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Sample records for barrett esophagus

  1. Barrett esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk for cancer in the area involved. However, cancer is not common. ... endoscopy to look for cell changes that indicate cancer. People with Barrett esophagus are recommended to have follow-up endoscopy every ...

  2. Biomarkers in Barrett esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnadath, K. K.; Reid, B. J.; Wang, K. K.

    2001-01-01

    Barrett esophagus is a premalignant condition that may progress to adenocarcinoma. The risk of developing cancer has been estimated to be approximately 1 in 250 patient-years of observation; however, there appear to be subsets of patients at much higher risk. Risk stratification has previously been

  3. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and Barrett's esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, P; Christensen, P B; Damkier, P

    1999-01-01

    often by endoscopy. A previous diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus was found in only 1.3% of the cancer patients. CONCLUSIONS: The rate of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Denmark has increased eightfold over a 20-yr period, and this increase is not explained by changes in classification or diagnostic routines....... More than 98% of esophageal adenocarcinomas were found in patients who could not have entered endoscopic surveillance, as Barrett's esophagus had not been diagnosed before the cancer diagnosis. Endoscopic surveillance to detect dysplasia may be an option for the individual patient with Barrett......OBJECTIVE: We described incidence rates of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Denmark in a 20-yr period and determined the proportion of patients diagnosed with esophageal adenocarcinoma who had a previous diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus, making them potential candidates for endoscopic surveillance...

  4. Is It Barrett's Esophagus or Gastric Heterotopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynel Mungan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Columnar epithelium in the distal part of the esophagus is generally related to Barrett's esophagus. Barrett's esophagus is a well-known premalignant lesion for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Therefore, its diagnosis and surveillance are important. Columnar epithelium in the esophagus other than Barrett's esophagus can be gastric heterotopia, which generally takes place in the upper part of the esophagus and is named inlet patch. The presence of gastric metaplasia in the distal part of the esophagus is rare and can cause misdiagnosis. Therefore, its differentiation from Barrett's esophagus is important. Here we present a case of gastric heterotopia located in the distal part of the esophagus that caused reflux-like symptoms and needed differentiation from Barrett's esophagus.

  5. Mucosal ablation in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S J; Selvasekar, C R; Birbeck, N

    2002-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is a prevalent, premalignant condition affecting the gastroesophageal junction and distal esophagus. Ablation plus antireflux therapy has recently been advocated to prevent the development of adenocarcinoma or to treat those unfit or unwilling to undergo esophagectomy. The present article, based on a search of Medline/ISI databases and cross-referencing of relevant articles, reviews the literature on this subject. A number of techniques have been used to remove the affected mucosa, including laser, electrocoagulation, argon plasma coagulation and photodynamic therapy but, as yet, none has been shown to be superior. Depending on the method used, ablation results in complete removal of Barrett's esophagus in approximately one third of patients and a partial response in nearly two-thirds. The resultant squamous mucosa is apparently 'normal' but may regress. To promote and maintain regeneration, antireflux therapy must be sufficient to reduce repetitive injury to the esophageal mucosa. Whether ablation reduces the cancer risk or delays its occurrence is unknown, though recent data suggests benefit. Complications are infrequent and usually mild. Regular follow-up endoscopy and deep biopsies continue to be necessary. Careful data from much larger populations with long-term follow-up is required before ablation reaches the stage of broad clinical application.

  6. Barrett's esophagus: clinical features, obesity, and imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2011-09-01

    The following includes commentaries on clinical features and imaging of Barrett\\'s esophagus (BE); the clinical factors that influence the development of BE; the influence of body fat distribution and central obesity; the role of adipocytokines and proinflammatory markers in carcinogenesis; the role of body mass index (BMI) in healing of Barrett\\'s epithelium; the role of surgery in prevention of carcinogenesis in BE; the importance of double-contrast esophagography and cross-sectional images of the esophagus; and the value of positron emission tomography\\/computed tomography.

  7. From Barrett's esophagus to adenocarcinoma and metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.K. Krishnadath (Kausilia)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe first description of islets of ectopic gastric mucosa in the esophagus was by Schmidt in 1805. One century later, in 1906, Tileston described peptic ulcerations in columnar epithelium lining the distal esophagus. In 1950 Norman Barrett gave a detailed description of the columnar

  8. Scintigraphic assessment of Barrett's esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotler, J.A.; Sampliner, R.E.; Kogan, F.J.; Henry, R.E.; Mason, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    Barrett's (B) esophagus is defined by the presence of columnar epithelium above the gastroesophageal junction. Patients with 5cm histologically proven B were evaluated for mucosal labeling (ML), esophageal motility (EM), gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and gastric emptying (GE) of solids and liquids with and without iv metaclopramide (MCP). ML, after premedication with cimetidine, was evaluated 20 and 40 min after injection of Tc-99m04 with ANT and RAO views. Eight of 11 B and 0 of 2 controls (C) labeled esophageal mucosa. EM was assessed in the supine position over one min after a 15 ml swallow Tc-99mSc-H2O. The normal pattern shows sequential, aboral, discreet peaks with no retrograde movement over one min in three computer derived regions over the esophagus. Five of 16 B and 1 of 6 C demonstrated abnormal pattern. GER was assessed in the supine position by serially increasing extrinsic binder pressures from 0 to 100 Torr after ingestion of 300 ml of Tc-99mSc-orange juice (OJ). GER was present in 13 of 15 B and 0 of 11 C. Reflux ranged from 5.1% to 30% at 100 Torr. Hiatal hernia (HH) was identified in 14 of 16 B by endoscopy and in 10 of 16 by scintigraphy. GE was evaluated after a liquid meal of 300 ml Tc-99mSc-OJ and a solid meal of Tc-99mSc-egg salad sandwich. The supine subject was imaged anteriorly for 30 min (liquid) or 60 min (solid). GE was assessed an additional 10 min after MCP. Clearance time (50%) for solid Ge was calculated from extrapolated linear fits of decay corrected data. There was no significant difference in liquid or solid GE between B and C. The authors conclude the following: 1) ML detects B with lower sensitivity than previously reported; 2) EM disorders are frequently found in B; 3) GER is frequently identified in B; 4) HH can be identified by nuclear technique; and 5) B shows normal GE and responds to MCP

