognosis prediction. This context-dependent network for PD and the underling functional mechanism remains unclear. In this paper, the brain network profiles in 11 PD patients without dementia were studied and compared with 12 healthy controls. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data were acquired when the subjects were performing a pseudorandomized unimanual or bimanual finger-to-thumb movement task. The activation was detected and the network profiles were analysed by psychophysiological interaction (PPI toolbox. For the controls and PD patients, the motor areas including the primary motor and premotor areas, supplementary motor area, the cerebellum and parts of the frontal, temporal and parietal gyrus were activated. The right putamen exhibited significant control > PD activation and weaker activity during the bimanual movement relative to the unimanual movement in the control group. The decreased putamen modulation on some nucleus in basal ganglia, such as putamen, thalamus and caudate, and some cortical areas, such as cingulate, parietal, angular, frontal, temporal and occipital gyrus was detected in the bimanual hand movement condition relative to the unimanual movement condition. Between group PPI difference was detected in cingulate gyrus, angular gyrus and precuneus (control > PD and inferior frontal gyrus (PD > control. The deficient putamen activation and its enhanced connectivity with the frontal gyrus could be a correlate of impaired basal ganglia inhibition and frontal gyrus compensation to maintain the task performance during the motor programs of PD patients.

  3. Basal Reinforced Piled Embankments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eekelen, S.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    A basal reinforced piled embankment consists of a reinforced embankment on a pile foundation. The reinforcement consists of one or more horizontal layers of geosynthetic reinforcement (GR) installed at the base of the embankment. The design of the GR is the subject of this thesis. A basal reinforce

  4. Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint Stabilization in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome--Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breahna, Anca Nicoleta; Meads, Bryce Maurice

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of an 18-years-old patient with thumb carpometacarpal ligament laxity due to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who was treated with trapezial opening wedge osteotomy combined with volar ligaments reconstruction. Two years postoperatively she is pain free and the thumb carpometacarpal joint is stable. PMID:26388011

  5. Autoimmune basal ganglia disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne

    2012-11-01

    The basal ganglia are deep nuclei in the brain that include the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. Pathological processes involving the basal ganglia often result in disorders of movement and behavior. A number of different autoimmune disorders predominantly involve the basal ganglia and can result in movement and psychiatric disorders. The classic basal ganglia autoimmune disorder is Sydenham chorea, a poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder. Resurgence in the interest in Sydenham chorea is the result of the descriptions of other poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders including tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder, broadly termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection. Encephalitic processes affecting the basal ganglia are also described including the syndromes basal ganglia encephalitis, encephalitis lethargica, and bilateral striatal necrosis. Last, systemic autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome can result in chorea or parkinsonism. Using paradigms learned from other autoantibody associated disorders, the authors discuss the autoantibody hypothesis and the role of systemic inflammation in autoimmune basal ganglia disorders. Identification of these entities is important as the clinician has an increasing therapeutic repertoire to modulate or suppress the aberrant immune system. PMID:22832771

  6. Long-Term Biostability of Pet Vascular Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Dieval

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PET Vascular prostheses are susceptible to physical modification and chemical degradation leading sometimes to global deterioration and rupture of the product. To understand the mechanisms of degradation, we studied 6 vascular prostheses that were explanted due to medical complications. We characterized their level of degradation by comparing them with a virgin prosthesis and carried out physicochemical and mechanical analyses. Results showed an important reduction of the fabric’s mechanical properties in specific areas. Moreover, PET taken from these areas exhibited structural anomalies and was highly degraded even in virgin prostheses. These results suggest that vascular prostheses have weak areas prior to implantation and that these areas are much more prone to in vivo degradation by human metabolism. Manufacturing process could be responsible for these weaknesses as well as designing of the compound. Therefore, we suggest that a more controlled manufacturing process could lead to a vascular prosthesis with enhanced lifespan.

  7. Patient satisfaction concerning implant-supported prostheses: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno César de Vasconcelos GURGEL; Ana Luísa de Barros PASCOAL; Bruno Luiz Menezes de SOUZA; Poliana Medeiros Cunha DANTAS; Sheyla Christinne Lira MONTENEGRO; Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli da Costa OLIVEIRA; Calderon, Patrícia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this observational study was to assess the degree of patient satisfaction toward implant-supported prostheses. A questionnaire was used with two scales (one consisting of detailed adjectival and the other of numerical responses) regarding chewing, esthetics, speaking, comfort and overall satisfaction. The scales were administered to a sample of 147 patients treated with implants and prostheses. The data were submitted to the Kappa statistic and the Chi-square test to analyze the as...

  8. Implant-retained craniofacial prostheses for facial defects

    OpenAIRE

    Federspil, Philipp A.

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial prostheses, also known as epistheses, are artificial substitutes for facial defects. The breakthrough for rehabilitation of facial defects with implant-retained prostheses came with the development of the modern silicones and bone anchorage. Following the discovery of the osseointegration of titanium in the 1950s, dental implants have been made of titanium in the 1960s. In 1977, the first extraoral titanium implant was inserted in a patient. Later, various solitary extraoral impl...

  9. Failed total carpometacarpal joint prosthesis of the thumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Bæk; Homilius, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis. The...... male:female ratio was 1:4 and the mean duration of observation 32 months (range 6-52). In three patients the revised implant was a MOJE uncemented carpometacarpal joint prosthesis and in seven patients an Elektra uncemented one. At follow-up grip strength was reduced to less than 90% of the other hand...... in eight of 10 patients, but the mean Disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) scores, self-reported pinch-grip-related function, and pain were comparable with our earlier published results with the Elektra carpometacarpal total joint prosthesis....

  10. Thumb-pads up-a new species of thick-thumbed bat from Sumatra (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae: Glischropus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Gábor; Görföl, Tamás; Wiantoro, Sigit; Kingston, Tigga; Bates, Paul J J; Huang, Joe Chun-Chia

    2015-01-01

    To date, three species of the genus Glischropus are recognized from the Indomalayan zoogeographic region-G. bucephalus from the Indochinese subregion, G. tylopus from the Sundaic subregion (Peninsular Thailand and Malaysia, Borneo, Sumatra, Moluccas) and G. javanus, restricted to Java. The investigation of the holotype and three topotype specimens of G. batjanus supported the view that the name was previously correctly regarded as the junior subjective synonym of G. tylopus. During review of material recently collected in southwestern Sumatra, Indonesia, one specimen of a yet undescribed species of Thick-thumbed bat was identified. G. aquilus n. sp. markedly differs from its congeners by its dark brown pelage, nearly black ear and tragus, and in skull proportions. The phylogenetic analysis based on cytb sequences also supports the specific distinctness of G. aquilus n. sp. Its discovery brings the count to 88 species of bats known from Sumatra. PMID:26249952

  11. First dorsal metacarpal artery islanded flap: A useful flap for reconstruction of thumb pulp defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Chetan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thumb pulp defects are commonly due to avulsion injuries. It is very important to reconstruct these defects using sensate flaps as the thumb pulp needs to be sensate for implementing the various functions of the thumb. A very good option for coverage of these defects is the islanded first dorsal metacarpal artery flap. Our study was done over a period of 2 years and involved 9 consecutive cases of thumb pulp defects treated at our institution. The patients included 8 males and 1 female, ranging in age from 16 to 51 years old. The flap size ranged from 2 x 1.5 cm to 5 x 3 cm. We had only one complication in the form of partial flap necrosis, which fortunately healed following debridement without the need for a secondary procedure. All our cases were done under local anesthesia with tourniquet control. All the patients had good fine touch and average two-point discrimination of 6 mm, which was satisfactory. Our good results further reinforce the islanded first dorsal metacarpal artery flap as one the best flaps for sensate reconstruction of thumb pulp defects. It replaces the soft tissue loss at the thumb pulp with minimal donor site morbidity and with good return of thumb pulp sensation.

  12. Effect of hip prostheses on radiotherapy dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small but growing proportion of patients requiring radiotherapy for prostate cancer have one or two hip prostheses which may shadow the target and affect the dose distribution. Approximately 10 such patients are treated at the Illawarra Cancer Care Centre per year. Hence a study was undertaken to examine the accuracy of various treatment methods that involve some of the treatment fields travelling through the prosthesis. A fixed-field measurement showed a dose reduction of 52% in the shadow of the prosthesis. A Monte Carlo simulation confirmed an increase in dose on the distal surface of the prosthesis of 35%. Of more clinical relevance, however, is the dose distribution due to the overall combined field treatment. Using a power law correction benchmarked against thermoluminescent dosimeters and Gafchromic film, three different beam set-ups for patient treatment were planned and the dose variation analysed. A four-field brick technique gave a dose variation across the target volume of ± 15% whereas a dual arc technique gave a dose variation of only ± 5%. A four-field oblique technique gave a dose variation of only ± 2% across the target volume but the oblique field technique included extra dose to the rectum. Copyright (2000) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  13. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Weilby-Burton arthroplasty of the trapeziometacarpal joint of the thumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, N O; Jensen, Claus Hjorth; Nygaard, H

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-three patients (25 thumbs) were treated by tendon interposition arthroplasty for trapeziometacarpal arthrosis as described by Weilby and modified slightly as described by Burton and Pellegrini. There was good (4/25, 16%) or complete (19/25, 76%) pain relief in 23 (92%) of the cases....... Activities of daily living were generally easier. Mobility and strength of the thumb were satisfactory. One patient had signs of instability during a stress test. We conclude that our technique produces a stable and pain-free thumb joint. However, careful selection of the patients for this procedure is...

  16. A modified palatal crib appliance for children with predetermined thumb-sucking habit - Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this case report was to introduce a modified design of palatal crib habit breaking appliance that can be used for children with predetermined thumb-sucking habit. The appliance is made of two bands on the upper first permanent molars and an extended metal framework to cover the anterior of the palatal roof. The appliance was applied for 4 months on an 8-year-old boy who persistently continued the habit of thumb-sucking. The appliance proved to be very effective for arresting thumb-sucking habit. (author)

  17. Loss of Dermatan-4-Sulfotransferase 1 Function Results in Adducted Thumb-Clubfoot Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dündar, Munis; Müller, Thomas; Zhang, Qi; Pan, Jing; Steinmann, Beat; Vodopiutz, Julia; Gruber, Robert; Sonoda, Tohru; Krabichler, Birgit; Utermann, Gerd; Baenziger, Jacques U.; Zhang, Lijuan; Janecke, Andreas R.

    2009-01-01

    Adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by typical facial appearance, wasted build, thin and translucent skin, congenital contractures of thumbs and feet, joint instability, facial clefting, and coagulopathy, as well as heart, kidney, or intestinal defects. We elucidated the molecular basis of the disease by using a SNP array-based genome-wide linkage approach that identified distinct homozygous nonsense and missense mutations in CHST14 in each of fou...

  18. Median Nerve Deformation and Displacement in the Carpal Tunnel during Index Finger and Thumb Motion

    OpenAIRE

    van Doesburg, Margriet H. M.; Yoshii, Yuichi; Villarraga, Hector R.; Henderson, Jacqueline; Cha, Stephen s; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the deformation and displacement of the normal median nerve in the carpal tunnel during index finger and thumb motion, using ultrasound. Thirty wrists from 15 asymptomatic volunteers were evaluated. Cross-sectional images during motion from full extension to flexion of the index finger and thumb were recorded. On the initial and final frames, the median nerve, flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and index finger flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendo...

  19. Surgical treatment of thumb adduction contracture in children with infantile cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Alexandrovich Novikov; Valery Vladimirovich Umnov

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the work is to evaluate the effectiveness of different methods of surgical treatment of thumb adduction contracture in children with infantile cerebral palsy.Materials and methods.The present study is based on diagnostic results of children with infantile cerebral palsy with affected upper limb. The main criterion for selection of patients was the presence of thumb adduction contracture, the absence of significant positive outcome in a patient after conservative treatment, the ...

  20. Cobalt release and complications resulting from the use of dental prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Imam, Hiba; Benetti, Ana R; Özhayat, Esben B;

    2016-01-01

    insufficient oral hygiene. CONCLUSIONS: Dental prostheses released cobalt during the fabrication stages, but not 1-5 years after insertion. No allergic reactions were observed. Signs of inflammation were related to candidiasis, insufficient oral hygiene, and ill-fitting prostheses.......BACKGROUND: Cobalt release from dental prostheses has been shown to elicit allergic reactions in cobalt-allergic patients. It is therefore important to investigate whether these prostheses are possible sources of sensitization. OBJECTIVES: To assess (i) cobalt release from dental prostheses and (ii......) allergic reactions to components of dental prostheses, and (iii) to investigate the oral mucosa for inflammation 1-5 years after insertion of the prostheses. METHOD: Clinical oral examination was conducted in 66 patients with 84 dental prostheses. Cobalt release from 84 functional (used) and 32 non...

  1. Intact thumb reflex in areflexic Guillain Barré syndrome: A novel phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkal Ravishankar Naik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Areflexia is one of the cardinal clinical features for the diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome. However, some patients may have sluggish proximal muscle stretch reflexes. Presence of thumb reflex, a distal stretch muscle reflex has not been documented in Guillain Barré syndrome. Materials and Methods: We prospectively evaluated thumb reflex in Guillain Barré syndrome patients and age matched controls from April to September 2013. Results: There were 31 patients with Guillain Barrι syndrome in whom thumb reflex could be elicited in all (24 brisk, 7 sluggish, whereas all the other muscle stretch reflexes were absent in 29 patients at presentation and the remaining two had sluggish biceps and quadriceps reflexes (P = 0.001. Serial examination revealed gradual diminution of the thumb reflex (P < 0.001. Rapid progression of weakness was associated with early loss of the thumb reflex. Conclusion: Thumb reflex, a distal stretch reflex is preserved in the early phase of Guillain Barré syndrome.

  2. Fracture of the radial sesamoid bone of the thumb: an unusual fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deabate Luca

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】The hand consists of five sesamoids. Two of them are present at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP joint of the thumb. Fracture of the sesamoid bones of the thumb is a rare injury and the literature on the radial side is seldom reported. We reported a case of a patient with a fracture of the radial sesamoid at the MCP joint of the thumb in order to increase attention regarding this type of injuries. A 44-year-old male, high level gymnastic trainer, was helping one of his athletes during an exercise while he reported a hyperextension trauma to the MCP joint of the right thumb. One week after trauma, he presented to the hand surgeon complaining of a painful thumb at the MCP joint level on its palmar aspect. Standard A-P and lateral X-rays revealed a fracture of the radial sesamoid and the fracture was treated with a splint for 3 weeks. He was able to resumed his entire work 6 weeks after the injury. The sesamoid fractures is an indicator of the magnitude of the hyperextension injury and sometimes associated with tears of the volar plate ligament of the MCP joint. And a failure to recognize the ligament injury may lead to a long-term hyperextension instability on pinching. Key words: Fracture, bone; Sesamoid bones; Thumb

  3. Implant-retained craniofacial prostheses for facial defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federspil, Philipp A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial prostheses, also known as epistheses, are artificial substitutes for facial defects. The breakthrough for rehabilitation of facial defects with implant-retained prostheses came with the development of the modern silicones and bone anchorage. Following the discovery of the osseointegration of titanium in the 1950s, dental implants have been made of titanium in the 1960s. In 1977, the first extraoral titanium implant was inserted in a patient. Later, various solitary extraoral implant systems were developed. Grouped implant systems have also been developed which may be placed more reliably in areas with low bone presentation, as in the nasal and orbital region, or the ideally pneumatised mastoid process. Today, even large facial prostheses may be securely retained. The classical atraumatic surgical technique has remained an unchanged prerequisite for successful implantation of any system. This review outlines the basic principles of osseointegration as well as the main features of extraoral implantology.

  4. Reflections on the present and future of upper limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Dario; Amsüss, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Despite progress in research and media attention on active upper limb prostheses, presently the most common commercial upper limb prosthetic devices are not fundamentally different from solutions offered almost one century ago. Limited information transfer for both control and sensory-motor integration and challenges in socket technology have been major obstacles. By analysing the present state-of-the-art and academic achievements, we provide our opinion on the future of upper limb prostheses. We believe that surgical procedures for muscle reinnervation and osseointegration will become increasingly clinically relevant; muscle electrical signals will remain the main clinical means for prosthetic control; and chronic electrode implants, first in muscles (control), then in nerves (sensory feedback), will become viable clinical solutions. After decades of suspended clinically relevant progress, it is foreseeable that a new generation of upper limb prostheses will enter the market in the near future based on such advances, thereby offering substantial clinical benefit for patients. PMID:26924191

  5. Bridging the gap between cadaveric and in vivo experiments: A biomechanical model evaluating thumb-tip endpoint forces

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlman, Sarah J.; Wendy M Murray

    2013-01-01

    The thumb is required for a majority of tasks of daily living. Biomechanical modeling is a valuable tool, with the potential to help us bridge the gap between our understanding of the mechanical actions of individual thumb muscles, derived from anatomical cadaveric experiments, and our understanding of how force is produced by the coordination of all of the thumb muscles, derived from studies involving human subjects. However, current biomechanical models do not replicate muscle force product...

  6. Using Noncontingent Reinforcement to Increase Compliance with Wearing Prescription Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richling, Sarah M.; Rapp, John T.; Carroll, Regina A.; Smith, Jeanette N.; Nystedt, Aaron; Siewert, Brook

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) on compliance with wearing foot orthotics and a hearing aid with 2 individuals. Results showed that NCR increased the participants' compliance with wearing prescription prostheses to 100% after just a few 5-min sessions, and the behavior change was maintained during lengthier sessions.…

  7. Modification of vascular prostheses with surface fibrin network promotes endothelization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riedel, Tomáš; Brynda, Eduard; Chlupáč, J.; Filová, E.; Bačáková, L.; Dyr, J. E.

    Dublin : National University of Ireland , 2011. s. 120, psiii-653. [Annual Conference of the European Society for Biomaterials /24./. 04.09.2011-08.09.2011, Dublin] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : fibrin * endothelial cell * vascular prostheses Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  8. RURS′ elbow guard: An innovative treatment of the thumb-sucking habit in a child with Hurler′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty R

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thumb sucking is the process of sucking on the thumb for oral pleasure. Thumb and finger sucking habits, or nonnutritive sucking, are considered to be the most prevalent of oral habits. Some parents are concerned by thumb sucking and may even try to restrain the infant or child. In most cases, this is not necessary. Most children stop thumb sucking on their own. When older children continue to suck their thumbs, it could mean they are bored, anxious, or have emotional problems such as depression. This article presents a case report of a child with Hurler′s syndrome along with thumb sucking/biting habit. Hurler′s syndrome, also known as mucopolysaccharidosis I, is a rare condition inherited as an autosomal-recessive trait. It represents the classical prototype of mucopolysaccharide disorder. A unique appliance to prevent thumb sucking/biting was developed and termed as "RURS′ elbow guard," which was successfully used to break thumb sucking of the child with Hurler syndrome. The present report also describes the steps in fabrication of this new habit-breaking appliance, which is also designed to protect the finger from the effects of the sucking habit.

  9. Sensory Evaluation of Post Traumatic Thumb after Reconstruction with Reverse Radial Forearm Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayeb Ghadimi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thumb is with a special role in hand function. Therefore, in addition to the significance of using thin, pliable, color-matched, and hairless cover in resurfacing the lesion in this area, recovery of sensation should also be taken into consideration. Materials and Methods: Thirteen patients with thumb degloving injuries were candidates for sensate reverse island radial forearm surgery. After transferring the flap, forearm lateral sensory nerve was sewn to the thumb digital nerve. At least for two years, these patients received regular diagnosis, and monofilament, static two point discrimination (S-2PD, and moving two point discrimination (M-2PD tests were taken from them.Results: Monofilament test did not show normal sensation recovery, at protective sensation threshold, in the parents. The difference between monofilament test and normal thumb was statistically significant (p<0.0001. In spite of this, the protective sensation was restored in all flaps after two years. According to the results from S-2PD and M-2PD tests, the restored sensation was at protective threshold or reduced, and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.0001.Conclusion: Given difficulties of performing free flaps, and also deficiencies of pedicle flaps, the forearm radial island flap is known as one of the primary choices in most of the thumb soft tissue and hand defects reconstruction, due to its advantages, especially restoring the sensation of the injured site.

  10. Combined index finger pollicization with an anterolateral thigh flap for thumb reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Guang; Xu Hongyan; Lei Hongyu; Guo Shuang; Huang Jianhua; Li Dibin

    2014-01-01

    A severe crush injury to the hand is devastating to patients. Under conditions in which the crush force is too great, the digits are not viable candidates for replantation. We present two cases in which the patients suffered from loss of the thumb ray at the first carpometacarpal joint and skin defect at the radial side. The tendons, radial nerve and metacarpal bone of the index finger were injured, and the second metacarpal head was retained. There was a comminuted fracture of the trapezium in both patients. The treatment protocols consisted of the index finger pollicization and the free anterolateral thigh flap transfer. The procedure was performed in a single operation. The new thumb is able to provide a stable post for pinch and grip after six months follow-up. Both patients were satisfied with the function and appearance of the reconstructed thumb.

  11. TIBIALIS ANTERIOR VASCULARIZED TRIPLE FLAPS IN ONE STAGE RECONSTRUCTION OF MUTILATED HAND WITH LOSS OF THUMB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱云良; 章一新; 张余光; 王丹茹; 关文祥

    2004-01-01

    Objective To introduce a one stage technique in the reconstruction of mutilated hand with loss of thumb and eventual digits. Methods Tibialis anterior pediculated triple flaps (TAPTF) including distal lateral leg, dorsalis pedis flaps for skin defect covering and trimmed hallux for thumb reconstruction were presented.Results Mutilated hands in five patients were repaired by the technique with acceptable cosmetic and functional success. A three to twelve months follow-up in three patients resulted in the recovery of protective thermal sensation and pinch action of the reconstructed thumb. The donor sites were free from major disability. Conclusion TAPTF is ideal for one stage reconstruction of the mutilated hand with loss of digits.

  12. Pipeline rules of thumb handbook a manual of quick, accurate solutions to everyday pipeline engineering problems

    CERN Document Server

    McAllister, EW

    2014-01-01

    Presented in easy-to-use, step-by-step order, Pipeline Rules of Thumb Handbook is a quick reference for day-to-day pipeline operations. For more than 35 years, the Pipeline Rules of Thumb Handbook has served as the ""go-to"" reference for solving even the most day-to-day vexing pipeline workflow problems. Now in its 8th edition, this handbook continues to set the standard by which all other piping books are judged. Along with over 30% new or updated material regarding codes, construction processes, and equipment, this book continues to offer hundreds of ""how-to"" methods and ha

  13. Studies of the projection for carpometacarpal joint of the thumb that considered patient burden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carpometacarpal joint of the thumb is the most important in manual exercise function. Robert method is used for the projection for carp metacarpal joint of the thumb broadly. But, the physique is difficult when there is a pain to a person of advanced age and an upper drumstick in Robert method. So, we devised the photography method that reduced patient burden. Comparison examined Robert method and Tokai method. Detect ability is equal in both method. Patient burden is reduced in Tokai method. Therefore, it isn't influenced a state of patient, and application range is useful broadly. (author)

  14. Government spending shocks and rule-of-thumb consumers: The role of steady state inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Gisle James Natvik

    2010-01-01

    Galí, López-Salido, and Vallés (2007) suggest that because part of the population follow a rule-of-thumb by which they spend their entire disposable income each period, private consumption responds positively to defcitfinanced increases in government spending. Key to this result is a centralized labor market. I show that the ability to explain the positive consumption response as a consequence of rule-of-thumb behavior hinges on the arbitrary assumption that wealth is redistributed across hou...

  15. Case report 364: Massive calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disorder (MCPDD) involving thumb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In summary, the case is presented of a 46-year-old man who developed stiffness and pain in his right thumb. Radiological study showed calcific deposits around the first metacarpophalangeal joint, which grew in extent and amount considerably over a two year period. The diagnosis of massive calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease (MCPDD) was established both by biopsy and operation. The surgical procedure was performed to remove the calcific mass after pressure on a digital nerve resulted in loss of sensation over the ulnar aspect of the thumb and flareups of swelling, pain and erythema, had developed at the first M-P joint. (orig./HP)

  16. Case report 364: Massive calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disorder (MCPDD) involving thumb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, G.Y.; Smoker, W.R.K.; Foucar, E.; Blair, W.F.; Malvitz, T.A.; Strottmann, M.P.

    1986-05-01

    In summary, the case is presented of a 46-year-old man who developed stiffness and pain in his right thumb. Radiological study showed calcific deposits around the first metacarpophalangeal joint, which grew in extent and amount considerably over a two year period. The diagnosis of massive calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease (MCPDD) was established both by biopsy and operation. The surgical procedure was performed to remove the calcific mass after pressure on a digital nerve resulted in loss of sensation over the ulnar aspect of the thumb and flareups of swelling, pain and erythema, had developed at the first M-P joint.

  17. Polyrethene nasolacrimal prostheses. Assessment of the complications using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the outcome of treatment of epiphora secondary to nasolacrimal duct obstruction by placement of a polyurethane prosthesis. We placed 20 polyurethane prostheses (song's prostheses) in 19 patients with nasolacrimal duct obstruction who presented idiopathic grade III-IV epiphora. All the patients underwent CT with follow-up studies 10 days, one month and three months after prosthesis placement. Epiphora resolved completely in 13 cases and partially in four. In two cases, the prosthesis was poorly positioned; one of them was replaced and the other functions to date. There were three cases of obstruction. We observed limited epistaxis in 7 patients and headache in one. The treatment of epiphora by polyurethane prosthesis placement is a simple procedure that is well tolerated by patients and has a high success rate. (Author) 14 refs

  18. Simulated prosthetic vision: improving text accessibility with retinal prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Gregoire; Jouffrais, Christophe; Mailhes, Corinne; Mace, Marc J-M

    2014-01-01

    Image processing can improve significantly the every-day life of blind people wearing current and upcoming retinal prostheses relying on an external camera. We propose to use a real-time text localization algorithm to improve text accessibility. An augmented text-specific rendering based on automatic text localization has been developed. It has been evaluated in comparison to the classical rendering through a Simulated Prosthetic Vision (SPV) experiment with 16 subjects. Subjects were able to detect text in natural scenes much faster and further with the augmented rendering compared to the control rendering. Our results show that current and next generation of low resolution retinal prostheses may benefit from real-time text detection algorithms. PMID:25570307

  19. The Safety of Common Voice Prostheses with ENT Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A; Bingham, B J

    1999-06-01

    Silicone voice prostheses, or valves, are inserted into the common tracheo-oesophageal wall of patients after laryngectomy, to allow speech rehabilitation. Granulation tissue around these voice prostheses is often removed by laser and the safety of these valves with lasers had not been confirmed. The common valves were exposed to increasing energies from the carbon dioxide, potassium-titanyl-phosphate and holmium YAG lasers, in air. The energies used were those in common clinical use. The Provox valves proved especially vulnerable to all laser energies. Other methods of removing granulation tissue should be tried prior to lasering, or the valves should be removed, as damage to them, or the patient's airway, can result. PMID:24519172

  20. Bio compatible thin films created on titanium prostheses by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films of hydroxylapatite (HA) and diamond-like carbon (DLC) were created on flat and cylindrical Ti-6Al-4V and Ti prostheses by method of pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Deposition conditions and results of physical film analysis (X-ray diffraction-XRD, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, scratch test) and preliminary results of in-vitro (fibroblasts, lymphocytes) and in-vivo experiments (in rats) are presented. (author)

  1. Manufacturing Implant Supported Auricular Prostheses by Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Karatas, Meltem Ozdemir; Cifter, Ebru Demet; Ozenen, Didem Ozdemir; Balik, Ali; Tuncer, Erman Bulent

    2011-01-01

    Maxillofacial prostheses are usually fabricated on the models obtained following the impression procedures. Disadvantages of conventional impression techniques used in production of facial prosthesis are deformation of soft tissues caused by impression material and disturbance of the patient due to. Additionally production of prosthesis by conventional methods takes longer time. Recently, rapid prototyping techniques have been developed for extraoral prosthesis in order to reduce these disadv...

  2. An analysis of choice: a case study on hip prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) surgery is a highly successful procedure offering relief of chronic pain and improving physical functioning. Given an ageing population, there is an ever increasing demand for THR, and an increasing need to establish its cost-effectiveness. This thesis explores two aspects of choice between the alternative prostheses: how choices should be made, and what choices are actually made. On the former, a key indicator is the long-term prosthesis survival ra...

  3. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Valvular Prostheses Dysfunction Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lázaro De la Cruz Avilés; Félix Rene Jorrín Román; Ernesto Falcón Pérez

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Valve Prostheses Dysfunction Treatment. The introduction of an artificial valve allows improving life quality and expectancy of an important number of patients and can be considered a common treatment within advanced heart valve disease. However, persons with this kind of prosthesis usually present another disease caused by the potential complications associated with the uses of anti-clotting medications. This document includes the different classifications of...

  4. Implant-supported prostheses versus conventional permanent and removable dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Koszuta Agnieszka; Szymanska Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Social, economic and technological progress results in an increasing range of treatment and rehabilitation methods for patients with partial or complete edentulism. The role of the dentist is to inform the patient about the full range of available missing teeth treatment options leading to complete rehabilitation of the masticatory organ in agreement with the patient’s aesthetic and functional expectations. The aim of the paper was to identify the type of prostheses used by patients before op...

  5. Prostheses, Cyborgs and Cyberspace – the Cyberpunk Trinity

    OpenAIRE

    Staša Sever

    2013-01-01

    This article will explore three elements that have collectively become the sine qua non of our lives: prostheses, cyborgs and cyberspace. The main concern of the article is to show the close connection between the technology-saturated reality of today and the literature of cyberpunk as the prototypical representative of merging the human and the technological. This will enable us to explore the interaction between literature and reality in the formation of the cyborg of today.

  6. Prostheses, Cyborgs and Cyberspace – the Cyberpunk Trinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staša Sever

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article will explore three elements that have collectively become the sine qua non of our lives: prostheses, cyborgs and cyberspace. The main concern of the article is to show the close connection between the technology-saturated reality of today and the literature of cyberpunk as the prototypical representative of merging the human and the technological. This will enable us to explore the interaction between literature and reality in the formation of the cyborg of today.

  7. Changes in photon dose distributions due to breast prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subcutaneous prosthetic implants have been routinely used for cosmetic augmentation and for tissue replacement following mastectomy over the last 15 years. The implants come in many forms as the gel filler material and surrounding shell material(s) vary significantly. This study uses a thin window parallel-plate chamber and thermoluminescent dosimeters to quantify any dosimetric changes to surrounding breast tissue due to the presence of the prosthesis. A mammographic phantom was compared to four commercial prostheses, namely two silicon gel fillers within two different shells (silicon or silicon/polyurethane), a tri-glyceride within silicon and a bio-oncotic gel within silicon and a bio-oncotic gel within silicon/polyurethane. The latter two implants were designed with a low-Z fill for diagnostic imaging benefits. Ion chamber results indicate no significant alteration of depth doses away from the implant with only minor canceling (parallel opposed) interface perturbations for all implants. In addition the physical changes to the irradiated prostheses were quantified by tonometry testing and qualified by color change. Each implant exhibited color change following 50 Gy, and the bio-oncotic gel became significantly less formable following irradiation, and even less formable 6 weeks postirradiation. The data indicates that prostheses do not affect the photon beam distribution, but radiation does affect the prosthesis. 9 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  8. The Role of Auricular Prostheses (Epitheses) in Ear Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspil, Philippe A

    2015-12-01

    The artwork of making the epithesis by the dedicated anaplastologist is the prerequisite of acceptance by the patient and the key for success of this approach. However, computer science is helping with virtual planning and rapid prototyping, and it is likely to revolutionize this process in the near future. One of the advantages of the auricular prostheses is that it can be manufactured as a mirrored replica of the opposite side (if normal or near normal). Furthermore, the results are predictable, and may be shown to the patient before surgery. The developments of various implant systems allow secure retention even in unfavorable anatomic situations as in the ideally pneumatized mastoid process. The advantage of the plate systems is that they spread the loading forces to multiple smaller bone screws, rendering it thereby resistant to torque with abutment insertion or magnet change. Auricular prostheses fulfill three roles: (1) temporary measure, (2) rescue procedure in failed auricular (re)construction, and (3) definitive treatment option. Conventional retention by medical adhesives, sometimes helped by making use of the remnant, keeps its place in the use as a temporary measure or if the patient declines surgery. Today, implant-retained auricular prostheses made of silicone are state of the art for prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with auricular defects. PMID:26667638

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with heart valve prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artifical valve prostheses are often regarded as a contraindication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), although preliminary in vitro studies suggested, that patients with these metallic implants might safely undergo MR examination. This study reports on the experience with a group of 89 patients with 100 heart valve prostheses who were examined by spin-echo MR and gradient-echo MR. MR examination was performed in all patients without complications. The spin-echo sequence showed advantages in the depiction of anatomical structures like paravalvular abcesses. Anatomical structures adjacent to the artificial valve were clearly visivle and the metal components of the valves showes no or only small artifacts. Artifacts were accentuated when using gradient-echo sequences. Gradient-echo sequences provided valuable information regarding the presence of valvular insufficiency. Physiological valvular regurgitation was easy to differentiate from pathological paravalvular or transvalvular regurgitation. These results demonstrate that patients with artificial valve prostheses can be imaged by MR without risk and that prosthesis-induced artifacts do no interfere with image interpretation. (orig.)

  10. Patient satisfaction concerning implant-supported prostheses: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno César de Vasconcelos GURGEL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this observational study was to assess the degree of patient satisfaction toward implant-supported prostheses. A questionnaire was used with two scales (one consisting of detailed adjectival and the other of numerical responses regarding chewing, esthetics, speaking, comfort and overall satisfaction. The scales were administered to a sample of 147 patients treated with implants and prostheses. The data were submitted to the Kappa statistic and the Chi-square test to analyze the association between dependent and independent variables. High degrees of satisfaction (greater than 91% were found for all categories evaluated, regardless of gender, age, number of implants or type of prosthesis. “Comfort” was associated significantly with the number of implants (p = 0.038, and “speaking” was associated significantly with the type of prosthesis (p = 0.029. Positive agreement was found between the scales for all categories evaluated, without statistically significant differences regarding respondent preference (p = 0.735. Patients treated with implant-supported prostheses were highly satisfied with the treatment.

  11. Molecular weight characterization of virgin and explanted polyester arterial prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarek, J M; Guidoin, R; Aubin, M; Prud'homme, R E

    1984-10-01

    The macromolecular properties of 17 virgin commercial arterial prostheses and a series of explanted prostheses, both manufactured from poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) yarns, have been studied by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Only small differences were found between the average molecular weights and the degree of crystallinity of the unused reference grafts. A broadening of the DSC curves was observed for the prostheses containing texturized yarns compared with those made solely from flat, untexturized yarns. This broadening may be due to greater heterogeneity of the crystal sizes caused by the texturizing process and to the use of two or more different yarns with dissimilar thermal histories in the same prosthesis. Average molecular weights of the explant series were significantly lower than those of the corresponding reference grafts but almost time independent. The polydispersity index and the degree of crystallinity of the explants remained constant as a function of time. These results are discussed in regard to others available in the literature. PMID:6242474

  12. A biomechanical evaluation of hinged total knee replacement prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Robin; Gheduzzi, Sabina; Bucher, Thomas A; Toms, Andrew D; Miles, Anthony W

    2013-08-01

    The number of total knee replacements being performed worldwide is undergoing an unprecedented increase. Hinged total knee replacements, used in complex salvage and revision procedures, currently account for a small but growing proportion of prostheses implanted. Modern hinged prostheses share the same basic configuration, allowing flexion-extension and tibial rotation. One aspect on which designs differ is the anteroposterior location of the hinge. A more posterior hinge is designed to increase the patellar tendon moment arm, reducing the quadriceps force required for a given activity and benefiting the patient. Five commonly used total knee replacements were evaluated in terms of quadriceps force and patellar tendon moment arm using a laboratory-based rig. Significant differences were identified between the five prostheses in quadriceps force and patellar tendon moment arm. Analysis of the correlation between these two parameters indicates that while patellar tendon moment arm influences quadriceps force, it is not the only factor. Also important is the lever function of the patella, and it is suggested here that the non-physiological nature of the prosthetic patellofemoral geometry may result in unnatural joint function. Thus, a thorough understanding of the resulting kinematic function of hinged total knee replacements is becoming increasingly important in complex revision total knee replacement to meet rising patient expectations and functional demands. PMID:23722496

  13. Restoration of thumb opposition by transposing the flexsor pollicis brevis muscle: thirteen-year clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background To repair late median nerve injury, many methods have been used in the past years. The aim of this study was to review a thirteen-year experience in restoration of thumb opposition by transposing flexor pollicis brevis muscle.Methods From July 1992 to August 2005, 63 patients without thumb opposition because of late median never injury were treated by transposing the flexor pollicis brevis muscle. All the patients had received primary nerve repair after the jnjury. The interval between the injury and the second operation was (1.87±2.31) years (6 months to 4.2 years). The patients were followed up for 3 to 48 [months mean (22.93±2.31) months]. A functional evaluation system designed in 1992 were used to estimate the outcomes of the patients. Results All the patients gained excellent functional results without complications and disabilities during follow-up.Conclusions Restoration of thumb opposition by transposing flexsor pollicis brevis muscle has the following advantages: 1. Operative trauma is minimal; 2. It is not necessary to transpose other tendons; 3. Except for the thumb in opposition, movements of other fingers and the wrist are not restricted postoperatively.

  14. Assessing Financial Education Methods: Principles vs. Rules-of-Thumb Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skimmyhorn, William L.; Davies, Evan R.; Mun, David; Mitchell, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Despite thousands of programs and tremendous public and private interest in improving financial decision-making, little is known about how best to teach financial education. Using an experimental approach, the authors estimated the effects of two different education methodologies (principles-based and rules-of-thumb) on the knowledge,…

  15. The Effect of an Open Carpal Tunnel Release on Thumb CMC Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Tanner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We have observed worsening thumb pain following carpal tunnel release (CTR in some patients. Our purpose was to determine the effect of open CTR on thumb carpometacarpal (CMC biomechanics. Methods. Five fresh-frozen cadaver arms with intact soft tissues were used. Each specimen was secured to a jig which fixed the forearm at 45° supination, and the wrist at 20° dorsiflexion, with thumb pointing up. The thumb was axially loaded with a force of 130 N. We measured 3D translation and rotation of the trapezium, radius, and first metacarpal, before and after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, radius and trapezium, and first metacarpal and trapezium during loading was calculated using rigid body mechanics. Overall stiffness of each specimen was determined. Results. Total construct stiffness following CTR was reduced in all specimens but not significantly. No significant changes were found in adduction, pronation, or dorsiflexion of the trapezium with respect to radius after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, between radius and trapezium, or between first metacarpal and trapezium after open CTR was not decreased significantly. Conclusion. From this data, we cannot determine if releasing the transverse carpal ligament alters kinematics of the CMC joint.

  16. The Engineer's Thumb or Sherlock Holmes on the trail of 'the uncanny'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batail, J

    1997-08-01

    Freud identified 'primal phantasies' (life in the womb, 'primal scene', seduction, castration). It is argued that 'The Engineer's Thumb', a short story from 'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes', draws its uncanniness from the fact that it is underpinned by all the primal phantasies described by Freud. 'The Engineer's Thumb' therefore illustrates what analytical interpretation can contribute to the understanding of certain literary works. 'The Engineer's Thumb' may also serve as an introduction to a broader study of the Freudian concept of 'the uncanny'. This study seems to confirm what Freud said when he pointed out that 'an uncanny experience occurs either when infantile complexes which have been repressed are once more revived by some impression, or when primitive beliefs which have been surmounted seem once more to be confirmed' (1919, p. 249). 'The Engineer's Thumb' has another interesting feature: in this short story. Conan Doyle, by setting up a 'talking cure', anticipates the creation of psychoanalysis and highlights in a striking way certain aspects of what was to become psychoanalytical treatment. PMID:9306190

  17. The Effect of an Open Carpal Tunnel Release on Thumb CMC Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Marc A; Conrad, Bryan P; Dell, Paul C; Wright, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We have observed worsening thumb pain following carpal tunnel release (CTR) in some patients. Our purpose was to determine the effect of open CTR on thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) biomechanics. Methods. Five fresh-frozen cadaver arms with intact soft tissues were used. Each specimen was secured to a jig which fixed the forearm at 45° supination, and the wrist at 20° dorsiflexion, with thumb pointing up. The thumb was axially loaded with a force of 130 N. We measured 3D translation and rotation of the trapezium, radius, and first metacarpal, before and after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, radius and trapezium, and first metacarpal and trapezium during loading was calculated using rigid body mechanics. Overall stiffness of each specimen was determined. Results. Total construct stiffness following CTR was reduced in all specimens but not significantly. No significant changes were found in adduction, pronation, or dorsiflexion of the trapezium with respect to radius after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, between radius and trapezium, or between first metacarpal and trapezium after open CTR was not decreased significantly. Conclusion. From this data, we cannot determine if releasing the transverse carpal ligament alters kinematics of the CMC joint. PMID:23251808

  18. Median nerve deformation and displacement in the carpal tunnel during index finger and thumb motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doesburg, Margriet H M; Yoshii, Yuichi; Villarraga, Hector R; Henderson, Jacqueline; Cha, Stephen S; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the deformation and displacement of the normal median nerve in the carpal tunnel during index finger and thumb motion, using ultrasound. Thirty wrists from 15 asymptomatic volunteers were evaluated. Cross-sectional images during motion from full extension to flexion of the index finger and thumb were recorded. On the initial and final frames, the median nerve, flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and index finger flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendons were outlined. Coordinate data were recorded and median nerve cross-sectional area, perimeter, aspect ratio of the minimal-enclosing rectangle, and circularity in extension and flexion positions were calculated. During index finger flexion, the tendon moves volarly while the nerve moves radially. With thumb flexion, the tendon moves volarly, but the median nerve moves toward the ulnar side. In both motions, the area and perimeter of the median nerve in flexion were smaller than in extension. Thus, during index finger or thumb flexion, the median nerve in a healthy human subject shifts away from the index finger FDS and FPL tendons while being compressed between the tendons and the flexor retinaculum in the carpal tunnel. We are planning to compare these data with measurements in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and believe that these parameters may be useful tools for the assessment of CTS and carpal tunnel mechanics with ultrasound in the future. PMID:20225286

  19. Capacity Value: Evaluation of WECC Rule of Thumb; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, Michael; Ibanez, Eduardo

    2015-06-09

    This presentation compares loss of load expectation and wind and solar capacity values to the rules of thumb used in the Western Interconnection planning and provides alternative recommendations to the modeling efforts of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council's Transmission Expansion Planning Policy Committee.

  20. Collateral ligament reconstruction of the chronic thumb injury with bio-tenodesis screw fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gvozdenovic, Robert; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new technique for the reconstruction of chronic lesions of the collateral ligaments of the metacarpophalangeal ligaments of the thumb, using a Bio-Tenodesis screw for the fixation of a tendon graft in a triangular manner with proximal apex and allowing early mobilization, starting 2...

  1. Bridging the gap between cadaveric and in vivo experiments: a biomechanical model evaluating thumb-tip endpoint forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlman, Sarah J; Murray, Wendy M

    2013-03-15

    The thumb is required for a majority of tasks of daily living. Biomechanical modeling is a valuable tool, with the potential to help us bridge the gap between our understanding of the mechanical actions of individual thumb muscles, derived from anatomical cadaveric experiments, and our understanding of how force is produced by the coordination of all of the thumb muscles, derived from studies involving human subjects. However, current biomechanical models do not replicate muscle force production at the thumb-tip. We hypothesized that accurate representations of the axes of rotation of the thumb joints were necessary to simulate the magnitude of endpoint forces produced by human subjects. We augmented a musculoskeletal model with axes of rotation derived from experimental measurements (Holzbaur et al., 2005) by defining muscle-tendon paths and maximum isometric force-generating capacity for the five intrinsic muscles. We then evaluated if this augmented model replicated a broad range of experimental data from the literature and identified which parameters most influenced model performance. The simulated endpoint forces generated by the combined action of all thumb muscles in our model yielded comparable forces in magnitude to those produced by nonimpaired subjects. A series of 8 sets of Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated that the difference in the axes of rotation of the thumb joints between studies best explains the improved performance of our model relative to previous work. In addition, we demonstrate that the endpoint forces produced by individual muscles cannot be replicated with existing experimental data describing muscle moment arms. PMID:23332233

  2. Determination of the alpha flux from dental prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For over fifty years manufacturers of dental prostheses have been adding uranium compounds to porcelains in an attempt to simulate the fluorescence properties of natural teeth. This paper presents preliminary results of work being carried out at the University of Manitoba aimed at measuring any radiation which may be emitted from the surface of a prosthesis. The measurement system and technique are described along with the study of problems related to background in such a low count rate experiment. The results obtained to this point for alpha particles show a low but statistically significant count rate which might represent a health hazard in the long term

  3. [COMBINED ACRYLIC-POLYPROPYLEN REMOVABLE PROSTHESES FOR PROSTHODONTIC TREATMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuturminsky, V

    2015-10-01

    The article deals with the development of methods to prevent complications with prosthetic dentures patients with psychiatric status. The authors developed a method of manufacturing the denture using modern thermoplastic materials, the use of which in practice does not cause prosthetic stomatitis in patients with psychiatric status. The proposed methodology has been tested clinically. Based on Schiller- Pisarev and study fixation of prostheses has been shown the advantage of the prosthesis used for prosthetics partial dentition defects that can not be fixed prosthetics in this category of patients. PMID:26483367

  4. A biodegradable gentamicin-hydroxyapatite-coating for infection prophylaxis in cementless hip prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neut, D.; Dijkstra, R. J. B.; Thompson, J. I.; Kavanagh, C.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    A degradable, poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), gentamicin-loaded prophylactic coating for hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated cementless hip prostheses is developed with similar antibacterial efficacy as offered by gentamicin-loaded cements for fixing traditional, cemented prostheses in bone. We descri

  5. BIODETERIORATION OF MEDICAL-GRADE SILICONE-RUBBER USED FOR VOICE PROSTHESES - A SEM STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NEU, TR; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ; DIJK, F; VERKERKE, GJ

    1993-01-01

    Silicone voice prostheses used for rehabilitation of speech after total laryngectomy are inserted in an non-sterile habitat. Deposits on explanted Groningen Button voice prostheses revealed a biofilm, due to heavy colonization of the silicone surface by bacteria and yeasts. Furthermore, it was demon

  6. Surgical treatment of tracheal collapse using pliable total ring prostheses: results in one experimental and 4 clinical cases.

