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Sample records for basal thumb prostheses

  1. Clinical Results of 40 Consecutive Basal Thumb Prostheses and No CRPS Type I After Vitamin C Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, Paul E; Unal, Halil; Ellis, Maarten L; Tuinebreijer, Wim E

    2010-02-17

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type I may occur as complication after any type of surgery for basal joint arthritis of the thumb. We investigated prospectively in an ongoing study our results after a fully standardized treatment with a total joint prosthesis under vitamin C prophylaxis.Patients with trapeziometacarpal arthritis stage II or III according to Dell, and no benefit from conservative treatment, were selected to undergo joint replacement with a semi-constrained hydroxyapatite coated prosthesis.First web opening and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for pain, activities of daily living (ADL) and satisfaction were taken pre and postoperatively. Vitamin C 500 mg daily was started two days prior to surgery during 50 days as prevention for CRPS. Post-operative treatment was functional.We performed 40 implantations for trapeziometacarpal arthritis in 34 patients (mean age 60.8 years; 27 females, 7 males) with a mean follow-up of 44 months. Operations were performed in day care under regional (or general) anesthesia.First web opening increased with 15.4 degrees and there was a significant improvement for pain, ADL and satisfaction as well (p = 0.000). Patient satisfaction was strongly associated with the amount of pain reduction. According to the Veldman and IASP criteria, there were no cases of CRPS.The overall complication rate for this procedure is high. Literature reports 5 cases of CRPS after 38 operations with the same implant (13%). We advise vitamin C as prophylaxis against CRPS in trapeziometacarpal joint replacement.

  2. Dubious space for Artelon joint resurfacing for basal thumb (trapeziometacarpal joint) osteoarthritis. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraglia, Francesco; Mariconda, Massimo; Balato, Giovanni; Di Donato, Sigismondo Luca; Criscuolo, Giovanni; Maffulli, Nicola

    2018-04-06

    Trapeziometacarpal arthritis is a common and disabling condition. There is no evidence in the literature of superiority of one surgical procedure over others. Several prosthetic implants have been introduced to preserve joint mobility. We searched the on Medline (PubMed), Web of Science and Scopus databases using the combined keywords 'artelon', 'thumb', 'carpometacarpal', 'trapeziometacarpal' and 'rhizoarthrosis'; 11 studies were identified. The use of Artelon implant is not recommended because of its high revision rate and worse outcomes compared to conventional techniques. Inert materials subjected to compressive and shearing forces could produce debris and subsequent inflammatory response. There is debate in the published scientific literature regarding the role of preoperative antibiotic profilaxis and post-surgery inflammatory response. Standard techniques such as trapeziectomy alone or combined with interposition or suspensionplasty offer effective treatment for thumb basal joint arthritis. Several prosthetic implants show promising results in terms of pain relief and functional request, but there is a need of long-term randomized controlled trials to demonstrate their equivalence, and eventually superiority, compared to standard techniques.

  3. New basal iguanodonts from the Cedar Mountain formation of Utah and the evolution of thumb-spiked dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T McDonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Basal iguanodontian dinosaurs were extremely successful animals, found in great abundance and diversity almost worldwide during the Early Cretaceous. In contrast to Europe and Asia, the North American record of Early Cretaceous basal iguanodonts has until recently been limited largely to skulls and skeletons of Tenontosaurus tilletti. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein we describe two new basal iguanodonts from the Yellow Cat Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation of eastern Utah, each known from a partial skull and skeleton. Iguanacolossus fortis gen. et sp. nov. and Hippodraco scutodens gen. et sp. nov. are each diagnosed by a single autapomorphy and a unique combination of characters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Iguanacolossus and Hippodraco add greatly to our knowledge of North American basal iguanodonts and prompt a new comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of basal iguanodont relationships. This analysis indicates that North American Early Cretaceous basal iguanodonts are more basal than their contemporaries in Europe and Asia.

  4. New Basal Iguanodonts from the Cedar Mountain Formation of Utah and the Evolution of Thumb-Spiked Dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Andrew T.; Kirkland, James I.; DeBlieux, Donald D.; Madsen, Scott K.; Cavin, Jennifer; Milner, Andrew R. C.; Panzarin, Lukas

    2010-01-01

    Background Basal iguanodontian dinosaurs were extremely successful animals, found in great abundance and diversity almost worldwide during the Early Cretaceous. In contrast to Europe and Asia, the North American record of Early Cretaceous basal iguanodonts has until recently been limited largely to skulls and skeletons of Tenontosaurus tilletti. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein we describe two new basal iguanodonts from the Yellow Cat Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation of eastern Utah, each known from a partial skull and skeleton. Iguanacolossus fortis gen. et sp. nov. and Hippodraco scutodens gen. et sp. nov. are each diagnosed by a single autapomorphy and a unique combination of characters. Conclusions/Significance Iguanacolossus and Hippodraco add greatly to our knowledge of North American basal iguanodonts and prompt a new comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of basal iguanodont relationships. This analysis indicates that North American Early Cretaceous basal iguanodonts are more basal than their contemporaries in Europe and Asia. PMID:21124919

  5. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields ...

  6. Thumb Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Thumb Sprains Email to a friend * required fields ...

  7. Statistical Rules-of-Thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, James K.

    1988-01-01

    Six best-selling introductory behavioral statistics textbooks that were published in 1982 and two well-known sampling theory textbooks were reviewed to determine the presence of rules-of-thumb--useful principles with wide application that are not intended to be strictly accurate. The relative frequency and type of rules are reported along with a…

  8. Treatment of thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis; quo vadis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The unique prehensile ability of the human hand is largely due to the biomechanical function of its complex first carpometacarpal (CMC1) joint. This makes the thumb the most important digit of the hand. The unique demands placed on the thumb regarding mobility, stability and transmission of force

  9. Autologous Fat Transfer for Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint Osteoarthritis: A Prospective Study.

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    Herold, Christian; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; Groddeck, Robert; Allert, Sixtus

    2017-08-01

    Most operations for carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis of the thumb irreversibly alter or destroy the anatomy. There is a high demand for minimally invasive alternatives. The authors report the results of autologous fat transfer for treatment of thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis. In a prospective study, 50 patients with thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis were observed for 1 year after autologous fat transfer. Manual liposuction and centrifugation were performed. Pain rating according to visual analogue pain scale; objective force of pinch grip and fist closure; and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire scores before and after treatment were analyzed. The average pain in stage 2 patients preoperatively was 7.7 ± 1.3; it was 1.8 ± 1.9 after 6 months and 2.4 ± 3.1 after 12 months. Patients with stage 2 osteoarthritis demonstrated a superior benefit from this treatment compared with patients with either stage 3 or stage 4 thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis. There were similar improvements for the parameters strength and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire score. No serious adverse events were observed. Autologous fat transplantation is an appealing alternative, especially in early-stage basal joint osteoarthritis of the thumb. The low invasiveness of the procedure and early recovery of patients compared with classical procedures such as trapeziectomy, and the superior long-term results compared with classical injection therapy, make this approach feasible as a first-line therapy in early-stage basal joint osteoarthritis of the thumb. Therapeutic, IV.

  10. Protective prostheses during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, T.S.; Flaxman, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    Current applications and complications in the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of oral malignancy are reviewed. Prostheses are used for decreasing radiation to vital structures not involved with the lesion but located in the field of radiation. With a program of oral hygiene and proper dental care, protective prostheses can help decrease greatly the morbidity seen with existing radiotherapy regimens

  11. Nuclear medicine and prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordenave, L.; Baquey, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    Whatever the bio-material, prosthesis or medical device concerned, from design to experimental then clinical validation, nuclear medicine (NM) techniques offer a unique opportunity in all indications, (in vitro diagnosis, in vivo diagnosis and therapy) to investigate, assess and predict the behaviour of the device, qualitatively and quantitatively. All research fields involving prostheses and their constitutive biomaterials may take advantage of NM. In order to review published works, one can analyze provided data according to two strategies: an upright one related to medical and surgical specialties that integrate NM and a more horizontal one, that is to describe what kind of contribution is brought by such investigations. The latter approach was preferred in our review. We discuss and illustrate benefits of NM in the following indications: as an in vitro tool, as an in vivo tool for the diagnosis i) of device integration in recipient, ii) of functional outcome after use or implantation, iii) and predictive assessment of undesirable side effects, iv) of occurrence of complications associated to the device implantation, v) of a new therapy efficiency; finally as in vivo tool of therapy. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine domains with stem cell potential as well as that of medical device associated with vigilance are new fields in basic research and clinical assessment that seem increasingly promising for the nuclear physician and to which NM could and would contribute from molecule to integrated system in order to improve knowledge and achievement of prostheses. (author)

  12. Rule of Thumb and Dynamic Programming

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    Lettau, M.; Uhlig, H.F.H.V.S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper studies the relationships between learning about rules of thumb (represented by classifier systems) and dynamic programming. Building on a result about Markovian stochastic approximation algorithms, we characterize all decision functions that can be asymptotically obtained through

  13. Rules of thumb and simplified methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahti, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    The author points out the value of a thorough grounding in fundamental physics combined with experience of applied practice when using simplified methods and rules of thumb in shield engineering. Present-day quality assurance procedures and good engineering practices require careful documentation of all calculations. The aforementioned knowledge of rules of thumb and back-of-the-envelope calculations can assure both the preparer and the reviewer that the results in the quality assurance documentation are the physically correct ones

  14. Motion Analysis of Thumb in Cellular Phone Use

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    Naotaka Sakai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The thumb motion of 10 normal subjects during cellular phone use was measured using a reflective marker detection system to compare the maximum, minimum and range of flexion angles of the interphalangeal (IP, metacarpophalangeal (MP and carpometacarpal (CM joints. Two micro-reflective markers 3 mm in diameter were each placed on the dorsal surface of the distal phalanx, basal phalanx and metacarpal bone of the thumb. Three markers were placed on the dorsal hand in order to define the dorsal hand plane. Each subject pushed the 12 keys of a folding cellular phone with an 85-mm-long and 40-mm-wide keypad, sequentially from ‘1’ to ‘#’, and the pushing motion was recorded by six infrared video cameras for 12 seconds, using the VICON 612 system. The mean maximum flexion angle of the MP joint was significantly (p < .05 larger than the CM joint, and the mean minimum flexion angle of the CM joint was significantly (p < .01 smaller than the IP and MP joints. The mean range of motion of the IP joint was significantly (p < .05 larger than the MP and the CM joints. In a comparison of different key-pushing motions, only the CM joint was significantly (p < .05 larger in its range of motion. In conclusion, thumb motion on pushing the keys of the cellular phone was produced mainly by the MP and the CM joints. In addition, the ability to reach keys in different areas of the cellular phone keypad is regulated by changing the flexion angle of the CM joint.

  15. Esthetic, functional, and prosthetic outcomes with implant-retained finger prostheses.

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    Aydin, Cemal; Nemli, Secil Karakoca; Yilmaz, Handan

    2013-04-01

    Traumatic amputation of fingers results in a serious impairment of hand function and affects the psychological status of the patients. The implant-retained finger prostheses are an alternative treatment. The aim of this case report is to represent the use of osseointegrated implants for retention of finger prostheses in a patient with amputated thumb and index finger. Dental implants were placed in the residual bone of the fingers using two-stage surgery. Custom-made attachments were used to provide retention between implants and silicone prostheses. Prosthetic fingernails were made of composite resin material. After 6 months, implants were clinically successful, and the patient was satisfied with the appearance and the function of the prostheses. The complications of broken prosthetic nail and mild discoloration were observed. Reconstruction of amputated fingers with implant-retained prosthesis is a worthwhile treatment providing esthetic, functional, and psychological benefits, although some complications might be experienced. Clinical relevance Implant-retained finger prostheses are an acceptable treatment modality for patients with amputated fingers. Evaluating implant prognosis, functional results and prosthetic results of the patients are necessary to address the benefits and complications of the treatment.

  16. Temperature variations in sintering ovens for metal ceramic dental prostheses: non-destructive assessment using OCT

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    Sinescu, C.; Bradu, A.; Duma, V.-F.; Topala, F. I.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2018-02-01

    We present a recent investigation regarding the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in the monitoring of the calibration loss of sintering ovens for the manufacturing of metal ceramic dental prostheses. Differences in the temperatures of such ovens with regard to their specifications lead to stress and even cracks in the prostheses material, therefore to the failure of the dental treatment. Evaluation methods of the ovens calibration consist nowadays of firing supplemental samples; this is subjective, expensive, and time consuming. Using an in-house developed swept source (SS) OCT system, we have demonstrated that a quantitative assessment of the internal structure of the prostheses, therefore of the temperature settings of the ovens can be made. Using en-face OCT images acquired at similar depths inside the samples, the differences in reflectivity allow for the evaluation of the differences in granulation (i.e., in number and size of ceramic grains) of the prostheses material. Fifty samples, divided in five groups, each sintered at different temperatures (lower, higher, or equal to the prescribed one) have been analyzed. The consequences of the temperature variations with regard to the one prescribed were determined. Rules-of-thumb were extracted to monitor objectively, using only OCT images of currently manufactured samples, the settings of the oven. The method proposed allows for avoiding producing prostheses with defects. While such rules-of-thumb achieve a qualitative assessment, an insight in our on-going work on the quantitative assessment of such losses of calibration on dental ovens using OCT is also made.

  17. Hypoplastic thumb type IIIB: An alternative method for surgical repair

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    Salih Onur Basat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypoplastic thumb is the second most common congenital deformity of the thumb. Thumb hypoplasia is characterized by diminished thumb size, metacarpal adduction, metacarpophalangeal joint instability, and thenar muscle hypoplasia. In the literature, different classification types of hypoplastic thumb have been used and different treatment methods described. In this case we presented an alternative palliative treatment method for a ten-year-old patient with modified Blauth's classification type IIIB hypoplastic thumb and one-year follow-up results. [Hand Microsurg 2014; 3(2.000: 59-61

  18. MR imaging findings of trigger thumb

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    Chang, Eric Y.; Chen, Karen C.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Trigger finger (or trigger thumb), also known as sclerosing tenosynovitis, is a common clinical diagnosis that rarely presents for imaging. Because of this selection bias, many radiologists may not be familiar with the process. Furthermore, patients who do present for imaging frequently have misleading examination indications. To our knowledge, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of trigger thumb have not been previously reported in the literature. In this article, we review the entity of trigger thumb, the anatomy involved, and associated imaging findings, which include flexor pollicis longus tendinosis with a distinct nodule, A1 pulley thickening, and tenosynovitis. In addition, in some cases, an abnormal Av pulley is apparent. In the rare cases of trigger finger that present for MR imaging, accurate diagnosis by the radiologist can allow initiation of treatment and avoid further unnecessary workup. (orig.)

  19. MR imaging findings of trigger thumb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chen, Karen C.; Chung, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    Trigger finger (or trigger thumb), also known as sclerosing tenosynovitis, is a common clinical diagnosis that rarely presents for imaging. Because of this selection bias, many radiologists may not be familiar with the process. Furthermore, patients who do present for imaging frequently have misleading examination indications. To our knowledge, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of trigger thumb have not been previously reported in the literature. In this article, we review the entity of trigger thumb, the anatomy involved, and associated imaging findings, which include flexor pollicis longus tendinosis with a distinct nodule, A1 pulley thickening, and tenosynovitis. In addition, in some cases, an abnormal Av pulley is apparent. In the rare cases of trigger finger that present for MR imaging, accurate diagnosis by the radiologist can allow initiation of treatment and avoid further unnecessary workup. (orig.)

  20. Students Learn by Doing: Teaching about Rules of Thumb.

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    Cude, Brenda J.

    1990-01-01

    Identifies situation in which consumers are likely to substitute rules of thumb for research, reviews rules of thumb often used as substitutes, and identifies teaching activities to help students learn when substitution is appropriate. (JOW)

  1. Rules of Thumb from the Literature on Research and Evaluation.

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    Lai, Morris K.

    Practical advice on frequently asked questions dealing with research and evaluation methodology is presented as rules of thumb, with citations to the author's sources. A statement in the literature is considered a rule of thumb if it meets one of the following criteria: (1) it is specifically called a rule of thumb; (2) it contains numbers in…

  2. Microbial biofilms on silicone facial prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariani, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Facial disfigurements can result from oncologic surgery, trauma and congenital deformities. These disfigurements can be rehabilitated with facial prostheses. Facial prostheses are usually made of silicones. A problem of facial prostheses is that microorganisms can colonize their surface. It is hard

  3. Thumb rule of visual angle: a new confirmation.

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    Groot, C; Ortega, F; Beltran, F S

    1994-02-01

    The classical thumb rule of visual angle was reexamined. Hence, the visual angle was measured as a function of a thumb's width and the distance between eye and thumb. The measurement of a thumb's width when held at arm's length was taken on 67 second-year students of psychology. The visual angle was about 2 degrees as R. P. O'Shea confirmed in 1991. Also, we confirmed a linear relationship between the size of a thumb's width at arm's length and the visual angle.

  4. Rules of thumb and useful equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Useful ''rules of thumb'' for dose rates, exposure, and penetration from alpha and beta emitters, fallout, neutrons, and gamma and x rays introduce some of the practical aspects of health physics in this chapter. The mathematical relationships important in determining radioactivity and radiation exposure are presented through a series of equations. Also included in this chapter are commonly employed equations expressing logarithmic, and wave and quantum relationships, as well as those used in classical physics and electrostatics

  5. Tracing the origin of the panda's thumb

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    Abella, Juan; Pérez-Ramos, Alejandro; Valenciano, Alberto; Alba, David M.; Ercoli, Marcos D.; Hontecillas, Daniel; Montoya, Plinio; Morales, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the relative development of the carnivoran radial sesamoids to untangle the evolution of this iconic structure. In the pandas (both giant and red), this `false thumb' is known to perform a grasping role during bamboo feeding in both the red and giant pandas. An original locomotor role has been inferred for ailurids, but this remains to be ascertained for ursids. A large sample of radial sesamoids of Indarctos arctoides from the Miocene of Batallones-3 (Spain) indicates that this early ailuropodine bear displayed a relatively hypertrophied radial sesamoid, with a configuration more similar to that of the red panda and other carnivorans than to that of giant pandas. This false thumb is the first evidence of this feature in the Ursidae, which can be linked to a more herbivorous diet. Moreover, in the two extant pandas, the false thumb should not be interpreted as an anatomical convergence, but as an exaptive convergence regarding its use during the bamboo feeding, which changes the evolutionary view of this singular structure.

  6. Force Myography to Control Robotic Upper Extremity Prostheses: A Feasibility Study

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    Erina eCho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Advancement in assistive technology has led to the commercial availability of multi-dexterous robotic prostheses for the upper extremity. The relatively low performance of the currently used techniques to detect the intention of the user to control such advanced robotic prostheses, however, limits their use. This article explores the use of force myography (FMG as a potential alternative to the well-established surface electro-myography (sEMG. Specifically, the use of FMG to control different grips of a commercially available robotic hand, Bebionic3, are investigated. Four male transradially amputated subjects participated in the study and a protocol was developed to assess the prediction accuracy of eleven grips. Different combinations of grips were examined ranging from six up to eleven grips. The results indicate that it is possible to classify six primary grips important in activities of daily living using FMG with an accuracy of above 70% in the residual limb. Additional strategies to increase classification accuracy, such as using the available modes on the Bebionic3, allowed results to improve up to 88.83% and 89.00% for opposed thumb and non-opposed thumb modes respectively.

  7. Distance-based kinematics of the five-oblique-axis thumb model with intersecting axes at the metacarpophalangeal joint.

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    Rojas, Nicolas; Dollar, Aaron M

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel and simple method to compute all possible solutions of the inverse kinematics problem of the five-oblique-axis thumb model with intersecting axes at the metacarpophalangeal joint. This thumb model is one of the suggested results by a magnetic-resonance-imaging-based study that, in contrast to those based on cadaver fingers or on the tracking of the surface of the fingers, takes into account muscle and ligament behaviors and avoids inaccuracies resulting from the movement of the skin with respect to the bones. The proposed distance-based inverse kinematics method eliminates the use of arbitrary reference frames as is usually required by standard approaches; this is relevant because the numerical conditioning of the resulting system of equations with such traditional approaches depends on the selected reference frames. Moreover, contrary to other parametrizations (e.g., Denavit-Hartenberg parameters), the suggested distance-based parameters for the thumb have a natural, human-understandable geometric meaning that makes them easier to be determined from any posture. These characteristics make the proposed approach of interest for those working in, for instance, measuring and modeling the movement of the human hand, developing rehabilitation devices such as orthoses and prostheses, or designing anthropomorphic robotic hands.

  8. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

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    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  9. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA, calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality.

  10. An ergonomics study of thumb movements on smartphone touch screen.

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    Xiong, Jinghong; Muraki, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between thumb muscle activity and thumb operating tasks on a smartphone touch screen with one-hand posture. Six muscles in the right thumb and forearm were targeted in this study, namely adductor pollicis, flexor pollicis brevis, abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor pollicis longus, first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and extensor digitorum. The performance measures showed that the thumb developed fatigue rapidly when tapping on smaller buttons (diameter: 9 mm compared with 3 mm), and moved more slowly in flexion-extension than in adduction-abduction orientation. Meanwhile, the electromyography and perceived exertion values of FDI significantly increased in small button and flexion-extension tasks, while those of APB were greater in the adduction-abduction task. This study reveals that muscle effort among thumb muscles on a touch screen smartphone varies according to the task, and suggests that the use of small touch buttons should be minimised for better thumb performance.

  11. Heat generated by knee prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, James W

    2006-01-01

    Temperature sensors were placed in 50 knees in 25 patients who had one or both joints replaced. Temperature recordings were made before walking, after walking, and after cycling. The heat generated in healthy, arthritic, and replaced knees was measured. The knee replacements were done using eight different prostheses. A rotating hinge knee prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 7 degrees C in 20 minutes and 9 degrees C in 40 minutes. An unconstrained ceramic femoral prosthesis articulating with a polyethylene tibial prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 4 degrees C compared with a healthy resting knee. The other designs using a cobalt-chrome alloy and high-density polyethylene had temperature increases of 5 degrees-7 degrees C with exercise. Frictional heat generated in a prosthetic knee is not immediately dissipated and may result in wear, creep, and other degenerative processes in the high-density polyethylene. Extended periods of elevated temperature in joints may inhibit cell growth and perhaps contribute to adverse performance via bone resorption or component loosening. Prosthetic knees generate more heat with activity than healthy or arthritic knees. More-constrained knee prostheses generate more heat than less-constrained prostheses. A knee with a ceramic femoral component generates less heat than a knee with the same design using a cobalt-chromium alloy.

  12. Selecting Pesticides and Nonchemical Alternatives: Green Thumbs' Rules of Thumb Decision Tools.

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    Grieshop, James I.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A sample of 78 (of 320) home gardeners use rules of thumb (heuristics) to choose between chemical pesticides and nonchemical alternatives. Pesticides rank low in 24 choice attributes where alternatives rank high, and vice versa. Gender, age, and years of pesticide use correlate with pesticide selection. (SK)

  13. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries of the Thumb

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    McKeon, Kathleen E.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The clinical diagnosis of thumb ulnar collateral ligament disruption has been based on joint angulation during valgus stress testing. This report describes a definitive method of distinguishing between complete and partial ulnar collateral ligament injuries by quantifying translation of the proximal phalanx on the metacarpal head during valgus stress testing. Methods: Sixty-two cadaveric thumbs underwent standardized valgus stress testing under fluoroscopy with the ulnar collateral ligament intact, following an isolated release of the proper ulnar collateral ligament, and following a combined release of both the proper and the accessory ulnar collateral ligament (complete ulnar collateral ligament release). Following complete ulnar collateral ligament release, the final thirty-seven thumbs were also analyzed after the application of a valgus force sufficient to cause 45° of valgus angulation at the metacarpophalangeal joint to model more severe soft-tissue injury. Two independent reviewers measured coronal plane joint angulation (in degrees), ulnar joint line gap formation (in millimeters), and radial translation of the proximal phalanx on the metacarpal head (in millimeters) on digital fluoroscopic images that had been randomized. Results: Coronal angulation across the stressed metacarpophalangeal joint progressively increased through the stages of the testing protocol: ulnar collateral ligament intact (average [and standard deviation], 20° ± 8.1°), release of the proper ulnar collateral ligament (average, 23° ± 8.3°), and complete ulnar collateral ligament release (average, 30° ± 8.9°) (p collateral ligament release (5.7 ± 1.5 mm), to that following complete ulnar collateral ligament release (7.2 ± 1.5 mm) (p collateral ligament (1.6 ± 0.8 mm vs. 1.5 ± 0.9 mm in the intact state). There was a significant increase in translation following release of the complete ulnar collateral ligament complex (3.0 ± 0.9 mm; p collateral ligament

  14. Variable Thumb Moment Arm Modeling and Thumb-Tip Force Production of a Human-Like Robotic Hand.

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    Niehues, Taylor D; Deshpande, Ashish D

    2017-10-01

    The anatomically correct testbed (ACT) hand mechanically simulates the musculoskeletal structure of the fingers and thumb of the human hand. In this work, we analyze the muscle moment arms (MAs) and thumb-tip force vectors in the ACT thumb in order to compare the ACT thumb's mechanical structure to the human thumb. Motion data are used to determine joint angle-dependent MA models, and thumb-tip three-dimensional (3D) force vectors are experimentally analyzed when forces are applied to individual muscles. Results are presented for both a nominal ACT thumb model designed to match human MAs and an adjusted model that more closely replicates human-like thumb-tip forces. The results confirm that the ACT thumb is capable of faithfully representing human musculoskeletal structure and muscle functionality. Using the ACT hand as a physical simulation platform allows us to gain a better understanding of the underlying biomechanical and neuromuscular properties of the human hand to ultimately inform the design and control of robotic and prosthetic hands.

  15. Injury to ulnar collateral ligament of thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Simerjit Singh; Pai, Dinker R; Kaur, Avneet; Dixit, Ruchita

    2014-02-01

    Injury of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of thumb can be incapacitating if untreated or not treated properly. This injury is notorious for frequently being missed by inexperienced health care personnel in emergency departments. It has frequently been described in skiers, but also occurs in other sports such as rugby, soccer, handball, basketball, volleyball and even after a handshake. The UCL of the thumb acts as a primary restraint to valgus stress and is injured if hyperabduction and hyperextension forces are applied to the first metacarpophalangeal joint. The diagnosis is best established clinically, though MRI is the imaging modality of choice. Many treatment options exist, surgical treatment being offered depending on various factors, including timing of presentation (acute or chronic), grade (severity of injury), displacement (Stener lesion), location of tear (mid-substance or peripheral), associated or concomitant surrounding tissue injury (bone, volar plate, etc.), and patient-related factors (occupational demands, etc.). This review aims to identify the optimal diagnostic techniques and management options for UCL injury available thus far. © 2014 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast prostheses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G5

    and the commonest cause of replacement of the prosthesis. Older prostheses contained silicone gel. Rupture of these prostheses, although asymptomatic in most patients, has been associated with collagen vascular disorders and chronic fatigue syndrome. However more current data disputes any of these associations.

  17. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Basal cell carcinoma Overview Basal cell carcinoma: This skin cancer ... that has received years of sun exposure. Basal cell carcinoma: Overview Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the ...

  18. Thumb carpometacarpal joint congruence during functional tasks and thumb range-of-motion activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halilaj, Eni; Moore, Douglas C; Patel, Tarpit K; Laidlaw, David H; Ladd, Amy L; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C; Crisco, Joseph J

    2017-01-01

    Joint incongruity is often cited as a possible etiological factor for the high incidence of thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) joint osteoarthritis (OA) in older women. There is evidence suggesting that biomechanics plays a role in CMC OA progression, but little is known about how CMC joint congruence, specifically, differs among different cohorts. The purpose of this in vivo study was to determine if CMC joint congruence differs with sex, age, and early stage OA for different thumb positions. Using CT data from 155 subjects and a congruence metric that is based on both articular morphology and joint posture, we did not find any differences in CMC joint congruence with sex or age group, but found that patients in the early stages of OA exhibit lower congruence than healthy subjects of the same age group. PMID:25570956

  19. Thumb carpometacarpal joint congruence during functional tasks and thumb range-of-motion activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halilaj, Eni; Moore, Douglas C; Patel, Tarpit K; Laidlaw, David H; Ladd, Amy L; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C; Crisco, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    Joint incongruity is often cited as a possible etiological factor for the high incidence of thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) joint osteoarthritis (OA) in older women. There is evidence suggesting that biomechanics plays a role in CMC OA progression, but little is known about how CMC joint congruence, specifically, differs among different cohorts. The purpose of this in vivo study was to determine if CMC joint congruence differs with sex, age, and early stage OA for different thumb positions. Using CT data from 155 subjects and a congruence metric that is based on both articular morphology and joint posture, we did not find any differences in CMC joint congruence with sex or age group, but found that patients in the early stages of OA exhibit lower congruence than healthy subjects of the same age group.

  20. Median nail dystrophy involving the thumb nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahulkrishna Kota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Median canaliform dystrophy of Heller is a rare entity characterized by a midline or a paramedian ridge or split and canal formation in nail plate of one or both the thumb nails. It is an acquired condition resulting from a temporary defect in the matrix that interferes with nail formation. Habitual picking of the nail base may be responsible for some cases. Histopathology classically shows parakeratosis, accumulation of melanin within and between the nail bed keratinocytes. Treatment of median nail dystrophy includes injectable triamcinalone acetonide, topical 0.1% tacrolimus, and tazarotene 0.05%, which is many a times challenging for a dermatologist. Psychiatric opinion should be taken when associated with the depressive, obsessive-compulsive, or impulse-control disorder. We report a case of 19-year-old male diagnosed as median nail dystrophy.

  1. Estimation of continuous thumb angle and force using electromyogram classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahman Siddiqi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human hand functions range from precise minute handling to heavy and robust movements. Remarkably, 50% of all hand functions are made possible by the thumb. Therefore, developing an artificial thumb that can mimic the actions of a real thumb precisely is a major achievement. Despite many efforts dedicated to this area of research, control of artificial thumb movements in resemblance to our natural movement still poses as a challenge. Most of the development in this area is based on discontinuous thumb position control, which makes it possible to recreate several of the most important functions of the thumb but does not result in total imitation. This work looks into the classification of electromyogram signals from thumb muscles for the prediction of thumb angle and force during flexion motion. For this purpose, an experimental setup is developed to measure the thumb angle and force throughout the range of flexion and simultaneously gather the electromyogram signals. Further, various features are extracted from these signals for classification and the most suitable feature set is determined and applied to different classifiers. A “piecewise discretization” approach is used for continuous angle prediction. Breaking away from previous research studies, the frequency-domain features performed better than the time-domain features, with the best feature combination turning out to be median frequency–mean frequency–mean power. As for the classifiers, the support vector machine proved to be the most accurate classifier giving about 70% accuracy for both angle and force classification and close to 50% for joint angle–force classification.

  2. Aniseikonia quantification: error rate of rule of thumb estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubkin, V; Shippman, S; Bennett, G; Meininger, D; Kramer, P; Poppinga, P

    1999-01-01

    To find the error rate in quantifying aniseikonia by using "Rule of Thumb" estimation in comparison with proven space eikonometry. Study 1: 24 adult pseudophakic individuals were measured for anisometropia, and astigmatic interocular difference. Rule of Thumb quantification for prescription was calculated and compared with aniseikonia measurement by the classical Essilor Projection Space Eikonometer. Study 2: parallel analysis was performed on 62 consecutive phakic patients from our strabismus clinic group. Frequency of error: For Group 1 (24 cases): 5 ( or 21 %) were equal (i.e., 1% or less difference); 16 (or 67% ) were greater (more than 1% different); and 3 (13%) were less by Rule of Thumb calculation in comparison to aniseikonia determined on the Essilor eikonometer. For Group 2 (62 cases): 45 (or 73%) were equal (1% or less); 10 (or 16%) were greater; and 7 (or 11%) were lower in the Rule of Thumb calculations in comparison to Essilor eikonometry. Magnitude of error: In Group 1, in 10/24 (29%) aniseikonia by Rule of Thumb estimation was 100% or more greater than by space eikonometry, and in 6 of those ten by 200% or more. In Group 2, in 4/62 (6%) aniseikonia by Rule of Thumb estimation was 200% or more greater than by space eikonometry. The frequency and magnitude of apparent clinical errors of Rule of Thumb estimation is disturbingly large. This problem is greatly magnified by the time and effort and cost of prescribing and executing an aniseikonic correction for a patient. The higher the refractive error, the greater the anisometropia, and the worse the errors in Rule of Thumb estimation of aniseikonia. Accurate eikonometric methods and devices should be employed in all cases where such measurements can be made. Rule of thumb estimations should be limited to cases where such subjective testing and measurement cannot be performed, as in infants after unilateral cataract surgery.

  3. Rule-of-thumb consumers, productivity and hours

    OpenAIRE

    Furlanetto, Francesco; Seneca, Martin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study the transmission mechanism of productivity shocks in a model with rule-of-thumb consumers. In the literature, this financial friction has been studied only with reference to fiscal shocks. We show that the presence of rule-of-thumb consumers is also very helpful in accounting for recent empirical evidence on productivity shocks. Rule-of-thumb agents, together with nominal and real rigidities, play an important role in reproducing the negative response of hours and the d...

  4. Ergonomics study on mobile phones for thumb physiology discomfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendero, J. M. S.; Doon, M. E. R.; Quiogue, K. C. A.; Soneja, L. C.; Ong, N. R.; Sauli, Z.; Vairavan, R.

    2017-09-01

    The study was conducted on Filipino undergraduate college students and aimed to find out about the significant factors associated with mobile phone usage and its effect on thumb pain.A correlation-prediction analysisand Multiple Linear Regression was adopted and used as the main tool in determining the significant factors and coming up with predictive models on thumb related pain. With the use of the software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences or SPSS in conducting linear regression, 2 significant factors on thumb-related pain (percentage of time using portrait as screen orientation when text messaging, amount of time playing games using one hand in a day) were found.

  5. Synovial Osteochondromatosis at the Carpometacarpal Joint of the Thumb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yonekura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial osteochondromatosis (SOC is a benign tumor characterized by synovial connective tissue metaplasia. SOC commonly affects major joints including the knee followed by the hip, elbow, and wrist. SOC cases in the hand are not reported as often as SOC of major joints. Particularly SOC of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb is rare. We report on a 57-year-old female with primary SOC of the carpometacarpal joint of her left thumb. Surgical excision was performed and the patient had no symptoms with full range of motion of her left thumb. At 3 years of follow-up, there was no recurrence.

  6. Current account dynamics with rule of thumb consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo M. Pereira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the idea of rule of thumb consumption, in which some households do not behave according to the Permanent Income Hypothesis, is applied to a small open economy framework. A model of current account with rule of thumb individuals and habit formation is presented and estimated for five different countries. Two parameters of the model are of particular interest: the share of domestic income that accrues to rule of thumb individuals and the coefficient of habit formation. Using current account data, the results obtained here support the view that rule of thumb behavior plays a major role in the economy. Moreover, the estimated habit formation coefficients are mostly small and nonsignificant.

  7. Prognostic value of thumb pain sensation in birth brachial plexopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O. Heise

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic value of absent thumb pain sensation in newborns and young infants with birth brachial plexopathy. METHODS: We evaluated 131 patients with birth brachial plexopathy with less than two months of age. Pain sensation was evoked by thumb nail bed compression to evaluate sensory fibers of the upper trunk (C6. The patients were followed-up monthly. Patients with less than antigravity elbow flexion at six months of age were considered to have a poor outcome. RESULTS: Thirty patients had absent thumb pain sensation, from which 26 showed a poor outcome. Sensitivity of the test was 65% and specificity was 96%. CONCLUSION: Evaluation of thumb pain sensation should be included in the clinical assessment of infants with birth brachial plexopathy.

  8. Thumb Sucking: Help Your Child Break the Habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... older kids who continue to suck their thumbs, peer pressure at school usually ends the habit. Remember, though, ... an incredibly difficult habit to break. Remember, though, peer pressure typically leads kids to stop daytime sucking habits ...

  9. Distraction lengthening of the proximal phalanx in distal thumb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansü, Eren; Ünal, Mehmet Bekir; Parmaksızoğlu, Fatih; Gürcan, Serkan

    2015-01-01

    Thumb amputation is a major cause of hand dysfunction, and the treatment for distal thumb amputations remains controversial. Although finger reconstruction methods using distraction lengthening are known to restore finger length and function, we found no reports in the literature regarding phalangeal lengthening in thumb amputations. We aimed to evaluate proximal phalangeal lengthening in thumb amputations at or near the interphalangeal (IP) joint. We retrospectively evaluated patients who had undergone distraction lengthening of the proximal phalanx of the thumb. All patients underwent osteotomy, either during the initial procedure or as a second-stage procedure. Distraction began 10 days after osteotomy with the use of an external fixator that remained in place until ossification of the gap occurred without bone grafting. Patients were evaluated using the QuickDASH score. Fourteen patients with a mean age of 27 years and a mean follow-up period of 7 years were enrolled. The mean phalangeal lengthening achieved was 20 mm. Ossification occurred at all distraction sites, and the fixators were maintained for a mean of 85 days. The mean healing index was 42.5 days/cm. All 14 patients achieved the desired amount of phalangeal lengthening without major complications such as nonunion, premature union, or gross infection. For reconstruction in cases of distal thumb amputations, distraction lengthening of the proximal phalanx can be used to improve absolute length, web space, and grip distance. The technique is safe and effective, improves functionality/cosmesis, and offers a low complication risk.

  10. A rule of thumb in mammalian herbivores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augner; Provenza; Villalba

    1998-08-01

    In two experiments on appetitive learning we conditioned lambs, Ovis aries, to particular concentrations of a flavour by mixing the flavour with an energy-rich food that complemented their energy-poor diet. The lambs were subsequently offered energy-rich food with five different concentrations of the flavour (the concentration to which they were conditioned, two higher concentrations, and two lower concentrations). At these tests, the lambs consistently preferred the weaker flavours. This finding stands in contrast to earlier results on generalization gradients. In a third experiment, similarly designed to the other two, we tested for effects of a strong flavour on the behaviour of lambs when they were offered a novel nutritious food. Half of the lambs were offered unadulterated wheat, and the others strongly flavoured wheat. We found that the flavour in itself was initially aversive. We propose that the lambs' avoidance of foods with strong flavours may be an expression of a rule of thumb of the type 'given a choice, avoid food with strong flavours'. Such a rule could be part of a risk-averse foraging strategy displayed by mammalian herbivores, and which could be of particular importance when they encounter unfamiliar foods. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour

  11. Investigation of firing temperature variation in ovens for ceramic-fused-to-metal dental prostheses using swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Raluca; Negrutiu, Meda-Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Bradu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Romînu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2018-03-01

    One of the most common fabrication techniques for dental ceramics is sintering, a process of heating of the ceramic to ensure densification. This occurs by viscous flow when the firing temperature is reached. Acceptable restorations require the alloy and ceramic to be chemically, thermally, mechanically, and aesthetically compatible. Thermal and mechanical compatibility include a fusing temperature of ceramic that does not cause distortion of the metal substructure. Decalibration of ovens used for firing of the ceramic layers for metal ceramic dental prostheses leads to stress and cracks in the veneering material, and ultimately to the failure of the restoration. 25 metal ceramic prostheses were made for this study. They were divided in five groups, each sintered at a different temperature: a group at the temperature prescribed by the producer, two groups at lower and two groups at higher temperatures set in the ceramic oven. An established noninvasive biomedical imaging method, swept source (SS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) was employed, in order to evaluate the modifications induced when using temperatures different from those prescribed for firing the samples. A quantitative assessment of the probes is performed by en-face OCT images, taken at constant depths inside the samples. The differences in granulation, thus in reflectivity allow for extracting rules-of-thumb to evaluate fast, by using only the prostheses currently produced the current calibration of the ceramic oven. OCT imaging can allow quick identification of the oven decalibration, to avoid producing dental prostheses with defects.

  12. The added value of measuring thumb and finger strength when comparing strength measurements in hypoplastic thumb patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, H M Ties; Selles, Ruud W; de Kraker, Marjolein; Stam, Henk J; Hovius, Steven E R

    2013-10-01

    When interventions to the hand are aimed at improving function of specific fingers or the thumb, the RIHM (Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer) is a validated tool and offers more detailed information to assess strength of the involved joints besides grip and pinch measurements. In this study, strength was measured in 65 thumbs in 40 patients diagnosed with thumb hypoplasia. These 65 thumbs were classified according to Blauth. Longitudinal radial deficiencies were also classified. The strength measurements comprised of grip, tip, tripod and key pinch. Furthermore palmar abduction and opposition of the thumb as well as abduction of the index and little finger were measured with the RIHM. For all longitudinal radial deficiency patients, grip and pinch strength as well as palmar abduction and thumb opposition were significantly lower than reference values (P<0.001). However, strength in the index finger abduction and the little finger abduction was maintained or decreased to a lesser extent according to the degree of longitudinal radial deficiency. All strength values decreased with increasing Blauth-type. Blauth-type II hands (n=15) with flexor digitorum superficialis 4 opposition transfer including stabilization of the metacarpophalangeal joint showed a trend toward a higher opposition strength without reaching statistical significance (P=0.094),however compared to non-operated Blauth-type II hands (n=6) they showed a lower grip strength (P=0.019). The RIHM is comparable in accuracy to other strength dynamometers. Using the RIHM, we were able to illustrate strength patterns on finger-specific level, showing added value when evaluating outcome in patients with hand related problems. © 2013.

  13. Bilateral congenital absence of flexor pollicis longus with thumb hypoplasia and thenar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Sehgal, Harsha; Bano, Shahina; Parmar, Pranjali R; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Congenital absence of flexor pollicis longus with or without associated anomalies of thenar muscles and thumb is of rare occurrence. Inability to flex the interphalangeal joint of the thumb and absent dorsal wrinkles and flexion creases of the thumb are important clues to the diagnosis. Routine radiography and cross-sectional imaging help to confirm and document the condition. This article presents an extremely rare case of bilateral congenital absence of flexor pollicis longus tendon with thumb hypoplasia and thenar atrophy

  14. Case report 525: Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) of thumb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statz, E.M.; Philipps, E.; Pochebit, S.M.; Cooper, A.; Leslie, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    A case was presented of benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) involving the distal phalanx of the thumb, a location heretofore not described in the literature. The distinction between BFH and other lesions (e.g. non-ossifying fibroma) was considered in depth. The distinction between benign and malignant fibrous histiocytoma was also described. (orig.)

  15. Rules of Thumb for Up-and-Down Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Reports that economist Paul Krugman identifies three types of economic writing. Asserts that the major principles of macroeconomics can be synthesized into "Five Rules of Thumb" which can help to interpret economic news. Presents and discusses these five rules and includes a survey summary of journalists and economists on this issue.…

  16. "Rule of Thumb" and the Folklaw of the Husband's Stick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Henry Ansgar

    1994-01-01

    The origin of the term "rule of thumb" is investigated, especially as it relates to legal issues and, in particular, in doctrine concerning the beating of wives. The term's supposed origin as a standard for determining spouse abuse is questioned. (MSE)

  17. Hypoplasia of the thumb. Clinical presentation and reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara A, Enrique M

    2008-01-01

    In the genesis of the partial or total absence of the thumb they are genetic, environmental factors or a combination of both. It is take part of a syndrome or to be isolated and frequently associated with problems of radial longitudinal deficiency of the forearm. Objective. The purpose of this study is shown the experience, the focus of the processing and the results obtained since the point esthetic and functional view. The most it accepted classification is the proposal by Blauth that helps to determine the forecast and the processing. Materials and methods. it is a work type series of cases in 22 children with hypoplasia of the thumb, with a minimum of 12 months, (average 28 months). In 15 cases there were association of radial dysplasia or another anomaly among them 4 patients with VATER, and the 7 remaining they corresponded to hypoplasia of the thumb as only entity. We carried out tendon transfer, with opening of the first comisure in 2 patients with hypoplasia type II. In 3 patients, with hypoplasia type III A, one carries out corner opening, transfer of the superficial flexor of the 4 finger to correct instability of the articulation MF and opposition of the thumb, and transfer for extension of the thumb. In 17 cases one carries out politicization of the index. Results. The outcome was evaluated in: non pinch, lateral pinch and fingertip pinch; the grade of opposition like good, minimal and non opposition, and the aesthetic result according to the satisfaction of the parents in bad, regular and good. The five children reconstructed with transfers of tendons and comisure opening had good result. In 17 children with politicization one patient had a necrosis, of the 16 remaining a good or acceptable result was obtained. Discussion. It is not easy to follow a good system of measure of the functional results. We find that a practical way to evaluate was the clip, opposition and aesthetics. Previous to the surgeries it is required to evaluate alterations

  18. The caring moment and the green-thumb phenomenon among Swedish nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kirsten Pryds; Bäck-Pettersson, Siv; Segesten, K

    1993-01-01

    People who have a special gift for gardening are sometimes described as having a green thumb. Likewise, some nurses have a green thumb for nursing. The aims of this study were to identify and describe the characteristics of green-thumb nurses and of caring situations. A descriptive......-exploratory design was used, and 16 nurses, recruited by their superiors, participated in semi-structured interviews. The findings revealed that the green-thumb nurse is competent, compassionate, and courageous. The essence of the caring moment was identified as the green-thumb nurse's ability to act on the spur...

  19. The thumb carpometacarpal joint: curvature morphology of the articulating surfaces, mathematical description and mechanical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, Henning; Dumont, Clemens; Perplies, Rainer; Fanghänel, Jochen; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Nägerl, Hans; Wachowski, Martin M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose is to present a mathematical model of the function of the thumb carpometacarpal joint (TCMCJ) based on measurements of human joints. In the TCMCJ both articulating surfaces are saddle-shaped. The aim was to geometrically survey the shapes of the articulating surfaces using precise replicas of 28 TCMCJs. None of these 56 articulating surfaces did mathematically extend the differential geometrical neighbourhood around the main saddle point so that each surface could be characterised by three main parameters: the two extreme radii of curvature in the main saddle point and the angle between the saddles' asymptotics (straight lines). The articulating surfaces, when contacting at the respective main saddle points, are incongruent. Hence, the TCMCJ has functionally five kinematical degrees of freedom (DOF); two DOF belong to flexion/extension, two to ab-/adduction. These four DOF are controlled by the muscular apparatus. The fifth DOF, axial rotation, cannot be adjusted but stabilized by the muscular apparatus so that physiologically under compressive load axial rotation does not exceed an angle of approximately ±3°. The TCMCJ can be stimulated by the muscular apparatus to circumduct. The mechanisms are traced back to the curvature incongruity of the saddle surfaces. Hence we mathematically proved that none of the individual saddle surfaces can be described by a quadratic saddle surface as is often assumed in literature. We derived an algebraic formula with which the articulating surfaces in the TCMCJ can be quantitatively described. This formula can be used to shape the articulating surfaces in physiologically equivalent TCMCJ-prostheses.

  20. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic ... syndrome is known as PTCH ("patched"). The gene is passed down ...

  1. Truncation Depth Rule-of-Thumb for Convolutional Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moision, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    In this innovation, it is shown that a commonly used rule of thumb (that the truncation depth of a convolutional code should be five times the memory length, m, of the code) is accurate only for rate 1/2 codes. In fact, the truncation depth should be 2.5 m/(1 - r), where r is the code rate. The accuracy of this new rule is demonstrated by tabulating the distance properties of a large set of known codes. This new rule was derived by bounding the losses due to truncation as a function of the code rate. With regard to particular codes, a good indicator of the required truncation depth is the path length at which all paths that diverge from a particular path have accumulated the minimum distance of the code. It is shown that the new rule of thumb provides an accurate prediction of this depth for codes of varying rates.

  2. Reconstruction of the thumb with external fixer of bony lengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriarte Locarno, Raymundo; Garcia Herrera, Alvaro; Bocanegra Navia, Sergio; Suarez Romero, Fabio

    2005-01-01

    The thumb amputation represents one of the most anti functional, unsightly and psychological disabilities of the hand. We describe the surgical technique, the bone distraction phases, additional surgeries and external fixation. We review prospectively our experience in the Military Hospital in Bogota, Colombia, from 1996 until 2003: 9 patients, men, amputation level: 1C to 4, we used a monolateral external fixator; Distraction speed: 0,75 mm/d, mean lengthening 3,9 cms, mean time with de fixation: 6 months. Bone consolidation: 100%, mild functional activity according to the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and arm score (DASH). We recommended this surgical technique, because it is easy, reproducible, and allows a functional recuperation of the thumb

  3. NMR structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase thumb subdomain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharaf, Naima G. [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States); Brereton, Andrew E. [Oregon State University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 2011 Ag & Life Sciences Bldg (United States); Byeon, In-Ja L. [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States); Andrew Karplus, P. [Oregon State University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 2011 Ag & Life Sciences Bldg (United States); Gronenborn, Angela M., E-mail: amg100@pitt.edu [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The solution NMR structure of the isolated thumb subdomain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has been determined. A detailed comparison of the current structure with dozens of the highest resolution crystal structures of this domain in the context of the full-length enzyme reveals that the overall structures are very similar, with only two regions exhibiting local conformational differences. The C-terminal capping pattern of the αH helix is subtly different, and the loop connecting the αI and αJ helices in the p51 chain of the full-length p51/p66 heterodimeric RT differs from our NMR structure due to unique packing interactions in mature RT. Overall, our data show that the thumb subdomain folds independently and essentially the same in isolation as in its natural structural context.

  4. Rules of Thumb in Life-Cycle Saving Decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Joachim; Schlafmann, Kathrin; Rodepeter, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    We analyse life-cycle saving decisions when households use simple heuristics, or rules of thumb, rather than solve the underlying intertemporal optimization problem. We simulate life-cycle saving decisions using three simple rules and compute utility losses relative to the solution of the optimization problem. Our simulations suggest that utility losses induced by following simple decision rules are relatively low. Moreover, the two main saving motives re ected by the canonical life-cyc...

  5. Rules of thumb in life-cycle savings models

    OpenAIRE

    Rodepeter, Ralf; Winter, Joachim

    1999-01-01

    We analyze life-cycle savings decisions when households use simple heuristics, or rules of thumb, rather than solve the underlying intertemporal optimization problem. The decision rules we explore are a simple Keynesian rule where consumption follows income; a simple consumption rule where only a fraction of positive income shocks is saved; a rule that corresponds to the permanent income hypothesis; and two rules that have been found in experimental studies. Using these rules, we simulate lif...

  6. Grebe syndrome with bilateral fibular hemimelia and thumb duplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Narasimha; Joseph, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    Grebe syndrome is a rare recessively inherited form of short-limbed dwarfism. Among the skeletal anomalies reported in the past, complete fibular hemimelia and thumb duplication have not been documented. We report a case of Grebe syndrome with these associated anomalies and review the various skeletal anomalies reported in the literature related to this syndrome. Awareness of the skeletal anomalies that can occur in this syndrome should enable an accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Grebe syndrome with bilateral fibular hemimelia and thumb duplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Narasimha; Joseph, Benjamin [Department of Orthopaedics, Kasturba Medical College, Karnataka State (India)

    2002-03-01

    Grebe syndrome is a rare recessively inherited form of short-limbed dwarfism. Among the skeletal anomalies reported in the past, complete fibular hemimelia and thumb duplication have not been documented. We report a case of Grebe syndrome with these associated anomalies and review the various skeletal anomalies reported in the literature related to this syndrome. Awareness of the skeletal anomalies that can occur in this syndrome should enable an accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. Two Extension Block Kirschner Wires’ Technique for Bony Mallet Thumb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Mifune

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mallet fingers with an avulsion fracture of the distal phalanx or rupture of the terminal tendon of the extensor mechanism is known as a common injury, while mallet thumb is very rare. In this paper, the case of a 19-year-old woman with a sprained left thumb sustained while playing basketball is presented. Plain radiographs and computed tomography revealed an avulsion fracture involving more than half of the articular surface at the base of the distal phalanx. Closed reduction and percutaneous fixation were performed using the two extension block Kirschner wires’ technique under digital block anesthesia. At 4 months postoperatively, the patient had achieved excellent results according to Crawford’s evaluation criteria and had no difficulties in working or playing basketball. Various conservative and operative treatment strategies have been reported for management of mallet thumb. We chose the two extension block Kirschner wires’ technique to minimize invasion of the extensor mechanism and nail bed and to stabilize the large fracture fragment.

  9. Assessing predation risk: optimal behaviour and rules of thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Nicky J; McNamara, John M; Houston, Alasdair I

    2003-12-01

    We look at a simple model in which an animal makes behavioural decisions over time in an environment in which all parameters are known to the animal except predation risk. In the model there is a trade-off between gaining information about predation risk and anti-predator behaviour. All predator attacks lead to death for the prey, so that the prey learns about predation risk by virtue of the fact that it is still alive. We show that it is not usually optimal to behave as if the current unbiased estimate of the predation risk is its true value. We consider two different ways to model reproduction; in the first scenario the animal reproduces throughout its life until it dies, and in the second scenario expected reproductive success depends on the level of energy reserves the animal has gained by some point in time. For both of these scenarios we find results on the form of the optimal strategy and give numerical examples which compare optimal behaviour with behaviour under simple rules of thumb. The numerical examples suggest that the value of the optimal strategy over the rules of thumb is greatest when there is little current information about predation risk, learning is not too costly in terms of predation, and it is energetically advantageous to learn about predation. We find that for the model and parameters investigated, a very simple rule of thumb such as 'use the best constant control' performs well.

  10. Association between hyperflexibility of the thumb and an unexplained bleeding tendency: is it a rule of thumb?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplinsky, C; Kenet, G; Seligsohn, U; Rechavi, G

    1998-05-01

    A bleeding tendency manifested by petechiae and ecchymoses is one of the most common causes for referral of patients to haematology clinics. Vessel wall pathology is not usually considered to be a cause for deranged haemostasis, although coexistence of increased capillary fragility and joint hypermobility have been reported. We determined the frequency of thumb hyperextensibility and scored the findings in a series of 44 patients referred because of ecchymoses and petechiae, as well as 261 control children and their mothers. All 44 patients had normal coagulation studies. Thumb flexibility score was +4 in 30 patients, +3 in eight patients, +2 in five patients and +1 in one of the index patients. In the control group, only one of 261 had a +4, and three had a +3 score, and two of 260 mothers had a +4 score. Ecchymoses were not observed in any of these subjects, nor in the +1 patients. Based on clinical presentation and normal coagulation studies, we suggest that our patients had an underlying subtype of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. In view of the dramatically high occurrence of thumb hyperextensibility in patients with unexplained mild bleeding tendency, costly haemostatic and coagulation studies on such patients may not be necessary.

  11. FEATURE EXTRACTION FOR EMG BASED PROSTHESES CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Aishwarya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of prosthetic limb would be more effective if it is based on Surface Electromyogram (SEMG signals from remnant muscles. The analysis of SEMG signals depend on a number of factors, such as amplitude as well as time- and frequency-domain properties. Time series analysis using Auto Regressive (AR model and Mean frequency which is tolerant to white Gaussian noise are used as feature extraction techniques. EMG Histogram is used as another feature vector that was seen to give more distinct classification. The work was done with SEMG dataset obtained from the NINAPRO DATABASE, a resource for bio robotics community. Eight classes of hand movements hand open, hand close, Wrist extension, Wrist flexion, Pointing index, Ulnar deviation, Thumbs up, Thumb opposite to little finger are taken into consideration and feature vectors are extracted. The feature vectors can be given to an artificial neural network for further classification in controlling the prosthetic arm which is not dealt in this paper.

  12. Continuing to work with a sterile thumb splint: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roner, S; Fürnstahl, P; Schweizer, A; Wieser, K

    2018-05-17

    Nonoperative treatment of an injured ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint (skier's thumb without a Stener lesion) is managed by immobilization. A splint is applied on the radial side with the thumb in slight flexion to immobilize the MCP joint and allow motion in the interphalangeal joint. Thermoplastic splints are mainly used for daily activities with the advantage of custom fabrication for optimal comfort. To immobilize the thumb during surgical procedures performed by an orthopedic surgeon, splints made of sterilizable materials are needed but not yet available to our knowledge. We present the case of a 36-year-old orthopedic surgeon diagnosed with skier's thumb, and the development and application of a reusable, patient-specific (i.e., the orthopedic surgeon) splint to immobilize the thumb MCP joint in a sterile environment so the surgeon could continue working. Copyright © 2018 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Injuries to the Collateral Ligaments of the Metacarpophalangeal Joint of the Thumb, Including Simultaneous Combined Thumb Ulnar and Radial Collateral Ligament Injuries, in National Football League Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Belkin, Nicole S; Kennelly, Steve; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie P; Rodeo, Scott A; Warren, Russell F; Hotchkiss, Robert N

    2017-01-01

    Thumb collateral ligament injuries occur frequently in the National Football League (NFL). In the general population or in recreational athletes, pure metacarpophalangeal (MCP) abduction or adduction mechanisms yield isolated ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) and radial collateral ligament (RCL) tears, respectively, while NFL athletes may sustain combined mechanism injury patterns. To evaluate the incidence of simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tears among all thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries in NFL athletes on a single team. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review of all thumb injuries on a single NFL team from 1991 to 2014 was performed. All players with a thumb MCP collateral ligament injury were included. Collateral ligament injuries were confirmed by review of both physical examination findings and magnetic resonance imaging. Player demographics, surgical details, and return-to-play data were obtained from the team electronic medical record and surgeons' records. A total of 36 thumbs in 32 NFL players were included in the study, yielding an incidence of 1.6 thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries per year on a single NFL team. Of these, 9 thumbs (25%) had a simultaneous combined UCL and RCL tear injury pattern confirmed on both physical examination and MRI. The remaining 27 thumbs (75%) were isolated UCL injuries. All combined UCL/RCL injuries required surgery due to dysfunction from instability; 63.0% of isolated UCL injuries required surgical repair ( P = .032) due to continued pain and dysfunction from instability. Repair, when required, was delayed until the end of the season. All players with combined UCL/RCL injuries and isolated UCL injuries returned to play professional football the following season. Simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tear is a previously undescribed injury pattern that occurred in 25% of thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries on a single NFL team over a 23-year period. All players with combined thumb UCL

  14. Rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb ? a review

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, Mandhkani; Rhemrev, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Skier?s thumb is a partial or complete rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb. It is an often-encountered injury and can lead to chronic pain and instability when diagnosed incorrectly. Knowledge of the anatomy and accurate physical examination are essential in the evaluation of a patient with skier?s thumb. This article provides a review of the relevant anatomy, the correct method of physical examination and the options for additional imaging a...