  9. Recurrent Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma after esophagectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemminger Lois L

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophagectomy is considered the gold standard for the treatment of high-grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE and for noninvasive adenocarcinoma (ACA of the distal esophagus. If all of the metaplastic epithelium is removed, the patient is considered "cured". Despite this, BE has been reported in patients who have previously undergone esophagectomy. It is often debated whether this is "new" BE or the result of an esophagectomy that did not include a sufficiently proximal margin. Our aim was to determine if BE recurred in esophagectomy patients where the entire segment of BE had been removed. Methods Records were searched for patients who had undergone esophagectomy for cure at our institution. Records were reviewed for surgical, endoscopic, and histopathologic findings. The patients in whom we have endoscopic follow-up are the subjects of this report. Results Since 1995, 45 patients have undergone esophagectomy for cure for Barrett's dysplasia or localized ACA. Thirty-six of these 45 patients underwent endoscopy after surgery including 8/45 patients (18% with recurrent Barrett's metaplasia or neoplasia after curative resection. Conclusion Recurrent Barrett's esophagus or adenocarcinoma after esophagectomy was common in our patients who underwent at least one endoscopy after surgery. This appears to represent the development of metachronous disease after complete resection of esophageal disease. Half of these patients have required subsequent treatment thus far, either repeat surgery or photodynamic therapy. These results support the use of endoscopic surveillance in patients who have undergone "curative" esophagectomy for Barrett's dysplasia or localized cancer.

  10. Barrett's esophagus: cancer and molecular biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson, Michael K.; Dhaliwal, Arashinder S.; Clemons, Nicholas J.; Phillips, Wayne A.; Dvorak, Katerina; Tong, Daniel; Law, Simon; Pirchi, E. Daniel; Räsänen, Jari; Krasna, Mark J.; Parikh, Kaushal; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.; Chen, Yu; Griffiths, Leonard; Colleypriest, Benjamin J.; Farrant, J. Mark; Tosh, David; Das, Kiron M.; Bajpai, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    The following paper on the molecular biology of Barrett's esophagus (BE) includes commentaries on signaling pathways central to the development of BE including Hh, NF-κB, and IL-6/STAT3; surgical approaches for esophagectomy and classification of lesions by appropriate therapy; the debate over the

  11. Quality of endoscopic surveillance of Barrett's esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogt, Jes Sefland; Larsen, Anders Christian; Sommer, Thorbjørn

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate adherence to Barrett's esophagus (BE) surveillance guidelines in Denmark. METHODS: The Danish Pathology Registry was used to identify 3692 patients. A total of 300 patients were included by drawing a simple random sample. Description...

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's Esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, J. J. G. H. M.

    2005-01-01

    Several articles have been published during the last year that may affect the management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or Barrett's esophagus in the near future. A new method of measuring esophageal pH has been introduced that does not require an indwelling transnasal

  13. Comparison of kinome profiles of Barrett's esophagus with normal squamous esophagus and normal gastric cardia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baal, Jantine W. P. M.; Diks, Sander H.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Rygiel, Agnieskza M.; Milano, Francesca; Joore, Jos; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.

    2006-01-01

    The precursor metaplastic mucosal lesion that predisposes for esophageal adenocarcinoma is Barrett's esophagus. Because the signal transduction events that occur in Barrett's esophagus are poorly understood, this study aimed at generating a comprehensive description of cellular kinase activity in

  14. Management of high-grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palley, S L; Sampliner, R E; Garewal, H S

    1989-08-01

    When Barrett's esophagus is complicated by adenocarcinoma, surgery is indicated in appropriate patients. Until now, high-grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus has been managed in a similar fashion. We explore this approach and review reported cases of high-grade dysplasia to suggest guidelines for collection of data to make future clinical decisions more rational.

  15. Histopathologic evaluation of an animal model for Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buskens, Christianne J.; Hulscher, Jan B. F.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; ten Kate, Fiebo J.; van Lanschot, J. Jan B.