    OpenAIRE

    Ayres, S A; Holmberg, D L

    1999-01-01

    Pliable total ring prostheses were created from the polyvinyl chloride drip chambers of intravenous administration sets. The total ring prostheses were placed in one clinically normal research dog and in 4 client-owned dogs diagnosed with tracheal collapse. The research dog was euthanized one month after placement of the prostheses. Histopathological analysis of the trachea adjacent to the prostheses revealed a mild inflammatory response. The follow-up period for the clinical cases was from 4...

  7. Terminal phalangeal accessory ossification center of the thumb: an additional radiographic finding in Larsen syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen syndrome is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple joint dislocations, vertebral anomalies and dysmorphic facies. Both autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive forms of the disorder have been proposed. Individuals with autosomal-dominant Larsen syndrome have characteristic ''cylindrical-shape'' thumbs caused by broad, shortened phalanges. Autosomal-dominant Larsen syndrome results from heterozygosity for mutations in filamin B, a cytoskeletal protein involved in multicellular processes. We report here a patient with a duplicated or accessory distal thumb phalanx and multiple large joint dislocations who was shown to be heterozygous for a filamin B mutation predicting the amino acid substitution G1691S. This adds a new radiographic finding, duplicated or accessory distal phalanx, to the radiographic abnormalities seen in this rare dominant disorder. (orig.)

  8. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannucci E

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Edoardo Mannucci,1 Stefano Giannini,2 Ilaria Dicembrini1 1Diabetes Agency, Careggi Teaching Hospital, Florence, 2Section of Endocrinology, Department of Biomedical Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Florence and Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy Abstract: Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with

  9. Carpometacarpal dislocation of the thumb associated with fracture of the trapezium

    OpenAIRE

    Kose, Ozkan; Keskinbora, Mert; Guler, Ferhat

    2014-01-01

    Carpometacarpal dislocation (CMC) of the thumb associated with fracture of trapezium is an extremely rare injury, with only 12 cases that sustained similar injuries reported in the literature. In this article, another patient with this rare injury was reported, and all previously published cases were extensively reviewed. The presented case and all previously published cases had a longitudinally oriented trapezium fracture, which is naturally unstable and almost always associated with disloca...

  10. Short-term effects of neurodynamic mobilization in 15 patients with secondary thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Villafañe, J. H.; Silva, G. B.; Fernández-Camero, Josué

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether neurodynamic mobilization of the median nerve improves pressure pain threshold (PPT) and pinch and grip strength in patients with secondary thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (TCOA). Fifteen patients with secondary TCOA (13 women and 2 men) between 70 and 90 years old were received by neurodynamic therapy. All patients received median nerve mobilization of the dominant hand by sliding technique during 4 sessions over 2 weeks. The outcome meas...

  11. STS-44 crewmembers give 'thumbs up' signal after landing at EAFB, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), give 'thumbs up' signal while posing in front of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, after landing on Runway 05 dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Left to right are Payload Specialist Thomas J. Hennen, Commander Frederick D. Gregory, and Mission Specialist (MS) Mario Runco, Jr. Detailed Supplementary Objective (DSO) sensors are in place on Hennen's face and forehead.

  12. Collateral ligament injuries of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb: a treatment algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Shelain; Potty, Anish; Taylor, Emma J.; Sorene, Elliot D.

    2010-01-01

    The management of injury to the ulnar and radial collateral ligaments at the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb is complex. Treatment is dependent upon a number of factors with a wide variety of options for each ligament. Inadequate treatment has the potential to lead to a poor functional outcome. We present the relevant clinical anatomy, mechanism of injury, methods of treatment available and suggest a single treatment algorithm for use in the management of these injuries.

  13. Hypermobility associated with osteoarthritis of the thumb base: a clinical and radiological subset of hand osteoarthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jónsson, H; Valtýsdóttir, S T; Kjartansson, O.; Brekkan, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of articular hypermobility on the clinical and radiological features of hand osteoarthritis (OA) and to investigate whether hand osteoarthritis associated with hypermobility should be considered a separate subset of hand OA. METHODS: Fifty consecutive female patients with clinical hand OA and thumb base symptoms were examined for hypermobility according to the Beighton criteria. RESULTS: Thirty one of the 50 patients had hypermobility features (Beighton score >...

  14. [Anti-basal ganglia antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masaharu

    2013-04-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) is a major manifestation of rheumatic fever, and the production of anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) has been proposed in SC. The pathogenesis is hypothesized as autoimmune targeting of the basal ganglia via molecular mimicry, triggered by streptococcal infection. The spectrum of diseases in which ABGA may be involved has been broadened to include other extrapyramidal movement disorders, such as tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism, as well as other psychiatric disorders. The autoimmune hypothesis in the presence and absence of ABGA has been suggested in Tourette's syndrome (TS), early onset obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Recently, the relationship between ABGA and dopamine neurons in the basal ganglia has been examined, and autoantibodies against dopamine receptors were detected in the sera from patients with basal ganglia encephalitis. In Japan, the occurrence of subacute encephalitis, where patients suffer from episodes of altered behavior and involuntary movements, has increased. Immune-modulating treatments are effective, indicating the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism. We aimed to detect the anti-neuronal autoantibodies in such encephalitis, using immunohistochemical assessment of patient sera. The sera from patients showing involuntary movements had immunoreactivity for basal ganglia neurons. Further epitopes for ABGA will be investigated in basal ganglia disorders other than SC, TS, OCD, and PANDAS. PMID:23568985

  15. MRI follow-up after free tendon graft reconstruction of the thumb ulnar collateral ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohman, M.; Kivisaari, L. [Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland); Vasenius, J. [Dextra Hospital, Department of Hand Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Nieminen, O. [Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Hand Surgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-11-15

    Our aim was to analyse whether MRI is useful in the follow-up of reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb, to describe normal postoperative findings, and to evaluate different MR sequences. Our study material consists of 10 patients who, because of a chronic rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb, had been operatively treated using a free tendon graft. The patients were, in addition to the clinical examination and radiographs, also imaged using MRI both pre- and postoperatively. The postoperative MRI controls, undertaken at 2, 12 and 24 months were analysed without knowledge of the clinical or radiographic findings. The reconstructed UCL was well visualised on MRI. One graft rupture was diagnosed on MRI and was later operatively confirmed. No increase in osteoarthritis of the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint of the thumb was seen during the follow-up. The single most informative MR sequence was T2TSE in the coronal plane. Magnetic resonance imaging may provide a clinically valuable means of assessing graft integrity in patients with suspected postoperative graft failure after UCL reconstruction, although we do not consider MRI necessary in the routine follow-up of patients with an uneventful recovery. (orig.)

  16. MRI follow-up after free tendon graft reconstruction of the thumb ulnar collateral ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to analyse whether MRI is useful in the follow-up of reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb, to describe normal postoperative findings, and to evaluate different MR sequences. Our study material consists of 10 patients who, because of a chronic rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb, had been operatively treated using a free tendon graft. The patients were, in addition to the clinical examination and radiographs, also imaged using MRI both pre- and postoperatively. The postoperative MRI controls, undertaken at 2, 12 and 24 months were analysed without knowledge of the clinical or radiographic findings. The reconstructed UCL was well visualised on MRI. One graft rupture was diagnosed on MRI and was later operatively confirmed. No increase in osteoarthritis of the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint of the thumb was seen during the follow-up. The single most informative MR sequence was T2TSE in the coronal plane. Magnetic resonance imaging may provide a clinically valuable means of assessing graft integrity in patients with suspected postoperative graft failure after UCL reconstruction, although we do not consider MRI necessary in the routine follow-up of patients with an uneventful recovery. (orig.)

  17. Osteoarthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal joint: Correlation of ultrasound appearances to disability and treatment response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate grading of thumb carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) osteoarthritis (OA) using ultrasound, correlating findings with disability and treatment response. Materials and methods: Patients with symptomatic thumb OA attending for ultrasound-guided CMCJ steroid injection and a group of asymptomatic controls were recruited prospectively. Thumb CMCJ ultrasound was graded (osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, capsule size, and measured capsule size), and a Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire was completed for each patient. Symptomatic patients then underwent injection with DASH repeated 6 weeks post-treatment. Ultrasound features were correlated with the initial DASH disability score and response as defined by change in DASH 6 weeks after treatment. Results: Thirty-one patients with symptomatic OA and 37 asymptomatic controls were recruited. With the exception of osteophytes (p = 0.017), no statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between severity of ultrasound features and patient disability. However, all features demonstrated statistically significant higher grades in the symptomatic group compared to controls. Ultrasound grading did not have statistical correlation with treatment response. Conclusion: No correlation was found between the majority of ultrasound features and the clinical severity of OA or likely response to treatment. However, these features are significantly more common in the symptomatic population

  18. Prevalence of heat and perspiration discomfort inside prostheses: Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamiar Ghoseiri, PhD Candidate

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available People with limb amputation deal with thermal stresses in their daily activities. Unfortunately, in the majority of this population, all thermal transfer mechanisms, including convection, radiation, evaporation, and conduction, can be disturbed due to the prosthetic socket barrier, decreased body surface area, and/or vascular disease. The thermal environment inside prosthetic sockets, in addition to decreased quality of life and prosthesis use, comfort, and satisfaction, could put people with amputation at high risk for skin irritations. The current review explores the importance of thermal and perspiration discomfort inside prosthetic sockets by providing an insight into the prevalence of the problem. The literature search was performed in two databases, PubMed and Web of Knowledge, to find relevant articles. After considering the review criteria and hand-searching the reference sections of the selected studies, 38 studies were listed for review and data extraction. This review revealed that more than 53% of people with amputation in the selected studies experienced heat and/or perspiration discomfort inside their prostheses. In spite of great technological advances, current prostheses are unable to resolve this problem. Therefore, more attention must be paid by researchers, clinicians, and manufacturers of prosthetic components to thermal-related biomechanics of soft tissues, proper fabrication technique, material selection, and introduction of efficient thermoregulatory systems.

  19. Posterior implants for distal extension removable prostheses: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrani, Ricardo; Brudvik, James S; Phillips, Keith M

    2003-08-01

    Common complaints associated with the Kennedy Class I (bilateral free end) and Class II (unilateral free end) removable partial denture situations are lack of stability, minimal retention, and unesthetic retentive clasping. Some of the same complaints have been reported for implant overdentures with only anterior implants. Starting in 1995, 10 of these patients were treated at the University of Washington with posterior osseointegrated implants to provide stability and/or retention of the removable prostheses, eliminating the need for clasps when possible. This article describes implant alternatives and prosthesis designs and presents a follow-up clinical evaluation of at least 1 year consisting of patient satisfaction, radiographic examination, and soft tissue health. Two groups were evaluated. Group 1 included patients whose implants were used as vertical stops for mandibular distal extension prostheses. Care was taken to ensure that the implants were not loaded laterally by creating a single-point contact at the center of a modified healing abutment. In these cases, sufficient retention was available from the anterior teeth and/or implant abutments. Group 2 included patients whose implants required retention because of lack of adequate tooth abutments. In those cases, a resilient type of attachment was used, which allowed for a small divergence from the path of insertion. Results indicated consistent increased satisfaction in all patients, minimal component wear, no radiographic evidence of excessive bone loss, and stable peri-implant soft tissues. PMID:12956479

  20. Titania nanotube arrays as interfaces for neural prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neural prostheses have become ever more acceptable treatments for many different types of neurological damage and disease. Here we investigate the use of two different morphologies of titania nanotube arrays as interfaces to advance the longevity and effectiveness of these prostheses. The nanotube arrays were characterized for their nanotopography, crystallinity, conductivity, wettability, surface mechanical properties and adsorption of key proteins: fibrinogen, albumin and laminin. The loosely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using a diethylene glycol based electrolyte, contained a higher presence of the anatase crystal phase and were subsequently more conductive. These arrays yielded surfaces with higher wettability and lower modulus than the densely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using water based electrolyte. Further the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the C17.2 neural stem cell line was investigated on the nanotube arrays. The proliferation ratio of the cells as well as the level of neuronal differentiation was seen to increase on the loosely packed arrays. The results indicate that loosely packed nanotube arrays similar to the ones produced here with a DEG based electrolyte, may provide a favorable template for growth and maintenance of C17.2 neural stem cell line. - Highlights: • Titania nanotube arrays can be fabricated with to have loosely or densely packed morphologies. • Titania nanotube arrays support higher C17.2 neural stem cell adhesion and proliferation. • Titania nanotube arrays support higher C17.2 neural stem cell differentiation towards neuronal lineage

  1. Oral Implant-Prostheses: New Teeth for a Brighter Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Cicco

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated that chewing can be regarded as a preventive measure for cognitive impairment, whereas masticatory deficiency, associated with soft-diet feeding, is a risk factor for the development of dementia. At present the link between orofacial sensorimotor activity and cognitive functions is unknown. In subjects with unilateral molar loss we have shown asymmetries in both pupil size and masticatory muscles electromyographic (EMG activity during clenching: the molar less side was characterized by a lower EMG activity and a smaller pupil. Since implant-prostheses, greatly reduced both the asymmetry in EMG activity and in pupil's size, trigeminal unbalance, leading to unbalance in the activity of the Locus Coeruleus (LC, may be responsible for the pupil's asymmetry. According to the findings obtained in animal models, we propose that the different activity of the right and left LC may induce an asymmetry in brain activity, thus leading to cognitive impairment. According to this hypothesis, prostheses improved the performance in a complex sensorimotor task and increased the mydriasis associated with haptic tasks. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the implant-prosthesis therapy, which reduces the unbalance of trigeminal proprioceptive afferents and the asymmetry in pupil's size, may improve arousal, boosting performance in a complex sensorimotor task.

  2. Titania nanotube arrays as interfaces for neural prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorkin, Jonathan A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); Hughes, Stephen [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); Soares, Paulo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic School, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR 80215-901 (Brazil); Popat, Ketul C., E-mail: ketul.popat@colostate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Neural prostheses have become ever more acceptable treatments for many different types of neurological damage and disease. Here we investigate the use of two different morphologies of titania nanotube arrays as interfaces to advance the longevity and effectiveness of these prostheses. The nanotube arrays were characterized for their nanotopography, crystallinity, conductivity, wettability, surface mechanical properties and adsorption of key proteins: fibrinogen, albumin and laminin. The loosely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using a diethylene glycol based electrolyte, contained a higher presence of the anatase crystal phase and were subsequently more conductive. These arrays yielded surfaces with higher wettability and lower modulus than the densely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using water based electrolyte. Further the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the C17.2 neural stem cell line was investigated on the nanotube arrays. The proliferation ratio of the cells as well as the level of neuronal differentiation was seen to increase on the loosely packed arrays. The results indicate that loosely packed nanotube arrays similar to the ones produced here with a DEG based electrolyte, may provide a favorable template for growth and maintenance of C17.2 neural stem cell line. - Highlights: • Titania nanotube arrays can be fabricated with to have loosely or densely packed morphologies. • Titania nanotube arrays support higher C17.2 neural stem cell adhesion and proliferation. • Titania nanotube arrays support higher C17.2 neural stem cell differentiation towards neuronal lineage.

  3. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Giannini, Stefano; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane) and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec) differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with regard to cardiovascular safety will provide definitive evidence. PMID:26203281

  4. 再造拇指指腹角度的设定及对生物力学的影响%Determination of opposing angle of the thumb pulp in thumb reconstruction and its effect on biomechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晨; 张继春; 夏晓明; 王京怀

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between thumb opposing angle and pinch strength of the thumb with the other fingers,and provide the theoretic basis for the best angle in thumb reconstruction.Methods Seven fresh cadaver hand specimens were used in the study.The thumb was severed in the middle of the proximal phalanx.It was re-attached with Kirschner wires at normal angle,5°,10° and 15° of pronation,and 5°,10° and 15° of supination.Thumb-to-finger pinch strength was measured when the flexor digitorum profundus of the index,long and ring fingers were pulled at 2,4 and 6 kg with an electronic pinch-strength gauge.The contact areas between the thumb and these three fingers at various angles with 4 kg pulling force were also measured using pressure sensitive films.The data were statistically analyzed.Results There were no significant differences in measurements of thumb-to-finger pinch strength with thumb positioned at various angles and fingers pulled with various forces.The contact area between the thumb and index finger did not change significantly when the thumb was at normal angle,5° and 10° of pronation,and 5° of supination.That contact area was significantly reduced when the thumb was positioned at < 5° of supination or > 10° of pronation.The contact area between the thumb and middle and ring fingers did not change significantly when the thumb was at normal angle,5°,10° and 15° of pronation,and 5° and 10° of supination.That contact area was significantly reduced when the thumb was positioned at > 15° of supination.Conclusion Thumb-to-finger pinch strength is not affected by the angle at which the thumb is positioned in thumb reconstruction.Thumb-to-index finger contact area is not affected either within 10° of pronation and 5° of supination of the thumb.Beyond this range the contact area is reduced.Thumb-to-middle finger and thumb-to-ring finger areas are consistent within 15° of pronation and 10° of supination.The contact areas

  5. Extensor pollicis brevis tendon can hyperextend thumb interphalangeal joint in absence of extensor pollicis longus: Case report and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Robert J; Strauch, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    We are reporting a case of extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture which did not require tendon transfer owing to the ability of the intact extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) to fully hyperextend the thumb interphalangeal joint. The thumb metacarpophalangeal joint was also able to be fully actively extended by the EPB. Previous anatomical studies have demonstrated that the insertional anatomy of the EPB tendon is highly variable and sometimes inserts onto the extensor hood and distal phalanx, which is likely the mechanism by which our patient was able to fully extend the thumb interphalangeal joint. Despite the potential for the EPB to extend the IP joint of the thumb, virtually all previously reported cases of extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon rupture had deficits of thumb IP extension requiring tendon transfer. This case highlights the potential ability of the EPB tendon to completely substitute for the function of the EPL tendon in providing thumb IP joint extension. PMID:27458556

  6. Extensor pollicis brevis tendon can hyperextend thumb interphalangeal joint in absence of extensor pollicis longus: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Robert J; Strauch, Carolyn B

    2016-07-18

    We are reporting a case of extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture which did not require tendon transfer owing to the ability of the intact extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) to fully hyperextend the thumb interphalangeal joint. The thumb metacarpophalangeal joint was also able to be fully actively extended by the EPB. Previous anatomical studies have demonstrated that the insertional anatomy of the EPB tendon is highly variable and sometimes inserts onto the extensor hood and distal phalanx, which is likely the mechanism by which our patient was able to fully extend the thumb interphalangeal joint. Despite the potential for the EPB to extend the IP joint of the thumb, virtually all previously reported cases of extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon rupture had deficits of thumb IP extension requiring tendon transfer. This case highlights the potential ability of the EPB tendon to completely substitute for the function of the EPL tendon in providing thumb IP joint extension. PMID:27458556

  7. Bone remodelling after hip prostheses surgery: normal evolution patterns by bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of hip prostheses is a common task in nuclear medicine practice. Physicians usually have problems to differentiate between changes in bone remodelling related to surgical procedures and complications like infection or loosening. Aim: To assess changes in bone remodelling after hip prostheses surgery by bone scintigraphy, and to determine normal evolution patterns of tracer uptake. To relate changes in bone remodelling with type of prostheses and clinical outcome. Materials and Methods: We studied 18 patients (6 males, mean age 68±10 years) who receipt a hip prostheses. Every patient underwent 3 bone scintigraphies, at 3 months, 1 year and 2 years after surgical implant of hip prostheses. Twelve prostheses were non-cemented, 3 were cemented and 3 hybrids. A semi-quantification of tracer uptake was performed, obtaining an uptake index from the average counts per pixel of regions of interest (ROIs) drawn around sacroiliac joints, acetabulum, greater trochanter, calcar, femur shaft, tip, and opposite normal femur. Sacroiliac joints and opposite normal femur were selected as reference areas. The uptake index was calculated by the formula: (ROI-reference)/reference. Clinical follow-up was performed at 3 months, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years. Results: While tracer uptake indexes of non-cemented prostheses decreased significantly in greater trochanter, calcar, femur shaft, and tip between 3 months-1 year studies, 1 year-2 years studies and between 3 months and 2 years studies (t-student, p<0.05), tracer uptake indexes did not decrease in acetabulum, opposite normal femur, and sacroiliac joint. On the contrary, cemented and hybrid prostheses did not show any significant difference in studied areas during the follow-up. All patients presented good clinical outcome, without pain and with correct mobility of the leg. Conclusion: These preliminary results indicate that, when non-cemented hip prostheses are implanted, there are important bone remodelling changes at 3

  8. Radiological follow-up of uncemented knee prostheses. Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary results of a prospective study of 40 uncemented total knee prostheses (TKP) are presented following a radiological protocol with fluoroscopic control and follow-up of over 2 years. The prosthesis-bone interface and the components alignment were assessed. Several radiological signs were studied to assess this interface with respect to the fixing of the component, but they showed little clinical correlation. Statistical significance (p<0.05, chisquare) was found only in the observation of sclerosis in areas of support for the tibital tray as a reaction of the bone. This radiological follow-up is of interest to determine the evolution of the interface and position of the implant to prevent complications (especially loosening) in patients, particularly those under 60 years old, who represent the group that can most benefit from prosthetic systems with uncemented anchorage because of their life expectation and level of activity. Author

  9. Physical Impacts of Compaction Treatments on PET Textile Vascular Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem Azaiez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Textile cardiovascular prostheses are woven or knitted structures made generally from biocompatible polyester fibres. After production, they have to undergo special treatments before packaging such as compaction. This treatment is necessary to reduce porosity especially for knitted structures, but it can modify poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET polymer’s properties. We have studied the effect of chemical and thermal compaction process parameters on physical properties of PET with DSC and XRD techniques. The obtained results show changes of glass transition temperature according to compaction parameters. A multiple melting peaks thermograms were observed for untreated and most compacted samples indicating differences between crystallites sizes. The compaction treatment involves an increase of PET crystallites size because of molecular bonds rearrangement among the polymeric chains. With DRX, we have showed crystallites size increases for compacted samples when compared with untreated samples. This increase is particularly important in perpendicular direction to (010 crystallographic plane.

  10. Physical Impacts of Compaction Treatments on Pet Textile Vascular Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem Azaiez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Textile cardiovascular prostheses are woven or knitted structures made generally from biocompatible polyester fibres. After production, they have to undergo special treatments before packaging such as compaction. This treatment is necessary to reduce porosity especially for knitted structures, but it can modify poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET polymer’s properties. We have studied the effect of chemical and thermal compaction process parameters on physical properties of PET with DSC and XRD techniques. The obtainedresults show changes of glass transition temperature according to compaction parameters. A multiple melting peaks thermograms were observed for untreated and most compacted samples indicating differences between crystallites sizes. The compaction treatment involves an increase of PET crystallites size because of molecular bonds rearrangement among the polymeric chains. With DRX, we have showed crystallites size increases for compacted samples when compared with untreated samples. This increase is particularly important in perpendicular direction to (010 crystallographic plane.

  11. Brain Prostheses as a Dynamic System (Immortalizing the Human Brain?)

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, Vadim

    2007-01-01

    Interest in development of brain prostheses, which might be proposed to recover mental functions lost due to neuron-degenerative disease or trauma, requires new methods in molecular engineering and nanotechnology to build artificial brain tissues. We develop a Dynamic Core model to analyze complexity of damaged biological neural network as well as transition and recovery of the system functionality due to changes in the system environment. We provide a method to model complexity of physical systems which might be proposed as an artificial tissue or prosthesis. Delocalization of Dynamic Core model is developed to analyze migration of mental functions in dynamic bio-systems which undergo architecture transition induced by trauma. Term Dynamic Core is used to define a set of causally related functions and Delocalization is used to describe the process of migration. Information geometry and topological formalisms are proposed to analyze information processes. A holographic model is proposed to construct dynamic e...

  12. Custom hip prostheses by integrating CAD and casting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pedro F.; Leal, Nuno; Neto, Rui J.; Lino, F. Jorge; Reis, Ana

    2012-09-01

    Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) is a surgical intervention that is being achieving high rates of success, leaving room to research on long run durability, patient comfort and costs reduction. Even so, up to the present, little research has been done to improve the method of manufacturing customized prosthesis. The common customized prostheses are made by full machining. This document presents a different approach methodology which combines the study of medical images, through CAD (Computer Aided Design) software, SLadditive manufacturing, ceramic shell manufacture, precision foundry with Titanium alloys and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM). The goal is to achieve the best comfort for the patient, stress distribution and the maximum lifetime of the prosthesis produced by this integrated methodology. The way to achieve this desiderate is to make custom hip prosthesis which are adapted to each patient needs and natural physiognomy. Not only the process is reliable, but also represents a cost reduction comparing to the conventional full machined custom hip prosthesis.

  13. Electric stimulation with sinusoids and white noise for neural prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K Freeman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We are investigating the use of novel stimulus waveforms in neural prostheses to determine whether they can provide more precise control over the temporal and spatial pattern of elicited activity as compared to conventional pulsatile stimulation. To study this, we measured the response of retinal ganglion cells to both sinusoidal and white noise waveforms. The use of cell-attached and whole cell patch clamp recordings allowed the responses to be observed without significant obstruction from the stimulus artifact. Electric stimulation with sinusoids elicited robust responses. White noise analysis was used to derive the linear kernel for the ganglion cell’s spiking response as well as for the underlying excitatory currents. These results suggest that in response to electric stimulation, presynaptic retinal neurons exhibit bandpass filtering characteristics with peak response that occur 25ms after onset. The experimental approach demonstrated here may be useful for studying the temporal response properties of other neurons in the CNS.

  14. Gamma Ray Sterilization of Starr-Edwards Heart Valve Prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr-Edwards valves have normally been sterilized by exposure to ethylene oxide or by autoclaving. Patients having a prosthetic valve replacement are known to have a higher incidence of endocarditis in comparison with patients in which no prosthesis has been used. Ethylene oxide will only sterilize the surface of the valve and autoclaving has caused distortion of the polytetrafluorethylene ring. Work has been done on the effect of gamma radiation on the components of these valve prostheses and is given in detail. The bacteriological efficiency, at a total absorbed dose of 2. 5 Mrad, has been established. Thirty valves treated by this method have now been inserted and twelve patients have been examined post-operatively for a period of one to two years. All valves are working normally and there has been no evidence of blood-borne infection or malfunction of the valve. (author)

  15. Study of dental prostheses influence in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Conto, C; Gschwind, R; Martin, E; Makovicka, L

    2014-02-01

    Dental prostheses made of high density material contribute to modify dose distribution in head and neck cancer treatment. Our objective is to quantify dose perturbation due to high density inhomogeneity with experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Firstly, measurements were carried in a phantom representing a human jaw with thermoluminescent detectors (GR200A) and EBT2 Gafchromic films in the vicinity of three samples: a healthy tooth, a tooth with amalgam and a Ni-Cr crown, irradiated in clinical configuration. Secondly, Monte Carlo simulations (BEAMnrc code) were assessed in an identical configuration. Experimental measurements and simulation results confirm the two well-known phenomena: firstly the passage from a low density medium to a high density medium induces backscattered electrons causing a dose increase at the interface, and secondly, the passage from a high density medium to a low density medium creates a dose decrease near the interface. So, the results show a 1.4% and 23.8% backscatter dose rise and attenuation after sample of 26.7% and 10.9% respectively for tooth with amalgam and crown compared to the healthy tooth. Although a tooth with amalgam has a density of about 12-13, the changes generated are not significant. However, the results for crown (density of 8) are very significant and the discordance observed may be due to calculation point size difference 0.8 mm and 0.25 mm respectively for TLD and Monte Carlo. The use of Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements provides objective evidence to evaluate treatment planning system results with metal dental prostheses. PMID:23583116

  16. Auditory Neural Prostheses – A Window to the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Kameshwaran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is one of the commonest congenital anomalies to affect children world-over. The incidence of congenital hearing loss is more pronounced in developing countries like the Indian sub-continent, especially with the problems of consanguinity. Hearing loss is a double tragedy, as it leads to not only deafness but also language deprivation. However, hearing loss is the only truly remediable handicap, due to remarkable advances in biomedical engineering and surgical techniques. Auditory neural prostheses help to augment or restore hearing by integration of an external circuitry with the peripheral hearing apparatus and the central circuitry of the brain. A cochlear implant (CI is a surgically implantable device that helps restore hearing in patients with severe-profound hearing loss, unresponsive to amplification by conventional hearing aids. CIs are electronic devices designed to detect mechanical sound energy and convert it into electrical signals that can be delivered to the coch­lear nerve, bypassing the damaged hair cells of the coch­lea. The only true prerequisite is an intact auditory nerve. The emphasis is on implantation as early as possible to maximize speech understanding and perception. Bilateral CI has significant benefits which include improved speech perception in noisy environments and improved sound localization. Presently, the indications for CI have widened and these expanded indications for implantation are related to age, additional handicaps, residual hearing, and special etiologies of deafness. Combined electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS / hybrid device is designed for individuals with binaural low-frequency hearing and severe-to-profound high-frequency hearing loss. Auditory brainstem implantation (ABI is a safe and effective means of hearing rehabilitation in patients with retrocochlear disorders, such as neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 or congenital cochlear nerve aplasia, wherein the cochlear nerve is damaged

  17. Cryotherapy in basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra A; Balachandran C; Shenoi S; Sabitha L; Pai Satish; Ravikumar B; Roy Alfred

    1999-01-01

    Cryotherapy has proved to be an effective tool in the management of various dermatoses. We report 6 patients with histopathologically proven basal cell carcinoma of variable sizes treated with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy by the open spray technique. Lesions tended to heal with depigmentation and scar formation. However depigmented areas often repigmented over a period of time.

  18. Work-related thumb disorders in South African physiotherapists treating musculoskeletal conditions using manual therapy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Jenkins

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Research question: What is the prevalence of and factors associated with work-related thumb problems (WRTP in South African physiotherapists treating musculoskeletal conditions using manual therapy techniques?Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive study design was used and data were collected using two Internet-based questionnaires.Participants: The sample size calculated for the study was 284 using 95% confidence levels and a 5% margin of error. There were 395 participants that were included in the study. Outcome measures: The variables measured included demographic, employment, educational and occupational factors.Results: The lifetime prevalence of WRTP in the physiotherapists was 65.3%. The manual techniques that were significantly associated with WRTP in the respondents who reported thumb problems were all grades of transverse glides applied to the spine as well as grade II–IV unilateral and central posterior-anterior pressures to the spine. The factors that remained significantly associated with WRTP in all 395 respondents after regression analysis were the cervical treatment of up to six patients a day and hyperextension > 30° of the non-dominant interphalangeal (IP joint of the thumb.Conclusion: This study confirms that a high percentage of physiotherapists using manual therapy techniques to treat musculoskeletal conditions are experiencing WRTP.Recommendations: The development of a valid and reliable WRTP screening tool is needed to aid in the identification of physiotherapists at risk and thus in the primary prevention of WRTP. A longitudinal study which follows newly qualified physiotherapists is recommended to investigate a possible cause-effect relationship and preventative strategies for WRTP in physiotherapists.

  19. The thumb subdomain of yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase is involved in processivity, transcript fidelity and mitochondrial transcription factor binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Gilberto; Sousa, Rui; Brieba, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    Single subunit RNA polymerases have evolved 2 mechanisms to synthesize long transcripts without falling off a DNA template: binding of nascent RNA and interactions with an RNA:DNA hybrid. Mitochondrial RNA polymerases share a common ancestor with T-odd bacteriophage single subunit RNA polymerases. Herein we characterized the role of the thumb subdomain of the yeast mtRNA polymerase gene (RPO41) in complex stability, processivity, and fidelity. We found that deletion and point mutants of the thumb subdomain of yeast mtRNA polymerase increase the synthesis of abortive transcripts and the probability that the polymerase will disengage from the template during the formation of the late initial transcription and elongation complexes. Mutations in the thumb subdomain increase the amount of slippage products from a homopolymeric template and, unexpectedly, thumb subdomain deletions decrease the binding affinity for mitochondrial transcription factor (Mtf1). The latter suggests that the thumb subdomain is part of an extended binding surface area involved in binding Mtf1. PMID:25654332

  20. Economic Decisions by Approved Principles: Rules of Thumb as Behavioral Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Buhr, Walter; Christiaans, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the relevance of the concept of rational behavior in economic theory and suggest, on the basis of modern brain research results, to abstain from this notion and instead to apply behavioral rules of thumb in decision-making, especially if these rules can be derived from rational problem solutions determined by individual economic agents. We give an example for our point of view which refers to a contribution by Baumol and Quandt on the pricing behavior of a monopolistic firm and whi...

  1. Hydrodynamic characteristics of mechanical heart valve prostheses in steady and pulsatile flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, František; Kořenář, Josef

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2002), s. 249-258. ISSN 1210-2717 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Keywords : mechanical heart valve prostheses * flow visualization- steady and pulsatile flow Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  2. Impact of fixed implant supported prostheses in edentulous patients: protocol for a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    López, Carolina S; Saka, Constanza H; Rada, Gabriel; Valenzuela, Daniela D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Edentulism is a debilitating and irreversible condition described as the ‘final marker of disease burden for oral health’. Therapy with dental implants is being used on a large scale to replace missing teeth and to rehabilitate edentulous patients with overdentures and implant supported fixed dentures as a method of solving the problem of instability and lack of retention associated with conventional removable prostheses. Fixed implant supported prostheses are an alternative for ...

  3. Comparative study of nonlinear ultrasonic methods applied to experimental models of prostheses osseointegration

    OpenAIRE

    RIVIERE, Jacques; Haupert, Sylvain; Johnson, Paul; Laugier, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    International audience This study is part of the long-term perspective to implement in vivo some new noninvasive methods to monitor the bone prostheses sealing or osseointegration (dental implants, hip prostheses). Although the most widely used clinically, X-ray radiography suffers from low sensitivity, limiting for instance its ability to detect early loosening of a prosthesis. The potential of methods developed over the past twenty years and based on elasticity measurements has been show...

  4. Evaluation of crosslinked and non-crosslinked biologic prostheses for abdominal hernia repair

    OpenAIRE

    de Castro Brás, L. E.; Shurey, S.; Sibbons, P. D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Abdominal wall defects and incisional hernias represent a challenging problem. Currently, several commercially available biologic prostheses are used clinically for hernia repair. We compared the performance and efficacy of two non-crosslinked meshes in ventral hernia repair to two crosslinked prostheses in a rodent model. Methods Animals were divided into 12 groups (4 matrix types and 3 termination time-points per matrix). A ventral defect was carefully created and overlapped wi...

  5. A biodegradable gentamicin-hydroxyapatite-coating for infection prophylaxis in cementless hip prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Neut, D.; RJB Dijkstra; JI Thompson; Kavanagh, C.; HC van der Mei; Busscher HJ

    2015-01-01

    A degradable, poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), gentamicin-loaded prophylactic coating for hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated cementless hip prostheses is developed with similar antibacterial efficacy as offered by gentamicin-loaded cements for fixing traditional, cemented prostheses in bone. We describe the development pathway, from in vitro investigation of antibiotic release and antibacterial properties of this PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating in different in vitro models to an evaluation of its ef...

  6. [Vision engineering--photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses: Okayama University model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Toshihiko

    2007-04-01

    Patients with retinitis pigmentosa lose photoreceptor cells by genetic abnormalities and hence become blind. Neurons such as bipolar cells and ganglion cells still remain alive even in the retina of these patients, and ganglion cells send axons to the brain as the optic nerve. The replacement of dead photoreceptor cells with something artificial is the basic concept of retinal prostheses. The remaining retinal neurons can be stimulated by either electric current or electric potential. Photodiode array and electrode array are two main ways to stimulate retinal neurons as retinal prostheses. These retinal prostheses have problems such as low sensitivity and requiring outer electric sources (batteries). To overcome the problems, we are developing photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses which absorb light and convert photon energy to electric potentials. The prototype, photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, could generate intracellular calcium elevation in photoreceptor-lacking retinal tissues and also in cultured retinal neurons. The photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses are thin and soft, and therefore, a sheet of the film in a large size, corresponding to wide visual field, can be inserted into the vitreous and then to the subretinal space through a small opening by rolling up the film. After the production control and the quality control have been established, clinical trials of the photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses would be planned in concordance with the Drugs and Medical Devices Law to prove the safety and the efficacy. PMID:17447519

  7. One-Handed Thumb Use on Smart Phones by Semi-literate and Illiterate Users in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katre, Dinesh

    There is a tremendous potential for developing mobile-based productivity tools and occupation specific applications for the semi-literate and illiterate users in India. One-handed thumb use on the touchscreen of smart phone or touch phone is considered as an effective alternative than the use of stylus or index finger, to free the other hand for supporting the occupational activity. In this context, usability research and experimental tests are conducted to understand the role of fine motor control, usability of thumb as the interaction apparatus and the ergonomic needs of users. The paper also touches upon cultural, racial and anthropometric aspects, which need due consideration while designing the mobile interface. Design recommendations are evolved to enhance the effectiveness of one-handed thumb use on smart phone, especially for the benefit of semi-literate and illiterate users.

  8. MR imaging in chronic rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR imaging has been shown as the best radiologic method for verifying and classifying acute ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) ruptures of the thumb. Our aim was to analyse the usefulness of MR also in old ruptures and to establish the most useful sequences. Ten patients with an old UCL rupture of the thumb were preoperatively imaged using 1.5 T MR. Three radiologists blinded to the findings separately analysed the MR images of these patients and of 10 age-and sex-matched voluntary controls. MR findings of the patients were compared with those of surgery. The consensus diagnosis of an UCL rupture was accurate in all 10 patients. All controls were classified as having no UCL rupture. In 5 of the 7 patients with a surgically defined Stener or non-Stener lesion, the consensus diagnosis was the same as the operative diagnosis. Due to excessive scarring it was not possible to verify any Stener lesion intra-operatively in 3 patients. The most informative MR sequence was T2 TSE in the coronal plane, the second most informative was T1 SE with fat suppression in the coronal plane. An old UCL rupture is well verified by MR but typing of the lesion as either a Stener or non-Stener type is not always possible

  9. MR imaging in chronic rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohman, M.; Kivisaari, A.; Kivisaari, L. [Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Vasenius, J. [Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland). Hand Surgery

    2000-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown as the best radiologic method for verifying and classifying acute ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) ruptures of the thumb. Our aim was to analyse the usefulness of MR also in old ruptures and to establish the most useful sequences. Ten patients with an old UCL rupture of the thumb were preoperatively imaged using 1.5 T MR. Three radiologists blinded to the findings separately analysed the MR images of these patients and of 10 age-and sex-matched voluntary controls. MR findings of the patients were compared with those of surgery. The consensus diagnosis of an UCL rupture was accurate in all 10 patients. All controls were classified as having no UCL rupture. In 5 of the 7 patients with a surgically defined Stener or non-Stener lesion, the consensus diagnosis was the same as the operative diagnosis. Due to excessive scarring it was not possible to verify any Stener lesion intra-operatively in 3 patients. The most informative MR sequence was T2 TSE in the coronal plane, the second most informative was T1 SE with fat suppression in the coronal plane. An old UCL rupture is well verified by MR but typing of the lesion as either a Stener or non-Stener type is not always possible.

  10. Rules of thumb for assessing reductive dechlorination pathways of PCDDs in specific systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a theoretical validation and proposition of the reductive dechlorination pathways for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) congeners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level for all PCDDs and Mulliken atomic charges on chlorine atoms were adopted as the probe of the dechlorination reaction activity. The experimentally substantiated dechlorination pathways of 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1,2,3,4-TCDD) and its daughter products in the presence of zero-valent zinc were validated and the complete pathway of dechlorination of octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) was proposed. The proposed pathways were found to be consistent with anaerobic biotransformation of several PCDD congeners. Four rules of thumb arrived from this study include (1) the chlorine atoms in the longitudinal (1,4,6,9) positions are removed in preference to the chlorine atoms on lateral (2,3,7,8) positions; (2) the chlorine atom that has more neighboring chlorine atoms at ortho-, meta- and para-positions is to be eliminated; (3) reductive dechlorination prefers to take place on the benzene ring having more chlorine substitutions; and (4) a chlorine atom on the side of the longitudinal symmetry axis containing more chlorine atoms is preferentially eliminated. These rules of thumb can be conveniently used for rapidly predicting the major dechlorination pathway for a given PCDD in specific systems.

  11. Dystrophic calcinosis in a child with a thumb sucking habit: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovannini Cesar Abrantes Lima de Figueiredo

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an uncommon case of a 3-year-old boy with a finger sucking habit who developed dystrophic calcification in his left thumb. Two years after excision, there was no recurrence, and the thumb retained full range of motion. We also discuss its probable pathogenesis and present a brief review of the literature about orthopedic complications in the hand due to this habit.Os autores apresentam caso incomum de uma criança de três anos de idade com o hábito de chupar o dedo que desenvolveu calcinose distrófica no polegar esquerdo. Dois anos após a ressecção cirúrgica, não ocorreu recidiva e o polegar mantém todos os movimentos. Discutem, ainda, sua provável patogênese e fazem breve revisão da literatura a respeito das complicações ortopédicas na mão devido a este hábito.

  12. Clinical experiences with three different designs of ankle prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippstein, Pascal F

    2002-12-01

    Until 1995, fusion was in our institution the only rational surgical option for a severe ankle arthrosis. Consistent reports about good mid- and long-term results with ankle replacement allowed us to change our minds. Ankle replacement became the gold standard and fusion was then almost totally banished. Because ankle arthrosis can be morphologically different from one patient to another, we soon believed that one single type of ankle prosthesis would not be the universal optimal solution for all patients. We therefore divided the ankle arthrosis into three groups. Each group shows the best solution from each of the ankle prostheses with which we had gained experience (Agility, STAR, and BP). The Agility prosthesis, which was indicated for ankles with extremely damaged geometry, did not restore sufficiently the ankle motion. Preoperatively stiff ankles remained stiff postoperatively. Additionally, significant residual pain was more likely to occur in those patients. These cases did not show significant advantages compared with ankle fusion, especially from a functional point of view. Fusion for these stiff ankles is therefore today our first treatment of choice. In our experience, the malleolar joints do not have to be replaced. Even a severe arthrosis at this level does not produce significant pain, provided that osteophytes have been removed and joint height has been restored by the implanted prosthesis. It is our strong belief that these malleolar joints are also less sensitive to pain, similar to the femoropatellar joint. For these reasons, a replacement of the malleolar joints and the resurfacing of the talar sides is not necessary. Leaving the talar sides untouched requires less bone resection and makes the implantation of the talar component easier. Although we obtained good results with the STAR prosthesis, we progressively abandoned it because of these reasons, and we preferred the BP prosthesis. The BP prosthesis works on the same biomechanic principle as

  13. Karsinoma Sel Basal Pada Wajah

    OpenAIRE

    Hastuti

    2008-01-01

    Karsinoma sel basal merupakan tumor ganas pada lapisan epidermis kulit yang paling umum dijumpai. Lokasi tumor iui paling banyak pada wajah dibandingkan anggota tubuh lainnya. Etiologi tumor iui diduga berhubungan dengan cahaya matahari yang mengandung sinar ultraviolet yang karsinogenik. Klasifikasi tumor ini dibagi berdasarkan gambaran kliuis dan histopatologisnya. Diagnosa tumor ini dapat ditegakkan dengan pemeriksaan k1inis dan histologis, pemeriksaan radiologis jarang digunakan. Diag...

  14. Basal body structure in Trichonympha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Paul; Gönczy, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Trichonympha is a symbiotic flagellate of many species of termites and of the wood-feeding cockroach. Remarkably, this unicellular organism harbors up to over ten thousand flagella on its surface, which serve to propel it through the viscous environment of the host hindgut. In the 1960s, analysis of resin-embedded Trichonympha samples by electron microscopy revealed that the basal bodies that give rise to these flagella are exceptionally long, with a proximal, cartwheel-bearing, region some 50 times longer than that of regular centrioles. In recent years, this salient feature has prompted the analysis of the 3D architecture of Trichonympha basal bodies in the native state using cryo-electron tomography. The resulting ~40 Å resolution map of the basal body proximal region revealed a number of novel features that may be conserved in centrioles of other systems. These include proximal-distal polarity of the pinhead structure that links the cartwheel to centriolar microtubules, as well as of the linker between the A and the C microtubules. Moreover, this work demonstrated that the cartwheel is made of stacked ring-like structures that likely each comprise 18 molecules of SAS-6 proteins. PMID:26937279

  15. Quantification of dental prostheses on cone-beam CT images by the Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Rong-Fu; Fang, Kwang-Ming; Ty, Wong; Hu, Chia Yu

    2016-01-01

    The gray values accuracy of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is affected by dental metal prostheses. The distortion of dental CBCT gray values could lead to inaccuracies of orthodontic and implant treatment. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of scanning parameters and dental metal prostheses on the accuracy of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) gray values using the Taguchi method. Eight dental model casts of an upper jaw including prostheses, and a ninth prosthesis-free dental model cast, were scanned by two dental CBCT devices. The mean gray value of the selected circular regions of interest (ROIs) were measured using dental CBCT images of eight dental model casts and were compared with those measured from CBCT images of the prosthesis-free dental model cast. For each image set, four consecutive slices of gingiva were selected. The seven factors (CBCTs, occlusal plane canting, implant connection, prosthesis position, coping material, coping thickness, and types of dental restoration) were used to evaluate scanning parameter and dental prostheses effects. Statistical methods of signal to noise ratio (S/N) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95% confidence were applied to quantify the effects of scanning parameters and dental prostheses on dental CBCT gray values accuracy. For ROIs surrounding dental prostheses, the accuracy of CBCT gray values were affected primarily by implant connection (42%), followed by type of restoration (29%), prostheses position (19%), coping material (4%), and coping thickness (4%). For a single crown prosthesis (without support of implants) placed in dental model casts, gray value differences for ROIs 1-9 were below 12% and gray value differences for ROIs 13-18 away from pros-theses were below 10%. We found the gray value differences set to be between 7% and 8% for regions next to a single implant-supported titanium prosthesis, and between 46% and 59% for regions between double implant

  16. Basal cell carcinoma of penis: case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, M Z; Polacarz, S V; Partington, P E

    1988-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the penis is rare. A patient who presented with a penile and scrotal ulcer due to basal cell carcinoma is reported. Wide local excision and split skin grafting were performed to excise the lesion completely.