  15. SPONGE ROBOTIC HAND DESIGN FOR PROSTHESES

    OpenAIRE

    Mine Seçkin

    2016-01-01

    In this study robotic hands and fingers’ materials are investigated from past to present and a sponge robotic hand is designed for biomedical applications. Emergence and necessity of soft robotic technology are explained and description of soft robot is made. Because of the importance of hand in a person’s body, researchers have dealt with robotic hand prostheses for many centuries and developed many hand types. To mimic the best for the human limbs, softness of the hand is one of the importa...

  16. Stimulation and recording electrodes for neural prostheses

    CERN Document Server

    Pour Aryan, Naser; Rothermel, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    This book provides readers with basic principles of the electrochemistry of the electrodes used in modern, implantable neural prostheses. The authors discuss the boundaries and conditions in which the electrodes continue to function properly for long time spans, which are required when designing neural stimulator devices for long-term in vivo applications. Two kinds of electrode materials, titanium nitride and iridium are discussed extensively, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The influence of the counter electrode on the safety margins and electrode lifetime in a two electrode system is explained. Electrode modeling is handled in a final chapter.

  17. MECHANICAL HEART-VALVE PROSTHESES - SOUND LEVEL AND RELATED COMPLAINTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAURENS, RRP; WIT, HP; EBELS, T

    In a randomised study, we investigated the sound production of mechanical heart valve prostheses and the complaints related to this sound. The CarboMedics, Bjork-Shiley monostrut and StJude Medical prostheses were compared. A-weighted levels of the pulse-like sound produced by the prosthesis were

  18. Oral cavity anaerobic pathogens in biofilm formation on voice prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertl, Kristina; Zijnge, Vincent; Zatorska, Beata; Leonhard, Matthias; Schneider-Stickler, Berit; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    BACKGROUND: A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method has been used to identify oral anaerobic pathogens in biofilms on voice prostheses. The purpose of the present study was to determine the location of those pathogens inside the biofilms. METHODS: Biofilms of 15 voice prostheses were sampled

  19. Lactobacilli : Important in biofilm formation on voice prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijssen, Kevin J. D. A.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify bacterial strains responsible for biofilm formation on silicone rubber voice prostheses. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted an analysis of the bacterial population in biofilms on used silicone rubber voice prostheses by using new microbiological methods. METHODS: Two

  20. 3D-printed upper limb prostheses : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kate, J; Smit, G.; Breedveld, P.

    2017-01-01

    Goal: This paper aims to provide an overview with quantitative information of existing 3D-printed upper limb prostheses. We will identify the benefits and drawbacks of 3D-printed devices to enable improvement of current devices based on the demands of prostheses users. Methods: A review was

  1. Laser vibrometer measurements and middle ear prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flock, Stephen T.; Dornhoffer, John; Ferguson, Scott

    1997-05-01

    One of us has developed an improved partial ossicular replacement prosthesis that is easier to implant and, based on pilot clinical measurements, results in better high-frequency hearing as compared to patients receiving one of the alternative prostheses. It is hypothesized that the primary reason for this is because of the relatively light weight (about 25 mg) and low compliance of the prosthesis, which could conceivably result in better high frequency vibrational characteristics. The purpose of our initial work was to develop an instrument suitable for objectively testing the vibrational characteristics of prostheses. We have developed a laser based device suitable for measuring the vibrational characteristics of the oval window or other structures of the middle ear. We have tested this device using a piezoelectric transducer excited at audio frequencies, as well as on the oval window in human temporal bones harvested from cadavers. The results illustrate that it is possible to non-invasively monitor the vibrational characteristics of anatomic structures with a very inexpensive photonic device.

  2. Radiological and scintigraphic evaluation of hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessler, W.; Schaub, W.

    1979-01-01

    The radiological findings following the introduction of hip prostheses are often equivocal. Additional bone scintigrams often provide important information for the evaluation of the prostheses. 1. An unstable hip prosthesis is characterised by abnormal uptake in bone, due to static and mechanical stress. 2. A positive scintigram does not necessarily indicate instability of the prosthesis. Increased uptake may also be due to inflammatory bone changes, healing, bone replacement, abnormal local stresses or soft tissue calcification. 3. In evaluating the scintigram one must take account not only of the intensity of isotope uptake, but also its distribution and exact localisation. 4. It is essential to compare the scintigram with the radiograph. Radiological features of possible instability become diagnostic if they correspond with appropriate increased radioactivity. If the latter is absent, the of instability remains doubtful. 5. In some cases early loosening of the stem of the prosthesis can be diagnosed while the radiograph is still negative. Increased radioactivity in the acetabulum is frequently seen in the presence of a stable acetabular prosthesis and must be interpreted with caution as a sign of loosening of the prosthesis. (orig.) [de

  3. Rules of thumb for the Z line shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beenakker, W.; Berends, F.A.; Marck, S.C. van der

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the theoretical parameters of the Z line shape, such as M Z and Γ Z , and the one photon exchange diagram are related to a set of parameters characterizing the experimental line shape. The latter are the peak height σ max , peak position √S max and half peak positions √S ± . The rules of thumb are accurate within 10 MeV. As a result we obtain approximate formulae which express M Z and Γ Z in the measured √S max and √S + -√S - . (orig.)

  4. 3D Printing Technology in Planning Thumb Reconstructions with Second Toe Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Cheng-Wu; Zhang, Jian-Lei; Meng, Ze-Zu; Liu, Lin-Feng; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Cong, Rui

    2017-05-01

    To report preoperative planning using 3D printing to plan thumb reconstructions with second toe transplant. Between December 2013 and October 2015, the thumbs of five patients with grade 3 thumb defects were reconstructed using a wrap-around flap and second toe transplant aided by 3D printing technology. CT scans of hands and feet were analyzed using Boholo surgical simulator software (www.boholo.com). This allowed for the creation of a mirror image of the healthy thumb using the uninjured thumb. Using 3D images of the reconstructed thumb, a model of the big toe and the second toe was created to understand the dimensions of the donor site. This model was also used to repair the donor site defect by designing appropriate iliac bone and superficial circumflex iliac artery flaps. The polylactic acid model of the donor toes and reconstructed thumb was produced using 3D printing. Surgically, the wrap-around flap of the first dorsal metatarsal artery and vein combined with the joint and bone of the second toe was based upon the model donor site. Sensation was reconstructed by anastomosing the dorsal nerve of the foot and the plantar digital nerve of the great toe. Patients commenced exercises 2 weeks after surgery. All reconstructed thumbs survived, although partial flap necrosis occurred in one case. This was managed with regular dressing changes. Patients were followed up for 3-15 months. The lengths of the reconstructed thumbs are 34-49 mm. The widths of the thumb nail beds are 16-19 mm, and the thickness of the digital pulp is 16-20 mm. The thumb opposition function was 0-1.5 cm; the extension angle was 5°-20° (mean, 16°), and the angle of flexion was 38°-55° (mean, 47°). Two-point discrimination was 9-11 mm (mean, 9.6 mm). The reconstructed thumbs had good appearance, function and sensation. Based on the criteria set forth by the Standard on Approval of Reconstructed Thumb and Finger Functional Assessment of the Chinese Medical Association, the results were

  5. [Surgical silicone prostheses in the treatment of biliary tract cancers: long prostheses or short prostheses? Results apropos of 500 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, B

    1992-10-01

    The interest of surgical prostheses in the palliative treatment of biliary tract cancer is well established, on the basis of their good tolerance, the more than 15 year follow up experience and the number of patients operated upon. After exeresis, they allow re-establishment of continuity, either by use of a prosthesis in Y when the right and let ducts can be dissected, or by using two prostheses, a multiperforated long prosthesis reimplanted in the duodenum and a short prosthesis reimplanted in the common bile duct without attaining the sphincter of Oddi. Of the 1000 cases treated, 500 were the object of a statistical analysis, 46 being operated upon by the author, in 60% of cases for biliary tract cancer, either primary or as an extension from the gallbladder. One-third of the patients had advanced lesions and a short survival of less than 3 months. Two-thirds a median survival of 9 months. In 10%, a radical exeresis was performed with survival of more than one year without recurrence of jaundice. Failure of treatment with persistence of jaundice was due to advanced disease for which surgery is unsatisfactory. Essential complications were premature bile leaks (5%) without serious consequences if sufficient drainage was maintained, since it stopped spontaneously, and angiocholitis (6%), the result of territory exclusion or reflux. Recurrence of jaundice was related to extension of the neoplasm to the secondary bile ducts, and to hepatic metastases. Obstruction of the prosthesis before two months was rare (6%) and was preceded by angiocholitis. In the absence of recurrence of the cancer the prosthesis can be replaced surgically without difficulty.

  6. Failed total carpometacarpal joint prosthesis of the thumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Bæk; Homilius, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis. T...... in eight of 10 patients, but the mean Disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) scores, self-reported pinch-grip-related function, and pain were comparable with our earlier published results with the Elektra carpometacarpal total joint prosthesis.......Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis....... The male:female ratio was 1:4 and the mean duration of observation 32 months (range 6-52). In three patients the revised implant was a MOJE uncemented carpometacarpal joint prosthesis and in seven patients an Elektra uncemented one. At follow-up grip strength was reduced to less than 90% of the other hand...

  7. Variations in the nerves of the thumb and index finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, W A; Coupland, R E

    1975-11-01

    The digital nerves to the thumb and index finger have been studied by dissecting twenty-five embalmed upper limbs. The palmar digital nerves to the thumb were constant in position and course, with a short lateral cutaneous branch from the radial palmar digital nerve in 30 per cent of cases. The palmar digital nerves to the index finger had a variable pattern, the commonest arrangement, well described in Gray's Anatomy, occurring in 74 per cent of cases. The variations and their frequency are described. By examining histological cross-sections of the index finger it was found that of about 5,000 endoneurial tubes entering the finger, 60 per cent passed beyond the distal digital crease to supply the pulp and nail bed. The depth of the palmar digital nerves was about 3 millimetres, but less at the digital creases, and their diameter lay between 1 and 1.5 millimetres as far as the distal digital crease. Clinical applications of the findings are discussed.

  8. Microsurgical replantation of a small segment of thumb volar skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyürek, Mustafa; Safak, Tunç

    2004-06-01

    This report presents a case of microsurgical replantation of a volar skin segment of the thumb. In a 24-year-old patient, a heavy object falling over the dominant thumb resulted in a crush-avulsion injury of a pure skin segment measuring 4 x 2 cm. Examination revealed that the distal fingertip as well as the bone-tendon structures remained intact. Exploration demonstrated that both neurovascular bundles were included in the avulsed skin segment. Microsurgical replantation was achieved successfully, repairing the radial digital artery at both ends with vein grafts as well as anastomosing a palmar vein. Both digital nerves were coapted proximally and distally. An excellent functional and cosmetic result was accomplished with a good sensory recovery. The authors conclude that microsurgical replantation should be attempted in cases of more proximal pure skin avulsions, even if the injury spares distal fingertip tissue or bone-tendon units. In such cases, replantation is superior to any other method of reconstruction. Liberal use of vein grafts is crucial to achieve success.

  9. Weilby-Burton arthroplasty of the trapeziometacarpal joint of the thumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, N O; Jensen, Claus Hjorth; Nygaard, H

    2000-01-01

    . Activities of daily living were generally easier. Mobility and strength of the thumb were satisfactory. One patient had signs of instability during a stress test. We conclude that our technique produces a stable and pain-free thumb joint. However, careful selection of the patients for this procedure...

  10. Collagenase Treatment for Dupuytren Disease of the Thumb and First Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreise, Marieke M.; Stenekes, Martin W.; Werker, Paul M. N.

    Purpose To evaluate the short-term effectiveness of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum to treat thumb and first web contractures in Dupuytren disease. Methods We prospectively included 14 thumbs in 12 patients with a contracture at the metacarpophalangeal or interphalangeal joint of at least 20

  11. Sports Injury-Related Fingers and Thumb Deformity Due to Tendon or Ligament Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Jie Bai

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Sports injury-related fingers and thumb deformity are relatively common. MRI is an accurate method for evaluation of the anatomy and pathologic conditions of the fingers and thumb. It is a useful tool for accurate diagnosis of the sports-related ligaments and tendons injuries in hand.

  12. Involuntary Neuromuscular Coupling between the Thumb and Finger of Stroke Survivors during Dynamic Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher L; Kamper, Derek G

    2018-01-01

    Finger-thumb coordination is crucial to manual dexterity but remains incompletely understood, particularly following neurological injury such as stroke. While being controlled independently, the index finger and thumb especially must work in concert to perform a variety of tasks requiring lateral or palmar pinch. The impact of stroke on this functionally critical sensorimotor control during dynamic tasks has been largely unexplored. In this study, we explored finger-thumb coupling during close-open pinching motions in stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis. Two types of perturbations were applied randomly to the index with a novel Cable-Actuated Finger Exoskeleton: a sudden joint acceleration stretching muscle groups of the index finger and a sudden increase in impedance in selected index finger joint(s). Electromyographic signals for specific thumb and index finger muscles, thumb tip trajectory, and index finger joint angles were recorded during each trial. Joint angle perturbations invoked reflex responses in the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), first dorsal interossei (FDI), and extensor digitorum communis muscles of the index finger and heteronymous reflex responses in flexor pollicis brevis of the thumb ( p  index finger joint impedance was suddenly increased, thumb tip movement was substantially increased, from 2 to 10 cm ( p  index finger impacting thumb activity. The degree of coupling modulated with the phase of motion. These findings reveal a potential mechanism for direct intervention to improve poststroke hand mobility and provide insight on prospective neurologically oriented therapies.

  13. Tribology of total hip arthroplasty prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, Claude B.

    2016-01-01

    Articulating components should minimise the generation of wear particles in order to optimize long-term survival of the prosthesis. A good understanding of tribological properties helps the orthopaedic surgeon to choose the most suitable bearing for each individual patient. Conventional and highly cross-linked polyethylene articulating either with metal or ceramic, ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal are the most commonly used bearing combinations. All combinations of bearing surface have their advantages and disadvantages. An appraisal of the individual patient’s objectives should be part of the assessment of the best bearing surface. Cite this article: Rieker CB. Tribology of total hip arthroplasty prostheses: what an orthopaedic surgeon should know. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:52-57. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000004. PMID:28461928

  14. One-stage thumb lengthening with use of an osteocutaneous 2nd metacarpal flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givissis, Panagiotis; Stavridis, Stavros I; Ditsios, Konstantinos; Christodoulou, Anastasios

    2009-12-01

    Traumatic thumb amputation represents an extremely disabling entity, thus rendering its reconstruction a procedure of paramount importance. A case of a patient, who sustained a traumatic amputation of his left index finger at the metacarpophalangeal joint and of his left thumb in the middle of the proximal phalanx 4 months ago and was initially treated elsewhere, is described. For the thumb reconstruction, an osteocutaneous flap of the radial side of the 2nd metacarpal, which consisted of a 3, 5-cm bony segment with the overlying skin and its blood and nerve supply was used. The flap was transferred and fixed with a plate and screws to the palmar-medial side of the stump of the thumb, while the 1st web space was deepened by removing the rest of the second metacarpal, while a partial skin graft was used to cover a remaining gap. Thumb functionality was restored immediately postoperatively, and the overall result was satisfactory.

  15. Computer-aided dental prostheses construction using reverse engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaberrieta, E; Minguez, R; Barrenetxea, L; Sierra, E; Etxaniz, O

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems with virtual articulators, which take into account the kinematics, constitutes a breakthrough in the construction of customised dental prostheses. This paper presents a multidisciplinary protocol involving CAM techniques to produce dental prostheses. This protocol includes a step-by-step procedure using innovative reverse engineering technologies to transform completely virtual design processes into customised prostheses. A special emphasis is placed on a novel method that permits a virtual location of the models. The complete workflow includes the optical scanning of the patient, the use of reverse engineering software and, if necessary, the use of rapid prototyping to produce CAD temporary prostheses.

  16. Left Hand Thumb Imprint Patterns Among Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Omair; Haroon, Muhammad Zeeshan; Rashid, Muhammad Adnan; Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Khan, Delawar

    2017-01-01

    Finger printing is an absolute method of identification. Recovery of finger prints from a crime scene is an important method of Forensic identification. Human finger prints are detailed, unique, difficult to alter, easily classifiable and durable over life making them stable and long-term tool of human identification. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 95,3rd year MBBS students of Ayub Medical College Abbottabad from December 2014 to August 2015 to establish the frequency of left hand thumb imprints by rolling and plain method. Study shows Loops among most common finger print pattern in 55 (58%) students out of 95, followed by whorls 33 (35%), arches 5 (5%) and composite 2 (2%). It is thus concluded that most common finger print pattern is loops followed by whorls, arches and composite.

  17. Candida albicans in patients with oronasal communication and obturator prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    MATTOS, Beatriz Silva Câmara; SOUSA, Andréa Alves de; MAGALHÃES, Marina Helena C. G. de; ANDRÉ, Marcia; BRITO E DIAS, Reinaldo

    2009-01-01

    Patients using obturator prostheses often present denture-induced stomatitis. In order to detect the presence of oral Candida albicans in patients with oronasal communications and to evaluate the effectiveness of a topical antifungal treatment, cytological smears obtained from the buccal and palatal mucosa of 10 adult patients, and from the nasal acrylic surface of their obturator prostheses were examined. A therapeutic protocol comprising the use of oral nystatin (Mycostatin®) and prosthesis...

  18. Hand burns surface area: A rule of thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargan, Dallan; Mandal, Anirban; Shokrollahi, Kayvan

    2018-03-11

    Rapid estimation of acute hand burns is important for communication, standardisation of assessment, rehabilitation and research. Use of an individual's own thumbprint area as a fraction of their total hand surface area was evaluated to assess potential utility in hand burn evaluation. Ten health professionals used an ink-covered dominant thumb pulp to cover the surfaces of their own non-dominant hand using the contralateral thumb. Thumbprints were assessed on the web spaces, sides of digits and dorsum and palm beyond the distal wrist crease. Hand surface area was estimated using the Banerjee and Sen method, and thumbprint ellipse area calculated to assess correlation. Mean estimated total hand surface area was 390.0cm 2 ±SD 51.5 (328.3-469.0), mean thumbprint ellipse area was 5.5cm 2 ±SD 1.3 (3.7-8.4), and mean estimated print number was 73.5±SD 11.0 (range 53.1-87.8, 95% CI 6.8). The mean observed number of thumbprints on one hand was 80.1±SD 5.9 (range 70.0-88.0, 95% CI 3.7), χ 2 =0.009. The combined mean of digital prints was 42, comprising a mean of two prints each on volar, dorsal, radial and ulnar digit surfaces, except volar middle and ring (3 prints each). Palmar prints were 15 (11-19), dorsal 15 (11-19), ulnar palm border 3, first web space 2, and second, third and fourth web spaces one each. Using the surface of the palm alone, excluding digits, as 0.5% of total body surface area, the area of one thumbprint was approximated as 1/30th of 1%. We have demonstrated how thumbprint area serves as a simple method for evaluating hand burn surface area. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterizing the Mechanical Properties of Running-Specific Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Owen N.; Taboga, Paolo; Grabowski, Alena M.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical stiffness of running-specific prostheses likely affects the functional abilities of athletes with leg amputations. However, each prosthetic manufacturer recommends prostheses based on subjective stiffness categories rather than performance based metrics. The actual mechanical stiffness values of running-specific prostheses (i.e. kN/m) are unknown. Consequently, we sought to characterize and disseminate the stiffness values of running-specific prostheses so that researchers, clinicians, and athletes can objectively evaluate prosthetic function. We characterized the stiffness values of 55 running-specific prostheses across various models, stiffness categories, and heights using forces and angles representative of those measured from athletes with transtibial amputations during running. Characterizing prosthetic force-displacement profiles with a 2nd degree polynomial explained 4.4% more of the variance than a linear function (prunning 3 m/s and 6 m/s (10°-25°) compared to neutral (0°) (pRunning-specific prostheses should be tested under the demands of the respective activity in order to derive relevant characterizations of stiffness and function. In all, our results indicate that when athletes with leg amputations alter prosthetic model, height, and/or sagittal plane alignment, their prosthetic stiffness profiles also change; therefore variations in comfort, performance, etc. may be indirectly due to altered stiffness. PMID:27973573

  20. Inhibition of the primary motor cortex and the upgoing thumb sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Nucera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The upgoing thumb sign has been frequently observed in patients with minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks as an indicator of brain involvement. We assessed the effect of primary motor cortex (M1 inhibition in the development of the upgoing thumb sign. Methods: Used repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS, 1Hz frequency for 15min, 1s ISI, 900 pulses at 60% of resting motor threshold to inhibit the right or left primary motor cortex of 10 healthy individuals. Participants were examined before and after rTMS by a neurologist who was blind to the site of motor cortex inhibition. Results: 10 neurological intact participants (5 women/5 men were recruited for this study. 2 cases were excluded due to pre-existing possible thumb signs. After the inhibition of the primary motor cortex, in 6 subjects out of 8, we observed a thumb sign contralateral to the site of primary motor cortex inhibition. In one subject an ipsilateral thumbs sign was noted. In another case, we did not find an upgoing thumb sign. Conclusion: The upgoing thumb sign is a subtle neurological finding that may be related to the primary motor cortex or corticospinal pathways involvements. Keywords: Corticospinal tract, Upper motor neuron lesions, Primary motor cortex, Transcranial magnetic stimulation

  1. Testicular prostheses in children: Is earlier better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peycelon, M; Rossignol, G; Muller, C O; Carricaburu, E; Philippe-Chomette, P; Paye-Jaouen, A; El Ghoneimi, A

    2016-08-01

    The absence of a testis occurs for various reasons in children, but testicular prosthesis implantation in children is uncommon. The optimal time for prosthesis placement is still unclear, and its complication rate has been poorly studied in children. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors of complications in cases of testicular prosthesis implantation in children. A monocentric, retrospective review was performed of children implanted with a testicular prosthesis between 2008 and 2014. All implantations were performed through an inguinal incision with a standardized procedure. Children were divided into two groups depending on the interval after orchiectomy: (A) early implantation (delay between surgeries prosthesis implantation at the mean age of 14.7 years (range 9-18) (A, 14.3; B, 14.6) with a mean delay of 36.1 months (A, 1.3; B, 80.3). Indications were mainly spermatic cord torsion (27%), bilateral anorchia (27%), and testicular atrophy after cryptorchidism surgery (19.2%). Complications (10.5%) included two cases of extrusion, one infection and one migration. Patient 1 had a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with testicle relapse 2 years after induction therapy. High-dose chemotherapy, total body irradiation and bilateral orchiectomies were performed, and bilateral prostheses were implanted 12 years after the end of chemotherapy. Complications happened 85 days after surgery. Patient 2 was followed-up for a proximal hypospadias. The tunica vaginalis flap, which was used during a redo urethroplasty, lead to testicular atrophy. Thirteen years after the last penile surgery, a testicular prosthesis was placed through an inguinal incision, and extrusion occurred 203 days after surgery. Bacterial cultures of the prostheses were sterile and histological review showed no sign of granuloma or graft rejection. The complication rate was significantly higher if the delay between the two surgeries exceeded 1 year (P = 0.01). Indications of

  2. A modified palatal crib appliance for children with predetermined thumb-sucking habit - Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlEmran, Sulaiman

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to introduce a modified design of palatal crib habit breaking appliance that can be used for children with predetermined thumb-sucking habit. The appliance is made of two bands on the upper first permanent molars and an extended metal framework to cover the anterior of the palatal roof. The appliance was applied for 4 months on an 8-year-old boy who persistently continued the habit of thumb-sucking. The appliance proved to be very effective for arresting thumb-sucking habit. (author)

  3. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. A Modified Rule of Thumb for Evaluating Scale Reproducibilities Determined by Electronic Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    The Goodenough technique for determining scale error is compared to the Guttman technique and demonstrated to be more conservative than the Guttman technique. Implications with regard to Guttman's evaluative rule of thumb for evaluating a reproducibility are noted. (Author)

  6. Future of newer basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Madhu, S. V.; Velmurugan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Basal insulin have been developed over the years. In recent times newer analogues have been added to the armanentarium for diabetes therapy. This review specifically reviews the current status of different basal insulins

  7. Getting a grip: different actions and visual guidance of the thumb and finger in precision grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melmoth, Dean R; Grant, Simon

    2012-10-01

    We manipulated the visual information available for grasping to examine what is visually guided when subjects get a precision grip on a common class of object (upright cylinders). In Experiment 1, objects (2 sizes) were placed at different eccentricities to vary the relative proximity to the participant's (n = 6) body of their thumb and finger contact positions in the final grip orientations, with vision available throughout or only for movement programming. Thumb trajectories were straighter and less variable than finger paths, and the thumb normally made initial contact with the objects at a relatively invariant landing site, but consistent thumb first-contacts were disrupted without visual guidance. Finger deviations were more affected by the object's properties and increased when vision was unavailable after movement onset. In Experiment 2, participants (n = 12) grasped 'glow-in-the-dark' objects wearing different luminous gloves in which the whole hand was visible or the thumb or the index finger was selectively occluded. Grip closure times were prolonged and thumb first-contacts disrupted when subjects could not see their thumb, whereas occluding the finger resulted in wider grips at contact because this digit remained distant from the object. Results were together consistent with visual feedback guiding the thumb in the period just prior to contacting the object, with the finger more involved in opening the grip and avoiding collision with the opposite contact surface. As people can overtly fixate only one object contact point at a time, we suggest that selecting one digit for online guidance represents an optimal strategy for initial grip placement. Other grasping tasks, in which the finger appears to be used for this purpose, are discussed.

  8. A simple rule of thumb for elegant prehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon-Williams, M; Tresilian, J R

    2001-07-10

    Reaching out to grasp an object (prehension) is a deceptively elegant and skilled behavior. The movement prior to object contact can be described as having two components, the movement of the hand to an appropriate location for gripping the object, the "transport" component, and the opening and closing of the aperture between the fingers as they prepare to grip the target, the "grasp" component. The grasp component is sensitive to the size of the object, so that a larger grasp aperture is formed for wider objects; the maximum grasp aperture (MGA) is a little wider than the width of the target object and occurs later in the movement for larger objects. We present a simple model that can account for the temporal relationship between the transport and grasp components. We report the results of an experiment providing empirical support for our "rule of thumb." The model provides a simple, but plausible, account of a neural control strategy that has been the center of debate over the last two decades.

  9. Reflections on the present and future of upper limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Dario; Amsüss, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in research and media attention on active upper limb prostheses, presently the most common commercial upper limb prosthetic devices are not fundamentally different from solutions offered almost one century ago. Limited information transfer for both control and sensory-motor integration and challenges in socket technology have been major obstacles. By analysing the present state-of-the-art and academic achievements, we provide our opinion on the future of upper limb prostheses. We believe that surgical procedures for muscle reinnervation and osseointegration will become increasingly clinically relevant; muscle electrical signals will remain the main clinical means for prosthetic control; and chronic electrode implants, first in muscles (control), then in nerves (sensory feedback), will become viable clinical solutions. After decades of suspended clinically relevant progress, it is foreseeable that a new generation of upper limb prostheses will enter the market in the near future based on such advances, thereby offering substantial clinical benefit for patients.

  10. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Dorsal Hand: An Update and Comprehensive Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Tiffany Y; Rubin, Ashley G; Brian Jiang, Shang I

    2016-04-01

    Excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary predisposing factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC). However, surprisingly, BCCs occur very rarely on the dorsal hand, which is subject to intense sun exposure, and their infrequent presentation in this location suggests that other factors besides UVR may play a role in BCC pathogenesis. Because dorsal hand BCCs are uncommon, knowledge of their characteristics is limited, and more data are needed to describe their clinical presentation and treatment. To perform an updated review of the literature on the management of dorsal hand BCCs. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review by searching the PubMed database with the key phrases "basal cell carcinoma dorsal hand," "basal cell carcinoma hand," and "basal cell carcinoma finger," and "basal cell carcinoma thumb." The authors identified 176 cases of dorsal hand BCCs in the literature, 120 of which had sufficient data for analysis. Only 4 cases were treated with Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). The authors present 14 additional cases of dorsal hand BCCs treated with MMS. Basal cell carcinomas on the dorsal hand occur infrequently, and potential risk factors include being a male of white descent and personal history of skin cancer. Mohs micrographic surgery seems to be an effective treatment method.

  11. REDUCED THROMBOGENICITY OF VASCULAR PROSTHESES BY COATING WITH ADP-ASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLEI, B; ROBINSON, PH; BAKKER, WW; Bartels, H.

    1992-01-01

    In this pilot study ADP-ase coated polyurethane (PL) vascular prostheses and noncoated (control) PU vascular prostheses (all vascular prostheses: ID 1.5 mm, length 1,5 cm) were implanted into the carotid artery of the rabbit to test wheter ADP-ase might function as an adequate anti-thrombogenic

  12. Thumb Reach of Indonesian Young Adult When Interacting with Touchscreen of Single-Handed Device: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umami, M. K.

    2018-01-01

    This study is a preliminary survey on thumb reach of Indonesian population when interacting with single-handed device. This study was aimed to know the thumb reach envelope on the screen of mobile phone. The correlation between the thumb reach vs. the hand length and thumb length was also identified. Thirty young adults participated in the study. All participants had normal body stature and were right-handed person. In the observational phase, the participant was asked to colour the canvas area on the screen of the mobile phone by using his/her thumb. The participant had to complete the task by applying the single hand interaction. The participant should grab the mobile phone as he/she use it normally in his/her daily activities. The thumb reach envelope of participants was identified from the coloured area of the canvas. The results of this study found that participants with a large hand length and thumb length tend to have a large thumb reach. The results of this study also show the thumb reach area of the participants is forming an elliptical shape that runs from the northeast to southwest on the device screen.

  13. Neglected nonunion of phalangeal neck fractures of the thumb in children: the outcome of delayed bone grafting in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2012-03-01

    Over a 12-year period, the author treated a total of 5 adults (mean age, 23 years) with neglected nonunion of phalangeal neck fractures of the thumb that were sustained in early childhood. Cosmetically, the affected thumb was shorter and smaller than the contralateral thumb. The thumb tip was flail and thumb pinch was weak. X-rays showed a nonunited phalangeal neck fracture with no radiologic evidence of avascular necrosis of the phalangeal head. All patients underwent iliac crest bone grafting. Bone union was obtained in all patients. At final follow-up (mean, 9 months), all patients were satisfied with the cosmetic appearance of the thumb. The thumb length increased by an average of 6 mm (range, 5-8 mm). Pinch improved in the range of 69% to 87% of the power of the contralateral thumb. However, there was restricted range of motion of the interphalangeal joint (mean range of motion of 10 degree only). It was concluded that delayed bone grafting of neglected nonunions of pediatric phalangeal neck fractures of the thumb is a worthwhile procedure and has a high satisfaction rate.

  14. The comparison between the length of vertical dimension of occlusion and the length of thumb on undergraduate Mongoloid students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goh Li Teng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Thumb Rule of Leonardo da Vinci states that many proportions of the face show relationship with the length of thumb which is measured from the proximal tip of the proximal phalanx to the distal tip of the distal phalanx. Previous studies have shown that the length of the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO is similar to the length of thumb of the Caucasoid race. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the length of VDO have correlations with the length of thumb among those of the Mongoloid race. This study took a survey method with the analytical cross-sectional approach. A total of 80 students of Faculty of Dentistry who have fulfilled all population criteria were randomly chosen to measure the length of VDO and the length of the thumb. Results analyzed with Student's t-test statistic revealed that there was a significant difference between males and females in the length of VDO and the length of the thumb, however, there was no significant difference between the length of VDO and the length of the thumb. There were very strong correlations (P<0.05 between the length of VDO and the length of the thumb. As a conclusion, the length of thumb can be suggested as an objective method to determine the length of VDO in this population.

  15. Involuntary Neuromuscular Coupling between the Thumb and Finger of Stroke Survivors during Dynamic Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Jones

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Finger–thumb coordination is crucial to manual dexterity but remains incompletely understood, particularly following neurological injury such as stroke. While being controlled independently, the index finger and thumb especially must work in concert to perform a variety of tasks requiring lateral or palmar pinch. The impact of stroke on this functionally critical sensorimotor control during dynamic tasks has been largely unexplored. In this study, we explored finger–thumb coupling during close–open pinching motions in stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis. Two types of perturbations were applied randomly to the index with a novel Cable-Actuated Finger Exoskeleton: a sudden joint acceleration stretching muscle groups of the index finger and a sudden increase in impedance in selected index finger joint(s. Electromyographic signals for specific thumb and index finger muscles, thumb tip trajectory, and index finger joint angles were recorded during each trial. Joint angle perturbations invoked reflex responses in the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS, first dorsal interossei (FDI, and extensor digitorum communis muscles of the index finger and heteronymous reflex responses in flexor pollicis brevis of the thumb (p < 0.017. Phase of movement played a role as a faster peak reflex response was observed in FDI during opening than during closing (p < 0.002 and direction of perturbations resulted in shorter reflex times for FDS and FDI (p < 0.012 for extension perturbations. Surprisingly, when index finger joint impedance was suddenly increased, thumb tip movement was substantially increased, from 2 to 10 cm (p < 0.001. A greater effect was seen during the opening phase (p < 0.044. Thus, involuntary finger–thumb coupling was present during dynamic movement, with perturbation of the index finger impacting thumb activity. The degree of coupling modulated with the phase of motion. These findings reveal a potential

  16. Microbial colonization of silicone voice prostheses used in laryngectomized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerenstein, S. E.; Grolman, W.; Schouwenburg, P. F.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the microbial colonization of dysfunctioning voice prostheses in laryngectomized patients and determine the influence of patient radiation therapy on prosthesis life span. In a 40-month period, 257 outpatient voice prosthesis replacements were carried out in a

  17. Critiquing the Computer-Aided Design of Dental Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, F. J.; And Others

    This paper describes RaPiD, a computer-aided assistant for the design of dental prostheses called removable partial dentures. The user manipulates icons directly to indicate the desired design solution to a given clinical situation. A developing design is represented as a logic database of components in a design; expert rules are applied as…

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast prostheses | Corr | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast MR imaging is the most accurate imaging investigation to detect breast prosthesis rupture. Rupture is common in older prostheses (> 10 years post implantation) and is often asymptomatic. The radiological signs of rupture are due to collapse of the elastomer shell which is eneveloped by silicone gel and when the ...

  19. Study of effects of radiation on silicone prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shedbalkar, A.R.; Devata, A.; Padanilam, T.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation effects on silicone gel and dose distribution of radiation through mammary prostheses were studied. Silicone gel behaves like tissue. Half value thickness for silicone gel and water are almost the same. Linear absorption coefficient for silicone gel and water are comparable

  20. Evaluation of pneumatic cylinder actuators for hand prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peerdeman, B.; Smit, Gerwin; Stramigioli, Stefano; Plettenburg, Dick; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-01-01

    DC motors are currently the preferred actuation method for externally powered hand prostheses. However, they are often heavy and large, which limits the number of actuators that can be integrated into the prosthesis. Alternative actuation methods are being researched, but have not yet found wide

  1. Novel strategies to improve the patency of vascular prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyligers, J.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Two novel strategies to improve the patency of vascular prostheses are described in this thesis. To improve the outcome of synthetic vascular bypass surgery, cell seeding is a promising concept that has extensively been investigated and is still evolving. To improve the short term effects due to

  2. [The costs for different voice prostheses depending on the lifetime].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldt, T; Ovari, A; Dommerich, S

    2013-06-01

    Voice prostheses are available in different types of architecture und from different producers. Especially the ones with antifungal properties are characterized by a high pricing. The aim of this paper is to check, whether these prices are reflected by the prosthesis life time.A Benchmarking with usage of mean lifetime and prosthesis costs. Comparing Provox 1, Provox 2, Provox Vega, Provox ActiValve, ESKA-Herrmann, Blom Singer Classic, Phonax, Blom Singer Advantage.The voice prosthesis Provox 1 offers the best price-lifetime-ratio (1.0). It's 6.7-times higher than the one of the Provox ActiValve (0.15). In addition, the classic prostheses Provox 2 (0.53), Blom Singer Classic (0.54) and ESKA-Herrmann (0.72) offer a good ratio compared to Provox 1, too.The mean lifetime of the voice prostheses do not reflect the pricing. The Provox 1 offers the best ratio and should be used as a reference in pricing the prostheses. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Cobalt release and complications resulting from the use of dental prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Imam, Hiba; Benetti, Ana R.; Özhayat, Esben B.

    2016-01-01

    of the functional prostheses released cobalt, whereas this was observed in 24 of 32 non-functional prostheses. None of the patients had contact allergy to cobalt. Of the 66 patients, 11 showed signs of inflammation of the oral mucosa, 2 had oral candidiasis, 16 had ill-fitting prostheses, and all had insufficient...... oral hygiene. CONCLUSIONS: Dental prostheses released cobalt during the fabrication stages, but not 1-5 years after insertion. No allergic reactions were observed. Signs of inflammation were related to candidiasis, insufficient oral hygiene, and ill-fitting prostheses....

  4. Isolated flexor pollicis longus nerve fascicle lesion – a rare differential diagnosis of thumb flexion deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauser, Eva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A rare differential diagnosis of thumb flexion deficiency is an isolated flexor pollicis longus (FPL nerve fascicle lesion. We present a 42-year-old otherwise healthy female patient who developed a weak thumb-to-index pinch and deficient right thumb flexion following the removal of osteosynthesis plates after a forearm fracture. Clinically,the flexor pollicis longus function was absent, yet index flexion and sensibility were unimpaired. Tendon rupture was excluded using a tenodesis test and the electro-physiological result of isolated interosseus nerve fascicle lesion was confirmed intraoperatively by inspection and electrostimulation. Tendon transfer using the extensor carpi radialis longus reconstruct strong thumb flexion during pinch. In summary, due to its specific location and anatomy, the FPL branch is more prone to isolated neuropathy, e.g. by injections or operations, than to other fascicles of the anterior interosseus nerve. When confronted with sudden and isolated thumb flexion deficiency, specialists should be aware of this rare phenomenon.

  5. [The vola stress change of patients after operation of wrop-around flap for thumb reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao-Jun; Pan, Yong-Wei; Wang, Zheng-Yi; Lin, Shun-Fu; Zhu, Xian-Long; Jiang, Jun; Zeng, Yan-Feng

    2009-11-01

    To analyse the vola stress change after operation of wrop-around flap for thumb reconstruction,to know the influence of vola pressure change after operation of wrop-around flap. From 1996 to 2004, 23 patients after the operation of wrop-around flap for thumb reconstruction were measured the entire footprint, the vola stress of single foot and double feet on static state and walking status. There were 16 males and 7 females,with a mean age of 23.7 years (17 to 42 years). The time from operation to measuring was 1.6 to 6 years (meana 3.8 years). The results of measuring were analyzed. Whether static footprint analysis or dynamic mechanical analysis, the plantar pressure distribution of donated foot were obviously different with those of the opposite site. The weight bearing of heel and the fourth and fifth metatarsal heads were nearly consistent with normal foot. But the former feet were obviously different. The weight bearing of the first metatarsal head was obviously lower than normal foot. And the weight bearing of the second and third metatarsal heads were obviously higher than normal foot. The operation of wrop-around flap for thumb reconstruction has advantage of the cosmesis and function of the reconstructed thumbs nearly consistent with normal thumbs. But the operation influences the postoperative foot pressure.

  6. Salvage reconstruction of failed interposition arthroplasty at the base of the thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Richard M; Rechnic, Mark; Shah, Kalpit N

    2012-12-01

    We present an operative procedure designed to revise a failed arthroplasty at the base of the thumb. This report describes a reliable operation that corrects residual instability and malignment which results in thumbs that are weak and painful despite a previous procedure. The operation has also been used as a primary procedure for arthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint where instability and subluxation was a major component of the problem requiring joint reconstruction. The unique features of this procedure include a reinforced double-thickness tendon graft, a unique tendon anchor, and a fascia lata allograft spacer. Significant functional improvement is anticipated when joint reconstruction provides increased proximal stability. Pinch and grip measurements improve. Pain scores also diminish after the operation. Hand function and patient satisfaction can be substantially improved with revision arthroplasty when the initial operation has failed to provide a thumb that is mobile, stable, and pain free. The technical features of the procedure address reduction of malignment, restoring of anatomic balance, and secure fixation of the proximal apex of the thumb metacarpal which restores thumb reduction position and digital balance.

  7. Fracture analysis of randomized implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur E.; Neal, Dan; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fractures of posterior fixed dental all-ceramic prostheses can be caused by one or more factors including prosthesis design, flaw distribution, direction and magnitude of occlusal loading, and nature of supporting infrastructure (tooth root/implant), and presence of adjacent teeth. This clinical study of implant-supported, all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, determined the effects of (1) presence of a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; (2) prosthesis loading either along the non-load bearing or load bearing areas; (3) presence of excursive contacts or maximum intercuspation contacts in the prosthesis; and (4) magnitude of bite force on the occurrence of veneer ceramic fracture. Methods 89 implant-supported FDPs were randomized as either a three-unit posterior metal-ceramic (Au-Pd-Ag alloy and InLine POM, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP or a ceramic-ceramic (ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP. Two implants (Osseospeed, Dentsply) and custom abutments (Atlantis, Dentsply) supported these FDPs, which were cemented with resin cement (RelyX Universal Cement). Baseline photographs were made with markings of teeth from maximum intercuspation (MI) and excursive function. Patients were recalled at 6 months and 1 to 3 years. Fractures were observed, their locations recorded, and images compared with baseline photographs of occlusal contacts. Conclusion No significant relationship exists between the occurrence of fracture and: (1) the magnitude of bite force; (2) a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; and (3) contacts in load-bearing or non-load-bearing areas. However, there was a significantly higher likelihood of fracture in areas with MI contacts only. Clinical Significance This clinical study demonstrates that there is a need to evaluate occlusion differently with implant-supported prostheses than with natural tooth supported prostheses because of the absence of a periodontal ligament. Implant supported prostheses should have minimal occlusion and

  8. 3D-printed upper limb prostheses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Kate, Jelle; Smit, Gerwin; Breedveld, Paul

    2017-04-01

    This paper aims to provide an overview with quantitative information of existing 3D-printed upper limb prostheses. We will identify the benefits and drawbacks of 3D-printed devices to enable improvement of current devices based on the demands of prostheses users. A review was performed using Scopus, Web of Science and websites related to 3D-printing. Quantitative information on the mechanical and kinematic specifications and 3D-printing technology used was extracted from the papers and websites. The overview (58 devices) provides the general specifications, the mechanical and kinematic specifications of the devices and information regarding the 3D-printing technology used for hands. The overview shows prostheses for all different upper limb amputation levels with different types of control and a maximum material cost of $500. A large range of various prostheses have been 3D-printed, of which the majority are used by children. Evidence with respect to the user acceptance, functionality and durability of the 3D-printed hands is lacking. Contrary to what is often claimed, 3D-printing is not necessarily cheap, e.g., injection moulding can be cheaper. Conversely, 3D-printing provides a promising possibility for individualization, e.g., personalized socket, colour, shape and size, without the need for adjusting the production machine. Implications for rehabilitation Upper limb deficiency is a condition in which a part of the upper limb is missing as a result of a congenital limb deficiency of as a result of an amputation. A prosthetic hand can restore some of the functions of a missing limb and help the user in performing activities of daily living. Using 3D-printing technology is one of the solutions to manufacture hand prostheses. This overview provides information about the general, mechanical and kinematic specifications of all the devices and it provides the information about the 3D-printing technology used to print the hands.

  9. Upon delineation of normal thyroid from diffuse goiter by terminal thumb phalanx measurement and thyroid scintiscan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenle, R.

    1987-01-01

    In 265 euthyroid patients the terminal thumb phalanx was measured for estimation of a normal thyroid according to the WHO rules of a normal thyroid. The results show up that hitherto published values of a normal thyroid seem to be too high and should be re-evaluated. This is confirmed by comparison with thyroid scans of 28 patients who were normal by WHO criteria, as length and width of the thyroidal lobe as well as the calculated thyroid volume were below or in the lower range of the hitherto published data of a normal thyroid. For delineation of a normal thyroid the average size of the terminal thumb phalanx seems to be less valuable, as in one third of the cases there was no concordance with the WHO rule. The measurement of the terminal thumb phalanx by ruler as a reference value is simple and fast to be performed. (orig.) [de

  10. The two-thumb technique using an elevated surface is preferable for teaching infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trang K; Hemway, Rae Jean; Perlman, Jeffrey M

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether the two-thumb technique is superior to the two-finger technique for administering chest compressions using the floor surface and the preferred location for performing infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (ie, floor, table, or radiant warmer). Twenty Neonatal Resuscitation Program trained medical personnel performed CPR on a neonatal manikin utilizing the two-thumb vs two-finger technique, a compression to ventilation ratio of 30:2 for 2 minutes in random order on the floor, table, and radiant warmer. Compression depth favored the two-thumb over two-finger technique on the floor (27 ± 8 mm vs 23 ± 7), table (26 ± 7 mm vs 22 ± 7), and radiant warmer (29 ± 4 mm vs 23 ± 4) (all P CPR preferably using an elevated firm surface. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Report Card on Basal Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Kenneth S.; And Others

    This report examines the nature of the modern basal reader, its economics, and use. First, the report provides a history showing how the confluence of business principles, positivistic science, and behavioral psychology led to the transformation of reading textbooks into basal readers. Next, the report examines objectives and subjective factors…

  12. Sports Injury-Related Fingers and Thumb Deformity Due to Tendon or Ligament Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Rong-Jie; Zhang, Hui-Bo; Zhan, Hui-Li; Qian, Zhan-Hua; Wang, Nai-Li; Liu, Yue; Li, Wen-Ting; Yin, Yu-Ming

    2018-05-05

    Hand injuries are very common in sports, such as skiing and ball sports. One of the major reasons causing hand and finger deformity is due to ligament and tendon injury. The aim of this study was to investigate if the high-resolution 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can demonstrate the complex anatomy of the fingers and thumb, especially the tendons and ligaments, and provide the accurate diagnosis of clinically important fingers and thumbs deformity due to ligamentous and tendinous injuries during sport activities. Sixteen fresh un-embalmed cadaveric hands were harvested from eight cadavers. A total of 20 healthy volunteers' hands and 44 patients with fingers or thumb deformity due to sports-related injuries were included in this study. All subjects had MR examination with T1-weighted images and proton density-weighted imaging with fat suppression (PD FS) in axial, coronal, and sagittal plane, respectively. Subsequently, all 16 cadaveric hands were sliced into 2-mm thick slab with a band saw (six in coronal plane, six in sagittal plane, and four in axial plane). The correlation of anatomic sections and the MRI characteristics of tendons of fingers and the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) at the metacarpal phalangeal joint (MCPJ) of thumb between 20 healthy volunteers and 44 patients (confirmed by surgery) were analyzed. The normal ligaments and tendons in 16 cadaveric hands and 20 volunteers' hands showed uniform low-signal intensity on all the sequences of the MRI. Among 44 patients with tendinous and ligamentous injuries in the fingers or thumb, 12 cases with UCL injury at MCPJ of the thumb (Stener lesion = 8 and non-Stener lesion = 4), 6 cases with the central slip injury, 12 cases with terminal tendon injury, and 14 cases with flexor digitorum profundus injury. The ligaments and tendons disruption manifested as increased signal intensity and poor definition, discontinuity, and heterogeneous signal intensity of the involved ligaments and tendons. Sports

  13. Standards and reliability in evaluation: when rules of thumb don't apply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcini, J J

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify situations in which two rules of thumb in evaluation do not apply. The first rule is that all standards should be absolute. When selection decisions are being made or when classroom tests are given, however, relative standards may be better. The second rule of thumb is that every test should have a reliability of .80 or better. Depending on the circumstances, though, the standard error of measurement, the consistency of pass/fail classifications, and the domain-referenced reliability coefficients may be better indicators of reproducibility.

  14. Longitudinal research on the oral environment of elderly wearing fixed or removable prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Junko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Kawazoe, Takayoshi

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate oral environmental risk factors involved in caries incidence in the elderly. We investigated the relationship between the oral environment factors of the elderly with both fixed prostheses and removable prostheses at baseline and at follow-up and examined time-course changes of each oral environmental factor by prosthesis type. The subject group consisted 11 elderly patients with fixed prostheses and 11 who wore removable prostheses. We examined oral environmental factors by saliva tests. Five oral environmental factors were examined: the stimulated salivary flow rate, buffering capacity, and the counts of mutans streptococci (SM), lactobacilli (LB), and Candida (CA). We compared these factors for subjects with fixed prostheses and those wearing removable prostheses at baseline and at follow-up. Furthermore, 3-year changes in the factors of each oral environment were compared and evaluated. Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the salivary microbial counts of SM and LB at baseline and at follow-up. The LB counts increased in the Denture group during the 3-year period and significant differences were noted. We found that fixed prostheses are less cariogenic, and removable prostheses cause an increase in the cariogenic bacterial count. Regarding time-course changes by the type of prosthesis, the LB count tended to increase in the subjects with removable prostheses. The risk of caries due to a fixed prosthesis may be lower than that of removable prostheses.

  15. Manufacturing implant supported auricular prostheses by rapid prototyping techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Meltem Ozdemir; Cifter, Ebru Demet; Ozenen, Didem Ozdemir; Balik, Ali; Tuncer, Erman Bulent

    2011-08-01

    Maxillofacial prostheses are usually fabricated on the models obtained following the impression procedures. Disadvantages of conventional impression techniques used in production of facial prosthesis are deformation of soft tissues caused by impression material and disturbance of the patient due to. Additionally production of prosthesis by conventional methods takes longer time. Recently, rapid prototyping techniques have been developed for extraoral prosthesis in order to reduce these disadvantages of conventional methods. Rapid prototyping technique has the potential to simplify the procedure and decrease the laboratory work required. It eliminates the need for measurement impression procedures and preparation of wax model to be performed by prosthodontists themselves In the near future this technology will become a standard for fabricating maxillofacial prostheses.

  16. Polyrethene nasolacrimal prostheses. Assessment of the complications using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pino, I. T.; Paul, L.; Duran, M. A.; Grande, C.

    1999-01-01

    To assess the outcome of treatment of epiphora secondary to nasolacrimal duct obstruction by placement of a polyurethane prosthesis. We placed 20 polyurethane prostheses (song's prostheses) in 19 patients with nasolacrimal duct obstruction who presented idiopathic grade III-IV epiphora. All the patients underwent CT with follow-up studies 10 days, one month and three months after prosthesis placement. Epiphora resolved completely in 13 cases and partially in four. In two cases, the prosthesis was poorly positioned; one of them was replaced and the other functions to date. There were three cases of obstruction. We observed limited epistaxis in 7 patients and headache in one. The treatment of epiphora by polyurethane prosthesis placement is a simple procedure that is well tolerated by patients and has a high success rate. (Author) 14 refs

  17. Indium-111 chloride imaging in the detection of infected prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayle, B.A.; Fawcett, H.D.; Wilkey, D.J.; Cierny, G. III; Mader, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-three patients with painful joint prostheses and a suspicion of infection were imaged with [ 111 In]chloride. A final diagnosis was established by culture in 19. Of these, 12 were categorized as true positives and three as true negatives. There were two false-positive studies, occurring in patients with knee prostheses. In both, the culture was obtained by aspiration. The sensitivity was 86%, specificity 60%, and accuracy 79%. Seventeen of the proven cases had bone imaging prior to [ 111 In]chloride imaging. All 17 static images were positive and were not helpful in differentiating loosening from infection. Using increased uptake on the blood-pool image as a criteria for infection, the sensitivity was 89%, but the specificity was 0. Adding flow studies made little difference in interpreting the blood-pool images. This study shows that [ 111 In]chloride imaging is more accurate in evaluating infection in prosthesis than bone imaging

  18. Manufacturing Implant Supported Auricular Prostheses by Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Karatas, Meltem Ozdemir; Cifter, Ebru Demet; Ozenen, Didem Ozdemir; Balik, Ali; Tuncer, Erman Bulent

    2011-01-01

    Maxillofacial prostheses are usually fabricated on the models obtained following the impression procedures. Disadvantages of conventional impression techniques used in production of facial prosthesis are deformation of soft tissues caused by impression material and disturbance of the patient due to. Additionally production of prosthesis by conventional methods takes longer time. Recently, rapid prototyping techniques have been developed for extraoral prosthesis in order to reduce these disadv...

  19. Workflow Optimization for Tuning Prostheses with High Input Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    of Specific Aim 1 by driving a commercially available two DoF wrist and single DoF hand. The high -level control system will provide analog signals...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0767 TITLE: Workflow Optimization for Tuning Prostheses with High Input Channel PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daniel Merrill...Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department

  20. Clinical Management of Implant Prostheses in Patients with Bruxism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Osamu; Lobbezoo, Frank; De Laat, Antoon; Iida, Takashi; Kitagawa, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kato, Takao; Kawara, Misao

    2012-01-01

    There is general agreement that excessive stress to the bone-implant interface may result in implant overload and failure. Early failure of the implant due to excessive loading occurs shortly after uncovering the implant. Excess load on a final restoration after successful implant integration can result in physical failure of the implant structure. Many clinicians believe that overload of dental implants is a risk factor for vertical peri-implant bone loss and/or may be detrimental for the suprastructure in implant prostheses. It has been documented that occlusal parafunction, such as, bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) affects the outcome of implant prostheses, but there is no evidence for a causal relation between the failures and overload of dental implants. In spite of this lack of evidence, often metal restorations are preferred instead of porcelain for patients in whom bruxism is presumed on the basis of tooth wear. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the importance of the occlusal scheme used in implant restorations for implant longevity and to suggest a clinical approach and occlusal materials for implant prostheses in order to prevent complications related to bruxism. PMID:22701484

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with heart valve prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, R.; Juengehuelsing, M.; Schicha, H.; Deutsch, H.J.; Sechtem, U.; Hilger, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    Artifical valve prostheses are often regarded as a contraindication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), although preliminary in vitro studies suggested, that patients with these metallic implants might safely undergo MR examination. This study reports on the experience with a group of 89 patients with 100 heart valve prostheses who were examined by spin-echo MR and gradient-echo MR. MR examination was performed in all patients without complications. The spin-echo sequence showed advantages in the depiction of anatomical structures like paravalvular abcesses. Anatomical structures adjacent to the artificial valve were clearly visivle and the metal components of the valves showes no or only small artifacts. Artifacts were accentuated when using gradient-echo sequences. Gradient-echo sequences provided valuable information regarding the presence of valvular insufficiency. Physiological valvular regurgitation was easy to differentiate from pathological paravalvular or transvalvular regurgitation. These results demonstrate that patients with artificial valve prostheses can be imaged by MR without risk and that prosthesis-induced artifacts do no interfere with image interpretation. (orig.) [de

  2. A Study of Thumb Print Patterns and ABO Blood Group Distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to establish a possible relationship between thumb print pattern and ABO blood group distribution. The study involves two hundred and nine-two volunteers comprising 159 female and 133 male. The blood group and finger print patterns were determined using standard techniques. Results ...

  3. Collateral ligament reconstruction of the chronic thumb injury with bio-tenodesis screw fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gvozdenovic, Robert; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new technique for the reconstruction of chronic lesions of the collateral ligaments of the metacarpophalangeal ligaments of the thumb, using a Bio-Tenodesis screw for the fixation of a tendon graft in a triangular manner with proximal apex and allowing early mobilization, starting 2...

  4. Partial trapeziectomy and interposition of fascia lata allograft in the operative treatment of thumb base osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, Anne J.; Weijns, Marieke E.; Braakenburg, Assa; Van Minnen, Leo Paul; Mink Van Der Molen, Aebele B.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the results of fascia lata allograft interposition after partial trapeziectomy in patients with symptomatic first carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis. Methods and results: Twenty-one patients (22 thumbs) with Eaton-Glickel stage II

  5. The Engineer's Thumb or Sherlock Holmes on the trail of 'the uncanny'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batail, J

    1997-08-01

    Freud identified 'primal phantasies' (life in the womb, 'primal scene', seduction, castration). It is argued that 'The Engineer's Thumb', a short story from 'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes', draws its uncanniness from the fact that it is underpinned by all the primal phantasies described by Freud. 'The Engineer's Thumb' therefore illustrates what analytical interpretation can contribute to the understanding of certain literary works. 'The Engineer's Thumb' may also serve as an introduction to a broader study of the Freudian concept of 'the uncanny'. This study seems to confirm what Freud said when he pointed out that 'an uncanny experience occurs either when infantile complexes which have been repressed are once more revived by some impression, or when primitive beliefs which have been surmounted seem once more to be confirmed' (1919, p. 249). 'The Engineer's Thumb' has another interesting feature: in this short story. Conan Doyle, by setting up a 'talking cure', anticipates the creation of psychoanalysis and highlights in a striking way certain aspects of what was to become psychoanalytical treatment.