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus are related to long-standing duodeno-gastroesophageal reflux. The development of an animal model in which Barrett's esophagus and/or carcinoma is induced by duodeno-(gastro-)esophageal reflux could provide better understanding of

  16. Barrett esophagus in scleroderma: Increased incidence and radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recht, M.P.; Levine, M.S.; Katzka, D.A.; Reynolds, J.C.; Saul, S.H.; Ouyang, A.; Cohen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen patients with scleroderma underwent esophagography and endoscopy because of symptoms of reflux esophagitis or dysphagia, or both. Five had biopsy-proved Barrett esophagus, and two of those five had esophageal adencarcinomas. In a blinded review of the barium studies, Barrett esophagus was thought to be probable in one case, possible in seven, and unlikely in five. Five of eight patients in the first two groups had Barrett esophagus on endoscopy, but none in the third group had this disease. The author's initial experience, therefore, suggests that a definitive radiologic diagnosis of Barrett esophagus is not possible in most patients with scleroderma. However, endoscopy may be avoided when Barrett esophagus is considered unlikely on esophagography

  17. Barrett's esophagus: cancer and molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Michael K; Dhaliwal, Arashinder S; Clemons, Nicholas J; Phillips, Wayne A; Dvorak, Katerina; Tong, Daniel; Law, Simon; Pirchi, E Daniel; Räsänen, Jari; Krasna, Mark J; Parikh, Kaushal; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Chen, Yu; Griffiths, Leonard; Colleypriest, Benjamin J; Farrant, J Mark; Tosh, David; Das, Kiron M; Bajpai, Manisha

    2013-10-01

    The following paper on the molecular biology of Barrett's esophagus (BE) includes commentaries on signaling pathways central to the development of BE including Hh, NF-κB, and IL-6/STAT3; surgical approaches for esophagectomy and classification of lesions by appropriate therapy; the debate over the merits of minimally invasive esophagectomy versus open surgery; outcomes for patients with pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy; the applications of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy; animal models examining the surgical models of BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma; the roles of various morphogens and Cdx2 in BE; and the use of in vitro BE models for chemoprevention studies. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. Dendritic cells in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Tran, Dinh; Killingsworth, Murray C; Buckland, Michael; Lord, Reginald V N

    2009-01-01

    Like other premalignant conditions that develop in the presence of chronic inflammation, the development and progression of Barrett's esophagus is associated with the development of an immune response, but how this immune response is regulated is poorly understood. A comprehensive literature search failed to find any report of the presence of dendritic cells in Barrett's intestinal metaplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma and this prompted our study. We used immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy to examine whether dendritic cells are present in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining with CD83, a specific marker for dendritic cells, was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of Barrett's intestinal metaplasia (IM, n = 12), dysplasia (n = 11) and adenocarcinoma (n = 14). CD83+ cells were identified in the lamina propria surrounding intestinal type glands in Barrett's IM, dysplasia, and cancer tissues. Computerized quantitative analysis showed that the numbers of dendritic cells were significantly higher in cancer tissues. Double immunostaining with CD83, CD20, and CD3, and electron microscopy demonstrated that dendritic cells are present in Barrett's esophagus and form clusters with T cells and B cells directly within the lamina propria. These findings demonstrate that dendritic cells are present in Barrett's tissues, with a significant increase in density in adenocarcinoma compared to benign Barrett's esophagus. Dendritic cells may have a role in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy treatment of Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma.

  19. Barrett esophagus and cancer: pathogenesis, carcinogenesis, and diagnostic dilemmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polkowski, W.; van Lanschot, J. J.; Offerhaus, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    A metaplastic process, in which native squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus is replaced by columnar epithelium, is known as Barrett esophagus (BE). Over the past years, intestinal metaplasia was recognized as a marker for BE. The risk for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a

  20. Optimal management of Barrett's esophagus: pharmacologic, endoscopic, and surgical interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konda VJA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Vani JA Konda1, Kunal Dalal21Section of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USAAbstract: Esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor, Barrett's esophagus, are rapidly rising in incidence. This review serves to highlight the role of pharmacologic, endoscopic, and surgical intervention in the management of Barrett's esophagus, which requires acid suppression and endoscopic assessment. Treatment with a proton pump inhibitor may decrease acid exposure and delay the progression to dysplasia. Patients who require aspirin for cardioprotection or other indications may also benefit in terms of a protective effect against the development of esophageal cancer. However, without other indications, aspirin is not indicated solely to prevent cancer. A careful endoscopic examination should include assessment of any visible lesions in a Barrett's segment. An expert gastrointestinal pathologist should confirm neoplasia in the setting of Barrett's esophagus. For those patients with high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma, careful consideration of endoscopic therapy or surgical therapy must be given. All visible lesions in the setting of dysplasia should be targeted with focal endoscopic mucosal resection for both accurate histopathologic diagnosis and treatment. The remainder of the Barrett's epithelium should be eradicated to address all synchronous and metachronous lesions. This may be done by tissue acquiring or nontissue acquiring means. Radiofrequency ablation has a positive benefit-risk profile for flat Barrett's esophagus. At this time, endoscopic therapy is not indicated for nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Esophagectomy is still reserved for selected cases with evidence of lymph node metastasis, unsuccessful endoscopic therapy, or with high-risk features of high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma.Keywords: Barrett's esophagus, high

  1. From Heartburn to Barrett's Esophagus, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G; Shaheen, Nicholas J

    2017-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) affects an estimated 20% of the population in the USA, and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. About 10-15% of patients with GERD will develop Barrett's esophagus (BE). The aims of this study were to review the available evidence of the pathophysiology of BE and the role of anti-reflux surgery in the treatment of this disease. The transformation of the squamous epithelium into columnar epithelium with goblet cells is due to the chronic injury produced by repeated reflux episodes. It involves genetic mutations that in some patients may lead to high-grade dysplasia and cancer. There is no strong evidence that anti-reflux surgery is associated with resolution or improvement in BE, and its indications should be the same as for other GERD patients without BE. Patients with BE without dysplasia require endoscopic surveillance, while those with low- or high-grade dysplasia should have consideration of endoscopic eradication therapy followed by surveillance. New endoscopic treatment modalities are being developed, which hold the promise to improve the management of patients with BE.