  17. Fracture resistance and failure mode of posterior fixed dental prostheses fabricated with two zirconia CAD/CAM systems

    OpenAIRE

    López Suárez, Carlos; Gonzalo, Esther; Peláez, Jesús; Rodríguez López, María Verónica; Suárez García, M. ª Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an improvement of zirconia ceramic materials to replace posterior missing teeth. To date little in vitro studies has been carried out on the fracture resistance of zirconia veneered posterior fixed dental prostheses. This study investigated the fracture resistance and the failure mode of 3-unit zirconia-based posterior fixed dental prostheses fabricated with two CAD/CAM systems. Material and Methods Twenty posterior fixed dental prostheses were studie...

  18. Intraocular camera for retinal prostheses: Refractive and diffractive lens systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Michelle Christine

    The focus of this thesis is on the design and analysis of refractive, diffractive, and hybrid refractive/diffractive lens systems for a miniaturized camera that can be surgically implanted in the crystalline lens sac and is designed to work in conjunction with current and future generation retinal prostheses. The development of such an intraocular camera (IOC) would eliminate the need for an external head-mounted or eyeglass-mounted camera. Placing the camera inside the eye would allow subjects to use their natural eye movements for foveation (attention) instead of more cumbersome head tracking, would notably aid in personal navigation and mobility, and would also be significantly more psychologically appealing from the standpoint of personal appearances. The capability for accommodation with no moving parts or feedback control is incorporated by employing camera designs that exhibit nearly infinite depth of field. Such an ultracompact optical imaging system requires a unique combination of refractive and diffractive optical elements and relaxed system constraints derived from human psychophysics. This configuration necessitates an extremely compact, short focal-length lens system with an f-number close to unity. Initially, these constraints appear highly aggressive from an optical design perspective. However, after careful analysis of the unique imaging requirements of a camera intended to work in conjunction with the relatively low pixellation levels of a retinal microstimulator array, it becomes clear that such a design is not only feasible, but could possibly be implemented with a single lens system.

  19. Precision of fit: zirconia three-unit fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuer, Florian; Naumann, Michael; Gernet, Wolfgang; Sorensen, John A

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the precision of fit of substructures milled from semi-sintered zirconia blocks fabricated with two different computer-assisted design (CAD)/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAM) systems. Three-unit posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDP) were fabricated for standardized dies (n = 10) with the Lava CAD/CAM system (Lava) and the Procera-bridge-zirconia CAD/CAM system (Procera). After cementation to the dies, the FDP were embedded and sectioned. Four cross-sections were made of each abutment tooth, and marginal and internal fit were evaluated under an optical microscope. A one-way analysis of variance was used to compare data (alpha = 0.05). Mean gap dimensions at the marginal opening for Lava and Procera were 15 (+/-7) microm and 9 (+/-5) microm, respectively. Mean marginal openings (P = 0.012) and internal adaptation at two out of three measurement locations were significantly different. Within the limitations of this study, the results suggest that the accuracy of both investigated systems is satisfactory for clinical use. PMID:18769946

  20. Implant-supported prostheses versus conventional permanent and removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszuta Agnieszka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Social, economic and technological progress results in an increasing range of treatment and rehabilitation methods for patients with partial or complete edentulism. The role of the dentist is to inform the patient about the full range of available missing teeth treatment options leading to complete rehabilitation of the masticatory organ in agreement with the patient’s aesthetic and functional expectations. The aim of the paper was to identify the type of prostheses used by patients before opting for implantsupported teeth replacements, according to the patients’ age, sex, marital status, place of residence and education. The study covered 464 patients, women and men, aged 20-74, treated with dental implants. The patients answered questions in an anonymous questionnaire. The influence of the prosthetic replacement type according to age and marital status was highly statistically significant, whereas it was statistically significant according to sex, place of residence and education. The female respondents who previously used tissue-borne complete or partial dentures opted for implant treatment more frequently. The respondents younger than 40 and between 40-60 years of age who did not previously used any prosthetic replacements opted for implant treatment more frequently. The respondents who did not use any prosthetic replacements decided to undergo implant treatment most frequently, regardless of their marital status, education and place of residence. The patients opted for implant treatment to improve their quality of life, despite the high cost of such therapy.

  1. Repairing method of fixed partial prostheses in dentistry: laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Cozarov, Dalibor; Culea, Laurentiu; Rominu, Mihai; Pop, Daniela M.

    2008-02-01

    Laser Welding is an advantageous method of connecting or repairing metal prosthetic frameworks because there are fewer effects of heating on the area surrounding the spot to be welded, and no further procedures, such as those used for conventional soldering, are necessary. Laser welding has been increasingly applied for fabricating the metal frameworks of prostheses and for other procedures, such as recovering the metal ridge and cusp, blocking holes on the occlusal surfaces after excess occlusal adjustment, thickening the metal framework, or adding contact points after excess grinding and adjusting of the crown margins. The objective of this study are represented by investigation and evaluation of three types of soldering compare to laser welding. The method is represented by the laser welding with a pulsed Nd-Yag Laser equipment. Other joints were produced, using three different soldering techniques. These joining areas were investigated for their quality and their corrosion properties. Corrosion attack was confirmed by electron microscopy. The investigations confirm the quality of laser welding. The investigated different laser welding methods revealed minimal corrosion and offers clear-cut advantages compared to the other soldering methods. Dental alloys are subjected to functional influences in the oral cavity and interact with the intraoral enviroment.

  2. Titania nanotube arrays as potential interfaces for neurological prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Jonathan Andrew

    Neural prostheses can make a dramatic improvement for those suffering from visual and auditory, cognitive, and motor control disabilities, allowing them regained functionality by the use of stimulating or recording electrical signaling. However, the longevity of these devices is limited due to the neural tissue response to the implanted device. In response to the implant penetrating the blood brain barrier and causing trauma to the tissue, the body forms a to scar to isolate the implant in order to protect the nearby tissue. The scar tissue is a result of reactive gliosis and produces an insulated sheath, encapsulating the implant. The glial sheath limits the stimulating or recording capabilities of the implant, reducing its effectiveness over the long term. A favorable interaction with this tissue would be the direct adhesion of neurons onto the contacts of the implant, and the prevention of glial encapsulation. With direct neuronal adhesion the effectiveness and longevity of the device would be significantly improved. Titania nanotube arrays, fabricated using electrochemical anodization, provide a conductive architecture capable of altering cellular response. This work focuses on the fabrication of different titania nanotube array architectures to determine how their structures and properties influence the response of neural tissue, modeled using the C17.2 murine neural stem cell subclone, and if glial encapsulation can be reduced while neuronal adhesion is promoted.

  3. Hydrogel-Electrospun Fiber Mat Composite Coatings for Neural Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning eHan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Achieving stable, long-term performance of implanted neural prosthetic devices has been challenging because of implantation related neuron loss and a foreign body response that results in encapsulating glial scar formation. To improve neuron-prosthesis integration and form chronic, stable interfaces, we investigated the potential of neurotrophin-eluting hydrogel-electrospun fiber mat (EFM composite coatings. In particular, poly(ethylene glycol-poly(ε-caprolactone (PEGPCL hydrogel- poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL EFM composites were applied as coatings for multielectrode arrays (MEAs. Coatings were stable and persisted on electrode surfaces for over 1 month under an agarose gel tissue phantom and over 9 months in a PBS immersion bath. To demonstrate drug release, a neurotrophin, nerve growth factor (NGF, was loaded in the PEGPCL hydrogel layer, and coating cytotoxicity and sustained NGF release were evaluated using a PC12 cell culture model. Quantitative MTT assays showed that these coatings had no significant toxicity toward PC12 cells, and neurite extension at day 7 and 14 confirmed sustained release of NGF at biologically significant concentrations for at least 2 weeks. Our results demonstrate that hydrogel-EFM composite materials can be applied to neural prostheses as a means to improve neuron-electrode proximity and enhance long-term device performance and function.

  4. Implant-retained auricular prostheses: a clinical challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, V; Sahoo, N K; Gopi, A; Saini, D K

    2016-05-01

    Microtia, malformation, deformity, and partial or complete loss of the pinna may be due to various congenital or acquired factors. In adult patients, surgical reconstruction of the missing pinna is difficult and the results are often far from satisfactory. An implant-retained auricular prosthesis is a suitable alternative. A retrospective study of eight patients treated with implant-retained auricular prostheses was performed. For each missing pinna, three titanium implants were placed in the temporal bone. After 6 months of osseointegration, the implants were loaded. Four cases were rehabilitated with a magnet-retained prosthesis and the remaining four with a bar and clip retained prosthesis. There were six male and two female patients with an average age of 30.62 years. Seven patients had unilateral absence of the pinna and one had bilateral absence. The loss was due to trauma in four patients and to burn in one patient, and three had congenital absence. A total 27 implants were placed, 12 on the right side and 15 on the left. The average post-rehabilitation follow-up was 21 months. Peri-implant tissue reactions were observed at two sites. The implant-retained auricular prosthesis is an alternative treatment approach with good retention and patient satisfaction. Long-term follow-up is required to assess delayed complications. PMID:26792146

  5. Polyurethane unicondylar knee prostheses: simulator wear tests and lubrication studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many materials are used as artificial joint bearing surfaces; these include conventional stainless steel or CoCrMo-on-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), CoCrMo on itself and alumina-on-alumina. However, these joints have a limited lifespan resulting in failure of the prosthesis and the need for revision surgery. A number of materials have been introduced recently in an attempt to overcome these problems. Polycarbonate urethane (PU) is a compliant material that can be used as an artificial joint bearing surface which has been developed to mimic the natural synovial joint more accurately by promoting fluid film lubrication. Tribological tests were performed on CoCrMo-on-PU unicondylar knee prostheses to assess their performance in vitro. The wear produced by these components was considerably lower than that found for conventional joints. They also exhibited low friction and operated close to full-fluid film lubrication with viscosities of lubricant similar to those found in patients with arthritis. These tests gave encouraging results for the tribological performance of this material couple for use as an alternative bearing combination

  6. Polyurethane unicondylar knee prostheses: simulator wear tests and lubrication studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholes, S C [Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Durham University, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Unsworth, A [Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Durham University, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Jones, E [Stryker Orthopaedics, Limerick (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-07

    Many materials are used as artificial joint bearing surfaces; these include conventional stainless steel or CoCrMo-on-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), CoCrMo on itself and alumina-on-alumina. However, these joints have a limited lifespan resulting in failure of the prosthesis and the need for revision surgery. A number of materials have been introduced recently in an attempt to overcome these problems. Polycarbonate urethane (PU) is a compliant material that can be used as an artificial joint bearing surface which has been developed to mimic the natural synovial joint more accurately by promoting fluid film lubrication. Tribological tests were performed on CoCrMo-on-PU unicondylar knee prostheses to assess their performance in vitro. The wear produced by these components was considerably lower than that found for conventional joints. They also exhibited low friction and operated close to full-fluid film lubrication with viscosities of lubricant similar to those found in patients with arthritis. These tests gave encouraging results for the tribological performance of this material couple for use as an alternative bearing combination.

  7. The basal bodies of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Dutcher, Susan K.; O’Toole, Eileen T.

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is a biflagellated cell that can swim or glide. C. reinhardtii cells are amenable to genetic, biochemical, proteomic, and microscopic analysis of its basal bodies. The basal bodies contain triplet microtubules and a well-ordered transition zone. Both the mother and daughter basal bodies assemble flagella. Many of the proteins found in other basal body-containing organisms are present in the Chlamydomonas genome, and mutants in these genes...

  8. Pulmonary Metastasis of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Sang-Hee; Shim, Woo-Haing; SHIN, DONG-HOON; Kim, Yun-Seong; Sung, Hyun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Although basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, it rarely metastasizes. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma may, therefore, initially elude diagnosis and management. We describe the case of a patient with a metastatic basal cell carcinoma present in the lungs. The differential diagnosis of suspected metastatic lesions should include metastases from a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, in addition to those from more commonly metastasizing carcinomas, especially in patients with a histor...

  9. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  10. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur S; Thami G; Kanwar A

    2003-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  11. Clear Cell Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Wang; Tracey Harbert; Jennifer Olivella; Daniel Olson; Sarma, Deba P; Stephanie Ortman

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Clear cell basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is an uncommon and unusual variant of BCC, which is characterized by a variable component of clear cells. The pathogenesis of this histological variant and its clinical significance has not been clarified. Differentiation of this uncommon variant of BCC from other clear cell tumors is important for the treatment. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male presented with a 0.9 cm dome-shaped lesion on his upper chest. A shave biopsy revealed a der...

  12. The basal ganglia in haemochromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, D.; Hoggenmueller, U.; Becker, G. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Hofmann, E. [Division of Neuroradiology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Fischer, R. [Medical Division Heinz Kalk-Klinik, Bad Kissingen (Germany); Kraus, M.; Scheurlen, M. [Department of Medicine, University of Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2000-01-01

    Haemochromatosis is characterised by deposition of iron-containing pigment in various organs, but little is known about possible deposition in the brain and its clinical impact. We therefore investigated 14 patients with hereditary haemochromatosis with MRI, CT and transcranial ultrasound (TCS) and examined them neurologically. In six of the patients dense lesions were found within the lentiform nucleus on CT, all of whom displayed hyperechogenic lesions in the same area on TCS, as did one other patient. In these patients the relative signal intensities of the lentiform nucleus measured by MRI relaxometry were higher. No patient had clinical signs of basal ganglia disorders. (orig.)

  13. The basal ganglia in haemochromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haemochromatosis is characterised by deposition of iron-containing pigment in various organs, but little is known about possible deposition in the brain and its clinical impact. We therefore investigated 14 patients with hereditary haemochromatosis with MRI, CT and transcranial ultrasound (TCS) and examined them neurologically. In six of the patients dense lesions were found within the lentiform nucleus on CT, all of whom displayed hyperechogenic lesions in the same area on TCS, as did one other patient. In these patients the relative signal intensities of the lentiform nucleus measured by MRI relaxometry were higher. No patient had clinical signs of basal ganglia disorders. (orig.)

  14. Correction of thumb angulations after physiolysis of delta phalanges in a child with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iba, Kousuke; Wada, Takuro; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Resection of the midzone of the continuous epiphysis of a delta phalanx (physiolysis) and its replacement by a free-fat graft from local tissue was performed to improve severe radial angulation of the both thumbs in a 22-month-old child with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Fifty-two months after surgery, satisfactory results were obtained for pinch function, appearance, and radiographic findings. Previous reports have indicated that corrective osteotomy of the thumbs in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome has an associated risk of incomplete correction and >30% of recurrence, because severe preoperative deformities of the delta phalanx make angulatory osteotomies difficult. Additionally, physiolysis is a less invasive procedure than corrective osteotomy and offers a reduced risk of incomplete or excess correction, physeal injury, or osteonecrosis in younger children. Therefore, physiolysis appears to be useful as an initial means of correcting severe thumb angulations secondary to a delta phalanx. We reported a case in which the physiolysis of the delta phalanx significantly improved severe angular deformities of the thumbs in association with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. PMID:27252959

  15. Unusual Constellation of Anomalies in Maternal Diabetes Syndrome: Bifurcated Distal Phalanx of the Thumb, Cleft Lip, and Patent Ductus Ateriosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IA Rad

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nMaternal hyperglycemia during early gestation is associated with an increased incidence of congenital anomalies. A case of mater­nal diabetes syndrome is presented here with a rare constellation of congenital anomalies, i.e., bifurcated distal pha­lanx of the thumb, patent ductus arteriosus and cleft lip.  

  16. Unusual Constellation of Anomalies in Maternal Diabetes Syndrome: Bifurcated Distal Phalanx of the Thumb, Cleft Lip, and Patent Ductus Ateriosus

    OpenAIRE

    IA Rad; AR Afshar

    2008-01-01

    "nMaternal hyperglycemia during early gestation is associated with an increased incidence of congenital anomalies. A case of mater­nal diabetes syndrome is presented here with a rare constellation of congenital anomalies, i.e., bifurcated distal pha­lanx of the thumb, patent ductus arteriosus and cleft lip.  

  17. [Physical interactions in MRI: Some rules of thumb for their reduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlenweg, M; Schaefers, G; Trattnig, S

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most powerful and at the same time gentlest clinical imaging techniques at the present time; however, the enormous physical complexity as well as simple inattentiveness (projectile effect) implicate a significant risk potential and place high demands on the MR operator to ensure a safe workflow. A sound knowledge of the potential MR interactions is the foundation for a safe and profitable operation for all parties.The first part of this article deals with the three most important sources of physical interaction, i.e. static magnetic field, gradient and high-frequency (HF) fields. The paper discusses the differences between each type of field with respect to the impact on human beings, the interactions with magnetic and electrically conducting objects/implants and the relevant safety standards. Each section is followed by simple rules of thumb to minimize potentially unwanted physical MRI interactions. PMID:26220127

  18. The basal bodies of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutcher, Susan K; O'Toole, Eileen T

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is a biflagellated cell that can swim or glide. C. reinhardtii cells are amenable to genetic, biochemical, proteomic, and microscopic analysis of its basal bodies. The basal bodies contain triplet microtubules and a well-ordered transition zone. Both the mother and daughter basal bodies assemble flagella. Many of the proteins found in other basal body-containing organisms are present in the Chlamydomonas genome, and mutants in these genes affect the assembly of basal bodies. Electron microscopic analysis shows that basal body duplication is site-specific and this may be important for the proper duplication and spatial organization of these organelles. Chlamydomonas is an excellent model for the study of basal bodies as well as the transition zone. PMID:27252853

  19. Differences in myoelectric and body-powered upper-limb prostheses: Systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. Carey, PhD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The choice of a myoelectric or body-powered upper-limb prosthesis can be determined using factors including control, function, feedback, cosmesis, and rejection. Although body-powered and myoelectric control strategies offer unique functions, many prosthesis users must choose one. A systematic review was conducted to determine differences between myoelectric and body-powered prostheses to inform evidence-based clinical practice regarding prescription of these devices and training of users. A search of 9 databases identified 462 unique publications. Ultimately, 31 of them were included and 11 empirical evidence statements were developed. Conflicting evidence has been found in terms of the relative functional performance of body-powered and myoelectric prostheses. Body-powered prostheses have been shown to have advantages in durability, training time, frequency of adjustment, maintenance, and feedback; however, they could still benefit from improvements of control. Myoelectric prostheses have been shown to improve cosmesis and phantom-limb pain and are more accepted for light-intensity work. Currently, evidence is insufficient to conclude that either system provides a significant general advantage. Prosthetic selection should be based on a patient's individual needs and include personal preferences, prosthetic experience, and functional needs. This work demonstrates that there is a lack of empirical evidence regarding functional differences in upper-limb prostheses.

  20. Differences in myoelectric and body-powered upper-limb prostheses: Systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Stephanie L; Lura, Derek J; Highsmith, M Jason

    2015-01-01

    The choice of a myoelectric or body-powered upper-limb prosthesis can be determined using factors including control, function, feedback, cosmesis, and rejection. Although body-powered and myoelectric control strategies offer unique functions, many prosthesis users must choose one. A systematic review was conducted to determine differences between myoelectric and body-powered prostheses to inform evidence-based clinical practice regarding prescription of these devices and training of users. A search of 9 databases identified 462 unique publications. Ultimately, 31 of them were included and 11 empirical evidence statements were developed. Conflicting evidence has been found in terms of the relative functional performance of body-powered and myoelectric prostheses. Body-powered prostheses have been shown to have advantages in durability, training time, frequency of adjustment, maintenance, and feedback; however, they could still benefit from improvements of control. Myoelectric prostheses have been shown to improve cosmesis and phantom-limb pain and are more accepted for light=intensity work. Currently, evidence is insufficient to conclude that either system provides a significant general advantage. Prosthetic selection should be based on a patient's individual needs and include personal preferences, prosthetic experience, and functional needs. This work demonstrates that there is a lack of empirical evidence regarding functional differences in upper-limb prostheses. PMID:26230500

  1. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bigal Marcelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month. The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF. Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine.

  2. Dentistry investigations of teeth and dental prostheses using OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, C.; Duma, V.-F.; Canjau, S.; Dobre, G.; Demian, D.; Cernat, R.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Todea, C.; Topala, F. I.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    We present some of our recent investigations in Dental Medicine using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Time Domain (TD), Spectral Domain (SD), and Swept Source (SS) OCT in-house developed systems are being used, for both ex vivo and in vivo investigations in the oral cavity. We study ex vivo the interface between the tooth and the dental sealant and demonstrate the limitations of the X-rays investigations that are now the gold standard for such procedures. Using OCT, defects in the interface that cannot be identified in radiographs can be determined both as position and magnitude. The drilling process of teeth can also be characterized in real time using OCT, to monitor the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) in order to avoid opening the pulp chamber. We demonstrate in this respect that an RDT of 0.5 mm is the minimum value to assure the integrity of the dentin wall between the drilled cavity and the pulp chamber; at an RDT of 0.3 mm or less a fracture is initiated, the dentin is punctured and endodontic treatment must follow. In vivo OCT investigations in the oral cavity were also performed (i.e., for metalloceramic prostheses and for ceramic inlay tooth interfaces), with the low cost, light weight and versatile handheld probes with 1D galvoscanners that we have developed and applied for a range of in-house developed OCT systems, in various clinical applications. They are briefly discussed, as well as some of our current and future work in the field, including for studies of soft tissue in the mouth.

  3. Personal Computer Based Clinical Programming Software for Auditory Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rajakumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory Prostheses (AP are widely used electronic devices for patients suffering with severe to profound senosorineural deafness by electrically stimulating the auditory nerve using an electrode array surgically placed in the inner ear. AP mainly contains external Body Worn Speech Processor (BWSP and internal Implantable Receiver Stimulator (IRS. BWSP receives an external sound or speech and generates encoded speech data bits for transmission to IRS via radio frequency transcutaneous link for excitation of electrode array. After surgical placement electrode array in the inner ear, BWSP should be fine tuned to achieve the 80-100% speech reception abilities of patient by an audiologist. Problem statement: Basic objective of this research was to develop a simple personal computer based user friendly hardware and software interface to fine tune the BWSP to achieve the best possible speech reception abilities of each individual patient. Approach: Tuning process involved several tasks such as identifying the active electrode contacts, determination of detection and pain thresholds of each active electrode and loads these values into BWSP by reprogramming the BWSP. This study contracted with development of easy and simple user friendly hardware and software interface for audiologist to perform post operation tuning procedures. A microcontroller based impedance telemetry with bidirectional RF transceiver was developed as a hardware interface between PC and IRS. The clinical programming software was developed using VB.NET 2008 to perform the post-operative tuning procedures such as (i impedance measurement, (ii fitting to determine the threshold and comfort levels for each active electrodes and (iii reprogramming the speech processor. Results: Simple hardware and software interfaces for audiologist were constructed and tested with laboratory model BWSP and IRS using simulated resistance electrode array. All the functional aspects were tested and results

  4. Progress in the clinical development and utilization of vision prostheses: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandli A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alice Brandli, Chi D Luu, Robyn H Guymer, Lauren N Ayton Centre for Eye Research Australia, Department of Surgery (Ophthalmology, The University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Vision prostheses, or “bionic eyes”, are implantable medical bionic devices with the potential to restore rudimentary sight to people with profound vision loss or blindness. In the past two decades, this field has rapidly progressed, and there are now two commercially available retinal prostheses in the US and Europe, and a number of next-generation devices in development. This review provides an update on the development of these devices and a discussion on the future directions for the field. Keywords: vision prostheses, bionic eye, vision restoration, blindness, medical bionics, retinitis pigmentosa

  5. Biomechanics of the Metalloceramic Bridge Prostheses at the Dental Row Lateral Department Small Defect Substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhulyov E.N.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A method of mathematical simulation was used for prosthetics improvement of patients with the dental row lateral department small defects by combined bridge prostheses with a support on insets. Four types of the metalloceramic bridge prosthesis constructions were used at a study of a biomechanics in a system of ″bridge prosthesis—supporting teeth—periodontium—alveolar part of a jaw″. The investigation results have demonstrated that a distribution of elastic tensions is unfavorable and can cause complications in bridge prostheses with a mesial support on inset and a distal support in a form of artificial crown. It is recommended to use the bridge prostheses with a bilateral support on insets in the mesioocclusive and distal cavities and the prosthesis constructions with a mesial support in a form of artificial crown and a distal support in a form of inset for substitution of the dental row lateral department small defects.

  6. Optimization of tomotherapy treatment planning for patients with bilateral hip prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, David; Smith, Shaun; Barnett, Rob; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the effect of different imaging options and the most efficient imaging strategy for treatment planning of patients with hip prostheses. Methods The planning kilovoltage CT (kVCT) and daily megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies for three prostate cancer patients with bilateral hip prostheses were used for creating hybrid kVCT/MVCT image sets. Treatment plans were created for kVCT images alone, hybrid kVCT/MVCT images, and MVCT images alone using the same dose prescription and p...

  7. Advances in 3D-Printed Pediatric Prostheses for Upper Extremity Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kara S; Lightdale-Miric, Nina

    2016-08-01

    ➤The prohibitive cost of cutting-edge prostheses prevents many children with a limb difference from obtaining them; however, new developments in 3-dimensional (3D) printing have the potential to increase the accessibility, customization, and procurement of such devices.➤Children with upper limb differences are ideal candidates for currently available 3D-printed devices because they quickly damage and outgrow prostheses, and the low cost of 3D printing makes repairs and upgrades substantially more affordable.➤Physicians and medical practitioners should become familiar with the possibilities of 3D-printed devices in order to determine the benefits and utility for their patients. PMID:27489324

  8. Development of a microcontrolled bioinstrumentation system for active control of leg prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, Alberto Lopez; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira; Dos Santos, Icaro; Sene, Iwens Gervasio; Salomoni, Sauro; Borges, Geovany Araujo

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the design of a microcontrolled bioinstrumentation system for active control of leg prostheses, using 4-channel electromyographic signal (EMG) detection and a single-channel electrogoniometer. The system is part of a control and instrumentation architecture in which a master processor controls the tasks of slave microcontrollers, through a RS-485 interface. Several signal processing methods are integrated in the system, for feature extraction (Recursive Least Squares), feature projection (Self Organizing Maps), and pattern classification (Levenberg-Marquardt Neural Network). The acquisition of EMG signals and additional mechanical information could help improving the precision in the control of leg prostheses. PMID:19163184

  9. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divvya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differentiation is practically very rare.

  10. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    OpenAIRE

    Divvya; Rehana; Viswanathan; Krishnaswamy; Anvar Ali

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differen...

  11. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs

  12. On neurocomputational models of the basal ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Moustafa

    2009-01-01

    Over the past few decades, it became evident that the basal ganglia is involved in cognitive as well as motor processes, including motor control, conditioning, working memory, and sequence learning. Systems-levels models attempt to explain what kinds of computations are employed by the basal ganglia. It is argued that the basal ganglia integrates information from different structures, such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and decides on which motor response to execute. Learning such ...

  13. Functional Neuroanatomy of the Basal Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Lanciego, José L.; Luquin, Natasha; Obeso, José A.

    2012-01-01

    The “basal ganglia” refers to a group of subcortical nuclei responsible primarily for motor control, as well as other roles such as motor learning, executive functions and behaviors, and emotions. Proposed more than two decades ago, the classical basal ganglia model shows how information flows through the basal ganglia back to the cortex through two pathways with opposing effects for the proper execution of movement. Although much of the model has remained, the model has been modified and amp...

  14. Striatal plasticity and basal ganglia circuit function

    OpenAIRE

    Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Malenka, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal striatum, which consists of the caudate and putamen, is the gateway to the basal ganglia. It receives convergent excitatory afferents from cortex and thalamus and forms the origin of the direct and indirect pathways—distinct basal ganglia circuits involved in motor control. It is also a major site of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Striatal plasticity alters the transfer of information throughout basal ganglia circuits and may represent a key neural substrate for adaptive m...

  15. Pathological basal ganglia activity in movement disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Wichmann, Thomas; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, and associated changes in basal ganglia activities has significantly changed in the course of the last few decades. This process began with the development of detailed anatomical models of the basal ganglia, followed by studies of basal ganglia activity patterns in animal models of common movement disorders and electrophysiological recordings in movement disorder patients undergoing functional neurosurgical procedures. These inve...

  16. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD; Waseem-Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi, MD; Julie Gehl, MD, PhD; Christen Krag, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstruct...

  17. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yeliz Bilir; Erkan Gokce; Banu Ozturk; Faik Alev Deresoy; Ruken Yuksekkaya; Emel Yaman

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity...

  18. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    OpenAIRE

    Nilton Nasser; Nilton Nasser Filho; Bruno Trauczynski Neto; Lissandra Melati da Silva

    2012-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no s...

  19. Striatal plasticity and basal ganglia circuit function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzer, Anatol C; Malenka, Robert C

    2008-11-26

    The dorsal striatum, which consists of the caudate and putamen, is the gateway to the basal ganglia. It receives convergent excitatory afferents from cortex and thalamus and forms the origin of the direct and indirect pathways, which are distinct basal ganglia circuits involved in motor control. It is also a major site of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Striatal plasticity alters the transfer of information throughout basal ganglia circuits and may represent a key neural substrate for adaptive motor control and procedural memory. Here, we review current understanding of synaptic plasticity in the striatum and its role in the physiology and pathophysiology of basal ganglia function. PMID:19038213

  20. The carpometacarpal joint of the thumb: MR appearance in asymptomatic volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschmann, Anna; Sutter, Reto; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, University of Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Schweizer, Andreas [Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, University of Zurich, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-08-15

    To prospectively characterize the MR appearance of the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint of the thumb in asymptomatic volunteers. Thirty-four asymptomatic volunteers (17 women, 17 men, mean age, 33.9 {+-} 9.2 years) underwent MR imaging of the thumb after approval by the local ethical committee. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently classified visibility and signal intensity (SI) characteristics of the anterior oblique (AOL/beak ligament), the posterior oblique (POL), the intermetacarpal (IML), and the dorsoradial ligaments (DRL) on a three-point Likert scale. The thickness of all ligaments, cartilage integrity, and presence of joint fluid were assessed. The alignment of the first metacarpal base with the trapezium was quantified on sagittal and coronal planes. The ligaments of the CMC joint were constantly visible in all volunteers for the POL and IML, and in all but one for the AOL and DRL. On intermediate-weighted fat-saturated images the POL (65 %/74 % reader 1/reader 2) and DRL (58 %/64 %) were commonly of increased SI, while the IML had a striated appearance in 91 %/76 % of subjects. The AOL showed a variable SI (36 %/42 % low, 27 %/27 % increased, 36 %/30 % striated). The IML was the thickest ligament with a mean of 2.9 mm/3.1 mm and the DRL the thinnest (1.2 mm/1.4 mm). There was a mean dorsal subluxation of 1.8 mm/2.0 mm and radial subluxation of 2.8 mm/3.4 mm of the metacarpal base. The AOL was significantly thicker in men (1.7 mm) than in women (1.2 mm; p = 0.02). Radial subluxation was significantly larger in men (3.4 mm) than in women (2.2 mm; p = 0.02). No subluxation in palmar or ulnar direction was seen. Radial and dorsal subluxation of the CMC joint can be a normal finding in a resting position at MR imaging. The CMC ligaments showed a considerable variability of signal intensity with a typically striated IML; thickness of the AOL is typically less than 2.2 mm, of the POL typically less than 2.9 mm. (orig.)

  1. The carpometacarpal joint of the thumb: MR appearance in asymptomatic volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prospectively characterize the MR appearance of the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint of the thumb in asymptomatic volunteers. Thirty-four asymptomatic volunteers (17 women, 17 men, mean age, 33.9 ± 9.2 years) underwent MR imaging of the thumb after approval by the local ethical committee. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently classified visibility and signal intensity (SI) characteristics of the anterior oblique (AOL/beak ligament), the posterior oblique (POL), the intermetacarpal (IML), and the dorsoradial ligaments (DRL) on a three-point Likert scale. The thickness of all ligaments, cartilage integrity, and presence of joint fluid were assessed. The alignment of the first metacarpal base with the trapezium was quantified on sagittal and coronal planes. The ligaments of the CMC joint were constantly visible in all volunteers for the POL and IML, and in all but one for the AOL and DRL. On intermediate-weighted fat-saturated images the POL (65 %/74 % reader 1/reader 2) and DRL (58 %/64 %) were commonly of increased SI, while the IML had a striated appearance in 91 %/76 % of subjects. The AOL showed a variable SI (36 %/42 % low, 27 %/27 % increased, 36 %/30 % striated). The IML was the thickest ligament with a mean of 2.9 mm/3.1 mm and the DRL the thinnest (1.2 mm/1.4 mm). There was a mean dorsal subluxation of 1.8 mm/2.0 mm and radial subluxation of 2.8 mm/3.4 mm of the metacarpal base. The AOL was significantly thicker in men (1.7 mm) than in women (1.2 mm; p = 0.02). Radial subluxation was significantly larger in men (3.4 mm) than in women (2.2 mm; p = 0.02). No subluxation in palmar or ulnar direction was seen. Radial and dorsal subluxation of the CMC joint can be a normal finding in a resting position at MR imaging. The CMC ligaments showed a considerable variability of signal intensity with a typically striated IML; thickness of the AOL is typically less than 2.2 mm, of the POL typically less than 2.9 mm. (orig.)

  2. Queuing Rule of Thumb based on M/M/s Queuing Theory with Applications in Construction Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teknomo K.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current trend of queuing theory development is toward more precision which requires higher mathematical manipulation. In this paper, we attempted to reverve the current trend toward simplification of queuing formulas such that it can be used in more practical purposes, especially in construction industry. Through numerical examples of two case studies on concreting and earth moving, how to model the construction activities as queuing systems is illustrated systematically. Through the numerical examples, it is shown that when the customer cost is much lower than the server cost, queuing system can be simplified only to incorporate the constraint equation. The queueing constraint equation is suggested to be used as queuing rule of thumb. The proposed rule of thumb is rather conservative in term of queuing performance compared to the standard stochastic queuing formula because it is assumed that all the customers arrive at once in the beginning of the service.

  3. Estimation of appropriate lubricating film thickness in ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauviqirrahman, M.; Muchammad, Bayuseno, A. P.; Ismail, R.; Saputra, E.; Jamari, J.

    2016-04-01

    Artificial hip prostheses, consisting of femoral head and acetabular cup are widely used and have affected the lives of many people.However, the primary issue associated with the long term performance of hip prostheses is loosening induced by excessive wear during daily activity. Therefore, an effective lubrication is necessary to significantly decrease the wear. To help understand the lubricating performance of such typical hip joint prostheses, in the present paper a hydrodynamic lubrication model based on Reynolds equationwas introduced. The material pairs of ceramic acetabular cup against ceramic femoral head was investegated.The main aim of this study is to investigate of the effect of loading on the formation of lubricating film thickness.The model of a ball-in-socket configuration was considered assuming that the cup was stationary while the ball was to rotate at a steady angular velocityvarying loads.Based on simulation result, it was found that to promote fluid film lubrication and prevent the contacting components leading to wear, the film thickness of lubricant should be determined carefully based on the load applied. This finding may have useful implication in predicting the failure of lubricating synovial fluid film and wear generation in hip prostheses.

  4. A comparison of autograft incus and titanium prostheses in primary ossiculoplasty in modified radical mastoidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous graft materials are available for ossicular reconstruction yet, no single option is considered ideal. This study aims to analyze and compare the outcome of primary ossiculoplasty in terms of hearing gain using autograft incus and titanium (Ti prostheses in patients with active squamosal chronic otitis media (COM undergoing modified radical mastoidectomy (MRM. Study Design: Randomized study. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with active squamosal COM with ossicular chain erosion undergoing MRM were divided into two equal groups. First group underwent ossiculoplasty with autograft incus and the second group received Ti prostheses. Follow-up was done over a period of 6 months and hearing thresholds were evaluated postoperatively at 3rd and 6th month at the four frequency average of 0.5/1/2/4 KHz. Results: There was no significant difference in air conduction (AC gain when the inter-group comparison is made (P > 0.05 at 3rd and 6th month, however, intra-group AC gain was significant in both groups, at the end of the 3rd month and 6th month (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Autograft incus and Ti prostheses both give a comparable hearing gain in ossicular reconstruction. Ti prostheses are a good alternative in longstanding cases of active squamous COM without any available ossicular autograft for hearing reconstruction.

  5. [Loading and strength of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses 2. Strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Meijers, C.C.A.J.; Vergoossen, E.L.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate strength of a dental prosthesis is defined as the strongest loading force applied to the prosthesis until afracture failure occurs. Important key terms are strength, hardness, toughness and fatigue. Relatively prevalent complications of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses are

  6. Percutaneous Osseointegrated Prostheses for Amputees: Limb Compensation in a 12-Month Ovine model

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Trevor J.; Beck, J. Peter; Bloebaum, Roy D.; Bachus, Kent N.

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous osseointegrated prostheses are being investigated as an alternative strategy to attach prosthetic limbs to patients. Although the use of these implants has shown to be promising in clinical trials; the ability to maintain a skin seal around an osseointegrated implant interface is a major challenge to prevent superficial and deep periprosthetic infections.

  7. [Technical aspects of treatments with single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersema, E.J.; Kreulen, C.M.; Latzke, P.; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    For the manufacture of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses, effective communication between dentist and dental technician is required. Mutual insight concerning the (im)possibilities of available treatments and technical options is prerequisitefor this communication. The manufacture of si

  8. Acrylic resin guide for locating the abutment screw access channel of cement-retained implant prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ayman; Maroulakos, Georgios; Garaicoa, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    Abutment screw loosening represents a common and challenging technical complication of cement-retained implant prostheses. This article describes the fabrication of a simple and accurate poly(methyl methacrylate) guide for identifying the location and angulation of the abutment screw access channel of a cement-retained implant prosthesis with a loosened abutment screw. PMID:26794698

  9. Tablet Keyboard Configuration Affects Performance, Discomfort and Task Difficulty for Thumb Typing in a Two-Handed Grip

    OpenAIRE

    Trudeau, Matthieu B.; Catalano, Paul J.; Jindrich, Devin L.; Dennerlein, Jack T.

    2013-01-01

    When holding a tablet computer with two hands, the touch keyboard configuration imposes postural constraints on the user because of the need to simultaneously hold the device and type with the thumbs. Designers have provided users with several possible keyboard configurations (device orientation, keyboard layout and location). However, potential differences in performance, usability and postures among these configurations have not been explored. We hypothesize that (1) the narrower standard k...

  10. Tablet Keyboard Configuration Affects Performance, Discomfort and Task Difficulty for Thumb Typing in a Two-Handed Grip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Matthieu B; Catalano, Paul J; Jindrich, Devin L; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2013-01-01

    When holding a tablet computer with two hands, the touch keyboard configuration imposes postural constraints on the user because of the need to simultaneously hold the device and type with the thumbs. Designers have provided users with several possible keyboard configurations (device orientation, keyboard layout and location). However, potential differences in performance, usability and postures among these configurations have not been explored. We hypothesize that (1) the narrower standard keyboard layout in the portrait orientation leads to lower self-reported discomfort and less reach than the landscape orientation; (2) a split keyboard layout results in better overall outcomes compared to the standard layout; and (3) the conventional bottom keyboard location leads to the best outcomes overall compared to other locations. A repeated measures laboratory experiment of 12 tablet owners measured typing speed, discomfort, task difficulty, and thumb/wrist joint postures using an active marker system during typing tasks for different combinations of device orientation (portrait and landscape), keyboard layout (standard and split), and keyboard location (bottom, middle, top). The narrower standard keyboard with the device in the portrait orientation was associated with less discomfort (least squares mean (and S.E.) 2.9±0.6) than the landscape orientation (4.5±0.7). Additionally, the split keyboard decreased the amount of reaching required by the thumb in the landscape orientation as defined by a reduced range of motion and less MCP extension, which may have led to reduced discomfort (2.7±0.6) compared to the standard layout (4.5±0.7). However, typing speed was greater for the standard layout (127±5 char./min.) compared to the split layout (113±4 char./min.) regardless of device orientation and keyboard location. Usage guidelines and designers can incorporate these findings to optimize keyboard design parameters and form factors that promote user performance and

  11. Tablet Keyboard Configuration Affects Performance, Discomfort and Task Difficulty for Thumb Typing in a Two-Handed Grip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu B Trudeau

    Full Text Available When holding a tablet computer with two hands, the touch keyboard configuration imposes postural constraints on the user because of the need to simultaneously hold the device and type with the thumbs. Designers have provided users with several possible keyboard configurations (device orientation, keyboard layout and location. However, potential differences in performance, usability and postures among these configurations have not been explored. We hypothesize that (1 the narrower standard keyboard layout in the portrait orientation leads to lower self-reported discomfort and less reach than the landscape orientation; (2 a split keyboard layout results in better overall outcomes compared to the standard layout; and (3 the conventional bottom keyboard location leads to the best outcomes overall compared to other locations. A repeated measures laboratory experiment of 12 tablet owners measured typing speed, discomfort, task difficulty, and thumb/wrist joint postures using an active marker system during typing tasks for different combinations of device orientation (portrait and landscape, keyboard layout (standard and split, and keyboard location (bottom, middle, top. The narrower standard keyboard with the device in the portrait orientation was associated with less discomfort (least squares mean (and S.E. 2.9±0.6 than the landscape orientation (4.5±0.7. Additionally, the split keyboard decreased the amount of reaching required by the thumb in the landscape orientation as defined by a reduced range of motion and less MCP extension, which may have led to reduced discomfort (2.7±0.6 compared to the standard layout (4.5±0.7. However, typing speed was greater for the standard layout (127±5 char./min. compared to the split layout (113±4 char./min. regardless of device orientation and keyboard location. Usage guidelines and designers can incorporate these findings to optimize keyboard design parameters and form factors that promote user performance

  12. One-Handed Thumb Use on Smart Phones by Semi-literate and Illiterate Users in India

    OpenAIRE

    Katre, Dinesh

    2010-01-01

    There is a tremendous potential for developing mobile-based productivity tools and occupation specific applications for the semi-literate and illiterate users in India. One-handed thumb use on the touchscreen of smart phone or touch phone is considered as an effective alternative than the use of stylus or index finger, to free the other hand for supporting the occupational activity. In this context, usability research and experimental tests are conducted to understand the role of fine motor c...

  13. The basal ganglia communicate with the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Andreea C; Dum, Richard P; Strick, Peter L

    2010-05-01

    The basal ganglia and cerebellum are major subcortical structures that influence not only movement, but putatively also cognition and affect. Both structures receive input from and send output to the cerebral cortex. Thus, the basal ganglia and cerebellum form multisynaptic loops with the cerebral cortex. Basal ganglia and cerebellar loops have been assumed to be anatomically separate and to perform distinct functional operations. We investigated whether there is any direct route for basal ganglia output to influence cerebellar function that is independent of the cerebral cortex. We injected rabies virus (RV) into selected regions of the cerebellar cortex in cebus monkeys and used retrograde transneuronal transport of the virus to determine the origin of multisynaptic inputs to the injection sites. We found that the subthalamic nucleus of the basal ganglia has a substantial disynaptic projection to the cerebellar cortex. This pathway provides a means for both normal and abnormal signals from the basal ganglia to influence cerebellar function. We previously showed that the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum has a disynaptic projection to an input stage of basal ganglia processing, the striatum. Taken together these results provide the anatomical substrate for substantial two-way communication between the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Thus, the two subcortical structures may be linked together to form an integrated functional network. PMID:20404184

  14. Readiness in the Basal Reader: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Pamela

    A study examined two 1989 basal reading series' (published by McGraw Hill and Holt) readiness/priming sequences in order to ascertain the theoretical bases of each and then compared the findings with those of an earlier study. All pages of the readiness/priming sequence student texts and workbooks of both basal reading series were analyzed using…

  15. Early recognition of basal cell naevus syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra-Knol, HE; Scheewe, JH; van der Vlist, GJ; van Doorn, ME; Ausems, MGEM

    2005-01-01

    The basal cell naevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by major manifestations such as basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmar or plantar pits, and intracranial calcifications. Early recognition is important in order to reduce morbidity due to cutaneous and cerebral malignan

  16. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Chronic Hair Pulling in a Child with Cri du Chat Syndrome: Effects on Co-Occurring Thumb Sucking

    OpenAIRE

    Vorndran, Christina M; Pace, Gary M.; Luiselli, James K; Flaherty, Jennifer; Christian, Lauren; Kleinmann, Ava

    2008-01-01

    The relation between hair pulling and thumb sucking in a child with Cri du Chat syndrome was evaluated during the assessment and treatment of hair pulling. A functional analysis suggested that both behaviors were maintained by automatic reinforcement and possibly by attention. Treatment combining differential reinforcement (praise), response interruption, and access to toys decreased hair pulling. A corresponding decrease in thumb sucking was observed even though it was not directly treated. ...