  6. Downdraught assessment during design : experimental and numerical evaluation of a rule of thumb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellen, L.; Timmers, S.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Nelissen, E.S.M.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Marken Lichtenbelt, van W.D.

    2012-01-01

    Large glass façades are popular architectural features in building design nowadays. However, these façades can result in interior downdraught during periods with low outdoor temperatures. A rule of thumb exists to assess the downdraught risk, based on window height and window temperature [1]. In

  7. Big drinkers: how BMI, gender and rules of thumb influence the free pouring of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarandescu, Laura; Walker, Doug; Wansink, Brian

    2014-11-01

    This research examines free pouring behavior and provides an account of how Body Mass Index (BMI) and gender might lead to the overpouring, and consequently the overconsumption of wine. An observational study with young adults investigated how BMI and gender affect free-pouring of wine over a variety of pouring scenarios, and how rules-of-thumb in pouring affect the quantities of alcohol poured by men and women across BMI categories. For men, the amount poured was positively related to BMI. However, BMI did not affect pours by women. The use of the "half glass" rule-of-thumb in pouring reduced the volume of wine poured by over 20% for both men and women. Importantly, this rule-of-thumb substantially attenuated the pours by men at high BMI levels. Increasing awareness of pouring biases represents an early and effective step toward curbing alcohol consumption among men, and especially those who are overweight. Additionally, using a simple "half glass" rule-of-thumb may be an effective way to curb overpouring, despite non-standard glass sizes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Assessing Financial Education Methods: Principles vs. Rules-of-Thumb Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skimmyhorn, William L.; Davies, Evan R.; Mun, David; Mitchell, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Despite thousands of programs and tremendous public and private interest in improving financial decision-making, little is known about how best to teach financial education. Using an experimental approach, the authors estimated the effects of two different education methodologies (principles-based and rules-of-thumb) on the knowledge,…

  9. The proportion of the face in younger adults using the thumb rule of Leonardo da Vinci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, O

    1996-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine whether the thumb rule of Leonardo da Vinci could be an objective method in the determination of the natural and artistic proportions of human face. In this study, a sample of 400 subjects (200 male and 200 female, 22-25 years old) was used. Measurements were made of the length of thumb, the length of ear, the approximate distances between the hair line and the glabella or eyebrows, between the glabella or eyebrows and the tip of the nose and the distance between the nose and the chin, and the distance between the ear and the lateral aspect of the eye. The results obtained in the males and females showed significant (p thumb and the proportions of the face examined in the study. Additionally, the height of the face was found to be almost three times the length of the thumb. However, the measurements obtained from female subjects were on average smaller than those taken from males. The results obtained in this experiment could be of value in understanding of the evaluation of the face for the people working in plastic surgery or art.

  10. Guidelines, Criteria, and Rules of Thumb for Evaluating Normed and Standardized Assessment Instruments in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Domenic V.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of developing assessment instruments in psychology, issues of standardization, norming procedures, and test reliability and validity are discussed. Criteria, guidelines, and rules of thumb are provided to help the clinician with instrument selection for a given psychological assessment. (SLD)

  11. Control of thumb force using surface functional electrical stimulation and muscle load sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke survivors often have difficulties in manipulating objects with their affected hand. Thumb control plays an important role in object manipulation. Surface functional electrical stimulation (FES) can assist movement. We aim to control the 2D thumb force by predicting the sum of individual muscle forces, described by a sigmoidal muscle recruitment curve and a single force direction. Methods Five able bodied subjects and five stroke subjects were strapped in a custom built setup. The forces perpendicular to the thumb in response to FES applied to three thumb muscles were measured. We evaluated the feasibility of using recruitment curve based force vector maps in predicting output forces. In addition, we developed a closed loop force controller. Load sharing between the three muscles was used to solve the redundancy problem having three actuators to control forces in two dimensions. The thumb force was controlled towards target forces of 0.5 N and 1.0 N in multiple directions within the individual’s thumb work space. Hereby, the possibilities to use these force vector maps and the load sharing approach in feed forward and feedback force control were explored. Results The force vector prediction of the obtained model had small RMS errors with respect to the actual measured force vectors (0.22±0.17 N for the healthy subjects; 0.17±0.13 N for the stroke subjects). The stroke subjects showed a limited work range due to limited force production of the individual muscles. Performance of feed forward control without feedback, was better in healthy subjects than in stroke subjects. However, when feedback control was added performances were similar between the two groups. Feedback force control lead, especially for the stroke subjects, to a reduction in stationary errors, which improved performance. Conclusions Thumb muscle responses to FES can be described by a single force direction and a sigmoidal recruitment curve. Force in desired direction can be

  12. In vivo analysis of trapeziometacarpal joint arthrokinematics during multi-directional thumb motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fong-Chin; Lin, Chien-Ju; Wang, Chien-Kuo; Chen, Guan-Po; Sun, Yung-Nien; Chuang, Alan K; Kuo, Li-Chieh

    2014-11-01

    The investigation of the joint arthrokinematics of the trapeziometacarpal joint is critical to comprehend the causative mechanism underlying this common form of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the arthrokinematics of the trapeziometacarpal joint during thumb postures in vivo. Fifteen healthy participants were enrolled in this study. Static computed tomography images of the 1st metacarpal bone and trapezium were taken at specific thumb postures during thumb flexion-extension, abduction-adduction, and circumduction motions. Images were analyzed to examine the joint gliding, expressed as displacement of the centroid of the articular surface of the 1st metacarpal bone, relative to the trapezium. The gliding ratio, defined as joint gliding in each direction normalized to the dimension of the trapezium joint surface in the given direction, was computed and compared between different thumb motions. The results indicate that thumb motions influenced joint gliding. The centroids of the articular surface of the 1st metacarpal bone were primarily located at the central and dorsal-radial regions while executing these motions. The maximum joint gliding of the 1st metacarpal bone occurred in the radial-ulnar direction when performing abduction-adduction, and in the dorsal-volar direction while performing flexion-extension and circumduction, with the gliding ratio values of 42.35%, 51.65%, and 51.85%, respectively. Activities that involved abduction-adduction in the trapeziometacarpal joint caused greater joint gliding in the ulnar-radial direction, while flexion-extension resulted in greater joint gliding in the dorsal-volar and distal-proximal directions. Understanding normal joint kinematics in vivo may provide insights into the possible mechanism leading to osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint, and help to improve the design of implants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Approximating optimal behavioural strategies down to rules-of-thumb: energy reserve changes in pairs of social foragers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean A Rands

    Full Text Available Functional explanations of behaviour often propose optimal strategies for organisms to follow. These 'best' strategies could be difficult to perform given biological constraints such as neural architecture and physiological constraints. Instead, simple heuristics or 'rules-of-thumb' that approximate these optimal strategies may instead be performed. From a modelling perspective, rules-of-thumb are also useful tools for considering how group behaviour is shaped by the behaviours of individuals. Using simple rules-of-thumb reduces the complexity of these models, but care needs to be taken to use rules that are biologically relevant. Here, we investigate the similarity between the outputs of a two-player dynamic foraging game (which generated optimal but complex solutions and a computational simulation of the behaviours of the two members of a foraging pair, who instead followed a rule-of-thumb approximation of the game's output. The original game generated complex results, and we demonstrate here that the simulations following the much-simplified rules-of-thumb also generate complex results, suggesting that the rule-of-thumb was sufficient to make some of the model outcomes unpredictable. There was some agreement between both modelling techniques, but some differences arose - particularly when pair members were not identical in how they gained and lost energy. We argue that exploring how rules-of-thumb perform in comparison to their optimal counterparts is an important exercise for biologically validating the output of agent-based models of group behaviour.

  14. Approximating optimal behavioural strategies down to rules-of-thumb: energy reserve changes in pairs of social foragers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rands, Sean A

    2011-01-01

    Functional explanations of behaviour often propose optimal strategies for organisms to follow. These 'best' strategies could be difficult to perform given biological constraints such as neural architecture and physiological constraints. Instead, simple heuristics or 'rules-of-thumb' that approximate these optimal strategies may instead be performed. From a modelling perspective, rules-of-thumb are also useful tools for considering how group behaviour is shaped by the behaviours of individuals. Using simple rules-of-thumb reduces the complexity of these models, but care needs to be taken to use rules that are biologically relevant. Here, we investigate the similarity between the outputs of a two-player dynamic foraging game (which generated optimal but complex solutions) and a computational simulation of the behaviours of the two members of a foraging pair, who instead followed a rule-of-thumb approximation of the game's output. The original game generated complex results, and we demonstrate here that the simulations following the much-simplified rules-of-thumb also generate complex results, suggesting that the rule-of-thumb was sufficient to make some of the model outcomes unpredictable. There was some agreement between both modelling techniques, but some differences arose - particularly when pair members were not identical in how they gained and lost energy. We argue that exploring how rules-of-thumb perform in comparison to their optimal counterparts is an important exercise for biologically validating the output of agent-based models of group behaviour.

  15. Fabrication of biosynthetic vascular prostheses by 193-nm excimer laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husinsky, Wolfgang; Csek, Ch.; Bartel, A.; Grabenwoeger, M.; Fitzal, F.; Wolner, Ernst

    1998-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of transmural capillary ingrowth into the inner surface of biosynthetic vascular prostheses (OmniflowTM) through perforations created by an excimer-laser, thus inducing an endothelial cell coverage. The biosynthetic vascular prostheses (10 cm length, 6 mm (phi) ) were perforated with an excimer laser ((phi) of the holes 50 - 100 micrometer, distance 4 mm) and implanted into the carotid arteries of 8 sheep. The laser tissue interaction process of 193 nm radiation ensures minimal thermal damage to the prostheses. They were compared to untreated OmniflowTM prostheses implanted at the contralateral side. Three months after implantation the prostheses were explanted and evaluated by gross morphology, histological examination and scanning electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy showed endothelial cells in the midgraft portion of all perforated prostheses, whereas collagen fibers, fibrin meshwork and activated platelets formed the inner layer in 6 out of 8 untreated OmniflowTM prostheses. It can be concluded, that spontaneous endothelialization of biosynthetic vascular prostheses can be achieved by transmural capillary ingrowth through perforations in the wall of the prostheses in an experimental sheep model.

  16. An overview of robotic/mechanical devices for post-stroke thumb rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Escobar, Marian; Rendon-Velez, Elizabeth

    2018-01-15

    This article aims to clarify the current state-of-the-art of robotic/mechanical devices for post-stroke thumb rehabilitation as well as the anatomical characteristics and motions of the thumb that are crucial for the development of any device that aims to support its motion. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify robotic/mechanical devices for post-stroke thumb rehabilitation. Specific electronic databases and well-defined search terms and inclusion/exclusion criteria were used for such purpose. A reasoning model was devised to support the structured abstraction of relevant data from the literature of interest. Following the main search and after removing duplicated and other non-relevant studies, 68 articles (corresponding to 32 devices) were left for further examination. These articles were analyzed to extract data relative to (i) the motions assisted/permitted - either actively or passively - by the device per anatomical joint of the thumb and (ii) mechanical-related aspects (i.e., architecture, connections to thumb, other fingers supported, adjustability to different hand sizes, actuators - type, quantity, location, power transmission and motion trajectory). Most articles describe preliminary design and testing of prototypes, rather than the thorough evaluation of commercially ready devices. Defining appropriate kinematic models of the thumb upon which to design such devices still remains a challenging and unresolved task. Further research is needed before these devices can actually be implemented in clinical environments to serve their intended purpose of complementing the labour of therapists by facilitating intensive treatment with precise and repeatable exercises. Implications for Rehabilitation Post-stroke functional disability of the hand, and particularly of the thumb, significantly affects the capability to perform activities of daily living, threatening the independence and quality of life of the stroke survivors. The latest studies

  17. Stress analysis in oral obturator prostheses, part II: photoelastic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Moreno, Amália; Zahoui, Abbas; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2014-06-01

    In part I of the study, two attachment systems [O-ring; bar-clip (BC)] were used, and the system with three individualized O-rings provided the lowest stress on the implants and the support tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution, through the photoelastic method, on implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses associated with different attachment systems: BOC-splinted implants with a bar connected to two centrally placed O-rings, and BOD-splinted implants with a BC connected to two distally placed O-rings (cantilever). One photoelastic model of the maxilla with oral-sinus-nasal communication with three parallel implants was fabricated. Afterward, two implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses with the two attachment systems described above were constructed. Each assembly was positioned in a circular polariscope and a 100-N axial load was applied in three different regions with implants by using a universal testing machine. The results were obtained through photograph record analysis of stress. The BOD system exhibited the highest stress concentration, followed by the BOC system. The O-ring, centrally placed on the bar, allows higher mobility of the prostheses and homogeneously distributes the stress to the region of the alveolar ridge and implants. It can be concluded that the use of implants with O-rings, isolated or connected with a bar, to rehabilitate maxillectomized patients allows higher prosthesis mobility and homogeneously distributes the stress to the alveolar ridge region, which may result in greater chewing stress distribution to implants and bone tissue. The clinical implication of the augmented bone support loss after maxillectomy is the increase of stress in the attachment systems and, consequently, a higher tendency for displacement of the prosthesis.

  18. Monte Carlo dose calculations for phantoms with hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazalova, M; Verhaegen, F; Coolens, C; Childs, P; Cury, F; Beaulieu, L

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of patients with hip prostheses are severely degraded by metal streaking artefacts. The low image quality makes organ contouring more difficult and can result in large dose calculation errors when Monte Carlo (MC) techniques are used. In this work, the extent of streaking artefacts produced by three common hip prosthesis materials (Ti-alloy, stainless steel, and Co-Cr-Mo alloy) was studied. The prostheses were tested in a hypothetical prostate treatment with five 18 MV photon beams. The dose distributions for unilateral and bilateral prosthesis phantoms were calculated with the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc MC code. This was done in three phantom geometries: in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry, and in an artefact-corrected geometry. The artefact-corrected geometry was created using a modified filtered back-projection correction technique. It was found that unilateral prosthesis phantoms do not show large dose calculation errors, as long as the beams miss the artefact-affected volume. This is possible to achieve in the case of unilateral prosthesis phantoms (except for the Co-Cr-Mo prosthesis which gives a 3% error) but not in the case of bilateral prosthesis phantoms. The largest dose discrepancies were obtained for the bilateral Co-Cr-Mo hip prosthesis phantom, up to 11% in some voxels within the prostate. The artefact correction algorithm worked well for all phantoms and resulted in dose calculation errors below 2%. In conclusion, a MC treatment plan should include an artefact correction algorithm when treating patients with hip prostheses

  19. Antibiotic cements in articular prostheses: current orthopaedic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, F; Belot, N; Ropars, M; Thomazeau, H; Lambotte, J C; Cathelineau, G

    2006-08-01

    The possibilities and limits of antibiotic cements (ACs) have been assessed by many researchers. ACs are now approved by many drug agencies, including the US Food and Drug Administration (approval in 2003), with widespread use in prophylaxis and curative treatments. Laboratory experiments have achieved satisfactory antibiotic delivery without impairing the mechanical properties of ACs. Implantation in large animals (e.g. sheep) showed an antibiotic concentration in the bone cortex four times the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 6 months after implantation. Human pharmacokinetics during total hip replacement (THR) show antibiotic concentrations 20 times the MIC in drainage fluids. No toxic concentrations have been detected in blood or urine, and no allergies, toxic effects, mechanical failures or selection of resistant microorganisms have been observed. Antibioprophylaxis has been assessed in prospective studies in over 1600 cases. In data from the Scandinavian arthroplasty registers, with an exhaustive follow-up of more than 240000 THRs, infection rate was reduced by ca. 50% (0.9% compared with 1.9%). In prostheses with severe infection, use of AC increases the infection control rate from 86% to 93% when using two-stage prosthetic exchanges. In moderate infection, a similar infection control rate (86%) was achieved either by two-stage exchange without local antibiotic or by one-stage exchange with AC; however, one-stage exchange achieved better functional results at lower cost and with reduced pain and hospital stay. Therefore, AC prophylaxis is widely used in countries with prostheses registers (Northern Europe), and use of ACs as treatment for infected prostheses is often considered as the gold standard in the EU and North America. However, AC is only an adjuvant treatment, and excision of infected and devascularized tissues as well as systemic antibiotic treatment managed by a multidisciplinary team remain the main factors of infection control.

  20. Heart valve prostheses: who protects our patients, and from what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, A C

    1977-01-01

    Phenomenal advances in the development of cardiac valve prostheses have taken place in less than two decades. However, the currently prevailing atmosphere of consumer protectionism in existence 20 years ago probably would have made such developments impossible. Recent passage of the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (P.L. 94-295) will not only make future development extremely difficult, but also may force the field of cardiac valve replacement back into the era of the 1950s. Regulations implementing this legislation may be even more disastrous. It is time for someone to protect patients from their so-called protectors.

  1. Provisional prostheses during ridge augmentation and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livada, Rania; Hottel, Timothy L; Shiloah, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in ridge augmentation and bone regeneration have expanded the pool of patients that could benefit from dental implants. However, providing the patient with a temporary prosthesis during the wound healing phase without impairing the process is a challenging task. This article summarizes available information pertaining to provisional prostheses, both tooth-supported and soft tissue-supported, that may meet the patient needs. The advantages and disadvantages of each class of prosthesis, along with indications and contraindications, were taken into consideration to aid the restorative dentist in choosing the optimal provisional for their patients.

  2. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Karthiga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Binkley and Johnson first reported this syndrome in 1951. But it was in 1960, Gorlin-Goltz established the association of basal cell epithelioma, jaw cyst and bifid ribs, a combination which is now frequently known as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as well as Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS. NBCCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and variable expressivity. NBCCS is characterized by variety of cutaneous, dental, osseous, opthalmic, neurologic and sexual abnormalities. One such case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is reported here with good illustrations.

  3. Terminal phalangeal accessory ossification center of the thumb: an additional radiographic finding in Larsen syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanay, Yasemin; Utine, Gulen E.; Tuncbilek, Ergul; Lachman, Ralph S.; Krakow, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Larsen syndrome is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple joint dislocations, vertebral anomalies and dysmorphic facies. Both autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive forms of the disorder have been proposed. Individuals with autosomal-dominant Larsen syndrome have characteristic ''cylindrical-shape'' thumbs caused by broad, shortened phalanges. Autosomal-dominant Larsen syndrome results from heterozygosity for mutations in filamin B, a cytoskeletal protein involved in multicellular processes. We report here a patient with a duplicated or accessory distal thumb phalanx and multiple large joint dislocations who was shown to be heterozygous for a filamin B mutation predicting the amino acid substitution G1691S. This adds a new radiographic finding, duplicated or accessory distal phalanx, to the radiographic abnormalities seen in this rare dominant disorder. (orig.)

  4. Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthrodesis of the Thumb - Minimum of Eight Months Follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus Wejnold; Brorson, Stig; Jensen, Claus Hjorth

    2016-01-01

    the disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand-questionnaire (DASH). In addition, patient satisfaction, pain, stiffness, and impairment of activities of daily living were assessed on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) followed by a question stating whether they would undergo the same procedure again. RESULTS: Two...... was to report outcome and disability following thumb MCP joint arthrodesis in the treatment of chronic instability after traumatic injuries. METHODS: A retrospective review of 26 patients operated on with MCP joint arthrodesis, median follow-up 42 months (8-104months). Subjective outcome was assessed using...... and age matched individuals. Many lived with pain, but all reported that they were willing to undergo the same procedure again. We suggest that the disability scale by the National Board of Industrial Injuries should be reconsidered for patients operated on with thumb MCP arthrodesis....

  5. Terminal phalangeal accessory ossification center of the thumb: an additional radiographic finding in Larsen syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanay, Yasemin [Hacettepe University, Clinical Genetics Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Medical Genetics Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Utine, Gulen E.; Tuncbilek, Ergul [Hacettepe University, Clinical Genetics Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Lachman, Ralph S. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Medical Genetics Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Pediatrics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Krakow, Deborah [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Medical Genetics Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Larsen syndrome is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple joint dislocations, vertebral anomalies and dysmorphic facies. Both autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive forms of the disorder have been proposed. Individuals with autosomal-dominant Larsen syndrome have characteristic ''cylindrical-shape'' thumbs caused by broad, shortened phalanges. Autosomal-dominant Larsen syndrome results from heterozygosity for mutations in filamin B, a cytoskeletal protein involved in multicellular processes. We report here a patient with a duplicated or accessory distal thumb phalanx and multiple large joint dislocations who was shown to be heterozygous for a filamin B mutation predicting the amino acid substitution G1691S. This adds a new radiographic finding, duplicated or accessory distal phalanx, to the radiographic abnormalities seen in this rare dominant disorder. (orig.)

  6. Recovering a "Disfigured"¹ Face: Cosmesis in the Everyday Use of Facial Prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yaron, Gili; Widdershoven, G.A.M.; Slatman, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Prosthetic devices that replace an absent body part are generally considered to be either cosmetic or functional. Functional prostheses aim to restore (some degree of) lost physical functioning. Cosmetic prostheses attempt to restore a “normal” appearance to bodies that lack (one or more) limbs by

  7. A need for a more user-centered design in body powered prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hichert, M.; Plettenburg, D.H.; Vardy, A.N.; Will, Wendy; Scheme, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Users of body powered prostheses (BPP) complain about too high operating forces, leading to pain and/or fatigue during or after prosthetic operation. In the worst case nerve and vessel damage can occur [1, 2], leading to nonuse of prostheses. Smit et al. investigated cable forces and displacements

  8. Articulation prostheses made of polymers which are improved by ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussens, G.; Nicaise, M.; Tran, K.O.

    1981-10-01

    Articulation prostheses for the human body are generally made of the couple very high molecular weight polyethylene-special steels. Polyethylene properties are modified by ionizing radiations: creep resistance is improved and friction coefficient is decreased. Modifications are controlled by the choice of radiation dose and dose rate. Wear tests have been made on hip prostheses [fr

  9. Air-flow resistances of silicone rubber voice prostheses after formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elving, GJ; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; van Weissenbruch, R; Albers, FWJ

    Laryngectomized patients use silicone rubber voice prostheses to rehabilitate their voice. However, biofilm formation limits the lifetime of voice prostheses by causing leakage or an increased air-flow resistance and the prosthesis has to be replaced. To determine which bacterial or yeast strains,

  10. Dual jaw treatment of edentulism using implant-supported monolithic zirconia fixed prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarawneh, Sandra; Limmer, Bryan; Reside, Glenn J; Cooper, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes restoration of the edentulous maxilla and mandible with implant supported fixed prostheses using monolithic zirconia, where the incisal edges and occluding surfaces were made of monolithic zirconia. Edentulism is a debilitating condition that can be treated with either a removable or fixed dental prosthesis. The most common type of implant-supported fixed prosthesis is the metal acrylic (hybrid), with ceramo-metal prostheses being used less commonly in complete edentulism. However, both of these prostheses designs are associated with reported complications of screw loosening or fracture and chipping of acrylic resin and porcelain. Monolithic zirconia implant-supported fixed prostheses have the potential for reduction of such complications. In this case, the CAD/CAM concept was utilized in fabrication of maxillary and mandibular screw-retained implant-supported fixed prostheses using monolithic zirconia. Proper treatment planning and execution coupled with utilizing advanced technologies contributes to highly esthetic results. However, long-term studies are required to guarantee a satisfactory long-term outcome of this modality of treatment. This case report describes the clinical and technical procedures involved in fabrication of maxillary and mandibular implant-supported fixed prostheses using monolithic zirconia as a treatment of edentulism, and proposes the possible advantages associated with using monolithic zirconia in eliminating dissimilar interfaces in such prostheses that are accountable for the most commonly occurring technical complication for these prostheses being chipping and fracture of the veneering material. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Movement characteristics of upper extremity prostheses during basic goal-directed tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwsema, Hanneke; van der Sluis, Corry K.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    Background: After an upper limb amputation a prosthesis is often used to restore the functionality. However, the frequency of prostheses use is generally low. Movement kinematics of prostheses use might suggest origins of this low use. The aim of this study was to reveal movement patterns of

  12. High cable forces deteriorate pinch force control in voluntary-closing body-powered prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hichert, M.; Abbink, D.A.; Kyberd, P.J.; Plettenburg, D.H.

    2017-01-01

    Background It is generally asserted that reliable and intuitive control of upper-limb prostheses requires adequate feedback of prosthetic finger positions and pinch forces applied to objects. Bodypowered prostheses (BPPs) provide the user with direct proprioceptive feedback. Currently available

  13. A biodegradable gentamicin-hydroxyapatite-coating for infection prophylaxis in cementless hip prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neut, D.; Dijkstra, R. J. B.; Thompson, J. I.; Kavanagh, C.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    A degradable, poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), gentamicin-loaded prophylactic coating for hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated cementless hip prostheses is developed with similar antibacterial efficacy as offered by gentamicin-loaded cements for fixing traditional, cemented prostheses in bone. We

  14. Evidence of a false thumb in a fossil carnivore clarifies the evolution of pandas

    OpenAIRE

    Salesa, Manuel J.; Antón, Mauricio; Peigné, Stéphane; Morales, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    The “false thumb” of pandas is a carpal bone, the radial sesamoid, which has been enlarged and functions as an opposable thumb. If the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) are not closely related, their sharing of this adaptation implies a remarkable convergence. The discovery of previously unknown postcranial remains of a Miocene red panda relative, Simocyon batalleri, from the Spanish site of Batallones-1 (Madrid), now shows that this animal had a false t...

  15. Osteoarthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal joint: Correlation of ultrasound appearances to disability and treatment response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, P.I.; Tun, J.K.; Farnell, R.D.; Campbell, D.A.; Robinson, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate grading of thumb carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) osteoarthritis (OA) using ultrasound, correlating findings with disability and treatment response. Materials and methods: Patients with symptomatic thumb OA attending for ultrasound-guided CMCJ steroid injection and a group of asymptomatic controls were recruited prospectively. Thumb CMCJ ultrasound was graded (osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, capsule size, and measured capsule size), and a Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire was completed for each patient. Symptomatic patients then underwent injection with DASH repeated 6 weeks post-treatment. Ultrasound features were correlated with the initial DASH disability score and response as defined by change in DASH 6 weeks after treatment. Results: Thirty-one patients with symptomatic OA and 37 asymptomatic controls were recruited. With the exception of osteophytes (p = 0.017), no statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between severity of ultrasound features and patient disability. However, all features demonstrated statistically significant higher grades in the symptomatic group compared to controls. Ultrasound grading did not have statistical correlation with treatment response. Conclusion: No correlation was found between the majority of ultrasound features and the clinical severity of OA or likely response to treatment. However, these features are significantly more common in the symptomatic population

  16. Oral Implant-Prostheses: New Teeth for a Brighter Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Cicco

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated that chewing can be regarded as a preventive measure for cognitive impairment, whereas masticatory deficiency, associated with soft-diet feeding, is a risk factor for the development of dementia. At present the link between orofacial sensorimotor activity and cognitive functions is unknown. In subjects with unilateral molar loss we have shown asymmetries in both pupil size and masticatory muscles electromyographic (EMG activity during clenching: the molar less side was characterized by a lower EMG activity and a smaller pupil. Since implant-prostheses, greatly reduced both the asymmetry in EMG activity and in pupil's size, trigeminal unbalance, leading to unbalance in the activity of the Locus Coeruleus (LC, may be responsible for the pupil's asymmetry. According to the findings obtained in animal models, we propose that the different activity of the right and left LC may induce an asymmetry in brain activity, thus leading to cognitive impairment. According to this hypothesis, prostheses improved the performance in a complex sensorimotor task and increased the mydriasis associated with haptic tasks. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the implant-prosthesis therapy, which reduces the unbalance of trigeminal proprioceptive afferents and the asymmetry in pupil's size, may improve arousal, boosting performance in a complex sensorimotor task.

  17. The improvement of polyethylene prostheses through radiation crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, T.A.; Grobbelaar, C.J.; Marais, F.

    1977-01-01

    During the past decade, remarkable progress has been made in the utilization of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as a material for the manufacture of prostheses used in orthopaedic operations. This polymer contributes largely to the success of total hip replacement. In the case of total knee replacement it was considered imperative that a more hard-wearing polymer should be developed if at all possible, because not only are the cold-flow characteristics of ordinary high-density polyethylene at high pressures a limiting factor, but particle formation from friction can furthermore lead to physiological side-effects which adversely affect the efficacy of joints made from this material, especially so in the case of knee-joints. Bearing in mind the excellent improvements to be obtained through the radiation crosslinking of polyethylene film, the radiation crosslinking of high-density polyethylene prostheses seemed to be a logical avenue to investigate. Experimental details are presented. Gamma radiation was used. Impact strength and tensile strength measurements were made on specimens irradiated over a dose range of 0 to 80 Mrad. The results are discussed. (U.K.)

  18. Toward Balance Recovery With Leg Prostheses Using Neuromuscular Model Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lower limb amputees are at high risk of falling as current prosthetic legs provide only limited functionality for recovering balance after unexpected disturbances. For instance, the most established control method used on powered leg prostheses tracks local joint impedance functions without taking the global function of the leg in balance recovery into account. Here we explore an alternative control policy for powered transfemoral prostheses that considers the global leg function and is based on a neuromuscular model of human locomotion. Methods We adapt this model to describe and simulate an amputee walking with a powered prosthesis using the proposed control, and evaluate the gait robustness when confronted with rough ground and swing leg disturbances. We then implement and partially evaluate the resulting controller on a leg prosthesis prototype worn by a non-amputee user. Results In simulation, the proposed prosthesis control leads to gaits that are more robust than those obtained by the impedance control method. The initial hardware experiments with the prosthesis prototype show that the proposed control reproduces normal walking patterns qualitatively and effectively responds to disturbances in early and late swing. However, the response to mid-swing disturbances neither replicates human responses nor averts falls. Conclusions The neuromuscular model control is a promising alternative to existing prosthesis controls, although further research will need to improve on the initial implementation and determine how well these results transfer to amputee gait. Significance This work provides a potential avenue for future development of control policies that help improve amputee balance recovery. PMID:26315935

  19. Edentulous patients' knowledge of dental hygiene and care of prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castellucci Barbosa, Luciano; Ferreira, Manoela Rejane Maia; de Carvalho Calabrich, Carolina Freire; Viana, Aline Cavalcanti; de Lemos, Maria Catarina Lavigne; Lauria, Roberta Andrade

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse denture users' oral care habits with regard to the use of their prostheses. Rehabilitative treatment is only successful when patients are motivated and aware of correct prosthesis use and hygiene. Questionnaires were distributed to 150 complete denture users at the Federal University of Bahia School of Dentistry, the Esmeralda Natividade Health Center, the Bahian Science Development Foundation and a Salvador nursing home. The questionnaire included information on gender, age, length of prosthesis use, cleaning methods and materials, etc. The data were analysed using EpiInfo version 6 software. The chi-squared test was used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. Questionnaire results showed that 78% of the subjects, with an average age of 67.3 years, had used the same complete denture for over 5 years. 64% slept with their prostheses and 44% removed them from the mouth only for cleaning. None of the patients interviewed knew anything about brushes designed specifically for complete dentures. 37.3% had a restricted diet and 44% believed that a complete denture would last for more than 10 years. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that the edentulous patients surveyed had limited awareness of prosthetic hygiene and long-term oral care despite extended periods of denture use.

  20. Patients With Thumb Carpometacarpal Arthritis Have Quantifiable Characteristic Expectations That Can Be Measured With a Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lana; Hashmi, Sohaib Z; Nguyen, Joseph; Lee, Steve K; Weiland, Andrew J; Mancuso, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    Although patient expectations associated with major orthopaedic conditions have shown clinically relevant and variable effects on outcomes, expectations associated with thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) arthritis have not been identified, described, or analyzed before, to our knowledge. We asked: (1) Do patients with thumb CMC arthritis express characteristic expectations that are quantifiable and have measurable frequency? (2) Can a survey on expectations developed from patient-derived data quantitate expectations in patients with thumb CMC arthritis? The study was a prospective cohort study. The first phase was a 12-month-period involving interviews of 42 patients with thumb CMC arthritis to define their expectations of treatment. The interview process used techniques and principles of qualitative methodology including open-ended interview questions, unrestricted time, and study size determined by data saturation. Verbatim responses provided content for the draft survey. The second phase was a 12-month period assessing the survey for test-retest reliability with the recruitment of 36 participants who completed the survey twice. The survey was finalized from clinically relevant content, frequency of endorsement, weighted kappa values for concordance of responses, and intraclass coefficient and Cronbach's alpha for interrater reliability and internal consistency. Thirty-two patients volunteered 256 characteristic expectations, which consisted of 21 discrete categories. Expectations with similar concepts were combined by eliminating redundancy while maintaining original terminology. These were reduced to 19 items that comprised a one-page survey. This survey showed high concordance, interrater reliability, and internal consistency, with weighted kappa values between 0.58 and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.39-0.78; p Patients with thumb CMC arthritis volunteer a characteristic and quantifiable set of expectations. Using responses recorded verbatim from patient interviews, a clinically

  1. Implant-level prostheses in the edentulous maxilla: a comparison with conventional abutment-level prostheses after 5 years of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalmarsson, Lars; Smedberg, Jan-Ivan; Pettersson, Mattias; Jemt, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Long-term comparisons of frameworks at the implant or abutment level are not available, and knowledge of the clinical function of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy frameworks is limited. Primarily, the aim of this study was to compare the 5-year clinical performance of frameworks with or without abutment connections to implants. Secondly, the outcomes of prostheses made from Co-Cr alloy with porcelain veneers to those made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) with acrylic veneers were compared. The test groups comprised patients treated with screw-retained fixed prostheses made at the implant level according to the Cresco method in either dental porcelain-veneered Co-Cr alloy (n = 15) or acrylic-veneered CP Ti (n = 25). A control group of 40 randomly selected patients were provided with prostheses made at the standard abutment level in CP Ti with acrylic veneers. For all patients, clinical and radiologic 5-year data were retrospectively collected and evaluated. Five-year implant cumulative survival rates (CSRs) were 98.6% and 97.6% for test and control groups, respectively (P > .05). No major differences in bone level were demonstrated between the groups after 5 years (P > .05). Significantly more complications occurred in the test groups compared to the control group (P level prostheses made of porcelain-veneered Co-Cr or acrylic-veneered CP Ti seem comparable to acrylic-veneered titanium prostheses made at the standard abutment level regarding implant CSR and bone levels. However, more complications were registered in implant-level prostheses compared to the standard abutment-level prostheses.

  2. Cortical visual prostheses: from microstimulation to functional percept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarpour Foroushani, Armin; Pack, Christopher C.; Sawan, Mohamad

    2018-04-01

    Cortical visual prostheses are intended to restore vision by targeted electrical stimulation of the visual cortex. The perception of spots of light, called phosphenes, resulting from microstimulation of the visual pathway, suggests the possibility of creating meaningful percept made of phosphenes. However, to date electrical stimulation of V1 has still not resulted in perception of phosphenated images that goes beyond punctate spots of light. In this review, we summarize the clinical and experimental progress that has been made in generating phosphenes and modulating their associated perceptual characteristics in human and macaque primary visual cortex (V1). We focus specifically on the effects of different microstimulation parameters on perception and we analyse key challenges facing the generation of meaningful artificial percepts. Finally, we propose solutions to these challenges based on the application of supervised learning of population codes for spatial stimulation of visual cortex.

  3. MR imaging of 22 Charnley-Mueller total hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmens, J.A.M.; Ruijs, J.H.J.

    1986-01-01

    To find out whether MR imaging is contraindicated in patients with metallic implants or can be a routine diagnostic procedure, MR investigations in 18 patients with 22 Charnley-Mueller total hip prostheses were performed on a 0.5 T Gyroscan S 5, Philips. No adverse reactions during or post MR investigation were encountered. The imaging of the soft tissue was superior to CT and showed less distortion. The diagnosis of loosening, by detection of demarcation lines at the interfaces was at its best in the distal part of the femoral stem prosthesis and was poor in the acetabular component and in the upper part of the stem prosthesis due to artifacts. (orig.) [de

  4. Gamma Ray Sterilization of Starr-Edwards Heart Valve Prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, J. R. P.; Alladine, M. F. [London Chest Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1967-09-15

    Starr-Edwards valves have normally been sterilized by exposure to ethylene oxide or by autoclaving. Patients having a prosthetic valve replacement are known to have a higher incidence of endocarditis in comparison with patients in which no prosthesis has been used. Ethylene oxide will only sterilize the surface of the valve and autoclaving has caused distortion of the polytetrafluorethylene ring. Work has been done on the effect of gamma radiation on the components of these valve prostheses and is given in detail. The bacteriological efficiency, at a total absorbed dose of 2. 5 Mrad, has been established. Thirty valves treated by this method have now been inserted and twelve patients have been examined post-operatively for a period of one to two years. All valves are working normally and there has been no evidence of blood-borne infection or malfunction of the valve. (author)

  5. Myoelectric signal processing for control of powered limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, P; Englehart, K; Hudgins, B

    2006-12-01

    Progress in myoelectric control technology has over the years been incremental, due in part to the alternating focus of the R&D between control methodology and device hardware. The technology has over the past 50 years or so moved from single muscle control of a single prosthesis function to muscle group activity control of multifunction prostheses. Central to these changes have been developments in the means of extracting information from the myoelectric signal. This paper gives an overview of the myoelectric signal processing challenge, a brief look at the challenge from an historical perspective, the state-of-the-art in myoelectric signal processing for prosthesis control, and an indication of where this field is heading. The paper demonstrates that considerable progress has been made in providing clients with useful and reliable myoelectric communication channels, and that exciting work and developments are on the horizon.

  6. Radiological follow-up of uncemented knee prostheses. Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Hervas, C.; Gomez Barrena, E.; Marquez Moreno, I.; Calle Yuste, F.; Ordonez Parra, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The preliminary results of a prospective study of 40 uncemented total knee prostheses (TKP) are presented following a radiological protocol with fluoroscopic control and follow-up of over 2 years. The prosthesis-bone interface and the components alignment were assessed. Several radiological signs were studied to assess this interface with respect to the fixing of the component, but they showed little clinical correlation. Statistical significance (p<0.05, chisquare) was found only in the observation of sclerosis in areas of support for the tibital tray as a reaction of the bone. This radiological follow-up is of interest to determine the evolution of the interface and position of the implant to prevent complications (especially loosening) in patients, particularly those under 60 years old, who represent the group that can most benefit from prosthetic systems with uncemented anchorage because of their life expectation and level of activity. Author

  7. Electric stimulation with sinusoids and white noise for neural prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K Freeman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We are investigating the use of novel stimulus waveforms in neural prostheses to determine whether they can provide more precise control over the temporal and spatial pattern of elicited activity as compared to conventional pulsatile stimulation. To study this, we measured the response of retinal ganglion cells to both sinusoidal and white noise waveforms. The use of cell-attached and whole cell patch clamp recordings allowed the responses to be observed without significant obstruction from the stimulus artifact. Electric stimulation with sinusoids elicited robust responses. White noise analysis was used to derive the linear kernel for the ganglion cell’s spiking response as well as for the underlying excitatory currents. These results suggest that in response to electric stimulation, presynaptic retinal neurons exhibit bandpass filtering characteristics with peak response that occur 25ms after onset. The experimental approach demonstrated here may be useful for studying the temporal response properties of other neurons in the CNS.

  8. [Significance of various implantate localizations of Sparks prostheses, experimental studies in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieler, H S; Parwaresch, R; Thiede, A

    1976-01-01

    Our investigations show that Sparks prostheses after subcutaneous implantation are suitable for vascular grafting. At the end of the organization period the connective tissue becomes strong, and after the third and fourth weeks collagenous and elastic fibers can be seen. Ten weeks after s.c. implantation, collagenous fibers predominate. After this the Sparks prostheses can be used as a vascular graft. Intraperitoneal implantation, however, shows a histologically different picture with characteristic findings: only fat cells can be observed, a strong granulation tissue with elastic and collagenous fibers is not present. After intraperitoneal implantation Sparks prostheses are therefore unsuitable for vascular grafts.

  9. International comparative evaluation of knee replacement with fixed or mobile-bearing posterior-stabilized prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Stephen; Sedrakyan, Art; Baste, Valborg; Gioe, Terence J; Namba, Robert; Martínez Cruz, Olga; Stea, Susanna; Paxton, Elizabeth; Banerjee, Samprit; Isaacs, Abby J; Robertsson, Otto

    2014-12-17

    Posterior-stabilized total knee prostheses were introduced to address instability secondary to loss of posterior cruciate ligament function, and they have either fixed or mobile bearings. Mobile bearings were developed to improve the function and longevity of total knee prostheses. In this study, the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries used a distributed health data network to study a large cohort of posterior-stabilized prostheses to determine if the outcome of a posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis differs depending on whether it has a fixed or mobile-bearing design. Aggregated registry data were collected with a distributed health data network that was developed by the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries to reduce barriers to participation (e.g., security, proprietary, legal, and privacy issues) that have the potential to occur with the alternate centralized data warehouse approach. A distributed health data network is a decentralized model that allows secure storage and analysis of data from different registries. Each registry provided data on mobile and fixed-bearing posterior-stabilized prostheses implanted between 2001 and 2010. Only prostheses associated with primary total knee arthroplasties performed for the treatment of osteoarthritis were included. Prostheses with all types of fixation were included except for those with the rarely used reverse hybrid (cementless tibial and cemented femoral components) fixation. The use of patellar resurfacing was reported. The outcome of interest was time to first revision (for any reason). Multivariate meta-analysis was performed with linear mixed models with survival probability as the unit of analysis. This study includes 137,616 posterior-stabilized knee prostheses; 62% were in female patients, and 17.6% had a mobile bearing. The results of the fixed-effects model indicate that in the first year the mobile-bearing posterior-stabilized prostheses had a significantly higher hazard

  10. The human airway epithelial basal cell transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Hackett

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population.Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the "human airway basal cell signature" as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels.The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of the stem/progenitor cells of the human airway epithelium.

  11. Auditory Neural Prostheses – A Window to the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Kameshwaran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is one of the commonest congenital anomalies to affect children world-over. The incidence of congenital hearing loss is more pronounced in developing countries like the Indian sub-continent, especially with the problems of consanguinity. Hearing loss is a double tragedy, as it leads to not only deafness but also language deprivation. However, hearing loss is the only truly remediable handicap, due to remarkable advances in biomedical engineering and surgical techniques. Auditory neural prostheses help to augment or restore hearing by integration of an external circuitry with the peripheral hearing apparatus and the central circuitry of the brain. A cochlear implant (CI is a surgically implantable device that helps restore hearing in patients with severe-profound hearing loss, unresponsive to amplification by conventional hearing aids. CIs are electronic devices designed to detect mechanical sound energy and convert it into electrical signals that can be delivered to the coch­lear nerve, bypassing the damaged hair cells of the coch­lea. The only true prerequisite is an intact auditory nerve. The emphasis is on implantation as early as possible to maximize speech understanding and perception. Bilateral CI has significant benefits which include improved speech perception in noisy environments and improved sound localization. Presently, the indications for CI have widened and these expanded indications for implantation are related to age, additional handicaps, residual hearing, and special etiologies of deafness. Combined electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS / hybrid device is designed for individuals with binaural low-frequency hearing and severe-to-profound high-frequency hearing loss. Auditory brainstem implantation (ABI is a safe and effective means of hearing rehabilitation in patients with retrocochlear disorders, such as neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 or congenital cochlear nerve aplasia, wherein the cochlear nerve is damaged

  12. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  13. Two-thumb technique is superior to two-finger technique during lone rescuer infant manikin CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udassi, Sharda; Udassi, Jai P; Lamb, Melissa A; Theriaque, Douglas W; Shuster, Jonathan J; Zaritsky, Arno L; Haque, Ikram U

    2010-06-01

    Infant CPR guidelines recommend two-finger chest compression with a lone rescuer and two-thumb with two rescuers. Two-thumb provides better chest compression but is perceived to be associated with increased ventilation hands-off time. We hypothesized that lone rescuer two-thumb CPR is associated with increased ventilation cycle time, decreased ventilation quality and fewer chest compressions compared to two-finger CPR in an infant manikin model. Crossover observational study randomizing 34 healthcare providers to perform 2 min CPR at a compression rate of 100 min(-1) using a 30:2 compression:ventilation ratio comparing two-thumb vs. two-finger techniques. A Laerdal Baby ALS Trainer manikin was modified to digitally record compression rate, compression depth and compression pressure and ventilation cycle time (two mouth-to-mouth breaths). Manikin chest rise with breaths was video recorded and later reviewed by two blinded CPR instructors for percent effective breaths. Data (mean+/-SD) were analyzed using a two-tailed paired t-test. Significance was defined qualitatively as pCPR, but there was no significant difference in percent effective breaths delivered between the two techniques. Two-thumb CPR had 4 fewer delivered compressions per minute, which may be offset by far more effective compression depth and compression pressure compared to two-finger technique. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Work-related thumb disorders in South African physiotherapists treating musculoskeletal conditions using manual therapy techniques

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    Heather Jenkins

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Research question: What is the prevalence of and factors associated with work-related thumb problems (WRTP in South African physiotherapists treating musculoskeletal conditions using manual therapy techniques? Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive study design was used and data were collected using two Internet-based questionnaires. Participants: The sample size calculated for the study was 284 using 95% confidence levels and a 5% margin of error. There were 395 participants that were included in the study. Outcome measures: The variables measured included demographic, employment, educational and occupational factors. Results: The lifetime prevalence of WRTP in the physiotherapists was 65.3%. The manual techniques that were significantly associated with WRTP in the respondents who reported thumb problems were all grades of transverse glides applied to the spine as well as grade II–IV unilateral and central posterior-anterior pressures to the spine. The factors that remained significantly associated with WRTP in all 395 respondents after regression analysis were the cervical treatment of up to six patients a day and hyperextension > 30° of the non-dominant interphalangeal (IP joint of the thumb. Conclusion: This study confirms that a high percentage of physiotherapists using manual therapy techniques to treat musculoskeletal conditions are experiencing WRTP. Recommendations: The development of a valid and reliable WRTP screening tool is needed to aid in the identification of physiotherapists at risk and thus in the primary prevention of WRTP. A longitudinal study which follows newly qualified physiotherapists is recommended to investigate a possible cause-effect relationship and preventative strategies for WRTP in physiotherapists.

  15. Simple heuristics and rules of thumb: where psychologists and behavioural biologists might meet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, John M C; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2005-05-31

    The Centre for Adaptive Behaviour and Cognition (ABC) has hypothesised that much human decision-making can be described by simple algorithmic process models (heuristics). This paper explains this approach and relates it to research in biology on rules of thumb, which we also review. As an example of a simple heuristic, consider the lexicographic strategy of Take The Best for choosing between two alternatives: cues are searched in turn until one discriminates, then search stops and all other cues are ignored. Heuristics consist of building blocks, and building blocks exploit evolved or learned abilities such as recognition memory; it is the complexity of these abilities that allows the heuristics to be simple. Simple heuristics have an advantage in making decisions fast and with little information, and in avoiding overfitting. Furthermore, humans are observed to use simple heuristics. Simulations show that the statistical structures of different environments affect which heuristics perform better, a relationship referred to as ecological rationality. We contrast ecological rationality with the stronger claim of adaptation. Rules of thumb from biology provide clearer examples of adaptation because animals can be studied in the environments in which they evolved. The range of examples is also much more diverse. To investigate them, biologists have sometimes used similar simulation techniques to ABC, but many examples depend on empirically driven approaches. ABC's theoretical framework can be useful in connecting some of these examples, particularly the scattered literature on how information from different cues is integrated. Optimality modelling is usually used to explain less detailed aspects of behaviour but might more often be redirected to investigate rules of thumb.

  16. Development and Reliability of the OMERACT Thumb Base Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroon, Féline P B; Conaghan, Philip G; Foltz, Violaine

    2017-01-01

    : The TOMS assessed the first carpometacarpal (CMC-1) and scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joints for synovitis, subchondral bone defects (including erosions, cysts, and bone attrition), osteophytes, cartilage, and bone marrow lesions on a 0-3 scale (normal to severe). Subluxation was evaluated only in the CMC......, with better performance for subchondral bone defects, subluxation, and bone marrow lesions. CONCLUSION: A thumb base OA MRI scoring system has been developed. The OMERACT TOMS demonstrated good intrareader and interreader reliability. Longitudinal studies are warranted to investigate reliability of change...

  17. A Case of Distal Epithelioid Sarcoma of the Thumb Expressing Podoplanin, TLE1 and Ca 125

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Karagkounis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal epithelioid sarcoma is a rare and slowly growing tumor that usually develops in the upper extremities of young adults. Neoplastic cells have both spindle and epithelioid appearance and are characterized by the loss of the nuclear protein SMARCB1/INI1. We present the case of a distal epithelioid sarcoma arising in the thumb of a 14-year-old girl, which immunohistochemically was characterized by the loss of SMARCB1/INI1 protein as well as the expression of podoplanin (D2-40, TLE1, Glut1, and Ca 125; plus, we highlight the differential diagnosis of epithelioid sarcoma from its histological mimics.

  18. One-Handed Thumb Use on Smart Phones by Semi-literate and Illiterate Users in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katre, Dinesh

    There is a tremendous potential for developing mobile-based productivity tools and occupation specific applications for the semi-literate and illiterate users in India. One-handed thumb use on the touchscreen of smart phone or touch phone is considered as an effective alternative than the use of stylus or index finger, to free the other hand for supporting the occupational activity. In this context, usability research and experimental tests are conducted to understand the role of fine motor control, usability of thumb as the interaction apparatus and the ergonomic needs of users. The paper also touches upon cultural, racial and anthropometric aspects, which need due consideration while designing the mobile interface. Design recommendations are evolved to enhance the effectiveness of one-handed thumb use on smart phone, especially for the benefit of semi-literate and illiterate users.

  19. Natural History of Bone Response to Hydroxyapatite-Coated Hip Prostheses Implanted in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Frayssinet, P.; Hardy, D.; Hanker, J. S.; Giammara, B. L.

    1995-01-01

    A series of 15 autopsied femurs containing hydroxyapatite- coated (HA-coated) prostheses was analysed histologically. Their implantation time ranged from 5 days up to 3 years. The coating thickness of some prostheses and the percentage of the coating in contact with bone at different levels were evaluated using an image analysis device. After the newly formed bone tissue had became mature, several bone morphotypes were identified at the coating contact. From the proximal to the distal part of...

  20. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

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    Bigal Marcelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month. The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF. Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine.

  1. Clinical evaluation vs magnetic resonance imaging of the skier’s thumb: A prospective cohort of 30 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahajan, Mandhkani, E-mail: mahajanmch@gmail.com [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Surgery, Lijnbaan 32, 2512 VA The Hague (Netherlands); Tolman, Christine, E-mail: c.tolman@mchaaglanden.nl [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Radiology, Lijnbaan 32, 2512 VA The Hague (Netherlands); Würth, B., E-mail: b.wurth@mchaaglanden.nl [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Emergency Care, Lijnbaan 32, 2512 VA The Hague (Netherlands); Rhemrev, Steven J., E-mail: s.rhemrev@mchaaglanden.nl [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Surgery, Lijnbaan 32, 2512 VA The Hague (Netherlands)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A skier’s thumb can be diagnosed by any physician when correctly instructed. • Additional imaging should be reserved when clinical examination is inconclusive. • MR imaging has excellent inter-rater agreement when diagnosing a skier’s thumb. - Abstract: Introduction: A skiers thumb, or a partial or complete rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is a clinical diagnosis. Swelling, pain, natural left-right difference and inexperience of a young physician can cause difficulty to correctly diagnose this injury. However, our theory is that any physician, given the correct instructions, should be able to diagnose this injury solely on clinical findings, without the necessity of additional imaging. Material and methods: In a large Dutch teaching hospital, physicians (residents with working experience of 6 months–3 years) working at the ER received instructions for physical examination. Patients >18 years, with an injury <1 week old, suspected of a true skier’s thumb had an MRI reported by two independent radiologists to confirm the diagnosis. Results: Thirty patients were included. Seven patients had no fixed endpoint (23%), all had a complete ligamentous rupture of the UCL on MRI, of which three patients had a Stener lesion. Fifteen patients (50%) met with the criteria  >35° laxity in extension of MCP/ >20° laxity in 30° flexion of the MCP. Of these, thirteen patients (81%) had a complete rupture (nine Stener lesions (56%)). One patient had a partial injury and one patient had no UCL-injury. Eight patients (27%) had inconclusive results during physical examination. Of these, two had a complete rupture (40%, 1 Stener). Three patients had a partial rupture and three patients had an intact UCL. Conclusion: A skier’s thumb can be diagnosed by any resident when correctly instructed. Additional imaging when diagnosing a skier’s thumb should be reserved in cases when physical examination remains inconclusive.

  2. [Morphological features of utilization intraperitoneal double-sided prostheses in inguinoplasty in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Luiz Carlos; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim; Silva Júnior, Orlando de Castro e; dos Santos, José Sebastião; Sukeda, Daniel Hirochi

    2009-10-01

    To asses the morphological features of the behavior of a double-sided prostheses using inguinoplasty laparotomy in dogs with latex side turned to the visceras. Twenty dogs were divided into two groups of 10 and submitted into infraumbilical laparotomy with double-sided prostheses fixed in an inguinal area and in the other side area a control prostheses of polipropilene (PPL). Macroscopics itens were studied on the 14th and 28th day post-operatory, and they were related to obstruction and intestinal fistulas, encystation, fusion and especially sticker. The microscopic analysis covered the inflammatory process in its acute, chronic and restored phase Infectious process, obstruction or intestinal fistula did not happen. The prostheses presented good accommodation and incorporation. The stickers happened with more prevalent and intensity with the PPL (p0,05). The double-sided prostheses in its parietal side adds the advantages of the incorporation's potential to the noticed material with PPL to the biocompatibility from the latex in its visceral side. The little distance between the PPL disc and the edge of the double-sided prostheses (2 cm) allied to its sticking with just five staples is not enough to avoid gaps, through which the epíploon migrated towards to the inflammatory process provoked by PPL in the parietal side.

  3. The Hand of Cercopithecoides williamsi (Mammalia, Primates: Earliest Evidence for Thumb Reduction among Colobine Monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Frost

    Full Text Available Thumb reduction is among the most important features distinguishing the African and Asian colobines from each other and from other Old World monkeys. In this study we demonstrate that the partial skeleton KNM-ER 4420 from Koobi Fora, Kenya, dated to 1.9 Ma and assigned to the Plio-Pleistocene colobine species Cercopithecoides williamsi, shows marked reduction of its first metacarpal relative to the medial metacarpals. Thus, KNM-ER 4420 is the first documented occurrence of cercopithecid pollical reduction in the fossil record. In the size of its first metacarpal relative to the medial metacarpals, C. williamsi is similar to extant African colobines, but different from cercopithecines, extant Asian colobines and the Late Miocene colobines Microcolobus and Mesopithecus. This feature clearly links the genus Cercopithecoides with the extant African colobine clade and makes it the first definitive African colobine in the fossil record. The postcranial adaptations to terrestriality in Cercopithecoides are most likely secondary, while ancestral colobinans (and colobines were arboreal. Finally, the absence of any evidence for pollical reduction in Mesopithecus implies either independent thumb reduction in African and Asian colobines or multiple colobine dispersal events out of Africa. Based on the available evidence, we consider the first scenario more likely.

  4. The Hand of Cercopithecoides williamsi (Mammalia, Primates): Earliest Evidence for Thumb Reduction among Colobine Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Stephen R; Gilbert, Christopher C; Pugh, Kelsey D; Guthrie, Emily H; Delson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Thumb reduction is among the most important features distinguishing the African and Asian colobines from each other and from other Old World monkeys. In this study we demonstrate that the partial skeleton KNM-ER 4420 from Koobi Fora, Kenya, dated to 1.9 Ma and assigned to the Plio-Pleistocene colobine species Cercopithecoides williamsi, shows marked reduction of its first metacarpal relative to the medial metacarpals. Thus, KNM-ER 4420 is the first documented occurrence of cercopithecid pollical reduction in the fossil record. In the size of its first metacarpal relative to the medial metacarpals, C. williamsi is similar to extant African colobines, but different from cercopithecines, extant Asian colobines and the Late Miocene colobines Microcolobus and Mesopithecus. This feature clearly links the genus Cercopithecoides with the extant African colobine clade and makes it the first definitive African colobine in the fossil record. The postcranial adaptations to terrestriality in Cercopithecoides are most likely secondary, while ancestral colobinans (and colobines) were arboreal. Finally, the absence of any evidence for pollical reduction in Mesopithecus implies either independent thumb reduction in African and Asian colobines or multiple colobine dispersal events out of Africa. Based on the available evidence, we consider the first scenario more likely.