  2. Clinical Study of Ursodeoxycholic Acid in Barrett's Esophagus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Martinez, Jessica A; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Trowers, Eugene; Gibson, Blake A; Della'Zanna, Gary; Richmond, Ellen; Chow, H-H Sherry

    2016-07-01

    Prior research strongly implicates gastric acid and bile acids, two major components of the gastroesophageal refluxate, in the development of Barrett's esophagus and its pathogenesis. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a hydrophilic bile acid, has been shown to protect esophageal cells against oxidative stress induced by cytotoxic bile acids. We conducted a pilot clinical study to evaluate the clinical activity of UDCA in patients with Barrett's esophagus. Twenty-nine patients with Barrett's esophagus received UDCA treatment at a daily dose of 13 to 15 mg/kg/day for 6 months. The clinical activity of UDCA was assessed by evaluating changes in gastric bile acid composition and markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine), cell proliferation (Ki67), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) in Barrett's esophagus epithelium. The bile acid concentrations in gastric fluid were measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. At baseline, UDCA (sum of unchanged and glycine/taurine conjugates) accounted for 18.2% of total gastric bile acids. After UDCA intervention, UDCA increased significantly to account for 93.4% of total gastric bile acids (P acid composition but did not modulate selected markers of oxidative DNA damage, cell proliferation, and apoptosis in the Barrett's esophagus epithelium. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 528-33. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Brian J. Reid, p. 512. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution in Barrett's esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumen L Kostadinov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is considered an outcome of decades-long clonal evolution fueled by acquisition of somatic genomic abnormalities (SGAs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been shown to reduce cancer risk, including risk of progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA. However, the cancer chemopreventive mechanisms of NSAIDs are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution by reducing SGA acquisition rate. We evaluated thirteen individuals with BE. Eleven had not used NSAIDs for 6.2±3.5 (mean±standard deviation years and then began using NSAIDs for 5.6±2.7 years, whereas two had used NSAIDs for 3.3±1.4 years and then discontinued use for 7.9±0.7 years. 161 BE biopsies, collected at 5-8 time points over 6.4-19 years, were analyzed using 1Million-SNP arrays to detect SGAs. Even in the earliest biopsies there were many SGAs (284±246 in 10/13 and 1442±560 in 3/13 individuals and in most individuals the number of SGAs changed little over time, with both increases and decreases in SGAs detected. The estimated SGA rate was 7.8 per genome per year (95% support interval [SI], 7.1-8.6 off-NSAIDs and 0.6 (95% SI 0.3-1.5 on-NSAIDs. Twelve individuals did not progress to EA. In ten we detected 279±86 SGAs affecting 53±30 Mb of the genome per biopsy per time point and in two we detected 1,463±375 SGAs affecting 180±100 Mb. In one individual who progressed to EA we detected a clone having 2,291±78 SGAs affecting 588±18 Mb of the genome at three time points in the last three of 11.4 years of follow-up. NSAIDs were associated with reduced rate of acquisition of SGAs in eleven of thirteen individuals. Barrett's cells maintained relative equilibrium level of SGAs over time with occasional punctuations by expansion of clones having massive amount of SGAs.

  4. Endoscopic diagnosis and therapies for Barrett esophagus: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irving Waxman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus is an area of great interest in Gastroenterology, with an increasing number of research studies being published in recent years and decades. Due to the fast growing evidence regarding this disease, it has become extremely difficult to keep updated on this subject. The present review article aims to summarize and update what is known regarding diagnosis and therapy in Barrett's esophagus. A critical and detailed review is made and the role of surveillance for this condition, techniques available for diagnosis (standard white light endoscopy, virtual chromoendoscopy, magnification... and treatment (mucosectomy, ablation... are presented. New and emerging technologies are described in detail and existing evidence is presented.

  5. Barrett esophagus: guided biopsies taken through digital image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, Agustina [Measurement and Signal Processing Laboratory, School of Engineering, UNMdP, J.B. Justo 4302, Mar del Plata, B7608FQD (Argentina); Pastore, Juan [Measurement and Signal Processing Laboratory, School of Engineering, UNMdP, J.B. Justo 4302, Mar del Plata, B7608FQD (Argentina); Abras, Guillermo [Measurement and Signal Processing Laboratory, School of Engineering, UNMdP, J.B. Justo 4302, Mar del Plata, B7608FQD (Argentina); Jury, Gaston [Centro de Estudios Digestivos Mar del Plata, 3 de Febrero 2852, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Jury, Ruben [Centro de Estudios Digestivos Mar del Plata, 3 de Febrero 2852, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Ballarin, Virginia [Measurement and Signal Processing Laboratory, School of Engineering, UNMdP, J.B. Justo 4302, Mar del Plata, B7608FQD (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    The most important problem that Barrett esophagus presents is, undoubtedly, the possibility of its malignization. In order to be sure not only on the occurrence of a Barrett esophagus but also to diagnose its possible complications, it is absolutely necessary to obtain biopsies to make a histological diagnosis. This should be done under endoscopic control to avoid mucus areas that may co-exist within the columnar epithelial, which could lead to a false diagnosis. In this paper we present a combination of two filters -a chromatic and a frequency filter-aiming at differentiating the various surfaces by highlighting the critical area to prevent false analysis and, consequently, false diagnosis.