  17. Adaptability of Paulownia tomentosa (thumb. Sieb. et Zucc. on green areas in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojičić Đurđa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The taxa with the improved esthetical characteristics, increased or decreased productivity, higher resistance to diseases, insect attacks, air pollution, as well as with optimal adaptability in urban coenoses are of great importance to land­scape architecture, horticulture and forestry. The criteria for the selection of individual plants out of the number of many individuals depend on their future usage, but also on their esthetical features, morphology and physiology. One of the species that fulfils the above criteria is Paulownia tomentosa (Thumb. Sieb. et Zucc. Different morphophysiological features of royal paulownia cultivated on green areas in Banovo Brdo, Dorćol, Tašmajdan, Novi Beograd and Zemun are analyzed. The study results prove the adaptability of royal paulownia on green areas in Belgrade, but also the need to select the parent trees with the best combining features prior to production, aiming at the improvement and production of planting material for urban coenoses and specific-purpose plantations of this species.

  18. A Case of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hayser Syndrome with Absence of the Right Thumb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Ranabir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old feminine adolescent, presented with congenital absence of right thumb, scoliosis, severe anemia, primary amenorrhea without secondary sexual characteristics, except for normally developed breasts. In the genital area, there was a pair of ill developed labia majora fused at upper end with a whirling pattern containing inside the urethral opening. The lower end of genitalia had loose skin folds containing adequate amounts of rugae with a raphe, mimicking the texture of scrotal skin. There was no vaginal orifice. Diagnostic work-up included routine hematological studies, skeletal radiography, renal ultrasonography, and renal scan to demonstrate possible association between the congenital genitourinary and skeletal anomalies. Ultrasound imaging studies confirmed that she had structures close to uterus with hematometra, but vagina and ovary were not found. Sonologically, the left kidney could not be visualized. Renal scan confirmed agenesis of the left kidney and hypoplastic, parenchymally insufficient, right kidney. Cytogenetic karyotyping revealed a 46, XX karyotyping and the presence of Barr chromatin body. Based on the clinical examination and investigations, a diagnosis of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome was established with associated limb and skeletal deformities.

  19. Evaluation of taper joints with combined fatigue and crevice corrosion testing: Comparison to human explanted modular prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reclaru, L., E-mail: lucien.reclaru@pxgroup.com [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Brooks, R.A. [Orthopaedic Research, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University of Cambridge, Box 180 Hills Road, CB2 0QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Zuberbühler, M. [Smith and Nephew Orthopaedics AG, Schachenalle 29, 5001 Aarau (Switzerland); Eschler, P.-Y.; Constantin, F. [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Tomoaia, G. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hateganu of Cluj-Napoca, Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for revision surgery of total joint replacements is increasing and modular joint replacement implants have been developed to provide adjustable prosthetic revision systems with improved intra-operative flexibility. An electrochemical study of the corrosion resistance of the interface between the distal and proximal modules of a modular prosthesis was performed in combination with a cyclic fatigue test. The complexity resides in the existence of interfaces between the distal part, the proximal part, and the dynamometric screw. A new technique for evaluating the resistance to cyclic dynamic corrosion with crevice stimulation was used and the method is presented. In addition, two components of the proximal module of explanted Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb prostheses were investigated by optical and electron microscopy. Our results reveal that: The electrolyte penetrates into the interface between the distal and proximal modules during cyclic dynamic fatigue tests, the distal module undergoes cracking and corrosion was generated at the interface between the two models; The comparison of the explanted proximal parts with the similar prostheses evaluated following cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion testing showed that there were significant similarities indicating that this method is suitable for evaluating materials used in the fabrication of modular prostheses. - Highlights: • Electrochemical crevice corrosion testing combined with fatigue test conducted on Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V modular prostheses • Cations released from integral prostheses • Comparison of human explanted modular prostheses with the similar prostheses evaluated in cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion.

  20. Study of effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work it is described the problems related to the radiotherapy treatments of patients with prostate cancer and hip implants Analyze the effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments and present the methods to overcome the problems that arise in these situations. Our patients are student in a TAC Philips with a range of Hounsfield number of-1000 to 4000. The planning and measurement of CT numbers are done in a RTP ADAC Pinnacle that have a maximum of 32767 CT units. The metallic implants more frequently used, titanium, stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, generate CT numbers from 2000 to 3000, and cause saturation effects. This problem may be solved with modern scanners that use the extended CT range. It is an algorithm that expand the usual range by a factor of 10. An alternative solution to this problem can be used if the prostheses are able to scan to select the window parameters that allow an automatic region of interest (roi) definition that match to the dimensions of the implants. Finally it is assigned the electronic/physical densities to the created roi's. The clinical dosimetry of patients with prostheses have been done defining the usual regions of interests (target volume and risk organs) in first place. Finally the prostheses are outlined using the window parameters previously measured and assigned the electronic or physical densities. The attenuation of the implant may then be calculated accurately. The presence of implants in the treatment fields originate artifacts in the TAC images of patients and underdosage of target volume that range between 12% and 30% in function of material an energy used. It is necessary the application of methods that correct the dose behind the implant, if it is not possible to prevent the incidence of the treatment beams over the prostheses. (Author)

  1. Three-Dimensional (3-D) Printing: A Cost-Effective Solution for Improving Global Accessibility to Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Kyle; Rand, Stephanie; Cancel, David; Chen, Yuxi; Kathirithamby, Rani; Stern, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    The lack of access to prostheses is a global problem, partially caused by the high cost associated with the current manufacturing process. Three-dimensional printing is gaining use in the medical field, and one such area is prosthetics. In addition to using cost-effective materials, this technology allows for rapid prototyping, making it an efficient solution for the development of affordable prostheses. If the rehabilitation medicine community embraces this novel technology, we can help alleviate the global disparity of access to prostheses. PMID:26709247

  2. Thermodynamic Significance of Human Basal Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangCuncheng

    1993-01-01

    The human basal state,a non-equilibrium steady state,is analysed in this paper in the light of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics whereby the thermodynamic significance of the basal metabolic rate and its distinction to the dissipation function and exergy loss are identified.The analysis demonstrates the correct expression of the effects of the blood flow on the heat balance in a human-body bio-heat model and the relationship between the basal metabolic rate and the blood perfusion.

  3. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie;

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  4. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  5. Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammed Khursheed; Murali Dharan Bashyam

    2014-03-01

    Apico-basal polarity is a cardinal molecular feature of adult eukaryotic epithelial cells and appears to be involved in several key cellular processes including polarized cell migration and maintenance of tissue architecture. Epithelial cell polarity is maintained by three well-conserved polarity complexes, namely, PAR, Crumbs and SCRIB. The location and interaction between the components of these complexes defines distinct structural domains of epithelial cells. Establishment and maintenance of apico-basal polarity is regulated through various conserved cell signalling pathways including TGF, Integrin and WNT signalling. Loss of cell polarity is a hallmark for carcinoma, and its underlying molecular mechanism is beginning to emerge from studies on model organisms and cancer cell lines. Moreover, deregulated expression of apico-basal polarity complex components has been reported in human tumours. In this review, we provide an overview of the apico-basal polarity complexes and their regulation, their role in cell migration, and finally their involvement in carcinogenesis.

  6. The many faces of basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most easily cured carcinoma, but because of the many forms it can take, and because it grows so slowly, it can be misdiagnosed or neglected. The author discusses its more common forms and etiologic considerations.

  7. Methanol intoxication with bilateral basal ganglia infarct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methanol is a toxic agent that affects the central nervous system, especially the optic nerves and basal ganglia. Symmetrical hypodense lesions in the basal ganglia, which can be demonstrated by CT or MRI, is accepted as the most characteristic radiological feature of the disease. A case of a patient with bilateral putaminal hypodense infarcts due tomethanol intoxication is presented. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  8. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic ...

  9. Somatotopic Organization of the Primate Basal Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Nambu, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Somatotopic organization is a fundamental and key concept to understand how the cortico-basal ganglia loop works. It is also indispensable knowledge to perform stereotaxic surgery for movement disorders. Here I would like to describe the somatotopic organization of the basal ganglia, which consist of the striatum, subthalamic nucleus, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. Projections from motor cortical regions representing different body parts terminate in different regions of these nuclei....

  10. Somatotopic organization of the primate basal ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi Nambu

    2011-01-01

    Somatotopic organization is a fundamental and key concept to understand how the cortico-basal ganglia loop works. It is also indispensable knowledge to perform stereotaxic surgery for movement disorders. Here I would like to describe the somatotopic organization of the basal ganglia, which consist of the striatum, subthalamic nucleus, globus pallidus and substantia nigra. Projections from motor cortical regions representing different body parts terminate in different regions of these nuclei. ...

  11. Replacement of missing lateral incisors with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic veneer-fixed dental prostheses: a clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Bissasu, Sami M; Al-houri, Nabil A

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message This report describes the use of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic veneer-fixed dental prostheses in replacing congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. This kind of prosthesis has an advantage over a lingual-retainer resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis in its capability of changing the color and shape of the abutment teeth. The prostheses provided an acceptable esthetics and comfort for the patient.

  12. Auscultatory characteristics of normally functioning Lillehei-Kaster, Björk-Shiley, and St Jude heart valve prostheses.

    OpenAIRE

    Kupari, M.; Harjula, A; Mattila, S

    1986-01-01

    Auscultatory and echocardiographic and phonocardiographic studies were performed on 26 patients who had a total of 11 Lillehei-Kaster, 16 Björk-Shiley, and 18 St Jude heart valve prostheses functioning normally in the aortic or mitral positions or both. With all types and positions of prostheses a distinct closing sound was always detected. It was frequently heard in two parts which, according to echocardiographic and phonocardiographic studies, resulted from the onset and completion of the v...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease Enable Javascript to ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease is a disorder ...

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation on wear characteristics of UHMWPE for joint prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is widely used as a rubbing material for clinical applications in total prostheses. Generally, total joint prostheses are sterilized by gamma irradiation. Gamma ray ordinarily does not change the properties of ceramic and metal material, but it is well known that UHMWPE has high sensitivities to gamma irradiation. Gamma irradiation causes crosslinking of UHMWPE, which changes its property from original one. This work shows that gamma irradiation has remarkable effects on the reduction of UHMWPE wear. Gamma irradiation is very useful for reduction of UHMWPE wear. In this experiment, medium gamma irradiation is enough to reduce UHMWPE wear. However, gamma irradiation causes reduction in tensile strength and elongation of UHMWPE. Therefore, we found that optimum point of dose to prevent reduction of mechanical properties and reduce wear. Additionally, we also indicate the wear reduction mechanism of crosslinked UHMWPE. (author)

  15. Similar Marginal Precision of Zirconia- and Metal-Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Maj Høygaard; Bahrami, Golnosh; Schropp, Lars;

    Similar Marginal Precision of Zirconia- and Metal-Ceramic Posterior Fixed Dental Prostheses Objective: An increased gap between restoration and prepared tooth causes more luting material to be exposed to the oral environment resulting in increased deterioration, leading to bacterial accumulation...... which can cause marginal periodontitis and secondary caries. The purpose of this randomized clinical study was to compare the marginal precision of CAD/CAM Zirconia-ceramic (ZC) and cast gold alloy metal-ceramic (MC) posterior fixed dental prostheses. Methods: As part of an ongoing randomized controlled...... clinical trial, 34 patients were randomized into two groups to receive a 3-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) replacing a second premolar or a first molar. 17 ZC FDPs (BeCe CAD Zirkon, BEGO with Vita VM9, VITA ) and 17 MC FDPs (Bio PontoStar, BEGO with Vita VM13, VITA). All FDPs were made in accordance...

  16. Tissue reaction around loosened prostheses: a histological, X-ray microanalytic and immunological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi,Takashi

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available Tissue reactions at the cement-bone and artificial implant-bone interface were examined light and electron microscopically in thirty-six patients who underwent revisory operation of hip or knee replacement. The reactions were classified into three types: inert tissue, active tissue with giant cell proliferation, and active tissue with predominant foamy cell proliferation. The third type of reaction was found only in total hip replacement with bone cement. No evidence of allergic reaction to implanted materials was found in any replacement, though active cellular infiltrations were observed around loosened prostheses especially in cemented arthroplasty. The tissue reactions always occurred around instable or loosened prostheses. Thus, the present study shows that mechanical instability is the primary cause of such undesired tissue reactions.

  17. Towards Long-Life Replacement Joint Prostheses-A Surface Engineering Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HanshanDong

    2004-01-01

    How to improve the wear resistance of bearing surfaces, hereby achieving long life of orthopaedic joint prostheses has long been a technical challenge with much fundamental interest and social and economic impacts. Surface engineering has been emerging as one of the most promising technologies to improve the tribological properties of biomedical materials. A current area of research within the Birmingham Surface Engineering Group has been directed at developing novel surface engineering technologies for biomedical materials towards long-life joint prostheses. Following a brief introduction, the author reports their recent progress in the surface engineering of biomedical materials particular for joint prosthesis. The potential of these innovative surface engineering technologies in enhancing the performance of oral and maxillofacial implants and surgical devices is also discussed.

  18. Towards Long-Life Replacement Joint Prostheses - A Surface Engineering Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanshan Dong

    2004-01-01

    How to improve the wear resistance of bearing surfaces, hereby achieving long life of orthopaedic joint prostheses has long been a technical challenge with much fundamental interest and social and economic impacts. Surface engineering has been emerging as one of the most promising technologies to improve the tribological properties of biomedical materials.A current area of research within the Birmingham Surface Engineering Group has been directed at developing novel surface engineering technologies for biomedical materials towards long-life joint prostheses. Following a brief introduction, the author reports their recent progress in the surface engineering of biomedical materials particular for joint prosthesis. The potential of these innovative surface engineering technologies in enhancing the performance of oral and maxillofacial implants and surgical devices is also discussed.

  19. Phylogenetic differences of mammalian basal metabolic rate are not explained by mitochondrial basal proton leak

    OpenAIRE

    Polymeropoulos, E. T.; Heldmaier, G; Frappell, P. B.; McAllan, B. M.; Withers, K. W.; M. Klingenspor; White, C.R.; Jastroch, M.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic rates of mammals presumably increased during the evolution of endothermy, but molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying basal metabolic rate (BMR) are still not understood. It has been established that mitochondrial basal proton leak contributes significantly to BMR. Comparative studies among a diversity of eutherian mammals showed that BMR correlates with body mass and proton leak. Here, we studied BMR and mitochondrial basal proton leak in liver of various marsupial species. Su...

  20. Immunoscintigraphy with antigranulocyte monoclonal antibodies for the diagnosis of septic loosening of hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the value of immunoscintigraphy (IS) with antigranulocyte monoclonal antibodies (Mab) in the diagnosis of subacute or chronic infection of hip prostheses, we prospectively studied 57 patients (23 women and 34 men; age 29-92 years, mean 72.7 years) sent to our institution in the past 6 years for clinical suspicion of septic loosening of a hip prosthesis. Nineteen patients had bilateral prostheses and one of them was studied twice. A total of 78 prostheses were examined. All patients had three-phase bone scans followed by IS with technetium-99m antigranulocyte Mab BW 250/183. Intervals between bone scans and IS varied from 2 days to 4 weeks. Final diagnosis was assessed by culture in 48 cases (articular puncture or intraoperative sampling) and by clinical follow-up of at least 8 months in 30 cases. Twelve prostheses were considered septic and 66 non-septic. The overall sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 64% respectively for bone scans, 67% and 75% for IS and 67% and 84% for both modalities together. In three cases, IS was doubtful and the final clinical diagnosis was negative for infection. False-positive results were observed in the presence of massive loosening of the prosthesis or in association with metaplastic peri-articular bone formation. In three of the four false-negative results, infection was proven only after enrichment of the culture, and the bacterium was Staphylococcus epidermidis. In 12/33 (36%) positive bone scans IS allowed the diagnosis of infection to be excluded. Overall accuracy of both modalities together was 81% and the negative predictive value was 93%, which compares favourably with the results reported for other non-invasive methods. (orig.)

  1. A comparison of autograft incus and titanium prostheses in primary ossiculoplasty in modified radical mastoidectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ankur Gupta; Ashok Kumar; Kanwar Sen; Isha Preet Tuli

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous graft materials are available for ossicular reconstruction yet, no single option is considered ideal. This study aims to analyze and compare the outcome of primary ossiculoplasty in terms of hearing gain using autograft incus and titanium (Ti) prostheses in patients with active squamosal chronic otitis media (COM) undergoing modified radical mastoidectomy (MRM). Study Design: Randomized study. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with active squamosal COM with ossicular ...

  2. Modeling and Preliminary Testing Socket-Residual Limb Interface Stiffness of Above-Elbow Prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Sensinger, Jonathon W.; Weir, Richard F. ff.

    2008-01-01

    The interface between the socket and residual limb can have a significant effect on the performance of a prosthesis. Specifically, knowledge of the rotational stiffness of the socket-residual limb (S-RL) interface is extremely useful in designing new prostheses and evaluating new control paradigms, as well as in comparing existing and new socket technologies. No previous studies, however, have examined the rotational stiffness of S-RL interfaces. To address this problem, a math model is compa...

  3. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia-ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal-ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis

  4. ROUGH SURFACES OF TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOYS FOR IMPLANTS AND PROSTHESES

    OpenAIRE

    Conforto, Egle; Aronsson, Bjorn-Owe; Salito, A.; Crestou, Catherine; Caillard, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys for dental implants and hip prostheses were surface-treated and/or covered by metallic or ceramic rough layers after being submitted to sand blasting. The goal of these treatments is to improve the surface roughness and, consequently, the osteointegration, the fixation and the stability of the implant. The microstructure of titanium and titanium alloys submitted to these treatments has been studied and correlated to their mechanical behavior. As treated/ covered a...

  5. Use of two-axis joystick for control of externally powered shoulder disarticulation prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Robert D. Lipschutz, BSME, CP; Blair Lock, MS; Jonathon Sensinger, PhD; Aimee E. Schultz, MS; Todd A. Kuiken, MD, PhD

    2011-01-01

    We explored a new method for simple and accurate control of shoulder movement for externally powered shoulder disarticulation prostheses with a two-axis joystick. We tested 10 subjects with intact shoulders and arms to determine the average amount of shoulder motion and force available to control an electronic input device. We then applied this information to two different input strategies to examine their effectiveness: (1) a traditional rocker potentiometer and a pair of force-sensing resis...

  6. Case Reports: Ipsilateral Shoulder and Elbow Arthroplasty Using Custom Interlocking Prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    McConkey, Mark O.; Baslaim, Abdullah M.; Regan, William D.

    2008-01-01

    Ipsilateral shoulder and elbow arthritis is not an uncommon problem seen in patients of upper extremity surgeons. If arthroplasty is required in both joints, there is a significant risk of periprosthetic fracture resulting from the stress riser occurring between the implants. We report the placement of custom interlocking shoulder and elbow prostheses in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. The elbow prosthesis with an uncemented humeral component was placed followed 18 months later by a cust...

  7. Mechanical compatibility of sol–gel annealing with titanium for orthopaedic prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, Andrew I.M.; Lim, Teoh S.; Brydone, Alistair S.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    Sol–gel processing is an attractive method for large-scale surface coating due to its facile and inexpensive preparation, even with the inclusion of precision nanotopographies. These are desirable traits for metal orthopaedic prostheses where ceramic coatings are known to be osteoinductive and the effects may be amplified through nanotexturing. However there are a few concerns associated with the application of sol–gel technology to orthopaedics. Primarily, the annealing stage required to tra...

  8. Progress in the clinical development and utilization of vision prostheses: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Brandli A; Luu CD; Guymer RH; Ayton LN

    2016-01-01

    Alice Brandli, Chi D Luu, Robyn H Guymer, Lauren N Ayton Centre for Eye Research Australia, Department of Surgery (Ophthalmology), The University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Vision prostheses, or “bionic eyes”, are implantable medical bionic devices with the potential to restore rudimentary sight to people with profound vision loss or blindness. In the past two decades, this field has rapidly progressed, and there a...

  9. What can normal gait biomechanics teach a designer of lower limb prostheses?*

    OpenAIRE

    Pitkin, M.

    2013-01-01

    Compensating a limb loss with prosthesis is a challenging task due to complexity of the human body which cannot be fully matched by the available technical means. Designer of lower limb prostheses wants to know what specification of the device could provide the best approximation to the normal locomotion. Deep understanding of the latter is essential, and gait analysis may be a valuable tool for this. Once prosthesis is built, gait analysis may help in comparing the wearer's performance with ...

  10. Biomechanics of the Metalloceramic Bridge Prostheses at the Dental Row Lateral Department Small Defect Substitution

    OpenAIRE

    Zhulyov E.N.; Sulyagina O.V.; Leontiev N.V.

    2009-01-01

    A method of mathematical simulation was used for prosthetics improvement of patients with the dental row lateral department small defects by combined bridge prostheses with a support on insets. Four types of the metalloceramic bridge prosthesis constructions were used at a study of a biomechanics in a system of ″bridge prosthesis—supporting teeth—periodontium—alveolar part of a jaw″. The investigation results have demonstrated that a distribution of elastic tensions is unfavorable and can cau...

  11. Biomechanical analysis of fixed bearing and mobile bearing total knee prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Urwin, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    In total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, mobile bearing (MB) total knee prostheses were designed to more closely mimic the function of the normal knee than traditional fixed bearing (FB) designs by allowing axial mobility between the polyethylene insert and tibial tray. Despite the hypothetical benefits of the MB design, few studies have objectively analysed knee biomechanics during activities of daily living (ADLs) in the laboratory compared to FB designs. This thesis aimed to substantiate t...

  12. Evaluation of dental material series from patients with dental prostheses and suspicion of delayed hypersensitivity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Fernanda Cortinhas; Cunha, Victor do Espirito Santo; Hahnstadt, Ruppert Ludwig; Pires, Mário Cezar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with oral sensitivity are common in our practice. Allergic contact dermatitis is one of the most frequent etiologies. OBJECTIVES Evaluate oral contact dermatitis using the Brazilian standard series and complementary dental series in patients using dental prostheses, with or without oral complaints. Determine specific dental Brazilian series. METHODS Patients using dental prostheses with or without oral complaints realized patch tests. Brazilian standard series and complementary dental series were used according to ICDRG recommendations. The results were analysed according to age, sex, race, atopic conditions and symptoms associated. RESULTS From 54 patients tested, 34 (63%) were positive at least to one substance. Nineteen had oral complaints, such as burning mouth, itch or oral erythema. There was no association between atopic condition and tests results. Without the oral series, just 23(42,6%) patients had a positive result. Using the Brazilian standard series with the complementary dental series we improved the positivity of the patch test to 47%. CONCLUSION In patients using prostheses and with oral complaints, patch tests with Brazilian standard series with complementary dental series improve the tests positivity. PMID:27192511

  13. In vivo comparison of force development with various materials of implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H K; Heo, S J; Koak, J Y; Kim, S K

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure axial loading, generating bending moments on fibre reinforced composite (FRC) implant prostheses using strain-gauged customized abutment in vivo. Bending moments of conventional implant prosthetic material were also measured and the data were compared with those for FRC. Three unit fixed dental prostheses were made for two dental implant fixtures, which had been functioning properly for more than one year using Tescera ATL, porcelain fused to metal and gold as occlusal material. Three patients participated in this study; two patients had two implants on one side of the mandible and one had two implants on both sides of the mandible. Five sets of fixed dental prostheses were fabricated for each material and these were cemented with Temp-bond on strain-gauged customized abutments, which were screwed into the underlying implant fixtures. Axial loadings and bending moments were measured when a patient bit the experimental fixed dental prosthesis. ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (alpha = 0.05) were used for statistical analysis. There were no significant differences in normalized bending moments among the three different implant prosthetic materials. Within the limitations of this study, Tescera ATL generated bending moments similar to conventional implant prosthetic materials such as gold and porcelain. PMID:19548956

  14. PIXE characterization of tissues surrounding metallic prostheses coated with biological glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbotteau, Y. E-mail: yves.barbotteau@qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Irigaray, J.L.; Moretto, Ph

    2004-01-01

    Biological glasses can be used as coatings for metallic prostheses in order to prevent corrosion. According to their composition, these glasses have different properties. We studied, in vivo, two glasses referred to as BVA and BVH. They are used as coatings of Ti6Al4V metallic implant. BVA glass disappears after 3 months of implantation and is replaced by bone. Prostheses initially coated by this glass have a larger osseous contact perimeter compared to the uncoated prostheses. This ensures a better anchoring of the implant and limits the micro-motions which cause wear debris. BVH glass keeps a constant composition during implantation and it is used like a layer which isolates metal implant from biological environment. In order to characterize the bony environment surrounding implants, we have used PIXE and RBS methods. This paper shows results of the behavior of bony tissue under micro-beam, the quality tests of new bone which replaces the BVA glass coating and the evaluation of corrosion effects. Titanium release in bony tissues begins when the metal surface of the prosthesis is exposed to biological fluids. After a few months of implantation, the titanium contamination is stabilized and remains localized within the first tens of micrometers of surrounding bone.

  15. Comparison of Various Functionally Graded Femoral Prostheses by Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azim Ataollahi Oshkour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on finite element analysis of a model comprising femur into which a femoral component of a total hip replacement was implanted. The considered prosthesis is fabricated from a functionally graded material (FGM comprising a layer of a titanium alloy bonded to a layer of hydroxyapatite. The elastic modulus of the FGM was adjusted in the radial, longitudinal, and longitudinal-radial directions by altering the volume fraction gradient exponent. Four cases were studied, involving two different methods of anchoring the prosthesis to the spongy bone and two cases of applied loading. The results revealed that the FG prostheses provoked more SED to the bone. The FG prostheses carried less stress, while more stress was induced to the bone and cement. Meanwhile, less shear interface stress was stimulated to the prosthesis-bone interface in the noncemented FG prostheses. The cement-bone interface carried more stress compared to the prosthesis-cement interface. Stair climbing induced more harmful effects to the implanted femur components compared to the normal walking by causing more stress. Therefore, stress shielding, developed stresses, and interface stresses in the THR components could be adjusted through the controlling stiffness of the FG prosthesis by managing volume fraction gradient exponent.

  16. Finite element analysis of stress distribution of obturator prostheses for acquired unilateral maxillary defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yun-zhi; FENG Hai-lan; WU Han-jiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess stresses produced by different obturator prostheses. Methods Three-dimensional finite clement models of unilateral maxillary defects rehabilitated with different obturators were constructed. The different stresses were analyzed by three-dimensional finite element method under different load angle. Results The Von Mises stress values obtained for the remaining tissues adjacent to defect cavity were higher when rehabilitated by inferior hollow obturator in comparison with by superior hollow obturator. The maximum of Von Mises were higher when rehabilitated by resilient hollow obturator than by rigid hollow obturator. It was also observed that in the rigid type stress distribution contours formed in the remaining tissues adjacent to defect cavity, while in resilient hollow obturator prostheses the stress distributed mainly in the prosthesis itself. The oblique load shows the most maximum of Von Mises among all types of obturator prostheses. Conclusions A high lateral wall of an obturator may be more better in preserving the remaining structures than a shorter prosthesis lateral wall. A soft liner may be incorporated to reduce the pain of the residual maxillary structures and mucosa. When load on defect, higher stress would be generated to the residual maxillary structures. The adjustment of occlusual relationship is very important.

  17. Electroactive polymeric sensors in hand prostheses: bending response of an ionic polymer metal composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddiss, Elaine; Chau, Tom

    2006-07-01

    In stark contrast to the inspiring functionality of the natural hand, limitations of current upper limb prostheses stemming from marginal feedback control, challenges of mechanical design, and lack of sensory capacity, are well-established. This paper provides a critical review of current sensory systems and the potential of a selection of electroactive polymers for sensory applications in hand prostheses. Candidate electroactive polymers are reviewed in terms of their relevant advantages and disadvantages, together with their current implementation in related applications. Empirical analysis of one of the most novel electroactive polymers, ionic polymer metal composites (IPMC), was conducted to demonstrate its potential for prosthetic applications. With linear responses within the operating range typical of hand prostheses, bending angles, and bending rates were accurately measured with 4.4+/-2.5 and 4.8+/-3.5% error, respectively, using the IPMC sensors. With these comparable error rates to traditional resistive bend sensors and a wide range of sensitivities and responses, electroactive polymers offer a promising alternative to more traditional sensory approaches. Their potential role in prosthetics is further heightened by their flexible and formable structure, and their ability to act as both sensors and actuators. PMID:16260170

  18. PIXE characterization of tissues surrounding metallic prostheses coated with biological glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological glasses can be used as coatings for metallic prostheses in order to prevent corrosion. According to their composition, these glasses have different properties. We studied, in vivo, two glasses referred to as BVA and BVH. They are used as coatings of Ti6Al4V metallic implant. BVA glass disappears after 3 months of implantation and is replaced by bone. Prostheses initially coated by this glass have a larger osseous contact perimeter compared to the uncoated prostheses. This ensures a better anchoring of the implant and limits the micro-motions which cause wear debris. BVH glass keeps a constant composition during implantation and it is used like a layer which isolates metal implant from biological environment. In order to characterize the bony environment surrounding implants, we have used PIXE and RBS methods. This paper shows results of the behavior of bony tissue under micro-beam, the quality tests of new bone which replaces the BVA glass coating and the evaluation of corrosion effects. Titanium release in bony tissues begins when the metal surface of the prosthesis is exposed to biological fluids. After a few months of implantation, the titanium contamination is stabilized and remains localized within the first tens of micrometers of surrounding bone

  19. Visual prostheses: The enabling technology to give sight to the blind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Maghami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Millions of patients are either slowly losing their vision or are already blind due to retinal degenerative diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP and age-related macular degeneration (AMD or because of accidents or injuries. Employment of artificial means to treat extreme vision impairment has come closer to reality during the past few decades. Currently, many research groups work towards effective solutions to restore a rudimentary sense of vision to the blind. Aside from the efforts being put on replacing damaged parts of the retina by engineered living tissues or microfabricated photoreceptor arrays, implantable electronic microsystems, referred to as visual prostheses, are also sought as promising solutions to restore vision. From a functional point of view, visual prostheses receive image information from the outside world and deliver them to the natural visual system, enabling the subject to receive a meaningful perception of the image. This paper provides an overview of technical design aspects and clinical test results of visual prostheses, highlights past and recent progress in realizing chronic high-resolution visual implants as well as some technical challenges confronted when trying to enhance the functional quality of such devices.

  20. Volar dislocation of the index carpometacarpal joint in association with a Bennett's fracture of the thumb: a rare injury pattern.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dillon, J P

    2012-02-03

    We describe a case of volar dislocation of the index carpometacarpal (CMC) joint in association with a Bennett\\'s fracture of the thumb following a motorcycle accident. Volar dislocation of the index carpometacarpal joint is an exceedingly rare but easily missed injury, with only a few reported cases in the literature. This report highlights the importance of a true lateral radiograph and close scrutiny of the film to detect this injury. Closed reduction supplemented with Kirschner wire fixation restored normal anatomical relations and achieved an excellent clinical result.

  1. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  2. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Hospital, P.O. BOX 19063, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2006-11-15

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  3. Somatotopic organization of the primate basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Nambu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Somatotopic organization is a fundamental and key concept to understand how the cortico-basal ganglia loop works. It is also indispensable knowledge to perform stereotaxic surgery for movement disorders. Here I would like to describe the somatotopic organization of the basal ganglia, which consist of the striatum, subthalamic nucleus, globus pallidus and substantia nigra. Projections from motor cortical regions representing different body parts terminate in different regions of these nuclei. Basal ganglia neurons respond not only to the stimulation of the corresponding regions of the motor cortices, but also to active and passive movements of the corresponding body parts. On the basis of these anatomical and physiological findings, somatotopic organization can be identified in the motor territories of these nuclei in the basal ganglia. In addition, projections from functionally interrelated cortical areas partially converge through the cortico-basal ganglia loop, but nevertheless the somatotopy is still preserved. Disorganized somatotopy may explain, at least in part, the pathophysiology of movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease and dystonia.

  4. Investigation of the dosimetric accuracy of the isocenter shifting method in prostate cancer patients with and without hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The use of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) enables compensation for prostate movement by shifting the treatment isocenter to track the prostate on a daily basis. Although shifting the isocenter can alter the source to skin distances (SSDs) and the effective depth of the target volume, it is commonly assumed that these changes have a negligible dosimetric effect, and therefore, the number of monitor units delivered is usually not adjusted. However, it is unknown whether or not this assumption is valid for patient with hip prostheses, which frequently contain high density materials. Methods: The authors conducted a retrospective study to investigate dosimetric effect of the isocenter shifting method for prostate patients with and without hip prostheses. For each patient, copies of the prostate volume were shifted by up to 1.5 cm from the original position to simulate prostate movement in 0.5 cm increments. Subsequently, 12 plans were created for each patient by creating a copy of the original plan for each prostate position with the isocenter shifted to track the position of the shifted prostate. The dose to the prostate was then recalculated for each plan. For patients with hip prostheses, plans were created both with and without lateral beam angles entering through the prostheses. Results: Without isocenter shifting to compensate for prostate motion of 1.5 cm, the dose to the 95% of the prostate (D-95%) changed by an average of 30% and by up to 64%. This was reduced to less than 3% with the isocenter shifting method. It was found that for patients with hip prostheses, this technique worked best for treatment plans that avoided beam angles passing through the prostheses. Conclusions: The results demonstrated that the isocenter shifting method can accurately deliver dose to the prostate even in patients with hip prostheses.

  5. Counseling on Early Childhood Concerns: Sleep Issues, Thumb-Sucking, Picky Eating, School Readiness, and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Arwa; Nasir, Laeth

    2015-08-15

    Family physicians are often a source of information and advice on early childhood concerns regarding sleep, thumb-sucking/pacifier use, picky eating, school readiness, and oral health. Evidence indicates that family variables are important in the genesis of sleep difficulties, and that traditional behavioral methods are not as effective as previously thought. Attention to family psychosocial well-being, especially maternal functioning, is important in addressing childhood sleep difficulties. Thumb-sucking and pacifier use may be associated with negative consequences if they persist, and referral is recommended after four years of age if appropriate behavioral interventions are ineffective. Picky eating is heavily influenced by environmental factors, and food neophobia is a normal stage of development. The main approaches to childhood eating problems include social modeling of normal eating behaviors, repeated exposures to new foods, and positive mealtime experiences. School readiness focuses on supporting the psychosocial variables that are associated with school success. Reading with the child enhances literacy skills. Quality early childhood education programs are also effective in enhancing school success. Delaying school entry is not beneficial and may be detrimental. School readiness includes the schools' role in supporting the learning needs of all children regardless of their abilities and skills. Oral health is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to overall health. Oral health should be incorporated into well-child visits beginning at the eruption of the first tooth. PMID:26280232

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging technology in evaluating the presence and integrity of the anterior oblique ligament of the thumb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan D. Collins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation examines the reliability and reproducibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technology in evaluating the anterior oblique ligament (AOL of the trapeziometacarpal joint (TMC of the thumb, in order to establish an effective imaging protocol to use in the early identification of conditions leading to degenerative arthritis. We used cadaver specimens, three hand surgeons independently rated from X-rays each specimen. The specimens were then scanned in a General Electric MRI machine with a standard wrist coil. An effort was made to reproduce the image of the AOL - with a unique technique to obtain images of the obliquely oriented thumb and its ligaments. Following the MRI, the specimens were dissected to expose the AOL and visualize the TMC joint. A standard MRI fiducial was sewn to the proximal and distal extent of the volar side of the AOL. The soft tissues were replaced and the skin was closed. They were then rescanned following the same protocol, and pre and post-dissection ligamentlabeled specimens were compared. Following dissection and tagging of the AOL ligament, a repeat MRI confirmed its location and validated the protocol in all cases. The open dissection and ligament tagging confirmed that what was visualized was in fact the structure of interest. This investigation demonstrated that with an appropriate MRI protocol it is feasible to guide the scanner to catch appropriate images of a ligament that is closely correlated with degenerative arthritis.

  7. Examination of the torque required to passively palmar abduct the thumb CMC joint in a pediatric population with hemiplegia and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Leia; Ahmad, Mona Qureshi; Kelty-Stephen, Damian; Correia, Annette

    2015-12-16

    Many activities of daily living involve precision grasping and bimanual manipulation, such as putting toothpaste on a toothbrush or feeding oneself. However, children afflicted by stroke, cerebral palsy, or traumatic brain injury may have lost or never had the ability to actively and accurately control the thumb. To translate insights from adult rehabilitation robotics to innovative therapies for hand rehabilitation in pediatric care, specifically for thumb deformities, an understanding of the torque needed to abduct the thumb to assist grasping tasks is required. Participants (n=16, 10 female, 13.2±3.1 years) had an upper extremity evaluation and measures were made of their passive range of motion, anthropometrics, and torques to abduct the thumb for both their affected and non-affected sides. Torque measures were made using a custom wrist orthosis that was adjusted for each participant. The torque to achieve maximum abduction was 1.47±0.61inlb for the non-affected side and 1.51±0.68inlb for the affected side, with a maximum recorded value of 4.87inlb. The overall maximum applied torque was observed during adduction and was 5.10inlb. We saw variation in the applied torque, which could have been due to the applied torques by the Occupational Therapist or the participant actively assisting or resisting the motion rather than remaining passive. We expect similar muscle and participant variation to exist with an assistive device. Thus, the data presented here can be used to inform the specifications for the development of an assistive thumb orthosis for children with "thumb-in-palm" deformity. PMID:26542786

  8. MRI of the basal ganglia calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR imaging was performed for 11 patients (9 in Down's syndrome and 2 in idiopathic intracerebral calcification) who showed calcifications in bilateral basal ganglia on CT. High signal intensity in the basal ganglia was found only in one patient with idiopathic intracerebral calcification on T1-weighted image. The calcified areas of all patients in Down's syndrome did not show high signal intensity on T1-weighted image. The exact reasons why MRI exhibits the different signal intensities in calcified tissue on T1-weighted image are unknown. Further clinical investigations will be needed. (author)

  9. The connectome of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Oliver; Eipert, Peter; Kettlitz, Richard; Leßmann, Felix; Wree, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The basal ganglia of the laboratory rat consist of a few core regions that are specifically interconnected by efferents and afferents of the central nervous system. In nearly 800 reports of tract-tracing investigations the connectivity of the basal ganglia is documented. The readout of connectivity data and the collation of all the connections of these reports in a database allows to generate a connectome. The collation, curation and analysis of such a huge amount of connectivity data is a great challenge and has not been performed before (Bohland et al. PloS One 4:e7200, 2009) in large connectomics projects based on meta-analysis of tract-tracing studies. Here, the basal ganglia connectome of the rat has been generated and analyzed using the consistent cross-platform and generic framework neuroVIISAS. Several advances of this connectome meta-study have been made: the collation of laterality data, the network-analysis of connectivity strengths and the assignment of regions to a hierarchically organized terminology. The basal ganglia connectome offers differences in contralateral connectivity of motoric regions in contrast to other regions. A modularity analysis of the weighted and directed connectome produced a specific grouping of regions. This result indicates a correlation of structural and functional subsystems. As a new finding, significant reciprocal connections of specific network motifs in this connectome were detected. All three principal basal ganglia pathways (direct, indirect, hyperdirect) could be determined in the connectome. By identifying these pathways it was found that there exist many further equivalent pathways possessing the same length and mean connectivity weight as the principal pathways. Based on the connectome data it is unknown why an excitation pattern may prefer principal rather than other equivalent pathways. In addition to these new findings the local graph-theoretical features of regions of the connectome have been determined. By

  10. Basal Cell Carcinoma in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Samet Vasfi Kuvat; Zuhal Gücin; Barış Keklik; Gülzade Özyalvaçlı; Karaca Başaran

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly seen nonmelanoma skin cancer which is rarely encountered in the childhood period. An 11-year old child was admitted to our clinic due to an erythematous and a slightly pigmented lesion with a 3 × 4 cm diameter on his posterior scalp. Macroscopically, the lesion was excised with a 10 mm safety margin. Pathologic examination revealed a basal cell carcinoma. No symptoms or signs of a syndrome were observed both in the patient and his family.

  11. Use of inflatable penile prostheses AMS CX with momentary squeeze in a patient with Peyronie’s disease after removal of two previously implanted penile prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizio Vicini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peyronie's disease (PD is a fibrotic wound-healing condition of the tunica albuginea that results in penile deformity, curvature, hinging, narrowing and shortening, penile pain, and in some cases, erectile dysfunction (ED. Surgery remains the gold standard treatment option, ensuring the faster and trustworthy treatment. For those patients who have erectile dysfunction and PD, penile prosthesis placement with straightening procedure is the best method to solve both diseases. The aim of this article is to present the use of hydraulic penile prostheses AMS CX with Momentary Squeeze associated with a complete isolation of the neurovascular bundle in a complex case after removal of two previously implanted prostheses in a man suffering from Peyronie’s disease and erectile dysfunction. Material and method: A 50 year-old patient underwent two previous prosthetic implants in another hospital. The first implantation was performed using an infrapubic approach followed by placement of a three-component hydraulic penile prosthesis. After six months the prosthesis was removed using an infra-pubic approach and two soft prosthesis Virilis II were implanted during the same surgery. One year after the second operation we implanted a hydraulic penile prosthesis AMS CX with Mo - mentary Squeeze after complete isolation of the neurovascular bundle, fixing the two crural tips at the same level of albuginea of the two corpora cavernosa. Result: Twelve months after surgery the penis was completely straight without penile shortening and the patient was fully satisfied with his sexual life. Conclusion: The procedure enabled a perfect alignment of the cylinders along the longitudinal axis and penile prosthetic symmetry to obtain a good penile rigidity and a perfect penile straightening.

  12. Surgical treatment of tracheal collapse using pliable total ring prostheses: results in one experimental and 4 clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, S A; Holmberg, D L

    1999-11-01

    Pliable total ring prostheses were created from the polyvinyl chloride drip chambers of intravenous administration sets. The total ring prostheses were placed in one clinically normal research dog and in 4 client-owned dogs diagnosed with tracheal collapse. The research dog was euthanized one month after placement of the prostheses. Histopathological analysis of the trachea adjacent to the prostheses revealed a mild inflammatory response. The follow-up period for the clinical cases was from 4 months to 11 years. Radiographs taken and fluoroscopy performed 1 day to 5 months after surgery revealed improvement or resolution of the tracheal collapse. One dog was asymptomatic 28 weeks following surgery. Two dogs died 7 and 9 years after surgery, with one requiring intermittent medical management for coughing. They were euthanized for nonrespiratory illness. One dog had a persistent nonproductive cough, due to collapse of the mainstem bronchi, when last evaluated 4 months postoperatively. Pliable total ring prostheses provided adequate stability to the trachea and had the advantage of conforming to the trachea and being easy to create, place, and suture. PMID:10563237

  13. Reward functions of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-07-01

    Besides their fundamental movement function evidenced by Parkinsonian deficits, the basal ganglia are involved in processing closely linked non-motor, cognitive and reward information. This review describes the reward functions of three brain structures that are major components of the basal ganglia or are closely associated with the basal ganglia, namely midbrain dopamine neurons, pedunculopontine nucleus, and striatum (caudate nucleus, putamen, nucleus accumbens). Rewards are involved in learning (positive reinforcement), approach behavior, economic choices and positive emotions. The response of dopamine neurons to rewards consists of an early detection component and a subsequent reward component that reflects a prediction error in economic utility, but is unrelated to movement. Dopamine activations to non-rewarded or aversive stimuli reflect physical impact, but not punishment. Neurons in pedunculopontine nucleus project their axons to dopamine neurons and process sensory stimuli, movements and rewards and reward-predicting stimuli without coding outright reward prediction errors. Neurons in striatum, besides their pronounced movement relationships, process rewards irrespective of sensory and motor aspects, integrate reward information into movement activity, code the reward value of individual actions, change their reward-related activity during learning, and code own reward in social situations depending on whose action produces the reward. These data demonstrate a variety of well-characterized reward processes in specific basal ganglia nuclei consistent with an important function in non-motor aspects of motivated behavior. PMID:26838982

  14. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  15. Basal Cell Carcinoma in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Flohil (Sophie)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThere are many different cutaneous malignancies, but malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represent approximately 98% of all skin cancers.In literature, these three skin cancers are often divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC

  16. Impact of fixed implant supported prostheses in edentulous patients: protocol for a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Carolina S; Saka, Constanza H; Rada, Gabriel; Valenzuela, Daniela D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Edentulism is a debilitating and irreversible condition described as the ‘final marker of disease burden for oral health’. Therapy with dental implants is being used on a large scale to replace missing teeth and to rehabilitate edentulous patients with overdentures and implant supported fixed dentures as a method of solving the problem of instability and lack of retention associated with conventional removable prostheses. Fixed implant supported prostheses are an alternative for implant rehabilitation treatment that allow patients to have new fixed teeth. They can be indicated in partial or total edentulous patients, and they can replace single teeth, or teeth and supporting tissues (hybrid prosthesis). They overcome the limitations of conventional dentures, increasing stability and retention, providing functional and psychological advantages for the patients. Methods and analysis We will electronically search for randomised controlled trials evaluating the effects of fixed implant supported prostheses in edentulous patients in the following databases: Pubmed/MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. We will also try to obtain literature screening references of included studies, searching for trial protocols in the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, reviewing International Team for Implantology conference proceedings and searching for non-published studies through Open Gray. Two researchers will independently undertake selection of studies, data extraction and assessment of the quality of the included studies. Data synthesis and subgroup analyses will be performed using special Review Manager software. Data will be combined in a meta-analysis using a random effects model. Results The results will be presented as risk ratios for dichotomous data, and as mean difference or standardised mean difference for continuous data. Ethics and dissemination No ethics approval is considered necessary. The results

  17. A biodegradable gentamicin-hydroxyapatite-coating for infection prophylaxis in cementless hip prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Neut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A degradable, poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, gentamicin-loaded prophylactic coating for hydroxyapatite (HA-coated cementless hip prostheses is developed with similar antibacterial efficacy as offered by gentamicin-loaded cements for fixing traditional, cemented prostheses in bone. We describe the development pathway, from in vitro investigation of antibiotic release and antibacterial properties of this PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating in different in vitro models to an evaluation of its efficacy in preventing implant-related infection in rabbits. Bone in-growth in the absence and presence of the coating was investigated in a canine model. The PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating showed high-burst release, with antibacterial efficacy in agar-assays completely disappearing after 4 days, minimising risk of inducing antibiotic resistance. Gentamicin-sensitive and gentamicin-resistant staphylococci were killed by the antibiotic-loaded coating, in a simulated prosthesis-related interfacial gap. PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coatings prevented growth of bioluminescent staphylococci around a miniature-stem mounted in bacterially contaminated agar, as observed using bio-optical imaging. PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coated pins inserted in bacterially contaminated medullary canals in rabbits caused a statistically significant reduction in infection rates compared to HA-coated pins without gentamicin. Bone ingrowth to PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coated pins, in condylar defects of Beagle dogs was not impaired by the presence of the degradable, gentamicin-loaded coating. In conclusion, the PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating constitutes an effective strategy for infection prophylaxis in cementless prostheses.