  5. Arthrodesis of the thumb interphalangeal joint and finger distal interphalangeal joints with a headless compression screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher; Earp, Brandon E; Floyd, W Emerson; Blazar, Philip E

    2014-01-01

    To study the results of using a small, headless compression screw (AcuTwist) for thumb interphalangeal (IP) joint and finger distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint arthrodeses. Between November 2007 and January 2012, 48 primary arthrodeses of the thumb IP joint or DIP joint in the other digits were performed in 29 consecutive patients with AcuTwist devices. Indications for arthrodesis included 19 cases of osteoarthritis in 25 fingers, 3 cases of lupus in 9 fingers, 2 cases of post-traumatic osteoarthritis in 2 fingers, and 1 case and finger each of acute trauma, neuromuscular disorder, postinfectious osteoarthritis, boutonniere deformity, and Dupuytren contracture. Charts were reviewed for clinical data, and radiographs were assessed for alignment and healing. Age averaged 59 years and follow-up averaged 12 months (range, 2-50 mo). Union occurred in 43 out of 46 fingers (94%). There were no cases of nail deformity, wound complications, tip hypersensitivity, or clinically notable malalignment. Three arthrodeses failed to fuse, including 2 asymptomatic nonunions and 1 fixation loss requiring revision with autograft. The complication rate was 9%. Distal digital joint arthrodesis with the AcuTwist resulted in a fusion rate of 94% with a complication rate of 9%. Our rate of fusion compares favorably with prior series using other methods of fixation. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dystrophic calcinosis in a child with a thumb sucking habit: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovannini Cesar Abrantes Lima de Figueiredo

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an uncommon case of a 3-year-old boy with a finger sucking habit who developed dystrophic calcification in his left thumb. Two years after excision, there was no recurrence, and the thumb retained full range of motion. We also discuss its probable pathogenesis and present a brief review of the literature about orthopedic complications in the hand due to this habit.Os autores apresentam caso incomum de uma criança de três anos de idade com o hábito de chupar o dedo que desenvolveu calcinose distrófica no polegar esquerdo. Dois anos após a ressecção cirúrgica, não ocorreu recidiva e o polegar mantém todos os movimentos. Discutem, ainda, sua provável patogênese e fazem breve revisão da literatura a respeito das complicações ortopédicas na mão devido a este hábito.

  7. Greying of the human hair: a worldwide survey, revisiting the '50' rule of thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panhard, S; Lozano, I; Loussouarn, G

    2012-10-01

    While numerous papers have reported on the biological mechanisms of human hair pigmentation and greying, epidemiological descriptions of both natural hair colour and the greying process, worldwide, remain scarce. To assess hair colour and greying in a large world sample of human subjects, and to revisit the validity of the 50/50/50 rule of thumb, which states that 'at age 50 years, 50% of the population has at least 50% grey hair'. The natural hair colour of 4192 healthy male and female volunteers was assessed using a sensorial expert evaluation through the comparison of each volunteer's hair with standard swatches. Hair colour was studied according to age, gender and ethnic or geographical origin. Overall we observed that between 45 and 65 years of age, 74% of people were affected by grey hair with a mean intensity of 27%. Men harboured significantly more grey hair than women. Both age at onset and rate of greying with age appeared to be clearly linked to ethnic/geographical origin. Subjects of Asian and African descent showed less grey hair than those of caucasian origin, at comparable ages, confirming previously reported data. Calculating the percentage of people showing at least 50% grey hair coverage at age 50 years leads to a global range of 6-23%, according to ethnic/geographical origin and natural hair colour: well below that expressed by the '50' rule of thumb. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  8. Rules of thumb for assessing reductive dechlorination pathways of PCDDs in specific systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Guining; Dang Zhi; Fennell, Donna E.; Huang Weilin; Li Zhong; Liu Congqiang

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a theoretical validation and proposition of the reductive dechlorination pathways for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) congeners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level for all PCDDs and Mulliken atomic charges on chlorine atoms were adopted as the probe of the dechlorination reaction activity. The experimentally substantiated dechlorination pathways of 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1,2,3,4-TCDD) and its daughter products in the presence of zero-valent zinc were validated and the complete pathway of dechlorination of octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) was proposed. The proposed pathways were found to be consistent with anaerobic biotransformation of several PCDD congeners. Four rules of thumb arrived from this study include (1) the chlorine atoms in the longitudinal (1,4,6,9) positions are removed in preference to the chlorine atoms on lateral (2,3,7,8) positions; (2) the chlorine atom that has more neighboring chlorine atoms at ortho-, meta- and para-positions is to be eliminated; (3) reductive dechlorination prefers to take place on the benzene ring having more chlorine substitutions; and (4) a chlorine atom on the side of the longitudinal symmetry axis containing more chlorine atoms is preferentially eliminated. These rules of thumb can be conveniently used for rapidly predicting the major dechlorination pathway for a given PCDD in specific systems.

  9. Estimating thumb-index finger precision grip and manipulation potential in extant and fossil primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feix, Thomas; Kivell, Tracy L; Pouydebat, Emmanuelle; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-05-06

    Primates, and particularly humans, are characterized by superior manual dexterity compared with other mammals. However, drawing the biomechanical link between hand morphology/behaviour and functional capabilities in non-human primates and fossil taxa has been challenging. We present a kinematic model of thumb-index precision grip and manipulative movement based on bony hand morphology in a broad sample of extant primates and fossil hominins. The model reveals that both joint mobility and digit proportions (scaled to hand size) are critical for determining precision grip and manipulation potential, but that having either a long thumb or great joint mobility alone does not necessarily yield high precision manipulation. The results suggest even the oldest available fossil hominins may have shared comparable precision grip manipulation with modern humans. In particular, the predicted human-like precision manipulation of Australopithecus afarensis, approximately one million years before the first stone tools, supports controversial archaeological evidence of tool-use in this taxon. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. MR imaging in chronic rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohman, M.; Kivisaari, A.; Kivisaari, L.; Vasenius, J.

    2000-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown as the best radiologic method for verifying and classifying acute ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) ruptures of the thumb. Our aim was to analyse the usefulness of MR also in old ruptures and to establish the most useful sequences. Ten patients with an old UCL rupture of the thumb were preoperatively imaged using 1.5 T MR. Three radiologists blinded to the findings separately analysed the MR images of these patients and of 10 age-and sex-matched voluntary controls. MR findings of the patients were compared with those of surgery. The consensus diagnosis of an UCL rupture was accurate in all 10 patients. All controls were classified as having no UCL rupture. In 5 of the 7 patients with a surgically defined Stener or non-Stener lesion, the consensus diagnosis was the same as the operative diagnosis. Due to excessive scarring it was not possible to verify any Stener lesion intra-operatively in 3 patients. The most informative MR sequence was T2 TSE in the coronal plane, the second most informative was T1 SE with fat suppression in the coronal plane. An old UCL rupture is well verified by MR but typing of the lesion as either a Stener or non-Stener type is not always possible

  11. Central line-associated bloodstream infections and catheter dwell-time: A theoretical foundation for a rule of thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voets, Philip J G M

    2018-05-14

    Many clinicians know from experience and medical epidemiological literature that the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) increases rapidly with a prolonged catheter dwell-time, but how this infection risk increases over time remains obscure. In this manuscript, a clinically useful rule of thumb is derived, stating that the risk of CLABSI increases in a quadratic fashion with the increase in catheter dwell-time. The proposed rule of thumb could be considered a quick and effortless clinical tool to rationally predict the pattern of CLABSI risk with an increasing catheter dwell-time. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Complete integration of technology for improved reproduction of auricular prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jason; Hatamleh, Muhanad M

    2014-05-01

    The accurate reproduction of the form and surface details of missing body structures is an essential part of any successful prosthetic rehabilitation. It helps mask the prosthesis and gives confidence to the patient. This clinical report details the integration of multiple in-house digital technologies of laser scanning, rapid prototyping, and digital color scanning and formulating to improve the shape, texture, orientation, and color of auricular prostheses for 3 patients with missing unilateral ears. A structured light laser scanner was used to digitize the patient's nondefect ear. The digitized data were then manipulated in specialist software and mirrored to reflect the opposing side. A rapid prototyping machine was used to manufacture a 3-dimensional (3D) model of the soft tissue required. This 3D mirrored ear model allowed the accurate reproduction of missing soft tissue. A color spectrometer was used to accurately reproduce the skin tones digitally and physically. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Implant-supported prostheses versus conventional permanent and removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszuta Agnieszka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Social, economic and technological progress results in an increasing range of treatment and rehabilitation methods for patients with partial or complete edentulism. The role of the dentist is to inform the patient about the full range of available missing teeth treatment options leading to complete rehabilitation of the masticatory organ in agreement with the patient’s aesthetic and functional expectations. The aim of the paper was to identify the type of prostheses used by patients before opting for implantsupported teeth replacements, according to the patients’ age, sex, marital status, place of residence and education. The study covered 464 patients, women and men, aged 20-74, treated with dental implants. The patients answered questions in an anonymous questionnaire. The influence of the prosthetic replacement type according to age and marital status was highly statistically significant, whereas it was statistically significant according to sex, place of residence and education. The female respondents who previously used tissue-borne complete or partial dentures opted for implant treatment more frequently. The respondents younger than 40 and between 40-60 years of age who did not previously used any prosthetic replacements opted for implant treatment more frequently. The respondents who did not use any prosthetic replacements decided to undergo implant treatment most frequently, regardless of their marital status, education and place of residence. The patients opted for implant treatment to improve their quality of life, despite the high cost of such therapy.

  14. Wireless technologies for closed-loop retinal prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, David C.; Bai, Shun; Yang, Jiawei; Tran, Nhan; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss various technologies needed to develop retinal prostheses with wireless power and data telemetry operation. In addition to the need to communicate with the implanted device, supply of power to the retinal prosthesis is especially difficult. This is because, in the implanted state, the device is not fixed in position due to constant motion of the eye. Furthermore, a retinal prosthesis incorporating a high density electrode array of more than 1000 electrodes is expected to consume approximately 45 mW of power and require 300 kbps of image and stimulation data. The front end of the wireless power and data transmission, the antenna, needs to be small compared to the size of the eye. Also, the wireless module is expected to operate in the reactive near-field region due to small separation between the transmit and receive antennas compared to their size and corresponding operating wavelength. An inductive link is studied as a means to transfer power and for data telemetry between the implant and external unit. In this work, the use of integrated circuit and microfabrication technologies for implementing inductive links is discussed. A closed-loop approach is taken to improve performance and reach optimum operation condition. Design and simulation data are presented as the basis for development of viable wireless module prototypes.

  15. Hydrogel-Electrospun Fiber Mat Composite Coatings for Neural Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning eHan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Achieving stable, long-term performance of implanted neural prosthetic devices has been challenging because of implantation related neuron loss and a foreign body response that results in encapsulating glial scar formation. To improve neuron-prosthesis integration and form chronic, stable interfaces, we investigated the potential of neurotrophin-eluting hydrogel-electrospun fiber mat (EFM composite coatings. In particular, poly(ethylene glycol-poly(ε-caprolactone (PEGPCL hydrogel- poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL EFM composites were applied as coatings for multielectrode arrays (MEAs. Coatings were stable and persisted on electrode surfaces for over 1 month under an agarose gel tissue phantom and over 9 months in a PBS immersion bath. To demonstrate drug release, a neurotrophin, nerve growth factor (NGF, was loaded in the PEGPCL hydrogel layer, and coating cytotoxicity and sustained NGF release were evaluated using a PC12 cell culture model. Quantitative MTT assays showed that these coatings had no significant toxicity toward PC12 cells, and neurite extension at day 7 and 14 confirmed sustained release of NGF at biologically significant concentrations for at least 2 weeks. Our results demonstrate that hydrogel-EFM composite materials can be applied to neural prostheses as a means to improve neuron-electrode proximity and enhance long-term device performance and function.

  16. [Communication prostheses and behavioral alignment in hospital leaflets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos-Silva, Paulo Roberto; Rivera, Francisco Javier Uribe; Rozemberg, Brani

    2003-08-01

    Review was made of publications that describe experience with printed material distributed to the lay public in hospital institutions. From the 146 leaflets examined, those aimed at professionals or disabled people, thus leaving 75 papers that illustrate the present pattern for the rationality behind the production, use and evaluation of this type of resource. In a general manner, such leaflets invest in the power of "ideal printed information" to align behavior with the hospital's biomedical agenda. The underlying rationality that permeates them perceives the "perfect information package" as one that efficiently describes its technical content for the purpose of unidirectional persuasion, is up-to-date in relation to readability scales and embellished by graphic design, and emphasizes the priorities defined by the professionals. Such "communication prostheses" should be capable of electronic validation by means of software suitable for proportioning the "doses" to the subject matter. Information as a drug, cognitivism, the lack of research on message reception and the need for communicative action for the deconstruction of systems of closed thinking within the hospital environment have been discussed.

  17. Intraocular camera for retinal prostheses: Refractive and diffractive lens systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Michelle Christine

    The focus of this thesis is on the design and analysis of refractive, diffractive, and hybrid refractive/diffractive lens systems for a miniaturized camera that can be surgically implanted in the crystalline lens sac and is designed to work in conjunction with current and future generation retinal prostheses. The development of such an intraocular camera (IOC) would eliminate the need for an external head-mounted or eyeglass-mounted camera. Placing the camera inside the eye would allow subjects to use their natural eye movements for foveation (attention) instead of more cumbersome head tracking, would notably aid in personal navigation and mobility, and would also be significantly more psychologically appealing from the standpoint of personal appearances. The capability for accommodation with no moving parts or feedback control is incorporated by employing camera designs that exhibit nearly infinite depth of field. Such an ultracompact optical imaging system requires a unique combination of refractive and diffractive optical elements and relaxed system constraints derived from human psychophysics. This configuration necessitates an extremely compact, short focal-length lens system with an f-number close to unity. Initially, these constraints appear highly aggressive from an optical design perspective. However, after careful analysis of the unique imaging requirements of a camera intended to work in conjunction with the relatively low pixellation levels of a retinal microstimulator array, it becomes clear that such a design is not only feasible, but could possibly be implemented with a single lens system.

  18. Implant prostheses for convertibility, stress control, esthetics, and hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, R E

    1988-07-01

    A method of connecting "fixed partial denture" prostheses to osseointegrated implant fixtures has been described. The advantages of this system of restoration for partially and fully edentulous mouths are that it is more effective in addressing the problems of (1) stress-control on abutments, (2) a back-up system for abutment failures, (3) esthetics, and (4) control of bacterial plaques around abutments. To accomplish this procedure, the application of convertible periodontal prosthesis techniques with modifications to some existing implant systems is undertaken. The disadvantages of this method seem insignificant when one considers the complexities and risks involved with the present array of implant prosthesis alternatives. Some patients and dentists might consider the necessity of the prosthesis being detachable as one disadvantage. In reality, the prosthesis can be used as a fixed restoration until the patient has fully adapted to the new proprioception and appearance. A large percentage of patients feel uncomfortable with the word "removable" because it immediately creates a perception of unsightly metallic clasp display, palatal coverage, tongue interference, and negative body image. The use of the term "detachable" coupled with the doctor's offer to perform this task for the patient "whenever necessary" will usually relieve the patient's anxiety and allow the treatment to proceed. Once neuromuscular and esthetic adaptation have occurred and the patient has accepted the prosthesis, daily detaching and home-care hygiene by the patient will follow without incident. Esthetic improvement is obvious (Fig. 3).

  19. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Taniwaki, Koukyo; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1990-05-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs.

  20. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Taniwaki, Koukyo; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi

    1990-01-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs

  1. Aging of monolithic zirconia dental prostheses: Protocol for a 5-year prospective clinical study using ex vivo analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, Vinciane; Wulfman, Claudine P.; Derbanne, Mathieu A.; Dupont, Nathalie M.; Le Goff, Stéphane O.; Tang, Mie-Leng; Seidel, Laurence; Dewael, Thibaut Y.; Vanheusden, Alain J.; Mainjot, Amélie K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent introduction of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) monolithic zirconia dental prostheses raises the issue of material low thermal degradation (LTD), a well-known problem with zirconia hip prostheses. This phenomenon could be accentuated by masticatory mechanical stress. Until now zirconia LTD process has only been studied in vitro. This work introduces an original protocol to evaluate LTD process of monolithic zirconia prostheses in the oral enviro...

  2. Anatomy is important, but need not be destiny: novel uses of the thumb in aye-ayes compared to other lemurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Sergio M; Pellis, Vivien C

    2012-06-01

    Aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascerensis) have highly specialized hands with long digits, especially the thin middle one (D3), which is used for extracting food, such as beetle larvae, under bark. Due to the elongation of their fingers, including the thumb, it is presumed that aye-ayes have a rather limited capacity for delicate manipulation of objects. However, studies have reported independent movement of digits D3 and D4, and one report noted a seemingly independent thumb (D1) movement in holding food. Sixteen captive adult aye-ayes were videotaped feeding on a diverse range of foods so as to document how the thumb is used during food holding. To determine if the patterns observed were unique to aye-ayes, 24 individuals from 9 other species of lemurs were also videotaped. Two patterns of thumb use idiosyncratic to aye-ayes and one other lemur, the sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi), were identified: (1) when holding a food item in one hand, the thumb was used to secure the food, with the other digits playing a secondary role; (2) when holding a food item with both hands, the thumbs once again took a predominant role in securing the food. In the majority of these cases, whether held by one or two thumbs, the thumbs curled around the item, but some descriptive evidence is provided that suggests that aye-ayes exaggerate the role of the thumbs by shifting the hold to the outer edge. The novel uses of the thumbs in aye-ayes demonstrate that brain mechanisms can sometimes override the behavioral (or motor) limitations imposed by the morphology of the body. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Peris, Ketty

    2015-11-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy is an effective and safe noninvasive treatment for low-risk basal cell carcinoma, with the advantage of an excellent cosmetic outcome. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy in basal cell carcinoma is supported by substantial research and clinical trials. In this article, we review the procedure, indications and clinical evidences for the use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  4. Modern basal insulin analogs: An incomplete story

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Gangopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The currently available basal insulin does not completely mimic the endogenous insulin secretion. This has continued to promote the search for ideal basal insulin. The newer basal insulin have primarily focused on increasing the duration of action, reducing variability, and reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia, particularly nocturnal. However, the changing criteria of hypoglycemia within a short span of a few years along with the surprising introduction of major cardiac events as another ou...

  5. [Comparison of the clinical effects of selective laser melting deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromium alloy base crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-min; Wang, Wei-qian; Ma, Jing-yuan

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical effects of selective laser melting (SLM) deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns. One hundred and sixty eight patients treated with either SLM deposition basal crowns (110 teeth) or cobalt chromium alloy casting basal crowns (110 teeth) were followed-up for 1 month, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months. The revised standard of American Public Health Association was used to evaluate the clinical effect of restoration, including the color of porcelain crowns, gingival inflammation, gingival margin discoloration, and crack or fracture. Data analysis was conducted with SPSS 20 software package for Student's t test and Chi-square test. Six cases were lost to follow-up. The patients who were treated with SLM deposition basal crowns (104 teeth) and cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns (101 teeth) completed the study. Patients were more satisfied with SLM deposition cobalt chromium alloy porcelain crowns. There was 1 prosthesis with poor marginal fit after 24 months of restoration in SLM crowns. There were 6 prostheses with edge coloring and 8 with poor marginal fit in cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns, which was significantly different between the 2 groups(P<0.05). The SLM deposition copings results in smaller edge coloring and better marginal fit than those of cobalt-chrome copings. Patients are pleased with short-term clinical results.

  6. An in vivo comparative study of the e-polytetrafluoroethylene vascular prostheses: Vitaflon and Gore-Tex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrova, N B; Gorodkov, A J; Sidorenko, E S; Schekhter, A B; Baquey, C

    1999-12-01

    A comparative study was performed in order to validate new Russian e-PTFE vascular prostheses Vitaflon (St. Petersburg, Russia). The Gore-Tex prostheses were chosen as a referential model. The prostheses were implanted in the venous and arterial positions in 13 dog experiments. After the implantation time was over a comprehensive histological and histochemical examination of excized specimens was performed. It was demonstrated that there is no difference in healing and functional properties between the two studied prostheses. Copyright 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  7. Functional neuroanatomy of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciego, José L; Luquin, Natasha; Obeso, José A

    2012-12-01

    The "basal ganglia" refers to a group of subcortical nuclei responsible primarily for motor control, as well as other roles such as motor learning, executive functions and behaviors, and emotions. Proposed more than two decades ago, the classical basal ganglia model shows how information flows through the basal ganglia back to the cortex through two pathways with opposing effects for the proper execution of movement. Although much of the model has remained, the model has been modified and amplified with the emergence of new data. Furthermore, parallel circuits subserve the other functions of the basal ganglia engaging associative and limbic territories. Disruption of the basal ganglia network forms the basis for several movement disorders. This article provides a comprehensive account of basal ganglia functional anatomy and chemistry and the major pathophysiological changes underlying disorders of movement. We try to answer three key questions related to the basal ganglia, as follows: What are the basal ganglia? What are they made of? How do they work? Some insight on the canonical basal ganglia model is provided, together with a selection of paradoxes and some views over the horizon in the field.

  8. A prospective randomized comparison of neoprene vs thermoplast hand-based thumb spica splinting for trapeziometacarpal arthrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, S. J. E.; Bot, A. G. J.; Curley, S. E.; Jupiter, J. B.; Ring, D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In patients with trapeziometacarpal arthrosis, we tested the hypothesis that there is no difference in arm-specific disability 5-15 weeks after prescription of a pre-fabricated neoprene or a custom-made thermoplast hand-based thumb spica splint with the metacarpophalangeal joint included

  9. Biology Teachers Designing Context-Based Lessons for Their Classroom Practice--The Importance of Rules-of-Thumb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Nienke; Janssen, Fred J. J. M.; Van Driel, Jan H.

    2011-01-01

    In science education in the Netherlands new, context-based, curricula are being developed. As in any innovation, the outcome will largely depend on the teachers who design and implement lessons. Central to the study presented here is the idea that teachers, when designing lessons, use rules-of-thumb: notions of what a lesson should look like if…

  10. Examining the Rule of Thumb of Not Using Multilevel Modeling: The "Design Effect Smaller than Two" Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Mark H. C.; Kwok, Oi-man

    2015-01-01

    Educational researchers commonly use the rule of thumb of "design effect smaller than 2" as the justification of not accounting for the multilevel or clustered structure in their data. The rule, however, has not yet been systematically studied in previous research. In the present study, we generated data from three different models…

  11. Rare Rapidly Growing Thumb Lesion in a 12-Year-Old Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana J Arnold, MD, MBA

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 12-year-old male presented to the emergency department with right thumb pain and a mass for 4 months (see images. He denied fevers, chills, change in appetite, or fatigue. He noted that the lesion was growing and “bleeds easily if bumped.” He denied any trauma to the thumb, except “hitting it” months ago while in football practice. Workup in the ED included complete blood cell count (CBC, comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, coagulation studies, uric acid, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH, all of which were within normal limits. Significant findings: MRI showed an “expansile, destructive solid and cystic mass with aggressive…characteristics…” (see images. Tissue biopsy confirmed a giant cell tumor arising from the bone. The patient underwent a debulking procedure, and later a distal amputation. Follow-up on pathology showed negative margins. Discussion: Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTBis a rare, often benign but locally aggressive neoplasm creating osteolytic lesions, commonly affecting long bones.Overall incidence is approximately 1 person per million per year.1,2 Pain is the leading symptom at presentation. Depending on the duration of disease, a mass may be present. Often, around joint involvement, there is a mechanical deficiency and poor strength due to local cortical disruption of the bone.3 In 80% of cases, the course of GCTB is benign; however, local recurrence rate is 20%–50%.4 Approximately 10% of tumors undergo malignant transformation during recurrence, and 1%–4% give rise to pulmonary metastases even in cases of benign histology.4 GCTB occurs most commonly during the second to fourth decades of life (60%–75%.5 The majority of lesions develop in the long bones (75%–90%, with most cases (50%–65% occurring near the knee.5 Most complications arise if there are pulmonary metastases. Radiation and chemotherapy can be used in those cases that aren

  12. Physical interactions in MRI. Some rules of thumb for their reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlenweg, M.; Schaefers, G.; Trattnig, S.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most powerful and at the same time gentlest clinical imaging techniques at the present time; however, the enormous physical complexity as well as simple inattentiveness (projectile effect) implicate a significant risk potential and place high demands on the MR operator to ensure a safe workflow. A sound knowledge of the potential MR interactions is the foundation for a safe and profitable operation for all parties. The first part of this article deals with the three most important sources of physical interaction, i.e. static magnetic field, gradient and high-frequency (HF) fields. The paper discusses the differences between each type of field with respect to the impact on human beings, the interactions with magnetic and electrically conducting objects/implants and the relevant safety standards. Each section is followed by simple rules of thumb to minimize potentially unwanted physical MRI interactions. (orig.) [de

  13. Mayer Rokitansky Kuster Hauser (MRKH) syndrome with absent thumbs and big toes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Mahira

    2014-01-01

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is a rare developmental failure of Müllerian ducts. Principle clinical features of MRKH syndrome are primary amenorrhoea associated with congenital absence of vagina, uterine anomalies, normal ovaries, 46 XX karyotype with normal female secondary sexual characteristics and frequent association with renal, skeletal, and other congenital anomalies. A case of a 3-year-old child with congenitally absent thumbs and big toes is reported herein; she was brought in with complaints of urinary incontinence. Radiological investigation (ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan) revealed absent uterus and vagina while both ovaries were normal. Intravenous urography (IVU) study showed bifid pelvicalyceal systems bilaterally. Karyotyping revealed a 46 XX female phenotype. Laparoscopy confirmed normal ovaries bilaterally and small unfused uterine buds lying beside both ovaries on each side of pelvis. Early diagnosis of MRKH syndrome is essential for timely planning of vaginal and (if possible) uterine reconstructive surgeries.

  14. Metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb arthrodesis using intramedullary interlocking screws XMCP™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa-Parra, C N; Montaner-Alonso, D; Morales-Rodríguez, J

    2017-09-04

    The study objective was to assess the results of a thumb metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ) arthrodesis using intramedullary interlocking screws at 25°, XMCP ™ (Extremity Medical, Parsippany, NJ). Radiographs evaluated the angle of arthrodesis, time of fusion and fixation of the implant. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed using the DASH questionnaire and the VAS scale. Any complications found during surgery or the follow-up period were noted. We studied 9 patients. The mean follow-up was 27.6 months. Patients showed clinical and radiological evidence of fusion in an average of 8 weeks, the angle of fusion was 25°. There were no complications and no implant had to be removed. The XMCP™ system provides a reliable method for MCPJ arthrodesis for several indications and can be used with other procedures in the complex hand. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Ectopic banking of amputated great toe for delayed thumb reconstruction: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Ian L; Hui-Chou, Helen G; Zelken, Jonathan; Basile, Patrick L; Ipsen, Derek; Higgins, James P

    2014-07-01

    Ectopic banking of amputated parts is a recognized technique for delayed replantation of an amputated part when the amputation stump will not permit immediate replantation. This is conventionally performed with the intent of transferring the injured part back to its anatomic position when the amputation stump is more appropriate for replantation. Current warfare conditions have led to a commonly encountered military trauma injury pattern of multiple extremity amputations with protected trunk and core structures. This pattern poses many challenges, including the limit or absence of donor sites for immediate or delayed flap reconstructive procedures. We describe a case in which we ectopically banked the great toe of an amputated lower extremity for delayed thumb reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The triangular density to approximate the normal density: decision rules-of-thumb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, William T.; Pomroy, Thomas A.; Fuller, Douglas N.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we explore the approximation of the normal density function with the triangular density function, a density function that has extensive use in risk analysis. Such an approximation generates a simple piecewise-linear density function and a piecewise-quadratic distribution function that can be easily manipulated mathematically and that produces surprisingly accurate performance under many instances. This mathematical tractability proves useful when it enables closed-form solutions not otherwise possible, as with problems involving the embedded use of the normal density. For benchmarking purposes we compare the basic triangular approximation with two flared triangular distributions and with two simple uniform approximations; however, throughout the paper our focus is on using the triangular density to approximate the normal for reasons of parsimony. We also investigate the logical extensions of using a non-symmetric triangular density to approximate a lognormal density. Several issues associated with using a triangular density as a substitute for the normal and lognormal densities are discussed, and we explore the resulting numerical approximation errors for the normal case. Finally, we present several examples that highlight simple decision rules-of-thumb that the use of the approximation generates. Such rules-of-thumb, which are useful in risk and reliability analysis and general business analysis, can be difficult or impossible to extract without the use of approximations. These examples include uses of the approximation in generating random deviates, uses in mixture models for risk analysis, and an illustrative decision analysis problem. It is our belief that this exploratory look at the triangular approximation to the normal will provoke other practitioners to explore its possible use in various domains and applications

  17. A Study of Ossiculoplasty in Chronic Otitis Media using different types of Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthapratim Laha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: A wide range of prostheses, autologus and synthetic are available for use these days. Ideally, the ossicular reconstruction prosthesis should be biocompatible, safe, easy to handle and capable of efficient sound transmission. Aim and objectives: To study operative ease and post-operative hearing results in patients undergoing ossiculoplasty with different types of prostheses. Materials and methods: A prospective randomized study of 25 patients with Chronic Otitis Media, undergoing ossiculoplasty was conducted at Command Hospital, Kolkata. Tragal cartilage was used in 05 patients, conchal cartilage in 05, refashioned incus in 05, hydroxyapatite in 05 and titanium prostheses in 05 patients. Subjects with mixed hearing loss, multiple co-morbidities and revision surgeries were excluded. Hearing assessment was done by pure tone audiometry pre-operatively and 04 and 12 weeks postoperatively. Results were analyzed statistically. Results: Using tragal or conchal cartilage took almost equal time as autologus incus. Using synthetic material saved time. Titanium prosthesis gives maximum surgical ease. Post-operative air-bone gap reduction within 20 dB was seen in all, irrespective of type of prostheses.  Conclusion: Surgical ease is considerably better with titanium prostheses; however hearing results are equally good in all.

  18. [Posturographic study of total prostheses in the leg. Apropos of 88 patients examined].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, G; Gentaz, R; Gagey, P M; Baron, J B

    1976-01-01

    By suppressing certain articular sensory receptors, the reconstructive surgery of joints using total prostheses modifies tonic postural activity and, by this means, alters the regulation of balance in the subjects of operation. This doubtless explains certain discrepancies between the apparently excellent results in respect of joint movement and muscle strength and poor utilisation of the joint in every day life (instability, use of sticks or failure to use the joint in walking). Drawing on the experience and basic work of specialists in posture, the authors have undertaken a study of tonic postural activity in patients who had received a total prosthesis in the lower limb, both from the clinical aspect and by graphic measurement using an electronic apparatus, the statokinesiometer. Fourteen normal subjects were tested to calibrate the apparatus and 8 patients suffering from established osteoarthritis of the hip were studied as controls. Analysis of tonic postural activity was made in 66 patients who had received total prostheses in the lower limb. The results showed significant disturbance in balance in ankle prostheses, minimal disturbance in knee prostheses and not significant disturbance in hip prostheses. Certain therapeutic implications are derived from this study.

  19. Fabrication of low cost soft tissue prostheses with the desktop 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Xue, Guang-huai; Fu, Jian-zhong

    2014-11-27

    Soft tissue prostheses such as artificial ear, eye and nose are widely used in the maxillofacial rehabilitation. In this report we demonstrate how to fabricate soft prostheses mold with a low cost desktop 3D printer. The fabrication method used is referred to as Scanning Printing Polishing Casting (SPPC). Firstly the anatomy is scanned with a 3D scanner, then a tissue casting mold is designed on computer and printed with a desktop 3D printer. Subsequently, a chemical polishing method is used to polish the casting mold by removing the staircase effect and acquiring a smooth surface. Finally, the last step is to cast medical grade silicone into the mold. After the silicone is cured, the fine soft prostheses can be removed from the mold. Utilizing the SPPC method, soft prostheses with smooth surface and complicated structure can be fabricated at a low cost. Accordingly, the total cost of fabricating ear prosthesis is about $30, which is much lower than the current soft prostheses fabrication methods.

  20. Dentistry investigations of teeth and dental prostheses using OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, C.; Duma, V.-F.; Canjau, S.; Dobre, G.; Demian, D.; Cernat, R.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Todea, C.; Topala, F. I.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    We present some of our recent investigations in Dental Medicine using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Time Domain (TD), Spectral Domain (SD), and Swept Source (SS) OCT in-house developed systems are being used, for both ex vivo and in vivo investigations in the oral cavity. We study ex vivo the interface between the tooth and the dental sealant and demonstrate the limitations of the X-rays investigations that are now the gold standard for such procedures. Using OCT, defects in the interface that cannot be identified in radiographs can be determined both as position and magnitude. The drilling process of teeth can also be characterized in real time using OCT, to monitor the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) in order to avoid opening the pulp chamber. We demonstrate in this respect that an RDT of 0.5 mm is the minimum value to assure the integrity of the dentin wall between the drilled cavity and the pulp chamber; at an RDT of 0.3 mm or less a fracture is initiated, the dentin is punctured and endodontic treatment must follow. In vivo OCT investigations in the oral cavity were also performed (i.e., for metalloceramic prostheses and for ceramic inlay tooth interfaces), with the low cost, light weight and versatile handheld probes with 1D galvoscanners that we have developed and applied for a range of in-house developed OCT systems, in various clinical applications. They are briefly discussed, as well as some of our current and future work in the field, including for studies of soft tissue in the mouth.

  1. Simulating auditory and visual sensorineural prostheses: a comparative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallum, L. E.; Dagnelie, G.; Suaning, G. J.; Lovell, N. H.

    2007-03-01

    Microelectronic vision prosthesis proposes to render luminous spots (so-called phosphenes) in the visual field of the otherwise blind subject by way of an implanted array of stimulating electrodes, and in doing so restore some spatial vision. There are now many research teams worldwide working towards a therapeutic device, analogous to the cochlear implant, for the profoundly blind. Despite the similarities between the cochlear implant and vision prostheses, there are few instances in the literature where the two approaches are compared and contrasted with a mind to informing the science and engineering of the latter. This is the focus of the present review; specifically, our interest is psychophysics and signal processing. Firstly, we examine the cochlear implant, and review a handful of psychophysical work: the acoustic simulation of cochlear implants and the method used. We focus on the use of normally hearing subjects (played coloured noise bands or sine waves) as a means of investigating cochlear-implant efficacy and speech processing algorithms. These results provide guidance to vision researchers, for they address the interpretation of simulation data, and flag key areas, such as 'artificial' perception in the presence of noise, that require experimental work in coming years. Secondly, we provide an up-to-date review of the body of analogous psychophysical work: the visual simulation, involving normal observers, of microelectronic vision prosthesis. These simulations allow predictions as to the likely clinical efficacy of the prosthesis; indeed, results to date suggest that a number on the order of 100 implanted electrodes will afford subjects mobility and recognition of faces (and other complex stimuli), while even fewer electrodes facilitate reading printed text and very simple visuomanual tasks. Further, the simulations allow investigations of image and signal processing strategies, plus they provide researchers in the field, and other interested persons

  2. Fusarium basal rot in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de C.L.M.; Broek, van den R.C.F.M.; Brink, van den L.

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium basal rot of onion, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cepae, is a steadily increasing problem in The Netherlands. Financial losses for Dutch farmers confronted with Fusarium basal rot is substantial, due to yield reduction and high storage costs. This paper describes the development and

  3. The future of basal insulin supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, Airin C. R.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2011-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the candidates for an improved basal insulin in the pharmaceutical pipeline. The first new basal insulin to enter the market is most likely insulin degludec (IDeg), currently reporting in phase 3 of development, from Novo Nordisk (Bagsvaerd, Denmark). IDeg has a

  4. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  5. Use of digital impression systems with intraoral scanners for fabricating restorations and fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoshimasa; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Furuchi, Mika; Sato, Yohei; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Matsumura, Hideo

    2018-01-01

    Accurate impressions are essential in fabri-cating dental restorations and fixed dental prostheses. During the last decade, digital impression systems have improved substantially. This review discusses the accuracy of digital impression systems for fabrication of dental restorations and fixed dental prostheses. A literature search in PubMed was performed for the period from July 2010 through June 2017. The search keywords were Cerec, digital impression, direct digitalization, indirect digitalization, and intraoral scanner. Only relevant studies are summarized and discussed in this review. In general, the latest systems have considerably reduced the time required for impression making, and the accuracy and marginal fit of digital impression systems have recently improved. Restorations and fixed dental prostheses fabricated with currently available digital impression systems and intraoral scanners exhibit clinically acceptable ranges of marginal gap in both direct and indirect procedures.

  6. Progress in the clinical development and utilization of vision prostheses: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandli A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alice Brandli, Chi D Luu, Robyn H Guymer, Lauren N Ayton Centre for Eye Research Australia, Department of Surgery (Ophthalmology, The University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Vision prostheses, or “bionic eyes”, are implantable medical bionic devices with the potential to restore rudimentary sight to people with profound vision loss or blindness. In the past two decades, this field has rapidly progressed, and there are now two commercially available retinal prostheses in the US and Europe, and a number of next-generation devices in development. This review provides an update on the development of these devices and a discussion on the future directions for the field. Keywords: vision prostheses, bionic eye, vision restoration, blindness, medical bionics, retinitis pigmentosa

  7. Adhesion to silicone rubber of yeasts and bacteria isolated from voice prostheses : Influence of salivary conditioning films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; GeertsemaDoornbusch, GI; vanderMei, HC

    Adhesion of yeasts and bacteria to silicone rubber is one of the first steps in the biodeterioration of silicone rubber voice prostheses. In this paper, adhesion of two streptococcal, staphylococcal, Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis strains, isolated from explanted voice prostheses was

  8. What are estimated reimbursements for lower extremity prostheses capable of surgical and nonsurgical lengthening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Eric R; Pepper, Andrew M; Letson, G Douglas

    2012-04-01

    Growing prostheses accommodate skeletally immature patients with bone tumors undergoing limb-preserving surgery. Early devices required surgical procedures for lengthening; recent devices lengthen without surgery. Expenses for newer expandable devices that lengthen without surgery are more than for their predecessors but overall reimbursement amounts are not known. We sought to determine reimbursement amounts associated with lengthening of growing prostheses requiring surgical and nonsurgical lengthening. We retrospectively reviewed 17 patients with growing prostheses requiring surgical expansion and eight patients with prostheses capable of nonsurgical expansion. Insurance documents were reviewed to determine the reimbursement for implantation, lengthening, and complications. Growth data were obtained from the literature. Mean reimbursement amounts of surgical and nonsurgical lengthenings were $9950 and $272, respectively. Estimated reimbursements associated with implantation of a growing prosthesis varied depending on age, sex, and location. The largest difference was found for 4-year-old boys with distal femoral replacement where reimbursement for expansion to maturity for surgical and nonsurgical lengthening prostheses would be $379,000 and $208,000, respectively. For children requiring more than one surgical expansion, net reimbursements were lower when a noninvasive lengthening device was used. Annual per-prosthesis maintenance reimbursements to address complications for surgical and nonsurgical lengthening prostheses were $3386 and $1856, respectively. This study showed that reimbursements for lengthening of growing endoprostheses capable of nonsurgical expansion may be less expensive in younger patients, particularly male patients undergoing distal femur replacement, than endoprostheses requiring surgical lengthening. Longer outcomes studies are required to see if reimbursements for complications differ between devices. Level III, economic and decision

  9. New total ossicular replacement prostheses with a resilient joint: experimental data from human temporal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechvo, Irina; Bornitz, Matthias; Lasurashvili, Nikoloz; Zahnert, Thomas; Beleites, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    New flexible total ossicular prostheses with an integrated microjoint can compensate for large static displacements in the reconstructed ossicular chain. When properly designed, they can mimic the function of the joints of the intact chain and ensure good vibration transfer in both straight and bent conditions. Prosthesis dislocations and extrusions are frequently observed after middle ear surgery. They are mainly related to the altered distance between the coupling points because of large static eardrum displacements. The new prostheses consist of 2 titanium shafts, which are incorporated into a silicone body. The sound transfer function and stapes footplate displacement at static loads were evaluated in human temporal bones after ossicular reconstruction using prostheses with 2 different silicones with different hardness values. The stiffness and bending characteristics of the prostheses were investigated with a quasi-static load. The sound transfer properties of the middle ears with the prostheses inserted under uncompressed conditions were comparable with those of ears with intact ossicular chains. The implant with the soft silicone had improved acoustic transfer characteristics over the implant with the hard silicone in a compressed state. In the quasi-static experiments, the minimum medial footplate displacement was found with the same implant. The bending characteristics depended on the silicone stiffness and correlated closely with the point and angle of the load incidence. The titanium prostheses with a resilient joint that were investigated in this study had good sound transfer characteristics under optimal conditions as well as in a compressed state. As a result of joint bending, the implants compensate for the small changes in length of the ossicular chain that occur under varying middle ear pressure. The implants require a stable support at the stapes footplate to function properly.

  10. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Bilir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts, the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  11. Prostheses and orthoses in the collections of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przeździak, Bogumił; Lutomirski, Adam; Kulczyk, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The authors described 424 orthopaedic appliances left by the prisoners of the Nazi Concentration Camp in Oświęcim. A collection of prostheses and orthoses, which is currently a part of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum's exhibition, is extraordinary as it illustrates the fate of innocent, crippled people, who were incarcerated and murdered. Another point of value of the collection is its technical aspect, as it provides a clear picture of construction of prostheses and orthoses at the beginning of the 20th century.

  12. External breast prostheses. A survey of their use by women after mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, R; Abraham, S F; Llewellyn-Jones, D

    1983-03-19

    Women who have had a mastectomy for breast cancer have to cope with two major problems: first, that they have cancer, and second, that they have lost their physical appearance. The provision of an appropriate prosthesis can reduce the sense of disfigurement. If women were to obtain the full psychological benefit of wearing a breast prosthesis, they need to be informed about the available breast forms, have an opportunity to choose between them, and to be satisfied with their choice. In this study of 49 women, only 44% had had the opportunity to choose a prosthesis, 28% were dissatisfied with their prostheses, and 17% were still using temporary prostheses.

  13. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  14. Basal encephalocele and morning glory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioli, J; Lesser, R L

    1983-01-01

    Basal encephaloceles are often associated with other midline anomalies such as hypertelorism, broad nasal root, cleft lip, and cleft palate. Optic disc anomalies such as pallor, dysplasia, optic pit, coLoboma, and megalopapilla have been reported to occur in patients with basal encephalocele We report a case of a child with a sphenoethmoidal encephalocele and morning glory syndrome of the optic nerve. The presence of such optic nerve anomalies with facial midline anomalies should alert the clinician to the possible presence of a basal encephalocele. Images PMID:6849854

  15. Trichoepithelioma And Multiple Basal Cell Epithelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey S.K

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of multiple trichoepithelioma and basal cell epithelioma is reported. Although malignant degeneration of trichoepithelioma is debated, clinical and histopathological studies, in our case, hint at that. The case is reported for its rarity.

  16. Queuing Rule of Thumb based on M/M/s Queuing Theory with Applications in Construction Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teknomo K.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current trend of queuing theory development is toward more precision which requires higher mathematical manipulation. In this paper, we attempted to reverve the current trend toward simplification of queuing formulas such that it can be used in more practical purposes, especially in construction industry. Through numerical examples of two case studies on concreting and earth moving, how to model the construction activities as queuing systems is illustrated systematically. Through the numerical examples, it is shown that when the customer cost is much lower than the server cost, queuing system can be simplified only to incorporate the constraint equation. The queueing constraint equation is suggested to be used as queuing rule of thumb. The proposed rule of thumb is rather conservative in term of queuing performance compared to the standard stochastic queuing formula because it is assumed that all the customers arrive at once in the beginning of the service.

  17. The first metatarsal web space: its applied anatomy and usage in tracing the first dorsal metatarsal artery in thumb reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong-Qing; Li, Jun; Zhong, Shi-Zhen; Xu, Da-Chuan; Xu, Xiao-Shan; Guo, Yuan-Fa; Wang, Xin-Min; Li, Zhu-Yi; Zhu, Yue-Liang

    2004-12-01

    To clarify the anatomical relationship of the structures in the first toe webbing space for better dissection of toes in thumb reconstruction. The first dorsal metatarsal artery, the first deep transverse metatarsal ligament and the extensor expansion were observed on 42 adult cadaveric lower extremities. Clinically the method of tracing the first dorsal metatarsal artery around the space of the extensor expansion was used in 36 cases of thumb reconstruction. The distal segments of the first dorsal metatarsal artery of Gilbert types I and II were located superficially to the extensor expansion. The harvesting time of a toe was shortened from 90 minutes to 50 minutes with 100% survival of reconstructed fingers. The distal segment of the first dorsal metatarsal artery lies constantly at the superficial layer of the extensor expansion. Most of the first metatarsal arteries of Gilbert types I and II can be easily located via the combined sequential and reverse dissection around the space of the extensor expansion.

  18. Use of basal stimulation at anesthesiology department

    OpenAIRE

    MARKOVÁ, Alena

    2012-01-01

    The theme ?The Use of Basal Stimulation at the Anaesthesiology and Resuscitation Department? was chosen in order to map out the use of this nursing method by the nurses and the staff who I cooperate with. The theoretical part deals with the environment at the Anaesthesiology and Resuscitation Department where the basal stimulation is used and also with special characteristics of the nursing care. Further, it deals with monitoring patients, causes of consciousness defects occurrence and kinds ...

  19. Degludec insulin: A novel basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Baruah, Manash; Kalra, Bharti

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews a novel insulin analogue, degludec, which has the potential to emerge as an ideal basal insulin. It reviews the limitations of existing basal insulin and analogues, and highlights the need for a newer molecule. The paper discusses the potential advantages of degludec, while reviewing its pharmacologic and clinical studies done so far. The paper assesses the potential role of insulin degludec and degludec plus in clinical diabetes practice.

  20. Germinoma originating in the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, Y.; Hori, T.; Watanabe, T.; Takenobu, A.; Takigawa, H.; Kishimoto, M.; Tanaka, J.

    1990-01-01

    About 5-10% of primary intracranial germ cell tumors arise in basal ganglia and thalamus, where CT studies have been made. MR of the tumors in the pineal region, and to our knowledge, from one tumor in the basal ganglia were similar. In the present case, MR produced confusion in confirming diagnosis, which may require additional evidence from the clinical course, tumor markers, and CT images. (orig.)

  1. Traumatic Floating 1st Metacarpal in a 14-Year-Old Boy Managed by Close Reduction and Thumb Spica Immobilization: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Himanshu Ravindra; Kamat, Nandan; Wajekar, Sagar; Mandalia, Saumil H

    2014-01-01

    Double dislocation of thumb metacarpal (MC) is a rare injury which may be secondarily complicated by growth plate injury in children. The management of floating 1st MC is also controversial since the treatment ranges from simple reduction to complex reconstruction surgeries. It is also important to understand the long-term results of different management strategies (close reduction, K-wire fixation, ligament reconstruction) as any residual stiffness or instability of thumb may result in severe disability of the hand. A 14-year-old boy with an alleged history of injury to the thumb due to a fall. The postulated mechanism of injury was forced hyperextension of thumb and axial loading of hand in the prone position. On examination, there was prominent bony swelling over the dorsal aspect of carpometacarpal (CMC) and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints which was very tender with diffuse swelling over entire thumb. X-ray showed dorsal dislocation of both MCP and CMC joints, without any fracture (bony avulsion) or volar plate avulsion. Treatment was by way of closed reduction performed by axial traction followed by forced flexion at MCP joint with continuous pressure over the dorsal aspect of the joint. The reduction of CMC joint was done by direct pressure over the dorsal aspect and full abduction of thumb. Following reduction, the thumb was immobilized in a thumb spica. Thus, we conclude it is possible to manage a case of floating 1st MC by closed reduction and immobilization, using proper reduction technique. However, a careful clinical and radiological assessment should be done beforehand for signs of bony injury or ligamentous instability.

  2. Dual-hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation over primary motor cortex enhances consolidation of a ballistic thumb movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Soichiro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanabe, Shigeo; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-02-19

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive technique that modulates motor performance and learning. Previous studies have shown that tDCS over the primary motor cortex (M1) can facilitate consolidation of various motor skills. However, the effect of tDCS on consolidation of newly learned ballistic movements remains unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that tDCS over M1 enhances consolidation of ballistic thumb movements in healthy adults. Twenty-eight healthy subjects participated in an experiment with a single-blind, sham-controlled, between-group design. Fourteen subjects practiced a ballistic movement with their left thumb during dual-hemisphere tDCS. Subjects received 1mA anodal tDCS over the contralateral M1 and 1mA cathodal tDCS over the ipsilateral M1 for 25min during the training session. The remaining 14 subjects underwent identical training sessions, except that dual-hemisphere tDCS was applied for only the first 15s (sham group). All subjects performed the task again at 1h and 24h later. Primary measurements examined improvement in peak acceleration of the ballistic thumb movement at 1h and 24h after stimulation. Improved peak acceleration was significantly greater in the tDCS group (144.2±15.1%) than in the sham group (98.7±9.1%) (Pballistic thumb movement in healthy adults. Dual-hemisphere tDCS over M1 may be useful to improve elemental motor behaviors, such as ballistic movements, in patients with subcortical strokes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the thumb carpometacarpal ligaments: a cadaveric study of ligament anatomy and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Amy L; Lee, Julia; Hagert, Elisabet

    2012-08-15

    Stability and mobility represent the paradoxical demands of the human thumb carpometacarpal joint, yet the structural origin of each functional demand is poorly defined. As many as sixteen and as few as four ligaments have been described as primary stabilizers, but controversy exists as to which ligaments are most important. We hypothesized that a comparative macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint would further define their role in joint stability. Thirty cadaveric hands (ten fresh-frozen and twenty embalmed) from nineteen cadavers (eight female and eleven male; average age at the time of death, seventy-six years) were dissected, and the supporting ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified. Ligament width, length, and thickness were recorded for morphometric analysis and were compared with use of the Student t test. The dorsal and volar ligaments were excised from the fresh-frozen specimens and were stained with use of a triple-staining immunofluorescent technique and underwent semiquantitative analysis of sensory innervation; half of these specimens were additionally analyzed for histomorphometric data. Mixed-effects linear regression was used to estimate differences between ligaments. Seven principal ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified: three dorsal deltoid-shaped ligaments (dorsal radial, dorsal central, posterior oblique), two volar ligaments (anterior oblique and ulnar collateral), and two ulnar ligaments (dorsal trapeziometacarpal and intermetacarpal). The dorsal ligaments were significantly thicker (p histologic appearance of capsular tissue with low cellularity. The dorsal deltoid ligament complex is uniformly stout and robust; this ligament complex is the thickest morphometrically, has the highest cellularity histologically, and shows the greatest degree of sensory nerve endings. The hypocellular anterior oblique ligament is thin, is variable in its location, and

  4. [Loading and strength of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses 2. Strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Meijers, C.C.A.J.; Vergoossen, E.L.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate strength of a dental prosthesis is defined as the strongest loading force applied to the prosthesis until afracture failure occurs. Important key terms are strength, hardness, toughness and fatigue. Relatively prevalent complications of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses are

  5. [Aftercare for durability and profitability of single-unit and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Loveren, C. van; Maarel-Wierink, C.D. van der; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    An important aim ofa treatment with single-unit and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses is a durable and profitable treatment outcome. That requires aftercare, too. First, the frequency of routine oral examinations should be assessed, using an individual risk profile. The objectives of the routine

  6. Waterjet cutting of periprosthetic interface tissue in loosened hip prostheses: an in vitro feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, Gert; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.; Dankelman, Jenny; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Valstar, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Waterjet cutting technology is considered a promising technology to be used for minimally invasive removal of interface tissue surrounding aseptically loose hip prostheses. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of waterjet cutting of interface tissue membrane. Waterjets with 0.2

  7. Restoring natural sensory feedback in real-time bidirectional hand prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raspopovic, Stanisa; Capogrosso, Marco; Petrini, Francesco Maria

    2014-01-01

    Hand loss is a highly disabling event that markedly affects the quality of life. To achieve a close to natural replacement for the lost hand, the user should be provided with the rich sensations that we naturally perceive when grasping or manipulating an object. Ideal bidirectional hand prosthese...

  8. Clinical Fit of Partial Removable Dental Prostheses Based on Alginate or Polyvinyl Siloxane Impressions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Witter, D.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical fit of metal-frame partial removable dental prostheses (PRDPs) based on custom trays used with alginate or polyvinyl siloxane impression material. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifth-year students of the Nijmegen Dental School made 25 correct

  9. [Technical aspects of treatments with single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersema, E.J.; Kreulen, C.M.; Latzke, P.; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    For the manufacture of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses, effective communication between dentist and dental technician is required. Mutual insight concerning the (im)possibilities of available treatments and technical options is prerequisitefor this communication. The manufacture of

  10. The development of artificial organs and prostheses worldwide and in the Ottoman Empire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdane, Leman; Cingi, Cemal; Elçioğlu, Ömür; Muluk, Nuray Bayar

    2016-08-01

    An artificial organ or prosthesis is a man-made device that is implanted or integrated into a human to replace a natural organ. There were many historical steps in the development of artificial organs and prostheses. New surgical techniques, the development of prosthetic materials and the creative ideas of engineers led to progress in this field. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  11. HEALING OF MICROVENOUS PTFE PROSTHESES IMPLANTED INTO THE RAT FEMORAL VEIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLEI, B; DIJK, F; JONGEBLOED, WL; ROBINSON, PH; Bartels, H.

    44 PTFE prostheses (Gore-Tex(R); ID 1 mm) were implanted into rats' femoral veins by means of the sleeve anastomotic technique and were evaluated at regular intervals from 1 h up till 24 weeks after implantation by means of light and electron microscopy to study in detail their healing process. All

  12. [Loading and strength of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses. 1. Retention and resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Meijers, C.C.A.J.; Vergoossen, E.L.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The degree to which single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses are able to withstand loading forces is dependent, among other things, on the quality of their retention and resistance. The quality of the retention and resistance of the configuration of an abutment tooth prepared for a metal and

  13. Evaluation of osseous integration of PVD-silver-coated hip prostheses in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Gregor; Hardes, Jendrik; Gosheger, Georg; Stoeppeler, Sandra; Ahrens, Helmut; Blaske, Franziska; Wehe, Christoph; Karst, Uwe; Höll, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Infection associated with biomaterials used for orthopedic prostheses remains a serious complication in orthopedics, especially tumor surgery. Silver-coating of orthopedic (mega)prostheses proved its efficiency in reducing infections but has been limited to surface areas exposed to soft tissues due to concerns of silver inhibiting osseous integration of cementless stems. To close this gap in the bactericidal capacity of silver-coated orthopedic prostheses extension of the silver-coating on surface areas intended for osseous integration seems to be inevitable. Our study reports about a PVD- (physical-vapor-deposition-) silver-coated cementless stem in a canine model for the first time and showed osseous integration of a silver-coated titanium surface in vivo. Radiological, histological, and biomechanical analysis revealed a stable osseous integration of four of nine stems implanted. Silver trace elemental concentrations in serum did not exceed 1.82 parts per billion (ppb) and can be considered as nontoxic. Changes in liver and kidney functions associated with the silver-coating could be excluded by blood chemistry analysis. This was in accordance with very limited metal displacement from coated surfaces observed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) 12 months after implantation. In conclusion our results represent a step towards complete bactericidal silver-coating of orthopedic prostheses.

  14. PATENCY AND HEALING OF MICROVASCULAR PROSTHESES - A REVIEW OF 10 YEARS OF EXPERIMENTAL WORK IN GRONINGEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLEI, B; ROBINSON, PH

    1993-01-01

    From 1982 onwards, in Groningen, The Netherlands, we have worked on the experimental evaluation and development of microvascular prostheses in rats and rabbits. In this review article a systematic overview of this experimental work is presented and the results are discussed with regard to the

  15. Screening of patients for first time prostheses after amputation of lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetra A.

    2016-01-01

    More than 25% of those who followed the recommended treatment and rehabilitation programme to prepare the amputation stump, reduced contracture and enhanced physical working abilities were declared to be appropriate for further prostheses. This indicates serious shortcomings in medical treatments during the early post-amputation period.

  16. Implementasi Pendekatan Rule-Of-Thumb untuk Optimasi Algoritma K-Means Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nishom

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the big data era, the clustering of data or so-called clustering has attracted great interest or attention from researchers in conducting various studies, many grouping algorithms have been proposed in recent times. However, as technology evolves, data volumes continue to grow and data formats are increasingly varied, thus making massive data grouping into a huge and challenging task. To overcome this problem, various research related methods for data grouping have been done, among them is K-Means. However, this method still has some shortcomings, among them is the sensitivity issue in determining the value of cluster (K. In this paper we discuss the implementation of the rule-of-thumb approach and the normalization of data on the K-Means method to determine the number of clusters or K values dynamically in the data groupings. The results show that the implementation of the approach has a significant impact (related to time, number of iterations, and no outliers in the data grouping.