  6. Barrett esophagus: guided biopsies taken through digital image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, Agustina; Pastore, Juan; Abras, Guillermo; Jury, Gaston; Jury, Ruben; Ballarin, Virginia

    2007-01-01

    The most important problem that Barrett esophagus presents is, undoubtedly, the possibility of its malignization. In order to be sure not only on the occurrence of a Barrett esophagus but also to diagnose its possible complications, it is absolutely necessary to obtain biopsies to make a histological diagnosis. This should be done under endoscopic control to avoid mucus areas that may co-exist within the columnar epithelial, which could lead to a false diagnosis. In this paper we present a combination of two filters -a chromatic and a frequency filter-aiming at differentiating the various surfaces by highlighting the critical area to prevent false analysis and, consequently, false diagnosis

  7. Diagnosis and therapy of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose of this review In the last 2 years, several studies have been published that will change the management of patients with Barrett's esophagus. In this review, we will discuss the most relevant studies as well as future prospects in this field. Recent findings Long-term follow-up studies have

  8. Esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett esophagus in a neurologically impaired teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Lee, Yeoun Joo; Chun, Peter; Shin, Dong Hoon; Park, Jae Hong

    2016-11-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) accompanied by Barrett esophagus (BE) is rare in patients younger than 20 years old. EAC in the upper esophagus is also rare. We report a rare case of EAC with BE that developed in the upper esophagus after chronic, untreated gastroesophageal reflux disease in a neurologically impaired teenager. A 19-year-old neurologically impaired man underwent endoscopy for evaluation of dysphagia and vomiting, and was diagnosed with EAC with BE. He underwent transthoracic esophagectomy, extensive lymph node dissection, and cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, but the prognosis was poor. Pathology indicated poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with BE. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Predicting Barrett's Esophagus in Families: An Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) Model Fitting Clinical Data to a Familial Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangqing; Elston, Robert C; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Falk, Gary W; Grady, William M; Faulx, Ashley; Mittal, Sumeet K; Canto, Marcia; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Wang, Jean S; Iyer, Prasad G; Abrams, Julian A; Tian, Ye D; Willis, Joseph E; Guda, Kishore; Markowitz, Sanford D; Chandar, Apoorva; Warfe, James M; Brock, Wendy; Chak, Amitabh

    2016-05-01

    Barrett's esophagus is often asymptomatic and only a small portion of Barrett's esophagus patients are currently diagnosed and under surveillance. Therefore, it is important to develop risk prediction models to identify high-risk individuals with Barrett's esophagus. Familial aggregation of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma, and the increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma for individuals with a family history, raise the necessity of including genetic factors in the prediction model. Methods to determine risk prediction models using both risk covariates and ascertained family data are not well developed. We developed a Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) risk prediction model from 787 singly ascertained Barrett's esophagus pedigrees and 92 multiplex Barrett's esophagus pedigrees, fitting a multivariate logistic model that incorporates family history and clinical risk factors. The eight risk factors, age, sex, education level, parental status, smoking, heartburn frequency, regurgitation frequency, and use of acid suppressant, were included in the model. The prediction accuracy was evaluated on the training dataset and an independent validation dataset of 643 multiplex Barrett's esophagus pedigrees. Our results indicate family information helps to predict Barrett's esophagus risk, and predicting in families improves both prediction calibration and discrimination accuracy. Our model can predict Barrett's esophagus risk for anyone with family members known to have, or not have, had Barrett's esophagus. It can predict risk for unrelated individuals without knowing any relatives' information. Our prediction model will shed light on effectively identifying high-risk individuals for Barrett's esophagus screening and surveillance, consequently allowing intervention at an early stage, and reducing mortality from esophageal adenocarcinoma. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(5); 727-35. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for

  10. Management of Barrett's esophagus: Screening to newer treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Thoguluva Chandrasekar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus is a premalignant condition of the esophagus in which the squamous epithelium of the lower end of the esophagus is replaced with columnar epithelium. Since the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma is on the rise, the major gastroenterology societies have come up with their recommendations for screening and surveillance. Specific factors like obesity, white race, age over 50 years, early age of onset of GERD, smoking and hiatal hernia have been identified as increasing the risk of Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis requires both endoscopic identification of columnar-lined mucosa and histological confirmation with biopsy. Most medical societies recommend screening people with GERD and other risk factors with endoscopy, but other alternatives employing less invasive methods are currently being studied. Surveillance strategies vary depending on the endoscopic findings and the Seattle biopsy protocol with random 4-quadrant sampling is recommended. Biomarkers have shown promising results, but more studies are needed in the future. White light endoscopy is the standard practice, but other advanced imaging modalities have shown variable results and hence more studies are awaited for further validation. Endoscopic eradication techniques, including both resection and ablation, have shown good but variable results for treating dysplastic lesions confined to the mucosa. Resection procedures to remove visible lesions followed by ablation of the dysplastic mucosa have shown the best results with higher eradication rates and lower recurrence rates. Surgical management is reserved for lesions with sub-mucosal invasion and lymph node spread with increased risk of metastasis.