  18. High-density EMG e-textile systems for the control of active prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farina, Dario; Lorrain, Thomas; Negro, Francesco; Jiang, Ning

    Myoelectric control of active prostheses requires electrode systems that are easy to apply for daily repositioning of the electrodes by the user. In this study we propose the use of Smart Fabric and Interactive Textile (SFIT) systems as an alternative solution for recording high-density EMG signals...... which were classified with linear discriminant analysis. The average classification accuracy for the nine tasks was 89.1 1.9 %. These results show that SFIT systems can be used as an effective way for muscle-machine interfacing....

  19. Full Mouth Rehabilitation of an Ectodermal Dysplasia Patient with Implant-Supported Prostheses: A Clinical Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahab Ghoveizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Full mouth rehabilitation in patients with ectodermal dysplasia (ED is difficult to manage, especially because the afflicted individuals are quite young when they are evaluated for treatment; therefore, esthetics is an important concern. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a 19-year-old girl diagnosed with ectodermal dysplasia. Eleven implants were placed in the maxilla and mandible along with bone grafting to the upper jaw and both arches were constructed by metal-ceramic implant-supported fixed prostheses. This treatment plan seems to be favorable for ED patients.

  20. Inlay-retained zirconia fixed dental prostheses: modified designs for a completely adhesive approach

    OpenAIRE

    Monaco, C.; CARDELLI, P.; Ozcan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there are many options for single-tooth replacement: metal-ceramic, all-ceramic, direct or indirect fibre-reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) or implants. Inlay-retained FDPs may especially be indicated when adjacent teeth have been previously restored and when implant placement is not possible or not indicated. In such cases, both metal-ceramic and fibre-reinforced composite FDPs have certain disadvantages. In this paper, we describe the use of all-ceramic inlay-re...

  1. Endothelial cells seeded and sheared on extracellular matrix proteins-coated vascular prostheses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlupáč, Jaroslav; Filová, Elena; Riedel, Tomáš; Brynda, Eduard; Remy-Zolghadri, M.; Bareille, R.; Fernandez, P.; Daculsi, R.; Bordenave, L.; Bačáková, Lucie

    Amsterdam: Marathon International, 2008. ---. [World Biomaterials Congress /8./. 28.05.2008-01.06.2008, Amsterdam] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011301; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4050202; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500110564 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400500507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : spo2 * endothelial cells * stear stress * extracellular matrix prostheses Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  2. Investigation of Nanostructured Thin Films Adhesion used to Improve Tribological Characteristics of Hip Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L. Badita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hip prosthesis is a complex mechanical biotribosystem with multiple functions. Under the action of cyclic dynamic loadings, developed in a biological adversely environment, it can lose the optimal functionality during the time. To improve mechanical characteristics of hip prostheses we deposited TiN films on SS316Lsteel substrates by pulse laser deposition method (PLD. Adhesion strength of the layer on the substrate was evaluated by scratch tests accompanied by different microscopy methods. Following these studies, we believe that the essential factor for increasing the hardness of femoral heads with thin layers is to provide a strong adherent coating to the substrate using PLD.

  3. Intraocular and extraocular cameras for retinal prostheses: Effects of foveation by means of visual prosthesis simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Benjamin Patrick

    Blindness due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa is unfortunately both widespread and largely incurable. Advances in visual prostheses that can restore functional vision in those afflicted by these diseases have evolved rapidly from new areas of research in ophthalmology and biomedical engineering. This thesis is focused on further advancing the state-of-the-art of both visual prostheses and implantable biomedical devices. A novel real-time system with a high performance head-mounted display is described that enables enhanced realistic simulation of intraocular retinal prostheses. A set of visual psychophysics experiments is presented using the visual prosthesis simulator that quantify, in several ways, the benefit of foveation afforded by an eye-pointed camera (such as an eye-tracked extraocular camera or an implantable intraocular camera) as compared with a head-pointed camera. A visual search experiment demonstrates a significant improvement in the time to locate a target on a screen when using an eye-pointed camera. A reach and grasp experiment demonstrates a 20% to 70% improvement in time to grasp an object when using an eye-pointed camera, with the improvement maximized when the percept is blurred. A navigation and mobility experiment shows a 10% faster walking speed and a 50% better ability to avoid obstacles when using an eye-pointed camera. Improvements to implantable biomedical devices are also described, including the design and testing of VLSI-integrable positive mobile ion contamination sensors and humidity sensors that can validate the hermeticity of biomedical device packages encapsulated by hermetic coatings, and can provide early warning of leaks or contamination that may jeopardize the implant. The positive mobile ion contamination sensors are shown to be sensitive to externally applied contamination. A model is proposed to describe sensitivity as a function of device geometry, and verified experimentally. Guidelines are

  4. Fixed dental prostheses with vertical tooth preparations without finish lines: A report of two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Solá-Ruíz, María Fernanda; Chust, César; Ferreiroa, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Tooth abutments can be prepared to receive fixed dental prostheses with different types of finish lines. The literature reports different complications arising from tooth preparation techniques, including gingival recession. Vertical preparation without a finish line is a technique whereby the abutments are prepared by introducing a diamond rotary instrument into the sulcus to eliminate the cementoenamel junction and to create a new prosthetic cementoenamel junction determined by the prosthetic margin. This article describes 2 patients whose dental abutments were prepared to receive ceramic restorations using vertical preparation without a finish line. PMID:26774314

  5. Efficacy of cleansing agents in killing microorganisms in mixed species biofilms present on silicone facial prostheses-an in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariani, Nina; Visser, Anita; Teulings, Margot R. I. M.; Dijk, Melissa; Rahardjo, Tri Budi W.; Vissink, Arjan; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of different cleansing agents in killing mixed species biofilms on silicone facial prostheses. Two bacterial and three yeast strains, isolated from silicone facial prostheses, were selected for the mixed species biofilms. A variety of agents used

  6. Atrophy of the basal ganglia as the initial diagnostic sign of germinoma in the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germ-cell tumors of the central nervous system generally develop in the midline, but the tumors can also occur in the basal ganglia and/or thalamus. However, MR images have rarely been documented in the early stage of the tumor in these regions. We retrospectively reviewed MR images obtained on admission and approximately 3 years earlier in two patients with germinoma in the basal ganglia, and compared them with CT. In addition to hyperdensity on CT, both hyperintensity on T1-weighted images and a small hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted images were commonly seen in the basal ganglia. These findings may be early MRI signs of germinoma in this region, and the earliest and most characteristic diagnostic feature on MRI was atrophy of the basal ganglia, which was recognizable before development of hemiparesis. (orig.)

  7. Novel missense mutation in the L1 gene in a child with corpus callosum agenesis, retardation, adducted thumbs, spastic paraparesis, and hydrocephalus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sztriha, L; Frossard, P; Hofstra, RMW; Verlind, E; Nork, M

    2000-01-01

    Corpus callosum agenesis, retardation, adducted thumbs, spastic paraparesis, and hydrocephalus (CRASH syndrome) is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by mutations in the neuronal cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1CAM) gene. L1 plays a key role in axon outgrowth and pathfinding during the development o

  8. Preserving the Posttrapeziectomy Space with a Human Acellular Dermal Matrix Spacer: A Pilot Case Series of Patients with Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline A. Yao, MD; Chandra V. Ellis, MD; Myles J. Cohen, MD; David A. Kulber, MD

    2013-01-01

    Background: Advanced thumb carpometacarpal arthritis is widely treated with trapeziectomy and tendon interposition despite donor-site morbidities. Trapeziectomy alone leaves a postresection space, leading to proximal metacarpal migration and scaphoid/trapezoid impingement. Prosthetic implants have been unsuccessful due to particulate debris, silicone synovitis, osteolysis, and migration. Recent studies have shown successful use of allograft for interposition material in the posttrapeziectomy ...

  9. Functional anatomy of thalamus and basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, María-Trinidad; Barcia, Carlos; Navarro, Juana Mari

    2002-08-01

    THALAMUS: The human thalamus is a nuclear complex located in the diencephalon and comprising of four parts (the hypothalamus, the epythalamus, the ventral thalamus, and the dorsal thalamus). The thalamus is a relay centre subserving both sensory and motor mechanisms. Thalamic nuclei (50-60 nuclei) project to one or a few well-defined cortical areas. Multiple cortical areas receive afferents from a single thalamic nucleus and send back information to different thalamic nuclei. The corticofugal projection provides positive feedback to the "correct" input, while at the same time suppressing irrelevant information. Topographical organisation of the thalamic afferents and efferents is contralateral, and the lateralisation of the thalamic functions affects both sensory and motoric aspects. Symptoms of lesions located in the thalamus are closely related to the function of the areas involved. An infarction or haemorrhage thalamic lesion can develop somatosensory disturbances and/or central pain in the opposite hemibody, analgesic or purely algesic thalamic syndrome characterised by contralateral anaesthesia (or hypaesthesia), contralateral weakness, ataxia and, often, persistent spontaneous pain. BASAL GANGLIA: Basal ganglia form a major centre in the complex extrapyramidal motor system, as opposed to the pyramidal motor system (corticobulbar and corticospinal pathways). Basal ganglia are involved in many neuronal pathways having emotional, motivational, associative and cognitive functions as well. The striatum (caudate nucleus, putamen and nucleus accumbens) receive inputs from all cortical areas and, throughout the thalamus, project principally to frontal lobe areas (prefrontal, premotor and supplementary motor areas) which are concerned with motor planning. These circuits: (i) have an important regulatory influence on cortex, providing information for both automatic and voluntary motor responses to the pyramidal system; (ii) play a role in predicting future events

  10. Insulin Degludec, The New Generation Basal Insulin or Just another Basal Insulin?

    OpenAIRE

    Sami N. Nasrallah; L. Raymond Reynolds

    2012-01-01

    The advances in recombinant DNA technology have led to an improvement in the properties of currently available long-acting insulin analogs. Insulin degludec, a new generation ultra-long-acting basal insulin, currently in phase 3 clinical trials, has a promising future in clinical use. When compared to its rival basal insulin analogs, a longer duration of action and lower incidence of hypoglycemic events in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients has been demonstrated.1,2 Its unique mechanism...

  11. Morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma peritumoral stroma varies among basal cell carcinoma subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Lesack Kyle; Naugler Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The role that the peritumoral stroma plays in the growth of tumours is currently poorly understood. In this manuscript the morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma subtypes and their associated peritumoral stromas are presented. Methods Ninety eight digitized basal cell carcinoma histology slides were categorized as infiltrative, nodular, or superficial subtypes, and were analysed using a combination of manual and computer-assisted approaches. The morphometric ...

  12. Surgical treatment of congenital clasped thumb%先天性钩状拇指的手术治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛; 张文同; 朱凌冬; 孙立泉; 于旸; 王广宇; 李开升

    2010-01-01

    Objective To present the surgical management of congenital clasped thumb.Methods The clinical data of 17 patients with congenital clasped thumb(CCT)were analyzed retrospectively.Thirty four affected hands of 17 patients with an average of 7 years and 9 months were recruited in this study.According to the Weckesser's classification,of the 17 cases,9 were graded as type Ⅰ,5 were type Ⅱ.and three were type Ⅲ.The 9 patients with type Ⅰ CCT underwent corrective surgery to transfer the extensor indicis proprius or the extensor carpi radialis longus,and transplant the palmaris longus to reconstruct the function of the thumb extensor digitorum.Of the other 8 patients with type Ⅱ and Ⅲ CCT,the affected hands were treated by releasing the contracture of finger web,the articular capsule of metacarpophalangeal joint,posterior interosseous fascia and the metacarpal bone insertion of caput transversum musculi adductoris hallucis:besides these,the same surgical procedure used on type Ⅰ patients was also performed to correct the deformities.Resalts All patients have been followed up for 7 months to 15 years.Among them,the healing and function of the fingers were excellent in 11 patients (64.7%).good in 3(64.7%),moderate in 2(64.7%)middle,and poor in 1(5.9%).Conclusions The surgical management for congenital clasped thumb should be planned individually to achieve better outcomes.%目的 探讨先天性钩状拇指不同类型的手术治疗方法.方法 回顾分析山东大学齐鲁儿童医院小儿外科手术治疗的17例先天性钩状拇指的临床资料.17例均为双侧,共34手,年龄3~9岁(平均7岁9月);参照Weckesser分型.本组同一患儿双手分型相同,其中Ⅰ型9例(52.9%),Ⅱ型5例(29.4%),Ⅲ型3例(17.6%);Ⅰ型采用示指固有伸肌转移或桡侧腕长伸肌和掌长肌腱移植重建拇指伸肌功能;Ⅱ、Ⅲ型通过松解指蹼挛缩、掌指关节关节囊、背侧骨问筋膜及拇收肌横头第三掌骨止点.并采用示

  13. The effect of the Tom Thumb dwarfing gene on grain size and grain number of wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tom Thumb dwarfing gene, Rht3, like the related genes Rht1 and Rht2 from Norin 10, has pleiotropic effects on individual ear yields, and grain protein concentrations. An experiment was conducted in which tiller number per plant and grain number per spike were restricted to ascertain whether reduced grain size and protein content are primary or secondary competitive effects in near-isogenic lines. The potential for grain growth was shown to be identical in Rht3 and rht genotypes when grain set was restricted, indicating that the primary effect of the gene is to increase spikelet fertility. Nitrogen accumulation within the grain was also affected by inter-grain competition but decreased nitrogen yields per plant indicated that reduced protein levels are, in part, a primary effect of the gene. Analysis of individual grain yields within Rht3 and rht spikes showed that the gene affected developmental 'dominance' relationships within the spike. (author)

  14. What do the basal ganglia do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, P; Marsden, C D

    1998-06-13

    We propose that the basal ganglia support a basic attentional mechanism operating to bind input to output in the executive forebrain. Such focused attention provides the automatic link between voluntary effort, sensory input, and the calling up and operation of a sequence of motor programmes or thoughts. The physiological basis for this attentional mechanism may lie in the tendency of distributed, but related, cortical activities to synchronise in the gamma (30 to 50 Hz) band, as occurs in the visual cortex. Coherent and synchronised elements are more effective when convergence occurs during successive stages of processing, and in this way may come together to give the one gestalt or action. We suggest that the basal ganglia have a major role in facilitating this aspect of neuronal processing in the forebrain, and that loss of this function contributes to parkinsonism and abulia. PMID:9635969

  15. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

    OpenAIRE

    Lamos EM; Younk LM; Davis SN

    2016-01-01

    Elizabeth M Lamos,1 Lisa M Younk,2 Stephen N Davis3 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, 2Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Introduction: Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with in...

  16. Linear Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ichinokawa, Yuko; Ohtuki, Akiko; Hattori, Mariko; Sadamasa, Hiroko; Hiruma, Masataro; Matumoto, Toshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) presents with diverse clinical features, and several morphologic and histologic variants of BCC have been reported [Sexton et al.: J Am Acad Dermatol 1990;23:1118-1126]. Linear BCC was first described as a new clinical subtype in 1985 by Lewis [Int J Dematol 1985;24:124-125]. Here, we present a case of linear BCC that we recently encountered in an elderly Japanese patient, and review other cases reported in Japan.

  17. Basal ganglia lesions in children and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The term “basal ganglia” refers to caudate and lentiform nuclei, the latter composed of putamen and globus pallidus, substantia nigra and subthalamic nuclei and these deep gray matter structures belong to the extrapyramidal system. Many diseases may present as basal ganglia abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) – to a lesser degree – allow for detection of basal ganglia injury. In many cases, MRI alone does not usually allow to establish diagnosis but together with the knowledge of age and circumstances of onset and clinical course of the disease is a powerful tool of differential diagnosis. The lesions may be unilateral: in Rassmussen encephalitis, diabetes with hemichorea/hemiballism and infarction or – more frequently – bilateral in many pathologic conditions. Restricted diffusion is attributable to infarction, acute hypoxic–ischemic injury, hypoglycemia, Leigh disease, encephalitis and CJD. Contrast enhancement may be seen in cases of infarction and encephalitis. T1-hyperintensity of the lesions is uncommon and may be observed unilaterally in case of hemichorea/hemiballism and bilaterally in acute asphyxia in term newborns, in hypoglycemia, NF1, Fahr disease and manganese intoxication. Decreased signal intensity on GRE/T2*-weighted images and/or SWI indicating iron, calcium or hemosiderin depositions is observed in panthotenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy, Fahr disease (and other calcifications) as well as with the advancing age. There are a few papers in the literature reviewing basal ganglia lesions. The authors present a more detailed review with rich iconography from the own archive

  18. Basal cell carcinoma of the perineum

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Adriane Ann; Dabade, Tushar; Dandekar, Monisha; Rogers, Gary; Rosmarin, David

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer. Most BCCs are found on areas of UV-damaged skin, The study of BCCs of sun-protected regions, however, suggests a more complex pathogenesis. We present a case of BCC of the perineum in a man with no previous history of skin cancer. This is the first report of BCC in this region and one of a small body of cases arising on or near the genital and perianal regions.

  19. Basal ganglia lesions in children and adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika, E-mail: m.figatowska@mp.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Institute of Mother and Child, ul. Kasprzaka 17a, 01-211 Warsaw (Poland); Mierzewska, Hanna, E-mail: h.mierzewska@gmail.com [Department of Neurology of Children and Adolescents, Institute of Mother and Child, ul. Kasprzaka 17a, 01-211 Warsaw (Poland); Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta, E-mail: e-jurkiewicz@o2.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-05-15

    The term “basal ganglia” refers to caudate and lentiform nuclei, the latter composed of putamen and globus pallidus, substantia nigra and subthalamic nuclei and these deep gray matter structures belong to the extrapyramidal system. Many diseases may present as basal ganglia abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) – to a lesser degree – allow for detection of basal ganglia injury. In many cases, MRI alone does not usually allow to establish diagnosis but together with the knowledge of age and circumstances of onset and clinical course of the disease is a powerful tool of differential diagnosis. The lesions may be unilateral: in Rassmussen encephalitis, diabetes with hemichorea/hemiballism and infarction or – more frequently – bilateral in many pathologic conditions. Restricted diffusion is attributable to infarction, acute hypoxic–ischemic injury, hypoglycemia, Leigh disease, encephalitis and CJD. Contrast enhancement may be seen in cases of infarction and encephalitis. T1-hyperintensity of the lesions is uncommon and may be observed unilaterally in case of hemichorea/hemiballism and bilaterally in acute asphyxia in term newborns, in hypoglycemia, NF1, Fahr disease and manganese intoxication. Decreased signal intensity on GRE/T2*-weighted images and/or SWI indicating iron, calcium or hemosiderin depositions is observed in panthotenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy, Fahr disease (and other calcifications) as well as with the advancing age. There are a few papers in the literature reviewing basal ganglia lesions. The authors present a more detailed review with rich iconography from the own archive.

  20. A novel method for evaluating position of the stem of hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined a novel method designed to assess the position of the stem of hip prostheses following Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). Fifteen hip prostheses were scanned with a CT scanner in accordance with Gruen's zones. At the fourth zoning-layer of CT scanning, an XY coordinate system was attached to CT images. The origin of the coordinate system was placed at the center of the femoral medullary cavity. The X-axis was parallel to the posterior condylar axis of the distal femur; the arrowhead of the X-axis was directed toward the body's midline. Based on this observational methodology, stem tip position in the femoral medullary cavity was readily apparent in CT images when the CT window level ranged from 500 HU (hounsfield) to 600 HU and CT window width was 1500-2000 HU. These data (including the center-to-center distance (distance between the center of the femoral medullary cavity and the center of the stem tip), the ratio of the center-to-center distance to the radius of the femoral medullary cavity and the quadrant value) may be treated as the evaluative parameters of stem position in the femoral medullary cavity. (author)

  1. Distal Femur Morphology of Iranian Population and Correlation With Current Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtadaei, Mehdi; Moghimi, Javad; Shahhoseini, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maintaining proper size and rotation of components of total knee arthroplasty is mandatory for optimal longevity. Ethnical differences may affect the fitness of prostheses that were manufactured mainly based on Caucasian dimensions. Objectives: To evaluate the distal femur morphology of the Iranian population at the level of standard cuts simulated via computed tomography. Patients and Methods: During 2013, 150 consecutive patients (96 males and 54 females) from the outpatient Department of Orthopedic Surgery of Rasoul Akram Hospital with knee CT scans were studied. We entered cases with apparent normal extremity alignment and bone maturity. Exclusion criteria were history of fracture or conditions affecting knee profile. Standard cuts were simulated on the CT scan using the Marco Pacs program. For each bone, anteroposterior (AP), mediolateral (ML), and aspect ratio (ML/AP) were measured. Values were compared with the sizing of four currently available prostheses. Results: The mean age of the patients was 43 years (range: 17 to 80). All isolated parameters were higher in men significantly (P populations. Alterations to the shape of components should be considered to provide optimal coverage.

  2. Dose increments in ionizing radiation therapy in tissues immediately adjacent to metallic dental prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy in the area of the jaws and face may have harmful side effects on the tissues next to metallic dental prostheses because they increase the radiation dose. Different kinds of radiation were investigated (x-rays, gamma radiation, electron radiation and ultra-hard x-rays) and measurements carried through on different materials used in dentistry. To determine the radiation dose increment different dosimetric methods were used and compared with each other. With the aid of thin-layer beryllium oxide dosemeters it is possible to determine dose increments in the tissue directly at the surface of the material causing the dose increase. As compared to earlier publications the doses established in the adjacent layers are partly substantially higher. Tissue/gold irradiated with cobalt 60 increases the dose by a factor 2.2, if irradiated with 100 KV x-rays by a factor 58. A reduction of the dose is possible by insulation of the surrounding tissue from the metal using a different material. Plastics of the kind used for moulding in dentistry are an appropriate choice. However where the edges of dental crowns are embedded in the gingiva or pontic elements have contact to it, plastics of the necessary material thickness cannot be applied. The metallic prostheses should then be removed. (orig./HP)

  3. A simple method for screening photoelectric dyes towards their use for retinal prostheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuo T

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectric dyes absorb light and convert photon energy to electric potentials. To test whether these dyes could be used for retinal prostheses, a simple in vitro screening system was developed. Retinal neurons were cultured from the eyes of chick embryos at the 10-day embryonic stage, at which time no retinal photoreceptor cells have yet developed. Intracellular calcium elevation was observed with Fluo-4 in cultured retinal neurons before and after photoelectric dye was applied at varying concentrations to the culture medium. Five of 7 photoelectric dyes tested in this in vitro system induced intracellular calcium elevation in cultured chick retinal neurons. The intracellular calcium elevation generated by the 5 photoelectric dyes was blocked by extracellular calcium depletion in the case of all 5 dyes, and, except for one dye, by the presence of voltage-gated calcium channel blockers. The photoelectric dyes absorbed light under an inverted microscope and stimulated retinal neurons. This simple in vitro system allows the screening of photoelectric dyes which can be used for retinal prostheses.

  4. Photoelastic analysis of cemented or screwed implant-supported prostheses with different prosthetic connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonella, Bianca Piccolotto; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Ferraço, Renato; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; Carvalho, Paulo S Perri de; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution of different retention systems (screwed or cemented) associated with different prosthetic connections (external hexagon, internal hexagon, and Morse taper) in 3-unit implant-supported fixed partial dentures through photoelasticity. Six models were fabricated with photoelastic resin PL-2, and each model contained two implants of 4.0 × 10.0 mm. The models presented different retention systems (screwed and cemented) and different connections (external hexagon, internal hexagon, and Morse taper). The prostheses were standardized and fabricated in Ni-Cr alloy. A circular polariscope was used and axial and oblique (45°) loads of 100 N were applied in a universal testing machine. The results were photographed and analyzed qualitatively with a graphic software (Adobe Photoshop). The screwed retention system exhibited higher number of fringes for both axial and oblique loadings. The internal hexagon implant presented better and lower stress distribution for both cemented and screwed prostheses. The oblique loading increased the number of fringes in all models tested. The cemented retention system presented better stress distribution. The internal hexagon implant was more favorable according to the biomechanical standpoint. The oblique load increased stress in all systems and connections tested. PMID:21851260

  5. Use of two-axis joystick for control of externally powered shoulder disarticulation prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Lipschutz, BSME, CP

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We explored a new method for simple and accurate control of shoulder movement for externally powered shoulder disarticulation prostheses with a two-axis joystick. We tested 10 subjects with intact shoulders and arms to determine the average amount of shoulder motion and force available to control an electronic input device. We then applied this information to two different input strategies to examine their effectiveness: (1 a traditional rocker potentiometer and a pair of force-sensing resistors and (2 a two-axis joystick. Three nondisabled subjects and two subjects with shoulder disarticulation amputations attempted to control an experimental externally powered shoulder using both control strategies. Two powered arms were tested, one with powered flexion/extension and humeral rotation and one with powered flexion/extension and adduction/abduction. Overwhelmingly, the subjects preferred the joystick control, because it was more intuitively linked with their shoulder movement. Additionally, two motions (one in each axis could be controlled simultaneously. This pilot study provides valuable insight into an effective means of controlling high-level, externally powered prostheses with a two-axis joystick.

  6. [Patient satisfaction with removable implant-supported prostheses in the edentulous mandible].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzmann, Nicola U; Marinello, Carlo P

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate patients' satisfaction with removable implant restorations with two or four implants compared to a complete denture (CD) in the edentulous mandible. 20 patients in each group were asked to fill out a questionnaire ("Patient satisfaction related to the prosthetic restoration") before treatment, after six months and three years. With implant restorations, either implant-retained (IRET) or implant-supported (ISUP), greater improvements in prostheses retention and pain reduction were achieved in comparison to complete dentures. In addition, restrictions related to food selection were resolved for most implant patients. Despite great inter-individual differences, there was a tendency for larger improvements of almost all parameters with IRET, except chewing ability, which was rated best with ISUP. Long-term results revealed that patients with ISUP (four implants) assessed prostheses retention with the highest ratings compared to those with IRET and CD (p = 0,0147). These results indicate that an improvement in functional and psychological parameters can be achieved with two implants, whilst stabilization with four implants improves prosthesis retention, chewing ability and pain reduction in the long term. Maintenance efforts were more complex for implant restorations than for CD and imply a recall at least once a year. PMID:16610459

  7. [Technical aspects of treatments with single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersema, E J; Kreulen, C M; Latzke, P; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2014-05-01

    For the manufacture of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses, effective communication between dentist and dental technician is required. Mutual insight concerning the (im)possibilities of available treatments and technical options is prerequisitefor this communication. The manufacture of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses involves 4 phases: recording the required detailed information on the relevant teeth and the occlusal system, the technical adjustments, the technical design and the technical fabrication. These phases can be accomplished through an analogue or (semi)digital procedure. Pioneering developments are computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM), and computerised milling machines. Associated with this are 3 manufacturing methods which can be distinguished: the dental practice method, the dental laboratory method and the milling centre method. Materials applied are metal alloys and ceramics, while resins are used for provisional and transitional constructions. Due to the fact that the choice of material in the analogue procedure is limited, CAD/CAM offers more options, the digital procedure is expected to gain ground gradually. It is expected that this development will provide an impulse to higher quality. PMID:24881256

  8. Potential of modeling and simulations of bioengineered devices: Endoprostheses, prostheses and orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginestra, Paola Serena; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Fiorentino, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Modeling and simulation of prosthetic devices are the new tools investigated for the production of total customized prostheses. Computational simulations are used to evaluate the geometrical and material designs of a device while assessing its mechanical behavior. Data acquisition through magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography or laser scanning is the first step that gives information about the human anatomical structures; a file format has to be elaborated through computer-aided design software. Computer-aided design tools can be used to develop a device that respects the design requirements as, for instance, the human anatomy. Moreover, through finite element analysis software and the knowledge of loads and conditions the prostheses are supposed to face in vivo, it is possible to simulate, analyze and predict the mechanical behavior of the prosthesis and its effects on the surrounding tissues. Moreover, the simulations are useful to eventually improve the design (as geometry, materials, features) before the actual production of the device. This article presents an extensive analysis on the use of finite element modeling for the design, testing and development of prosthesis and orthosis devices. PMID:27095509

  9. Electromyographic evaluation of mastication and swallowing in elderly individuals with mandibular fixed implant-supported prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giédre Berretin-Felix

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of implant-supported oral rehabilitation in the mandible on the electromyographic activity during mastication and swallowing in edentulous elderly individuals. Fifteen patients aged more than 60 years were evaluated, being 10 females and 5 males. All patients were edentulous, wore removable complete dentures on both dental arches, and had the mandibular dentures replaced by implant-supported prostheses. All patients were submitted to electromyographic evaluation of the masseter, superior orbicularis oris muscles, and the submental muscles, before surgery and 3, 6 and 18 months postoperatively, using foods of different textures. The results obtained at the different periods were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test. Statistical analysis showed that only the masseter muscle had a significant loss in electromyographic activity (p<0.001, with a tendency of similar response for the submental muscles. Moreover, there was an increase in the activity of the orbicularis oris muscle during rubber chewing after treatment, yet without statistically significant difference. Mandibular fixed implant-supported prostheses in elderly individuals revealed a decrease in electromyographic amplitude for the masseter muscles during swallowing, which may indicate adaptation to new conditions of stability provided by fixation of the complete denture in the mandibular arch.

  10. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Kumar; Ashish Chauhan; Subhash Kashyap

    2016-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition ...

  11. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of Eclipse treatment planning system for effects on dose distribution of the hip prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Çatlı, Serap, E-mail: serapcatli@hotmail.com [Gazi University, Faculty of Sciences, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Tanır, Güneş [Gazi University, Faculty of Sciences, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of titanium, titanium alloy, and stainless steel hip prostheses on dose distribution based on the Monte Carlo simulation method, as well as the accuracy of the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 and 18 MV photon energies. In the present study the pencil beam convolution (PBC) method implemented in the Eclipse TPS was compared to the Monte Carlo method and ionization chamber measurements. The present findings show that if high-Z material is used in prosthesis, large dose changes can occur due to scattering. The variance in dose observed in the present study was dependent on material type, density, and atomic number, as well as photon energy; as photon energy increased back scattering decreased. The dose perturbation effect of hip prostheses was significant and could not be predicted accurately by the PBC method for hip prostheses. The findings show that for accurate dose calculation the Monte Carlo-based TPS should be used in patients with hip prostheses.

  12. Antibacterial Efficacy of a New Gentamicin-Coating for Cementless Prostheses Compared to Gentamicin-Loaded Bone Cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neut, Danielle; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Thompson, Jonathan I.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2011-01-01

    Cementless prostheses are increasingly popular but require alternative prophylactic measures than the use of antibiotic-loaded bone cements. Here, we determine the 24-h growth inhibition of gentamicin-releasing coatings from grit-blasted and porous-coated titanium alloys, and compare their antibacte

  13. No justification for cervical disk prostheses in clinical practice: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Donk, R.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate whether a beneficial clinical effect of cervical disk prostheses over conventional cervical diskectomy with fusion exists. METHODS: A literature search was completed ending February 4, 2009, that included the abstract books of recent major spine c

  14. The effect of buttermilk consumption on biofilm formation on silicone rubber voice prostheses in an artificial throat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; Bruinsma, G; van Meissenbruch, R; Leunisse, C; van der Mei, HC; Dijk, F; Albers, FVJ

    1998-01-01

    Biofilm formation on indwelling silicone rubber voice prostheses in laryngectomized patients is still the main reason for dysfunction of the valve, leading to frequent replacements. Within patient support groups in The Netherlands, laryngectomees have suggested that the consumption of buttermilk pro

  15. Mechanosensation and maximum bite force in edentulous patients rehabilitated with bimaxillary implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Luraschi, Julien; Schimmel, Martin; Bernard, Jean-Pierre; Gallucci, German O; Belser, Urs Christophe; Muller, Frauke

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare tactile sensitivity and maximum voluntary bite force (MBF) of edentulous patients with implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (IFDP/IFDPs) to those wearing complete dentures (CG-CC) and fully dentate subjects (CG-DD).

  16. Study of the milling strategy on the tool life and the surface quality for knee prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boujelbene

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this research is to make a study about the influence of the tool trajectory’s generation onits tool life and the improvement of the surface quality in multi-axis milling at high speed machining of the kneeprostheses. The material used for this study is the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V ELI (TA6V ELI for implant.Design/methodology/approach: The methodology has consisted on proving a serie of parameters combinationswith various machining configurations and various programs of the tool trajectory’s generation in three and fiveaxes (the axis of the tool is maintained normal on the machined surface by rotation around Y axis; the axis ofthe tool is maintained according to axis Z; the axis of the tool is tilted around the Y axis. And determined theinfluence of the machining strategy over of the tool life.Findings: The knee prostheses are constructed with important mechanical resistance materials withcomplex form, which require high performance cutting tools and high cost. The good generation’s trajectoryof the cutting tool in multi-axes milling permits to minimize flank wear. High speed Machining offersa considerable profit in the capacity of surface quality, duration of the machining and polishing operationsand consequently in improvement productivity. But the choice of the cutting speed must be recommendedby the couple tool-materials.Research limitations/implications: A possible future work would be the development of a generalthe phenomenal of the residual stress of various machining configurations and various programsof the tool trajectory’s generation and the knee protheses life. The behaviour of the residual stress studiesare planed in the future.Practical implications: The relationship found between the milling strategy on the tool life and surfacequality work piece has an important practical implication since it allows selecting the best cutting conditionfor knee prostheses. Results are of great importance in the quality

  17. The Reality of Myoelectric Prostheses: Understanding What Makes These Devices Difficult for Some Users to Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, Alix; Kenney, Laurence; Thies, Sibylle; Galpin, Adam; Head, John

    2016-01-01

    Users of myoelectric prostheses can often find them difficult to control. This can lead to passive-use of the device or total rejection, which can have detrimental effects on the contralateral limb due to overuse. Current clinically available prostheses are "open loop" systems, and although considerable effort has been focused on developing biofeedback to "close the loop," there is evidence from laboratory-based studies that other factors, notably improving predictability of response, may be as, if not more, important. Interestingly, despite a large volume of research aimed at improving myoelectric prostheses, it is not currently known which aspect of clinically available systems has the greatest impact on overall functionality and everyday usage. A protocol has, therefore, been designed to assess electromyographic (EMG) skill of the user and predictability of the prosthesis response as significant parts of the control chain, and to relate these to functionality and everyday usage. Here, we present the protocol and results from early pilot work. A set of experiments has been developed. First, to characterize user skill in generating the required level of EMG signal, as well as the speed with which users are able to make the decision to activate the appropriate muscles. Second, to measure unpredictability introduced at the skin-electrode interface, in order to understand the effects of the socket-mounted electrode fit under different loads on the variability of time taken for the prosthetic hand to respond. To evaluate prosthesis user functionality, four different outcome measures are assessed. Using a simple upper limb functional task prosthesis users are assessed for (1) success of task completion, (2) task duration, (3) quality of movement, and (4) gaze behavior. To evaluate everyday usage away from the clinic, the symmetricity of their real-world arm use is assessed using activity monitoring. These methods will later be used to assess a prosthesis user cohort to

  18. Simulation of epiretinal prostheses - Evaluation of geometrical factors affecting stimulation thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertsch Arnaud

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An accurate understanding of the electrical interaction between retinal prostheses and retinal tissue is important to design effective devices. Previous studies have used modelling approaches to simulate electric fields generated by epiretinal prostheses in saline and to simulate retinal ganglion cell (RGC activation using passive or/and active biophysical models of the retina. These models have limited scope for studying an implanted human retinal prosthesis as they often do not account for real geometry and composition of the prosthesis-retina interface. This interface consists of real dimensions and location of stimulation and ground electrodes that are separated by the retinal tissue and surrounded by physiological fluids. Methods In this study, we combined the prosthesis-retina interface elements into a framework to evaluate the geometrical factors affecting stimulation thresholds for epiretinal prostheses used in clinical human trials, as described by Balthasar et al. in their Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (IOVS paper published in 2008 using the Argus I epiretinal implants. Finite element method (FEM based computations were used to estimate threshold currents based on a threshold criterion employing a passive electric model of the retina. Results Threshold currents and impedances were estimated for different electrode-retina distances. The profiles and the values for thresholds and impedances obtained from our simulation framework are within the range of measured values in the only elaborate published clinical trial until now using Argus I epiretinal implants. An estimation of resolution for the electrodes used in these trials was provided. Our results reiterate the importance of close proximity between electrodes and retina for safe and efficient retinal stimulation. Conclusions The validation of our simulation framework being relevant for epiretinal prosthesis research is derived from the good

  19. Early Onset Basal Cell Carcinoma: Surgical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Betekhtin M.; Ananiev J.; Tchernev G.; Zisova L.; Philipov S.; Hristova R.

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most frequent non-melanoma skin cancer. Only 5-15% of BCC cases can be found in patients aged 20-40 years (so-called early onset). The early onset BCC is characterized by active and aggressive tumour growth, clinically presenting in most of the cases as a morpheaform, locally infiltrating or recurrent BCC. Despite the advances in the study of the pathogenesis of this tumour, surgery remains the most used, most effective and most suitable treatment modality. W...

  20. Mössbauer spectroscopy of Basal Ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miglierini, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.miglierini@stuba.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava, Slovakia and Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials (Czech Republic); Lančok, Adriana [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR, v. v. i., 250 68 Husinec-Řež 1001 (Czech Republic); Kopáni, Martin [Institute of Medical Physics, Biophysics, Informatics and Telemedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Sasinkova 2, 811 08 Bratislava (Slovakia); Boča, Roman [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of SS. Cyril and Methodius, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)

    2014-10-27

    Chemical states, structural arrangement, and magnetic features of iron deposits in biological tissue of Basal Ganglia are characterized. The methods of SQUID magnetometry and electron microscopy are employed. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is used as a principal method of investigation. Though electron microscopy has unveiled robust crystals (1-3 μm in size) of iron oxides, they are not manifested in the corresponding {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra. The latter were acquired at 300 K and 4.2 K and resemble ferritin-like behavior.

  1. Mössbauer spectroscopy of Basal Ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical states, structural arrangement, and magnetic features of iron deposits in biological tissue of Basal Ganglia are characterized. The methods of SQUID magnetometry and electron microscopy are employed. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is used as a principal method of investigation. Though electron microscopy has unveiled robust crystals (1-3 μm in size) of iron oxides, they are not manifested in the corresponding 57Fe Mössbauer spectra. The latter were acquired at 300 K and 4.2 K and resemble ferritin-like behavior

  2. Epidemiology of basal-like breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Millikan, Robert C.; Newman, Beth; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Moorman, Patricia G.; Conway, Kathleen; Smith, Lisa. V.; Labbok, Miriam H; Geradts, Joseph; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Jackson, Susan; Nyante, Sarah; Livasy, Chad; Carey, Lisa; Earp, H. Shelton; Perou, Charles M

    2007-01-01

    Risk factors for the newly identified “intrinsic” breast cancer subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, basal-like and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive/estrogen receptor-negative) were determined in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population-based, case–control study of African-American and white women. Immunohistochemical markers were used to subtype 1,424 cases of invasive and in situ breast cancer, and case subtypes were compared to 2,022 controls. Luminal A, the most common s...

  3. Nonsurgical Treatment Options for Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary H. Lien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC remains the most common form of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC in Caucasians, with perhaps as many as 2 million new cases expected to occur in the United States in 2010. Many treatment options, including surgical interventions and nonsurgical alternatives, have been utilized to treat BCC. In this paper, two non-surgical options, imiquimod therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT, will be discussed. Both modalities have demonstrated acceptable disease control rates, cosmetically superior outcomes, and short-term cost-effectiveness. Further studies evaluating long-term cure rates and long-term cost effectiveness of imiquimod therapy and PDT are needed.

  4. Rough surfaces of titanium and titanium alloys for implants and prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium and titanium alloys for dental implants and hip prostheses were surface-treated and/or covered by metallic or ceramic rough layers after being submitted to sand blasting. The goal of these treatments is to improve the surface roughness and consequently the osteointegration, the fixation, and the stability of the implant. The microstructure of titanium and titanium alloys submitted to these treatments has been studied and correlated to their mechanical behavior. As-treated/covered and mechanically tested surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Structural analyses performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), mainly in cross-section, reveal the degree of adherence and cohesion between the surface layer and the substrate (implant). We observed that, although the same convenient surface roughness was obtained with the two types of process, many characteristics as structural properties and mechanical behavior are very different

  5. An optical coherence tomography investigation of materials defects in ceramic fixed partial dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Todea, Carmen; Rominu, Mihai; Laissue, Philippe L.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    Metal ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial prostheses are mainly used in the frontal part of the dental arch because for esthetics reasons. The masticatory stress may induce fractures of the bridges. There are several factors that are associated with the stress state created in ceramic restorations, including: thickness of ceramic layers, mechanical properties of the materials, elastic modulus of the supporting substrate material, direction, magnitude and frequency of applied load, size and location of occlusal contact areas, residual stresses induced by processing or pores, restoration-cement interfacial defects and environmental defects. The fractures of these bridges lead to functional, esthetic and phonetic disturbances which finally render the prosthetic treatment inefficient. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detection and analysis of possible material defects in metal-ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  6. Designing and constructing prototype hand and forearm models (pronation and supination for myoelectric hand prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Marcela Sánchez R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation engineering’s work consists of developing products associated with physical rehabilitation, mainly prostheses for upper and lower extremity amputees. Developing such products implies mechanical design and the suitable selection of materials and manufacturing process to replace some of the functions which a patient may have lost. The work presented here was aimed at establishing an optimal solution for substituting the needs of a patient having had the forearm amputated at the proximal level of the elbow. This article describes the whole process followed, from understanding the medical language to developing a functional prototype able to replace the arm’s two functions (i.e. the hand and forearm’s pronation and supination movements.

  7. Shock machine for the mechanical behaviour of hip prostheses: a description of performance capabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Uribe, Juliana; Forest, Bernard; 10.1002/ls.167

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the behaviour of a shock machine designed for testing hip prostheses. A microseparation between head and cup occurs inducing a shock of several times the body weight, leading to fracture of ceramic femoral components. Femoral heads and cups of diameter 32 mm manufactured from alumina were tested in dry and wet conditions. Implants were subjected to shocks with a load profile of 9 kN load at 2 Hz and various microseparations. Position is monitored and force is measured with two acquisition systems. The working range and the device capabilities were investigated. Only cups tested in dry conditions failed. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed intergranular and transgranular fractures. Two wear stripes were observed on the heads. Three-dimensional roughness of wear stripes was measured. Since experimental results are in good agreement with retrieved femoral heads, the shocks machine reproduces the in vivo degradations.

  8. The mechanical performance of weft-knitted/electrospun bilayer small diameter vascular prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Guan, Ying; Kim, Soo-Hyun; King, Martin W

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for a significant mortality rate worldwide. Autologous vessels, such as the saphenous vein and the internal mammary artery, are currently the gold standard materials for by-pass surgery. However, they may not always be available due to aging, previous harvesting or the pre-existing arterial disease. Synthetic commercial ePTFE and polyester (PET) are not suitable for small diameter vascular grafts (PLA) and poly(lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) polymers to mimic the multilayer structure of native arteries. We also designed the prostheses to provide some of the required mechanical properties. While the bilayer structure had excellent circumferential tensile strength, bursting strength and suture retention resistance, the radial compliance did not show any observable improvement. PMID:27111627

  9. Abdominal ventral hernia repair with current biological prostheses: an experimental large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanwix, Matthew G; Nam, Arthur J; Hui-Chou, Helen G; Ferrari, Jonathan P; Aberman, Harold M; Hawes, Michael L; Keledjian, Kaspar M; Jones, Luke S; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2011-04-01

    Biologic prostheses have emerged to address the limitations of synthetic materials for ventral hernia repairs; however, they lack experimental comparative data. Fifteen swine were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 bioprosthetic groups (DermaMatrix, AlloDerm, and Permacol) after creation of a full thickness ventral fascial defect. At 15 weeks, host incorporation, hernia recurrence, adhesion formation, neovascularization, inflammation, and biomechanical properties were assessed. No animals had hernia recurrence or eventration. DermaMatrix and Alloderm implants demonstrated more adhesions, greater inflammatory infiltration, and more longitudinal laxity, but near identical neovascularization and tensile strength to Permacol. We found that porcine acellular dermal products (Permacol) contain following essential properties of an ideal ventral hernia repair material: low inflammation, less elastin and stretch, lower adhesion rates and cost, and more contracture. The addition of lower cost xenogeneic acellular dermal products to the repertoire of available acellular dermal products demonstrates promise, but requires long-term clinical studies to verify advantages and efficacy. PMID:21042180

  10. Electrical stimulation of the brain and the development of cortical visual prostheses: An historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Philip M; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-01-01

    Rapid advances are occurring in neural engineering, bionics and the brain-computer interface. These milestones have been underpinned by staggering advances in micro-electronics, computing, and wireless technology in the last three decades. Several cortically-based visual prosthetic devices are currently being developed, but pioneering advances with early implants were achieved by Brindley followed by Dobelle in the 1960s and 1970s. We have reviewed these discoveries within the historical context of the medical uses of electricity including attempts to cure blindness, the discovery of the visual cortex, and opportunities for cortex stimulation experiments during neurosurgery. Further advances were made possible with improvements in electrode design, greater understanding of cortical electrophysiology and miniaturisation of electronic components. Human trials of a new generation of prototype cortical visual prostheses for the blind are imminent. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Hold Item. PMID:26348986

  11. Ultra Low-Power Algorithm Design for Implantable Devices: Application to Epilepsy Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriram Raghunathan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Low-power circuit design techniques have enabled the possibility of integrating signal processing and feature extraction algorithms on-board implantable medical devices, eliminating the need for wireless transfer of data outside the patient. Feature extraction algorithms also serve as valuable tools for modern-day artificial prostheses, made possible by implantable brain-computer-interface systems. This paper intends to review the challenges in designing feature extraction blocks for implantable devices, with specific focus on developing efficacious but computationally efficient algorithms to detect seizures. Common seizure detection features used to construct algorithms are evaluated and algorithmic, mathematical as well as circuit-level design techniques are suggested to effectively translate the algorithms into hardware implementations on low-power platforms.