  17. Trapezium excision and suture suspensionplasty (TESS) for the treatment of thumb carpometacarpal arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Matthew D; Meyer, Nicholas J; Baker, Daniel; Brehmer, Jess; Carlson, Brent D

    2014-06-01

    Basilar thumb arthritis, or first carpometacarpal arthritis, is a common condition affecting older women and some men. It is estimated that as many as one third of postmenopausal woman are affected. Surgical treatment of this condition includes options ranging from arthrodesis to prosthetic arthroplasty. Intermediate options include complete or partial trapezial excision with or without interposition of a cushioning/stabilizing material (auto source, allo source, synthetic source). A multitude of methods appear to offer similar end results, although some methods definitely involve more surgical work and perhaps greater patient risk. Through retrospective evaluation of a cohort of patients who underwent suture suspensionplasty, we determined the postoperative effect on strength, motion, patient satisfaction, complications, and radiographic maintenance of the scaphoid-metacarpal distance. This review shows the method to be clinically effective and, by comparison with a more traditional ligament reconstruction trapezial interposition arthroplasty, the method does not require use of autograft or allograft tendon and has fewer surgical steps. Forty-four patients were included in this retrospective study. The results showed that 91% of patients were satisfied with the procedure. Pinch and grip strength remained the same preoperatively and postoperatively. A Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand patient-reported outcome instrument (DASH) scores averaged 30 at final follow-up. Three patients developed a late complication requiring further surgical intervention. In summary, this technique appears to be technically reproducible, requires no additional tendon material, and achieves objectively and subjectively similar results to other reported procedures used to manage first CMC Arthritis.

  18. Evaluation of taper joints with combined fatigue and crevice corrosion testing: Comparison to human explanted modular prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reclaru, L., E-mail: lucien.reclaru@pxgroup.com [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Brooks, R.A. [Orthopaedic Research, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University of Cambridge, Box 180 Hills Road, CB2 0QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Zuberbühler, M. [Smith and Nephew Orthopaedics AG, Schachenalle 29, 5001 Aarau (Switzerland); Eschler, P.-Y.; Constantin, F. [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Tomoaia, G. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hateganu of Cluj-Napoca, Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for revision surgery of total joint replacements is increasing and modular joint replacement implants have been developed to provide adjustable prosthetic revision systems with improved intra-operative flexibility. An electrochemical study of the corrosion resistance of the interface between the distal and proximal modules of a modular prosthesis was performed in combination with a cyclic fatigue test. The complexity resides in the existence of interfaces between the distal part, the proximal part, and the dynamometric screw. A new technique for evaluating the resistance to cyclic dynamic corrosion with crevice stimulation was used and the method is presented. In addition, two components of the proximal module of explanted Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb prostheses were investigated by optical and electron microscopy. Our results reveal that: The electrolyte penetrates into the interface between the distal and proximal modules during cyclic dynamic fatigue tests, the distal module undergoes cracking and corrosion was generated at the interface between the two models; The comparison of the explanted proximal parts with the similar prostheses evaluated following cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion testing showed that there were significant similarities indicating that this method is suitable for evaluating materials used in the fabrication of modular prostheses. - Highlights: • Electrochemical crevice corrosion testing combined with fatigue test conducted on Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V modular prostheses • Cations released from integral prostheses • Comparison of human explanted modular prostheses with the similar prostheses evaluated in cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion.

  19. Objective clinical assessment of change in swallowing ability of maxillectomy patients when wearing obturator prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Miwa; Tsukiyama, Yoshihiro; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of treatment outcome is important in maxillofacial rehabilitation. Although eating is one of the oral functions that most strongly influences patients' quality of life, only a few reports exist on the objective assessment of swallowing for maxillectomy patients. The purpose of this study was to identify changes in the swallowing ability of maxillectomy patients when wearing obturator prostheses through the use of an objective clinical assessment. The swallowing ability of 38 postmaxillectomy patients consecutively treated with obturator prostheses was objectively evaluated with the "water-drinking test" that was developed for the assessment of dysphagia patients after cerebrovascular disease. In this test, the subjects were instructed to drink 30 mL of water in one swallow. The profile was evaluated with the combination of the time required for drinking the water and the incidence of cough reflex. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the paired t test, and the Chi-square test with StatView 5.0 for the Macintosh. Performance improved significantly when the patients wore prostheses (P = .0026, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). The mean drinking times without and with prostheses were 8.2 +/- 6.3 s and 5.0 +/- 3.5 s, respectively. Drinking time was shortened significantly when the prosthesis was worn (P = .0002, paired t test). The assessment of behavior and episodes revealed that the swallowing ability of the maxillectomy patients was significantly improved when a prosthesis was worn (P = .0002, Chi-square test). The swallowing ability of maxillectomy patients was quantitatively and qualitatively improved with obturator prostheses.

  20. Computerized tomographic diagnosis of basal skull fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tokutaro; Shimoyama, Ichiro; Endoh, Mitsutoshi; Ninchoji, Toshiaki; Uemura, Kenichi.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of basal skull fractures used to be difficult, particularly on the basis of routine skull roentgenography alone. We have now examined the diagnostic value of conventional computerized tomography in basal skull fractures. We studied 82 cases clinically diagnosed as basal skull fractures. We examined them based on at least one of the following computerized tomographic criteria for basal skull fractures: 1) fracture line(s), 2) intracranial air, 3) fluid in the paranasal sinuses, and 4) fluid in the middle ear, including the mastoid air cells. The signs of the fracture line and of the intracranial air are definite indications of basal skull fracture, but the signs of fluid in the paranasal sinuses and/or in the middle ear are not definite. When combined, however, with such other clinical signs as black eye, Battle's sign, CSF leakage, CSF findings, and profuse nasal or ear bleeding, the diagnosis is more reliable. Seventy cases (85.4%) in this series had basal skull fractures according to our computerized tomographic criteria. Among them , 26 cases (31.7%) were diagnosed with fracture lines, 17 cases (20.7%) with intracranial air, 16 cases (19.5%) with fluid in the paranasal sinuses, 10 cases (12.2%) with fluid in the middle ear, and one case (1.2%) with fluid in both. Twelve cases (14.6%) of the 82 cases clinically diagnosed as basal skull fractures could not have been diagnosed on our computerized tomographic criteria alone. We diagnosed them because of CSF leakage, CSF findings, surgical findings, etc. (author)

  1. Investigation of the effect of conservative interventions in thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Lucia; Valdes, Kristin; Vanti, Carla; Negrini, Stefano; Pillastrini, Paolo; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a current review of randomized controlled trials regarding the effect of conservative interventions on pain and function in people with thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) osteoarthritis (OA), perform a meta-analysis of the findings and summarize current knowledge. Data were obtained from MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, PEDro and CENTRAL databases from their inception to May 2014. Reference lists of relevant literature reviews were also searched. All published randomized trials without restrictions to time of publication or language were considered for inclusion. Study subjects were symptomatic adults with thumb CMC OA. Two reviewers independently selected studies, conducted quality assessment and extracted results. Data were pooled in a meta-analysis, when possible, using a random-effects model. Quality of the body evidence was assessed using GRADE approach. Sixteen RCTs involving 1145 participants met the inclusion criteria. Twelve were of high quality (PEDro score > 6). We found moderate quality evidence that manual therapy and therapeutic exercise combined with manual therapy improve pain in thumb CMC OA at short- and intermediate-term follow-up, and from low to moderate quality evidences that magneto therapy improves pain and function at short-term follow-up. Orthoses (splints) were found to improve function at long-term follow-up and pinch strength at short-term follow-up. Finally, we found from very low to low-quality evidence that other conservative interventions provide no significant improvement in pain and in function at short- and long-term follow-up. Some of the commonly performed conservative interventions performed in therapy have evidence to support their use to improve hand function and decrease hand pain. Additional research is required to determine the efficacy of other therapeutic interventions that are performed with patients with thumb CMC OA. Manual therapy and exercise are an effective means of improving pain and

  2. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Hospital, P.O. BOX 19063, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2006-11-15

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  3. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du

    2006-01-01

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  4. [Internal fixation with one-hole microplate for the treatment of collateral ligament injuries of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb combined with fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi-Xun; Sun, De-Tao; Chen, Xu-Hui; Li, Jun; Cui, Yan; Hu, Ji-Chao; Shu, Zheng-Hua; He, Jian; Ding, Chao-Qi; Chen, Bo

    2015-03-01

    To study clinical effects of one-hole microplate internal fixation for the treatment of collateral ligament injuries of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb combined with fracture. Twenty-two patients (16 males, 6 females) with collateral ligament injuries of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb combined fracture were treated with one-hole microplate internal fixation. The age of the patients ranged from 18 to 53 years old with a mean age of 28.5 years old. The duration from injury to surgery ranged from 2 hours to 2 months, and the mean time was 6 days. All the patients had collateral ligament injuries combined with fracture of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb. Thirteen patients had injuries in the right hand and 9 patients had injuries in the left hand. There were 18 cases of closed wound and 4 cases of open wound. Eighteen patients had fresh injuries ( 2 weeks). Sixteen patients had injuries in the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb combined with fracture, 6 patients had radial collateral ligament injuries of the thumb combined with fracture, 4 cases of which were complicated with injuries of abductor pollicis brevis and the end of the flexor pollicis brevis tender. The size of the avulsed fragment was about 3.0 mm x 4.0 mm to 6.0 mm x 7.0 mm. The incisions of 22 patients healed by first intention. The follow-up periods ranged from 6 months to 5 years old,with an average of 2.5 years old. The thumb function was evaluated by Saetta and other evaluation criteria, and 20 patients got an excellent result and 2 good. The application of one-hole microplate internal fixation in treating collateral ligament injuries with fracture of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb is an effective method.

  5. Scientific or rule-of-thumb techniques of ground-water management--Which will prevail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Charles Lee

    1969-01-01

    Emphasis in ground-water development, once directed largely to quantitatively minor (but sociologically vital) service of human and stock needs, is shifting: aquifers are treated as possible regulating reservoirs managed conjunctively with surface water. Too, emphasis on reducing stream pollution is stimulating interest in aquifers as possible waste-storage media. Such management of aquifers requires vast amounts of data plus a much better understanding of aquifer-system behavior than now exists. Implicit in this deficiency of knowledge is a need for much new research, lest aquifers be managed according to ineffective rule-of-thumb standards, or even abandoned as unmanageable. The geohydrologist's task is to define both internal and boundary characteristics of aquifer systems. Stratigraphy is a primary determinant of these characteristics, but stratigraphically minor features may make aquifers transcend stratigraphic boundaries. For example, a structurally insignificant fracture may carry more water than a major fault; a minor stratigraphic discontinuity may be a major hydrologic boundary. Hence, there is a need for ways of defining aquifer boundaries and quantifying aquifer and confining-bed characteristics that are very different from ordinary stratigraphic techniques. Among critical needs are techniques for measuring crossbed permeability; for extrapolating and interpolating point data on direction and magnitude of permeability in defining aquifer geometry; and for accurately measuring geochemical properties of water and aquifer material, and interpreting those measurements in terms of source of water, rate of movement, and waste-sorbing capacities of aquifers and of confining beds--in general, techniques adequate for predicting aquifer response to imposed forces whether static, hydraulic, thermal, or chemical. Only when such predictions can be made routinely can aquifer characteristics be inserted into a master model that incorporates both the hydrologic and

  6. Mate choice when males are in patches: optimal strategies and good rules of thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, John M C; Halupka, Konrad

    2004-11-07

    In standard mate-choice models, females encounter males sequentially and decide whether to inspect the quality of another male or to accept a male already inspected. What changes when males are clumped in patches and there is a significant cost to travel between patches? We use stochastic dynamic programming to derive optimum strategies under various assumptions. With zero costs to returning to a male in the current patch, the optimal strategy accepts males above a quality threshold which is constant whenever one or more males in the patch remain uninspected; this threshold drops when inspecting the last male in the patch, so returns may occur only then and are never to a male in a previously inspected patch. With non-zero within-patch return costs, such a two-threshold rule still performs extremely well, but a more gradual decline in acceptance threshold is optimal. Inability to return at all need not decrease performance by much. The acceptance threshold should also decline if it gets harder to discover the last males in a patch. Optimal strategies become more complex when mean male quality varies systematically between patches or years, and females estimate this in a Bayesian manner through inspecting male qualities. It can then be optimal to switch patch before inspecting all males on a patch, or, exceptionally, to return to an earlier patch. We compare performance of various rules of thumb in these environments and in ones without a patch structure. A two-threshold rule performs excellently, as do various simplifications of it. The best-of-N rule outperforms threshold rules only in non-patchy environments with between-year quality variation. The cutoff rule performs poorly.

  7. How Weight Affects the Perceived Spacing between the Thumb and Fingers during Grasping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie A Butler

    Full Text Available We know much about mechanisms determining the perceived size and weight of lifted objects, but little about how these properties of size and weight affect the body representation (e.g. grasp aperture of the hand. Without vision, subjects (n = 16 estimated spacing between fingers and thumb (perceived grasp aperture while lifting canisters of the same width (6.6cm but varied weights (300, 600, 900, and 1200 g. Lifts were performed by movement of either the wrist, elbow or shoulder to examine whether lifting with different muscle groups affects the judgement of grasp aperture. Results for perceived grasp aperture were compared with changes in perceived weight of objects of different sizes (5.2, 6.6, and 10 cm but the same weight (600 g. When canisters of the same width but different weights were lifted, perceived grasp aperture decreased 4.8% [2.2 ‒ 7.4] (mean [95% CI]; P < 0.001 from the lightest to the heaviest canister, no matter how they were lifted. For objects of the same weight but different widths, perceived weight decreased 42.3% [38.2 ‒ 46.4] from narrowest to widest (P < 0.001, as expected from the size-weight illusion. Thus, despite a highly distorted perception of the weight of objects based on their size, we conclude that proprioceptive afferents maintain a reasonably stable perception of the aperture of the grasping hand over a wide range of object weights. Given the small magnitude of this 'weight-grasp aperture' illusion, we propose the brain has access to a relatively stable 'perceptual ruler' to aid the manipulation of different objects.

  8. Radiologic study of basal cell nevus syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Tae Won [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-11-15

    Several cases of jaw cyst-basal cell nevus-bifid rib syndrome are presented. This syndrome consists principally of multiple jaw cysts, basal cell nevi, and bifid ribs but no one component is present in all patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the multiple characteristics of this syndrome and present three cases in a family and additional 4 cases. The many malformations associated with the syndrome have variable expressively. In the cases, multiple jaw cysts, pal mar and plantar pittings, bridging of sella, temporoparietal bossing, hypertelorism, cleft palate, and dystopia canthoru m have been observed.

  9. Basal cell nevus syndrome: 2 case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Seo, Yo Seob; Kim, Jin Soo

    2008-01-01

    The basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal abnormalities. We experienced two cases that represented several characteristics of BCNS. Case 1: a thirty three year-old man visited CSU hospital. His radiographs showed four cystic lesions at both maxillary sinus and both mandibular angle, with bifid rib and ectopic calcification of falx cerebri. After marsupialization and enucleation, recurrent and newly developing tendency were found on his follow-up radiographs. Case 2: a seventeen year-old man had four large cystic lesions which were diagnosed as odontogenic keratocysts. He had craniofacial anomalies which included ectopic calcification and frontal bossing.

  10. Radiologic study of basal cell nevus syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tae Won

    1988-01-01

    Several cases of jaw cyst-basal cell nevus-bifid rib syndrome are presented. This syndrome consists principally of multiple jaw cysts, basal cell nevi, and bifid ribs but no one component is present in all patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the multiple characteristics of this syndrome and present three cases in a family and additional 4 cases. The many malformations associated with the syndrome have variable expressively. In the cases, multiple jaw cysts, pal mar and plantar pittings, bridging of sella, temporoparietal bossing, hypertelorism, cleft palate, and dystopia canthoru m have been observed.

  11. MRI of the basal ganglia calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Masayuki; Murata, Tetsuhito; Kimura, Hirohiko

    1992-01-01

    MR imaging was performed for 11 patients (9 in Down's syndrome and 2 in idiopathic intracerebral calcification) who showed calcifications in bilateral basal ganglia on CT. High signal intensity in the basal ganglia was found only in one patient with idiopathic intracerebral calcification on T1-weighted image. The calcified areas of all patients in Down's syndrome did not show high signal intensity on T1-weighted image. The exact reasons why MRI exhibits the different signal intensities in calcified tissue on T1-weighted image are unknown. Further clinical investigations will be needed. (author)

  12. Impact of implant-supported prostheses on nutritional status and oral health perception in edentulous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Osta, Nada; El Osta, Lana; Moukaddem, Farah; Papazian, Tatiana; Saad, Robert; Hennequin, Martine; Rabbaa Khabbaz, Lydia

    2017-04-01

    Improvement of nutritional status and perception of oral health are supposed to be different with complete conventional denture or implant-supported fixed or removable prostheses. Since no study has been conducted in Lebanon, the aim of our study was to assess the nutritional status and oral heath related quality of life (OHRQoL) in totally edentulous patients after treatment with complete denture or implant supported-prostheses. This was an observational clinical prospective study. A convenient sample of Lebanese people aged 60 years or more was selected between September 2013 and July 2015 from the Departments of removable and fixed prosthesis at Saint-Joseph University of Beirut. The treatment options included complete denture, implant-supported complete denture and implant-supported fixed prostheses. Nutritional status and OHRQoL were assessed with the Mini-Nutritional Assessment Index (MNA) and the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) respectively at Baseline (first visit before treatment), 2-3 weeks after treatment (t1), 3 months (t2) and 6 months (t3) after treatment. Fifty-one participants (mean age: 69.39 ± 7.164 years) were included. The results have shown an improvement over time in nutritional status and OHRQoL for all treatment groups. However, 2-3 weeks after treatment the number of participants at risk of malnutrition was higher with complete removable denture, intermediate with implant-supported complete denture and lower with implant-supported fixed prostheses (p-value = 0.049). Moreover, the mean GOHAI score was significantly lower over time with complete removable denture compared to implant-supported prostheses (p-value nutritional status for implant supported-prostheses compared to conventional removable dentures. Therefore, it is fundamental that dentists communicate with their patients about implant treatment to understand their expectations, to explain the outcomes and achieve the desired clinical result. Copyright © 2017

  13. The Use of Prostheses in Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery: Joy or Toy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ping Wu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The high recurrence rate of pelvic organ prolapse (POP of up to 30% after pelvic reconstructive surgery makes a more refined surgery imperative, as well as the need for either biological or synthetic prostheses as adjuvant treatment. Patients with recurrence risks may benefit from the adjuvant treatment: (1 to substitute for the lack of supportive tissue; (2 to reinforce inadequate tissue; (3 to induce new supportive tissue; and (4 to consolidate and complement the insufficient surgical techniques. However, some debatable issues in use of the prosthetics remain. The use of prosthetics enables the simultaneous repair of all vaginal defects of POP and concomitant anti-incontinence surgery to be faster, easier and more precise. Nevertheless, great care should be devoted to the actual and theoretical short- and long-term risks, many of which have not been fully elucidated. Despite the lack of various ideal characteristics, the type I monofilament, macroporous polypropylene, has been suggested to have the lowest incidence of infection and erosion among the nonabsorbable prostheses. There is good evidence to support the use of nonabsorbable synthetic mesh for abdominal sacrocolpopexy, while the use of prostheses for repairing isolated anterior and posterior compartment defects remains controversial. There have been no long-term studies with sufficient patient numbers to prove whether synthetic or biological prostheses are superior during vaginal surgery. Tension-free vaginal mesh techniques with procedural kits are being adopted increasingly, despite the paucity of data. Although short-term follow-up studies have shown tension-free vaginal mesh to be a safe and effective technique to correct POP, anatomic and functional results of long-term follow-up studies, however, have not yet confirmed the effectiveness and safety. Mesh erosion remains a concern, with variable rates according to different materials and approaches. Newly developed prostheses offer

  14. Effect of treatment with fixed and removable dental prostheses. An oral health-related quality of life study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øzhayat, Esben Boeskov; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate patient-reported effects of treatment with fixed dental prostheses (FDP) and removable dental prostheses (RDP) and relate the change in Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) to the type of treatment and objective dental variables of aesthetics and masti......The aim of the study was to evaluate patient-reported effects of treatment with fixed dental prostheses (FDP) and removable dental prostheses (RDP) and relate the change in Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) to the type of treatment and objective dental variables of aesthetics...... were obtained. The participants completed the Oral Health Impact Profile 49 (OHIP-49) before and after treatment. A control group with no need for dental treatment also completed the OHIP-49. All participants had a significant improvement in OHRQoL. The improvement was higher for the RDP group than...

  15. Preliminary observations on influence of dairy products on biofilm removal from silicone rubber voice prostheses in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; Free, RH; Van Weissenbruch, R; Albers, FWJ; Van der Mei, HC

    We determined oropharyngeal biofilm removal from silicone rubber voice prostheses in an artificial throat after perfusion with different commercially available dairy products, including buttermilk, Lactobacillus casei Shirota fermented milk (Yakult, Yakult Netherlands BV, Almere, The Netherlands),

  16. Proximity Interactions among Basal Body Components in Trypanosoma brucei Identify Novel Regulators of Basal Body Biogenesis and Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Quang Dang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The basal body shares similar architecture with centrioles in animals and is involved in nucleating flagellar axonemal microtubules in flagellated eukaryotes. The early-branching Trypanosoma brucei possesses a motile flagellum nucleated from the basal body that consists of a mature basal body and an adjacent pro-basal body. Little is known about the basal body proteome and its roles in basal body biogenesis and flagellar axoneme assembly in T. brucei. Here, we report the identification of 14 conserved centriole/basal body protein homologs and 25 trypanosome-specific basal body proteins. These proteins localize to distinct subdomains of the basal body, and several of them form a ring-like structure surrounding the basal body barrel. Functional characterization of representative basal body proteins revealed distinct roles in basal body duplication/separation and flagellar axoneme assembly. Overall, this work identified novel proteins required for basal body duplication and separation and uncovered new functions of conserved basal body proteins in basal body duplication and separation, highlighting an unusual mechanism of basal body biogenesis and inheritance in this early divergent eukaryote.

  17. Should silicone prostheses be considered for specimen banking? A pilot study into their use for human biomonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Ian J; Bæk, Kine; Kringstad, Alfhild; Roald, Helge E; Thomas, Kevin V

    2013-09-01

    Persistent organic pollutant (POP) biomonitoring in humans is challenging and generally carried out using blood, breast milk or adipose tissue, with concentrations normalised to the lipid content of the sample matrix. The goal of this cross-sectional pilot study was to evaluate the validity and feasibility of explanted silicone prostheses as a matrix for persistent organic pollutant biomonitoring in humans. We postulate that pollutant concentrations in silicone prostheses inserted in the body will equilibrate with that in the body over time and provide a measure of the overall body burden. This study included silicone prostheses from 22 female patients of the Colosseum clinic (Oslo, Norway) collected between September 2010 and April 2012. Absorption of chlorinated and brominated POPs into silicone prostheses during implantation was observed. Relative levels of the different contaminants measured in prostheses were in agreement with those from serum and breast milk analyses from the general Norwegian population. The comparison of serum and breast milk-based literature data with prosthesis concentrations transposed into lipid-normalised concentrations supports the validity of the prosthesis measurements. The median of relative percent differences between measurements with replicate silicone prostheses from 11 patients was below 30%. Observed increases in prosthesis concentrations with patients' age were found to be very similar to literature data from studies of the Norwegian population. Silicone prostheses therefore represent a promising matrix for the biomonitoring of nonpolar and non-ionic pollutants in humans. Sample accessibility and body burden representativeness of the silicone prostheses suggest that specimen banking should be initiated. © 2013.

  18. Optical coherence tomography of basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yücel, D.; Themstrup, L.; Manfredi, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most prevalent malignancy in Caucasians. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging technology using the principle of interferometry. OCT has shown a great potential in diagnosing, monitoring, and follow-up of BCC. So far most...

  19. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  20. Basal Cell Carcinoma: 10 Years of Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigna, E.; Tarallo, M.; Maruccia, M.; Sorvillo, V.; Pollastrini, A.; Scuderi, N.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a locally invasive malignant epidermal tumour. Incidence is increasing by 10% per year; incidence of metastases is minimal, but relapses are frequent (40%-50%). The complete excision of the BCC allows reduction of relapse. Materials and Methods. The study cohort consists of 1123 patients underwent surgery for basal cell carcinoma between 1999 and 2009. Patient and tumor characteristics recorded are: age; gender; localization (head and neck, trunk, and upper and lower extremities), tumor size, excisional margins adopted, and relapses. Results. The study considered a group of 1123 patients affected by basal cell carcinoma. Relapses occurred in 30 cases (2,67%), 27 out of 30 relapses occurred in noble areas, where peripheral margin was <3mm. Incompletely excised basal cell carcinoma occurred in 21 patients (1,87%) and were treated with an additional excision. Discussion. Although guidelines indicate 3mm peripheral margin of excision in BCC <2cm, in our experience, a margin of less than 5mm results in a high risk of incomplete excisions

  1. Induced resistance: an enhancement of basal resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. de; Robben, C.; Pelt, J.A. van; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Upon primary pathogen attack, plants activate resistance mechanisms at the site of infection. Besides this so-called basal resistance, plants have also the ability to enhance their defensive capacity against future pathogen attack. There are at least two types of biologically induced resistance.

  2. Parallel basal ganglia circuits for decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikosaka, Okihide; Ghazizadeh, Ali; Griggs, Whitney; Amita, Hidetoshi

    2018-03-01

    The basal ganglia control body movements, mainly, based on their values. Critical for this mechanism is dopamine neurons, which sends unpredicted value signals, mainly, to the striatum. This mechanism enables animals to change their behaviors flexibly, eventually choosing a valuable behavior. However, this may not be the best behavior, because the flexible choice is focused on recent, and, therefore, limited, experiences (i.e., short-term memories). Our old and recent studies suggest that the basal ganglia contain separate circuits that process value signals in a completely different manner. They are insensitive to recent changes in value, yet gradually accumulate the value of each behavior (i.e., movement or object choice). These stable circuits eventually encode values of many behaviors and then retain the value signals for a long time (i.e., long-term memories). They are innervated by a separate group of dopamine neurons that retain value signals, even when no reward is predicted. Importantly, the stable circuits can control motor behaviors (e.g., hand or eye) quickly and precisely, which allows animals to automatically acquire valuable outcomes based on historical life experiences. These behaviors would be called 'skills', which are crucial for survival. The stable circuits are localized in the posterior part of the basal ganglia, separately from the flexible circuits located in the anterior part. To summarize, the flexible and stable circuits in the basal ganglia, working together but independently, enable animals (and humans) to reach valuable goals in various contexts.

  3. Basal cell carcinoma on the left cheek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jancar, B.

    2007-01-01

    A 91-year-old female patient was treated with irradiation for histologically confirmed basal cell carcinoma on the left cheek. The tumour, measuring 3 x 3 cm, with the depth of 2 cm, was extending up to the lower lid of the left eye. (author)

  4. Vulvar basal cell carcinoma, a rare location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Nitipir

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Basal Cell Carcinoma is the most common human malignant neoplasm. Vulvar basal cell carcinoma is rare, accounting for less than 5% of all vulvar neoplasms. Vulvar basal cell carcinomas are usually diagnosed late because they are often asymptomatic and tend to grow at slow rates. They are usually diagnosed late because they are often asymptomatic. However, these tumours may appear in areas which are normally covered with ultraviolet light. We present the case of a 60 years old woman diagnosed with invasive breast cancer for which she underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patient presented to our department with an ulcerated vulvar lesion. On inspection, the tumour measured 3/2 cm and was located on the left labium majus. The biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of vulvar basal cell carcinoma and a wide local excision was performed with no relapse at one year. In conclusion, early detection of BCC’s is critical to allow complete surgical cure so any abnormality on the vulva should be biopsied. A wide safety margin of 1cm should be achieved when resecting the tumour and the physician should keep in mind that the BCC’s of the vulva has a high recurrence rate. Previous chemotherapy is not associated with this type of non-melanoma skin cancer.

  5. Neglected basal cell carcinoma on scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant basal cell carcinoma (BCC is a very rare entity. Usually, they occur due to the negligence of the patient. Local or distant metastasis is present in most cases. Here, we present a case of giant BCC that clinically resembled squamous cell carcinoma and demonstrated no metastasis at presentation.

  6. Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Loss of cell polarity is a hallmark for carcinoma, and its underlying molecular mechanism is beginning to emerge from studies on model organisms and cancer cell lines. Moreover, deregulated expression of apico-basal polarity complex components has been reported in human tumours. In this review, we provide an ...

  7. Immunosuppressive Environment in Basal Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Silje Haukali; Nielsen, Patricia S; Gjerdrum, Lise M R

    2016-01-01

    Interaction between tumour survival tactics and anti-tumour immune response is a major determinant for cancer growth. Regulatory T cells (T-regs) contribute to tumour immune escape, but their role in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is not understood. The fraction of T-regs among T cells was analysed b...

  8. Heterogeneity of limbal basal epithelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Yasutaka; Li, Wei; Chen, Ying-Ting; He, Hua; Chen, Szu-yu; Kheirkah, Ahmad; Zhu, Ying-Tien; Matsumoto, Yukihiro; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2010-11-01

    Although corneal epithelial stem cells (SCs) are located at the limbus between the cornea and the conjunctiva, not all limbal basal epithelial cells are SCs. Using 2 dispase digestions to remove different amounts of limbal basal epithelial cells for cross-sections, flat mounts, and cytospin preparations, double immunostaining to pancytokeratins (PCK) and vimentin (Vim) identified 3 p63+ epithelial progenitors such as PCK-/Vim+, PCK/Vim, and PCK-/Vim+ and 1 p63+ mesenchymal cell, PCK-/Vim+. PCK-/Vim- progenitors had the smallest cell size were 10-20 times more enriched on collagen I-coated dishes in the 5-minute rapid adherent fraction that contained the highest percentage of p63+ cells but the lowest percentage of cytokeratin12+ cells, and gave rise to high Ki67 labeling and vivid clonal growth. In contrast, PCK+/Vim+ and PCK+/Vim- progenitors were found more in the slow-adherent fraction and yielded poor clonal growth. PCK/Vim progenitors and clusters of PCK-/Vim+ mesenchymal cells, which were neither melanocytes nor Langerhans cells, were located in the limbal basal region. Therefore, differential expression of PCK and Vim helps identify small PCK-/Vim- cells as the most likely candidate for SCs among a hierarchy of heterogeneous limbal basal progenitors, and their close association with PCK-/Vim+ presumed "niche" cells.

  9. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  10. Cross-pinning: the philosophy of retrievability applied practically to fixed, implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, M J; Hatzipanagiotis, P; Wilson, P R

    2008-03-01

    Biologic and technical complications are widely reported in the dental literature and often compromise the functional and/or aesthetic features of fixed, implant-supported prostheses. Managing complications without damaging or destroying a restoration is an obvious advantage of implant-based dentistry where the option of prosthetic retrievability is almost always available. The technique of cross-pinning uses a transverse screw to secure a prosthesis to a milled implant abutment, allowing prosthetic retrievability irrespective of dental implant alignment. This study presents guidelines for cross-pinning implant-supported prostheses based on resistance form, screw mechanics and natural tooth contours. The technical aspects of cross-pinning are also discussed using examples from four implant systems.

  11. [Endo-exo prostheses : Osseointegrated percutaneously channeled implants for rehabilitation after limb amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschoff, H-H; Juhnke, D-L

    2016-05-01

    In 1999 the first endo-exo femoral prosthesis (EEFP) was implanted in Germany in a patient who had suffered a traumatic above-knee amputation. This procedure involves a skeletally anchored exoprosthetic device that is inserted into the residual femur. The distal part of the implant protrudes transcutaneously and allows attachment to a prosthetic limb which provides direct force transmission to the external prosthetic components. The technique originated from dental implantology and helps to avoid possible problems resulting from treatment of amputated limbs using socket prostheses. In the meantime, durability times of over 10 years have now helped to invalidate the initially well-founded reservations held against the procedure. What advantages can be achieved by osseointegrated and percutaneously channeled prostheses and which problems had to be overcome for treatment. Critical evaluation of data from patients operated on in Lübeck, Germany from January 2003 to December 2014. With osseointegrated and percutaneously channeled prostheses permanent durability times can be achieved. Infection-associated soft tissue problems at the site of skin protrusion (stoma) can be successfully prevented. The creation of this so-called stoma means acceptance of a possible bacterial portal of entry into the body. Patient satisfaction has so far been high, postoperative rehabilitation is simplified and the technique could possibly lower the costs of medical treatment. Endo-exo prostheses have proved to be successful for more than 15 years. A critical appraisal of the indications as well as a close cooperation between the surgeon, orthopedic technician and the associated rehabilitation facilities with the patient are the basis for the long-term success of this relatively new treatment approach.

  12. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia-ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal-ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis

  13. Functional changes through the usage of 3D-printed transitional prostheses in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Jorge M; Peck, Jean L; Srivastava, Rakesh; Pierce, James E; Dudley, Drew R; Than, Nicholas A; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2017-11-08

    There is limited knowledge on the use of 3 D-printed transitional prostheses, as they relate to changes in function and strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify functional and strength changes after usage of 3 D-printed transitional prostheses for multiple weeks for children with upper-limb differences. Gross manual dexterity was assessed using the Box and Block Test and wrist strength was measured using a dynamometer. This testing was conducted before and after a period of 24 ± 2.61 weeks of using a 3 D-printed transitional prosthesis. The 11 children (five girls and six boys; 3-15 years of age) who participated in the study, were fitted with a 3 D-printed transitional partial hand (n = 9) or an arm (n = 2) prosthesis. Separate two-way repeated measures ANOVAs were performed to analyze function and strength data. There was a significant hand by time interaction for function, but not for strength. Conclusion and relevance to the study of disability and rehabilitation: The increase in manual gross dexterity suggests that the Cyborg Beast 2 3 D-printed prosthesis can be used as a transitional device to improve function in children with traumatic or congenital upper-limb differences. Implications for Rehabilitation Children's prosthetic needs are complex due to their small size, rapid growth, and psychosocial development. Advancements in computer-aided design and additive manufacturing offer the possibility of designing and printing transitional prostheses at a very low cost, but there is limited knowledge on the function of this type of devices. The use of 3D printed transitional prostheses may improve manual gross dexterity in children after several weeks of using it.

  14. Integration of the Residual Limb with Prostheses via Direct Skin-Bone-Peripheral Nerve Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0791 TITLE: Integration of the Residual Limb with Prostheses via Direct Skin- Bone-Peripheral Nerve Interface...ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE October 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2016 - 29 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Integration of the...translational study to develop Skin and Bone Integrated Pylon with Peripheral Neural Interface (SBIP-PNI) directly attached to the residuum and the

  15. Ranking of CT in persistent vertigo after implantation of stapes prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koesling, S.; Woldag, K.; Meister, E.F.; Reschke, I.; Schulz, H.G.

    1995-01-01

    10 of 150 patients had persistent vertigo after implanation of stapes prostheses. These patients were evaluated by high resolution CT in the axial and coronal plane. Scans showed in all cases findings which related to the symptoms. The CT findings were proved intraoperatively in 9 cases. A new indirect sign of a perilymphatic fistula is described in form of an air bulla at the end of the prosthesis. Retympanotomy could be planned better with the help of HR-CT. (orig.) [de

  16. Human endothelium on vascular prostheses modified by extracellular matrix proteins in a flow experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlupáč, Jaroslav; Filová, Elena; Riedel, Tomáš; Brynda, Eduard; Remy-Zolghadri, M.; Bareille, R.; Fernandez, P.; Daculsi, R.; Bordenave, L.; Bačáková, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 58-60 (2006), s. 10-13 ISSN 1429-7248 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011301; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4050202; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400500507; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500110564 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : bioartificial vascular prostheses * laminin * fibrin Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  17. Application of quality by design for 3D printed bone prostheses and scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Marquez, Daniel; Mirnajafizadeh, Ali; Carty, Christopher P; Stewart, Rodney A

    2018-01-01

    3D printing is an emergent manufacturing technology recently being applied in the medical field for the development of custom bone prostheses and scaffolds. However, successful industry transformation to this new design and manufacturing approach requires technology integration, concurrent multi-disciplinary collaboration, and a robust quality management framework. This latter change enabler is the focus of this study. While a number of comprehensive quality frameworks have been developed in recent decades to ensure that the manufacturing of medical devices produces reliable products, they are centred on the traditional context of standardised manufacturing techniques. The advent of 3D printing technologies and the prospects for mass customisation provides significant market opportunities, but also presents a serious challenge to regulatory bodies tasked with managing and assuring product quality and safety. Before 3D printing bone prostheses and scaffolds can gain traction, industry stakeholders, such as regulators, clients, medical practitioners, insurers, lawyers, and manufacturers, would all require a high degree of confidence that customised manufacturing can achieve the same quality outcomes as standardised manufacturing. A Quality by Design (QbD) approach to custom 3D printed prostheses can help to ensure that products are designed and manufactured correctly from the beginning without errors. This paper reports on the adaptation of the QbD approach for the development process of 3D printed custom bone prosthesis and scaffolds. This was achieved through the identification of the Critical Quality Attributes of such products, and an extensive review of different design and fabrication methods for 3D printed bone prostheses. Research outcomes include the development of a comprehensive design and fabrication process flow diagram, and categorised risks associated with the design and fabrication processes of such products. An extensive systematic literature review

  18. Immunoscintigraphy with antigranulocyte monoclonal antibodies for the diagnosis of septic loosening of hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boubaker, A.; Bischof Delaloye, A.; Blanc, C.H.; Dutoit, M.; Leyvraz, P.F.; Delaloye, B.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the value of immunoscintigraphy (IS) with antigranulocyte monoclonal antibodies (Mab) in the diagnosis of subacute or chronic infection of hip prostheses, we prospectively studied 57 patients (23 women and 34 men; age 29-92 years, mean 72.7 years) sent to our institution in the past 6 years for clinical suspicion of septic loosening of a hip prosthesis. Nineteen patients had bilateral prostheses and one of them was studied twice. A total of 78 prostheses were examined. All patients had three-phase bone scans followed by IS with technetium-99m antigranulocyte Mab BW 250/183. Intervals between bone scans and IS varied from 2 days to 4 weeks. Final diagnosis was assessed by culture in 48 cases (articular puncture or intraoperative sampling) and by clinical follow-up of at least 8 months in 30 cases. Twelve prostheses were considered septic and 66 non-septic. The overall sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 64% respectively for bone scans, 67% and 75% for IS and 67% and 84% for both modalities together. In three cases, IS was doubtful and the final clinical diagnosis was negative for infection. False-positive results were observed in the presence of massive loosening of the prosthesis or in association with metaplastic peri-articular bone formation. In three of the four false-negative results, infection was proven only after enrichment of the culture, and the bacterium was Staphylococcus epidermidis. In 12/33 (36%) positive bone scans IS allowed the diagnosis of infection to be excluded. Overall accuracy of both modalities together was 81% and the negative predictive value was 93%, which compares favourably with the results reported for other non-invasive methods. (orig.)

  19. Progressive recovery of osseoperception as a function of the combination of implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Mauro; Bonachela, Wellington; Soares, Janir

    2008-06-01

    The extraction of teeth involves the elimination of extremely sensitive periodontal mechanoreceptors, which play an important role in oral sensory perception. The aim of this study was to evaluate the recovery of interocclusal sensory perception for micro-thickness in individuals with different types of implant-supported prostheses. Wearers of complete dentures (CDs) comprised the negative control group (group A, n=17). The experimental group consisted of wearers of prostheses supported by osseointegrated implants (Group B, n=29), which was subsequently divided into 4 subgroups: B(1) (n=5)--implant supported overdentures (ISO) occluding with CD; B(2) (n=6)--implant-supported fixed prostheses (ISFP) occluding with CD; B(3) (n=8)--wearers of maxillary and mandibular ISFP, and B(4) (n=10)--ISFP occluding with natural dentition (ND). Individuals with ND represented the positive control group (Group C, n=24). Aluminum foils measuring 10 microm, 24 microm, 30 microm, 50 microm, 80 microm, and 104 microm thickness were placed within the premolar area, adding up to 120 tests for each individual. The mean tactile thresholds of groups A, B1, B2, B3, B4, and C were 92 microm, 27 microm, 27 microm, 14 microm, 10 microm, and 10 microm, respectively. [Correction added after publication online 18 April 2008: in the preceding sentence 92 microm, 27 microm, 14 microm, 10 microm and 10 microm, was corrected to 92 microm, 27 microm, 27 microm, 14 microm, 10 microm and 10 microm]. The Kruskal-Wallis test revealed significant difference among groups (P<0.05). The Dunn test revealed that group A was statistically different from groups C, B(3), and B(4), and that B(1) and B(2) were statistically different from group C. Progressive recovery of osseoperception as a function of the combination of implant-supported prostheses could be observed. Moreover, ISO and/or ISFP combinations may similarly maximize the recovery of osseoperception.

  20. Application of quality by design for 3D printed bone prostheses and scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Marquez, Daniel; Mirnajafizadeh, Ali; Carty, Christopher P.

    2018-01-01

    3D printing is an emergent manufacturing technology recently being applied in the medical field for the development of custom bone prostheses and scaffolds. However, successful industry transformation to this new design and manufacturing approach requires technology integration, concurrent multi-disciplinary collaboration, and a robust quality management framework. This latter change enabler is the focus of this study. While a number of comprehensive quality frameworks have been developed in recent decades to ensure that the manufacturing of medical devices produces reliable products, they are centred on the traditional context of standardised manufacturing techniques. The advent of 3D printing technologies and the prospects for mass customisation provides significant market opportunities, but also presents a serious challenge to regulatory bodies tasked with managing and assuring product quality and safety. Before 3D printing bone prostheses and scaffolds can gain traction, industry stakeholders, such as regulators, clients, medical practitioners, insurers, lawyers, and manufacturers, would all require a high degree of confidence that customised manufacturing can achieve the same quality outcomes as standardised manufacturing. A Quality by Design (QbD) approach to custom 3D printed prostheses can help to ensure that products are designed and manufactured correctly from the beginning without errors. This paper reports on the adaptation of the QbD approach for the development process of 3D printed custom bone prosthesis and scaffolds. This was achieved through the identification of the Critical Quality Attributes of such products, and an extensive review of different design and fabrication methods for 3D printed bone prostheses. Research outcomes include the development of a comprehensive design and fabrication process flow diagram, and categorised risks associated with the design and fabrication processes of such products. An extensive systematic literature review

  1. Rule of Thumb Proposing the Size of Aperture Expected to be Sufficient to Resolve Double Stars with Given Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Wilfried

    2018-01-01

    Visual observation of double stars is an anachronistic passion especially attractive for amateurs looking for sky objects suitable for visual observation even in light polluted areas. Session planning then requires a basic idea which objects might be suitable for a given equipment—this question is a long term issue for visual double star observers and obviously not easy to answer, especially for unequal bright components. Based on a reasonably large database with limited aperture observations (done with variable aperture equipment iris diaphragm or aperture masks) a heuristic approach is used to derive a statistically well founded Rule of Thumb formula.

  2. Return to football and long-term clinical outcomes after thumb ulnar collateral ligament suture anchor repair in collegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Hadeed, Michael M; Lyons, Matthew L; Gluck, Joshua S; Diduch, David R; Chhabra, A Bobby

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate return to play after complete thumb ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injury treated with suture anchor repair for both skill position and non-skill position collegiate football athletes and report minimum 2-year clinical outcomes in this population. For this retrospective study, inclusion criteria were complete rupture of the thumb UCL and suture anchor repair in a collegiate football athlete performed by a single surgeon who used an identical technique for all patients. Data collection included chart review, determination of return to play, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (QuickDASH) outcomes. A total of 18 collegiate football athletes were identified, all of whom were evaluated for follow-up by telephone, e-mail, or regular mail at an average 6-year follow-up. Nine were skill position players; the remaining 9 played in nonskill positions. All players returned to at least the same level of play. The average QuickDASH score for the entire cohort was 1 out of 100; QuickDASH work score, 0 out of 100; and sport score, 1 out of 100. Average time to surgery for skill position players was 12 days compared with 43 for non-skill position players. Average return to play for skill position players was 7 weeks postoperatively compared with 4 weeks for non-skill position players. There was no difference in average QuickDASH overall scores or subgroup scores between cohorts. Collegiate football athletes treated for thumb UCL injuries with suture anchor repair had quick return to play, reliable return to the same level of activity, and excellent long-term clinical outcomes. Skill position players had surgery sooner after injury and returned to play later than non-skill position players, with no differences in final level of play or clinical outcomes. Management of thumb UCL injuries in collegiate football athletes can be safely and effectively tailored according to the demands of the player's football position. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2014

  3. Volar dislocation of the index carpometacarpal joint in association with a Bennett's fracture of the thumb: a rare injury pattern.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dillon, J P

    2012-02-03

    We describe a case of volar dislocation of the index carpometacarpal (CMC) joint in association with a Bennett\\'s fracture of the thumb following a motorcycle accident. Volar dislocation of the index carpometacarpal joint is an exceedingly rare but easily missed injury, with only a few reported cases in the literature. This report highlights the importance of a true lateral radiograph and close scrutiny of the film to detect this injury. Closed reduction supplemented with Kirschner wire fixation restored normal anatomical relations and achieved an excellent clinical result.

  4. Comparison of fixed implant-supported prostheses, removable implant-supported prostheses, and complete dentures: patient satisfaction and oral health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sung-Hee; Kim, Younhee; Park, Joo-Yeon; Jung, Yea Ji; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Park, Sun-Young

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare patient satisfaction and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among fully edentulous patients treated with either fixed implant-supported prostheses (FP), removable implant-supported prostheses (RP), or complete dentures (CD). Eighty-six patients - 29 FP, 27 RP, and 30 CD patients - participated in this study. The survey was conducted using face-to-face interviews with a questionnaire that included a patient satisfaction scale and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). We measured patient satisfaction after prosthetic treatments and OHRQoL before and after the treatments. After prosthetic treatments, OHRQoL increased in all three groups (P patient satisfaction and OHRQoL, and both groups showed greater improvement compared with the CD group. Specifically, the OHRQoL dimensions of functional limitation, physical pain, psychological discomfort, and psychological disability in the FP group, and functional limitation in the RP group, improved greatly in comparison with the CD group (P patient satisfaction than the CD treatment. Reliable information of OHRQoL and patient satisfaction helps experts and patients choose the best prosthetic treatment option. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. EFFICIENCY OF PROSTHETIC TREATMENT WITH POST RESECTION PROSTHESES WITH SOLID SUBSTITUTE PART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gerdzhikov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to track the effectiveness of prosthetic treatment with post resection dentures with solid substitute part and their role in the restoration of damaged functions. Materials and methods: The study included 14 patients (9 men and 5 women with different size and location of defects in the upper jaw treated in the period 2010-2016 with post resection prostheses with a solid substitute part. The impressions were taken with irreversible hydrocolloid impression material. The prostheses were completed by heat-curing acrylic with low quantity residual monomer. The effectiveness of prosthetics was evaluated by the method of Mihaylov for both oral-nasal examination of the pressure with the device "Oronasopneumotest." For objectifying and assess the occlusal-articulation ratios was held computerized occlusal analysis with the system T-SCAN 8. Results: The results showed successful obturation and sealing of defects in all patients. It was found satisfactory recovery of the speaking function and normalization of occlusal-articulation ratios. Conclusion: The prosthetic treatment with post resection prostheses with a solid substitute part allows successful recovery of the lost speech and chewing functions, helping to restore self esteem and social rehabilitation of patients.

  6. Visual prostheses: The enabling technology to give sight to the blind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Maghami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Millions of patients are either slowly losing their vision or are already blind due to retinal degenerative diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP and age-related macular degeneration (AMD or because of accidents or injuries. Employment of artificial means to treat extreme vision impairment has come closer to reality during the past few decades. Currently, many research groups work towards effective solutions to restore a rudimentary sense of vision to the blind. Aside from the efforts being put on replacing damaged parts of the retina by engineered living tissues or microfabricated photoreceptor arrays, implantable electronic microsystems, referred to as visual prostheses, are also sought as promising solutions to restore vision. From a functional point of view, visual prostheses receive image information from the outside world and deliver them to the natural visual system, enabling the subject to receive a meaningful perception of the image. This paper provides an overview of technical design aspects and clinical test results of visual prostheses, highlights past and recent progress in realizing chronic high-resolution visual implants as well as some technical challenges confronted when trying to enhance the functional quality of such devices.

  7. Evaluation of Osseous Integration of PVD-Silver-Coated Hip Prostheses in a Canine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Hauschild

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection associated with biomaterials used for orthopedic prostheses remains a serious complication in orthopedics, especially tumor surgery. Silver-coating of orthopedic (megaprostheses proved its efficiency in reducing infections but has been limited to surface areas exposed to soft tissues due to concerns of silver inhibiting osseous integration of cementless stems. To close this gap in the bactericidal capacity of silver-coated orthopedic prostheses extension of the silver-coating on surface areas intended for osseous integration seems to be inevitable. Our study reports about a PVD- (physical-vapor-deposition- silver-coated cementless stem in a canine model for the first time and showed osseous integration of a silver-coated titanium surface in vivo. Radiological, histological, and biomechanical analysis revealed a stable osseous integration of four of nine stems implanted. Silver trace elemental concentrations in serum did not exceed 1.82 parts per billion (ppb and can be considered as nontoxic. Changes in liver and kidney functions associated with the silver-coating could be excluded by blood chemistry analysis. This was in accordance with very limited metal displacement from coated surfaces observed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS 12 months after implantation. In conclusion our results represent a step towards complete bactericidal silver-coating of orthopedic prostheses.

  8. Interest of Flow Diversion Prostheses in the Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Armoiry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow diversion prostheses represent a new endovascular approach aimed at treating patients with large wide-neck aneurysms. Our objective is to present this new technology, to review the clinical studies on efficacy, and to emphasize its current limits. Flow diversion prostheses consist of a cylinder made of a large number of braided microfilaments providing a large metallic surface when deployed and inducing a blood flow diversion outside the aneurysm. Two different brands are currently available. Clinical data supporting their efficacy are currently limited to six non comparative cohort studies that included between 18 and 107 patients. Procedural implantation was shown to be feasible in more than 90% and safe with a thirty-day mortality between 2.8 and 5.5%. Complete occlusion rates at twelve months varied between 85.7 and 100%. Even though promising, the current status of flow diversion prostheses needs further evaluation with randomized, prospective, clinical trials with comparison to conventional strategies including endovascular coiling or surgical clipping.

  9. Biomedical Titanium alloy prostheses manufacturing by means of Superplastic and Incremental Forming processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piccininni Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work collects some results of the three-years Research Program “BioForming“, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education (MIUR and aimed to investigate the possibility of using flexible sheet forming processes, i.e. Super Plastic Forming (SPF and Single Point Incremental Forming (SPIF, for the manufacturing of patient-oriented titanium prostheses. The prosthetic implants used as case studies were from the skull; in particular, two different Ti alloys and geometries were considered: one to be produced in Ti-Gr23 by SPF and one to be produced in Ti-Gr2 by SPIF. Numerical simulations implementing material behaviours evaluated by characterization tests were conducted in order to design both the manufacturing processes. Subsequently, experimental tests were carried out implementing numerical results in terms of: (i gas pressure profile able to determine a constant (and optimal strain rate during the SPF process; (ii tool path able to avoid rupture during the SPIF process. Post forming characteristics of the prostheses in terms of thickness distributions were measured and compared to data from simulations for validation purposes. A good correlation between numerical and experimental thickness distributions has been obtained; in addition, the possibility of successfully adopting both the SPF and the SPIF processes for the manufacturing of prostheses has been demonstrated.

  10. Control Capabilities of Myoelectric Robotic Prostheses by Hand Amputees: A Scientific Research and Market Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Müller, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Hand amputation can dramatically affect the capabilities of a person. Cortical reorganization occurs in the brain, but the motor and somatosensorial cortex can interact with the remnant muscles of the missing hand even many years after the amputation, leading to the possibility to restore the capabilities of hand amputees through myoelectric prostheses. Myoelectric hand prostheses with many degrees of freedom are commercially available and recent advances in rehabilitation robotics suggest that their natural control can be performed in real life. The first commercial products exploiting pattern recognition to recognize the movements have recently been released, however the most common control systems are still usually unnatural and must be learned through long training. Dexterous and naturally controlled robotic prostheses can become reality in the everyday life of amputees but the path still requires many steps. This mini-review aims to improve the situation by giving an overview of the advancements in the commercial and scientific domains in order to outline the current and future chances in this field and to foster the integration between market and scientific research.

  11. Control Capabilities of Myoelectric Robotic Prostheses by Hand Amputees: A Scientific Research and Market Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredo eAtzori

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hand amputation can dramatically affect the capabilities of a person. Cortical reorganization occurs in the brain, but the motor and somatosensorial cortex can interact with the remnant muscles of the missing hand even many years after the amputation, leading to the possibility to restore the capabilities of hand amputees through myoelectric prostheses. Myoelectric hand prostheses with many degrees of freedom are commercially available and recent advances in rehabilitation robotics suggest that their natural control can be performed in real life. The first commercial products exploiting pattern recognition to recognize the movements have recently been released, however the most common control systems are still usually unnatural and must be learned through long training. Dexterous and naturally controlled robotic prostheses can become reality in the everyday life of amputees but the path still requires many steps. This mini-review aims to improve the situation by giving an overview of the advancements in the commercial and scientific domains in order to outline the current and future chances in this field and to foster the integration between market and scientific research.

  12. Neuromuscular coordination of masticatory muscles in subjects with two types of implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Maglione, Michele; Simion, Massimo; Sforza, Chiarella

    2004-04-01

    To compare the electromyographic (EMG) characteristics of masticatory muscles in patients with fixed implant-supported prostheses and implant overdentures. Nineteen subjects aged 45-79 years were examined. Fourteen were edentulous and had been successfully rehabilitated with (a) maxillary and mandibular implant-supported fixed prostheses (seven patients); (b) mandibular implant overdentures and maxillary complete dentures (seven patients). Five control subjects had natural dentition or single/partial (no more than two teeth) tooth or implant fixed dentures. Surface EMG of the masseter and temporal muscles was performed during unilateral gum chewing and during maximum teeth clenching. To reduce biological and instrumental noise, all values were standardized as percentage of a maximum clenching on cotton rolls. During clenching, temporal muscle symmetry was larger in control subjects and fixed implant-supported prosthesis patients than in overdenture patients (analysis of variance, P=0.005). No differences were found in masseter muscle symmetry or in muscular torque. Muscle activities (integrated areas of the EMG potentials over time) were significantly larger in control subjects than in implant-supported prosthesis patients (P=0.014). In both patient groups, a poor neuromuscular coordination during chewing, with altered muscular patterns, and a smaller left-right symmetry than in control subjects were found (P=0.05). No differences in masticatory frequency were found. Surface EMG analysis of clenching and chewing showed that fixed implant-supported prostheses and implant overdentures were functionally equivalent. Neuromuscular coordination during chewing was inferior to that found in subjects with natural dentition.

  13. Dental prostheses mimic the natural enamel behavior under functional loading: A review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Madfa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramic dental restorations are designed to repair functionality as well as esthetics of the failed teeth. However, these materials exhibited several performance deficiencies such as fracture, poor esthetic properties of ceramic cores (particularly zirconia cores, and difficulty in accomplishing a strong ceramic–resin-based cement bond. Therefore, improving the mechanical properties of these ceramic materials is of great interest in a wide range of disciplines. Consequently, spatial gradients in surface composition and structure can improve the mechanical integrity of ceramic dental restorations. Thus, this article reviews the current status of the functionally graded dental prostheses inspired by the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ structures and the linear gradation in Young's modulus of the DEJ, as a new material design approach, to improve the performance compared to traditional dental prostheses. This is a remarkable example of nature's ability to engineer functionally graded dental prostheses. The current article opens a new avenue for recent researches aimed at the further development of new ceramic dental restorations for improving their clinical durability.

  14. Accelerated treatment protocols: full arch treatment with interim and definitive prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Carl

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of titanium, root form implants and osseointegration, dental treatment has undergone a metamorphosis in recent years. These new techniques enable dentists to provide anchorage for various kinds of prostheses that improve masticatory function, esthetics, and comfort for patients. Implant treatment protocols have been improved relative to implant macro- and micro-geometries, surgical and prosthetic components, and treatment times. Over the past 20 years, immediate occlusal function (also known as loading) has been established as a predictable treatment modality, provided certain specific criteria are met. In many cases, edentulous patients, crippled by the loss of their teeth, can undergo outpatient surgical and prosthetic procedures and return to a masticatory function that is near normal--sometimes after only one day of surgical and prosthetic treatment. This treatment option is also available for patients with advanced, generalized periodontal disease. Computer-assisted design/Computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has transformed how dental prostheses are made, offering improved accuracy, longevity, and biocompatibility; along with reduced labor costs and fewer complications than casting technologies. This article reviews the principles associated with immediate occlusal loading and illustrates one specific accelerated prosthodontic treatment protocol used to treat edentulous and partially edentulous patients with interim and definitive prostheses.

  15. High Cable Forces Deteriorate Pinch Force Control in Voluntary-Closing Body-Powered Prostheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Hichert

    Full Text Available It is generally asserted that reliable and intuitive control of upper-limb prostheses requires adequate feedback of prosthetic finger positions and pinch forces applied to objects. Body-powered prostheses (BPPs provide the user with direct proprioceptive feedback. Currently available BPPs often require high cable operation forces, which complicates control of the forces at the terminal device. The aim of this study is to quantify the influence of high cable forces on object manipulation with voluntary-closing prostheses.Able-bodied male subjects were fitted with a bypass-prosthesis with low and high cable force settings for the prehensor. Subjects were requested to grasp and transfer a collapsible object as fast as they could without dropping or breaking it. The object had a low and a high breaking force setting.Subjects conducted significantly more successful manipulations with the low cable force setting, both for the low (33% more and high (50% object's breaking force. The time to complete the task was not different between settings during successful manipulation trials.High cable forces lead to reduced pinch force control during object manipulation. This implies that low cable operation forces should be a key design requirement for voluntary-closing BPPs.