  11. Length of Barrett's segment predicts failure of eradication in radiofrequency ablation for Barrett's esophagus: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckett, Tyler; Allamneni, Chaitanya; Cowley, Kevin; Eick, John; Gullick, Allison; Peter, Shajan

    2018-05-21

    We aim to investigate factors that may contribute to failure of eradication of dysplastic Barrett's Esophagus among patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation treatment. A retrospective review of patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation for treatment of Barrett's Esophagus was performed. Data analyzed included patient demographics, medical history, length of Barrett's Esophagus, number of radiofrequency ablation sessions, and histopathology. Subsets of patients achieving complete eradication were compared with those not achieving complete eradication. A total of 107 patients underwent radiofrequency ablation for Barrett's Esophagus, the majority white, overweight, and male. Before treatment, 63 patients had low-grade dysplasia, and 44 patients had high-grade dysplasia or carcinoma. Complete eradication was achieved in a majority of patients (57% for metaplasia, and 76.6% for dysplasia). Failure of eradication occurred in 15.7% of patients. The median number of radiofrequency ablation treatments in patients achieving complete eradication was 3 sessions, compared to 4 sessions for failure of eradication (p = 0.06). Barrett's esophagus length of more than 5 cm was predictive of failure of eradication (p Radiofrequency ablation for dysplastic Barrett's Esophagus is a proven and effective treatment modality, associated with a high rate of complete eradication. Our rates of eradication from a center starting an ablation program are comparable to previously published studies. Length of Barrett's segment > 5 cm was found to be predictive of failure of eradication in patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation.

  12. The prevalence of gastric heterotopia of the proximal esophagus is underestimated, but preneoplasia is rare - correlation with Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitz, Ulrich; Vieth, Michael; Evert, Matthias; Arand, Jovana; Roessner, Albert; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2017-07-12

    The previously reported prevalence of gastric heterotopia in the cervical esophagus, also termed inlet patch (IP), varies substantially, ranging from 0.18 to 14%. Regarding cases with adenocarcinoma within IP, some experts recommend to routinely obtain biopsies from IP for histopathology. Another concern is the reported relation to Barrett's esophagus. The objectives of the study were to prospectively determine the prevalence of IP and of preneoplasia within IP, and to investigate the association between IP and Barrett's esophagus. 372 consecutive patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy were carefully searched for the presence of IP. Biopsies for histopathology were targeted to the IP, columnar metaplasia of the lower esophagus, gastric corpus and antrum. Different definitions of Barrett's esophagus were tested for an association with IP. At least one IP was endoscopically identified in 53 patients (14.5%). Histopathology, performed in 46 patients, confirmed columnar epithelium in 87% of cases, which essentially presented corpus and/or cardia-type mucosa. Intestinal metaplasia was detected in two cases, but no neoplasia. A previously reported association of IP with Barrett's esophagus was weak, statistically significant only when short segments of cardia-type mucosa of the lower esophagus were included in the definition of Barrett's esophagus. The prevalence of IP seems to be underestimated, but preneoplasia within IP is rare, which does not support the recommendation to regularly obtain biopsies for histopathology. Biopsies should be targeted to any irregularities within the heterotopic mucosa. The correlation of IP with Barrett's esophagus hints to a partly common pathogenesis.

  13. Barrett's esophagus: Ten years of experience at a tertiary care hospital center in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Valdovinos-Andraca

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The frequency of Barrett's esophagus was 9.6 cases for every 1,000 upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed. Dysplasia was not documented in the majority of the patients with Barrett's esophagus and they had no histopathologic changes during follow-up. A total of 19.3% of the patients presented with dysplasia or cancer.

  14. Aspirin in Preventing Disease Recurrence in Patients With Barrett Esophagus After Successful Elimination by Radiofrequency Ablation | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This randomized phase II trial studies the safety of and how well aspirin works in preventing Barrett's esophagus from returning after it has been successfully eliminated by radiofrequency ablation. Studying samples of tissue from patients with Barrett's esophagus for the levels of a specific protein that is linked to developing Barrett's esophagus may help doctors learn

  15. The spectrum of motor function abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, D; Blondeau, K; Sifrim, D; Tack, J

    2009-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus has traditionally been regarded as the most severe end of the spectrum of gastroesophageal reflux disease and is of great clinical importance in view of the association with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Studies have documented high levels of esophageal acid exposure in Barrett's esophagus. Various pathogenetic mechanisms underlie this phenomenon. These include abnormalities in esophageal peristalsis, defective lower esophageal sphincter pressures, gastric dysmotility and bile reflux. Whilst these factors provide evidence for an acquired cause of Barrett's esophagus, an underlying genetic predisposition cannot be ruled out. Although the past decade has brought about many new discoveries in the pathogenesis of Barrett's esophagus, it has also added further controversy to this complex disorder. A detailed analysis of the gastrointestinal motor abnormalities occurring in Barrett's esophagus follows, with a review of the currently available literature and an update on this condition that continues to be of interest to the gastroenterologist.