  12. Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected orthopedic prostheses with ceftazidime-ciprofloxacin antibiotic combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouqui, P; Rousseau, M C; Stein, A; Drancourt, M; Raoult, D

    1995-11-01

    Indwelling device infections are associated with considerable morbidity and extremely high cost. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequent gram-negative etiologic agent associated with infections of indwelling catheters and foreign body implants. It is generally agreed that eradication of infection in the presence of a foreign body requires removal of the foreign body. Using a combination of ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin, we cured nine of nine patients with P. aeruginosa-infected osteosynthetic material and four of five patients with hip and knee prostheses without removing the foreign material. Follow-up was for a mean of 21 months (range, 6 to 60 months). Some patients experienced minor side effects (arthralgia in one patient and rash in another patient). We conclude that this combination is effective and safe and should be useful in the treatment of P. aeruginosa-infected orthopedic implants. PMID:8585720

  13. Characterization of a bioinspired elastin-polypropylene fumarate material for vascular prostheses applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Silvia; Barenghi, Rossella; Beke, Szabolcs; Ceseracciu, Luca; Romano, Ilaria; Sbrana, Francesca; Stagnaro, Paola; Brandi, Fernando; Vassalli, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    Vascular prostheses are widely used devices fundamental to avoid the effect of life-threatening diseases and defects. Besides a long experience in the fabrication of biomaterials for vascular applications, many issues still remain unattended. In particular, obtaining a bio-resorbable and bio-active scaffold is a challenge of paramount importance. We present a novel application in which a promising biodegradable polymer, poly-propylene fumarate (PPF), is printed using three dimensional laser-induced cross-linking micromachining device. To enhance the biological role of the scaffold, a bio-inspired approach was taken, by coating the surface of the PPF with elastin, the main constituent of the innermost layer of natural veins and arteries.

  14. Evolution of sensory structures in basal metazoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Dave K; Nakanishi, Nagayasu; Yuan, David; Camara, Anthony; Nichols, Scott A; Hartenstein, Volker

    2007-11-01

    Cnidaria have traditionally been viewed as the most basal animals with complex, organ-like multicellular structures dedicated to sensory perception. However, sponges also have a surprising range of the genes required for sensory and neural functions in Bilateria. Here, we: (1) discuss "sense organ" regulatory genes, including; sine oculis, Brain 3, and eyes absent, that are expressed in cnidarian sense organs; (2) assess the sensory features of the planula, polyp, and medusa life-history stages of Cnidaria; and (3) discuss physiological and molecular data that suggest sensory and "neural" processes in sponges. We then develop arguments explaining the shared aspects of developmental regulation across sense organs and between sense organs and other structures. We focus on explanations involving divergent evolution from a common ancestral condition. In Bilateria, distinct sense-organ types share components of developmental-gene regulation. These regulators are also present in basal metazoans, suggesting evolution of multiple bilaterian organs from fewer antecedent sensory structures in a metazoan ancestor. More broadly, we hypothesize that developmental genetic similarities between sense organs and appendages may reflect descent from closely associated structures, or a composite organ, in the common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria, and we argue that such similarities between bilaterian sense organs and kidneys may derive from a multifunctional aggregations of choanocyte-like cells in a metazoan ancestor. We hope these speculative arguments presented here will stimulate further discussion of these and related questions. PMID:21669752

  15. The Sun's immutable basal quiet atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, W.; Wallace, L.

    2003-02-01

    We employ limb darkening, spectral energy distribution (color), and center-disk spectrum line strength to investigate photospheric temporal variability. Current limb-darkening curves agree to 1% with past observations taken at different epochs extending back to 1975. Concerning color, from the data of Labs and Neckel (Cox, 1999) we deduce that the solar limb is 1000 Å more red than disk center. But when integrated over the entire disk to represent the Sun-as-a-star, the color shift is only 30 Å. Color is therefore not a very sensitive indicator of full-disk photospheric change. We examine the center-disk time series for C 5380 Å and Fe 5379 Å equivalent width and the Ca K index. The ratio C 5380/Fe 5379 in equivalent width is 0.4221+0.00011 (+/-0.00003) y-1, indicating secular change but with no cycle modulation. Converted to temperature this variance amounts to +/-0.028 K. This is in contrast to the full-disk cycle modulation of these lines reported by Gray and Livingston (1997b). Ca K index also exhibits no cycle variation at disk center. Taking into account these findings, plus the small fraction of the photosphere occupied by magnetic elements as revealed in high-resolution G-band pictures, we suggest that cycle magnetic fields thread through the basal atmosphere without physical effect; that the basal quiet atmosphere is observationally immutable to the magnetic cycle within the limits given above.

  16. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Syringin from the Bark of Ilex rotunda Thumb Using Response Surface Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Wang; Li-Chun Zhao; Wei Li; Xin Deng; Xiang-Hua Xia; Jian Liang; Geng-Liang Yang; Ying He

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a rapid extraction method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of syringin from the bark of Ilex rotunda Thumb using response surface methodology (RSM) is described. The syringin was analyzed and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV detection (HPLC-UV). The extraction solvent, extraction temperature and extraction time, the three main factors for UAE, were optimized with Box-Behnken design (BBD) to obtain the highest ...

  17. The Gram-Charlier A Series based Extended Rule-of-Thumb for Bandwidth Selection in Univariate and Multivariate Kernel Density Estimations

    OpenAIRE

    C, Dharmani Bhaveshkumar

    2015-01-01

    The article derives a novel Gram-Charlier A (GCA) Series based Extended Rule-of-Thumb (ExROT) for bandwidth selection in Kernel Density Estimation (KDE). There are existing various bandwidth selection rules achieving minimization of the Asymptotic Mean Integrated Square Error (AMISE) between the estimated probability density function (PDF) and the actual PDF. The rules differ in a way to estimate the integration of the squared second order derivative of an unknown PDF $(f(\\cdot))$, identified...

  18. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Kinetics Demonstrate Long Range Allosteric Effects of Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deredge, Daniel; Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A; Wintrode, Patrick L

    2016-05-01

    New nonnucleoside analogs are being developed as part of a multi-drug regimen to treat hepatitis C viral infections. Particularly promising are inhibitors that bind to the surface of the thumb domain of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B). Numerous crystal structures have been solved showing small molecule non-nucleoside inhibitors bound to the hepatitis C viral polymerase, but these structures alone do not define the mechanism of inhibition. Our prior kinetic analysis showed that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) do not block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from the initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex. Here we have mapped the effect of three NNI2 inhibitors on the conformational dynamics of the enzyme using hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics. All three inhibitors rigidify an extensive allosteric network extending >40 Å from the binding site, thus providing a structural rationale for the observed disruption of the transition from distributive initiation to processive elongation. The two more potent inhibitors also suppress slow cooperative unfolding in the fingers extension-thumb interface and primer grip, which may contribute their stronger inhibition. These results establish that NNI2 inhibitors act through long range allosteric effects, reveal important conformational changes underlying normal polymerase function, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:27006396

  19. A rule-of-thumb approach to estimate annual deep percolation and runoff in irrigated landscapes at field to farm scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selle, B.; Githui, F.; Thayalakumaran, T.

    2009-04-01

    The rootzone of a field or farm in irrigated landscapes is the logical unit that can be managed or influenced by farmers, catchment managers and water authorities. Increasing scarcity, variability and expensive nature of water supplies necessitates better understanding of the rootzone water balance in irrigated landscapes. The major terms of the annual water balance in the rootzone include rainfall, irrigation, evapotranspiration, deep percolation below the rootzone and runoff. While information on annual rainfall, irrigation and evapotranspiration can often be readily obtained at field to farm scales, deep percolation and runoff are typically unavailable as their continuous measurement is difficult and/or uneconomical. Consequently, these terms are often calculated using models that are able to simulate the rootzone water balance. In this case study, we developed a rule-of-thumb approach to estimate annual deep percolation and runoff for the Barr Creek catchment in northern Victoria, Australia. Firstly, annual deep percolation and runoff were calculated at field to farm scales using an integrated SWAT-MODFLOW model calibrated against a comprehensive data set including drain flows and salinity, remotely sensed evapotranspiration and watertable levels. Secondly, a rule-of-thumb approach was developed to approximate annual deep percolation and runoff from readily available information on annual irrigation, rainfall, evapotranspiration, soils, watertable levels and landuse. This rule-of-thumb approach can be applied to continuously estimate deep percolation and runoff.

  20. Thumb-loops up for catalysis: a structure/function investigation of a functional loop movement in a GH11 xylanase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Siméon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics is a key feature of enzyme catalysis. Unfortunately, current experimental and computational techniques do not yet provide a comprehensive understanding and description of functional macromolecular motions. In this work, we have extended a novel computational technique, which combines molecular modeling methods and robotics algorithms, to investigate functional motions of protein loops. This new approach has been applied to study the functional importance of the so-called thumb-loop in the glycoside hydrolase family 11 xylanase from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus (Tx-xyl. The results obtained provide new insight into the role of the loop in the glycosylation/deglycosylation catalytic cycle, and underline the key importance of the nature of the residue located at the tip of the thumb-loop. The effect of mutations predicted in silico has been validated by in vitro site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Overall, we propose a comprehensive model of Tx-xyl catalysis in terms of substrate and product dynamics by identifying the action of the thumb-loop motion during catalysis.

  1. Basal area from photos.... Is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, B.; Ward, B.; Armston, J.; Schaefer, M.; Thurgate, N.; van den Hengel, A.; Lowe, A.; Phinn, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes collaborative work conducted between the Ausplots and AusCover facilities within Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) and the Australian Centre for Visual Technologies (ACVT) to develop new photopoint collection methodologies for use by terrestrial ecologists. These photopoints are being collected at Ausplots survey sites throughout rangeland environments across Australia along with a wide suite of environmental measures, including a range of soil, vegetation species and structure and genetics information, with currently around 270 sites out of 700 collected. These collections are intended to augment the ecological data collected at each site and provide a record of that time. Similar measures are also being collected at Auscover calibration and validation sites. Our photopoints incorporate three sets of overlapping photographs, each collected from exposure points at the vertices of an equilateral triangle with sides of 2.5 m located around the centre point of the field site. The photos from each exposure point typically overlap by 50% and at least one photo in each series include a calibration target mounted on a pole at the centre of the exposure points. These photographs are then processed to create a range of data products. Seamless photo panoramas are constructed for each field site and are stored with the relevant site data allowing ecologists utilising the ecological data to also include the environment in which that data were collected. Point clouds are also produced allowing a three dimensional view of the site and potentially allowing similar analysis, albeit at lower precision, to that of terrestrial Lidar systems. These three dimensional site reconstructions are used to measure stem diameters, and calculate basal area, which are summed for the site, providing a measure of basal area per hectare when the visible distance is taken into account. This method is potentially more accurate than rapid techniques such as

  2. Early Onset Basal Cell Carcinoma: Surgical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betekhtin M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most frequent non-melanoma skin cancer. Only 5-15% of BCC cases can be found in patients aged 20-40 years (so-called early onset. The early onset BCC is characterized by active and aggressive tumour growth, clinically presenting in most of the cases as a morpheaform, locally infiltrating or recurrent BCC. Despite the advances in the study of the pathogenesis of this tumour, surgery remains the most used, most effective and most suitable treatment modality. We describe a case of a 39-year-old woman who developed an early onset BCC of the nasolabial fold. After the subsequent surgical excision an excellent cosmetic result was achieved.

  3. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamos EM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth M Lamos,1 Lisa M Younk,2 Stephen N Davis3 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, 2Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Introduction: Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, the ability to provide clinically necessary high doses of insulin at low volume is also needed. Areas covered: This review highlights the published reports of the pharmacokinetic (PK and glucodynamic properties of concentrated insulins: Humulin-R U500, insulin degludec U200, and insulin glargine U300, describes the clinical efficacy, risk of hypoglycemic, and metabolic changes observed, and finally, discusses observations about the complexity of introducing a new generation of concentrated insulins to the therapeutic market. Conclusion: Humulin-R U500 has a similar onset but longer duration of action compared with U100 regular insulin. Insulin glargine U300 has differential PK/pharmacodynamic effects when compared with insulin glargine U100. In noninferiority studies, glycemic control with degludec U200 and glargine U300 is similar to insulin glargine U100 and nocturnal hypoglycemia is reduced. Concentrated formulations appear to behave as separate molecular entities when compared with earlier U100 insulin analog compounds. In the review of available published data, newer concentrated basal insulins may offer an advantage in terms of reduced intraindividual variability as well as reducing the injection burden in individuals requiring high-dose and large volume insulin therapy. Understanding the PK and pharmacodynamic properties of this new generation of insulins is critical to safe dosing, dispensing, and administration

  4. How to achieve a predictable basal insulin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzhals, P

    2005-09-01

    The development of insulin analogues over the last two decades have aimed at optimising the pharmacokinetic profile of subcutaneously injected insulin for therapeutic use in diabetes mellitus. Rapid acting analogues were successfully engineered and marketed in the late 1990's. In engineering long-acting analogues it has been a particular challenge to obtain action profiles that would be predictable from day to day in the same person. The most recent approach has been to acylate the insulin molecule with a fatty acid which provides the insulin molecule with a specific affinity for albumin. The first clinically available agent of this type is insulin detemir. Pharmacological studies have shown that reversible albumin binding will protract absorption following subcutaneous injection but still allow the insulin molecule to be recognised by the insulin receptor following dissociation from the carrier protein. Moreover, the molecular features of insulin detemir are attractive in that the molecule can be formulated as a neutral aqueous solution and does not precipitate after injection. Together with an important buffering mechanism effected by plasma albumin binding, this explains a highly significant reduction of within-subject variability of pharmacodynamic response observed in repeat isoglycaemic clamp studies where insulin detemir was compared to other basal insulin products. No safety considerations have been identified in using albumin as an insulin carrier to protract and buffer insulin action. In assessing the clinical attractiveness of insulin analogues, it is furthermore critically important to consider how the molecular modifications impact efficacy and safety. A number of pharmacological studies have shown that insulin detemir overall retains the molecular pharmacological properties of native human insulin, including a physiological balance between metabolic and mitogenic potencies. Taken together, insulin detemir provides an attractive novel approach for

  5. A randomized controlled clinical trial of 3-unit posterior zirconia–ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDP) with layered or pressed veneering ceramics: 3-year results

    OpenAIRE

    Naenni, Nadja; Bindl, Andreas; Sax, Caroline; Hämmerle, Christoph; Sailer, Irena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was to test whether or not posterior zirconia-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with pressed veneering ceramic exhibit less chipping than FDPs with layered veneering ceramics

  6. The excision width in surgical treatment of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mališ M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma originates from pluripotent cells of basal layer of epiderm, external covering of hair follicles, sebaceous glands or other skin adnexa. It is characterized by local infiltrating and sometimes destructive growth. There are several types of basal cell carcinomas that may be manifested in over 12 clinical forms. Surgical treatment depends to a large extent on the histological type, localization and its clinical manifestation. The analysis included 250 patients of both gender and different age, operated for basal cell carcinoma. Clinical characteristics of basal cell carcinoma and the width of the excision were described. It was concluded that the width of the excision of basal cell cancer was in relation to histological type. .

  7. The effect of adhesive strength of hydroxyapatite coating on the stability of hydroxyapatite-coated prostheses in vivo at the early stage of implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Yonghong; Zhu, Shu; Guo, Fei; Zhu, Jinyu; Li,Mao; Ma, Jie; Zhu, Qingsheng

    2012-01-01

    Introduction With the increase in joint revision surgery after arthroplasty, defects of hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated prostheses have been observed increasingly often. These defects adversely affect the prosthetic stability in vivo. This study has analyzed the potential effect of the adhesive strength of HA coating on the stability of HA-coated prostheses in vivo after its implantation. Material and methods Sixty experimental rabbits were divided into HA- and Ti-coated groups. HA-coated prosthes...

  8. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Tattooed Eyebrow

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Park, Jin; Kim, Seong-min; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk

    2009-01-01

    Malignant skin tumors, including squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, have occurred in tattoos. Seven documented cases of basal cell carcinoma associated with tattoos have also been reported in the medical literature. We encountered a patient with basal cell carcinoma in a tattooed eyebrow. We report on this case as the eighth reported case of a patient with basal cell carcinoma arising in a tattooed area.

  9. Covert skill learning in a cortical-basal ganglia circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Charlesworth, JD; Warren, TL; Brainard, MS

    2012-01-01

    We learn complex skills such as speech and dance through a gradual process of trial and error. Cortical-basal ganglia circuits have an important yet unresolved function in this trial-and-error skill learning; influential ' actor-models propose that basal ganglia circuits generate a variety of behaviours during training and learn to implement the successful behaviours in their repertoire. Here we show that the anterior forebrain pathway (AFP), a cortical-basal ganglia circuit, contributes to s...

  10. Sequence learning in a model of the basal ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Søiland, Stian

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a computational model of the basal ganglia that is able to learn sequences and perform action selection. The basal ganglia is a set of structures in the human brain involved in everything from action selection to reinforcement learning, inspiring research in psychology, neuroscience and computer science. Two temporal difference models of the basal ganglia based on previous work have been reimplemented. Several experiments and analyses help understand and describe the or...

  11. Update on models of basal ganglia function and dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    DeLong, Mahlon; Wichmann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Circuit models of basal ganglia function and dysfunction have undergone significant changes over time. The previous view that the basal ganglia are centers in which massive convergence of cortical information occurred has now been replaced by a view in which these structures process information in a highly specific manner, participating in anatomical and functional modules that also involve cortex and thalamus. In addition, much has been learned about the intrinsic connections of the basal ga...

  12. PIGMENTED BASAL CELL CARCINOMA: A RARE CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL VARIANT

    OpenAIRE

    Chandralekha; Vijaya Bhaskar; Bhagyalakshmi; Sudhakar; Sumanlatha

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common malignant tumour of skin , commonly referred to as „rodent ulcer‟. It is common in the head and neck region. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a clinical and histological variant of basal cell carcinoma that exhibits inc reased pigmentation. It is a rare variant that can clinically mimic malignant melanoma. It is more common in males than females. Herein , we are...

  13. Site-specific basal body duplication in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Eileen T; Dutcher, Susan K

    2014-02-01

    Correct centriole/basal body positioning is required for numerous biological processes, yet how the cell establishes this positioning is poorly understood. Analysis of centriolar/basal body duplication provides a key to understanding basal body positioning and function. Chlamydomonas basal bodies contain structural features that enable specific triplet microtubules to be specified. Electron tomography of cultures enriched in mitotic cells allowed us to follow basal body duplication and identify a specific triplet at which duplication occurs. Probasal bodies elongate in prophase, assemble transitional fibers (TF) and are segregated with a mature basal body near the poles of the mitotic spindle. A ring of nine-singlet microtubules is initiated at metaphase, orthogonal to triplet eight. At telophase/cytokinesis, triplet microtubule blades assemble first at the distal end, rather than at the proximal cartwheel. The cartwheel undergoes significant changes in length during duplication, which provides further support for its scaffolding role. The uni1-1 mutant contains short basal bodies with reduced or absent TF and defective transition zones, suggesting that the UNI1 gene product is important for coordinated probasal body elongation and maturation. We suggest that this site-specific basal body duplication ensures the correct positioning of the basal body to generate landmarks for intracellular patterning in the next generation. PMID:24166861

  14. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition and diagnosis of suspected lesions by performing histopathological examination in unusual circumstances. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2452-2454

  15. Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Forehead: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Rudić, Milan; Kranjčec, Zoran; Lisica-Šikić, Nataša; Kovačić, Marijan

    2012-01-01

    Giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC) is defined as a tumor 5cm or greater in diameter. They present less than 1% of all basal cell carcinomas. We present a case of an 85-year-old male patient with a giant ulcerating tumor of the left forehead (measuring 7x6cm). Under local anesthesia tumor was surgically excised. No involvement of the underlying periostal or bone structure was noted. Pathohystological exam revealed the giant basal cell carcinoma, with free surgical margins. Giant basal cell carc...

  16. Neutron activation studies of the in-body corrosion of hip-joint prostheses made of Co-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) the trace element composition of 18 elements was investigated in human tissues (articular capsule and fascia lata) of 36 persons after removal of hip-joint prostheses made of Co-Cr alloys. Normal trace element concentrations were determined studying a group of 26 patients before receiving their first artificial hip-joint. The tissues of patients with metal implants exhibited a heavy burdening by corrosion products (Co, Cr, Ni) from the prostheses as well as by Zr, Hf and Ba from the bone cements. Moreover, changes in the distribution of trace elements not contained in the steel were also observed. A comparison of the analytical results with those of model experiments of the corrosion of Co-Cr alloy in Ringer's solution demonstrates that the distribution pattern of corrosion products in the tissues are influenced by both, the biochemical properties as well as by selective dissolution of the alloy constituents. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the quality of life of patients with maxillofacial defects after prosthodontic therapy with obturator prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depprich, R; Naujoks, C; Lind, D; Ommerborn, M; Meyer, U; Kübler, N R; Handschel, J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how patients with maxillofacial defects evaluate their quality of life after maxillectomy and prosthodontic therapy with obturator prostheses. 43 patients were included in the study (25 female, 18 male). 31 (72%) patients completed a standardized questionnaire of 143 items and then answered additional questions in a standardized interview. Global quality of life after prosthodontic therapy with obturator prostheses was 64% (±22.9) on average. Functioning of the obturator prosthesis, impairment of ingestion, speech and appearance, the extent of therapy, and the existence of pain had significant impact on the quality of life (pmaxillectomy sufficient information about the treatment, adequate psychological care and speech therapy should be provided. PMID:20980129

  18. Insulin Degludec, The New Generation Basal Insulin or Just another Basal Insulin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrallah, Sami N; Reynolds, L Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The advances in recombinant DNA technology have led to an improvement in the properties of currently available long-acting insulin analogs. Insulin degludec, a new generation ultra-long-acting basal insulin, currently in phase 3 clinical trials, has a promising future in clinical use. When compared to its rival basal insulin analogs, a longer duration of action and lower incidence of hypoglycemic events in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients has been demonstrated.1,2 Its unique mechanism of action is based on multihexamer formation after subcutaneous injection. This reportedly allows for less pharmacodynamic variability and within-subject variability than currently available insulin analogs, and a duration of action that is over 24 hours.3 The lack of proof of carcinogenicity with insulin degludec is yet another factor that would be taken into consideration when choosing the optimal basal insulin for a diabetic individual.4 A formulation of insulin degludec with insulin aspart, Insulin degludec 70%/aspart 30%, may permit improved flexibly of dosing without compromising glycemic control or safety.5. PMID:22879797

  19. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika, E-mail: annika.schuhbaeck@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Weingartner, Christina [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Schneider, Christian [Department of Radiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Ensminger, Stephan [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification.

  20. Ankle mechanics during sidestep cutting implicates need for 2-degrees of freedom powered ankle-foot prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Evandro M. Ficanha; Mohammad Rastgaar, PhD; Kenton R. Kaufman, PhD

    2015-01-01

    The ankle joint of currently available powered prostheses is capable of controlling one degree of freedom (DOF), focusing on improved mobility in the sagittal plane. To increase agility, the requirements of turning in prosthesis design need to be considered. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were studied during sidestep cutting and straight walking. There were no significant differences between the ankle sagittal plane mechanics when comparing sidestep cutting and straight walking; however, signi...

  1. Interference in adhesion of bacteria and yeasts isolated from explanted voice prostheses to silicone rubber by rhamnolipid biosurfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, L. R.; Ibrahim M. Banat; Mei, Henny van der; J. A. Teixeira; Oliveira, Rosário

    2006-01-01

    Aims: The effects and extent of adhesion of four different bacterial and two yeast strains isolated from explanted voice prostheses to silicone rubber with and without an adsorbed rhamnolipid biosurfactant layer obtained from Pseudomonas aeruginosa DS10-129 was studied. Methods and Results: The ability of rhamnolipid biosurfactant to inhibit adhesion of micro-organisms to silicone rubber was investigated in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The anti-adhesive activity of the bio...

  2. Marginal and Internal Fit of Cobalt-Chromium Fixed Dental Prostheses Generated from Digital and Conventional Impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Per Svanborg; Henrik Skjerven; Pablo Carlsson; Alf Eliasson; Stig Karlsson; Anders Örtorp

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Digital impressions are increasingly used and have the potential to avoid the problem of inaccurate impressions. Only a few studies to verify the accuracy of digital impressions have been performed. The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal and internal fit of 3-unit tooth supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) fabricated from digital and conventional impressions. Methods. Ten FDPs were produced from digital impressions using the iTero system and 10 FDPs were produce...

  3. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification

  4. Objective clinical performance outcome of total knee prostheses. A study of mobile bearing knees using fluoroscopy, electromyography and roentgenstereophotogrammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Garling, Eric Harald

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to to assess with accurate and objective methods the function and fixation of total knee prostheses with special emphasis on mobile bearing total knee designs. The mobile bearing of a rotating platform design showed limited motion or no motion during a step-up task thereby nullifying the theoretical advantages of a mobile bearing prosthesis. Apatite coated implants show excellent mid-term Roentgen Stereophotogrammetric Analysis (RSA) results and offer some clinical a...

  5. Distinctive Patterns of CTNNB1 (β-Catenin) Alterations in Salivary Gland Basal Cell Adenoma and Basal Cell Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Vickie Y; Sholl, Lynette M; Krane, Jeffrey F

    2016-08-01

    Salivary gland basaloid neoplasms are diagnostically challenging. Limited publications report that some basal cell adenomas harbor CTNNB1 mutations, and nuclear β-catenin expression is prevalent. We evaluated β-catenin expression in basal cell adenomas and adenocarcinomas in comparison with salivary tumors in the differential diagnosis and performed targeted genetic analysis on a subset of cases. β-catenin immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded whole sections from 73 tumors. Nuclear staining was scored semiquantitatively by extent and intensity. DNA was extracted from 6 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples (5 basal cell adenomas, 1 basal cell adenocarcinoma) for next-generation sequencing. Nuclear β-catenin staining was present in 18/22 (82%) basal cell adenomas; most were diffuse and strong and predominant in the basal component. Two of 3 basal cell adenocarcinomas were positive (1 moderate focal; 1 moderate multifocal). All adenoid cystic carcinomas (0/20) and pleomorphic adenomas (0/20) were negative; 2/8 epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas showed focal nuclear staining. Most β-catenin-negative tumors showed diffuse membranous staining in the absence of nuclear staining. Four of 5 basal cell adenomas had exon 3 CTNNB1 mutations, all c.104T>C (p.I35T). Basal cell adenocarcinoma showed a more complex genomic profile, with activating mutations in PIK3CA, biallelic inactivation of NFKBIA, focal CYLD deletion, and without CTNNB1 mutation despite focal β-catenin expression. Nuclear β-catenin expression has moderate sensitivity (82%) for basal cell adenoma but high specificity (96%) in comparison with its morphologic mimics. CTNNB1 mutation was confirmed in most basal cell adenomas tested, and findings in basal cell adenocarcinoma suggest possible tumorigenic mechanisms, including alterations in PI3K and NF-κB pathways and transcriptional regulation. PMID:27259009

  6. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  7. Combining Vibrotactile Feedback with Volitional Myoelectric Control for Robotic Transtibial Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baojun; Feng, Yanggang; Wang, Qining

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the development of myoelectric control for robotic lower-limb prostheses makes it possible for amputee users to volitionally control prosthetic joints. However, the human-centered control loop is not closed due to the lack of sufficient feedback of prosthetic joint movement, and it may result in poor control performance. In this research, we propose a vibrotactile stimulation system to provide the feedback of ankle joint position, and validate the necessity of combining it with volitional myoelectric control to achieve improved control performance. The stimulation system is wearable and consists of six vibrators. Three of the vibrators are placed on the anterior side of the thigh and the other three on the posterior side of the thigh. To explore the potential of applying the proposed vibrotactile feedback system for prosthetic ankle control, eight able-bodied subjects and two transtibial amputee subjects (TT1 and TT2) were recruited in this research, and several experiments were designed to investigate subjects' sensitivities to discrete and continuous vibration stimulations applied on the thigh. Then, we proposed a stimulation controller to produce different stimulation patterns according to current ankle angle. Amputee subjects were asked to control a virtual ankle displayed on the computer screen to reach different target ankle angles with a myoelectric controller, and control performances under different feedback conditions were compared. Experimental results indicated that subjects were more sensitive to stimulation position changes (identification accuracies were 96.39 ± 0.86, 91.11, and 93.89% for able-bodied subjects, TT1, and TT2, respectively) than stimulation amplitude changes (identification accuracies were 89.89 ± 2.40, 87.04, and 85.19% for able-bodied subjects, TT1, and TT2, respectively). Response times of able-bodied subjects, TT1, and TT2 to stimulation pattern changes were 0.47 ± 0.02 s, 0.53 s, and 0.48

  8. A 10-Year Clinical Evaluation of Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prostheses on Non-Prepared Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piemjai, Morakot; Özcan, Mutlu; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the conditions of the non-invasive resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (FDP) and patient satisfaction up to 10 years of clinical function. A total of 23 patients who required fixed prostheses in the areas of mandibular anterior and premolar, and maxillary anterior region received resin-bonded restorations between 1999-2003. In 13 patients with 14 edentulous areas were restored with an adhesive pontic (natural tooth, acrylic and porcelain). Two indirect proximal veneers using resin composite were placed in each space in 10 patients having 13 edentulous spaces. All prostheses were bonded to the proximal surface of adjacent teeth using resin cement based on 4-META/MMA-TBB. No debonding of proximal veneers but 4 pontic debonding was observed which were rebonded and remained functional until final follow up. The abutments in pontic and proximal veneer groups were free of caries and hypersensitivity. Periodontal health was improved after treatment and was maintained for 10 years except for 4 abutments that still showed some bleeding on probing. Non-invasive resin-bonded FDPs are simple, pain-free, less costly treatment procedures that could provide acceptable clinical longevity with high patient satisfaction. PMID:27424337

  9. Design of mixed-mode natural convection solar crop dryers: Application of principles and rules of thumb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forson, F.K.; Akuffo, F.O. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana); Nazha, M.A.A.; Rajakaruna, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, De Montfort University, Queens Building, Leicester LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    A mixed-mode natural convection solar crop dryer (MNCSCD) designed and used for drying cassava and other crops in an enclosed structure is presented. A prototype of the dryer was constructed to specification and used in experimental drying tests. This paper outlines the systematic combination of the application of basic design concepts, and rules of thumb resulting from numerous and several years of experimental studies used and presents the results of calculations of the design parameters. A batch of cassava 160 kg by mass, having an initial moisture content of 67% wet basis from which 100 kg of water is required to be removed to have it dried to a desired moisture content of 17% wet basis, is used as the drying load in designing the dryer. A drying time of 30-36 h is assumed for the anticipated test location (Kumasi; 6.7 N,1.6 W) with an expected average solar irradiance of 400 W/m{sup 2} and ambient conditions of 25 C and 77.8% relative humidity. A minimum of 42.4 m{sup 2} of solar collection area, according to the design, is required for an expected drying efficiency of 12.5%. Under average ambient conditions of 28.2 C and 72.1% relative humidity with solar irradiance of 340.4 W/m{sup 2}, a drying time of 35.5 h was realised and the drying efficiency was evaluated as 12.3% when tested under full designed load signifying that the design procedure proposed is sufficiently reliable. (author)

  10. Anti-basal ganglia antibodies in PANDAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Harvey S; Loiselle, Christopher R; Lee, Olivia; Minzer, Karen; Swedo, Susan; Grus, Franz H

    2004-04-01

    An autoimmune-mediated mechanism involving molecular mimicry has been proposed for a variety of pediatric movement disorders that occur after a streptococcal infection. In this study, anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) were measured in 15 children with the diagnosis of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS) and compared with those in 15 controls. ELISA and Western immunoblotting (WB) methods were used to detect ABGA against supernatant (S1), pellet (P2), and synaptosomal preparations from adult postmortem caudate, putamen, and globus pallidus. ELISA optical density values did not differ between PANDAS patients and controls across all preparations. Immunoblotting identified multiple bands in all subjects with no differences in the number of bands or their total density. Discriminant analysis, used to assess mean binding patterns, showed that PANDAS patients differed from controls only for the caudate S1 fraction (Wilks' lambda = 0.0236, P tic subjects providing the greatest discrimination. Among the epitopes contributing to differences between PANDAS and control in the caudate S1 fraction, mean binding to the epitope at 183 kDa was the most different between groups. In conclusion, ELISA measurements do not differentiate between PANDAS and controls, suggesting a lack of major antibody changes in this disorder. Further immunoblot analyses using a caudate supernatant fraction are required to completely exclude the possibility of minor antibody repertoire differences in PANDAS subjects, especially in those who primarily have tics. PMID:15077238

  11. New basal cell carcinoma susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zink, Florian; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kehr, Birte; Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Grasa, Matilde; Planelles, Dolores; Sanmartin, Onofre; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Nexø, Bjørn A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jonasson, Jon G.; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kristinsdottir, Anna M.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vogel, Ulla; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Olafsson, Jon H.; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing screen for DNA sequence variants that confer risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 24,988,228 SNPs and small indels detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and imputed into 4,572 BCC patients and 266,358 controls. Here we show the discovery of four new BCC susceptibility loci: 2p24 MYCN (rs57244888[C], OR=0.76, P=4.7 × 10−12), 2q33 CASP8-ALS2CR12 (rs13014235[C], OR=1.15, P=1.5 × 10−9), 8q21 ZFHX4 (rs28727938[G], OR=0.70, P=3.5 × 10−12) and 10p14 GATA3 (rs73635312[A], OR=0.74, P=2.4 × 10−16). Fine mapping reveals that two variants correlated with rs73635312[A] occur in conserved binding sites for the GATA3 transcription factor. In addition, expression microarrays and RNA-seq show that rs13014235[C] and a related SNP rs700635[C] are associated with expression of CASP8 splice variants in which sequences from intron 8 are retained. PMID:25855136

  12. Fluctuating selection on basal metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johan F; Nilsson, Jan-Åke

    2016-02-01

    BMR (Basal metabolic rate) is an important trait in animal life history as it represents a significant part of animal energy budgets. BMR has also been shown to be positively related to sustainable work rate and maximal thermoregulatory capacity. To this date, most of the studies have focused on the causes of interspecific and intraspecific variation in BMR, and fairly little is known about the fitness consequences of different metabolic strategies. In this study, we show that winter BMR affects local survival in a population of wild blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus), but that the selection direction differs between years. We argue that this fluctuating selection is probably a consequence of varying winter climate with a positive relation between survival and BMR during cold and harsh conditions, but a negative relation during mild winters. This fluctuating selection can not only explain the pronounced variation in BMR in wild populations, but will also give us new insights into how energy turnover rates can shape the life-history strategies of animals. Furthermore, the study shows that the process of global warming may cause directional selection for a general reduction in BMR, affecting the general life-history strategy on the population level. PMID:26839687

  13. Basal cell hyperplasia and basal cell carcinoma of the prostate: a comprehensive review and discussion of a case with c-erbB-2 expression

    OpenAIRE

    Montironi, R; Mazzucchelli, R; Stramazzotti, D; Scarpelli, M; López Beltran, A; Bostwick, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    Prostatic basal cell proliferations range from ordinary basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) to florid basal cell hyperplasia to basal cell carcinoma. The distinction between these forms of BCH, including the variant with prominent nucleoli (formerly called atypical BCH), and basal cell carcinoma depends on morphological and immunohistochemical criteria and, in particular, on the degree of cell proliferation. In florid BCH, the proliferation index is intermediate between ordinary BCH and basal cell c...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wang QK, Liu JY. Identification of a novel genetic locus on chromosome 8p21.1-q11.23 for idiopathic ... DH. Analysis of candidate genes at the IBGC1 locus associated with idiopathic basal ... DH. Genetic heterogeneity in familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr ...

  15. Calcification of the basal ganglia following carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor calcification of the basal ganglia was demonstrated by computed tomography in a woman, aged 66, who had survived carbon monoxide poisoning 48 years earlier. Extensive neuropathological investigations have demonstrated calcified lesions of the basal ganglia in a number of conditions, but their frequency and topographic distribution in vivo remain to be elucidated, by means of CT. (orig.)

  16. The Place of Career Women in the Basals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leondis, Mary T.

    A study analyzed two basal reading series to determine if they depicted realistically the role of the career woman as she exists in society. A list of female careers in the 1989 editions of Houghton-Mifflin and McGraw Hill reading basals for grades 1 to 6 was compared to the career categories of the "United States Bureau of Census, Statistical…

  17. Mineralizing angiopathy with basal ganglia stroke in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia stroke is known following trivial head trauma. Recently a distinct clinic-radiological entity termed ′mineralizing angiopathy′ was described. We report an infant who developed basal ganglia stroke following trivial fall. His clinic-radiological features are described.

  18. Automated generation of IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses: Comparison of different planning strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voet, Peter W. J.; Dirkx, Maarten L. P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J. M. [Erasmus MC - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To compare IMRT planning strategies for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses.Methods: All plans were generated fully automatically (i.e., no human trial-and-error interactions) using iCycle, the authors' in-house developed algorithm for multicriterial selection of beam angles and optimization of fluence profiles, allowing objective comparison of planning strategies. For 18 prostate cancer patients (eight with bilateral hip prostheses, ten with a right-sided unilateral prosthesis), two planning strategies were evaluated: (i) full exclusion of beams containing beamlets that would deliver dose to the target after passing a prosthesis (IMRT{sub remove}) and (ii) exclusion of those beamlets only (IMRT{sub cut}). Plans with optimized coplanar and noncoplanar beam arrangements were generated. Differences in PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were quantified. The impact of beam number on plan quality was evaluated.Results: Especially for patients with bilateral hip prostheses, IMRT{sub cut} significantly improved rectum and bladder sparing compared to IMRT{sub remove}. For 9-beam coplanar plans, rectum V{sub 60Gy} reduced by 17.5%{+-} 15.0% (maximum 37.4%, p= 0.036) and rectum D{sub mean} by 9.4%{+-} 7.8% (maximum 19.8%, p= 0.036). Further improvements in OAR sparing were achievable by using noncoplanar beam setups, reducing rectum V{sub 60Gy} by another 4.6%{+-} 4.9% (p= 0.012) for noncoplanar 9-beam IMRT{sub cut} plans. Large reductions in rectum dose delivery were also observed when increasing the number of beam directions in the plans. For bilateral implants, the rectum V{sub 60Gy} was 37.3%{+-} 12.1% for coplanar 7-beam plans and reduced on average by 13.5% (maximum 30.1%, p= 0.012) for 15 directions.Conclusions: iCycle was able to automatically generate high quality plans for prostate cancer patients with prostheses. Excluding only beamlets that passed through the prostheses (IMRT{sub cut} strategy) significantly improved

  19. Factors associated with mucosal pain in patients with partial removable dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, H; Fueki, K; Yoshida-Kohno, E; Wakabayashi, N

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with mucosal pain in patients with partial removable dental prostheses (PRDPs). In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, 333 patients wearing 500 PRDPs (mean age 71·4 years, men 33·3%) were consecutively recruited from prosthetic clinic of a dental hospital in Japan. Subjects rated pain intensity and frequency of denture-bearing mucosa. An examiner recorded age, gender and systemic diseases as well as dental, mucosa, denture, sensory, behavioural- and psychological-related characteristics that were possibly associated with the mucosal pain. Multivariate analyses were performed to analyse factors related to mucosal pain. Pain intensity was rated as more than score 0 (presence) in 34·2% (171/500) PRDPs, and pain was experienced after denture delivery in 42·8% (214/500) PRDPs. Logistic regression analyses showed that younger age, mucosal damage, poor mucosal condition, bone prominence, poor residual ridge, higher pain sensitivity, presence of awake bruxism, perception of oral dryness, interim denture wear and high number of missing teeth were significant independent predictors for the presence of the mucosal pain intensity and/or frequency (P < 0·05). Multiple factors are associated with mucosal pain in patients with PRDPs. Oral mucosal characteristics, age, pain sensitivity and behavioural factors seem to be more critical for mucosal pain than distribution of missing teeth and number of abutment teeth. PMID:27289212

  20. Functionalization of polydimethylsiloxane membranes to be used in the production of voice prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Ferreira, Álvaro Carvalho, Tiago Ruivo Correia, Bernardo Paiva Antunes, Ilídio Joaquim Correia and Patrícia Alves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The voice is produced by the vibration of vocal cords which are located in the larynx. Therefore, one of the major consequences for patients subjected to laryngectomy is losing their voice. In these cases, a synthetic one-way valve set (voice prosthesis can be implanted in order to allow restoration of speech. Most voice prostheses are produced with silicone-based materials such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS. This material has excellent properties, such as optical transparency, chemical and biological inertness, non-toxicity, permeability to gases and excellent mechanical resistance that are fundamental for its application in the biomedical field. However, PDMS is very hydrophobic and this property causes protein adsorption which is followed by microbial adhesion and biofilm formation. To overcome these problems, surface modification of materials has been proposed in this study. A commercial silicone elastomer, SylgardTM 184 was used to prepare membranes whose surface was modified by grafting 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate and methacrylic acid by low-pressure plasma treatment. The hydrophilicity, hydrophobic recovery and surface energy of the produced materials were determined. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity of the materials were also assessed. The results obtained revealed that the PDMS surface modification performed did not affect the material's biocompatibility, but decreased their hydrophobic character and bacterial adhesion and growth on its surface.

  1. Estimation of the knee joint angle from surface electromyographic signals for active control of leg prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface electromyographic (SEMG) signal is very convenient for prosthesis control because it is non-invasively acquired and intrinsically related to the user's intention. This work presents a feature extraction and pattern classification algorithm for estimation of the intended knee joint angle from SEMG signals acquired using two sets of electrodes placed on the upper leg. The proposed algorithm uses a combination of time-domain and frequency-domain approaches for feature extraction (signal amplitude histogram and auto-regressive coefficients, respectively), a self-organizing map for feature projection and a Levenberg–Marquardt multi-layer perceptron neural network for pattern classification. The new algorithm was quantitatively compared with the method proposed by Wang et al (2006 Med. Biol. Eng. Comput. 44 865–72), which uses wavelet packet feature extraction, principal component analysis and a multi-layer perceptron neural classifier. The proposed method provided lower error-to-signal percentage and peak error amplitudes, higher correlation and fewer error events. The algorithm presented in this work may be useful as part of a myoelectric controller for active leg prostheses designed for transfemoral amputees

  2. Effect of Luting Agents on Retention of Dental Implant-Supported Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu-Hwa; Lin, Tai-Min; Liu, Perng-Ru; Ramp, Lance C

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the retentive strength of 7 different luting agents in cement-retained implant abutment/analog assemblies. Fifty-six externally hexed dental implant abutment/analog assemblies and cast superstructures were divided randomly into 7 groups for cementation with each of the 7 luting agents. Five definitive cements tested were zinc phosphate cement, All-Bond 2, Maxcem, RelyX Luting cement, HY-Bond, and two provisional cements, ImProv and Premier. Cast superstructures were cemented onto the implant abutments and exposed to 1000 thermal cycles (0°C-55°C) and 100 000 cycles on a chewing simulator (75 N load). A universal testing machine was used to measure cement failure load of the assembled specimens. Cement failure load was evaluated with 1-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range analysis. Significant differences in cement failure loads were measured (P zinc phosphate cement were analogous, and higher than HY-Bond. Improv and Premier constituted a pair, which demonstrated the lowest retentive values. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, Maxcem and All-Bond 2 are good candidates for cement-retained implant prostheses while concerning retention. PMID:24666355

  3. Enhancing the soft tissue seal around intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses using silanized fibronectin titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimutengwende-Gordon, M; Pendegrass, C; Blunn, G, E-mail: mukai.cg@mac.com [Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, University College London, Brockley Hill, Stanmore, HA7 4LP (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    The success of intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses (ITAP) relies on achieving a tight seal between the soft tissues and the implant in order to avoid infection. Fibronectin (Fn) may be silanized onto titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) in order to promote soft-tissue attachment. The silanization process includes passivation with sulphuric acid, which alters surface characteristics. This study aimed to improve in vitro fibroblast adhesion to silanized fibronectin (SiFn) titanium alloy by omitting the passivation stage. Additionally, the study assessed the effects of SiFn on in vivo dermal attachment, comparing the results with adsorbed Fn, hydroxyapatite (HA), Fn adsorbed onto HA (HAFn) and uncoated controls. Surface topography was assessed using scanning electron microscopy, profilometry and contact angle measurement. Anti-vinculin antibodies were used to immunolocalize fibroblast adhesion sites. A histological assessment of soft-tissue attachment and cell alignment relative to implants in an in vivo ovine model was performed. Passivation resulted in rougher, more hydrophobic, microcracked surfaces and was associated with poorer fibroblast adhesion than unpassivated controls. SiFn and HAFn surfaces resulted in more favourable cell alignment in vivo, implying that dermal attachment was enhanced. These results suggest that SiFn and HAFn surfaces could be useful in optimizing the soft tissue seal around ITAP.