  16. PIXE characterization of tissues surrounding metallic prostheses coated with biological glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbotteau, Y.; Irigaray, J.L.; Moretto, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    Biological glasses can be used as coatings for metallic prostheses in order to prevent corrosion. According to their composition, these glasses have different properties. We studied, in vivo, two glasses referred to as BVA and BVH. They are used as coatings of Ti6Al4V metallic implant. BVA glass disappears after 3 months of implantation and is replaced by bone. Prostheses initially coated by this glass have a larger osseous contact perimeter compared to the uncoated prostheses. This ensures a better anchoring of the implant and limits the micro-motions which cause wear debris. BVH glass keeps a constant composition during implantation and it is used like a layer which isolates metal implant from biological environment. In order to characterize the bony environment surrounding implants, we have used PIXE and RBS methods. This paper shows results of the behavior of bony tissue under micro-beam, the quality tests of new bone which replaces the BVA glass coating and the evaluation of corrosion effects. Titanium release in bony tissues begins when the metal surface of the prosthesis is exposed to biological fluids. After a few months of implantation, the titanium contamination is stabilized and remains localized within the first tens of micrometers of surrounding bone

  17. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M'rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy.

  18. Atrophy of the basal ganglia as the initial diagnostic sign of germinoma in the basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K.; Ishikawa, K.; Takahashi, N.; Furusawa, T.; Sakai, K. [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Ito, J.; Tokiguchi, S. [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Faculty of Dentistry (Japan); Morii, K. [Department of Neurosurgery, Niigata University Brain Research Institute (Japan); Yamada, M. [Department of Pathology, Niigata University Brain Research Institute (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    Germ-cell tumors of the central nervous system generally develop in the midline, but the tumors can also occur in the basal ganglia and/or thalamus. However, MR images have rarely been documented in the early stage of the tumor in these regions. We retrospectively reviewed MR images obtained on admission and approximately 3 years earlier in two patients with germinoma in the basal ganglia, and compared them with CT. In addition to hyperdensity on CT, both hyperintensity on T1-weighted images and a small hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted images were commonly seen in the basal ganglia. These findings may be early MRI signs of germinoma in this region, and the earliest and most characteristic diagnostic feature on MRI was atrophy of the basal ganglia, which was recognizable before development of hemiparesis. (orig.)

  19. Examination of the torque required to passively palmar abduct the thumb CMC joint in a pediatric population with hemiplegia and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Leia; Ahmad, Mona Qureshi; Kelty-Stephen, Damian; Correia, Annette

    2015-12-16

    Many activities of daily living involve precision grasping and bimanual manipulation, such as putting toothpaste on a toothbrush or feeding oneself. However, children afflicted by stroke, cerebral palsy, or traumatic brain injury may have lost or never had the ability to actively and accurately control the thumb. To translate insights from adult rehabilitation robotics to innovative therapies for hand rehabilitation in pediatric care, specifically for thumb deformities, an understanding of the torque needed to abduct the thumb to assist grasping tasks is required. Participants (n=16, 10 female, 13.2±3.1 years) had an upper extremity evaluation and measures were made of their passive range of motion, anthropometrics, and torques to abduct the thumb for both their affected and non-affected sides. Torque measures were made using a custom wrist orthosis that was adjusted for each participant. The torque to achieve maximum abduction was 1.47±0.61inlb for the non-affected side and 1.51±0.68inlb for the affected side, with a maximum recorded value of 4.87inlb. The overall maximum applied torque was observed during adduction and was 5.10inlb. We saw variation in the applied torque, which could have been due to the applied torques by the Occupational Therapist or the participant actively assisting or resisting the motion rather than remaining passive. We expect similar muscle and participant variation to exist with an assistive device. Thus, the data presented here can be used to inform the specifications for the development of an assistive thumb orthosis for children with "thumb-in-palm" deformity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Educational Quality of YouTube Videos in Thumb Exercises for Carpometacarpal Osteoarthritis: A Search on Current Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Cantero-Tellez, Raquel; Valdes, Kristin; Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Berjano, Pedro

    2017-09-01

    Conservative treatments are commonly performed therapeutic interventions for the management of carpometacarpal (CMC) joint osteoarthritis (OA). Physical and occupational therapies are starting to use video-based online content as both a patient teaching tool and a source for treatment techniques. YouTube is a popular video-sharing website that can be accessed easily. The purpose of this study was to analyze the quality of content and potential sources of bias in videos available on YouTube pertaining to thumb exercises for CMC OA. The YouTube video database was systematically searched using the search term thumb osteoarthritis and exercises from its inception to March 10, 2017. Authors independently selected videos, conducted quality assessment, and extracted results. A total of 832 videos were found using the keywords. Of these, 10 videos clearly demonstrated therapeutic exercise for the management of CMC OA. In addition, the top-ranked video found by performing a search of "views" was a video with more than 121 863 views uploaded in 2015 that lasted 12.33 minutes and scored only 2 points on the Global Score for Educational Value rating scale. Most of the videos viewed that described conservative interventions for CMC OA management have a low level of evidence to support their use. Although patients and novice hand therapists are using YouTube and other online resources, videos that are produced by expert hand therapists are scarce.

  1. Rules of thumb from plant data to estimate the public consequences of a nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggenstos, M.; Uboldi, P.; Schulz, R.

    2001-01-01

    In an accident situation with core degradation there is typically a pre-phase in which the radioactivity is inside the primary system and the containment before a release to the environment. The assessment of the possible risk to the public in this situation must be based on the situation inside the plant (violation of safety parameters) and a forecast of the containment behaviour to be expected. To obtain a first quick estimate of the source term and, therefore, the off-site dose rules of thumb were established which should fulfil the following purposes: assessment of the danger, estimated from plant data, estimation of the dose at the critical point outside based on the dose rate inside the containment. The rules of thumb which were introduced in Switzerland, are explained. The assessment is based on roughly 30 plant parameters which are transmitted in case of an accident in real-time. The rules were designed in such a way that they rely on simply determined parameters such core exit temperature or dose rate in the containment. (orig.) [de

  2. Early detection surveillance for an emerging plant pathogen: a rule of thumb to predict prevalence at first discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, S; Gottwald, T R; Cunniffe, N J; Alonso Chavez, V; van den Bosch, F

    2015-09-07

    Emerging plant pathogens are a significant problem for conservation and food security. Surveillance is often instigated in an attempt to detect an invading epidemic before it gets out of control. Yet in practice many epidemics are not discovered until already at a high prevalence, partly due to a lack of quantitative understanding of how surveillance effort and the dynamics of an invading epidemic relate. We test a simple rule of thumb to determine, for a surveillance programme taking a fixed number of samples at regular intervals, the distribution of the prevalence an epidemic will have reached on first discovery (discovery-prevalence) and its expectation E(q*). We show that E(q*) = r/(N/Δ), i.e. simply the rate of epidemic growth divided by the rate of sampling; where r is the epidemic growth rate, N is the sample size and Δ is the time between sampling rounds. We demonstrate the robustness of this rule of thumb using spatio-temporal epidemic models as well as data from real epidemics. Our work supports the view that, for the purposes of early detection surveillance, simple models can provide useful insights in apparently complex systems. The insight can inform decisions on surveillance resource allocation in plant health and has potential applicability to invasive species generally. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Learning Reward Uncertainty in the Basal Ganglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Mikhael

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning the reliability of different sources of rewards is critical for making optimal choices. However, despite the existence of detailed theory describing how the expected reward is learned in the basal ganglia, it is not known how reward uncertainty is estimated in these circuits. This paper presents a class of models that encode both the mean reward and the spread of the rewards, the former in the difference between the synaptic weights of D1 and D2 neurons, and the latter in their sum. In the models, the tendency to seek (or avoid options with variable reward can be controlled by increasing (or decreasing the tonic level of dopamine. The models are consistent with the physiology of and synaptic plasticity in the basal ganglia, they explain the effects of dopaminergic manipulations on choices involving risks, and they make multiple experimental predictions.

  4. Investigation of the dosimetric accuracy of the isocenter shifting method in prostate cancer patients with and without hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Kinsey, Erica; Xia Ping

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The use of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) enables compensation for prostate movement by shifting the treatment isocenter to track the prostate on a daily basis. Although shifting the isocenter can alter the source to skin distances (SSDs) and the effective depth of the target volume, it is commonly assumed that these changes have a negligible dosimetric effect, and therefore, the number of monitor units delivered is usually not adjusted. However, it is unknown whether or not this assumption is valid for patient with hip prostheses, which frequently contain high density materials. Methods: The authors conducted a retrospective study to investigate dosimetric effect of the isocenter shifting method for prostate patients with and without hip prostheses. For each patient, copies of the prostate volume were shifted by up to 1.5 cm from the original position to simulate prostate movement in 0.5 cm increments. Subsequently, 12 plans were created for each patient by creating a copy of the original plan for each prostate position with the isocenter shifted to track the position of the shifted prostate. The dose to the prostate was then recalculated for each plan. For patients with hip prostheses, plans were created both with and without lateral beam angles entering through the prostheses. Results: Without isocenter shifting to compensate for prostate motion of 1.5 cm, the dose to the 95% of the prostate (D-95%) changed by an average of 30% and by up to 64%. This was reduced to less than 3% with the isocenter shifting method. It was found that for patients with hip prostheses, this technique worked best for treatment plans that avoided beam angles passing through the prostheses. Conclusions: The results demonstrated that the isocenter shifting method can accurately deliver dose to the prostate even in patients with hip prostheses.

  5. Dose attenuation effect of hip prostheses in a 9-MV photon beam. Commercial treatment planning system versus Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesbahi, A.; Nejad, F.S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effect of various hip prostheses on pelvis lateral fields treated by a 9-MV photon beam using Monte Carlo (MC) and effective path-length (EPL) methods. The head of the Neptun 10 pc linac was simulated using the MCNP4C MC code. The accuracy of the MC model was evaluated using measured dosimetric features including depth dose values and dose profiles in a water phantom. The Alfard treatment planning system (TPS) was used for EPL calculations. A virtual water phantom with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 30 cm 3 and a cube with dimensions of 4 x 4 x 4 cm 3 made of various metals centered in 12 cm depth was used for MC and EPL calculations. Various materials including titanium, Co-Cr-Mo, and steel alloys were used as hip prostheses. Our results showed significant attenuation in absorbed dose for points after and inside the prostheses. Attenuations of 32%, 54% and 55% were seen for titanium, Co-Cr-Mo, and steel alloys, respectively, at a distance of 5 cm from the prosthesis. Considerable dose increase (up to 18%) was found at the water-prosthesis interface due to back-scattered electrons using the MC method. The results of EPL calculations for the titanium implant were comparable to the MC calculations. This method, however, was not able to predict the interface effect or calculate accurately the absorbed dose in the presence of the Co-Cr-Mo and steel prostheses. The dose perturbation effect of hip prostheses is significant and cannot be predicted accurately by the EPL method for Co-Cr-Mo or steel prostheses. The use of MC-based TPS is recommended for treatments requiring fields passing through hip prostheses. (author)

  6. Basal ganglia lesions in children and adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika, E-mail: m.figatowska@mp.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Institute of Mother and Child, ul. Kasprzaka 17a, 01-211 Warsaw (Poland); Mierzewska, Hanna, E-mail: h.mierzewska@gmail.com [Department of Neurology of Children and Adolescents, Institute of Mother and Child, ul. Kasprzaka 17a, 01-211 Warsaw (Poland); Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta, E-mail: e-jurkiewicz@o2.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-05-15

    The term “basal ganglia” refers to caudate and lentiform nuclei, the latter composed of putamen and globus pallidus, substantia nigra and subthalamic nuclei and these deep gray matter structures belong to the extrapyramidal system. Many diseases may present as basal ganglia abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) – to a lesser degree – allow for detection of basal ganglia injury. In many cases, MRI alone does not usually allow to establish diagnosis but together with the knowledge of age and circumstances of onset and clinical course of the disease is a powerful tool of differential diagnosis. The lesions may be unilateral: in Rassmussen encephalitis, diabetes with hemichorea/hemiballism and infarction or – more frequently – bilateral in many pathologic conditions. Restricted diffusion is attributable to infarction, acute hypoxic–ischemic injury, hypoglycemia, Leigh disease, encephalitis and CJD. Contrast enhancement may be seen in cases of infarction and encephalitis. T1-hyperintensity of the lesions is uncommon and may be observed unilaterally in case of hemichorea/hemiballism and bilaterally in acute asphyxia in term newborns, in hypoglycemia, NF1, Fahr disease and manganese intoxication. Decreased signal intensity on GRE/T2*-weighted images and/or SWI indicating iron, calcium or hemosiderin depositions is observed in panthotenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy, Fahr disease (and other calcifications) as well as with the advancing age. There are a few papers in the literature reviewing basal ganglia lesions. The authors present a more detailed review with rich iconography from the own archive.

  7. Basal ganglia lesions in children and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika; Mierzewska, Hanna; Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    The term “basal ganglia” refers to caudate and lentiform nuclei, the latter composed of putamen and globus pallidus, substantia nigra and subthalamic nuclei and these deep gray matter structures belong to the extrapyramidal system. Many diseases may present as basal ganglia abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) – to a lesser degree – allow for detection of basal ganglia injury. In many cases, MRI alone does not usually allow to establish diagnosis but together with the knowledge of age and circumstances of onset and clinical course of the disease is a powerful tool of differential diagnosis. The lesions may be unilateral: in Rassmussen encephalitis, diabetes with hemichorea/hemiballism and infarction or – more frequently – bilateral in many pathologic conditions. Restricted diffusion is attributable to infarction, acute hypoxic–ischemic injury, hypoglycemia, Leigh disease, encephalitis and CJD. Contrast enhancement may be seen in cases of infarction and encephalitis. T1-hyperintensity of the lesions is uncommon and may be observed unilaterally in case of hemichorea/hemiballism and bilaterally in acute asphyxia in term newborns, in hypoglycemia, NF1, Fahr disease and manganese intoxication. Decreased signal intensity on GRE/T2*-weighted images and/or SWI indicating iron, calcium or hemosiderin depositions is observed in panthotenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy, Fahr disease (and other calcifications) as well as with the advancing age. There are a few papers in the literature reviewing basal ganglia lesions. The authors present a more detailed review with rich iconography from the own archive

  8. Linear Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Ichinokawa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC presents with diverse clinical features, and several morphologic and histologic variants of BCC have been reported [Sexton et al.: J Am Acad Dermatol 1990;23:1118–1126]. Linear BCC was first described as a new clinical subtype in 1985 by Lewis [Int J Dematol 1985;24:124–125]. Here, we present a case of linear BCC that we recently encountered in an elderly Japanese patient, and review other cases reported in Japan.

  9. CT brain demonstration of basal ganglion calcification in adult HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    brain barrier has been postulated. Calcification of the basal ganglia in encephalopathic HIV/AIDS children has been relatively well documented. Only two adult HIV cases with basal ganglion calcification (BGC) have been reported in the literature.

  10. Radial Force: An Underestimated Parameter in Oversizing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Prostheses: In Vitro Analysis with Five Commercialized Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, Sandrine; Fujita, Buntaro; Gullón, Lucía; Désirée, Pott; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Ensminger, Stephan; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2017-09-05

    The goal is to inform in depth on transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) prosthesis mechanical behavior, depending on frame type, design, and size, and how it crucially impacts the oversizing issue in clinical use, and ultimately the procedure outcome. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is an established therapy for high-risk patients suffering from aortic stenosis, and the indication for TAVR is progressively expanding to intermediate-risk patients. Choosing the optimal oversizing degree is crucial to safely anchor the TAVR valve-which involves limiting the risks for embolism, aortic regurgitation, conductance disturbance, or annulus rupture-and to increase the valve prosthesis performance. The radial force (RF) profiles of five TAVR prostheses were measured in vitro: the CoreValve 23 and 26 (Medtronic, MN), the Acurate neo S (Symetis, Switzerland), and the SAPIEN XT 23 and 26 (Edwards Lifesciences, CA). Measurements were run with the RX Machine equipment (Machine Solutions Inc., AZ), which is used in ISO standard tests for intravascular stents. Test protocols were adapted for TAVR prostheses. With the prostheses RF profiles' results, mechanical behavior differences could be described and discussed in terms of oversizing strategy and clinical impact for all five valves. Besides, crossing the prostheses' RF profiles with their recommended size windows made the assessment of borderline size cases possible and helped analyze the risks when accurate measurement of patient aortic annulus proves difficult. The prostheses' RF profiles bring new support in clinical decision-making for valve type and size in patients.

  11. Reduction of metal artifacts from hip prostheses on CT images of the pelvis: value of iterative reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsbach, Fabian; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Wanner, Guido A; Krauss, Andreas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2013-07-01

    To assess the value of iterative frequency split-normalized (IFS) metal artifact reduction (MAR) for computed tomography (CT) of hip prostheses. This study had institutional review board and local ethics committee approval. First, a hip phantom with steel and titanium prostheses that had inlays of water, fat, and contrast media in the pelvis was used to optimize the IFS algorithm. Second, 41 consecutive patients with hip prostheses who were undergoing CT were included. Data sets were reconstructed with filtered back projection, the IFS algorithm, and a linear interpolation MAR algorithm. Two blinded, independent readers evaluated axial, coronal, and sagittal CT reformations for overall image quality, image quality of pelvic organs, and assessment of pelvic abnormalities. CT attenuation and image noise were measured. Statistical analysis included the Friedman test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and Levene test. Ex vivo experiments demonstrated an optimized IFS algorithm by using a threshold of 2200 HU with four iterations for both steel and titanium prostheses. Measurements of CT attenuation of the inlays were significantly (P algorithm for CT image reconstruction significantly reduces metal artifacts from hip prostheses, improves the reliability of CT number measurements, and improves the confidence for depicting pelvic abnormalities.

  12. Development of friction and wear full-scale testing for TKR prostheses with reliable low cost apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwandi, Agri; Soemardi, Tresna P.; Kiswanto, Gandjar; Kusumaningsih, Widjajalaksmi; I. Gusti Agung I. G., W.

    2018-02-01

    Prostheses products must undergo simulation and physical testing, before clinical testing. Finite element method is a preliminary simulation for in vivo test. The method visualizes the magnitude of the compressive force and the critical location of the Total Knee Replacement (TKR) prostheses design. In vitro testing is classified as physical testing for prostheses product. The test is conducted to evaluate the potential failure of the product and the characteristics of the prostheses TKR material. Friction and wear testing are part of the in vivo test. Motion of knee joints, which results in the phenomena of extension and deflection in the femoral and tibia insert, is represented by friction and wear testing. Friction and wear tests aim to obtain an approximate lifetime in normal and extreme load patterns as characterized by the shape of the friction surface area. The lifetime estimation requires friction and wear full-scale testing equipments for TKR prostheses products. These are necessary in obtaining initial data on potential product failures and characterizing of the material based on the ASTM F2724-08 standards. Based on the testing result and statistical analysis data, the average wear rate value per year is 2.19 × 10-3 mg/MC, with a 10 % safety limit of volume and 14,400 cycles times, for 15 hours moving nonstop then the prediction of wear life of the component tibia insert is ± 10 years.

  13. Sport prostheses and prosthetic adaptations for the upper and lower limb amputees: an overview of peer reviewed literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragaru, Mihai; Dekker, Rienk; Geertzen, Jan H B

    2012-09-01

    Sport prostheses are used by both upper- and lower-limb amputees while participating in sports and other physical activities. Although the number of these devices has increased over the past decade, no overview of the peer reviewed literature describing them has been published previously. Such an overview will allow specialists to choose appropriate prostheses based on available scientific evidence rather than on personal experience or preference. To provide an overview of the sport prostheses as they are described by the papers published in peer reviewed literature. Literature review. Four electronic databases were searched using free text and Medical Subject Headings (MESH) terms. Papers were included if they concerned a prosthesis or a prosthetic adaptation used in sports. Papers were excluded if they did not originate from peer reviewed sources, if they concerned prostheses for body parts other than the upper or lower limbs, if they concerned amputations distal to the wrist or ankle, or if they were written in a language other than English. Twenty-four papers were included in this study. The vast majority contained descriptive data and consisted of expert opinions and technical notes. Data concerning the energy efficiency, technical characteristics and special mechanical properties of prostheses or prosthetic adaptations for sports, other than running, are scarce.

  14. Traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hematoma: A report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Grewal, Sarvpreet Singh; Gupta, Bharat; Jain, Vikas; Sobti, Harman

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic Basal ganglia hemorrhage is relatively uncommon. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma after trauma is extremely rare and is limited to case reports. We report two cases of traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhage, and review the literature in brief. Both cases were managed conservatively.

  15. Basal Cell Ameloblastoma: A Rare Histological Variant of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ameloblastomas are an inscrutable group of oral tumors. Basal cell ameloblastoma is a rare variant of ameloblastoma with very few cases reported until date. The tumor is composed of more primitive cells and has less conspicuous peripheral palisading. It shows remarkable similarity to basal cell carcinoma, basal cell ...

  16. Surface characterization of polymers used in fabrication of interim prostheses after treatment with photopolymerized glaze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Daniela Micheline dos; Commar, Betina Chiarelo; Rocha Bonatto, Liliane da; Freitas da Silva, Emily Vivianne; Sônego, Mariana Vilela; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Pesqueira, Aldieris Alves; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2017-01-01

    The material used for interim prostheses fabrication must present excellent physical properties for greater longevity in the face of environmental conditions, which can occur in the oral cavity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a photopolymerized glaze on the physical and mechanical properties of polymers used for the fabrication of interim prostheses, before and after thermocycling and immersion in staining solutions. One hundred samples of composite and acrylic resins were fabricated: Dencor chemically activated acrylic resin (CAAR) (n = 20) and heat-polymerized acrylic resin (HPAR) (n = 20), Charisma (n = 20), Structur (n = 20), and Protemp (n = 20). A mechanical polishing was performed on half of the samples, and a chemical polishing was performed on the remaining samples. Subsequently, all samples were submitted to thermocycling and immersion in coffee staining solution for 21 days. Analysis of color and microhardness, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) were performed. The data were submitted to repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by the Tukey test (α = 0.05) and the Student t-test (α = 0.05). It was verified that the glaze decreased the chromatic alteration values, and increased the microhardness values of the samples, with the exception of the Charisma resin. The samples that did not receive chemical polishing had the greatest number of surface irregularities. This study concluded that the groups with glaze presented less color alteration. In addition, Charisma and Structur resins exhibited the greatest chromatic stability. As to the microhardness, the values were greater when the samples were treated with the glaze, with the exception of the Charisma group. - Highlights: • Polymers used in fabrication of interim prostheses were analyzed. • The influence of a chemical polishing on these polymers was analyzed.

  17. A computer-based biomechanical analysis of the three-dimensional motion of cementless hip prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J L; Bloomfeld, R S; Lautenschlager, E P; Wixson, R L

    1992-04-01

    A computer-based mathematical technique was developed to measure and completely describe the migration and micromotion of a femoral hip prosthesis relative to the femur. This technique utilized the mechanics of rigid-body motion analysis and apparatus of seven linear displacement transducers to measure and describe the complete three-dimensional motion of the prosthesis during cyclic loading. Computer acquisition of the data and custom analysis software allowed one to calculate the magnitude and direction of the motion of any point of interest on the prostheses from information about the motion of two points on the device. The data were also used to replay the tests using a computer animation technique, which allowed a magnified view of the three-dimensional motion of the prosthesis. This paper describes the mathematical development of the rigid-body motion analysis, the experimental method and apparatus for data collection, the technique used to animate the motion, the sources of error and the effect of the assumptions (rigid bodies) on the results. Selected results of individual test runs of uncemented and cemented prostheses are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the method. The combined effect of the vibration and electrical noise resulted in a resolution of the system of about 3-5 microns motion for each transducer. Deformation effects appear to contribute about 3-15 microns to the measurement error. This measurement and analysis technique is a very sensitive and powerful means of assessing the effects of different design parameters on the migration and micromotion of total joint prostheses and can be applied to any other case (knee, dental implant) where three-dimensional relative motion between two bodies is important.

  18. A biodegradable gentamicin-hydroxyapatite-coating for infection prophylaxis in cementless hip prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Neut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A degradable, poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, gentamicin-loaded prophylactic coating for hydroxyapatite (HA-coated cementless hip prostheses is developed with similar antibacterial efficacy as offered by gentamicin-loaded cements for fixing traditional, cemented prostheses in bone. We describe the development pathway, from in vitro investigation of antibiotic release and antibacterial properties of this PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating in different in vitro models to an evaluation of its efficacy in preventing implant-related infection in rabbits. Bone in-growth in the absence and presence of the coating was investigated in a canine model. The PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating showed high-burst release, with antibacterial efficacy in agar-assays completely disappearing after 4 days, minimising risk of inducing antibiotic resistance. Gentamicin-sensitive and gentamicin-resistant staphylococci were killed by the antibiotic-loaded coating, in a simulated prosthesis-related interfacial gap. PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coatings prevented growth of bioluminescent staphylococci around a miniature-stem mounted in bacterially contaminated agar, as observed using bio-optical imaging. PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coated pins inserted in bacterially contaminated medullary canals in rabbits caused a statistically significant reduction in infection rates compared to HA-coated pins without gentamicin. Bone ingrowth to PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coated pins, in condylar defects of Beagle dogs was not impaired by the presence of the degradable, gentamicin-loaded coating. In conclusion, the PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating constitutes an effective strategy for infection prophylaxis in cementless prostheses.

  19. [Clinical characteristics of the Soviet low-profile heart valve prostheses EMIKS and LIKS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukerman, G I; Dobrova, N B; Faminskiĭ, D O; Pomortseva, L V; Gvakhariia, I N; Chigogidze, N A; Zaretskiĭ, Iu V

    1989-01-01

    The present work is devoted to the clinical assessment of the Soviet-made cardiac valve prostheses 'EMIKS' and 'LIKS'. From 1983 to May 1, 1988, 632 prostheses were implanted to 508 patients. A group of 348 patients were assessed: 139 after mitral (M) replacement, 130 after aortal (A) replacement, and 79 after mitral-aortal (M+A) replacement. Hospital mortality rate was: in M group--4.3 per cent, in A group--5.3 per cent, in M+A group--8.8 per cent. Survival rate on the fifth postoperative year was: in M group--89.5 +/- 9.2 per cent, in a group--90.0 +/- 4.2 per cent, in M+A group--91.0 +/- 6.2 per cent, the stability of the good results being 85.5 +/- 7.2, 79.5 +/- 6.2, and 75.0 +/- 9.1 per cent, respectively. At year 5 of the follow-up, patient numbers without thromboembolic complications amounted to 95.0 +/- 4.7 per cent in M group, 95.5 +/- 4.2 per cent in A group, and 85.0 +/- 9.1 in M+A group. 95.1 per cent patients belong to functional classes I and II. In mitral replacement, the mean 'EMIKS' gradient was 4.2 +/- 0.58 mm Hg, the 'LIKS' one--4.58 +/- 0.62 mm Hg. Intravascular hemolysis was not observed. The 'EMIKS' and 'LIKS' prostheses match the models produced in other countries. No significant differences between the two models were found.

  20. Whole-body angular momentum during stair walking using passive and powered lower-limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickle, Nathaniel T; Wilken, Jason M; Aldridge, Jennifer M; Neptune, Richard R; Silverman, Anne K

    2014-10-17

    Individuals with a unilateral transtibial amputation have a greater risk of falling compared to able-bodied individuals, and falling on stairs can lead to serious injuries. Individuals with transtibial amputations have lost ankle plantarflexor muscle function, which is critical for regulating whole-body angular momentum to maintain dynamic balance. Recently, powered prostheses have been designed to provide active ankle power generation with the goal of restoring biological ankle function. However, the effects of using a powered prosthesis on the regulation of whole-body angular momentum are unknown. The purpose of this study was to use angular momentum to evaluate dynamic balance in individuals with a transtibial amputation using powered and passive prostheses relative to able-bodied individuals during stair ascent and descent. Ground reaction forces, external moment arms, and joint powers were also investigated to interpret the angular momentum results. A key result was that individuals with an amputation had a larger range of sagittal-plane angular momentum during prosthetic limb stance compared to able-bodied individuals during stair ascent. There were no significant differences in the frontal, transverse, or sagittal-plane ranges of angular momentum or maximum magnitude of the angular momentum vector between the passive and powered prostheses during stair ascent or descent. These results indicate that individuals with an amputation have altered angular momentum trajectories during stair walking compared to able-bodied individuals, which may contribute to an increased fall risk. The results also suggest that a powered prosthesis provides no distinct advantage over a passive prosthesis in maintaining dynamic balance during stair walking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Surface characterization of polymers used in fabrication of interim prostheses after treatment with photopolymerized glaze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Daniela Micheline dos, E-mail: danielamicheline@foa.unesp.br [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), José Bonifácio St., 1193, Aracatuba, São Paulo 16015-050 (Brazil); Commar, Betina Chiarelo; Rocha Bonatto, Liliane da; Freitas da Silva, Emily Vivianne; Sônego, Mariana Vilela [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), José Bonifácio St., 1193, Aracatuba, São Paulo 16015-050 (Brazil); Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano [Technological Plasma Laboratory (LaPTec), Experimental Campus of Sorocaba, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Tres de Março Av., 511, Sorocaba, Sao Paulo, 18087-180 (Brazil); Pesqueira, Aldieris Alves; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), José Bonifácio St., 1193, Aracatuba, São Paulo 16015-050 (Brazil)

    2017-02-01

    The material used for interim prostheses fabrication must present excellent physical properties for greater longevity in the face of environmental conditions, which can occur in the oral cavity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a photopolymerized glaze on the physical and mechanical properties of polymers used for the fabrication of interim prostheses, before and after thermocycling and immersion in staining solutions. One hundred samples of composite and acrylic resins were fabricated: Dencor chemically activated acrylic resin (CAAR) (n = 20) and heat-polymerized acrylic resin (HPAR) (n = 20), Charisma (n = 20), Structur (n = 20), and Protemp (n = 20). A mechanical polishing was performed on half of the samples, and a chemical polishing was performed on the remaining samples. Subsequently, all samples were submitted to thermocycling and immersion in coffee staining solution for 21 days. Analysis of color and microhardness, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) were performed. The data were submitted to repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by the Tukey test (α = 0.05) and the Student t-test (α = 0.05). It was verified that the glaze decreased the chromatic alteration values, and increased the microhardness values of the samples, with the exception of the Charisma resin. The samples that did not receive chemical polishing had the greatest number of surface irregularities. This study concluded that the groups with glaze presented less color alteration. In addition, Charisma and Structur resins exhibited the greatest chromatic stability. As to the microhardness, the values were greater when the samples were treated with the glaze, with the exception of the Charisma group. - Highlights: • Polymers used in fabrication of interim prostheses were analyzed. • The influence of a chemical polishing on these polymers was analyzed.

  2. Fixed and mobile-bearing total ankle prostheses: Effect on tibial bone strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Alexandre; Fernandes, Caroline Sieger; Guillemin, Maïka; Crevoisier, Xavier

    2017-10-01

    Total ankle replacement is associated to a high revision rate. To improve implant survival, the potential advantage of prostheses with fixed bearing compared to mobile bearing is unclear. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that fixed and mobile bearing prostheses are associated with different biomechanical quantities typically associated to implant failure. With a validated finite element model, we compared three cases: a prosthesis with a fixed bearing, a prosthesis with a mobile bearing in a centered position, and a prosthesis with mobile bearing in an eccentric position. Both prostheses were obtained from the same manufacturer. They were tested on seven tibias with maximum axial compression force during walking. We tested the hypothesis that there was a difference of bone strain, bone-implant interfacial stress, and bone support between the three cases. We also evaluated, for the three cases, the correlations between bone support, bone strain and bone-implant interfacial stress. There were no statistically significant differences between the three cases. Overall, bone support was mainly trabecular, and less effective in the posterior side. Bone strain and bone-implant interfacial stress were strongly correlated to bone support. Even if slight differences are observed between fixed and mobile bearing, it is not enough to put forward the superiority of one of these implants regarding their reaction to axial compression. When associated to the published clinical results, our study provides no argument to warn surgeons against the use of two-components fixed bearing implants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimization of tomotherapy treatment planning for patients with bilateral hip prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David; Smith, Shaun; Barnett, Rob; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav

    2014-02-04

    To determine the effect of different imaging options and the most efficient imaging strategy for treatment planning of patients with hip prostheses. The planning kilovoltage CT (kVCT) and daily megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies for three prostate cancer patients with bilateral hip prostheses were used for creating hybrid kVCT/MVCT image sets. Treatment plans were created for kVCT images alone, hybrid kVCT/MVCT images, and MVCT images alone using the same dose prescription and planning parameters. The resulting dose volume histograms were compared. The orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) reconstruction tool for kVCT images and different MVCT options were investigated with a water tank fit with double hip prostheses. Treatment plans were created for all imaging options and calculated dose was compared with the one measured by a pin-point ion chamber. On average for three patients, the D35% for the bladder was 8% higher in plans based on MVCT images and 7% higher in plans based on hybrid images, compared to the plans based on kVCT images alone. Likewise, the D35% for the rectum was 3% higher than the kVCT based plan for both hybrid and MVCT plans. The average difference in planned D99% in the PTV compared to kVCT plans was 0.9% and 0.1% for MVCT and hybrid plans, respectively. For the water tank with hip prostheses phantom, the kVCT plan with O-MAR correction applied showed better agreement between the measured and calculated dose than the original image set, with a difference of -1.9% compared to 3.3%. The measured doses for the MVCT plans were lower than the calculated dose due to image size limitations. The best agreement was for the kVCT/MVCT hybrid plans with the difference between calculated and measured dose around 1%. MVCT image provides better visualization of patient anatomy and hybrid kVCT/MVCT study enables more accurate calculations using updated MVCT relative electron density calibration.

  4. Optimization of tomotherapy treatment planning for patients with bilateral hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, David; Smith, Shaun; Barnett, Rob; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of different imaging options and the most efficient imaging strategy for treatment planning of patients with hip prostheses. The planning kilovoltage CT (kVCT) and daily megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies for three prostate cancer patients with bilateral hip prostheses were used for creating hybrid kVCT/MVCT image sets. Treatment plans were created for kVCT images alone, hybrid kVCT/MVCT images, and MVCT images alone using the same dose prescription and planning parameters. The resulting dose volume histograms were compared. The orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) reconstruction tool for kVCT images and different MVCT options were investigated with a water tank fit with double hip prostheses. Treatment plans were created for all imaging options and calculated dose was compared with the one measured by a pin-point ion chamber. On average for three patients, the D 35% for the bladder was 8% higher in plans based on MVCT images and 7% higher in plans based on hybrid images, compared to the plans based on kVCT images alone. Likewise, the D 35% for the rectum was 3% higher than the kVCT based plan for both hybrid and MVCT plans. The average difference in planned D99% in the PTV compared to kVCT plans was 0.9% and 0.1% for MVCT and hybrid plans, respectively. For the water tank with hip prostheses phantom, the kVCT plan with O-MAR correction applied showed better agreement between the measured and calculated dose than the original image set, with a difference of -1.9% compared to 3.3%. The measured doses for the MVCT plans were lower than the calculated dose due to image size limitations. The best agreement was for the kVCT/MVCT hybrid plans with the difference between calculated and measured dose around 1%. MVCT image provides better visualization of patient anatomy and hybrid kVCT/MVCT study enables more accurate calculations using updated MVCT relative electron density calibration

  5. Early rehabilitation of facial defects using interim removable prostheses: A clinical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekanandhan Ramkumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical resection of neoplasms or malformations of the face may result in defects that are not amenable to immediate surgical reconstruction. Such defects can have a severe adverse effect on patient perceptions of body image and self-esteem. In these cases, the use of an interim removable facial prosthesis can offer a rapid alternative treatment solution. The patient may then resume social interactions more comfortably while permitting easy access to the facial defect to observe tissue healing while awaiting definitive rehabilitation. This article presents a case report describing the use of interim nasal prostheses to provide rapid patient rehabilitation of facial defects.

  6. High-density EMG e-textile systems for the control of active prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farina, Dario; Lorrain, Thomas; Negro, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Myoelectric control of active prostheses requires electrode systems that are easy to apply for daily repositioning of the electrodes by the user. In this study we propose the use of Smart Fabric and Interactive Textile (SFIT) systems as an alternative solution for recording high-density EMG signa...... classified with linear discriminant analysis. The average classification accuracy for the nine tasks was 89.1 1.9 %. These results show that SFIT systems can be used as an effective way for muscle-machine interfacing....

  7. Brachial plexus injury management through upper extremity amputation with immediate postoperative prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, J M; Leal, J M; Underwood, J; Childers, S J

    1982-02-01

    Management of patients with brachial plexus injuries requires a team approach so that all aspects of their care are addressed simultaneously. This report examines elective amputation and prosthetic rehabilitation in a patient with brachial plexus avulsion of the left arm. The best possibility for good prosthetic rehabilitation is the early application of prosthetic devices with intensive occupational therapy. Using this type of approach, we have achieved significant improvement in amputation rehabilitation of upper extremity amputees treated with immediate postoperative conventional electric and myoelectric prostheses.

  8. Nonsurgical Treatment Options for Basal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, M. H.; Sondak, V. K.; Sondak, V. K.

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) remains the most common form of non melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in Caucasians, with perhaps as many as 2 million new cases expected to occur in the United States in 2010. Many treatment options, including surgical interventions and nonsurgical alternatives, have been utilized to treat BCC. In this paper, two non-surgical options, imiquimod therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT), will be discussed. Both modalities have demonstrated acceptable disease control rates, cosmetically superior outcomes, and short-term cost-effectiveness. Further studies evaluating long-term cure rates and long-term cost effectiveness of imiquimod therapy and PDT are needed.

  9. The Basal Ganglia and Adaptive Motor Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, Ann M.; Aosaki, Toshihiko; Flaherty, Alice W.; Kimura, Minoru

    1994-09-01

    The basal ganglia are neural structures within the motor and cognitive control circuits in the mammalian forebrain and are interconnected with the neocortex by multiple loops. Dysfunction in these parallel loops caused by damage to the striatum results in major defects in voluntary movement, exemplified in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. These parallel loops have a distributed modular architecture resembling local expert architectures of computational learning models. During sensorimotor learning, such distributed networks may be coordinated by widely spaced striatal interneurons that acquire response properties on the basis of experienced reward.

  10. Basal cell carcinoma after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Keisuke; Terashi, Hiroto; Ishida, Yasuhisa; Tahara, Shinya; Osaki, Takeo; Nomura, Tadashi; Ejiri, Hirotaka

    2008-01-01

    We reported two cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that developed after radiation therapy. A 50-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy for the treatment of intracranial germinoma at the age of 22, presented with several tumors around the radiation ulcer. All tumors showed BCC. A 33-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy on the head for the treatment of leukemia at the age of 2, presented with a black nodule within the area of irradiation. The tumor showed BCC. We discuss the occurrence of BCC after radiation therapy. (author)

  11. Mössbauer spectroscopy of Basal Ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Kopáni, Martin; Boča, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Chemical states, structural arrangement, and magnetic features of iron deposits in biological tissue of Basal Ganglia are characterized. The methods of SQUID magnetometry and electron microscopy are employed. 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is used as a principal method of investigation. Though electron microscopy has unveiled robust crystals (1-3 μm in size) of iron oxides, they are not manifested in the corresponding 57 Fe Mössbauer spectra. The latter were acquired at 300 K and 4.2 K and resemble ferritin-like behavior

  12. Mössbauer spectroscopy of Basal Ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miglierini, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.miglierini@stuba.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava, Slovakia and Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials (Czech Republic); Lančok, Adriana [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR, v. v. i., 250 68 Husinec-Řež 1001 (Czech Republic); Kopáni, Martin [Institute of Medical Physics, Biophysics, Informatics and Telemedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Sasinkova 2, 811 08 Bratislava (Slovakia); Boča, Roman [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of SS. Cyril and Methodius, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)

    2014-10-27

    Chemical states, structural arrangement, and magnetic features of iron deposits in biological tissue of Basal Ganglia are characterized. The methods of SQUID magnetometry and electron microscopy are employed. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is used as a principal method of investigation. Though electron microscopy has unveiled robust crystals (1-3 μm in size) of iron oxides, they are not manifested in the corresponding {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra. The latter were acquired at 300 K and 4.2 K and resemble ferritin-like behavior.

  13. Simulator comparison of thumball, thumb switch, and touch screen input concepts for interaction with a large screen cockpit display format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Denise R.; Parrish, Russell V.

    1990-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted comparing three different input methods for interfacing to a large screen, multiwindow, whole flight deck display for management of transport aircraft systems. The thumball concept utilized a miniature trackball embedded in a conventional side arm controller. The multifunction control throttle and stick (MCTAS) concept employed a thumb switch located in the throttle handle. The touch screen concept provided data entry through a capacitive touch screen installed on the display surface. The objective and subjective results obtained indicate that, with present implementations, the thumball concept was the most appropriate for interfacing with aircraft systems/subsystems presented on a large screen display. Not unexpectedly, the completion time differences between the three concepts varied with the task being performed, although the thumball implementation consistently outperformed the other two concepts. However, pilot suggestions for improved implementations of the MCTAS and touch screen concepts could reduce some of these differences.

  14. The effect of the Tom Thumb dwarfing gene on grain size and grain number of wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, M.D.; Flintham, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Tom Thumb dwarfing gene, Rht3, like the related genes Rht1 and Rht2 from Norin 10, has pleiotropic effects on individual ear yields, and grain protein concentrations. An experiment was conducted in which tiller number per plant and grain number per spike were restricted to ascertain whether reduced grain size and protein content are primary or secondary competitive effects in near-isogenic lines. The potential for grain growth was shown to be identical in Rht3 and rht genotypes when grain set was restricted, indicating that the primary effect of the gene is to increase spikelet fertility. Nitrogen accumulation within the grain was also affected by inter-grain competition but decreased nitrogen yields per plant indicated that reduced protein levels are, in part, a primary effect of the gene. Analysis of individual grain yields within Rht3 and rht spikes showed that the gene affected developmental 'dominance' relationships within the spike. (author)

  15. Polar decomposition of the Mueller matrix: a polarimetric rule of thumb for square-profile surface structure recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, J M; Saiz, J M; González, F; Moreno, F

    2011-07-20

    In this research, the polar decomposition (PD) method is applied to experimental Mueller matrices (MMs) measured on two-dimensional microstructured surfaces. Polarization information is expressed through a set of parameters of easier physical interpretation. It is shown that evaluating the first derivative of the retardation parameter, δ, a clear indication of the presence of defects either built on or dug in the scattering flat surface (a silicon wafer in our case) can be obtained. Although the rule of thumb thus obtained is established through PD, it can be easily implemented on conventional surface polarimetry. These results constitute an example of the capabilities of the PD approach to MM analysis, and show a direct application in surface characterization. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  16. IMPROVED HEALING OF SMALL-CALIBER POLYTETRAFLUOROETHYLENE PROSTHESES BY INDUCTION OF A CLOT LAYER - A REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLEI, B; STRONCK, JW; WILDEVUUR, CRH

    1991-01-01

    This report reviews our experiments that have been undertaken to test the hypothesis whether the induction of a clot layer on the graft surface of small-caliber polytetrafluoroethylene ( PTFE) prostheses might improve their healing. 1 2 PTFE prostheses with a fibril length of 30-mu-m, PTFE

  17. Efficacy of cleansing agents in killing microorganisms in mixed species biofilms present on silicone facial prostheses-an in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariani, Nina; Visser, Anita; Teulings, Margot R. I. M.; Dijk, Melissa; Rahardjo, Tri Budi W.; Vissink, Arjan; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of different cleansing agents in killing mixed species biofilms on silicone facial prostheses. Two bacterial and three yeast strains, isolated from silicone facial prostheses, were selected for the mixed species biofilms. A variety of agents used

  18. Clinical and Radiographic Assessment of Reasons for Replacement of Metal- Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses in Patients Referring to Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Refai, Roa'a; Saker, Samah

    2018-01-01

    The expected length of service and reasons for fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) replacement are a frequent inquiry by patients while the answers were mainly based on studies reports that was conducted outside the middle east region. This clinical and radiographic survey was constructed to assess and survey clinically and radiographically the reasons of replacement of metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, amongst patients reporting at dental school in Taibah University. Between January and May 2016, 151 patients were recruited for this study. Interview (include questions pertained to the length of service of the prosthesis, the nature of complaint as told by patient in her own words), clinical examination, intra-oral photographs, and periapical radiographs, were done by the researchers. The parameters assessed were secondary caries, open margins, loss of retention, failure of endodontic treatment of the abutment and periodontal diseases. A total number of 249 failed fixed dental prostheses were evaluated. Of which 180 (39.7%) were single crowns, 159 (35.0%) were retainers and 117 (25.8%) were pontics in 69 fixed partial denture. The most common reason for replacement of fixed restorations was periodontal diseases affecting 92.8% of all types' restorations, followed by defective margin in 90.4% of examined restoration, poor aesthetic in 88% of restorations, while periapical involvement was found in 85.5% of fixed dental prosthesis. The survival rates of fixed prostheses were not predictable, and no association was found between number of years in service and the number of restorations. The most common reasons for replacing single unit fixed dental prostheses are periodontal diseases and periapical involvement, while defective margins and poor aesthetic mainly associated with multi-unit fixed dental prostheses. Key words: Failure, Fixed dental prosthesis, Survival, Replacement.

  19. 19 mm sized bileaflet valve prostheses' flow field investigated by bidimensional laser Doppler anemometry (part II: maximum turbulent shear stresses)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, V; Grigioni, M; Daniele, C; D'Avenio, G; Boccanera, G

    1997-11-01

    The investigation of the flow field generated by cardiac valve prostheses is a necessary task to gain knowledge on the possible relationship between turbulence-derived stresses and the hemolytic and thrombogenic complications in patients after valve replacement. The study of turbulence flows downstream of cardiac prostheses, in literature, especially concerns large-sized prostheses with a variable flow regime from very low up to 6 L/min. The Food and Drug Administration draft guidance requires the study of the minimum prosthetic size at a high cardiac output to reach the maximum Reynolds number conditions. Within the framework of a national research project regarding the characterization of cardiovascular endoprostheses, an in-depth study of turbulence generated downstream of bileaflet cardiac valves is currently under way at the Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of the Istituto Superiore di Sanita. Four models of 19 mm bileaflet valve prostheses were used: St Jude Medical HP, Edwards Tekna, Sorin Bicarbon, and CarboMedics. The prostheses were selected for the nominal Tissue Annulus Diameter as reported by manufacturers without any assessment of valve sizing method, and were mounted in aortic position. The aortic geometry was scaled for 19 mm prostheses using angiographic data. The turbulence-derived shear stresses were investigated very close to the valve (0.35 D0), using a bidimensional Laser Doppler anemometry system and applying the Principal Stress Analysis. Results concern typical turbulence quantities during a 50 ms window at peak flow in the systolic phase. Conclusions are drawn regarding the turbulence associated to valve design features, as well as the possible damage to blood constituents.

  20. Isometric Thumb Exertion Induces B Cell and T Cell Lymphocytosis in Trained and Untrained Males: Physical Aptitude Determines Response Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Michael Szlezak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study examined the effect of low-dose thumb exertion on lymphocyte subpopulation trafficking. The potential role of blood lactate in mediating lymphocyte redistribution was also investigated. Methods: 27 male participants (18 weightlifting-trained; 9 untrained were separated into 3 groups of 9 (Weightlifting and Untrained Experimental: WLEXP, UTEXP; Weightlifting Placebo: WLPLA. WLEXP and UTEXP performed 4x60 second isometric thumb intervals separated by 60 second rest intervals in a single-blinded placebo-controlled study.  Participants were assessed over a 60 minute post-intervention recovery period for pain, blood lactate and lymphocyte subpopulation counts. Results: WLPLA did not change for any measured variable (p>0.05. The two experimentalgroups increased significantly (p0.05. No differences in cell count were seen for CD56+/CD16+ lymphocytes across time for any group (p>0.05. UTEXP showed an early significant increase (20 min post-intervention in CD4+CD3+ (20.78%, p0.05. Conversely, WLEXP group showed no early increase followed by a delayed increase in cell count evident at the final time-point; CD4+CD3+ (19.06%, p<0.01, CD8+CD3+ (11.46%, p=0.033 and CD19+ (28.87%, p<0.01. Blood lactate was not correlated with lymphocyte counts. Conclusions: Physical aptitude and not cellular energy demand influences the lymphocyte response to resistance-exercise. Keywords: B-Lymphocytes; Exercise; Lactic Acid; Lymphocytosis; Resistance Training; T-Lymphocytes

  1. Thumb fingertip reconstruction with palmar V-Y flaps combined with bone and nail bed grafts following amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao; Wang, Libo; Mi, Jingyi; Xu, Yajun; Rui, Yongjun; Xue, Mingyu; Shen, Xiaofang; Qiang, Li

    2015-04-01

    The aim of treating thumb fingertip amputations with no indication for replantation is to reestablish functional and esthetic properties. From March 2005 to October 2008, we treated 14 patients with thumb fingertip amputation using palmar V-Y flaps combined with bone and nail bed grafts. There were 10 men and 4 women, whose ages at surgery ranged from 19 to 63 years (mean 35.8 years). In all, 11 of the injuries occurred in the dominant hand. According to Allen's classification, two were type II, seven were type III, and five were type IV. All patients underwent emergency surgery, with a time delay after injury of 3-12 h (mean 6.4 h). In each case, the amputation was a crush or avulsion injury, making microsurgical replantation not feasible. All of the flaps survived. At 8-17 months (average 12.8 months) of follow-up, the average subjective satisfaction score was 8.64. All patients experienced cold intolerance, and none of the patients complained of dysesthesia. Favorable results (excellent or good) were found in 78.6%. Thin primary nails appeared on the grafted nail bed about 3 weeks after surgery, following which the newly formed nail thickened and developed a more natural appearance. In one case, the new nail plate showed abnormal thickening due to hyperkeratosis. The bone graft healed at 5 weeks. The mean two-point discrimination was 7.5 mm. Grip strength was 10% less than that in the unaffected hand. Metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joint mobility losses were less than 10°. All patients returned to their jobs. No patients had postoperative complications. We believe that the combination of palmar V-Y flap and bone and nail bed grafts provides a distinct advantage over other choices. It improves function when replantation is not an option.

  2. How good are our impressions? An audit of alginate impression quality in the production of removable prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Impressions are taken regularly in practice giving vital information to the dental laboratory, but are there quality assurance systems in place to make sure that they are up to a sufficient standard? As dental professionals we have to appreciate that dental technicians can only work with the information given to them. This makes the skill of taking a good impression vital in order for us as clinicians to provide prostheses of good quality. This paper outlines an audit of alginate impressions and their quality in the making of removable prostheses. To record the quality of impression taking, and how one's own ability to critique an impression may differ from that of our colleagues.

  3. Phylogenetic differences of mammalian basal metabolic rate are not explained by mitochondrial basal proton leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polymeropoulos, E T; Heldmaier, G; Frappell, P B; McAllan, B M; Withers, K W; Klingenspor, M; White, C R; Jastroch, M

    2012-01-07

    Metabolic rates of mammals presumably increased during the evolution of endothermy, but molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying basal metabolic rate (BMR) are still not understood. It has been established that mitochondrial basal proton leak contributes significantly to BMR. Comparative studies among a diversity of eutherian mammals showed that BMR correlates with body mass and proton leak. Here, we studied BMR and mitochondrial basal proton leak in liver of various marsupial species. Surprisingly, we found that the mitochondrial proton leak was greater in marsupials than in eutherians, although marsupials have lower BMRs. To verify our finding, we kept similar-sized individuals of a marsupial opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and a eutherian rodent (Mesocricetus auratus) species under identical conditions, and directly compared BMR and basal proton leak. We confirmed an approximately 40 per cent lower mass specific BMR in the opossum although its proton leak was significantly higher (approx. 60%). We demonstrate that the increase in BMR during eutherian evolution is not based on a general increase in the mitochondrial proton leak, although there is a similar allometric relationship of proton leak and BMR within mammalian groups. The difference in proton leak between endothermic groups may assist in elucidating distinct metabolic and habitat requirements that have evolved during mammalian divergence.

  4. Electromyography data for non-invasive naturally-controlled robotic hand prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Castellini, Claudio; Caputo, Barbara; Hager, Anne-Gabrielle Mittaz; Elsig, Simone; Giatsidis, Giorgio; Bassetto, Franco; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in rehabilitation robotics suggest that it may be possible for hand-amputated subjects to recover at least a significant part of the lost hand functionality. The control of robotic prosthetic hands using non-invasive techniques is still a challenge in real life: myoelectric prostheses give limited control capabilities, the control is often unnatural and must be learned through long training times. Meanwhile, scientific literature results are promising but they are still far from fulfilling real-life needs. This work aims to close this gap by allowing worldwide research groups to develop and test movement recognition and force control algorithms on a benchmark scientific database. The database is targeted at studying the relationship between surface electromyography, hand kinematics and hand forces, with the final goal of developing non-invasive, naturally controlled, robotic hand prostheses. The validation section verifies that the data are similar to data acquired in real-life conditions, and that recognition of different hand tasks by applying state-of-the-art signal features and machine-learning algorithms is possible.

  5. ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF MASTICATION AND SWALLOWING IN ELDERLY INDIVIDUALS WITH MANDIBULAR FIXED IMPLANTSUPPORTED PROSTHESES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretin-Felix, Giédre; Nary, Hugo; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Trindade, Alceu Sergio; Machado, Wellington Monteiro

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of implant-supported oral rehabilitation in the mandible on the electromyographic activity during mastication and swallowing in edentulous elderly individuals. Fifteen patients aged more than 60 years were evaluated, being 10 females and 5 males. All patients were edentulous, wore removable complete dentures on both dental arches, and had the mandibular dentures replaced by implant-supported prostheses. All patients were submitted to electromyographic evaluation of the masseter, superior orbicularis oris muscles, and the submental muscles, before surgery and 3, 6 and 18 months postoperatively, using foods of different textures. The results obtained at the different periods were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test. Statistical analysis showed that only the masseter muscle had a significant loss in electromyographic activity (p<0.001), with a tendency of similar response for the submental muscles. Moreover, there was an increase in the activity of the orbicularis oris muscle during rubber chewing after treatment, yet without statistically significant difference. Mandibular fixed implant-supported prostheses in elderly individuals revealed a decrease in electromyographic amplitude for the masseter muscles during swallowing, which may indicate adaptation to new conditions of stability provided by fixation of the complete denture in the mandibular arch. PMID:19089202

  6. Clinical study on the success of posterior monolithic zirconia crowns and fixed dental prostheses: preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Bankoğlu Güngör

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this report was to present preliminary clinical results regarding the success rates and technical outcomes of posterior monolithic zirconia single tooth crowns (STs and fixed dental prostheses (FDPs. Materials and Method: Thirty-four patients received 43 posterior monolithic zirconia restorations as single tooth crowns (STs and/or fixed dental prostheses (FDPs, which were fabricated using a CAD-CAM (Computer Aided Design - Computer Aided Manufacturing system. At baseline and every 6 months, the restorations were examined for survival and technical outcomes. Success of the restorations was defined as the restoration remaining in situ, with no need for removal or replacement at follow-up visits. Technical outcomes were evaluated with a modified version of the United States Public Health Services criteria. Survival of restorations was estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. For each restoration, duration of follow-up was calculated from the time of placement to the date of its first failure. Results: After a mean observation period of 18.6 ± 3.9 months (between 8-24 months, cumulative survival rates were 86.7% and 92.3% for STs and FDPs, respectively. Technical evaluation revealed good marginal adaptation and crown contours; however, modifications were needed for shade and occlusion of restorations. Conclusion: These preliminary results revealed high survival rate and generally successful technical outcomes for posterior monolithic zirconia STs and FDPs.

  7. 3D surface reconstruction and FIB microscopy of worn alumina hip prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, P; Inkson, B J; Rainforth, W M [Department of Engineering Materials, Mappin St., University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Stewart, T [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.rainforth@sheffield.ac.uk

    2008-08-15

    Interest in alumina-on-alumina total hip replacements (THR) continues to grow for the young and active patient due to their superior wear performance and biocompatibility compared to the alternative traditional polymer/metal prostheses. While alumina on alumina bearings offer an excellent solution, a region of high wear, known as stripe wear, is commonly observed on retrieved alumina hip components that poses concern. These in-vivo stripe wear mechanisms can be replicated in vitro by the introduction of micro-separation during the simulated walking cycle in hip joint simulation. However, the understanding of the mechanisms behind the stripe wear processes is relatively poor. 3D topographic reconstructions of titled SEM stereo pairs from different zones have been obtained to determine the local worn surface topography. Focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy was applied to examine the subsurface damage across the stripe wear. The paper presents novel images of sub-surface microcracks in alumina along with 3D reconstructions of the worn ceramic surfaces and a classification of four distinct wear zones following microseparation in hip prostheses.