  16. Chromoendoscopy and magnification endoscopy in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michael J; Sharma, Prateek

    2003-04-01

    Chromoendoscopy and magnification endoscopy appear to be a valuable adjuncts for the detection and classification of BE. These techniques may also prove to be useful aids in surveillance protocols for identifying dysplastic epithelium or early cancer within a segment of BE. Ideally, the use of these techniques would enable the endoscopist to rule in or out the presence of IM and of dysplastic or cancerous epithelium by obtaining only a minimal number of targeted biopsy specimens, or potentially performing no biopsies at all. This could transform upper endoscopy into a much more effective screening and surveillance tool for BE. Several problems currently exist for the use of chromoendoscopy for BE. Results of studies reporting the accuracy of chromoendoscopy remain mixed,and are likely explained by the wide range of techniques and materials used in the investigations. Staining adds several steps, and likely several minutes, to an upper endoscopy. Staining within the esophagus is often patchy and uneven. In addition, poor spraying technique exaggerates the irregular uptake by the mucosa. There is a high false-positive rate when staining gastric-type epithelium and denuded epithelium. Areas of dysplasia or cancer may take up stain in an irregular manner, or may not stain at all. Chromoendoscopy is a relatively new technique in the management of BE and depends on the skill and experience of the endoscopist. Magnification, however, only allows the endoscopist to observe small areas of mucosa at a time, increasing the overall complexity and length of the procedure. The learning curve for this procedure is relatively short, however, and endoscopists can usually become proficient in the technique quickly. Currently, the greatest body of literature exists concerning the use of methylene blue for diagnosing BE. At the present time, chromoendoscopy and magnification endoscopy appear to be most beneficial in detecting IM in short segments of esophageal columnar

  17. Elevated Z line: a new sign of Barrett's esophagus on double-contrast barium esophagograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marc S; Ahmad, Nuzhat A; Rubesin, Stephen E

    2015-01-01

    We describe an elevated Z line as a new radiographic sign of Barrett's esophagus characterized by a transversely oriented, zigzagging, barium-etched line extending completely across the circumference of the midesophagus. An elevated Z line is rarely seen in other patients, so this finding should be highly suggestive of Barrett's esophagus on double-contrast barium esophagograms. If the patient is a potential candidate for surveillance, endoscopy and biopsy should be performed to confirm the presence of Barrett's esophagus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Biomarkers for Risk Stratification of Neoplastic Progression in Barrett Esophagus

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    Marjon Kerkhof

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Barrett esophagus (BE is caused by chronic gastroesophageal reflux and predisposes to the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma through different grades of dysplasia. Only a subset of BE patients will finally develop esophageal adenocarcinoma. The majority will therefore not benefit from an endoscopic surveillance program, based on the histological identification of dysplasia. Several studies have been performed to find additional biomarkers that can be used to detect the subgroup of patients with an increased risk of developing malignancy in BE. In this review, we will summarize the most promising tissue biomarkers, i.e. proliferation/cell cycle proteins, tumor suppressor genes, adhesion molecules, DNA ploidy status and inflammation associated markers, that can be used for risk stratification in BE, and discuss their respective clinical application.

  19. Outcomes of Radiofrequency Ablation for Dysplastic Barrett's Esophagus: A Comprehensive Review

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    Iabichino, Giuseppe; Arena, Monica; Consolo, Pierluigi; Morace, Carmela; Opocher, Enrico; Mangiavillano, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is a condition in which the normal squamous lining of the esophagus has been replaced by columnar epithelium containing intestinal metaplasia induced by recurrent mucosal injury related to gastroesophageal reflux disease. Barrett's esophagus is a premalignant condition that can progress through a dysplasia-carcinoma sequence to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Multiple endoscopic ablative techniques have been developed with the goal of eradicating Barrett's esophagus and preventing neoplastic progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma. For patients with high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal neoplasia, radiofrequency ablation with or without endoscopic resection for visible lesions is currently the most effective and safe treatment available. Recent data demonstrate that, in patients with Barrett's esophagus and low-grade dysplasia confirmed by a second pathologist, ablative therapy results in a statistically significant reduction in progression to high-grade dysplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Treatment of dysplastic Barrett's esophagus with radiofrequency ablation results in complete eradication of both dysplasia and of intestinal metaplasia in a high proportion of patients with a low incidence of adverse events. A high proportion of treated patients maintain the neosquamous epithelium after successful treatment without recurrence of intestinal metaplasia. Following successful endoscopic treatment, endoscopic surveillance should be continued to detect any recurrent intestinal metaplasia and/or dysplasia. This paper reviews all relevant publications on the endoscopic management of Barrett's esophagus using radiofrequency ablation. PMID:28070182

  20. A nonrandomized trial of vitamin D supplementation for Barrett's esophagus.

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    Linda C Cummings

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency may increase esophageal cancer risk. Vitamin D affects genes regulating proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation and induces the tumor suppressor 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH in other cancers. This nonrandomized interventional study assessed effects of vitamin D supplementation in Barrett's esophagus (BE. We hypothesized that vitamin D supplementation may have beneficial effects on gene expression including 15-PGDH in BE.BE subjects with low grade or no dysplasia received vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol 50,000 international units weekly plus a proton pump inhibitor for 12 weeks. Esophageal biopsies from normal plus metaplastic BE epithelium and blood samples were obtained before and after vitamin D supplementation. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured to characterize vitamin D status. Esophageal gene expression was assessed using microarrays.18 study subjects were evaluated. The baseline mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was 27 ng/mL (normal ≥30 ng/mL. After vitamin D supplementation, 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels rose significantly (median increase of 31.6 ng/mL, p<0.001. There were no significant changes in gene expression from esophageal squamous or Barrett's epithelium including 15-PGDH after supplementation.BE subjects were vitamin D insufficient. Despite improved vitamin D status with supplementation, no significant alterations in gene expression profiles were noted. If vitamin D supplementation benefits BE, a longer duration or higher dose of supplementation may be needed.