  4. Enhancing the soft tissue seal around intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses using silanized fibronectin titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses (ITAP) relies on achieving a tight seal between the soft tissues and the implant in order to avoid infection. Fibronectin (Fn) may be silanized onto titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) in order to promote soft-tissue attachment. The silanization process includes passivation with sulphuric acid, which alters surface characteristics. This study aimed to improve in vitro fibroblast adhesion to silanized fibronectin (SiFn) titanium alloy by omitting the passivation stage. Additionally, the study assessed the effects of SiFn on in vivo dermal attachment, comparing the results with adsorbed Fn, hydroxyapatite (HA), Fn adsorbed onto HA (HAFn) and uncoated controls. Surface topography was assessed using scanning electron microscopy, profilometry and contact angle measurement. Anti-vinculin antibodies were used to immunolocalize fibroblast adhesion sites. A histological assessment of soft-tissue attachment and cell alignment relative to implants in an in vivo ovine model was performed. Passivation resulted in rougher, more hydrophobic, microcracked surfaces and was associated with poorer fibroblast adhesion than unpassivated controls. SiFn and HAFn surfaces resulted in more favourable cell alignment in vivo, implying that dermal attachment was enhanced. These results suggest that SiFn and HAFn surfaces could be useful in optimizing the soft tissue seal around ITAP.

  5. Development of nanofluorapatite polymer-based composite for bioactive orthopedic implants and prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gangfeng; Wang, Hui; Yao, Xiaocong; Bi, Dawei; Zhu, Gang; Tang, Songchao; Wei, Jie; Yang, Lili; Tong, Peijian; Xiao, Luwei

    2014-01-01

    Fluorapatite with low solubility is a promising biomaterial due to its structure, which is similar to hydroxyapatite. In this study a bioactive composite of nanofluorapatite (n-FA) and polyamide 12 (PA12) was fabricated. The results revealed that the mechanical properties (such as compressive strength and elastic modulus), hydrophilicity, and antibacterial properties of n-FA/PA12 composite were obviously improved by adding n-FA into PA12 as compared with PA12. In addition, cell proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on n-FA/PA12 composite was significantly higher than with PA12, and alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells on the n-FA/PA12 composite was expressed at obviously higher levels as compared with PA12. The results suggest that n-FA/PA12 composite could support cell proliferation and differentiation, showing good cytocompatibility. Histological evaluation indicates that n-FA/PA12 composite enhances the efficiency of new bone formation with the introduction of n-FA into PA12, and the quantity of the newly formed bone for n-FA/PA12 composite is significantly higher than with PA12. In conclusion, n-FA/PA12 composite exhibits good biocompatibility and osteogenesis, which might be used for various orthopedic prostheses and dental implants. PMID:25143735

  6. Finite element modelling of shock-induced damages on ceramic hip prostheses

    CERN Document Server

    Uribe, Juliana; Geringer, Jean; 10.5402/2011/121486

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to simulate the behaviour of hip prostheses under mechanical shocks. When hip joint is replaced by prosthesis, during the swing phase of the leg, a microseparation between the prosthetic head and the cup could occur. Two different sizes of femoral heads were studied: 28 and 32 mm diameter, made, respectively, in alumina and zirconia. The shock-induced stress was determined numerically using finite element analysis (FEA), Abaqus software. The influence of inclination, force, material, and microseparation was studied. In addition, an algorithm was developed from a probabilistic model, Todinov's approach, to predict lifetime of head and cup. Simulations showed maximum tensile stresses were reached on the cup's surfaces near to rim. The worst case was the cup-head mounted at 30^{\\circ}. All simulations and tests showed bulk zirconia had a greater resistance to shocks than bulk alumina. The probability of failure could be bigger than 0.9 when a porosity greater than 0.7% vol. is present in...

  7. Mechanical compatibility of sol-gel annealing with titanium for orthopaedic prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Andrew I M; Lim, Teoh S; Brydone, Alistair S; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    Sol-gel processing is an attractive method for large-scale surface coating due to its facile and inexpensive preparation, even with the inclusion of precision nanotopographies. These are desirable traits for metal orthopaedic prostheses where ceramic coatings are known to be osteoinductive and the effects may be amplified through nanotexturing. However there are a few concerns associated with the application of sol-gel technology to orthopaedics. Primarily, the annealing stage required to transform the sol-gel into a ceramic may compromise the physical integrity of the underlying metal. Secondly, loose particles on medical implants can be carcinogenic and cause inflammation so the coating needs to be strongly bonded to the implant. These concerns are addressed in this paper. Titanium, the dominant material for orthopaedics at present, is examined before and after sol-gel processing for changes in hardness and flexural modulus. Wear resistance, bending and pull tests are also performed to evaluate the ceramic coating. The findings suggest that sol-gel coatings will be compatible with titanium implants for an optimum temperature of 500 °C. PMID:26691162

  8. FACTORS RELATED TO ORAL CANDIDIASIS IN ELDERLY USERS AND NON-USERS OF REMOVABLE DENTAL PROSTHESES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyra Maria Pires de Carvalho BIANCHI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the association between oral candidiasis in elderly users and nonusers of prosthesis and its predisposing factors. To this end, we performed a cross-sectional study where saliva samples from 48 patients were collected they used prosthesis and 43 patients (control group who did not use. Among the 91 patients, Candida spp were isolated in 40 (83.3% who used prosthesis and in 23 (53.5% in the control group. A statistically significant association was determined between the two groups, the isolation of yeasts and dental prosthesis (p < 0.05, OR = 4.3. The most common etiological agent was Candida albicans (37 isolates, with 23 (62.2% in the denture group and 14 (37.8% (control group. Among patients who presented clinical manifestations of oral candidiasis (n = 24, 83.3% (n = 20 belonged to the group that wore dentures, while only 16.7% (n = 4 belonged to the control group. Elderly patients with diabetes had 4.4 times higher estimated risk of developing oral candidiasis when compared with individuals without this condition. There was no statistically significant association between being user prostheses and have diabetes with the onset of candidiasis. No statistically significant association was determined between xerostomia, use of prosthesis and oral candidiasis. The use of prosthetics and poor oral hygiene in elderly patients predisposes to the development of oral candidiasis.

  9. Doppler echocardiographic evaluation of Bjork-Shiley and St. Jude Medical prostheses in the mitral position.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenobu,Masaharu

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available The left ventricular studies by Doppler echocardiography were performed in 50 patients with a Bjork-Shiley (B-S mitral valve and 50 patients after implantation of a St. Jude Medical (SJM mitral valve; the effect of valve replacement on the hemodynamic performance at rest and during bicycle exercise was determined from serial echocardiographic data. Twenty-eight patients (56% of the B-S group and 42 patients (84% of the SJM group showed a good response to the exercise. There was no significant difference in the effective orifice area at rest among each sizes of the B-S valve. In the SJM valve, on the contrary, the effective valve orifice area increases in parallel to the size of the SJM valve. There was a clear relation between the valve size and pressure gradient. The pressure gradient directly depends on the valve size and the effective orifice area in the SJM valve. High pressure gradient group in both prostheses had a tendency to take negative values of percent increase in stroke volume. Further, there were no cases showing positive values of percent increase in end-diastolic volume among the patients whose pressure gradients were assumed to be more than 10 mmHg at rest. It is suggested that impairment of inflow caused by the artificial valve, prosthetic valve stenosis, is possibly a significant factor causing left ventricular dysfunction, notably a decrease in stroke volume during exercise.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS

  10. Functionalization of polydimethylsiloxane membranes to be used in the production of voice prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The voice is produced by the vibration of vocal cords which are located in the larynx. Therefore, one of the major consequences for patients subjected to laryngectomy is losing their voice. In these cases, a synthetic one-way valve set (voice prosthesis) can be implanted in order to allow restoration of speech. Most voice prostheses are produced with silicone-based materials such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This material has excellent properties, such as optical transparency, chemical and biological inertness, non-toxicity, permeability to gases and excellent mechanical resistance that are fundamental for its application in the biomedical field. However, PDMS is very hydrophobic and this property causes protein adsorption which is followed by microbial adhesion and biofilm formation. To overcome these problems, surface modification of materials has been proposed in this study. A commercial silicone elastomer, SylgardTM 184 was used to prepare membranes whose surface was modified by grafting 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate and methacrylic acid by low-pressure plasma treatment. The hydrophilicity, hydrophobic recovery and surface energy of the produced materials were determined. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity of the materials were also assessed. The results obtained revealed that the PDMS surface modification performed did not affect the material's biocompatibility, but decreased their hydrophobic character and bacterial adhesion and growth on its surface. (paper)

  11. Morphological alteration of microwave disinfected acrylic resins used for dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M. C.; Bita, B. I.; Avram, A. M.; Tucureanu, V.; Schiopu, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we aim to perform a cross section morphological characterization of an acrylic polymer used for dental prostheses subjected to microwave disinfection. The method was largely investigated and the microbiological effectiveness is well established, but there are some issues regarding the in-depth alteration of the material. In our research, the surface roughness is insignificant and the samples were not polished or refined by any means. Two groups of 7 acrylic discs (20 mm diameter, 2 mm thickness) were prepared from a heat-cured powder. Half of the samples embedded a stainless steel reinforcement, in order to observe the changes at the interfaces between the polymer and metallic wire. After the gradual wet microwave treatment, the specimens - including the controls - were frozen in liquid nitrogen and broken into pieces. Fragments were selected for gold metallization to ensure a good contrast for SEM imaging. We examined the samples in cross section employing a high resolution SEM. We have observed the alterations occurred at the surface of the acrylic sample and at the interface with the metallic wire along with the increase of the power and exposure time. The bond configuration of acrylate samples was analysed by FTIR spectrometry.

  12. Basal ganglia - thalamus and the crowning enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela eGarcia-Munoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available When Hubel (1982 referred to layer 1 of primary visual cortex as …a ‘crowning mystery’ to keep area-17 physiologists busy for years to come... he could have been talking about any cortical area. In the 80’s and 90’s there were no methods to examine this neuropile on the surface of the cortex: a tangled web of axons and dendrites from a variety of different places with unknown specificities and doubtful connections to the cortical output neurons some hundreds of microns below. Recently, three changes have made the crowning enigma less of an impossible mission: the clear presence of neurons in layer 1 (L1, the active conduction of voltage along apical dendrites and optogenetic methods that might allow us to look at one source of input at a time. For all of those reasons alone, it seems it is time to take seriously the function of L1. The functional properties of this layer will need to wait for more experiments but already L1 cells are GAD67 positive, i.e., inhibitory! They could reverse the sign of the thalamic glutamate (GLU input for the entire cortex. It is at least possible that in the near future normal activity of individual sources of L1 could be detected using genetic tools. We are at the outset of important times in the exploration of thalamic functions and perhaps the solution to the crowning enigma is within sight. Our review looks forward to that solution from the solid basis of the anatomy of the basal ganglia output to motor thalamus. We will focus on L1, its afferents, intrinsic neurons and its influence on responses of pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5. Since L1 is present in the whole cortex we will provide a general overview considering evidence mainly from the somatosensory cortex before focusing on motor cortex.

  13. Osteoarthritis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb: a new MR imaging technique for the standardized detection of relevant ligamental lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess ligament lesions and subluxations of the carpometacarpal joints of the thumbs (CMC I) of asymptomatic volunteers and of patients with CMC I osteoarthritis using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 20 CMC I joints of 14 asymptomatic volunteers (6 x both sides) and 28 CMC I joints of 22 patients (6 x both sides) with symptomatic and X-ray-diagnosed osteoarthritis of CMC I joints were studied. During extension, flexion, abduction and adduction of the thumb, the anterior oblique (AOL), intermetacarpal (IML), posterior oblique (POL) and dorsal radial (DRL) ligaments were evaluated using 3-T MRI on two standard planes, and translation of metacarpal I (MC I) was assessed. The MRI demonstrated that ligament lesions of the AOL and IML are frequent. Isolated rupture of the AOL was found in 6 of 28 (21 %), combined rupture of the AOL + IML in 5 of 28 (18 %) and isolated IML rupture in 4 of 28 (14 %) joints. The patients had a significantly increased dorsal translation of MC I during extension with a median of 6.4 mm vs. 5.4 mm in asymptomatic volunteers (p < 0.05). MRIs of CMC I in two standardized planes frequently show combined ligament ruptures. The dorsal subluxation of MC I, which is increased in patients, correlates with OA severity based on X-ray and can be quantified by MRI. For joint-preserving surgical procedures and for prosthesis implantation of the CMC I, we recommend performing an MRI in two planes of the thumb - extension and abduction - to evaluate the ligaments and dorsal subluxation of MC I. (orig.)

  14. The interaction between the first transmembrane domain and the thumb of ASIC1a is critical for its N-glycosylation and trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Jing

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channel-1a (ASIC1a, the primary proton receptor in the brain, contributes to multiple diseases including stroke, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis. Thus, a better understanding of its biogenesis will provide important insights into the regulation of ASIC1a in diseases. Interestingly, ASIC1a contains a large, yet well organized ectodomain, which suggests the hypothesis that correct formation of domain-domain interactions at the extracellular side is a key regulatory step for ASIC1a maturation and trafficking. We tested this hypothesis here by focusing on the interaction between the first transmembrane domain (TM1 and the thumb of ASIC1a, an interaction known to be critical in channel gating. We mutated Tyr71 and Trp287, two key residues involved in the TM1-thumb interaction in mouse ASIC1a, and found that both Y71G and W287G decreased synaptic targeting and surface expression of ASIC1a. These defects were likely due to altered folding; both mutants showed increased resistance to tryptic cleavage, suggesting a change in conformation. Moreover, both mutants lacked the maturation of N-linked glycans through mid to late Golgi. These data suggest that disrupting the interaction between TM1 and thumb alters ASIC1a folding, impedes its glycosylation and reduces its trafficking. Moreover, reducing the culture temperature, an approach commonly used to facilitate protein folding, increased ASIC1a glycosylation, surface expression, current density and slowed the rate of desensitization. These results suggest that correct folding of extracellular ectodomain plays a critical role in ASIC1a biogenesis and function.

  15. Osteoarthritis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb: a new MR imaging technique for the standardized detection of relevant ligamental lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumont, Clemens [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Georg-August-Universitaet, Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Lerzer, Sebastian; Tezval, Mohammad; Stuermer, Klaus Michael [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Vafa, Morad Ali; Lotz, Joachim [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Interventional Radiology, Goettingen (Germany); Dechent, Peter [University Medical Center Goettingen, MR-Research in Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Cognitive Neurology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To assess ligament lesions and subluxations of the carpometacarpal joints of the thumbs (CMC I) of asymptomatic volunteers and of patients with CMC I osteoarthritis using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 20 CMC I joints of 14 asymptomatic volunteers (6 x both sides) and 28 CMC I joints of 22 patients (6 x both sides) with symptomatic and X-ray-diagnosed osteoarthritis of CMC I joints were studied. During extension, flexion, abduction and adduction of the thumb, the anterior oblique (AOL), intermetacarpal (IML), posterior oblique (POL) and dorsal radial (DRL) ligaments were evaluated using 3-T MRI on two standard planes, and translation of metacarpal I (MC I) was assessed. The MRI demonstrated that ligament lesions of the AOL and IML are frequent. Isolated rupture of the AOL was found in 6 of 28 (21 %), combined rupture of the AOL + IML in 5 of 28 (18 %) and isolated IML rupture in 4 of 28 (14 %) joints. The patients had a significantly increased dorsal translation of MC I during extension with a median of 6.4 mm vs. 5.4 mm in asymptomatic volunteers (p < 0.05). MRIs of CMC I in two standardized planes frequently show combined ligament ruptures. The dorsal subluxation of MC I, which is increased in patients, correlates with OA severity based on X-ray and can be quantified by MRI. For joint-preserving surgical procedures and for prosthesis implantation of the CMC I, we recommend performing an MRI in two planes of the thumb - extension and abduction - to evaluate the ligaments and dorsal subluxation of MC I. (orig.)

  16. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Biological Continuum of Basal Cell Carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Karaninder S.; Mahajan, Vikram K.; Pushpinder S Chauhan; Anju Lath Sharma; Vikas Sharma; Abhinav, C.; Gayatri Khatri; Neel Prabha; Saurabh Sharma; Muninder Negi

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) accounts for 80% of all nonmelanoma skin cancers. Its metastasis is extremely rare, ranging between 0.0028 and 0.55 of all BCC cases. The usual metastasis to lymph nodes, lungs, bones, or skin is from the primary tumor situated in the head and neck region in nearly 85% cases. A 69-year-old male developed progressively increasing multiple, fleshy, indurated, and at places pigmented noduloulcerative plaques over back, chest, and left axillary area 4 years after wide s...

  17. Skiers thumb - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it in place. After surgery your hand and forearm will be in a cast or splint for ... of bleeding. If you have heart disease, high blood pressure, kidney disease, liver disease, or have had stomach ...

  18. Motivating Green Thumbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Barbara; Hogue, June

    1978-01-01

    The current popularity of house plants can provide the basis for numerous classroom activities. Students can make flower pots from tubs and cans, chart plant growth on a graph, make mint sherbert, or expand their vocabulary by learning plant descriptors. Details and more suggestions are included in this article. (MA)

  19. Ultrastructure of the basal lamina of bovine ovarian follicles and its relationship to the membrana granulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving-Rodgers, H F; Rodgers, R J

    2000-03-01

    Different morphological phenotypes of follicular basal lamina and of membrana granulosa have been observed. Ten preantral follicles (basal lamina and membrana granulosa. Within each antral follicle, the shape of the basal cells of the membrana granulosa was uniform, and either rounded or columnar. There were equal proportions of follicles basal cells and with rounded basal cells. Larger follicles had only rounded basal cells. Conventional basal laminae of a single layer adjacent to the basal granulosa cells were observed in healthy follicles at the preantral and antral stages. However, at the preantral stage, the conventional types of basal lamina were enlarged or even partially laminated. A second type of basal lamina, described as 'loopy', occurred in about half the preantral follicles and in half the antral follicles basal laminae were not observed in larger follicles. 'Loopy' basal laminae were composed of basal laminae aligning the basal surface of basal granulosa cells, but with additional layers or loops often branching from the innermost layer. Each loop was usually Basal cellular processes were also common, and vesicles could be seen budding off from these processes. In antral follicles, conventional basal laminae occurred in follicles with rounded basal granulosa cells. Other follicles with columnar cells, and atretic follicles, had the 'loopy' basal lamina phenotype. Thus, follicles have different basal laminae that relate to the morphology of the membrana granulosa. PMID:10864785

  20. Cortico-Basal Ganglia Circuit Function in Psychiatric Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaydin, Lisa A; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2016-01-01

    Circuit dysfunction models of psychiatric disease posit that pathological behavior results from abnormal patterns of electrical activity in specific cells and circuits in the brain. Many psychiatric disorders are associated with abnormal activity in the prefrontal cortex and in the basal ganglia, a set of subcortical nuclei implicated in cognitive and motor control. Here we discuss the role of the basal ganglia and connected prefrontal regions in the etiology and treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, and depression, emphasizing mechanistic work in rodent behavioral models to dissect causal cortico-basal ganglia circuits underlying discrete behavioral symptom domains relevant to these complex disorders. PMID:26667072

  1. An Unusual Location of Basal Cell Carcinoma: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Birgül Tepe

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant skin tumour. Chronic sun exposure is considered as the main etiologic factor in its development. Although it mainly occurs on sun-exposed areas as the face and neck, it rarely develops on the forearms and/or arms. The etiologic factors which affect the anatomic distribution of basal cell carcinoma are not well-known. Here we report two patients who developed basal cell carcinoma on the forearm. None of the patients had a specific etiologic fac...

  2. Obturator or "lateral" bypass in the management of infected vascular prostheses at the groin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidović Lazar B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The infection of the previously implanted vascular graft at the groin, is associated with great mortality and morbidity rate [1]. The authors present a retrospective study in which they analyzed management of infected vascular prostheses at the groin, using obturator bypass in 26 cases, and "lateral" bypass in 15 cases. The indications for obturator bypass reconstructions included: 20 infections of aorto-femoral grafts, two infected pse udoaneurysms in the groin after RTA of the superficial femoral artery, and 4 infections of iliac-femoral grafts. The indications for lateral bypass reconstructions were: infections after aorto-femoral reconstructions - 8 cases; infection after femora-popliteal reconstructions - 4 cases; infection after iliac-femoral reconstruction - 2 patients, and one infected pseudoaneurysm in the groin after RTA of the superficial femoral artery. In 3 subjects obturator bypass was performed using extraperitoneal approach while in other 23 patients transperitoneal approach was done by donor's artery. The obturator bypass was performed using a PTFE graft in 3 cases and Dacron graft in 23. The donor's artery used for obturator bypass was a noninfected proximal part of aortofemoral graft in 20 cases, and iliac artery in 6 patients. The superfical femoral artery was recipient artery for obturator bypass in 3 cases, deep femoral artery in one case, and above the knee popliteal artery in 22 cases (Figure 1. In two patients transperitoenal approach to donors artery for "lateral" bypass has been used, and in 13 cases extraperitoneal. The proximal noninfected part of aorto femoral graft was used as a donor's artery for lateral bypass in 8 patients, while common iliac artery in 7 subjects. In 5 cases recon structions were performed using PTFE grafts, in 3 using autologous saphenous vein grafts, and in 7 using Dacron grafts. The recipient artery for "lateral" bypass was deep femoral in 8 cases, superficial femoral in three patients and

  3. Image reconstruction and the effect on dose calculation for hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High atomic number inserts, such as hip prostheses and dental fillings, cause streak artifacts on computed tomography (CT) images when filtered back-projection (FBP) methods are used. These streak artifacts severely degrade our ability to differentiate the tumor volume. Also, incorrect Hounsfield numbers yield incorrect electron density information that may lead to erroneous dose calculations, and, as a result, compromise clinical outcomes. The aim of this research was to evaluate the dosimetric consequences of artifacts during radiotherapy planning of a prostate patient containing a hip prosthesis. The CT numbers corresponding to an iron prosthesis were inserted into the right femoral head of an existing CT image set. This artifact-free image was used as the standard image set. CT projections through the image set formed the sinogram, from which filtered back projection and iterative deblurring methods were used to create reconstructed image sets. These reconstructed image sets contained artifacts. Prostate treatment plans were then calculated using a Monte Carlo system for the standard and reconstructed CT image sets. Close to the prosthesis, the CT numbers between the reconstructed and standard image sets differed substantially. However, because the CT number differences covered only a small area, the dose distributions on the reconstructed and standard image sets were not significantly different. The dose-volume histograms for the prostate, rectum, and bladder were virtually identical. Our results indicate that even though CT image artifacts restrict our ability to differentiate tumors and critical structures, the dose distributions for a prostate plan containing a hip prosthesis, calculated on both artifact-free image sets and image sets containing artifacts, are not significantly different

  4. Percutaneous osseointegrated prostheses for amputees: Limb compensation in a 12-month ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Trevor J; Beck, J Peter; Bloebaum, Roy D; Bachus, Kent N

    2011-10-13

    Percutaneous osseointegrated prostheses are being investigated as an alternative strategy to attach prosthetic limbs to patients. Although the use of these implants has shown to be promising in clinical trials, the ability to maintain a skin seal around an osseointegrated implant interface is a major challenge to prevent superficial and deep periprosthetic infections. The specific aim of this study was to establish a translational load-bearing ovine model to assess postoperative limb compensation and gait symmetry following a percutaneous osseointegrated implant. We tested the following hypotheses: (1) the animals would return to pre-amputation limb loads within 12-months; (2) the animals would return to a symmetrical gait pattern (stride length and time in stance) within 12-months. The results demonstrated that one month following surgery, the sheep loaded their amputated limb to a mean value of nearly 80% of their pre-amputation loading condition; by 12-months, this mean had dropped to approximately 74%. There was no statistical differences between the symmetry of the amputated forelimb and the contralateral forelimb at any time point for the animals stride length or the time spent in the stance phase of their gait cycle. Thus, the data showed that while the animals maintained symmetric gait patterns, they did not return to full weight-bearing after 12-months. The results of this study showed that a large animal load-bearing model had a symmetric gait and was weight bearing for up to 12 months. While the current investigation utilizes an ovine model, the data show that osseointegrated implant technology with postoperative follow-up can help our human patients return to symmetric gait and maintain an active lifestyle, leading to an improvement in their quality of life following amputation. PMID:21920525

  5. Wear behavior between zirconia and titanium as an antagonist on fixed dental prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the wear behavior of the abrader when tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (TZP), cp-titanium (CpTi) and Ti–6Al–4V alloy (TiAlV) were used as the antagonist on fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Both hemisphere abrader and flat substrate specimens were prepared using TZP, CpTi and TiAlV. Two-body wear tests were performed in distilled water, and the wear volume of the abrader specimen was measured to evaluate the wear behavior. In addition, scanning microscopic observation and an electron probe micro-analysis were performed to elucidate the underlying mechanism of the wear. The wear volume of CpTi and TiAlV abrader specimens was approximately 20 times larger than that of TZP abrader specimen against all substrate specimens. This is due to the differences in hardness between the ultra-hardness of TZP and the comparatively low hardness of CpTi and TiAlV. The wear volume of CpTi and TiAlV abrader specimens against the TZP substrate was significantly smaller than for the CpTi and TiAlV substrates despite the hardness of TZP being much larger than those of CpTi and TiAlV. This phenomenon may be based on the adhesive wear mechanism. Elements of Ti, Al and V originating in the TiAlV substrate were detected adhering to the abrader CpTi specimen. These results suggest that FDPs of CpTi and TiAlV are susceptible to wear against not only TZP but also CpTi and TiAlV in contrast to TZP FDPs. (paper)

  6. Effect of axial loads on implant-supported partial fixed prostheses by strain gauge analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gustavo Oliveira de Vasconcellos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The present study used strain gauge analysis to perform an in vitro evaluation of the effect of axial loading on 3 elements of implant-supported partial fixed prostheses, varying the type of prosthetic cylinder and the loading points. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three internal hexagon implants were linearly embedded in a polyurethane block. Microunit abutments were connected to the implants applying a torque of 20 Ncm, and prefabricated Co-Cr cylinders and plastic prosthetic cylinders were screwed onto the abutments, which received standard patterns cast in Co-Cr alloy (n=5. Four strain gauges (SG were bonded onto the surface of the block tangentially to the implants, SG 01 mesially to implant 1, SG 02 and SG 03 mesially and distally to implant 2, respectively, and SG 04 distally to implant 3. Each metallic structure was screwed onto the abutments with a 10 Ncm torque and an axial load of 30 kg was applied at five predetermined points (A, B, C, D, E. The data obtained from the strain gauge analyses were analyzed statistically by RM ANOVA and Tukey's test, with a level of significance of p<0.05. RESULTS: There was a significant difference for the loading point (p=0.0001, with point B generating the smallest microdeformation (239.49 µε and point D the highest (442.77 µε. No significant difference was found for the cylinder type (p=0.748. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that the type of cylinder did not affect in the magnitude of microdeformation, but the axial loading location influenced this magnitude.

  7. The study of wear behaviors on abducted hip joint prostheses by an alternate finite element approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Wu, James Shih-Shyn; Chen, Jian-Horng

    2016-07-01

    An acetabular cup with larger abduction angles is able to affect the normal function of the cup seriously that may cause early failure of the total hip replacement (THR). Complexity of the finite element (FE) simulation in the wear analysis of the THR is usually concerned with the contact status, the computational effort, and the possible divergence of results, which become more difficult on THRs with larger cup abduction angles. In the study, we propose a FE approach with contact transformation that offers less computational effort. Related procedures, such as Lagrangian Multiplier, partitioned matrix inversion, detection of contact forces, continuity of contact surface, nodal area estimation, etc. are explained in this report. Through the transformed methodology, the computer round-off error is tremendously reduced and the embedded repetitive procedure can be processed precisely and quickly. Here, wear behaviors of THR with various abduction angles are investigated. The most commonly used combination, i.e., metal-on-polyethylene, is adopted in the current study where a cobalt-chromium femoral head is paired with an Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) cup. In all illustrations, wear coefficients are estimated by self-averaging strategy with available experimental datum reported elsewhere. The results reveal that the THR with larger abduction angles may produce deeper depth of wear but the volume of wear presents an opposite tendency; these results are comparable with clinical and experimental reports. The current approach can be widely applied easily to fields such as the study of the wear behaviors on ante-version, impingement, and time-dependent behaviors of prostheses etc. PMID:27265055

  8. The first metatarsal web space:its applied anatomy and usage in tracing the first dorsal metatarsal artery in thumb reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐永清; 李军; 钟世镇; 徐达传; 徐小山; 郭远发; 汪新民; 李主一; 朱跃良

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the anatomical relationship of the structures in the first toe webbing space for better dissection of toes in thumb reconstruction.Methods: The first dorsal metatarsal artery, the first deep transverse metatarsal ligament and the extensor expansion were observed on 42 adult cadaveric lower extremities. Clinically the method of tracing the first dorsal metatarsal artery around the space of the extensor expansion was used in 36 cases of thumb reconstruction.Results: The distal segments of the first dorsal metatarsal artery of Gilbert types I and II were located superficially to the extensor expansion. The harvesting time of a toe was shortened from 90 minutes to 50 minutes with 100% survival of reconstructed fingers. Conclusions: The distal segment of the first dorsal metatarsal artery lies constantly at the superficial layer of the extensor expansion. Most of the first metatarsal arteries of Gilbert types I and II can be easily located via the combined sequential and reverse dissection around the space of the extensor expansion.

  9. Optimization of scan time in MRI for total hip prostheses. SEMAC tailoring for prosthetic implants containing different types of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deligianni, X. [University of Basel Hospital, Basel (Switzerland). Div. of Radiological Physics; Merian Iselin Klinik, Basel (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiology; Bieri, O. [University of Basel Hospital, Basel (Switzerland). Div. of Radiological Physics; Elke, R. [Orthomerian, Basel (Switzerland); Wischer, T.; Egelhof, T. [Merian Iselin Klinik, Basel (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiology

    2015-12-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of soft tissues after total hip arthroplasty is of clinical interest for the diagnosis of various pathologies that are usually invisible with other imaging modalities. As a result, considerable effort has been put into the development of metal artifact reduction MRI strategies, such as slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC). Generally, the degree of metal artifact reduction with SEMAC directly relates to the overall time spent for acquisition, but there is no specific consensus about the most efficient sequence setup depending on the implant material. The aim of this article is to suggest material-tailored SEMAC protocol settings. Five of the most common total hip prostheses (1. Revision prosthesis (S-Rom), 2. Titanium alloy, 3. Mueller type (CoNiCRMo alloy), 4. Old Charnley prosthesis (Exeter/Stryker), 5. MS-30 stem (stainless-steel)) were scanned on a 1.5 T MRI clinical scanner with a SEMAC sequence with a range of artifact-resolving slice encoding steps (SES: 2 - 23) along the slice direction (yielding a total variable scan time ranging from 1 to 10 min). The reduction of the artifact volume in comparison with maximal artifact suppression was evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively in order to establish a recommended number of steps for each case. The number of SES that reduced the artifact volume below approximately 300 mm{sup 3} ranged from 3 to 13, depending on the material. Our results showed that although 3 SES steps can be sufficient for artifact reduction for titanium prostheses, at least 11 SES should be used for prostheses made of materials such as certain alloys of stainless steel. Tailoring SES to the implant material and to the desired degree of metal artifact reduction represents a simple tool for workflow optimization of SEMAC imaging near total hip arthroplasty in a clinical setting.

  10. Optimization of scan time in MRI for total hip prostheses. SEMAC tailoring for prosthetic implants containing different types of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of soft tissues after total hip arthroplasty is of clinical interest for the diagnosis of various pathologies that are usually invisible with other imaging modalities. As a result, considerable effort has been put into the development of metal artifact reduction MRI strategies, such as slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC). Generally, the degree of metal artifact reduction with SEMAC directly relates to the overall time spent for acquisition, but there is no specific consensus about the most efficient sequence setup depending on the implant material. The aim of this article is to suggest material-tailored SEMAC protocol settings. Five of the most common total hip prostheses (1. Revision prosthesis (S-Rom), 2. Titanium alloy, 3. Mueller type (CoNiCRMo alloy), 4. Old Charnley prosthesis (Exeter/Stryker), 5. MS-30 stem (stainless-steel)) were scanned on a 1.5 T MRI clinical scanner with a SEMAC sequence with a range of artifact-resolving slice encoding steps (SES: 2 - 23) along the slice direction (yielding a total variable scan time ranging from 1 to 10 min). The reduction of the artifact volume in comparison with maximal artifact suppression was evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively in order to establish a recommended number of steps for each case. The number of SES that reduced the artifact volume below approximately 300 mm3 ranged from 3 to 13, depending on the material. Our results showed that although 3 SES steps can be sufficient for artifact reduction for titanium prostheses, at least 11 SES should be used for prostheses made of materials such as certain alloys of stainless steel. Tailoring SES to the implant material and to the desired degree of metal artifact reduction represents a simple tool for workflow optimization of SEMAC imaging near total hip arthroplasty in a clinical setting.

  11. Short latency cerebellar modulation of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christopher H; Fremont, Rachel; Arteaga-Bracho, Eduardo E; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2014-12-01

    The graceful, purposeful motion of our body is an engineering feat that remains unparalleled in robotic devices using advanced artificial intelligence. Much of the information required for complex movements is generated by the cerebellum and the basal ganglia in conjunction with the cortex. Cerebellum and basal ganglia have been thought to communicate with each other only through slow, multi-synaptic cortical loops, begging the question as to how they coordinate their outputs in real time. We found that the cerebellum rapidly modulates the activity of the striatum via a disynaptic pathway in mice. Under physiological conditions, this short latency pathway was capable of facilitating optimal motor control by allowing the basal ganglia to incorporate time-sensitive cerebellar information and by guiding the sign of cortico-striatal plasticity. Conversely, under pathological condition, this pathway relayed aberrant cerebellar activity to the basal ganglia to cause dystonia. PMID:25402853

  12. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki and others

    1988-09-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis.

  13. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis. (author)

  14. Basal cell carcinoma arising in a smallpox vaccination site.

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, J D; Shesol, B F; Horne, D W

    1980-01-01

    A case of pigmented basal cell carcinoma developing in a smallpox revaccination site is presented. Any progressive change within a smallpox vaccination scar should be thoroughly evaluated and treated appropriately after tissue diagnosis.

  15. Monoscopic photogrammetry to obtain 3D models by a mobile device: a method for making facial prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar-Gamarra, Rodrigo; Seelaus, Rosemary; Da Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes; da Silva, Airton Moreira; Dib, Luciano Lauria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to present the development of a new technique to obtain 3D models using photogrammetry by a mobile device and free software, as a method for making digital facial impressions of patients with maxillofacial defects for the final purpose of 3D printing of facial prostheses. Methods With the use of a mobile device, free software and a photo capture protocol, 2D captures of the anatomy of a patient with a facial defect were transformed into a 3D model. The resulta...

  16. NAA applied to the study of metallic ion transfer induced by orthopedic surgical tools or by metallic prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After implantation of a metallic prosthesis in a patient, damage can occur and surrounding tissues may be modified. These effects were related by characterizing the soft tissue content. However, the variations in element concentrations can be small and it is necessary to evaluate the instrumental contamination, measured in muscular and capsular tissues surrounding the hips of selected corpses. From corpses, which never undergo surgical operations, samples have been cut with different surgical tools. From corpses with hip prosthesis, samples have been cut with scalpels to determine the contamination induced by metallic prostheses. Results give the mineral composition of surgical tools and of muscular and capsular tissues. (author)

  17. Proposing national identification number on dental prostheses as universal personal identification code - A revolution in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad, Rajendra K; Belgaumi, Uzma; Vibhute, Nupura; Kadashetti, Vidya; Chandrappa, Pramod Redder; Gugwad, Sushma

    2015-01-01

    The proper identification of a decedent is not only important for humanitarian and emotional reasons, but also for legal and administrative purposes. During the reconstructive identification process, all necessary information is gathered from the unknown body of the victim and hence that an objective reconstructed profile can be established. Denture marking systems are being used in various situations, and a number of direct and indirect methods are reported. We propose that national identification numbers be incorporated in all removable and fixed prostheses, so as to adopt a single and definitive universal personal identification code with the aim of achieving a uniform, standardized, easy, and fast identification method worldwide for forensic identification. PMID:26005294

  18. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome: A Case Report and Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bala Subramanyam, S.; Naga Sujata, D.; Sridhar, K.; Pushpanjali, M

    2011-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, a rare autosomal dominant disorder, comprises of a number of abnormalities such as multiple nevoid basal cell carcinomas, skeletal abnormalities and multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Diagnosis may be difficult because of the variability of expressivity and different ages of onset for different traits of this disorder. The dental clinician may be the first to encounter and identify this syndrome, when the multiple cysts like radiolucencies are disc...

  19. Basal Jawed Vertebrate Phylogenomics Using Transcriptomic Data from Solexa Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ming; Zou, Ming; Lei YANG; He, Shunping

    2012-01-01

    The traditionally accepted relationships among basal jawed vertebrates have been challenged by some molecular phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial sequences. Those studies split extant gnathostomes into two monophyletic groups: tetrapods and piscine branch, including Chondrichthyes, Actinopterygii and sarcopterygian fishes. Lungfish and bichir are found in a basal position on the piscine branch. Based on transcriptomes of an armored bichir (Polypterus delhezi) and an African lungfish ...

  20. Drosophila melanogaster as a model for basal body research

    OpenAIRE

    Jana, Swadhin Chandra; Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica; Durand, Bénédicte; Timothy L. Megraw

    2016-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is one of the most extensively studied organisms in biological research and has centrioles/basal bodies and cilia that can be modelled to investigate their functions in animals generally. Centrioles are nine-fold symmetrical microtubule-based cylindrical structures required to form centrosomes and also to nucleate the formation of cilia and flagella. When they function to template cilia, centrioles transition into basal bodies. The fruit fly has various...

  1. Prevalence and clinical relevance of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With increasing CT examinations of the cerebrum, the discovery of basal ganglia calcification becomes more frequent. In order to correlate these calcifications to the symptoms believed to be accompanied with Fahr's disease 2318 cranial CT scans were examined. There was an overall incidence of basal ganglia calcification of 12.5%. The most frequent location was the globus pallidus (96.4%). In the examined population there was no correlation found between the calcifications and symptoms having been described with striopallidentate calcifications. (orig.)

  2. Optimization Well-Type on the Conditions of Basal Groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Jiaming Zhang; Xiaodong Wu; Guoqing Han; Shudong Li; Jia Zhang

    2013-01-01

    For optimization well-type on the conditions of basal groundwater, inasmuch as an analogy exists between electrical and fluid flow, the electrolytic analogy experiments have been conducted, which made a series of comparisons and evaluations between 9 types of complex well configurations and vertical well in terms of production. Taking into account the boundary condition of basal groundwater, we conducted 3×3×10 experiments in totally, including vertical well, horizontal well, radial well, sna...

  3. Childhood trauma and basal cortisol in people with personality disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Flory, Janine D.; Yehuda, Rachel; Grossman, Robert; New, Antonia S.; Mitropoulou, Vivian; Siever, Larry J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the influence of various forms of childhood abuse on basal cortisol levels in a sample of adults with Axis II personality disorders. Participants included 63 adults (n=19 women) who provided basal plasma cortisol samples and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Linear regression analyses that included all five subscales (i.e., sexual abuse, physical abuse, emotional abuse, physical neglect and emotional neglect) demonstrated that Physical abuse was related to lowe...

  4. Pseudohypoparathyroidism, parkinsonism syndrome, with no basal ganglia calcification.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, B K; Donley, D K

    1988-01-01

    A 20 year old woman with pseudohypoparathyroidism, Parkinsonism and no basal ganglia calcifications shown by computed tomography is reported. She has typical features of pseudohypoparathyroidism and biochemical evidence of end-organ resistance to parathyroid hormone. She is mentally retarded and has tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and stooped posture. The cause of Parkinsonism in pseudohypoparathyroidism is thought to be basal ganglia calcification. This patient must have another pathophysiol...

  5. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; Naevoid Basalzellkarzinom-Syndrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grgic, A.; Heinrich, M.; Heckmann, M.; Kramann, B. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Aliani, S. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin; Dill-Mueller, D. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Hautklinik und Poliklinik; Uder, M. [Erlange-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2005-07-01

    Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmar/plantar pits, calcification of the falx cerebri, and spine and rib anomalies. The combination of clinical, imaging, and histological findings is helpful in identifying NBCCS patients. Imaging plays a crucial role in evaluation of these patients. We present a wide variety of clinical and radiological findings characteristic of this disease. (orig.)

  6. CT and MRI diagnosis of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze CT and MRI features of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage and investigate the diagnostic value. Methods: 21 cases with traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage diagnosed by clinic, CT and MRI in our hospital were collected in this study Plain CT scan were immediately performed in 21 cases after injury, plain MR scan were performed in 1 to 3 days. 12 cases of them underwent diffusion weighted imagine (DWI). The CT and MRI findings were retrospectively summarized. Results: 8 cases were found with simple traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage. Complexity of basal ganglia hemorrhage occurred in 13 cases, 6 cases combined with subdural hemorrhage, 3 cases with epidural hematoma, 2 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, 6 cases with brain contusion and laceration in other locations, 4 cases with skull fracture. 26 lesions of basal ganglia hematoma were showed in 21 cases, 14 lesions of pallidum hemorrhage in 11 cases confirmed by MR could not be distinguished from calcification at the fast CT scan. 5 more lesions of brain contusion and laceration and 4 more lesions of brain white matter laceration were found by MR. Conclusion: CT in combination with MRI can diagnose traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage and its complications early, comprehensively and accurately, which plays an important role in the clinical therapy selection and prognosis evaluation. (authors)

  7. Axillary basal cell carcinoma in patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome: report of basal cell carcinoma in both axilla of a woman with basal cell nevus syndrome and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Basal cell carcinoma of the axilla, an area that is not usually exposed to the sun, is rare. Individuals with basal cell nevus syndrome, a disorder associated with a mutation in the patch 1 (PTCH1) gene, develop numerous basal cell carcinomas.Purpose: To describe a woman with basal cell nevus syndrome who developed a pigmented basal cell carcinoma in each of her axilla and to review the features of axillary basal cell carcinoma patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome.Methods: Pubmed w...

  8. HIPOPLASIA DEL PULGAR: PRESENTACIÓN CLÍNICA Y RECONSTRUCCIÓN Hipoplasia of the thumb: Clinical presentation and reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique M Vergara Amador

    2008-03-01

    ógicas o renales. Pacientes con deficiencia longitudinal del radio tienen peores resultados que los pacientes que tuvieron hipoplasia única del pulgar. En general los resultados fueron buenos y están de acuerdo con los reportes de la literatura donde escriben que el procedimiento ideal para la reconstrucción de un pulgar hipoplásico tipo IIIb, IV y V sigue siendo la pulgarización.Background. in the genesis of the partial or total absence of the thumb they are genetic, environmental factors or a combination of both. It is take part of a syndrome or to be isolated and frequently associated with problems of radial longitudinal deficiency of the forearm. Objective. The purpose of this study is mostar the experience, the focus of the processing and the results obtained since the point esthetic and functional view. The most it accepted classification is the proposal by Blauth that helps to determine the forecast and the processing. Materials and methods. it is a work type series of cases in 22 children with hipoplasia of the thumb, with a minimum of 12 months, (average 28 months. In 15 cases there were association of radial dysplasia or another anomaly among them 4 patients with VATER, and the 7 remaining they corresponded to hipoplasia of the thumb as only entity. We carried out tendon transfer, with opening of the first comisure in 2 patients with hipoplasia type II. In 3 patients, with hipoplasia type III A, one carries out corner opening, transfer of the superficial flexor of the 4 finger to correct instability of the articulation MF and opposition of the thumb, and transfer for extension of the thumb. In 17 cases one carries out pollicization of the index. Results. The outcome was evaluated in: non pinch, lateral pinch and fingertip pinch; the grade of opposition like good, minimal and non opposition, and the aesthetic result according to the satisfaction of the parents in bad, regular and good. The five children reconstructed with transfers of tendons and comisure

  9. Development of nanofluorapatite polymer-based composite for bioactive orthopedic implants and prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu G

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gangfeng Hu,1,2 Hui Wang,1 Xiaocong Yao,1 Dawei Bi,1 Gang Zhu,1 Songchao Tang,2 Jie Wei,2 Lili Yang,3 Peijian Tong,4 Luwei Xiao4 1The First People’s Hospital of Xiaoshang, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory of Ultra-fine Materials, Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Zhejiang Traditional Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Fluorapatite with low solubility is a promising biomaterial due to its structure, which is similar to hydroxyapatite. In this study a bioactive composite of nanofluorapatite (n-FA and polyamide 12 (PA12 was fabricated. The results revealed that the mechanical properties (such as compressive strength and elastic modulus, hydrophilicity, and antibacterial properties of n-FA/PA12 composite were obviously improved by adding n-FA into PA12 as compared with PA12. In addition, cell proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on n-FA/PA12 composite was significantly higher than with PA12, and alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells on the n-FA/PA12 composite was expressed at obviously higher levels as compared with PA12. The results suggest that n-FA/PA12 composite could support cell proliferation and differentiation, showing good cytocompatibility. Histological evaluation indicates that n-FA/PA12 composite enhances the efficiency of new bone formation with the introduction of n-FA into PA12, and the quantity of the newly formed bone for n-FA/PA12 composite is significantly higher than with PA12. In conclusion, n-FA/PA12 composite exhibits good biocompatibility and osteogenesis, which might be used for various orthopedic prostheses and dental implants. Keywords: nanofluorapatite, bioactive composites, cell behavior, orthopedic implants

  10. Mandibular bone resorption in patients treated with tissue-integrated prostheses and in complete-denture wearers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sennerby, L.; Carlsson, G.E.; Bergman, B.; Warfvinge, J.