  8. Implant-supported titanium prostheses following augmentation procedures: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, C; Hoffmeister, B

    2003-03-01

    This report describes a novel technique for fabricating retrievable implant-supported titanium (Ti) prostheses in patients requiring a comprehensive treatment plan involving the combined efforts of maxillofacial surgery and implant prosthodontics. Following bone graft reconstructive surgery and implant placement prosthetic treatment was initiated by inserting ITI-Octa abutments. An impression was made, and a framework was fabricated by fusing Ti-cast frameworks to prefabricated titanium copings by laser-welding. This was followed by veneering or fabrication of a removable denture with Ti metal re-enforcement. Favourable clinical results have been achieved using these screw-retained Ti implant-supported restorations for patients treated with reconstructive bone graft-surgery, with clinical observation periods ranging from three to four years. The present observations suggest that these screw-retained implant-supported Ti prostheses may be a meaningful contribution to implant prosthodontics, facilitating retrievable restorations of optimum biocompatibility, good marginal precision and with a good esthetic result. However, controlled clinical studies are needed to establish the long-term serviceability of these Ti restorations.

  9. Survival and failure modes: platform-switching for internal and external hexagon cemented fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchieta, Rodolfo B; Machado, Lucas S; Hirata, Ronaldo; Coelho, Paulo G; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the probability of survival (reliability) of platform-switched fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) cemented on different implant-abutment connection designs. Eighty-four-three-unit FDPs (molar pontic) were cemented on abutments connected to two implants of external or internal hexagon connection. Four groups (n = 21 each) were established: external hexagon connection and regular platform (ERC); external hexagon connection and switched platform (ESC); internal hexagon and regular platform (IRC); and internal hexagon and switched platform (ISC). Prostheses were subjected to step-stress accelerated life testing in water. Weibull curves and probability of survival for a mission of 100,000 cycles at 400 N (two-sided 90% CI) were calculated. The beta values of 0.22, 0.48, 0.50, and 1.25 for groups ERC, ESC, IRC, and ISC, respectively, indicated a limited role of fatigue in damage accumulation, except for group ISC. Survival decreased for both platform-switched groups (ESC: 74%, and ISC: 59%) compared with the regular matching platform counterparts (ERC: 95%, and IRC: 98%). Characteristic strength was higher only for ERC compared with ESC, but not different between internal connections. Failures chiefly involved the abutment screw. Platform switching decreased the probability of survival of FDPs on both external and internal connections. The absence in loss of characteristic strength observed in internal hexagon connections favor their use compared with platform-switched external hexagon connections. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  10. Creating natural-looking removable prostheses: combining art and science to imitate nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patras, Michael; Kourtis, Stefanos; Sykaras, Nikitas

    2012-06-01

    Patient awareness of dental appearance has increased, resulting in more demanding esthetic requests. There is also strong evidence that increased esthetics is highly significant for complete denture acceptance and success. Taking notice of patients' perceptions of natural appearance and esthetics, the clinician can incorporate their preferences in the construction of individualized dentures that will be harmonized with their facial characteristics. Despite the evolution of materials and techniques, the vast majority of dentures still fail to look natural. Thus, producing prostheses that defy detection and successfully restore the appearance of edentulous patients remains a challenge for the clinician. This paper presents a clinical case where immediate loading of implants supporting a mandibular overdenture was combined with an opposing conventional maxillary denture to satisfy the high functional and esthetic demands of the patient. It also emphasizes the individualized esthetic performance through customization during their fabrication while taking into consideration the various clinical parameters affecting rehabilitation of the edentulous jaw. Implant-retained overdentures can significantly improve the patients' function. The esthetic performance of these restorations however, may not be satisfying the patients' expectations and demands. Customizing the artificial gingival areas and individual staining of the prefabricated acrylic teeth may improve the esthetic performance creating natural-looking removable prostheses. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. 500 penile prostheses implanted by a surgeon in Italy in the last 30 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Pozza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of our study was to report our experience with patients affected by Erectile Dysfunction (ED and undergoing penile prosthetic implantation (PPI in a single center by a single surgeon. Material and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the clinical outcome of 500 patients (mean age: 51.5 years, range: 20-86 years affected by ED and referred to our private andrological center from January 1984 to December 2013 who underwent penile prosthesis implantation, including the reported level of patient satisfaction. Results: 182 silicone, 180 malleable, 18 monocomponent hydraulic and 120 multicomponents hydraulic prostheses were implanted by the same experienced surgeon. All patients were hospitalized for the procedure. All patients were evaluated immediately, 1 month (496 patients and, for the great majority, every year after implantation. One hundred twenty five patients were lost to follow-up. Twenty two patients underwent revision surgery for complications in the postoperative period. The most serious postoperative complications were mechanical problems (45 patients, 9.0% and infection (15 patients, 3%. Forty two (8.4% prostheses were explanted. Overall, 80% (400/500 of patients were able to have sexual intercourse and were fully satisfied with the results. Conclusions: In our experience prosthetic surgery should be considered a good solution for men affected by ED and not responsive to other therapeutic solutions. Prosthetic surgery can be performed not only in large public hospitals but also in smaller private facilities.

  12. Electromyographic evaluation of mastication and swallowing in elderly individuals with mandibular fixed implant-supported prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giédre Berretin-Felix

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of implant-supported oral rehabilitation in the mandible on the electromyographic activity during mastication and swallowing in edentulous elderly individuals. Fifteen patients aged more than 60 years were evaluated, being 10 females and 5 males. All patients were edentulous, wore removable complete dentures on both dental arches, and had the mandibular dentures replaced by implant-supported prostheses. All patients were submitted to electromyographic evaluation of the masseter, superior orbicularis oris muscles, and the submental muscles, before surgery and 3, 6 and 18 months postoperatively, using foods of different textures. The results obtained at the different periods were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test. Statistical analysis showed that only the masseter muscle had a significant loss in electromyographic activity (p<0.001, with a tendency of similar response for the submental muscles. Moreover, there was an increase in the activity of the orbicularis oris muscle during rubber chewing after treatment, yet without statistically significant difference. Mandibular fixed implant-supported prostheses in elderly individuals revealed a decrease in electromyographic amplitude for the masseter muscles during swallowing, which may indicate adaptation to new conditions of stability provided by fixation of the complete denture in the mandibular arch.

  13. Evaluation of non-conformities of hip prostheses made of titanium alloys and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Ewerton de Oliveira Teotonio; Nascimento, Jose Jeferson da Silva; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Morais, Crislene Rodrigues da Silva; Campos, Karla Valeria Miranda de

    2017-01-01

    A large number of metallic alloys has satisfactory behavior when used to manufacture implants for hip prostheses. However, they must be in conformity with standards, to ensure their quality for long periods without losing its functionality. Therefore, this paper aims to study the non-conformities in two hip prostheses, one of titanium and other stainless steel according to standards. The implants studied passed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence, tensile test and optical microscopy (OM). Specimens for the tensile test were made according to ASTM E 8M, as well, MO samples passed by metallographic procedure. The results evidenced that some chemical compositions showed in relation to the standards. The XRD analysis showed peaks of austenite and absence of ferrite for the stainless steel, while the titanium alloy presents an alpha phase (HCP) more significant than the beta phase (BCC). The stainless steel alloys and titanium have yield strength and tensile strength that meet the standards. On the other hand, the elastic modulus of the titanium alloy and stainless steel, comes to be ten times greater than the human bone. Therefore, the high modulus of elasticity of the alloys, favors bone resorption problems. The stainless steel microstructure is typical of an austenitic matrix, while the titanium alloy presents α + β microstructure. (author)

  14. [Failure of zirconia-based prostheses on natural teeth and implants: focus on risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, N; Koenig, V; Vanheusden, A; Mainjot, A

    2014-01-01

    Cohesive fracture of the veneering ceramic (chipping) is the first cause of failure of zirconia-based prostheses on natural teeth and implants. Besides risk factors related to the material (thermal stresses generated during the manufacturing process, framework inappropriate design), there are some clinical risk factors, which can influence the restoration prognosis. Indeed, unfavorable occlusal relationships and/or the presence of parafunctions such as bruxism and clenching, which are frequent pathologies, engender significant overloading. A retrospective study was performed at the University Hospital Center (CHU) of Liege on 147 dental and implants prostheses, placed between May 2003 and January 2012. This study highlighted a significant correlation between chipping and the absence of an occlusal nightguard (p = 0.0048), the presence of a ceramic restoration as an antagonist (p = 0.013), the presence of occlusal parafunctions (p = 0.018), and the presence of implants as support of the restorations (p = 0.026). These results underline the importance of external stress and occlusal risk factors diagnosis, as the need to perform an occlusal nightguard to patients with parafunctions.

  15. The stereognostic ability of natural dentitions versus implant-supported fixed prostheses or overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, R; Bou Serhal, C; van Steenberghe, D

    1997-06-01

    A stereognostic ability test was performed in 60 patients. Forty patients were rehabilitated by means of osseointegrated implants. One group consisted of 20 patients with fixed prostheses on implants in both the upper and lower jaws. The other 20 patients had a maxillary denture while in the mandible an overdenture was retained by means of two implants connected by a bar. They were compared to a group of 20 subjects (controls) with a non-restored natural dentition. For the stereognostic ability test, subjects had to recognise ten different test pieces by manipulating them with two antagonistic incisor teeth, avoiding any contact with other oral structures. Both response time and percentage accuracy of recognition were evaluated. The present findings indicated that subjects with an overdenture on implants did not score significantly different from those with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis. In contrast, subjects with teeth had a significantly better stereognostic ability. The percentage of correct responses was 52% for overdentures, 56% for fixed prostheses on implants and 75% for natural dentitions. From these results, it could be concluded that the stereognostic ability is impaired in subjects rehabilitated with osseointegrated implants by about one-third to one-quarter compared to subjects with natural teeth.

  16. Wireless radio channel for intramuscular electrode implants in the control of upper limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stango, Antonietta; Yazdandoost, Kamya Yekeh; Farina, Dario

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years the use of implanted devices has been considered also in the field of myoelectric hand prostheses. Wireless implanted EMG (Electromyogram) sensors can improve the functioning of the prosthesis, providing information without the disadvantage of the wires, and the usability by amputees. The solutions proposed in the literature are based on proprietary communication protocols between the implanted devices and the prosthesis controller, using frequency bands that are already assigned to other purposes. This study proposes the use of a standard communication protocol (IEEE 802.15.6), specific for wireless body area networks (WBANs), which assign a specific bandwidth to implanted devices. The propagation losses from in-to-on body were investigated by numerical simulation with a 3D human model and an electromagnetic solver. The channel model resulting from the study represents the first step towards the development of myoelectric prosthetic hands which are driven by signals acquired by implanted sensors. However these results can provide important information to researchers for further developments, and manufacturers, which can decrease the production costs for hand prostheses having a common standard of communication with assigned frequencies of operation.

  17. Wear Distribution Detection of Knee Joint Prostheses by Means of 3D Optical Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saverio Affatato

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine total knee polyethylene inserts from in vitro simulation to evaluate and display—using a 3D optical scanner—wear patterns and wear rates of inserts exposed to wear by means of simulators. Various sets of tibial inserts have been reconstructed by using optical scanners. With this in mind, the wear behavior of fixed and mobile bearing polyethylene knee configurations was investigated using a knee wear joint simulator. After the completion of the wear test, the polyethylene menisci were analyzed by an innovative 3D optical scanners in order to evaluate the 3D wear distribution on the prosthesis surface. This study implemented a new procedure for evaluating polyethylene bearings of joint prostheses obtained after in vitro wear tests and the proposed new approach allowed quantification of the contact zone on the geometry of total knee prostheses. The results of the present study showed that mobile TKPs (total knee prosthesis have lower wear resistance with respect to fixed TKPs.

  18. Anterior Cantilever Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prostheses: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourshed, Bilal; Samran, Abdulaziz; Alfagih, Amal; Samran, Ahalm; Abdulrab, Saleem; Kern, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    This review evaluated the survival rate of single retainer anterior resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs) to determine whether the choice of material affects their clinical outcome. An electronic search of the English peer-reviewed dental literature in PubMed was conducted to identify all publications reporting on cantilever RBFDPs until May 2016. Study information extraction and methodological quality assessments were accomplished by two reviewers independently. The searched keywords were as follows: "resin-bonded, single retainer, all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs), all-ceramic RBFDPs, cantilever resin, RBFDPs, cantilever resin-bonded bridge, two units cantilevered, two-unit cantilevered, metal-ceramic cantilever, and metal-ceramic." Furthermore, the ''Related Articles'' feature of PubMed was used to identify further references of interest within the primary search. The bibliographies of the obtained references were used to identify pertinent secondary references. Review articles were also used to identify relevant articles. After the application of exclusion criteria, the definitive list of articles was screened to extract the qualitative data, and the results were analyzed. Overall 2588 articles were dedicated at the first review phase; however, only 311 studies were left after the elimination of duplicates and unrelated studies. Seventeen studies passed the second review phase. Five studies were excluded because they were follow-up studies of the same study cohort. Twelve studies were finally selected. The use of cantilever RBFDPs showed promising results and high survival rates. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. [Single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses in relation to the occlusal system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, D J; Gerritsen, A E; van Spijker, A; Creugers, N H J

    2013-02-01

    Occlusion concepts based on functional aspects offer more solid ground in the diagnostic process and in the treatment of (reduced) dentitions than morphologically and mechanically oriented occlusion concepts. Nevertheless, for occlusal reconstruction morphologically oriented guidelines are necessary. These guidelines are based on the border movements and positions of the mandible in the orofacial system, and on the location and modelling of the occlusal contacts in the occlusal system. The modelling of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses must harmonize with the occlusal system. Moreover, an important feature is the relation of the anterior teeth which enables mutually protected occlusion. Characteristics of a healthy orofacial and occlusal system are: absence of pathology, perceived sufficient oral functions, variability inform and function, and adaptive capacity. When designing single- or multiunit fixed dental prostheses, a pragmatic starting point is to maintain the existing occlusion and the existing speech pattern unless arguments can be provided for alterations. The occlusal design should aim at optimizing oral functions, such as mandibular and occlusal stability.

  20. Neural prostheses in clinical applications--trends from precision mechanics towards biomedical microsystems in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, T; Schuettler, M; Koch, K P

    2004-04-01

    Neural prostheses partially restore body functions by technical nerve excitation after trauma or neurological diseases. External devices and implants have been developed since the early 1960s for many applications. Several systems have reached nowadays clinical practice: Cochlea implants help the deaf to hear, micturition is induced by bladder stimulators in paralyzed persons and deep brain stimulation helps patients with Parkinson's disease to participate in daily life again. So far, clinical neural prostheses are fabricated with means of precision mechanics. Since microsystem technology opens the opportunity to design and develop complex systems with a high number of electrodes to interface with the nervous systems, the opportunity for selective stimulation and complex implant scenarios seems to be feasible in the near future. The potentials and limitations with regard to biomedical microdevices are introduced and discussed in this paper. Target specifications are derived from existing implants and are discussed on selected applications that has been investigated in experimental research: a micromachined implant to interface a nerve stump with a sieve electrode, cuff electrodes with integrated electronics, and an epiretinal vision prosthesis.

  1. Inducing repetitive action potential firing in neurons via synthesized photoresponsive nanoscale cellular prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Siyuan; Madhukar, Anupam

    2013-02-01

    Recently we reported an analysis that examined the potential of synthesized photovoltaic functional abiotic nanosystems (PVFANs) to modulate membrane potential and activate action potential firing in neurons. Here we extend the analysis to delineate the requirements on the electronic energy levels and the attendant photophysical properties of the PVFANs to induce repetitive action potential under continuous light, a capability essential for the proposed potential application of PVFANs as retinal cellular prostheses to compensate for loss of photoreceptors. We find that repetitive action potential firing demands two basic characteristics in the electronic response of the PVFANs: an exponential dependence of the PVFAN excited state decay rate on the membrane potential and a three-state system such that, following photon absorption, the electron decay from the excited state to the ground state is via intermediate state(s) whose lifetime is comparable to the refractory time following an action potential. In this study, the potential of synthetic photovoltaic functional abiotic nanosystems (PVFANs) is examined under continuous light to modulate membrane potential and activate action potential firing in neurons with the proposed potential application of PVFANs as retinal cellular prostheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Histologic Mimics of Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanoszek, Lauren M; Wang, Grace Y; Harms, Paul W

    2017-11-01

    - Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human malignant neoplasm and is a frequently encountered diagnosis in dermatopathology. Although BCC may be locally destructive, it rarely metastasizes. Many diagnostic entities display morphologic and immunophenotypic overlap with BCC, including nonneoplastic processes, such as follicular induction over dermatofibroma; benign follicular tumors, such as trichoblastoma, trichoepithelioma, or basaloid follicular hamartoma; and malignant tumors, such as sebaceous carcinoma or Merkel cell carcinoma. Thus, misdiagnosis has significant potential to result in overtreatment or undertreatment. - To review key features distinguishing BCC from histologic mimics, including current evidence regarding immunohistochemical markers useful for that distinction. - Review of pertinent literature on BCC immunohistochemistry and differential diagnosis. - In most cases, BCC can be reliably diagnosed by histopathologic features. Immunohistochemistry may provide useful ancillary data in certain cases. Awareness of potential mimics is critical to avoid misdiagnosis and resulting inappropriate management.

  3. Estimating shrub biomass from basal stem diameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J K

    1976-01-01

    Stem lengths and oven dry wt of stemwood and foilage were determined for shrubs in dia classes of 0 to 0.5 cm, 0.5 to 2 cm and 2 to 5 cm in various habitat types in Idaho and Montana. The logarithm of basal stem dia was closely correlated with the logarithm of wt. Regression components are presented for estimating leaf wt and total above-ground wt of 25 woody shrub species using a linear equation relating these 2 variables. Percentage stemwood wt is given for the 3 dia classes. Dia distributions for the smallest dia class were normal except for a few species with fine twigs; distributions for the other classes were positively skewed. Applications to forest fuel studies are briefly discussed.

  4. Estimating shrub biomass from basal stem diameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J K

    1976-01-01

    Stem lengths and oven dry wt of stemwood and foilage were determined for shrubs in dia classes of 0 to 0.5 cm, 0.5 to 2 cm and 2 to 5 cm in various habitat types in Idaho and Montana. The logarithm of basal stem dia was closely correlated with the logarithm of wt. Regression components are presented for estimating leaf wt and total above-ground wt of 25 woody shrub species using a linear equation relating these 2 variables. Percentage stemwood wt is given for the 3 dia classes. Dia distributions for the smallest dia class were normal except for a few species with fine twigs: distributions for the other classes were positively skewed. Applications to forest fuel studies are briefly discussed.

  5. CT cisternography of the basal cisterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanski, M.; Dickob, M.; Wittkowski, W.; Muenster Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Air cisternograms at post mortem and positive contrast cisternograms on patients were performed in order to study intracisternal structures, particularly cranial nerves, as seen on CT. Air and contrast CT cisternograms showed excellent demonstration of the second, third, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth cranial nerves. The ninth and tenth cranial nerves could not always be separated from each other and demonstration of the first, fourth, eleventh and twelfth cranial nerves was often not possible or was unsatisfactory. With a knowledge of the normal anatomy and of important surrounding structures, the individual cranial nerves are easily identified. The anthropologic baseline appears highly suitable for CT examination of the basal cisterns. The complementary coronal projection is also very valuable. (orig.) [de

  6. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamos EM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth M Lamos,1 Lisa M Younk,2 Stephen N Davis3 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, 2Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Introduction: Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, the ability to provide clinically necessary high doses of insulin at low volume is also needed. Areas covered: This review highlights the published reports of the pharmacokinetic (PK and glucodynamic properties of concentrated insulins: Humulin-R U500, insulin degludec U200, and insulin glargine U300, describes the clinical efficacy, risk of hypoglycemic, and metabolic changes observed, and finally, discusses observations about the complexity of introducing a new generation of concentrated insulins to the therapeutic market. Conclusion: Humulin-R U500 has a similar onset but longer duration of action compared with U100 regular insulin. Insulin glargine U300 has differential PK/pharmacodynamic effects when compared with insulin glargine U100. In noninferiority studies, glycemic control with degludec U200 and glargine U300 is similar to insulin glargine U100 and nocturnal hypoglycemia is reduced. Concentrated formulations appear to behave as separate molecular entities when compared with earlier U100 insulin analog compounds. In the review of available published data, newer concentrated basal insulins may offer an advantage in terms of reduced intraindividual variability as well as reducing the injection burden in individuals requiring high-dose and large volume insulin therapy. Understanding the PK and pharmacodynamic properties of this new generation of insulins is critical to safe dosing, dispensing, and administration

  7. Antibacterial Efficacy of a New Gentamicin-Coating for Cementless Prostheses Compared to Gentamicin-Loaded Bone Cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neut, Danielle; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Thompson, Jonathan I.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    Cementless prostheses are increasingly popular but require alternative prophylactic measures than the use of antibiotic-loaded bone cements. Here, we determine the 24-h growth inhibition of gentamicin-releasing coatings from grit-blasted and porous-coated titanium alloys, and compare their

  8. Interference in adhesion of bacteria and yeasts isolated from explanted voice prostheses to silicone rubber by rhamnolipid biosurfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, LR; Banat, IM; van der Mei, HC; Teixeira, JA; Oliveira, R

    Aims: The effects and extent of adhesion of four different bacterial and two yeast strains isolated from explanted voice prostheses to silicone rubber with and without an adsorbed rhamnolipid biosurfactant layer obtained from Pseudomonasaeruginosa DS10-129 was studied. Methods and Results: The

  9. Pathogenic characteristics of Candida albicans isolated from oral cavities of denture wearers and cancer patients wearing oral prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothibe, J V; Patel, M

    2017-09-01

    Candida albicans cause opportunistic infections including oral candidiasis in immunocompromised patients. It has an ability to cause infection due to its virulence factors. This study investigated the pathogenic characteristics of C. albicans isolated from the oral cavities of healthy subjects and two vulnerable groups, denture wearers and cancer patients wearing oral prostheses. Oral rinse samples were collected and cultured for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of Candida. Twenty strains of C. albicans isolated from the healthy individuals and denture wearers and, 14 strains isolated from the cancer patients were selected and their pathogenic characteristics were measured. The results of the study groups were compared using a Scheffe test for pairwise comparison and a chi square test. Denture wearer and cancer patients with prostheses carried significantly higher number (p production were significantly higher in the strains from denture wearers. In addition, high number of isolates from the denture wearers produced phospholipase and proteinase (85% and 80% respectively) compared to the strains from normal subjects (25% and 60% respectively). Only the germ tube formation and adherence ability were significantly higher in the strains from the cancer patients with prostheses (p = 0.05 and p oral cavity and prostheses is important in the prevention of colonization of Candida and the development of oral candidiasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. ENHANCED HEALING OF 30-MU-M GORE-TEX PTFE MICROARTERIAL PROSTHESES BY ALCOHOL-PRETREATMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLEI, B; STRONCK, JW; WILDEVUUR, CRH

    1991-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microvascular prostheses with a fibril length of 30-mu-m were pretreated with alcohol (n = 18), implanted into the abdominal aorta of rats and were evaluated at 1 day (n = 3), 1 week (n = 3), 3 weeks (n = 6) and 6 weeks (n = 6) to determine whether alcohol-pretreatment

  11. Sport prostheses and prosthetic adaptations for the upper and lower limb amputees : an overview of peer reviewed literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragaru, Mihai; Dekker, Rienk; Geertzen, Jan H. B.

    Background: Sport prostheses are used by both upper- and lower-limb amputees while participating in sports and other physical activities. Although the number of these devices has increased over the past decade, no overview of the peer reviewed literature describing them has been published

  12. A Classic Case of Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dattaprasad Dadhe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited condition characterized mainly by basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratinizing odontogenic tumors, and other systemic anomalies. As these manifestations do not alter the patient′s lifestyle, most of the cases are diagnosed through oral abnormalities. A classic case of basal cell nevus syndrome fulfilling almost all the major and minor criteria has been reported here.

  13. Immunohistochemical Characteristics of Triple Negative/Basal-like Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Emel Ebru PALA; Ümit BAYOL; Süheyla CUMURCU; Elif KESKİN

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Triple-negative-breast-cancer that accounts for 10-20% of all breast carcinomas is defined by the lack of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2 expression, and agressive clinical behavior. Triple-negative-breast-cancer is categorized into basal like and other types. The basal-like subtype is characterized by the expression of myoepithelial/basal markers.Material and Method: We studied 41 immunohistochemically triplenegative- breast-cancer patients to determine EGFR, Cytoke...

  14. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Tattooed Eyebrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Park, Jin; Kim, Seong-Min; Kim, Han-Uk

    2009-01-01

    Malignant skin tumors, including squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, have occurred in tattoos. Seven documented cases of basal cell carcinoma associated with tattoos have also been reported in the medical literature. We encountered a patient with basal cell carcinoma in a tattooed eyebrow. We report on this case as the eighth reported case of a patient with basal cell carcinoma arising in a tattooed area. PMID:20523804

  15. Basal-body-associated macromolecules: a continuing debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Mignot, J; Brugerolle, G; Didier, P; Bornens, M

    1993-07-01

    Controversy over the possibility that centrioles/basal bodies contain nucleic acids has overshadowed results demonstrating other macromolecules in the lumen of these organelles. Glycogen particles, which are known to be present within the lumen of the centriole/basal body of sperm cells, have now been found in basal bodies of protists belonging to three different groups. Here, we extend the debate on a role for RNA in basal body/centriole function and speculate on the origin and the function of centriolar glycogen.

  16. Assessment of health-related quality of life in Turkish patients with facial prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atay Arzu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facial prostheses are intended to provide a non-operative rehabilitation for patients with acquired facial defects. By improving aesthetics and quality of life (QOL, this treatment involves reintegration of the patient into family and social life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of QOL in adult patients with facial prostheses and to compare this perception with that of a control group. Methods The study participants consisted of 72 patients, who were divided into three equal-sized groups according to the type of prosthesis (OP- orbital prosthesis, AP- auricular prosthesis, NP - nasal prosthesis and 24 healthy control participants without any congenital or acquired deformity of face or body. Clinical and socio-demographic data were gathered from each person’s medical chart. Participants completed the Turkish version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, Short Form (WHOQOL-BREF. Descriptive statistics, independent sample t-tests, Pearson's chi-square test, ANOVA, ANCOVA, and Pearson correlation were used to analyse the data. Results Compared with the control participants, patients with NP scored lower on the all domains of QOL and all three patient groups had lower scores on overall QOL and its domains of physical and environmental health. Patients with OP reported significantly lower physical health scores than those with AP, while patients with NP reported significantly lower overall QOL and psychological health scores than those with AP. Female patients had lower environmental domain scores than did male patients. The patient’s age and income correlated with social relationships QOL, while the patient’s income and the age of facial prosthesis were correlated with environmental QOL. Conclusion Patients with facial prostheses had lower scores in overall QOL, physical and environmental health domains than the control participants. Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics

  17. Implant loading protocols for edentulous patients with fixed prostheses: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaspyridakos, Panos; Chen, Chun-Jung; Chuang, Sung-Kiang; Weber, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    To report on the effect of immediate implant loading with fixed prostheses compared to early and conventional loading on implant and prosthesis survival, failure, and complications. An electronic and manual search was conducted to identify randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) as well as prospective and retrospective studies involving rough surface implants and implant fixed complete dental prostheses for edentulous patients. The 62 studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria featured 4 RCTs, 2 prospective case-control studies, 34 prospective cohort studies, and 22 retrospective cohort studies. These studies yielded data from 2,695 patients (2,757 edentulous arches) with 13,653 implants. Studies were grouped according to the loading protocol applied; 45 studies reported on immediate loading, 8 on early loading, and 11 on conventional loading. For the immediate loading protocol with flap surgery, the implant and prosthesis survival rates ranged from 90.1% to 100% and 93.75% to 100%, respectively (range of follow-up, 1 to 10 years). When immediate loading was combined with guided flapless implant placement, the implant survival rates ranged from 90% to 99.4%. For the early loading protocol, the implant and prosthesis survival rates ranged from 94.74% to 100% and 93.75% to 100%, respectively (range of follow-up, 1 to 10 years). For the conventional loading protocol, the implant and prosthesis survival rates ranged from 94.95% to 100% and 87.5% to 100%, respectively (range of follow-up, 2 to 15 years). No difference was identified between maxilla and mandible. When selecting cases carefully and using dental implants with a rough surface, immediate loading with fixed prostheses in edentulous patients results in similar implant and prosthesis survival and failure rates as early and conventional loading. For immediate loading, most of the studies recommended a minimal insertion torque of 30 Ncm. The estimated 1-year implant survival was above 99% with all three

  18. Modelling the initiation of basal sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantelli, E.; Schoof, C.

    2017-12-01

    The initiation of basal sliding is a thermally-controlled process that affects ice speed, englacial heat transport, and melt water production at the bed, and ultimately influences the large-scale dynamics of ice sheets. From a modelling perspective, describing the onset of sliding in thin-film models suitable for ice sheet scale simulations is problematic. In particular, previous work concluded that, under shallow-ice mechanics, the scenario of a hard switch from frozen to molten bed leads to an infinite vertical velocity at the onset, and higher-order mechanical formulations are needed to describe sliding initiation. An alternative view considers the occurrence of subtemperate sliding, which allows for a smooth sliding velocity across the onset. However, the sliding velocity decreases rapidly as temperature drops below the melting point, thus raising the issue of whether a mechanical model that does not resolve the ice sheet thickness scale is ever appropriate to model the onset of sliding. In this study we first present a boundary layer model for the hard switch scenario. Our analysis, which considers a thermo-mechanically coupled Stokes flow near the onset, shows that the abrupt onset of sliding is never possible. In fact, the acceleration of ice flow deflects the flowlines towards the bed, which freezes again immediately downstream to the onset. This leads to the conclusion that the sliding velocity must change smoothly across the onset, thus the temperature dependence of sliding needs to be taken into account. In this context, we examine a limiting case of standard temperature-dependent sliding laws, where sliding onset takes the form of an extended transition region interposed between fully frozen and temperate bed. In the transition region basal temperature is at the melting point, and the sliding velocity varies smoothly as dictated by the energy budget of the bed. As the extent of this region is not small compared to the ice sheet length scale, we couple

  19. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  20. Rough surfaces of titanium and titanium alloys for implants and prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conforto, E.; Aronsson, B.-O.; Salito, A.; Crestou, C.; Caillard, D.

    2004-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys for dental implants and hip prostheses were surface-treated and/or covered by metallic or ceramic rough layers after being submitted to sand blasting. The goal of these treatments is to improve the surface roughness and consequently the osteointegration, the fixation, and the stability of the implant. The microstructure of titanium and titanium alloys submitted to these treatments has been studied and correlated to their mechanical behavior. As-treated/covered and mechanically tested surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Structural analyses performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), mainly in cross-section, reveal the degree of adherence and cohesion between the surface layer and the substrate (implant). We observed that, although the same convenient surface roughness was obtained with the two types of process, many characteristics as structural properties and mechanical behavior are very different

  1. Reinforcement of a PMMA resin for fixed interim prostheses with nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapa, Popi; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Bikiaris, Dimitrios; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M; Koidis, Petros

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible reinforcement of Nanodiamonds (ND) in a PMMA resin for fixed interim restorations. The fracture toughness (K(Ic)), impact strength and the dynamic thermomechanical properties (T(g), E´, E´´, tanδ) of a series of PMMA-ND nanocomposites with different amounts of ND were evaluated. The fracture toughness increased as the ND percentage increased up to 0.38% wt but a greater amount of ND induced a decrease in K(Ic). Impact strength and Young's modulus were also increased by increasing nanoparticles content, indicating the reinforcing effect of ND. Dynamic mechanical properties were also affected. By increasing the ND content an increase of storage modulus was recorded, while glass transition was shifted at higher temperatures. Under the limitations of this study, it can be suggested that reinforcing PMMA with ND nanoparticles -especially at low concentrations- may increase the overall performance of fixed interim prostheses.

  2. A review of scalp camouflaging agents and prostheses for individuals with hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jeff C H; Shapiro, Ron L; Shapiro, Paul; Zupan, Matt; Pierre-Louis, Margareth; Hordinsky, Maria K

    2012-08-15

    Hair loss is a common problem for both men and women and may impact negatively on self-esteem. A variety of medical and surgical treatment options are available depending on the type of alopecia. Many patients also seek the advice of their physicians about options to hide or reduce the appearance of hair loss with hair prostheses (wigs, hairpieces, and extensions) or hair camouflaging agents (hair fibers, powder cakes, lotions, sprays, hair crayons, and scalp tattooing). Herein, we review current methods to hide or reduce the appearance of hair loss and discuss their associated costs, advantages, and disadvantages. Knowledge of products available to cover scalp, eyebrow, and eyelash hair loss may not only better equip clinicians to respond to questions from concerned patients, but may provide additional options to help these patients best cope with their hair loss.

  3. Tribology of total hip arthroplasty prostheses: What an orthopaedic surgeon should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, Claude B

    2016-02-01

    Articulating components should minimise the generation of wear particles in order to optimize long-term survival of the prosthesis.A good understanding of tribological properties helps the orthopaedic surgeon to choose the most suitable bearing for each individual patient.Conventional and highly cross-linked polyethylene articulating either with metal or ceramic, ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal are the most commonly used bearing combinations.All combinations of bearing surface have their advantages and disadvantages. An appraisal of the individual patient's objectives should be part of the assessment of the best bearing surface. Cite this article: Rieker CB. Tribology of total hip arthroplasty prostheses: what an orthopaedic surgeon should know. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:52-57. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000004.

  4. Fit Analysis of Different Framework Fabrication Techniques for Implant-Supported Partial Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spazzin, Aloísio Oro; Bacchi, Atais; Trevisani, Alexandre; Farina, Ana Paula; Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the vertical misfit of implant-supported frameworks made using different techniques to obtain passive fit. Thirty three-unit fixed partial dentures were fabricated in cobalt-chromium alloy (n = 10) using three fabrication methods: one-piece casting, framework cemented on prepared abutments, and laser welding. The vertical misfit between the frameworks and the abutments was evaluated with an optical microscope using the single-screw test. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α = .05). The one-piece casted frameworks presented significantly higher vertical misfit values than those found for framework cemented on prepared abutments and laser welding techniques (P Laser welding and framework cemented on prepared abutments are effective techniques to improve the adaptation of three-unit implant-supported prostheses. These techniques presented similar fit.

  5. The use of interlocking prostheses for both temporary and definitive management of infected periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konan, Sujith; Rayan, Faizal; Manketelow, Andrew R J; Haddad, Fares S

    2011-12-01

    Infected periprosthetic fractures around total hip arthroplasties are an extremely challenging problem. We describe our experience of managing infected periprosthetic femoral fractures using interlocking long-stem femoral prostheses either as temporary functional spacers or as definitive implants. The Cannulock (Orthodesign, Christchurch, United Kingdom) uncoated stem was used in 12 cases, and the Kent hip prosthesis (Biomet Merck, Bridgend, United Kingdom), in 5 cases. Satisfactory outcome was noted in all cases, and in 11 cases, revision to a definitive stem has been undertaken after successful control of infection and fracture union. The use of interlocking stems offers a relatively appealing solution for a complex problem and avoids the complications that would be associated with resection of the entire femur or the use of large quantities of bone cement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of Basal Conditions on Grounding-Line Retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koellner, S. J.; Parizek, B. R.; Alley, R. B.; Muto, A.; Holschuh, N.; Nowicki, S.

    2017-12-01

    An often-made assumption included in ice-sheet models used for sea-level projections is that basal rheology is constant throughout the domain of the simulation. The justification in support of this assumption is that physical data for determining basal rheology is limited and a constant basal flow law can adequately approximate current as well as past behavior of an ice-sheet. Prior studies indicate that beneath Thwaites Glacier (TG) there is a ridge-and-valley bedrock structure which likely promotes deformation of soft tills within the troughs and sliding, more akin to creep, over the harder peaks; giving rise to a spatially variable basal flow law. Furthermore, it has been shown that the stability of an outlet glacier varies with the assumed basal rheology, so accurate projections almost certainly need to account for basal conditions. To test the impact of basal conditions on grounding-line evolution forced by ice-shelf perturbations, we modified the PSU 2-D flowline model to enable the inclusion of spatially variable basal rheology along an idealized bedrock profile akin to TG. Synthetic outlet glacier "data" were first generated under steady-state conditions assuming a constant basal flow law and a constant basal friction coefficient field on either a linear or bumpy sloping bed. In following standard procedures, a suite of models were then initialized by assuming different basal rheologies and then determining the basal friction coefficients that produce surface velocities matching those from the synthetic "data". After running each of these to steady state, the standard and full suite of models were forced by drastically reducing ice-shelf buttressing through side-shear and prescribed basal-melting perturbations. In agreement with previous findings, results suggest a more plastic basal flow law enhances stability in response to ice-shelf perturbations by flushing ice from farther upstream to sustain the grounding-zone mass balance required to prolong the

  7. Patterned basal seismicity shows sub-ice stream bedforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcheck, C. G.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Schwartz, S. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Patterns in seismicity emanating from the bottom of fast-moving ice streams and glaciers may indicate localized patches of higher basal resistance— sometimes called 'sticky spots', or otherwise varying basal properties. These seismogenic basal areas resist an unknown portion of the total driving stress of the Whillans Ice Plain (WIP), in West Antarctica, but may play an important role in the WIP stick-slip cycle and ice stream slowdown. To better understand the mechanism and importance of basal seismicity beneath the WIP, we analyze seismic data collected by a small aperture (micro-earthquakes in Dec 2014, and we compare the resulting map of seismicity to ice bottom depth measured by airborne radar. The number of basal earthquakes per area within the network is spatially heterogeneous, but a pattern of two 400m wide streaks of high seismicity rates is evident, with >50-500 earthquakes detected per 50x50m grid cell in 2 weeks. These seismically active streaks are elongated approximately in the ice flow direction with a spacing of 750m. Independent airborne radar measurements of ice bottom depth from Jan 2013 show a low-amplitude ( 5m) undulation in the basal topography superposed on a regional gradient in ice bottom depth. The flow-perpendicular wavelength of these low-amplitude undulations is comparable to the spacing of the high seismicity bands, and the streaks of high seismicity intersect local lows in the undulating basal topography. We interpret these seismic and radar observations as showing seismically active sub-ice stream bedforms that are low amplitude and elongated in the direction of ice flow, comparable to the morphology of mega scale glacial lineations (MSGLs), with high basal seismicity rates observed in the MSGL troughs. These results have implications for understanding the formation mechanism of MSGLS and well as understanding the interplay between basal topographic roughness, spatially varying basal till and hydrologic properties, basal

  8. Antifungal activity of components used for decontamination of dental prostheses on the growth of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Lima Gouveia

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effectiveness of antimicrobial solutions employed in dental prosthesis decontamination is still uncertain. Aim: To evaluate the antifungal activity of cleaners used in the decontamination of dental prostheses on the growth of Candida albicans. Material and method: The evaluated products were: Corega Tabs(r (S1, Sodium Hypochlorite 1% (S2, Sodium Bicarbonate 1% (S3, Hydrogen Peroxide 1% (S4, Chlorhexidine Digluconate 0.12% - Periogard (r (S5, Mouthrinse based on essential oils - Listerine(r (S6, essential oil from Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary at concentrations of 1% (S7 and 2% (S8. The antifungal activity of the products was evaluated by agar diffusion technique and the determination of microbial death curve of samples of C. albicans (ATCC 90028 in concentration 1.5 × 106 CFU/mL. The tests were performed in triplicate and statistical analysis was made by ANOVA Two-Way and Tukey tests, with the confidence level of 95%. Result: The average of the zones of inhibition growth, in millimeters, obtained for the products were: 0.0 (S1, 44.7 (S2, 0.0 (S3, 21.6 (S4, 10.0 (S5, 6.1 (S6, 0.0 (S7 and 2.4 (S8. Considering the determination of microbial death curve, all products showed a statistical difference (p<0.01 from control (0.85% sodium chloride and S3 groups. Fungal growth less than 2×104 CFU/mL and an accentuation of the microbial death curve were observed after 30 minutes, with exception for S3 and control groups. Conclusion: The studied compounds, with the exception of Sodium Bicarbonate, have antifungal effect against C. albicans, which contribute for dental prostheses hygiene.

  9. Immediately loaded implants supporting fixed prostheses in the edentulous maxilla: a preliminary clinical and radiologic report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergkvist, Göran; Sahlholm, Sten; Karlsson, Ulf; Nilner, Krister; Lindh, Christina

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the survival rate of immediately loaded ITI sand-blasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) solid-screw dental implants in the edentulous maxilla after 8 months of loading. Twenty-eight patients (mean age 63 years) with edentulous maxillae each received 6 implants and 1 implant-supported fixed provisional prosthesis within 24 hours after surgery. After a mean healing time of 15 weeks, the patient received a definitive, screw-retained, implant-supported fixed prosthesis. A total of 168 implants were placed. Clinical parameters were registered after 1 month of loading with the implant-supported fixed prostheses as well as 8 months after implant placement. Radiologic examinations and assessments were made at implant placement and after 8 months. The mean marginal bone level at implant placement was 1.6 mm (range 0 to 5.1; SD 1.1) apical of the reference point (the implant shoulder). The mean marginal bone level at the 8-month follow-up was 3.2 mm (range 0.4 to 5.9; SD 1.1) apical of the reference point. Three implants failed during the healing period. The improved results in the present study might be a result of the positive effect of splinting the implants immediately after placement. ITI SLA solid-screw implants immediately loaded (ie, loaded within 24 hours of placement) and supporting fixed prostheses had successful survival rates after 8 months. The present results constitute a solid baseline for future follow-up studies.

  10. Comparison of patellofemoral outcomes after TKA using two prostheses with different patellofemoral design features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Dae Kyung; Baek, Jong Hun; Yoon, Kyung Tack; Son, Hyuck Sung; Song, Sang Jun

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the clinical and radiographic results after TKA using two prostheses with different sagittal patellofemoral design features, including outcomes related to compatibility of the patellofemoral joint. The clinical and radiographic results of 81 patients (100 knees) who underwent TKA using the specific prosthesis (group A) were compared with those in a control group who underwent TKA using the other prosthesis (group B). The presence of anterior knee joint pain, patellar crepitation, and patellar clunk syndrome was also checked. The function score and maximum flexion angle at the last follow-up were slightly better in group A than those in group B (92.0 ± 2.3 vs. 90.6 ± 4.2) (133.6° ± 8.4° vs. 129.6° ± 11.4°). Anterior knee pain was observed in 6 knees and patellar crepitation in four knees in group A. In group B, these symptoms were observed in 22 knees and 18 knees, respectively. There was no patellar clunk syndrome in either group. The alignment was corrected with satisfactory positioning of components. The patellar height remained unchanged after TKA in the two groups. The differences between preoperative and postoperative patellar tilt angle and patellar translation were small. When comparing the clinical and radiographic results after TKA using two prostheses with different sagittal patellofemoral design features, TKA using the specific prosthesis provided satisfactory results with less clinical symptoms related to the patellofemoral kinematics with TKA using the other prosthesis. III.

  11. Distrofia de la membrana basal epitelial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaadia Pérez Parra

    Full Text Available La distrofia de Cogan es la distrofia corneal anterior más común, frecuente en adultos del sexo femenino, entre 40-70 años de edad. Presentamos un caso de una paciente de 50 años de edad, del sexo femenino, quien refiere visión borrosa, lagrimeo y fotofobia. Al examen de la córnea en lámpara de hendidura se observan imágenes de color grisáceo en forma de huellas dactilares y de mapa. Esta afección es causada por alteraciones de la membrana basal epitelial que provoca la separación parcial o total del epitelio corneal. Generalmente asintomática, es la causa más frecuente de erosión corneal recurrente. Las opciones terapéuticas varían desde lubricantes, soluciones hipertónicas tópicas, lentes de contacto de vendaje, desbridamiento del epitelio central, micropunciones mecánicas o diatermia y fotoqueratectomía con láser excímer.

  12. Does basal metabolic rate drive eating rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar; Ponnalagu, Shalini; Bi, Xinyan; Forde, Ciaran

    2018-05-15

    There have been recent advances in our understanding of the drivers of energy intake (EI). However, the biological drivers of differences in eating rate (ER) remain less clear. Studies have reported that the fat-free mass (FFM) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) are both major components that contribute to daily energy expenditure (EE) and drive EI. More recently, a number of observations report that higher ER can lead to greater EI. The current study proposed that adults with a higher BMR and higher energy requirements would also exhibit higher ERs. Data on BMR, FFM, and ER were collected from 272 Chinese adults (91 males and 181 females) in a cross-sectional study. Analysis showed significant positive associations between BMR and ER (r s  = 0.405, p BMR explained about 15% of the variation in ER which was taken to be metabolically significant. This association provides metabolic explanation that the differences in an individual's BMR (hence energy requirements) may be correlated with ERs. This merits further research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fluctuating selection on basal metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johan F; Nilsson, Jan-Åke

    2016-02-01

    BMR (Basal metabolic rate) is an important trait in animal life history as it represents a significant part of animal energy budgets. BMR has also been shown to be positively related to sustainable work rate and maximal thermoregulatory capacity. To this date, most of the studies have focused on the causes of interspecific and intraspecific variation in BMR, and fairly little is known about the fitness consequences of different metabolic strategies. In this study, we show that winter BMR affects local survival in a population of wild blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus), but that the selection direction differs between years. We argue that this fluctuating selection is probably a consequence of varying winter climate with a positive relation between survival and BMR during cold and harsh conditions, but a negative relation during mild winters. This fluctuating selection can not only explain the pronounced variation in BMR in wild populations, but will also give us new insights into how energy turnover rates can shape the life-history strategies of animals. Furthermore, the study shows that the process of global warming may cause directional selection for a general reduction in BMR, affecting the general life-history strategy on the population level.

  14. A whole stand basal area projection model for Appalachian hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Brooks; Lichun Jiang; Matthew Perkowski; Benktesh Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Two whole-stand basal area projection models were developed for Appalachian hardwood stands. The proposed equations are an algebraic difference projection form based on existing basal area and the change in age, trees per acre, and/or dominant height. Average equation error was less than 10 square feet per acre and residuals exhibited no irregular trends.

  15. Basal cell epithelioma (carcinoma) in children and teenagers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahbari, H.; Mehregan, A.H.

    1982-01-15

    Among over 390,000 routine dermatopathologic specimens there were 85 cases diagnosed as basal cell epithelioma (carcinoma) (BCE) in persons 19 years old or younger. This number was refined to 40 cases de novo BCE in children and teenagers. Basal cell epithelioma unrelated to other conditions is rare in the young and it should be differentiated from similar fibroepithelial growths.

  16. computed tomography features of basal ganglia and periventricular

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV is probably the most common cause of basal ganglia and periventricular calcification today. on-enhanced computed tomography (NECT) shows diffuse cerebral atrophy in 90% of cases. Bilateral, symmetrical basal ganglia calcification is seen in 30% of cases, but virtually never before 1 year of age.1. CMV (FIG.2).

  17. Amyloid in basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K E; Westermark, Per

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of amyloid substance was studied in two different types of skin tumours: basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis. In 9 out of 49 cases of seborrheic keratosis amyloid substance was found. In the basal cell carcinomas, 194 out of 260 cases showed amyloid deposits, a rate...

  18. Effects of electrode size and spacing on sensory modalities in the phantom thumb perception area for the forearm amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P; Chai, G H; Zhu, K H; Lan, N; Sui, X H

    2015-01-01

    Tactile sensory feedback plays a key role in accomplishing the dexterous manipulation of prosthetic hands for the amputees, and the non-invasive transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of the phantom finger perception (PFP) area would be an effective way to realize sensory feedback clinically. In order to realize the high-spatial-resolution tactile sensory feedback in the PFP region, we investigated the effects of electrode size and spacing on the tactile sensations for potentially optimizing the surface electrode array configuration. Six forearm-amputated subjects were recruited in the psychophysical studies. With the diameter of the circular electrode increasing from 3 mm to 12 mm, the threshold current intensity was enhanced correspondingly under different sensory modalities. The smaller electrode could potentially lead to high sensation spatial resolution. Whereas, the smaller the electrode, the less the number of sensory modalities. For an Φ-3 mm electrode, it is even hard for the subject to perceive any perception modalities under normal stimulating current. In addition, the two-electrode discrimination distance (TEDD) in the phantom thumb perception area decreased with electrode size decreasing in two directions of parallel or perpendicular to the forearm. No significant difference of TEDD existed along the two directions. Studies in this paper would guide the configuration optimization of the TENS electrode array for potential high spatial-resolution sensory feedback.

  19. Thumb-size ultrasonic-assisted spectroscopic imager for in-situ glucose monitoring as optional sensor of conventional dialyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogo, Kosuke; Mori, Keita; Qi, Wei; Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    We proposed the ultrasonic-assisted spectroscopic imaging for the realization of blood-glucose-level monitoring during dialytic therapy. Optical scattering and absorption caused by blood cells deteriorate the detection accuracy of glucose dissolved in plasma. Ultrasonic standing waves can agglomerate blood cells at nodes. In contrast, around anti-node regions, the amount of transmitted light increases because relatively clear plasma appears due to decline the number of blood cells. Proposed method can disperse the transmitted light of plasma without time-consuming pretreatment such as centrifugation. To realize the thumb-size glucose sensor which can be easily attached to dialysis tubes, an ultrasonic standing wave generator and a spectroscopic imager are required to be small. Ultrasonic oscillators are ∅30[mm]. A drive circuit of oscillators, which now size is 41×55×45[mm], is expected to become small. The trial apparatus of proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imager, whose size is 30×30×48[mm], also can be little-finger size in principal. In the experiment, we separated the suspension mixed water and micro spheres (Θ10[mm) into particles and liquid regions with the ultrasonic standing wave (frequency: 2[MHz]). Furthermore, the spectrum of transmitted light through the suspension could be obtained in visible light regions with a white LED.

  20. Endotracheal tube and laryngeal mask airway cuff volume changes with altitude: a rule of thumb for aeromedical transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Catherine; Parkinson, Neil; Bleetman, Anthony

    2007-03-01

    Helicopters and light (unpressurised) aircraft are used increasingly for the transport of ventilated patients. Most of these patients are ventilated through endotracheal tubes (ETTs), others through laryngeal mask airways (LMAs). The cuffs of both ETTs and LMAs inflate with increases in altitude as barometric pressure decreases (30 mbar/1000 feet). Tracheal mucosa perfusion becomes compromised at a pressure of approximately 30 cm H2O; critical perfusion pressure is 50 cm H2O. The change in dimensions of the inflated cuffs of a size 8 ETT and a size 5 LMA were measured with digital callipers at 1000 feet intervals in the unpressurised cabin of an Agusta 109 helicopter used by the Warwickshire and Northamptonshire Air Ambulance. A linear expansion in cuff dimensions as a function of altitude increase was identified. For ETTs, a formula for removal of air from the cuff with increasing altitude was calculated and is recommended for use in aeromedical transfers. This is 1/17x1.1 = 0.06 ml/1000 foot ascent/ml initial cuff inflation. The data for LMA cuff expansion failed to show significant correlation with altitude change. Further work is required to determine a similar rule of thumb for LMA cuff deflation.

  1. Stochastic prey arrivals and crab spider giving-up times: simulations of spider performance using two simple "rules of thumb".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareiva, Peter; Morse, Douglass H; Eccleston, Jill

    1989-03-01

    We compared the patch-choice performances of an ambush predator, the crab spider Misumena vatia (Thomisidae) hunting on common milkweed Asclepias syriaca (Asclepiadaceae) umbles, with two stochastic rule-of-thumb simulation models: one that employed a threshold giving-up time and one that assumed a fixed probability of moving. Adult female Misumena were placed on milkweed plants with three umbels, each with markedly different numbers of flower-seeking prey. Using a variety of visitation regimes derived from observed visitation patterns of insect prey, we found that decreases in among-umbel variance in visitation rates or increases in overall mean visitation rates reduced the "clarity of the optimum" (the difference in the yield obtained as foraging behavior changes), both locally and globally. Yield profiles from both models were extremely flat or jagged over a wide range of prey visitation regimes; thus, differences between optimal and "next-best" strategies differed only modestly over large parts of the "foraging landscape". Although optimal yields from fixed probability simulations were one-third to one-half those obtained from threshold simulations, spiders appear to depart umbels in accordance with the fixed probability rule.

  2. Adenoid basal hyperplasia of the uterine cervix: a lesion of reserve cell type, distinct from adenoid basal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdraon, Olivier; Cornélius, Aurélie; Farine, Marie-Odile; Boulanger, Loïc; Wacrenier, Agnès

    2012-12-01

    Adenoid basal hyperplasia is an underrecognized cervical lesion, resembling adenoid basal carcinoma, except the absence of deep invasion into the stroma. We report a series of 10 cases, all extending less than 1 mm from the basement membrane. Our results support the hypothesis that adenoid basal hyperplasia arises from reserve cells of the cervix. Lesions were found close to the squamocolumnar junction, in continuity with the nearby subcolumnar reserve cells. They shared the same morphology and immunoprofile using a panel of 4 antibodies (keratin 5/6, keratin 14, keratin 7 and p63) designed to differentiate reserve cells from mature squamous cells and endocervical columnar cells. We detected no human papillomavirus infection by in situ hybridization targeting high-risk human papillomavirus, which was concordant with the absence of immunohistochemical p16 expression. We demonstrated human papillomavirus infection in 4 (80%) of 5 adenoid basal carcinoma, which is in the same range as previous studies (88%). Thus, adenoid basal hyperplasia should be distinguished from adenoid basal carcinoma because they imply different risk of human papillomavirus infection and of subsequent association with high-grade invasive carcinoma. In our series, the most reliable morphological parameters to differentiate adenoid basal hyperplasia from adenoid basal carcinoma were the depth of the lesion and the size of the lesion nests. Furthermore, squamous differentiation was rare in adenoid basal hyperplasia and constant in adenoid basal carcinoma. Finally, any mitotic activity and/or an increase of Ki67 labeling index should raise the hypothesis of adenoid basal carcinoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reliability of basal plasma vasopressin concentrations in healthy male adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Daniel S; Westlye, Lars T; Smerud, Knut T; Mahmoud, Ramy A; Djupesland, Per G; Andreassen, Ole A

    2017-10-01

    The neuropeptides oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) play important and interrelated roles in modulating mammalian social behaviour. While the OT system has received considerable research attention for its potential to treat psychiatric symptoms, comparatively little is known about the role of the AVP system in human social behaviour. To better understand the intraindividual stability of basal AVP, the present study assessed the reproducibility of basal plasma AVP concentrations. Basal plasma AVP was assessed at four sampling points separated by 8 days, on average, in 16 healthy adult males. Only one out of six comparisons revealed strong evidence for reproducibility of basal AVP concentrations (visit 2 vs. visit 4: r=0.8, p0.1). The concordance correlation coefficient [0.15, 95% CI (-0.55, 0.73)] also revealed poor overall reproducibility. Poor reliability of basal AVP concentrations suggests future work covarying AVP with trait markers should proceed with careful consideration of intraindividual fluctuations.

  4. Axillary basal cell carcinoma in patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome: report of basal cell carcinoma in both axilla of a woman with basal cell nevus syndrome and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2014-08-17

    Basal cell carcinoma of the axilla, an area that is not usually exposed to the sun, is rare. Individuals with basal cell nevus syndrome, a disorder associated with a mutation in the patch 1 (PTCH1) gene, develop numerous basal cell carcinomas. To describe a woman with basal cell nevus syndrome who developed a pigmented basal cell carcinoma in each of her axilla and to review the features of axillary basal cell carcinoma patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome. Pubmed was used to search the following terms: axillary basal cell carcinoma and basal cell nevus syndrome. The papers and their citations were evaluated. Basal cell nevus syndrome patients with basal cell carcinoma of the axilla were observed in two women; this represents 2.5% (2 of 79) of the patients with axillary basal cell carcinoma. Both women had pigmented tumors that were histologically nonaggressive. The cancers did not recur after curettage or excision. Basal cell carcinoma of the axilla has only been described in 79 individuals; two of the patients were women with pigmented tumors who had basal cell nevus syndrome. Similar to other patients with axillary basal cell carcinoma, the tumors were histologically nonaggressive and did not recur following treatment. Whether PTCH1 gene mutation predisposes basal cell nevus patients to develop axillary basal cell carcinomas remains to be determined.

  5. How ice shelf morphology controls basal melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Christopher M.; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2009-12-01

    The response of ice shelf basal melting to climate is a function of ocean temperature, circulation, and mixing in the open ocean and the coupling of this external forcing to the sub-ice shelf circulation. Because slope strongly influences the properties of buoyancy-driven flow near the ice shelf base, ice shelf morphology plays a critical role in linking external, subsurface heat sources to the ice. In this paper, the slope-driven dynamic control of local and area-integrated melting rates is examined under a wide range of ocean temperatures and ice shelf shapes, with an emphasis on smaller, steeper ice shelves. A 3-D numerical ocean model is used to simulate the circulation underneath five idealized ice shelves, forced with subsurface ocean temperatures ranging from -2.0°C to 1.5°C. In the sub-ice shelf mixed layer, three spatially distinct dynamic regimes are present. Entrainment of heat occurs predominately under deeper sections of the ice shelf; local and area-integrated melting rates are most sensitive to changes in slope in this "initiation" region. Some entrained heat is advected upslope and used to melt ice in the "maintenance" region; however, flow convergence in the "outflow" region limits heat loss in flatter portions of the ice shelf. Heat flux to the ice exhibits (1) a spatially nonuniform, superlinear dependence on slope and (2) a shape- and temperature-dependent, internally controlled efficiency. Because the efficiency of heat flux through the mixed layer decreases with increasing ocean temperature, numerical simulations diverge from a simple quadratic scaling law.