    1988-01-01

    Mandibular bone resorption was studied in patients treated with tissue-integrated prostheses (TIP) and in complete-denture wearers by distance and area measurements on cephalometric radiographs. The area measurements were performed by means of a computer. Two TIP groups with short and long periods (average chi=2.4 and 23.9 years) of edentulousness, and wearing complete dentures before fixture installtion, were followed up to over 7-8 years. Mandibular bone resorption was remarkably small behind the distally positioned fixtures in comparison with the correspondings region in complete-denture wearers. Patients with complete dentures showed a continous resorption of the mandibular alveolar ridge over 21 years, even though there were great individual variations. The bone loss was most pronounced anteriorly and during the first 2 years after extraction of the residual teeth. It is concluded that treatment with tissue-integrated prostheses seems to reduce bone resorption in the mandible, probably owing to favorable load conditions and adequate stimulation of the bone.

  11. Percutaneous bone cement refixation of aseptically loose hip prostheses: the effect of interface tissue removal on injected cement volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malan, Daniel F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Intelligent Systems, Delft (Netherlands); Valstar, Edward R. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); Nelissen, Rob G.H.H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    To quantify whether injected cement volumes differed between two groups of patients who underwent experimental minimally invasive percutaneous cement injection procedures to stabilize aseptically loose hip prostheses. One patient group was preoperatively treated using gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy to remove fibrous interface tissue, while the other group received no preoperative treatment. It was hypothesized that cement penetration may have been inhibited by the presence of fibrous interface tissue in periprosthetic lesions. We analyzed 17 patients (14 female, 3 male, ages 72-91, ASA categories 2-4) who were treated at our institution. Osteolytic lesions and injected cement were manually delineated using 3D CT image segmentation, and the deposition of injected cement was quantified. Patients who underwent preoperative gene-directed enzyme therapy to remove fibrous tissue exhibited larger injected cement volumes than those who did not. The observed median increase in injected cement volume was 6.8 ml. Higher cement leakage volumes were also observed for this group. We conclude that prior removal of periprosthetic fibrous interface tissue may enable better cement flow and penetration. This might lead to better refixation of aseptically loosened prostheses. (orig.)

  12. Low in vitro third-body wear on total hip prostheses induced by calcium sulphate used for local antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberger, R; Wahl, P; Krieg, J; Gautier, E

    2014-01-01

    In case of implant associated infection, implant preservation is associated with high failure rates. Therefore, a removal or exchange of the implant is most often mandatory for treatment success. Alternatively, under certain conditions, local antibiotic delivery can be applied - preserving the implant, using for example calcium sulphate as a resorbable carrier. In this work, third-body wear on total hip prostheses caused by calcium sulphate particles was tested in a hip simulator. Inlays made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) against 28 mm CoCrMo heads and 36 mm alumina pairings were tested in triplicate, both with and without calcium sulphate particles in the test liquid. Neither the alumina articulations nor the CoCrMo heads were affected by the calcium sulphate particles since calcium sulphate is a relatively soft material. The polyethylene inlays showed 39-89 % higher wear during exposure compared to references, but wear returned to normal when no more particles were added. Thus, calcium sulphate might be used as antibiotic carrier even in the presence of total hip prostheses without fearing excessive third-body wear. PMID:25340804

  13. Low in vitro third-body wear on total hip prostheses induced by calcium sulphate used for local antibiotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Heuberger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In case of implant associated infection, implant preservation is associated with high failure rates. Therefore, a removal or exchange of the implant is most often mandatory for treatment success. Alternatively, under certain conditions, local antibiotic delivery can be applied – preserving the implant, using for example calcium sulphate as a resorbable carrier. In this work, third-body wear on total hip prostheses caused by calcium sulphate particles was tested in a hip simulator. Inlays made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE and cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE against 28 mm CoCrMo heads and 36 mm alumina pairings were tested in triplicate, both with and without calcium sulphate particles in the test liquid. Neither the alumina articulations nor the CoCrMo heads were affected by the calcium sulphate particles since calcium sulphate is a relatively soft material. The polyethylene inlays showed 39-89 % higher wear during exposure compared to references, but wear returned to normal when no more particles were added. Thus, calcium sulphate might be used as antibiotic carrier even in the presence of total hip prostheses without fearing excessive third-body wear.

  14. Percutaneous bone cement refixation of aseptically loose hip prostheses: the effect of interface tissue removal on injected cement volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To quantify whether injected cement volumes differed between two groups of patients who underwent experimental minimally invasive percutaneous cement injection procedures to stabilize aseptically loose hip prostheses. One patient group was preoperatively treated using gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy to remove fibrous interface tissue, while the other group received no preoperative treatment. It was hypothesized that cement penetration may have been inhibited by the presence of fibrous interface tissue in periprosthetic lesions. We analyzed 17 patients (14 female, 3 male, ages 72-91, ASA categories 2-4) who were treated at our institution. Osteolytic lesions and injected cement were manually delineated using 3D CT image segmentation, and the deposition of injected cement was quantified. Patients who underwent preoperative gene-directed enzyme therapy to remove fibrous tissue exhibited larger injected cement volumes than those who did not. The observed median increase in injected cement volume was 6.8 ml. Higher cement leakage volumes were also observed for this group. We conclude that prior removal of periprosthetic fibrous interface tissue may enable better cement flow and penetration. This might lead to better refixation of aseptically loosened prostheses. (orig.)

  15. Value of scintigraphy with Cuban 99mTc-ciprofloxacin in the detection of infected hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental, analytical cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 patients with suspicion of infectious process that were referred to 'Frank Pais' International Scientific Orthopedic Complex from January 1st, 2003 to December 31st, 2004, aimed at determining the efficacy of the Cuban 99mTc-ciprofloxacin in the evaluation of bacterial infections of the hip prostheses. Bone scintigraphies with 99mTc-methylendiphosphonate and 99mTc-ciprofloxacin were performed at 1, 4 and 24 hours after the injection. The culture/biopsy was used to confirm the criteria. On the visual analysis of the patients, sensitivity was obtained in 100 %, specificity in 75 %, diagnostic accuracy in 93.3 %, positive predictive value in 91.6 %, and negative predictive value in 100 %. The injured/healthy ratio showed significant differences between the patients with and without infection at the diverse hours of acquisition, with a level of significance of a = 0.05. The effectiveness of the Cuban formulation of 99mTc-ciprofloxacin in the evaluation of bacterial infections of the hip prostheses was proved

  16. Dopamine-glutamate interactions in the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, W J

    1998-01-01

    In an attempt to formulate a working hypothesis of basal-ganglia functions, arguments are considered suggesting that the basal ganglia are involved in a process of response selection i.e. in the facilitation of "wanted" and in the suppression of "unwanted" behaviour. The meso-accumbal dopamine-system is considered to mediate natural and drug-induced reward and sensitization. The meso-striatal dopamine-system seems to fulfill similar functions: It may mediate reinforcement which strengthens a given behaviour when elicited subsequently, but which is not experienced as reward or hedonia. Glutamate as the transmitter of the corticofugal projections to the basal ganglia nuclei and of the subthalamic neurons is critically involved in basal ganglia functions and dysfunctions; for example Parkinson's disease can be considered to be a secondary hyperglutamatergic disease. Additionally, glutamate is an essential factor in the plasticity response of the basal-ganglia. However, opposite to previous suggestions, the NMDA-receptor blocker MK-801 does not prevent psychostimulant- nor morphine-induced day to day increase (sensitization) of locomotion. Also the day to day increase of haloperidol-induced catalepsy was not prevented by MK-801. PMID:9871434

  17. De la generación del pulgar a la generación del índice From thumb's generation to forefinger's generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henar León Barroso

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available La aparición en 2010 de las tablets y el uso espontáneo que los niños desde primera infancia hacen de ellos, nos lleva a replantearnos si no estaremos delante de una nueva generación, la Generación del índice, frente a la llamada, hace unos años, Generación del Pulgar.The emergence of tablets in 2010 and the spontaneous use that children from early childhood make them, leads us to rethink whether we are in front of a new generation, the forefinger's generation , compared to the call, a few years ago, thumb's generation.

  18. Glomangioma da artéria digital do polegar: relato de um caso Glomus tumor of digital artery of thumb: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Terezinha Guillaumon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam um caso de tumor glômico em ramo da artéria radial que irriga o polegar direito, com história clínica de 4 meses. O doente referia o aparecimento de tumoração de aproximadamente 2,0 centímetros na região interdigital, entre o primeiro e o segundo quirodactilos da mão direita, sobre o músculo flexor curto do polegar, extremamente dolorosa e com dor em progressão. Os exames com aparelho de Doppler bidirecional e o eco-color-Doppler apresentaram, como diagnóstico presuntivo, malformação arteriovenosa, pelo turbilhonamento do fluxo e ausência de estenoses. A tumoração foi retirada por cirurgia aberta e encaminhada para exame histopatológico, com diagnóstico de glomangioma. Este relato descreve uma doença arterial pouco frequente, que causa extremo desconforto ao seu portador, mas que é solucionada pela exerese cirúrgica, sem sequelas.We report on a case of glomus tumor in the branch of the radial artery of the right thumb. The tumor had a 4-year clinical history. The patient reported the development of a 2.0-cm tumor in the interdigital region between the first and second fingers of the right hand on the short flexor muscle of thumb. The patient also complained of severe and progressive pain. Tests using bidirectional Doppler and echo-color-Doppler revealed a presumptive diagnosis of arteriovenous malformation based on the turbulence of the flow and absence of stenosis. The tumor was removed by open surgery and sent for histopathological examination, which showed a diagnosis of glomangioma. The present report describes a rare arterial disease causing extreme discomfort to the patient, which may be treated with surgical resection without sequelae.

  19. Computed tomography of granulomatous basal meningitis caused by pneumococcus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of 3-month-old female with ''granulomatous basal meningitis'' caused by pneumococcus was described. She suffered from high fever, vomiting, convulsion and loss of consciousness on January 28th, 1982. On admission the protein content of the spinal fluid was 280 mg/100 ml, the glucose 4 mg/100 ml and the cell count was 1206/3(L : 845, N : 361). Her symptoms and signs were deteriorated in spite of antibiotics and anticonvulsants. CT scan on the 10th day showed the enhanced basal cistern. She died on the 11th day but autopsy was not carried out. In this case, pneumococcus was cultured in CSF. This seemed to be the first case of ''granulomatous basal meningitis'' due to purulent meningitis in Japan. (author)

  20. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA IN MIDDLE EAR: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a very common skin cancer, it is much more common in fair – skinned individuals with a family history of Basal cell carcinoma and increases closure to the equator or at higher attitude, this tumor is a extremely rarely found in the middle ear, accounts for 45% of all au ricular carcinomas and is more common than squamous cell carcinoma, it is most frequently found in patient between 40 and 60 years of age, sunlight exposure is the most common modifiable risk factor, we are here presenting a case of Basal cell carcinoma in middle ear presented with ear discharge and polyp in external auditory canal and middle ear, treated with radiotherapy

  1. Time representation in reinforcement learning models of the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Joseph Gershman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement learning models have been influential in understanding many aspects of basal ganglia function, from reward prediction to action selection. Time plays an important role in these models, but there is still no theoretical consensus about what kind of time representation is used by the basal ganglia. We review several theoretical accounts and their supporting evidence. We then discuss the relationship between reinforcement learning models and the timing mechanisms that have been attributed to the basal ganglia. We hypothesize that a single computational system may underlie both reinforcement learning and interval timing—the perception of duration in the range of seconds to hours. This hypothesis, which extends earlier models by incorporating a time-sensitive action selection mechanism, may have important implications for understanding disorders like Parkinson's disease in which both decision making and timing are impaired.

  2. Time representation in reinforcement learning models of the basal ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Samuel J.; Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Ludvig, Elliot A.

    2014-01-01

    Reinforcement learning (RL) models have been influential in understanding many aspects of basal ganglia function, from reward prediction to action selection. Time plays an important role in these models, but there is still no theoretical consensus about what kind of time representation is used by the basal ganglia. We review several theoretical accounts and their supporting evidence. We then discuss the relationship between RL models and the timing mechanisms that have been attributed to the basal ganglia. We hypothesize that a single computational system may underlie both RL and interval timing—the perception of duration in the range of seconds to hours. This hypothesis, which extends earlier models by incorporating a time-sensitive action selection mechanism, may have important implications for understanding disorders like Parkinson's disease in which both decision making and timing are impaired. PMID:24409138

  3. Synchronizing activity of basal ganglia and pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimer, G; Rivlin, M; Israel, Z; Bergman, H

    2006-01-01

    Early physiological studies emphasized changes in the discharge rate of basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD), whereas recent studies stressed the role of the abnormal oscillatory activity and neuronal synchronization of pallidal cells. However, human observations cast doubt on the synchronization hypothesis since increased synchronization may be an epi-phenomenon of the tremor or of independent oscillators with similar frequency. Here, we show that modern actor/ critic models of the basal ganglia predict the emergence of synchronized activity in PD and that significant non-oscillatory and oscillatory correlations are found in MPTP primates. We conclude that the normal fluctuation of basal ganglia dopamine levels combined with local cortico-striatal learning rules lead to noncorrelated activity in the pallidum. Dopamine depletion, as in PD, results in correlated pallidal activity, and reduced information capacity. We therefore suggest that future deep brain stimulation (DBS) algorithms may be improved by desynchronizing pallidal activity. PMID:17017503

  4. An Unusual Location of Basal Cell Carcinoma: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Tepe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant skin tumour. Chronic sun exposure is considered as the main etiologic factor in its development. Although it mainly occurs on sun-exposed areas as the face and neck, it rarely develops on the forearms and/or arms. The etiologic factors which affect the anatomic distribution of basal cell carcinoma are not well-known. Here we report two patients who developed basal cell carcinoma on the forearm. None of the patients had a specific etiologic factor except for chronic sunlight exposure. The aim of our report is to show that this prevalant cutaneous malignancy can be encountered in rare/unusual areas. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 51-4

  5. Assessment of Body-Powered Upper Limb Prostheses by Able-Bodied Subjects, using the Box and Blocks Test and the Nine Hole Peg Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkate, L.; Smit, G.; Plettenburg, D.H.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design: Experimental trial. Background: The functional performance of currently available body-powered prostheses is unknown. Objective: The goal of this study was to objectively assess and compare the functional performance of three commonly used body-powered upper limb terminal devices. Meth

  6. To what extent does the longevity of fixed dental prostheses depend on the function of the cement? Working Group 4 materials : cementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelhoff, Daniel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2007-01-01

    Aims/Background: The objective of this review was to define the impact of cementation mode on the longevity of different types of single tooth restorations and fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Methods: Literature search by PubMed as the major database was used utilizing the terms namely, adhesive tech

  7. Prospective clinical phase II study of two new indwelling voice prostheses (Provox Vega 22.5 and 20 Fr) and a novel anterograde insertion device (Provox Smart Inserter)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J.M. Hilgers; A.H. Ackerstaff; I. Jacobi; A.J.M. Balm; I.B. Tan; M.W.M. van den Brekel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis: To assess device life of the new Provox Vega 22.5 and 20 Fr prostheses, to establish whether the optimized airflow characteristics of these devices materialize in better voice characteristics in comparison to Provox2, and to assess the feasibility of voice prosthesis replaceme

  8. A review of stand basal area growth models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Hong-gang; Zhang Jian-guo; Duan Ai-guo; He Cai-yun

    2007-01-01

    Growth and yield modeling has a long history in forestry. The methods of measuring the growth of stand basal area have evolved from those developed in the U.S.A. and Germany during the last century. Stand basal area modeling has progressed rapidly since the first widely used model was published by the U.S. Forest Service. Over the years, a variety of models have been developed for predicting the growth and yield of uneven/even-aged stands using stand-level approaches. The modeling methodology has not only moved from an empirical approach to a more ecological process-based approach but also accommodated a variety of techniques such as: 1) simultaneous equation methods, 2) difference models, 3) artificial neural network techniques, 4) linear/nonlinear regression models, and 5) matrix models. Empirical models using statistical methods were developed to reproduce accurately and precisely field observations. In contrast, process models have a shorter history, developed originally as research and education tools with the aim of increasing the understanding of cause and effect relationships. Empirical and process models can be married into hybrid models in which the shortcomings of both component approaches can, to some extent, be overcome. Algebraic difference forms of stand basal area models which consist of stand age, stand density and site quality can fully describe stand growth dynamics. This paper reviews the current literature regarding stand basal area models, discusses the basic types of models and their merits and outlines recent progress in modeling growth and dynamics of stand basal area. Future trends involving algebraic difference forms, good fitting variables and model types into stand basal area modeling strategies are discussed.

  9. Covert skill learning in a cortical-basal ganglia circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Jonathan D; Warren, Timothy L; Brainard, Michael S

    2012-06-14

    We learn complex skills such as speech and dance through a gradual process of trial and error. Cortical-basal ganglia circuits have an important yet unresolved function in this trial-and-error skill learning; influential 'actor-critic' models propose that basal ganglia circuits generate a variety of behaviours during training and learn to implement the successful behaviours in their repertoire. Here we show that the anterior forebrain pathway (AFP), a cortical-basal ganglia circuit, contributes to skill learning even when it does not contribute to such 'exploratory' variation in behavioural performance during training. Blocking the output of the AFP while training Bengalese finches to modify their songs prevented the gradual improvement that normally occurs in this complex skill during training. However, unblocking the output of the AFP after training caused an immediate transition from naive performance to excellent performance, indicating that the AFP covertly gained the ability to implement learned skill performance without contributing to skill practice. In contrast, inactivating the output nucleus of the AFP during training completely prevented learning, indicating that learning requires activity within the AFP during training. Our results suggest a revised model of skill learning: basal ganglia circuits can monitor the consequences of behavioural variation produced by other brain regions and then direct those brain regions to implement more successful behaviours. The ability of the AFP to identify successful performances generated by other brain regions indicates that basal ganglia circuits receive a detailed efference copy of premotor activity in those regions. The capacity of the AFP to implement successful performances that were initially produced by other brain regions indicates precise functional connections between basal ganglia circuits and the motor regions that directly control performance. PMID:22699618

  10. Somatic Cell Fusions Reveal Extensive Heterogeneity in Basal-like Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Ying; Subedee, Ashim; Bloushtain-Qimron, Noga;

    2015-01-01

    heterogeneity in basal-like breast cancers that correlates with clinical outcome. We also found that protein extracts of basal-like cells are sufficient to induce a luminal-to-basal phenotypic switch, implying a trigger of basal-like autoregulatory circuits. We determined that KDM6A might be required for...

  11. Optimal Surgical Safety Margin for Facial Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Olimpiu Hârceagă; Corina Baican; Rodica Cosgarea

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The major objective of this study is to establish optimal surgical margin for facial primary basal cell carcinoma smaller than 2.3 cm in diameter. Recommendations for this type of skin tumors are for 4 mm surgical margin, but on the face there is a tendency to use smaller margins, for example 2-3 mm.Material and Method. 38 patients with 40 primary facial basal cell carcinoma of less than 2.3 cm in diameter, nonsclerodermiform types, were included in the study. All tumors were init...

  12. Isolation of basal and mucous cell populations from rabbit trachea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of a unit gravity sedimentation procedure to monodispersed rabbit tracheal cells resulted in the isolation of enriched (2-fold to 2.5-fold) basal and mucous cell populations. Cellular integrity was confirmed by a trypan blue dye exclusion index of 93%, [3H] leucine incorporation, and ultrastructural analysis. Unit gravity sedimentation is an affective and rapid procedure for obtaining viable, homogeneous preparations of basal and mucous cells that may be used for in vitro studies of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and glycoprotein biosynthesis in respiratory mucous epithelia

  13. Radiotherapy of germinomas involving the basal ganglia and thalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine patients with histologically confirmed germinomas of the basal ganglia and thalamus (GBT) were treated by radiotherapy. The average dose of 52.5 Gy was delivered to the tumor bed, 37 Gy to the whole brain and 24.8 Gy to the CNS axis. The local control, which was verified by CT scan, was achieved in all patients. All patients are alive 11 to 96 months after radiotherapy. As with other intracranial germinomas, germinomas of the basal ganglia and thalamus respond well to radiotherapy and the prognosis is good after treatment. (author). 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. Abnormalities of the bilateral basal ganglia and thalami - diagnostic possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several diseases may cause non specific MRT abnormalities of the bilateral basal ganglia and thalami. As such, diagnosis of the underlying etiology may be difficult to achieve at imaging. In one clinical case are presented the diagnostic possibilities based on clinical date (previous history, clinical symptoms and evolution) and imaging data (type of signal abnormalities, location of lesions and associated abnormalities). The main categories of diseases causing MRT abnormalities of the bilateral basal ganglia and thalami in adult are: toxic, metabolic, vascular, infectious, inflammatory diseases and tumors.

  15. The classification and surgical treatment of the terminal phalanx of congenital thumb duplication%末节先天复拇畸形的分型和术式选择

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高伟阳; 王安远; 丁健; 李志杰; 陈星隆; 厉智; 李晓阳

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the classification and individualized treatment of the terminal phalanx of thumb duplication.Methods From Apr.2003 to Dec.2012,76 patients with 77 involved thumbs duplication at the level which is distal to the interphalangeal joint were retrospectively studied.Based on the morphology (the nail width and the thumb circumference) and the deviation of the thumb,we classified the terminal phalanx of thumb duplication into 5 types as Type A (no bony connection called floating thumb),Type B (asymmetry and no deviation),Type C (asymmetry and deviation),Type D (symmetry and no deviation) and Type E (symmetry and deviation).Different surgical procedures were selected according to different types.Simple excision of the smaller thumb was adopted for Type A case.Removement of the smaller thumb (usually the radial) and of the collateral ligament of the interphalangeal joint were selected for Type B.Removement of the smaller thumb (usually the radial) and reconstruction of the collateral ligament of the interphalangeal joint,as well as corrective osteotomies at the neck of the proximal phalanx were performed for Type C.The modified Bilhaut-Cloquet procedure with reconstruction of the collateral ligament of the interphalangeal joint were adopted in Type D.The classical Bilhaut-Cloquet procedure,or the modified Bilhaut-Cloquet procedure with reconstruction of the collateral ligament of the interphalangeal joint and corrective osteotomies at the neck of the proximal phalanx were performed in Type E.The results were assessed by an evaluation form for thumb duplication by the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Hand.Results According to our new classification standard,there were 3 cases with Type A duplicated thumbs,36 with Type B,13 with Type C,15 with Type D,10 with Type E.All the 76 patients underwent the individualized surgical treatment.The patients were followed up for 6-60 months.According to the evaluation form,excellent results were achieved in 66 thumbs

  16. Study of effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments in prostate cancer; Estudio de los efectos de las protesis metalicas en tratamientos radioterapicos en irradiacion pelvica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, P.; Mateos, J. C.; Herrador, M.; Ortiz, M. J.

    2006-07-01

    In this work it is described the problems related to the radiotherapy treatments of patients with prostate cancer and hip implants Analyze the effects of metallic prostheses in radiotherapy treatments and present the methods to overcome the problems that arise in these situations. Our patients are student in a TAC Philips with a range of Hounsfield number of-1000 to 4000. The planning and measurement of CT numbers are done in a RTP ADAC Pinnacle that have a maximum of 32767 CT units. The metallic implants more frequently used, titanium, stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, generate CT numbers from 2000 to 3000, and cause saturation effects. This problem may be solved with modern scanners that use the extended CT range. It is an algorithm that expand the usual range by a factor of 10. An alternative solution to this problem can be used if the prostheses are able to scan to select the window parameters that allow an automatic region of interest (roi) definition that match to the dimensions of the implants. Finally it is assigned the electronic/physical densities to the created roi's. The clinical dosimetry of patients with prostheses have been done defining the usual regions of interests (target volume and risk organs) in first place. Finally the prostheses are outlined using the window parameters previously measured and assigned the electronic or physical densities. The attenuation of the implant may then be calculated accurately. The presence of implants in the treatment fields originate artifacts in the TAC images of patients and underdosage of target volume that range between 12% and 30% in function of material an energy used. It is necessary the application of methods that correct the dose behind the implant, if it is not possible to prevent the incidence of the treatment beams over the prostheses. (Author)

  17. Basal cell carcinoma of the skin with areas of squamous cell carcinoma: a basosquamous cell carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, J.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of basosquamous cell carcinoma is controversial. A review of cases of basal cell carcinoma showed 23 cases that had conspicuous areas of squamous cell carcinoma. This was distinguished from squamous differentiation and keratotic basal cell carcinoma by a comparative study of 40 cases of compact lobular and 40 cases of keratotic basal cell carcinoma. Areas of intermediate tumour differentiation between basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma were found. Basal cell carcinomas with ...

  18. Pigmented Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Clinical Variant, Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    K., Deepadarshan; M., Mallikarjun; N. Abdu, Noshin

    2013-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant tumour of skin, comprising 80% of non-melanoma cancers. Intermittent exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a clinical and histological variant of basal cell carcinoma that exhibits increased pigmentation. It is a very rare variant, although its frequency can reach upto 6% of total basal cell carcinomas in Hispanics. Herein, we are reporting 2 cases of pigmented basal cell carcinoma.

  19. Radiological follow-up of uncemented knee prostheses. Preliminary study. Seguimiento radiologico de protesis de rodilla no cementadas. Estudio preliminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Hervas, C.; Gomez Barrena, E.; Marquez Moreno, I.; Calle Yuste, F.; Ordoez Parra, J.M.

    1993-10-01

    The preliminary results of a prospective study of 40 uncemented total knee prostheses (TKP) are presented following a radiological protocol with fluoroscopic control and follow-up of over 2 years. The prosthesis-bone interface and the components alignment were assessed. Several radiological signs were studied to assess this interface with respect to the fixing of the component, but they showed little clinical correlation. Statistical significance (p<0.05, chisquare) was found only in the observation of sclerosis in areas of support for the tibital tray as a reaction of the bone. This radiological follow-up is of interest to determine the evolution of the interface and position of the implant to prevent complications (especially loosening) in patients, particularly those under 60 years old, who represent the group that can most benefit from prosthetic systems with uncemented anchorage because of their life expectation and level of activity. Author

  20. Proposing national identification number on dental prostheses as universal personal identification code - A revolution in forensic odontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra K Baad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The proper identification of a decedent is not only important for humanitarian and emotional reasons, but also for legal and administrative purposes. During the reconstructive identification process, all necessary information is gathered from the unknown body of the victim and hence that an objective reconstructed profile can be established. Denture marking systems are being used in various situations, and a number of direct and indirect methods are reported. We propose that national identification numbers be incorporated in all removable and fixed prostheses, so as to adopt a single and definitive universal personal identification code with the aim of achieving a uniform, standardized, easy, and fast identification method worldwide for forensic identification.

  1. Polarized Integrin Mediates Human Keratinocyte Adhesion to Basal Lamina

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, Michele; Tamura, Richard N.; Kajiji, Shama; Bondanza, Sergio; Rossino, Paola; Cancedda, Ranieri; Carlo Marchisio, Pier; Quaranta, Vito

    1990-09-01

    Epithelial cell interactions with matrices are critical to tissue organization. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitations of cell lysates prepared from stratified cultures of human epidermal cells showed that the major integrins expressed by keratinocytes are α_Eβ_4 (also called α_6β_4) and α_2β_1/α_3β_1. The α_Eβ_4 integrin is localized at the surface of basal cells in contact with the basement membrane, whereas α_2β_1/ α_3β_1 integrins are absent from the basal surface and are localized only on the lateral surface of basal and spinous keratinocytes. Anti-β_4 antibodies potently inhibited keratinocyte adhesion to matrigel or purified laminin, whereas anti-β_1 antibodies were ineffective. Only anti-β_4 antibodies were able to detach established keratinocyte colonies. These data suggest that α_Eβ_4 mediates keratinocyte adhesion to basal lamina, whereas the β_1 subfamily is involved in cell-cell adhesion of keratinocytes.

  2. Basal ganglion stroke presenting as subtle behavioural change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Stephanie J; Begaz, T

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral infarctions can have many presentations ranging from hemiparesis to subtle behavioural changes. A case is presented in which the only sign of a left basal ganglion infarct was isolated abulia. This case highlights the importance of a thorough evaluation in cases of acute unexplained changes in behaviour. PMID:21686449

  3. Calibration of Partial Factors for Basal Reinforced Piled Embankments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Duijnen, P.G.; Schweckendiek, T.; Calle, E.O.F.; Van Eekelen, S.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the design guideline for basal reinforced piled embankments has been revised (CUR226:2015) adopting a new analytical design model (The Concentric Arches (CA) model, Van Eekelen et al., 2013; 2015). The CA model provides geosynthetic reinforcement (GR) strains which were compared

  4. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stacey, S.N.; Sulem, P.; Masson, G.; Gudjonsson, S.A.; Thorleifsson, G.; Jakobsdottir, M.; Sigurdsson, A.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Sigurgeirsson, B.; Benediktsdottir, K.R.; Thorisdottir, K.; Ragnarsson, R.; Scherer, D.; Hemminki, K.; Rudnai, P.; Gurzau, E.; Koppova, K.; Botella-Estrada, R.; Soriano, V.; Juberias, P.; Saez, B.; Gilaberte, Y.; Fuentelsaz, V.; Corredera, C.; Grasa, M.; Hoiom, V.; Lindblom, A.; Bonenkamp, J.J.; Rossum, M.M. van; Aben, K.K.H.; Vries, E. de; Santinami, M.; Mauro, M.G. Di; Maurichi, A.; Wendt, J.; Hochleitner, P.; Pehamberger, H.; Gudmundsson, J.; Magnusdottir, D.N.; Gretarsdottir, S.; Holm, H.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Frigge, M.L.; Blondal, T.; Saemundsdottir, J.; Bjarnason, H.; Kristjansson, K.; Bjornsdottir, G.; Okamoto, I.; Rivoltini, L.; Rodolfo, M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Hansson, J.; Nagore, E.; Mayordomo, J.I.; Kumar, R.; Karagas, M.R.; Nelson, H.H.; Gulcher, J.R.; Rafnar, T.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Olafsson, J.H.; Kong, A.; Stefansson, K.

    2009-01-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 x 10(-9)). A vari

  5. Saccade learning with concurrent cortical and subcortical basal ganglia loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve eN'guyen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Basal Ganglia is a central structure involved in multiple cortical and subcortical loops. Some of these loops are believed to be responsible for saccade target selection. We study here how the very specific structural relationships of these saccadic loops can affect the ability of learning spatial and feature-based tasks.We propose a model of saccade generation with reinforcement learning capabilities based onour previous basal ganglia and superior colliculus models. It is structured around the interactions of two parallel cortico-basal loops and one tecto-basal loop. The two cortical loops separately deal with spatial and non-spatial information to select targets in a concurrent way. The subcortical loop is used to make the final target selection leading to the production of thesaccade. These different loops may work in concert or disturb each other regarding reward maximization. Interactions between these loops and their learning capabilities are tested on different saccade tasks.The results show the ability of this model to correctly learn basic target selection based on different criteria (spatial or not. Moreover the model reproduces and explains training dependent express saccades toward targets based on a spatial criterion. Finally, the model predicts that in absence of prefrontal control, the spatial loop should dominate.

  6. Writing with Basals: A Sentence Combining Approach to Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutzel, D. Ray; Merrill, Jimmie D.

    Sentence combining techniques can be used with basal readers to help students develop writing skills. The first technique is addition, characterized by using the connecting word "and" to join two or more base sentences together. The second technique is called "embedding," and is characterized by putting parts of two or more base sentences together…

  7. Task-Phase-Specific Dynamics of Basal Forebrain Neuronal Ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A Nitz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortically projecting basal forebrain neurons play a critical role in learning and attention, and their degeneration accompanies age-related impairments in cognition. Despite the impressive anatomical and cell-type complexity of this system, currently available data suggest that basal forebrain neurons lack complexity in their response fields, with activity primarily reflecting only macro-level brain states such as sleep and wake, onset of relevant stimuli and/or reward obtainment. The current study examined the spiking activity of basal forebrain neuron populations across multiple phases of a selective attention task, addressing, in particular, the issue of complexity in ensemble firing patterns across time. Clustering techniques applied to the full population revealed a large number of distinct categories of task-phase-specific activity patterns. Unique population firing-rate vectors defined each task phase and most categories of task-phase-specific firing had counterparts with opposing firing patterns. An analogous set of task-phase-specific firing patterns was also observed in a population of posterior parietal cortex neurons. Thus, consistent with the known anatomical complexity, basal forebrain population dynamics are capable of differentially modulating their cortical targets according to the unique sets of environmental stimuli, motor requirements, and cognitive processes associated with different task phases.

  8. Favourable results of Mohs micrographic surgery for basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gniadecki, Robert; Glud, Martin; Mortensen, Kia;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignant neoplasm with an annual incidence approaching 200/100,000 person-years. Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) is widely used in North America and in Europe for treatment of BCC. This technique ensures radical tumour removal, sparing of...

  9. Filaggrin Gene Mutations and Risk of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Jesper Rabølle; Thyssen, J P; Johansen, J D;

    2013-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is prevalent in lightly-pigmented Europeans. While ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an important risk factor, genetic predispositions to BCC have also been identified (1) . Atopic dermatitis (AD), a condition with a heritability that reaches 71-84%, might increase the risk...

  10. Oral health related quality of life in cleft lip and palate patients rehabilitated with conventional prostheses or dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Piero; Giardino, Rita; Sassano, Pierpaolo; Amodeo, Giulia; Pompa, Giorgio; Cascone, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) is the most common congenital craniofacial abnormality, with a prevalence of 9.92 per 10,000 live births. In treating patients with CLP, oral rehabilitation is definitely a very important phase of the treatment in order to improve the patient's oral health related quality of life (OH-QoL). The aim of this retrospective study is to assess the OH-QoL in patients rehabilitated with different prosthetic options, thus comparing the conventional treatments, which include removable partial dentures and fixed partial dentures, with the implant-supported prostheses. Materials and Methods: Sixty-three patients were enrolled in this retrospective survey [44 females (69.84%) and 19 males (30.16%)] with a mean age of 34.93 ± 7.04 years (age range 21–53 years). They were all treated for CLP and rehabilitated with a conventional prosthesis or an implant-supported denture. Two different questionnaires were used in the present study to evaluate patients’ OH-QoL: The Italian version of the 49-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49) and the Italian version of the Cleft Evaluation Profile (CEP). Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test, with a significant P < 0,05. Results: Data analysis revealed that patients rehabilitated with implant-supported dentures and fixed partial dentures showed a good level of satisfaction with their prostheses, scoring low values in the OHIP-49 and high values in the CEP, while subjects with removable partial dentures scored the highest values in the OHIP-49 and the lowest values in the CEP, which means an unsatisfactory feeling (P < 0.05). Conclusions: OH-QoL is a challenging demand for all prosthodontists. Our results show, clearly, that patients rehabilitated with implant-supported dentures are more satisfied compared to subjects with fixed partial dentures and removable partial dentures. PMID:26759802

  11. Structural stability of posterior retainer design for resin-bonded prostheses: a 3D finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Shinya, Akikazu; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Botelho, Michael George; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the stress distribution and natural frequency of different shape and thickness retainer designs for maxillary posterior resin-bonded prostheses using finite element (FE) method. A 3D FE model of a three unit posterior resin-bonded prosthesis analysis model was generated. Three different shaped retainer designs, viz. C-shaped (three axial surface wraparounds), D-shaped (three axial surface wraparounds with central groove) and O-shaped (360° wraparounds), and three different thicknesses, viz., 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 mm, resin-bonded prostheses were used in this study. The resin-bonded prosthesis analysis model was imported into an FE analysis software (ANSYS 10.0, ANSYS, USA) and attribution of material properties. The nodes at the bottom surface of the roots were assigned fixed zero displacement in the three spatial dimensions. A simulated angle of 45° loading of a 100 N force was applied to the node of the pontic lingual cusp surface. The stress distributions and corresponding natural frequencies were analyzed and resolved. The C-shaped retainer for 0.4 mm thickness recorded the greatest von Mises stresses of 71.4 MPa for all three groups. C-shaped, D-shaped and O-shaped retainer presented natural frequencies 3,988, 7,754, and 10,494 Hz, respectively. D-shaped retainer and O-shaped retainer increased natural frequencies and structural rigidity over the traditional C-shaped retainer. The maximum von Mises stresses values of the remaining tooth and prosthesis decreased with greater retainer thickness. D-shaped retainer and O-shaped retainer increased natural frequencies and structural rigidity over the traditional C-shaped retainer. PMID:25200313

  12. Crossed cerebellar and cerebral cortical diaschisis in basal ganglia hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phenomenon of diaschisis in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex in patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage using cerebral blood flow SPECT. Twelve patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage were studied with Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT. Asymmetric index (AI) was calculated in the cerebellum and cerebral cortical regions as | CR-CL |/ (CR-CL) x 200, where CR and CL are the mean reconstructed counts for the right and left ROIs, respectively. Hypoperfusion was considered to be present when AI was greater than mean + 2 SD of 20 control subjects. Mean AI of the cerebellum and cerebral cortical regions in patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage was significantly higher than normal controls (p<0.05): Cerebellum (18.68±8.94 vs 4.35±0.94, mean ±SD), thalamus (31.91±10.61 vs 2.57±1.45), basal ganglia (35.94±16.15 vs 4.34±2.08), parietal (18.94±10.69 vs 3.24±0.87), frontal (13.60±10.8 vs 4.02±2.04) and temporal cortex (18.92±11.95 vs 5.13±1.69). Ten of the 12 patients had significant hypoperfusion in the contralateral cerebellum. Hypoperfusion was also shown in the ipsilateral thalamus (n=12), ipsilateral parietal (n=12), frontal (n=6) and temporal cortex (n=10). Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) and cortical diaschisis may frequently occur in patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage, suggesting that CCD can develop without the interruption of corticopontocerebellar pathway

  13. Clinical application of forearm and dorsal thumb neurocutaneous axial island flap%前臂及拇背侧皮神经营养血管蒂岛状皮瓣的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄飞; 吴水培; 高建明; 李强; 俞立新

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the indication for forearm and dorsalthumb neurocutaneous axial island flap.Methods The degloved injury of distal phalanx of thumb was covered by forearm neurocutaneous axial island flap for two cases. Soft tissue defect of the thumb at palmar side was repaired by radial and ulnar dorsal thumb neurocutaneous axial island flap for 10 cases. The area of the flap was 2 cm × 3 cm ~ 7 cm × 11 cm. Rusults All 11 cases of the surgical flaps were survived, except 1 case in which distal partnecrosis occurred in forearm lateral neurocatomeous flap due to its larger area. Conclusions Forearm neurocutaneous axial island flap was suitable for repairing the degloved injury of the distal phalanx of thumb. But the length of the flap should not exceed 11 cm. The dorsal thumb flap was only chosen for minor area soft tissue defect in thumb due to its short length.%目的探讨前臂及拇背侧带皮神经营养血管蒂岛状皮瓣临床应用的适应证。方法利用以前臂外侧皮神经营养血管为蒂的岛状皮瓣修复拇指末节脱套伤2例,带拇背桡侧皮神经营养血管蒂岛状皮瓣及尺背侧皮神经营养血管蒂逆行岛状皮瓣修复拇指掌侧软组织缺损10例。皮瓣切取面积2cm×3cm~7cm×11cm。结果11例皮瓣全部成活,1例前臂外侧皮神经皮瓣因切取面积较大导致远端部分坏死。结论以前臂皮神经营养血管为蒂的岛状皮瓣适用于拇指末节脱套伤,但皮瓣长度不应超过11cm;拇背侧皮瓣宽度较小,仅适宜修复拇指较小面积的软组织缺损。

  14. Solute effect on basal and prismatic slip systems of Mg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Amitava; Kim, Seong-Gon; Horstemeyer, M F

    2014-11-01

    In an effort to design novel magnesium (Mg) alloys with high ductility, we present a first principles data based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT). The DFT was employed to calculate the generalized stacking fault energy curves, which can be used in the generalized Peierls-Nabarro (PN) model to study the energetics of basal slip and prismatic slip in Mg with and without solutes to calculate continuum scale dislocation core widths, stacking fault widths and Peierls stresses. The generalized stacking fault energy curves for pure Mg agreed well with other DFT calculations. Solute effects on these curves were calculated for nine alloying elements, namely Al, Ca, Ce, Gd, Li, Si, Sn, Zn and Zr, which allowed the strength and ductility to be qualitatively estimated based on the basal dislocation properties. Based on our multiscale methodology, a suggestion has been made to improve Mg formability. PMID:25273695

  15. Morphological elucidation of basal ganglia circuits contributing reward prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyama, Fumino; Takahashi, Susumu; Karube, Fuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies in monkeys have shown that dopaminergic neurons respond to the reward prediction error. In addition, striatal neurons alter their responsiveness to cortical or thalamic inputs in response to the dopamine signal, via the mechanism of dopamine-regulated synaptic plasticity. These findings have led to the hypothesis that the striatum exhibits synaptic plasticity under the influence of the reward prediction error and conduct reinforcement learning throughout the basal ganglia circuits. The reinforcement learning model is useful; however, the mechanism by which such a process emerges in the basal ganglia needs to be anatomically explained. The actor-critic model has been previously proposed and extended by the existence of role sharing within the striatum, focusing on the striosome/matrix compartments. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to confirm morphologically, partly because of the complex structure of the striosome/matrix compartments. Here, we review recent morphological studies that elucidate the input/output organization of the striatal compartments. PMID:25698913

  16. [Morphological Re-evaluation of the Basal Ganglia Network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyama, Fumino

    2016-07-01

    Electrophysiological studies in monkeys have shown that dopaminergic neurons respond to the reward prediction error. In addition, striatal neurons alter their responsiveness to cortical or thalamic inputs in response to dopamine signals, via dopamine-regulated synaptic plasticity. These findings have led to the hypothesis that the striatum exhibits synaptic plasticity under the influence of reward prediction error and conducts reinforcement learning throughout the basal ganglia circuits. The reinforcement learning model is useful; however, the mechanism by which such a process emerges in the basal ganglia needs to be anatomically explained. The actor-critic model has been previously proposed and extended by the existence of role sharing within the striatum, with particular focus on the striosome and matrix compartments. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to confirm morphologically, partly because of the complex structure of the striosome and matrix compartments. Here, we review recent morphological studies that elucidate the input/output organization of the striatal compartments. PMID:27395470

  17. Basal resistance for three of the largest Greenland outlet glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapero, Daniel R.; Joughin, Ian R.; Poinar, Kristin; Morlighem, Mathieu; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Resistance at the ice-bed interface provides a strong control on the response of ice streams and outlet glaciers to external forcing, yet it is not observable by remote sensing. We used inverse methods constrained by satellite observations to infer the basal resistance to flow underneath three of the Greenland Ice Sheet's largest outlet glaciers. In regions of fast ice flow and high (>250 kPa) driving stresses, ice is often assumed to flow over a strong bed. We found, however, that the beds of these three glaciers provide almost no resistance under the fast-flowing trunk. Instead, resistance to flow is provided by the lateral margins and stronger beds underlying slower-moving ice upstream. Additionally, we found isolated patches of high basal resistivity within the predominantly weak beds. Because these small-scale (tested their robustness to different degrees of regularization.

  18. Recurrent peripheral odontogenic fibroma associated with basal cell budding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Sreeja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm. It represents the soft tissue counterpart of central odontogenic fibroma. The embryonic source of POdF has been suggested by many as arising from the rest of dental lamina that has persisted in the gingiva following its disintegration. It presents clinically as a firm, slow growing and sessile gingival mass, which is difficult to distinguish with more common inflammatory lesions. Very few cases of recurrence have been documented. It has been stated that histological budding of basal cell layer of the surface squamous epithelium is associated with higher recurrence and the presence of calcification in direct apposition to the epithelial rest is associated with lower recurrence. Hereby, we present a case which histologically exhibited budding of the basal cell layer, which could have been the reason for its recurrence.

  19. Cerebellar networks with the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Andreea C; Dum, Richard P; Strick, Peter L

    2013-05-01

    The dominant view of cerebellar function has been that it is exclusively concerned with motor control and coordination. Recent findings from neuroanatomical, behavioral, and imaging studies have profoundly changed this view. Neuroanatomical studies using virus transneuronal tracers have demonstrated that cerebellar output reaches vast areas of the neocortex, including regions of prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex. Furthermore, it has recently become clear that the cerebellum is reciprocally connected with the basal ganglia, which suggests that the two subcortical structures are part of a densely interconnected network. Taken together, these findings elucidate the neuroanatomical substrate for cerebellar involvement in non-motor functions mediated by the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in processes traditionally associated with the basal ganglia. PMID:23579055

  20. Is Broca's area part of a basal ganglia thalamocortical circuit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Michael T

    2006-05-01

    The cortex constituting Broca's area does not exist in isolation. Rather, like other cortical regions, Broca's area is connected to other brain structures, which likely play closely related functional roles. This paper focuses on the basal ganglia, a set of subcortical structures that project through topographically organized "channels" via the thalamus to different frontal regions. It is hypothesized that the basal ganglia project to Broca's area. This circuitry is further posited to encompass at least two channels. One channel can be characterized as subserving procedural memory, while the other underlies the retrieval of knowledge from declarative memory. These hypotheses are supported by both anatomical and functional evidence. Implications and issues for further investigation are discussed. PMID:16881254