  6. Basal melting driven by turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbanipour Esfahani, Babak; Hirata, Silvia C.; Berti, Stefano; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2018-05-01

    Melting and, conversely, solidification processes in the presence of convection are key to many geophysical problems. An essential question related to these phenomena concerns the estimation of the (time-evolving) melting rate, which is tightly connected to the turbulent convective dynamics in the bulk of the melt fluid and the heat transfer at the liquid-solid interface. In this work, we consider a convective-melting model, constructed as a generalization of the Rayleigh-Bénard system, accounting for the basal melting of a solid. As the change of phase proceeds, a fluid layer grows at the heated bottom of the system and eventually reaches a turbulent convection state. By means of extensive lattice-Boltzmann numerical simulations employing an enthalpy formulation of the governing equations, we explore the model dynamics in two- and three-dimensional configurations. The focus of the analysis is on the scaling of global quantities like the heat flux and the kinetic energy with the Rayleigh number, as well as on the interface morphology and the effects of space dimensionality. Independently of dimensionality, we find that the convective-melting system behavior shares strong resemblances with that of the Rayleigh-Bénard one, and that the heat flux is only weakly enhanced with respect to that case. Such similarities are understood, at least to some extent, considering the resulting slow motion of the melting front (with respect to the turbulent fluid velocity fluctuations) and its generally little roughness (compared to the height of the fluid layer). Varying the Stefan number, accounting for the thermodynamical properties of the material, also seems to have only a mild effect, which implies the possibility of extrapolating results in numerically delicate low-Stefan setups from more convenient high-Stefan ones. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the geophysically relevant problem of modeling Arctic ice melt ponds.

  7. Basal ganglia - thalamus and the crowning enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela eGarcia-Munoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available When Hubel (1982 referred to layer 1 of primary visual cortex as …a ‘crowning mystery’ to keep area-17 physiologists busy for years to come... he could have been talking about any cortical area. In the 80’s and 90’s there were no methods to examine this neuropile on the surface of the cortex: a tangled web of axons and dendrites from a variety of different places with unknown specificities and doubtful connections to the cortical output neurons some hundreds of microns below. Recently, three changes have made the crowning enigma less of an impossible mission: the clear presence of neurons in layer 1 (L1, the active conduction of voltage along apical dendrites and optogenetic methods that might allow us to look at one source of input at a time. For all of those reasons alone, it seems it is time to take seriously the function of L1. The functional properties of this layer will need to wait for more experiments but already L1 cells are GAD67 positive, i.e., inhibitory! They could reverse the sign of the thalamic glutamate (GLU input for the entire cortex. It is at least possible that in the near future normal activity of individual sources of L1 could be detected using genetic tools. We are at the outset of important times in the exploration of thalamic functions and perhaps the solution to the crowning enigma is within sight. Our review looks forward to that solution from the solid basis of the anatomy of the basal ganglia output to motor thalamus. We will focus on L1, its afferents, intrinsic neurons and its influence on responses of pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5. Since L1 is present in the whole cortex we will provide a general overview considering evidence mainly from the somatosensory cortex before focusing on motor cortex.

  8. Implications of basal micro-earthquakes and tremor for ice stream mechanics: Stick-slip basal sliding and till erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcheck, C. Grace; Tulaczyk, Slawek; Schwartz, Susan Y.; Walter, Jacob I.; Winberry, J. Paul

    2018-03-01

    The Whillans Ice Plain (WIP) is unique among Antarctic ice streams because it moves by stick-slip. The conditions allowing stick-slip and its importance in controlling ice dynamics remain uncertain. Local basal seismicity previously observed during unstable slip is a clue to the mechanism of ice stream stick-slip and a window into current basal conditions, but the spatial extent and importance of this basal seismicity are unknown. We analyze data from a 2010-2011 ice-plain-wide seismic and GPS network to show that basal micro-seismicity correlates with large-scale patterns in ice stream slip behavior: Basal seismicity is common where the ice moves the least between unstable slip events, with small discrete basal micro-earthquakes happening within 10s of km of the central stick-slip nucleation area and emergent basal tremor occurring downstream of this area. Basal seismicity is largely absent in surrounding areas, where inter-slip creep rates are high. The large seismically active area suggests that a frictional sliding law that can accommodate stick-slip may be appropriate for ice stream beds on regional scales. Variability in seismic behavior over inter-station distances of 1-10 km indicates heterogeneity in local bed conditions and frictional complexity. WIP unstable slips may nucleate when stick-slip basal earthquake patches fail over a large area. We present a conceptual model in which basal seismicity results from slip-weakening frictional failure of over-consolidated till as it is eroded and mobilized into deforming till.

  9. A basal stem cell signature identifies aggressive prostate cancer phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan A.; Sokolov, Artem; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Baertsch, Robert; Newton, Yulia; Graim, Kiley; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M.; Witte, Owen N.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from numerous cancers suggests that increased aggressiveness is accompanied by up-regulation of signaling pathways and acquisition of properties common to stem cells. It is unclear if different subtypes of late-stage cancer vary in stemness properties and whether or not these subtypes are transcriptionally similar to normal tissue stem cells. We report a gene signature specific for human prostate basal cells that is differentially enriched in various phenotypes of late-stage metastatic prostate cancer. We FACS-purified and transcriptionally profiled basal and luminal epithelial populations from the benign and cancerous regions of primary human prostates. High-throughput RNA sequencing showed the basal population to be defined by genes associated with stem cell signaling programs and invasiveness. Application of a 91-gene basal signature to gene expression datasets from patients with organ-confined or hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer revealed that metastatic small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma was molecularly more stem-like than either metastatic adenocarcinoma or organ-confined adenocarcinoma. Bioinformatic analysis of the basal cell and two human small cell gene signatures identified a set of E2F target genes common between prostate small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and primary prostate basal cells. Taken together, our data suggest that aggressive prostate cancer shares a conserved transcriptional program with normal adult prostate basal stem cells. PMID:26460041

  10. Learning and memory functions of the Basal Ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Mark G; Knowlton, Barbara J

    2002-01-01

    Although the mammalian basal ganglia have long been implicated in motor behavior, it is generally recognized that the behavioral functions of this subcortical group of structures are not exclusively motoric in nature. Extensive evidence now indicates a role for the basal ganglia, in particular the dorsal striatum, in learning and memory. One prominent hypothesis is that this brain region mediates a form of learning in which stimulus-response (S-R) associations or habits are incrementally acquired. Support for this hypothesis is provided by numerous neurobehavioral studies in different mammalian species, including rats, monkeys, and humans. In rats and monkeys, localized brain lesion and pharmacological approaches have been used to examine the role of the basal ganglia in S-R learning. In humans, study of patients with neurodegenerative diseases that compromise the basal ganglia, as well as research using brain neuroimaging techniques, also provide evidence of a role for the basal ganglia in habit learning. Several of these studies have dissociated the role of the basal ganglia in S-R learning from those of a cognitive or declarative medial temporal lobe memory system that includes the hippocampus as a primary component. Evidence suggests that during learning, basal ganglia and medial temporal lobe memory systems are activated simultaneously and that in some learning situations competitive interference exists between these two systems.

  11. Red Dot Basal Cell Carcinoma: Report of Cases and Review of This Unique Presentation of Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-03-22

    Red dot basal cell carcinoma is a unique variant of basal cell carcinoma. Including the three patients described in this report, red dot basal cell carcinoma has only been described in seven individuals. This paper describes the features of two males and one female with red dot basal cell carcinoma and reviews the characteristics of other patients with this clinical subtype of basal cell carcinoma. A 70-year-old male developed a pearly-colored papule with a red dot in the center on his nasal tip. A 71-year-old male developed a red dot surrounded by a flesh-colored papule on his left nostril. Lastly, a 74-year-old female developed a red dot within an area of erythema on her left mid back. Biopsy of the lesions all showed nodular and/or superficial basal cell carcinoma. Correlation of the clinical presentation and pathology established the diagnosis of red dot basal cell carcinoma. The tumors were treated by excision using the Mohs surgical technique. Pubmed was searched with the keyword: basal, cell, cancer, carcinoma, dot, red, and skin. The papers generated by the search and their references were reviewed. Red dot basal cell carcinoma has been described in three females and two males; the gender was not reported in two patients. The tumor was located on the nose (five patients), back (one patient) and thigh (one patient). Cancer presented as a solitary small red macule or papule; often, the carcinoma was surrounded by erythema or a flesh-colored papule. Although basal cell carcinomas usually do not blanch after a glass microscope slide is pressed against them, the red dot basal cell carcinoma blanched after diascopy in two of the patients, resulting in a delay of diagnosis in one of these individuals. Dermoscopy may be a useful non-invasive modality for evaluating skin lesions when the diagnosis of red dot basal cell carcinoma is considered. Mohs surgery is the treatment of choice; in some of the patients, the ratio of the area of the postoperative wound to that

  12. The expanding universe of disorders of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, Jose A; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Stamelou, Maria; Bhatia, Kailash P; Burn, David J

    2014-08-09

    The basal ganglia were originally thought to be associated purely with motor control. However, dysfunction and pathology of different regions and circuits are now known to give rise to many clinical manifestations beyond the association of basal ganglia dysfunction with movement disorders. Moreover, disorders that were thought to be caused by dysfunction of the basal ganglia only, such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease, have diverse abnormalities distributed not only in the brain but also in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems; this knowledge poses new questions and challenges. We discuss advances and the unanswered questions, and ways in which progress might be made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modified Design of Pin-on-Ring Tribometer for Hip Joint Prostheses Measurement; Case Study on Salat Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Khafidh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Total hip replacement (THR is one of the most successful orthopedic surgical procedures for replacing a broken hip joint. In THR, wear may occur at the articulating surface of the acetabular cup and the femoral head. In Indonesia, the country with the largest Muslim population in the world, most of the inhabitants do salat (praying every day. THR users are banned from doing salat for fear it will damage the hip joint prostheses. The previous wear calculation methods on the hip joint prostheses use the gravimetric, coordinate measuring machine (CMM, profiler, and geometric method. The disadvantages of the previous methods are that the geometry of the wear patch and the wear volume are only known at the end of the experiment, so they cannot be used to calculate the specific wear rate values in real time. So far, in every modeling of the hip joint prostheses, the values of the specific wear rate are assumed to be constant. This paper reports on the design modification of a pin-on-ring tribometer that is used to measure the wear volumes in hip joint prostheses. The result shows that modifications of the femoral head holder, reciprocating motion, elastic joint, and extra displacement transducer is needed to get the specific wear rate value. The calculation method to find the delta volume that is the value of displacement less than the displacement minimum (δmin is based on a graph, while the calculation method to find the delta volume that is the value of displacement that is more than the displacement minimum (δmin is based on an equation. In the salat test protocol, the longest test time was during the sujud (prostration motion, which took 1034.17 minutes in the experiment.

  14. Noninvasive radioisotopic technique for detection of platelet deposition in mitral valve prostheses and quantitation of visceral microembolism in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Fuster, V.; Rao, S.A.; Forshaw, P.L.; Kaye, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    A noninvasive technique has been developed in the dog model for imaging, with a gamma camera, the platelet deposition on Bjoerk-Shiley mitral valve prostheses early postoperatively. At 25 hours after implantation of the prosthesis and 24 hours after intravenous administration of 400 to 500 microCi of platelets labeled with indium-111, the platelet deposition in the sewing ring and perivalvular cardiac tissue can be clearly delineated in a scintiphotograph. An in vitro technique was also developed for quantitation of visceral microemboli in brain, lungs, kidneys, and other tissues. Biodistribution of the labeled platelets was quantitated, and the tissue/blood radioactivity ratio was determined in 22 dogs in four groups: unoperated normal dogs, sham-operated dogs, prosthesis-implanted dogs, and prosthesis-implanted dogs treated with dipyridamole before and aspirin and dipyridamole immediately after operation. Fifteen to 20% of total platelets were consumed as a consequence of the surgical procedure. On quantitation, we found that platelet deposition on the components of the prostheses was significantly reduced in prosthesis-implanted animals treated with dipyridamole and aspirin when compared with prosthesis-implanted, untreated dogs. All prosthesis-implanted animals considered together had a twofold to fourfold increase in tissue/blood radioactivity ratio in comparison with unoperated and sham-operated animals, an indication that the viscera work as filters and trap platelet microemboli that are presumably produced in the region of the mitral valve prostheses. In the dog model, indium-111-labeled platelets thus provide a sensitive marker for noninvasive imaging of platelet deposition on mechanical mitral valve prostheses, in vitro evaluation of platelet microembolism in viscera, in vitro quantitation of surgical consumption of platelets, and evaluation of platelet-inhibitor drugs

  15. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika; Weingartner, Christina; Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed; Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger; Schneider, Christian; Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan; Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification

  16. An Evaluation of the Gap Sizes of 3-Unit Fixed Dental Prostheses Milled from Sintering Metal Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Jae-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the clinical acceptability of sintering metal-fabricated 3-unit fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) based on gap sizes. Ten specimens were prepared on research models by milling sintering metal blocks or by the lost-wax technique (LWC group). Gap sizes were assessed at 12 points per abutment (premolar and molar), 24 points per specimen (480 points in a total in 20 specimens). The measured points were categorized as marginal, axial wall, and occlusal for assessment in a silicone...

  17. Marginal and Internal Fit of Cobalt-Chromium Fixed Dental Prostheses Generated from Digital and Conventional Impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Svanborg, Per; Skjerven, Henrik; Carlsson, Pablo; Eliasson, Alf; Karlsson, Stig; Örtorp, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Digital impressions are increasingly used and have the potential to avoid the problem of inaccurate impressions. Only a few studies to verify the accuracy of digital impressions have been performed. The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal and internal fit of 3-unit tooth supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) fabricated from digital and conventional impressions. Methods. Ten FDPs were produced from digital impressions using the iTero system and 10 FDPs were produce...

  18. Additive Manufacturing: A Comparative Analysis of Dimensional Accuracy and Skin Texture Reproduction of Auricular Prostheses Replicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkovskiy, Alexey; Spintzyk, Sebastian; Axmann, Detlef; Engel, Eva-Maria; Weber, Heiner; Huettig, Fabian

    2017-11-10

    The use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and additive manufacturing in maxillofacial prosthetics has been widely acknowledged. Rapid prototyping can be considered for manufacturing of auricular prostheses. Therefore, so-called prostheses replicas can be fabricated by digital means. The objective of this study was to identify a superior additive manufacturing method to fabricate auricular prosthesis replicas (APRs) within a digital workflow. Auricles of 23 healthy subjects (mean age of 37.8 years) were measured in vivo with respect to an anthropometrical protocol. Landmarks were volumized with fiducial balls for 3D scanning using a handheld structured light scanner. The 3D CAD dataset was postprocessed, and the same anthropometrical measurements were made in the CAD software with the digital lineal. Each CAD dataset was materialized using fused deposition modeling (FDM), selective laser sintering (SLS), and stereolithography (SL), constituting 53 APR samples. All distances between the landmarks were measured on the APRs. After the determination of the measurement error within the five data groups (in vivo, CAD, FDM, SLS, and SL), the mean values were compared using matched pairs method. To this, the in vivo and CAD dataset were set as references. Finally, the surface structure of the APRs was qualitatively evaluated with stereomicroscopy and profilometry to ascertain the level of skin detail reproduction. The anthropometrical approach showed drawbacks in measuring the protrusion of the ear's helix. The measurement error within all groups of measurements was calculated between 0.20 and 0.28 mm, implying a high reproducibility. The lowest mean differences of 53 produced APRs were found in FDM (0.43%) followed by SLS (0.54%) and SL (0.59%)--compared to in vivo, and again in FDM (0.20%) followed by SL (0.36%) and SLS (0.39%)--compared to CAD. None of these values exceed the threshold of clinical relevance (1.5%); however, the qualitative

  19. Using a colorimeter to develop an intrinsic silicone shade guide for facial prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, L M; Andres, C J; Moore, B K; Goodacre, C J; Muñoz, C A

    1998-12-01

    To determine if using CIE L*a*b* color measurements of white facial skin could be correlated to those of silicone shade samples that visually matched the skin. Secondly, to see if a correlation in color measurements could be achieved between the silicone shade samples and duplicated silicone samples made using a shade-guide color formula. A color booth was designed according to ASTM specifications, and painted using a Munsell Value 8 gray. A Minolta colorimeter was used to make facial skin measurements on 15 white adults. The skin color was duplicated using custom-shaded silicone samples. A 7-step wedge silicone shade guide was then fabricated, representing the commonly encountered thicknesses when fabricating facial prostheses. The silicone samples were then measured with the Minolta colorimeter. The readings were compared with the previous L*a*b* readings from the corresponding patient's skin measurements, and the relative color difference was then calculated. Silicone samples were fabricated and analyzed for three of the patients to determine if duplication of the visually matched silicone specimen was possible using the silicone color formula, and if the duplicates were visually and colorimetrically equivalent to each other. The color difference Delta E and chromaticity was calculated, and the data were analyzed using a coefficient-of-variation formula expressed by percent. A Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient was performed to determine if a correlation existed between the skin and the silicone samples at the p 0), but only the 1-mm and 4-mm b* readings were very strong. Patient and silicone L*a*b* measurement results showed very little change in the a* axis, while the L* and b* measurements showed more change in their numbers, with changes in depth for all patient silicone samples. Delta E numbers indicated the lowest Delta E at the 1-mm depth and the highest Delta E at the 10-mm depth. All duplicated samples matched their original silicone samples

  20. Design of mixed-mode natural convection solar crop dryers: Application of principles and rules of thumb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forson, F.K.; Akuffo, F.O. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana); Nazha, M.A.A.; Rajakaruna, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, De Montfort University, Queens Building, Leicester LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    A mixed-mode natural convection solar crop dryer (MNCSCD) designed and used for drying cassava and other crops in an enclosed structure is presented. A prototype of the dryer was constructed to specification and used in experimental drying tests. This paper outlines the systematic combination of the application of basic design concepts, and rules of thumb resulting from numerous and several years of experimental studies used and presents the results of calculations of the design parameters. A batch of cassava 160 kg by mass, having an initial moisture content of 67% wet basis from which 100 kg of water is required to be removed to have it dried to a desired moisture content of 17% wet basis, is used as the drying load in designing the dryer. A drying time of 30-36 h is assumed for the anticipated test location (Kumasi; 6.7 N,1.6 W) with an expected average solar irradiance of 400 W/m{sup 2} and ambient conditions of 25 C and 77.8% relative humidity. A minimum of 42.4 m{sup 2} of solar collection area, according to the design, is required for an expected drying efficiency of 12.5%. Under average ambient conditions of 28.2 C and 72.1% relative humidity with solar irradiance of 340.4 W/m{sup 2}, a drying time of 35.5 h was realised and the drying efficiency was evaluated as 12.3% when tested under full designed load signifying that the design procedure proposed is sufficiently reliable. (author)

  1. Two thumbs and one index: A comparison of manual coordination in touch-typing and mobile-typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerni, Tania; Longcamp, Marieke; Job, Remo

    2016-06-01

    It has been extensively demonstrated that in touch-typing, manual alternation is performed faster than manual repetition (see i.e. Rumelhart & Norman, 1982), due to parallel activation of successive keystrokes. In this experiment, we tested whether the manual coordination patterns typical of touch-typing can be observed in mobile-typing. We recruited skilled touch-typists and divided them into two groups depending on their typing habits on the mobile device. The "one-hand" group typed with one index finger on the mobile, and therefore produced words exclusively through manual repetition. The "two-hands" group used two thumbs, and therefore produced words through a combination of mobile-typing repetitions and alternations. The two groups were tested in a typing to dictation task with both a standard keyboard and a mobile keyboard. Results showed that manual alternation and manual repetition patterns are similar in touch-typing and in mobile-typing. For the "two-hands" group, the mean interkeystroke intervals (IKIs) for touch-typing decreased as manual alterations in words increased in both touch- and mobile-typing. The "one-hand" group showed an opposite pattern in mobile-typing. Bigram frequency was correlated with IKIs per bigrams in both tasks and groups, but the correlation for the "one-hand" group in mobile-typing was different. Our results suggest that manual coordination processes are the same in touch-typing and in mobile-typing despite different effectors, provided that both hands are used to type. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Explicit tracking of uncertainty increases the power of quantitative rule-of-thumb reasoning in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Iain G; Rickett, Benjamin C; Jones, Nick S

    2014-12-02

    Back-of-the-envelope or rule-of-thumb calculations involving rough estimates of quantities play a central scientific role in developing intuition about the structure and behavior of physical systems, for example in so-called Fermi problems in the physical sciences. Such calculations can be used to powerfully and quantitatively reason about biological systems, particularly at the interface between physics and biology. However, substantial uncertainties are often associated with values in cell biology, and performing calculations without taking this uncertainty into account may limit the extent to which results can be interpreted for a given problem. We present a means to facilitate such calculations where uncertainties are explicitly tracked through the line of reasoning, and introduce a probabilistic calculator called CALADIS, a free web tool, designed to perform this tracking. This approach allows users to perform more statistically robust calculations in cell biology despite having uncertain values, and to identify which quantities need to be measured more precisely to make confident statements, facilitating efficient experimental design. We illustrate the use of our tool for tracking uncertainty in several example biological calculations, showing that the results yield powerful and interpretable statistics on the quantities of interest. We also demonstrate that the outcomes of calculations may differ from point estimates when uncertainty is accurately tracked. An integral link between CALADIS and the BioNumbers repository of biological quantities further facilitates the straightforward location, selection, and use of a wealth of experimental data in cell biological calculations. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ulnar digits contribution to grip strength in patients with thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis is less than in normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge H; Valdes, Kristin; Angulo-Diaz-Parreño, Santiago; Pillastrini, Paolo; Negrini, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    Grip testing is commonly used as an objective measure of strength in the hand and upper extremity and is frequently used clinically as a proxy measure of function. Increasing knowledge of hand biomechanics, muscle strength, and prehension patterns can provide us with a better understanding of the functional capabilities of the hand. The objectives of this study were to determine the contribution of ulnar digits to overall grip strength in individuals with thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) osteoarthritis (OA). Thirty-seven subjects participated in the study. This group consisted of 19 patients with CMC OA (aged 60-88 years) and 18 healthy subjects (60-88 years). Three hand configurations were used by the subjects during grip testing: use of the entire hand (index, middle, ring, and little fingers) (IMRL); use of the index, middle, and ring fingers (IMR); and use of only the index and middle fingers (IM). Grip strength findings for the two groups found that compared to their healthy counterparts, CMC OA patients had, on average, a strength deficiency of 45.6, 35.5, and 28.8 % in IMRL, IMR, and IM, respectively. The small finger contribution to grip is 14.3 % and the ring and small finger contribute 34 % in subjects with CMC OA. Grip strength decreases as the number of digits contributing decreased in both groups. The ulnar digits contribution to grip strength is greater than one third of total grip strength in subjects with CMC OA. Individuals with CMC OA demonstrate significantly decreased grip strength when compared to their healthy counterparts.

  4. The field size matters: low dose external beam radiotherapy for thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis : Importance of field size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Bulling, Elke; Nitsche, Mirko; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Hermann, Robert Michael

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy (RT) for thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (rhizarthrosis). The responses of 84 patients (n = 101 joints) were analyzed 3 months after therapy (n = 65) and at 12 months (n = 27). Patients were treated with 6 fractions of 1 Gy, two times a week, with a linear accelerator. At the end of therapy, about 70 % of patients reported a response (partial remission or complete remission), 3 months later about 60 %, and 1 year after treatment 70 %. In univariate regression analysis, higher patient age and field size greater than 6 × 4 cm were associated with response to treatment, while initial increase of pain under treatment was predictive for treatment failure. Duration of RT series (more than 18 days), gender, time of symptoms before RT, stress pain or rest pain, or prior ortheses use, injections, or surgery of the joint were not associated with treatment efficacy. In multivariate regression analysis, only field size and initial pain increase were highly correlated with treatment outcome. In conclusion, RT represents a useful treatment option for patients suffering from carpometacarpal osteoarthritis. In contrast to other benign indications, a larger field size (>6 × 4 cm) seems to be more effective than smaller fields and should be evaluated in further prospective studies.

  5. 19 mm sized bileaflet valve prostheses' flow field investigated by bidimensional laser Doppler anemometry (part I: velocity profiles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, V; Grigioni, M; Daniele, C; D'Avenio, G; Boccanera, G

    1997-11-01

    The investigation of the flow field downstream of a cardiac valve prosthesis is a well established task. In particular turbulence generation is of interest if damage to blood constituents is to be assessed. Several prosthetic valve flow studies are available in literature but they generally concern large-sized prostheses. The FDA draft guidance requires the study of the maximum Reynolds number conditions for a cardiac valve model to assess the worst case in turbulence by choosing both the minimum valve diameter and a high cardiac output value as protocol set up. Within the framework of a national research project regarding the characterization of cardiovascular endoprostheses, the Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering is currently conducting an in-depth study of turbulence generated downstream of bileaflet cardiac valves. Four models of 19 mm sized bileaflet valve prostheses, namely St Jude Medical HP Edwards Tekna, Sorin Bicarbon, and CarboMedics, were studied in aortic position. The prostheses were selected for the nominal annulus diameter reported by the manufacturers without any assessment of the valve sizing method. The hemodynamic function was investigated using a bidimensional LDA system. Results concern velocity profiles during the peak flow systolic phase, at high cardiac output regime, highlighting the different flow field features downstream of the four small-sized cardiac valves.

  6. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    1988-01-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis. (author)

  7. Airway Basal Cell Heterogeneity and Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynds, Robert E; Janes, Sam M

    2017-09-01

    Basal cells are stem/progenitor cells that maintain airway homeostasis, enact repair following epithelial injury, and are a candidate cell-of-origin for lung squamous cell carcinoma. Heterogeneity of basal cells is recognized in terms of gene expression and differentiation capacity. In this Issue, Pagano and colleagues isolate a subset of immortalized basal cells that are characterized by high motility, suggesting that they might also be heterogeneous in their biophysical properties. Motility-selected cells displayed an increased ability to colonize the lung in vivo The possible implications of these findings are discussed in terms of basal cell heterogeneity, epithelial cell migration, and modeling of metastasis that occurs early in cancer evolution. Cancer Prev Res; 10(9); 491-3. ©2017 AACR See related article by Pagano et al., p. 514 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Facial skin follllicular hyperkeratosis of patients with basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zhuchkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a clinical observation of paraneoplastic syndrome of a patient with basal cell carcinoma of skin. Authors present clinical features of the described for the first time, paraneoplastic retentional follicular hyperkeratosis of facial area.

  9. Computed tomography of calcification of the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Churl Min; Suh, Soo Jhi; Kim, Soon Yong

    1981-01-01

    Calcifications of the basal ganglia are rarely found at routine autopsies and in skull radiographs. CT is superior to the plain skull radiographs in detecting intracranial attenuation differences and may be stated to be the method of choice in the diagnosis of intracranial calcifications. Of 5985 brain CT scans performed in Kyung Hee University Hospital during past 3 years, 36 cases were found to have high attenuation lesions suggesting calcifications within basal ganglia. 1. The incidence of basal ganglia calcification on CT scan was about 0.6%. 2. Of these 36 cases, 34 cases were bilateral and the remainder was unilateral. 3. The plain skull films of 23 cases showed visible calcification of basal ganglia in 3 cases (13%). 4. No specific metabolic disease was noted in the cases

  10. The Basal Cell Marker p63 and Prostate Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Signoretti, Sabina

    2002-01-01

    ...(s) involved in prostate carcinogenesis. The p53-homologue p63 is selectively expressed in the basal cell compartment of a variety of epithelial tissues and p63 deficient mice show severe defects in the development of epithelial organs...

  11. The Basal Cell Marker p63 and Prostate Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Signoretti, Sabina

    2003-01-01

    ...(s) involved in prostate carcinogenesis. The p53-homologue p63 is selectively expressed in the basal cell compartment of a variety of epithelial tissues and p63 deficient mice show severe defects in the development of epithelial organs...

  12. The Basal Cell Marker p63 and Prostate Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Signoretti, Sabina

    2004-01-01

    ...(s) involved in prostate carcinogenesis. The p53-homologue p63 is selectively expressed in the basal cell compartment of a variety of epithelial tissues and p63 deficient mice show severe defects in the development of epithelial organs...

  13. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki and others

    1988-09-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis.

  14. [Basal cell carcinoma of the nose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvallot, T; Raulo, Y; Zeller, J; Faivre, J M; Horn, G; Baruch, J

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study of 81 patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the nose was to present the oncological and cosmetic results of surgical treatment and compare these results with those of other possible treatments. We report a series of 81 cases of histologically proven BCC of the nose located chiefly on the alae nasi and on the lower end of this organ; 42 p. 100 of the tumors had previously been treated and had recurred. The patients' mean age was 63 years, and the shortest follow-up was 3 years. Excision of the tumor under simple or reinforced local anaesthesia was complete in 88 p. 100 of the cases, incomplete or borderline in 12 p. 100 and systematically repeated. Extemporaneous histological examination was performed in 18 p. 100 of the cases. The operative lesion was repaired with a graft or a flap. There was no postsurgical treatment. The recurrence rate was 4 p. 100 with a minimum follow-up of 3 years. The cosmetic result was good in 78 p. 100 of the patients. Numerous treatments have been used against BCC of the nose, the results, advantages and disadvantages of each of these treatments are given below: 1. Cryosurgery. The problem with this method is that it is relatively difficult to perform and requires reliable operators. The cure rate is similar to that of other treatments. 2. Chemotherapy is not frequently used. 3. Electrocoagulation. Contrary to the conventional excision, this method precludes all histological controls, and the common idea of good oncological results is now being revised. 4. Radiotherapy. The recurrence rate varies from 7 to 11.8 p. 100 with fair cosmetic results. It requires numerous sessions, cannot be repeated in case of recurrence and complicates the surgical treatment. In addition, there is a long-term risk of radiodystrophy. 5. Curietherapy by local implantation of 192Iridium has a recurrence rate of 2.5 to 7 p. 100. This treatment requires hospitalization and is costly. It is indicated in cases of complex surgery

  15. Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification Presented with Impulse Control Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin, Cem; Levent, Mustafa; Akbaba, Gulhan; Kara, Bilge; Yeniceri, Emine Nese; Inanc, Betul Battaloglu

    2015-01-01

    Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC), also referred to as Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (IBGC) or “Fahr’s disease,” is a clinical condition characterized by symmetric and bilateral calcification of globus pallidus and also basal ganglions, cerebellar nuclei, and other deep cortical structures. It could be accompanied by parathyroid disorder and other metabolic disturbances. The clinical features are dysfunction of the calcified anatomic localization. IBGC most commonly present...

  16. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; Naevoid Basalzellkarzinom-Syndrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grgic, A.; Heinrich, M.; Heckmann, M.; Kramann, B. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Aliani, S. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin; Dill-Mueller, D. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Hautklinik und Poliklinik; Uder, M. [Erlange-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2005-07-01

    Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmar/plantar pits, calcification of the falx cerebri, and spine and rib anomalies. The combination of clinical, imaging, and histological findings is helpful in identifying NBCCS patients. Imaging plays a crucial role in evaluation of these patients. We present a wide variety of clinical and radiological findings characteristic of this disease. (orig.)

  17. Bilateral basal ganglia calcifications visualised on CT scan.

    OpenAIRE

    Brannan, T S; Burger, A A; Chaudhary, M Y

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-eight cases of basal ganglia calcification imaged on computed axial tomography were reviewed. Most cases were felt to represent senescent calcification. The possibility of a vascular aetiology in this group is discussed. A less common group of patients was identified with calcification secondary to abnormalities in calcium metabolism or radiation therapy. Three cases of basal ganglia calcifications were detected in juvenile epileptic patients receiving chronic anticonvulsants. These ca...

  18. Treatment of basal cell epithelioma with high energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Y. (Hyogo-ken Cancer Center, Kobe (Japan)); Kumano, M.; Kumano, K.

    1981-11-01

    Thirty patients with basal cell epithelioma received high energy electron beam therapy. They were irradiated with a dose ranging from 4,800 rad (24 fractions, 35 days) to 12,000 rad (40 fractions, 57 days). Tumors disappeared in all cases. These were no disease-related deaths; in one patient there was recurrence after 2 years. We conclude that radiotherapy with high energy electron beam is very effective in the treatment of basal cell epithelioma.

  19. Basal Ganglia Calcification with Tetanic Seizure Suggest Mitochondrial Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Finsterer, Josef; Enzelsberger, Barbara; Bastowansky, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 65 Final Diagnosis: Mitochondrial disorder Symptoms: Headache ? tetanic seizure Medication: Diazepam Clinical Procedure: Admission Specialty: Neurology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Basal ganglia calcification (BGC) is a rare sporadic or hereditary central nervous system (CNS) abnormality, characterized by symmetric or asymmetric calcification of the basal ganglia. Case Report: We report the case of a 65-year-old Gypsy female who was admitted for a...

  20. Shell bone histology indicates terrestrial palaeoecology of basal turtles

    OpenAIRE

    Scheyer, Torsten; Sander, P. Martin

    2009-01-01

    The palaeoecology of basal turtles from the Late Triassic was classically viewed as being semi-aquatic, similar to the lifestyle of modern snapping turtles. Lately, this view was questioned based on limb bone proportions, and a terrestrial palaeoecology was suggested for the turtle stem. Here, we present independent shell bone microstructural evidence for a terrestrial habitat of the oldest and basal most well-known turtles, i.e. the Upper Triassic Proterochersis robusta and Proganochelys que...

  1. Mechanical compatibility of sol-gel annealing with titanium for orthopaedic prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Andrew I M; Lim, Teoh S; Brydone, Alistair S; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    Sol-gel processing is an attractive method for large-scale surface coating due to its facile and inexpensive preparation, even with the inclusion of precision nanotopographies. These are desirable traits for metal orthopaedic prostheses where ceramic coatings are known to be osteoinductive and the effects may be amplified through nanotexturing. However there are a few concerns associated with the application of sol-gel technology to orthopaedics. Primarily, the annealing stage required to transform the sol-gel into a ceramic may compromise the physical integrity of the underlying metal. Secondly, loose particles on medical implants can be carcinogenic and cause inflammation so the coating needs to be strongly bonded to the implant. These concerns are addressed in this paper. Titanium, the dominant material for orthopaedics at present, is examined before and after sol-gel processing for changes in hardness and flexural modulus. Wear resistance, bending and pull tests are also performed to evaluate the ceramic coating. The findings suggest that sol-gel coatings will be compatible with titanium implants for an optimum temperature of 500 °C.

  2. Mastication and jaw motion of partially edentulous patients are affected by different implant-based prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, T M S V; Campos, C H; Rodrigues Garcia, R C M

    2014-07-01

    The main goal of prosthetic treatment is to restore masticatory function. However, insufficient evidence supports the recommendation of one specific prosthetic intervention for partially edentulous patients. Function after the use of three different prostheses by the same partially edentulous subject. Mastication was assessed in 12 subjects (mean age 62.6 ± 7.8 years) after they had used removable partial dentures (RPDs), implant-supported partial dentures (IRPDs) and implant-fixed partial dentures (IFPDs). Masticatory ability (MA) was estimated by visual analogue scale questionnaire, while the mandibular chewing motion was evaluated by kinesiographic device, representing an objective measurement of masticatory function. Data were analysed by repeated-measures anova followed by Tukey-Kramer (P < 0.05). MA improved after IRPD and IFPD use (P < 0.05). Opening, closing and total cycle time duration were reduced after both IRPD and IFPD use (P < 0.05), irrespectively the implant prosthesis type. IFPDs and IRPDs restore the masticatory function of partially edentulous patients better than RPDs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Fifteen-year survival of anterior all-ceramic cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this follow-up study was to report the long-term outcome of all-ceramic cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs). In 16 patients (mean age of 33.3±17.5years) 22 RBFDPs made from a glass-infiltrated alumina ceramic (In-Ceram) were inserted with a phosphate monomer containing luting agent after air-abrasion of the retainer wings. The abutment preparation included a shallow groove on the cingulum and a small proximal box. The restorations replacing 16 maxillary and 6 mandibular incisors were followed over a mean observation time of 188.7 months. No restoration debonded. Two RBFDPs fractured and were lost 48 and 214 months after insertion, respectively. The 10-year and 15-year survival rates were both 95.4% and dropped to 81.8% after 18 years. Anterior all-ceramic cantilever RBFDPs exhibited an excellent clinical longevity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Design of Complete Dentures by Adopting CAD Developed for Fixed Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanfeng; Han, Weili; Cao, Jing; Iv, Yuan; Zhang, Yue; Han, Yishi; Shen, Yi; Ma, Zheng; Liu, Huanyue

    2018-02-01

    The demand for complete dentures is expected to increase worldwide, but complete dentures are mainly designed and fabricated manually involving a broad series of clinical and laboratory procedures. Therefore, the quality of complete dentures largely depends on the skills of the dentist and technician, leading to difficulty in quality control. Computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has been used to design and fabricate various dental restorations including dental inlays, veneers, crowns, partial crowns, and fixed partial dentures (FPDs). It has been envisioned that the application of CAD/CAM technology could reduce intensive clinical/laboratory work for the fabrication of complete dentures; however, CAD/CAM is seldom used to fabricate complete dentures due to the lack of suitable CAD software to design virtual complete dentures although the CAM techniques are in a much advanced stage. Here we report the successful design of virtual complete dentures using CAD software of 3Shape Dental System 2012, which was developed for designing fixed prostheses instead of complete dentures. Our results demonstrated that complete dentures could be successfully designed by the combination of two modeling processes, single coping and full anatomical FPD, available in the 3Shape Dental System 2012. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. FACTORS RELATED TO ORAL CANDIDIASIS IN ELDERLY USERS AND NON-USERS OF REMOVABLE DENTAL PROSTHESES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Cyra Maria Pires de Carvalho; Bianchi, Hélcio Aparecido; Tadano, Tomoko; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues de; Hoffmann-Santos, Hugo Dias; Leite, Diniz Pereira; Hahn, Rosane Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the association between oral candidiasis in elderly users and nonusers of prosthesis and its predisposing factors. To this end, we performed a cross-sectional study where saliva samples from 48 patients were collected they used prosthesis and 43 patients (control group) who did not use. Among the 91 patients, Candida spp were isolated in 40 (83.3%) who used prosthesis and in 23 (53.5%) in the control group. A statistically significant association was determined between the two groups, the isolation of yeasts and dental prosthesis (p oral candidiasis (n = 24), 83.3% (n = 20) belonged to the group that wore dentures, while only 16.7% (n = 4) belonged to the control group. Elderly patients with diabetes had 4.4 times higher estimated risk of developing oral candidiasis when compared with individuals without this condition. There was no statistically significant association between being user prostheses and have diabetes with the onset of candidiasis. No statistically significant association was determined between xerostomia, use of prosthesis and oral candidiasis. The use of prosthetics and poor oral hygiene in elderly patients predisposes to the development of oral candidiasis.

  6. Post-operative hemimaxillectomy rehabilitation using prostheses supported by zygoma implants and remaining natural teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhou Qu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the stability of prostheses supported by zygoma implants and remaining teeth for subjects who had undergone hemi-maxillectomy. METHODS: Ten patients were included in the study. Oral rehabilitation was performed using a temporary prosthesis that was supported by remaining teeth for the first three months. Then, a zygoma implant was placed to provide support for a final prosthesis in addition to the remaining teeth. Each prosthesis was tailor-made according to biomechanical three-dimensional finite element analysis results. The patients were assessed using the prosthesis functioning scale of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. In addition, retention and bite force were recorded for both the temporary prosthesis and the final prosthesis. RESULTS: The mean bite force of the prosthetic first molar was increased to 69.2 N. The mean retentive force increased to 13.5 N after zygoma implant insertion. The bite force on the prosthetic first molar was improved to 229.3 N. CONCLUSION: Bite force increased significantly with the support of a zygoma implant. The use of zygoma implants in the restoration of maxillary defects improved functional outcome and patient satisfaction.

  7. Waterjet cutting of periprosthetic interface tissue in loosened hip prostheses: an in vitro feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaij, Gert; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M; Dankelman, Jenny; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Valstar, Edward R

    2015-02-01

    Waterjet cutting technology is considered a promising technology to be used for minimally invasive removal of interface tissue surrounding aseptically loose hip prostheses. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of waterjet cutting of interface tissue membrane. Waterjets with 0.2 mm and 0.6 mm diameter, a stand-off distance of 5 mm, and a traverse speed of 0.5 mm/s were used to cut interface tissue samples in half. The water flow through the nozzle was controlled by means of a valve. By changing the flow, the resulting waterjet pressure was regulated. Tissue sample thickness and the required waterjet pressures were measured. Mean thickness of the samples tested within the 0.2 mm nozzle group was 2.3 mm (SD 0.7 mm) and within the 0.6 mm nozzle group 2.6 mm (SD 0.9 mm). The required waterjet pressure to cut samples was between 10 and 12 MPa for the 0.2 mm nozzle and between 5 and 10 MPa for the 0.6 mm nozzle. Cutting bone or bone cement requires about 3 times higher waterjet pressure (30-50 MPa, depending on used nozzle diameter) and therefore we consider waterjet cutting as a safe technique to be used for minimally invasive interface tissue removal. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Poly Implant Prothèse breast prostheses scandal: Embodied risk and social suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Cinzia

    2015-12-01

    This article examines the 2010 scandal surrounding the use and subsequent recall of adulterated Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) silicone breast prostheses in France. It uses a mixed method approach that includes 12 interviews with French PIP prosthesis recipients, analyses of medical literature, policy documents of French and EU regulatory agencies, and an online forum for PIP recipients. These data are used to explain how the definition of "acceptable risk" in the silicone implants controversy of the 1990s in the US influenced the PIP scandal later on in France. Additionally, PIP recipients had an embodied experience of risk that clashed with the definition of risk used by authorities and some surgeons. The coverage of re-implantation was also defined at different policy levels, leading to variation in patients' suffering. The combination of fraud and lack of recognition from part of the medical system constitutes an example of social suffering for the patients involved. The PIP scandal is a useful case for analyzing the interconnection of embodied experience and professional and public policy definitions of medical risk through the concepts of moral economy and biological citizenship. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prostheses size dependency of the mechanical response of the herniated human abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Allué, R; Hernández-Gascón, B; Lèoty, L; Bellón, J M; Peña, E; Calvo, B

    2016-12-01

    Hernia repairs still exhibit clinical complications, i.e. recurrence, discomfort and pain and mesh features are thought to be highly influent. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of the defect size and mesh type in an herniated abdominal wall using numerical models. To do so, we have started from a FE model based on a real human abdomen geometry obtained by MRI, where we have provoked an incisional hernia of three different sizes. The surgical procedure was simulated by covering the hernia with a prostheses, and three surgical meshes with distinct mechanical properties were used for the hernia repair: an isotropic heavy-weight mesh (Surgipro @ ), a slightly anisotropic light-weight mesh (Optilene @ ) and a highly anisotropic medium-weight mesh (Infinit @ ). The mechanical response of the wall to a high intraabdominal pressure (corresponding to a coughing motion) was analyzed here. Our findings suggest that the anisotropy of the mesh becomes more relevant with the increase of the defect size. Additionally, according to our results Optilene @ showed the closest deformation to the natural distensibility of the abdomen while Infinit @ should be carefully used due to its excessive compliance.

  10. Clinical Fit of Partial Removable Dental Prostheses Based on Alginate or Polyvinyl Siloxane Impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; Witter, Dick J; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Creugers, Nico H

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical fit of metal-frame partial removable dental prostheses (PRDPs) based on custom trays used with alginate or polyvinyl siloxane impression material. Fifth-year students of the Nijmegen Dental School made 25 correct impressions for 23 PRDPs for 21 patients using alginate, and 31 correct impressions for 30 PRDPs for 28 patients using polyvinyl siloxane. Clinical fit of the framework as a whole and of each retainer separately were evaluated by calibrated supervisors during framework try-in before (first evaluation) and after (second evaluation) possible adjustments (score 0 = poor fit, up to score 3 = good fit). Framework fit and fit of the denture base were evaluated at delivery (third evaluation). Finally, postinsertion sessions were evaluated and total number of sessions needed, sore spots, adjustments to the denture base, and reported food-impaction were recorded. No significant differences in clinical fit (of the framework as a whole, for the retainers, or for the denture base) were found between the groups in the three evaluation sessions. Differences were not found for postinsertion sessions with one exception: in the alginate group, four subjects reported food impaction, versus none in the polyvinyl siloxane group. Clinical fit of metal-frame PRDPs based on impressions with custom trays combined with alginate or polyvinyl siloxane was similar.

  11. Temperature measurement and control system for transtibial prostheses: Single subject clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoseiri, Kamiar; Zheng, Yong Ping; Leung, Aaron K L; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Aminian, Gholamreza; Masoumi, Mehdi; Safari, Mohammad Reza

    2018-01-01

    The snug fit of a prosthetic socket over the residual limb can disturb thermal balance and put skin integrity in jeopardy by providing an unpleasant and infectious environment. The prototype of a temperature measurement and control (TM&C) system was previously introduced to resolve thermal problems related to prostheses. This study evaluates its clinical application in a setting with reversal, single subject design. The TM&C system was installed on a fabricated prosthetic socket of a man with unilateral transtibial amputation. Skin temperature of the residual limb without prosthesis at baseline and with prosthesis during rest and walking was evaluated. The thermal sense and thermal comfort of the participant were also evaluated. The results showed different skin temperature around the residual limb with a temperature decrease tendency from proximal to distal. The TM&C system decreased skin temperature rise after prosthesis wearing. The same situation occurred during walking, but the thermal power of the TM&C system was insufficient to overcome heat build-up in some regions of the residual limb. The participant reported no significant change of thermal sense and thermal comfort. Further investigations are warranted to examine thermography pattern of the residual limb, thermal sense, and thermal comfort in people with amputation.

  12. Thermal time constant: optimising the skin temperature predictive modelling in lower limb prostheses using Gaussian processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Neha; Glesk, Ivan; Buis, Arjan

    2016-06-01

    Elevated skin temperature at the body/device interface of lower-limb prostheses is one of the major factors that affect tissue health. The heat dissipation in prosthetic sockets is greatly influenced by the thermal conductive properties of the hard socket and liner material employed. However, monitoring of the interface temperature at skin level in lower-limb prosthesis is notoriously complicated. This is due to the flexible nature of the interface liners used which requires consistent positioning of sensors during donning and doffing. Predicting the residual limb temperature by monitoring the temperature between socket and liner rather than skin and liner could be an important step in alleviating complaints on increased temperature and perspiration in prosthetic sockets. To predict the residual limb temperature, a machine learning algorithm - Gaussian processes is employed, which utilizes the thermal time constant values of commonly used socket and liner materials. This Letter highlights the relevance of thermal time constant of prosthetic materials in Gaussian processes technique which would be useful in addressing the challenge of non-invasively monitoring the residual limb skin temperature. With the introduction of thermal time constant, the model can be optimised and generalised for a given prosthetic setup, thereby making the predictions more reliable.

  13. Functionalization of polydimethylsiloxane membranes to be used in the production of voice prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Ferreira, Álvaro Carvalho, Tiago Ruivo Correia, Bernardo Paiva Antunes, Ilídio Joaquim Correia and Patrícia Alves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The voice is produced by the vibration of vocal cords which are located in the larynx. Therefore, one of the major consequences for patients subjected to laryngectomy is losing their voice. In these cases, a synthetic one-way valve set (voice prosthesis can be implanted in order to allow restoration of speech. Most voice prostheses are produced with silicone-based materials such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS. This material has excellent properties, such as optical transparency, chemical and biological inertness, non-toxicity, permeability to gases and excellent mechanical resistance that are fundamental for its application in the biomedical field. However, PDMS is very hydrophobic and this property causes protein adsorption which is followed by microbial adhesion and biofilm formation. To overcome these problems, surface modification of materials has been proposed in this study. A commercial silicone elastomer, SylgardTM 184 was used to prepare membranes whose surface was modified by grafting 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate and methacrylic acid by low-pressure plasma treatment. The hydrophilicity, hydrophobic recovery and surface energy of the produced materials were determined. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity of the materials were also assessed. The results obtained revealed that the PDMS surface modification performed did not affect the material's biocompatibility, but decreased their hydrophobic character and bacterial adhesion and growth on its surface.

  14. Context-dependent adaptation improves robustness of myoelectric control for upper-limb prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Gauravkumar K.; Hahne, Janne M.; Castellini, Claudio; Farina, Dario; Dosen, Strahinja

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Dexterous upper-limb prostheses are available today to restore grasping, but an effective and reliable feed-forward control is still missing. The aim of this work was to improve the robustness and reliability of myoelectric control by using context information from sensors embedded within the prosthesis. Approach. We developed a context-driven myoelectric control scheme (cxMYO) that incorporates the inference of context information from proprioception (inertial measurement unit) and exteroception (force and grip aperture) sensors to modulate the outputs of myoelectric control. Further, a realistic evaluation of the cxMYO was performed online in able-bodied subjects using three functional tasks, during which the cxMYO was compared to a purely machine-learning-based myoelectric control (MYO). Main results. The results demonstrated that utilizing context information decreased the number of unwanted commands, improving the performance (success rate and dropped objects) in all three functional tasks. Specifically, the median number of objects dropped per round with cxMYO was zero in all three tasks and a significant increase in the number of successful transfers was seen in two out of three functional tasks. Additionally, the subjects reported better user experience. Significance. This is the first online evaluation of a method integrating information from multiple on-board prosthesis sensors to modulate the output of a machine-learning-based myoelectric controller. The proposed scheme is general and presents a simple, non-invasive and cost-effective approach for improving the robustness of myoelectric control.

  15. Optimization of metal artefact reduction (MAR) sequences for MRI of total hip prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toms, A.P., E-mail: andoni.toms@nnuh.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital Trust, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7UY (United Kingdom); Smith-Bateman, C.; Malcolm, P.N.; Cahir, J. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital Trust, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7UY (United Kingdom); Graves, M. [University Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Aim: To describe the relative contribution of matrix size and bandwidth to artefact reduction in order to define optimal sequence parameters for metal artefact reduction (MAR) sequences for MRI of total hip prostheses. Methods and materials: A phantom was created using a Charnley total hip replacement. Mid-coronal T1-weighted (echo time 12 ms, repetition time 400 ms) images through the prosthesis were acquired with increasing bandwidths (150, 300, 454, 592, and 781 Hz/pixel) and increasing matrixes of 128, 256, 384, 512, 640, and 768 pixels square. Signal loss from the prosthesis and susceptibility artefact was segmented using an automated tool. Results: Over 90% of the achievable reduction in artefacts was obtained with matrixes of 256 x 256 or greater and a receiver bandwidth of approximately 400 Hz/pixel or greater. Thereafter increasing the receiver bandwidth or matrix had little impact on reducing susceptibility artefacts. Increasing the bandwidth produced a relative fall in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of between 49 and 56% for a given matrix, but, in practice, the image quality was still satisfactory even with the highest bandwidth and largest matrix sizes. The acquisition time increased linearly with increasing matrix parameters. Conclusion: Over 90% of the achievable metal artefact reduction can be realized with mid-range matrices and receiver bandwidths on a clinical 1.5 T system. The loss of SNR from increasing receiver bandwidth, is preferable to long acquisition times, and therefore, should be the main tool for reducing metal artefact.

  16. Systematic Review of Ossicular Chain Anatomy: Strategic Planning for Development of Novel Middle Ear Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrava, Brandon; Roehm, Pamela C

    2017-08-01

    Objective To systematically review the anatomy of the ossicular chain. Data Sources Google Scholar, PubMed, and otologic textbooks. Review Methods A systematic literature search was performed on January 26, 2015. Search terms used to discover articles consisted of combinations of 2 keywords. One keyword from both groups was used: [ ossicular, ossicle, malleus, incus, stapes] and [ morphology, morphometric, anatomy, variation, physiology], yielding more than 50,000 hits. Articles were then screened by title and abstract if they did not contain information relevant to human ossicular chain anatomy. In addition to this search, references of selected articles were studied as well as suggested relevant articles from publication databases. Standard otologic textbooks were screened using the search criteria. Results Thirty-three sources were selected for use in this review. From these studies, data on the composition, physiology, morphology, and morphometrics were acquired. In addition, any correlations or lack of correlations between features of the ossicular chain and other features of the ossicular chain or patient were noted, with bilateral symmetry between ossicles being the only important correlation reported. Conclusion There was significant variation in all dimensions of each ossicle between individuals, given that degree of variation, custom fitting, or custom manufacturing of prostheses for each patient could optimize prosthesis fit. From published data, an accurate 3-dimensional model of the malleus, incus, and stapes can be created, which can then be further modified for each patient's individual anatomy.

  17. Microscopical analysis of synovial fluid wear debris from failing CoCr hip prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, M. B.; Brown, A. P.; Cox, A.; Curry, A.; Denton, J.

    2010-07-01

    Metal on metal hip joint prostheses are now commonly implanted in patients with hip problems. Although hip replacements largely go ahead problem free, some complications can arise such as infection immediately after surgery and aseptic necrosis caused by vascular complications due to surgery. A recent observation that has been made at Manchester is that some Cobalt Chromium (CoCr) implants are causing chronic pain, with the source being as yet unidentified. This form of replacement failure is independent of surgeon or hospital and so some underlying body/implant interface process is thought to be the problem. When the synovial fluid from a failed joint is examined particles of metal (wear debris) can be found. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been used to look at fixed and sectioned samples of the synovial fluid and this has identified fine (< 100 nm) metal and metal oxide particles within the fluid. TEM EDX and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) have been employed to examine the composition of the particles, showing them to be chromium rich. This gives rise to concern that the failure mechanism may be associated with the debris.

  18. Enhancing the soft tissue seal around intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses using silanized fibronectin titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimutengwende-Gordon, M; Pendegrass, C; Blunn, G, E-mail: mukai.cg@mac.com [Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, University College London, Brockley Hill, Stanmore, HA7 4LP (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    The success of intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses (ITAP) relies on achieving a tight seal between the soft tissues and the implant in order to avoid infection. Fibronectin (Fn) may be silanized onto titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) in order to promote soft-tissue attachment. The silanization process includes passivation with sulphuric acid, which alters surface characteristics. This study aimed to improve in vitro fibroblast adhesion to silanized fibronectin (SiFn) titanium alloy by omitting the passivation stage. Additionally, the study assessed the effects of SiFn on in vivo dermal attachment, comparing the results with adsorbed Fn, hydroxyapatite (HA), Fn adsorbed onto HA (HAFn) and uncoated controls. Surface topography was assessed using scanning electron microscopy, profilometry and contact angle measurement. Anti-vinculin antibodies were used to immunolocalize fibroblast adhesion sites. A histological assessment of soft-tissue attachment and cell alignment relative to implants in an in vivo ovine model was performed. Passivation resulted in rougher, more hydrophobic, microcracked surfaces and was associated with poorer fibroblast adhesion than unpassivated controls. SiFn and HAFn surfaces resulted in more favourable cell alignment in vivo, implying that dermal attachment was enhanced. These results suggest that SiFn and HAFn surfaces could be useful in optimizing the soft tissue seal around ITAP.

  19. [Aftercare for durability and profitability of single-unit and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; van Loveren, C; van der Maarel-Wierink, C D; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2013-01-01

    An important aim ofa treatment with single-unit and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses is a durable and profitable treatment outcome. That requires aftercare, too. First, the frequency of routine oral examinations should be assessed, using an individual risk profile. The objectives of the routine oral examinations are the prevention and, when necessary, the treatment of pathological conditions and complications. With regard to prevention, attention should be paid to information and instruction, oral biofilm and calculus, non-functional activities, hard tooth tissues, periodontal and peri-implant tissues, and saliva. Subsequently, it can be determined whether the intended durability and profitability have been achieved or can still be achieved, whether or not through indicated adjustments. Special attention should be paid to endodontically treated teeth. Restorative, repair or replacement treatments may be indicated in case ofcomplications, such as loose single- or multi-unitfixed dental prosthesis, fracture of a fixed dental prosthesis unit, lost tooth pulp vitality, tooth root fracture, and implant or implant abutment problems.

  20. Basal Forebrain Gating by Somatostatin Neurons Drives Prefrontal Cortical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Nelson; Alonso, Alejandra; Morales, Cristian; Espinosa, Pedro; Chávez, Andrés E; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2017-11-17

    The basal forebrain provides modulatory input to the cortex regulating brain states and cognitive processing. Somatostatin-expressing neurons constitute a heterogeneous GABAergic population known to functionally inhibit basal forebrain cortically projecting cells thus favoring sleep and cortical synchronization. However, it remains unclear if somatostatin cells can regulate population activity patterns in the basal forebrain and modulate cortical dynamics. Here, we demonstrate that somatostatin neurons regulate the corticopetal synaptic output of the basal forebrain impinging on cortical activity and behavior. Optogenetic inactivation of somatostatin neurons in vivo rapidly modified neural activity in the basal forebrain, with the consequent enhancement and desynchronization of activity in the prefrontal cortex, reflected in both neuronal spiking and network oscillations. Cortical activation was partially dependent on cholinergic transmission, suppressing slow waves and potentiating gamma oscillations. In addition, recruitment dynamics was cell type-specific, with interneurons showing similar temporal profiles, but stronger responses than pyramidal cells. Finally, optogenetic stimulation of quiescent animals during resting periods prompted locomotor activity, suggesting generalized cortical activation and increased arousal. Altogether, we provide physiological and behavioral evidence indicating that somatostatin neurons are pivotal in gating the synaptic output of the basal forebrain, thus indirectly controlling cortical operations via both cholinergic and non-cholinergic mechanisms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.