  1. Epithelial cell proliferative activity of Barrett's esophagus : methodology and correlation with traditional cancer risk markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, FTM; Ganesh, S; Kuipers, EJ; De Jager-Krikken, A; Karrenbeld, A; Harms, Geert; Sluiter, WJ; Koudstaal, J; Klinkenberg-Knol, EC; Lamers, CBHW; Kleibeuker, JH

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition, due to chronic gastroesophageal reflux. Effective antireflux therapy may diminish cancer risk. To evaluate this option an intermediate marker is needed. We developed a methodology for measurement of epithelial cell proliferative activity of

  2. The burden of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in patients with Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijshaar, M. E.; Kerkhof, M.; Siersema, P. D.; Steyerberg, E. W.; Homs, M. Y. V.; Essink-Bot, M.-L.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Patients with Barrett's esophagus are recommended to undergo regular surveillance with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, an invasive procedure that may cause anxiety, pain, and discomfort. We assessed to what extent patients perceived this procedure as burdensome. PATIENTS

  3. Stepwise radiofrequency ablation of Barrett's esophagus preserves esophageal inner diameter, compliance, and motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, H.; Gondrie, J. J.; McMahon, B. P.; Pouw, R. E.; Gregersen, H.; Bergman, J. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Background and aim: Stepwise endoscopic circumferential and focal radiofrequency ablation is safe and effective for the eradication of Barrett's esophagus. In contrast to other techniques, radiofrequency ablation appears to avoid significant esophageal scarring or stenosis. Our aim was to evaluate

  4. Frequency, types and complications of barrett's esophagus in patients with symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, A.L.; Sadiq, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study was carried out to evaluate the frequency, types and complications of Barrett's esophagus in symptomatic gastro-esophageal reflux patients. Subjects: A total of 100 patients of gastro-esophageal reflux were studied to evaluate the frequency, types and complications of Barrett's esophagus. Endoscopic biopsies were taken and examined with H and E and various special stains like PAS, Alcian blue/PAS, high iron diamine/ Alcian blue and Giemsa stains. Results: Of 100 cases studied, 32 were found to have Barrett's esophagus on microscopy. The remaining 68 cases showed low and high grade changes of gastro-esophageal reflux. Conclusion: In comparison with studies from western countries, Barrett's esophagus was found to be relatively more common in our population. However, the frequency of complications like ulcer, stricture, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma was lesser. (author)

  5. Validation of the Prague C&M classification of Barrett's esophagus in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez Herrero, Lorenza; Curvers, Wouter L.; van Vilsteren, Frederike G. I.; Wolfsen, Herbert; Ragunath, Krish; Wong Kee Song, Louis-Michel; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie C.; van Oijen, Arnoud; Scholten, Pieter; Schoon, Erik J.; Schenk, Ed B. E.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Bergman, Jacques G. H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and study aims: The Prague C&M classification for Barrett's esophagus has found widespread acceptance but has only been validated by Barrett's experts scoring video sequences. To date, validation has been lacking for its application in routine practice during real-time endoscopy. The aim

  6. Characterization of tissue autofluorescence in Barrett's esophagus by confocal fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kara, M. A.; DaCosta, R. S.; Streutker, C. J.; Marcon, N. E.; Bergman, J. J. G. H. M.; Wilson, B. C.

    2007-01-01

    High grade dysplasia and early cancer in Barrett's esophagus can be distinguished in vivo by endoscopic autofluorescence point spectroscopy and imaging from non-dysplastic Barrett's mucosa. We used confocal fluorescence microscopy for ex vivo comparison of autofluorescence in non-dysplastic and

  7. p16 mutation spectrum in the premalignant condition Barrett's esophagus.

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    Thomas G Paulson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutation, promoter hypermethylation and loss of heterozygosity involving the tumor suppressor gene p16 (CDKN2a/INK4a have been detected in a wide variety of human cancers, but much less is known concerning the frequency and spectrum of p16 mutations in premalignant conditions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have determined the p16 mutation spectrum for a cohort of 304 patients with Barrett's esophagus, a premalignant condition that predisposes to the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Forty seven mutations were detected by sequencing of p16 exon 2 in 44 BE patients (14.5% with a mutation spectrum consistent with that caused by oxidative damage and chronic inflammation. The percentage of patients with p16 mutations increased with increasing histologic grade. In addition, samples from 3 out of 19 patients (15.8% who underwent esophagectomy were found to have mutations. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest the environment of the esophagus in BE patients can both generate and select for clones with p16 mutations.

  8. Gene expression changes associated with Barrett's esophagus and Barrett's-associated adenocarcinoma cell lines after acid or bile salt exposure

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    Sahbaie Peyman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal reflux and Barrett's esophagus represent two major risk factors for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Previous studies have shown that brief exposure of the Barrett's-associated adenocarcinoma cell line, SEG-1, or primary cultures of Barrett's esophageal tissues to acid or bile results in changes consistent with cell proliferation. In this study, we determined whether similar exposure to acid or bile salts results in gene expression changes that provide insights into malignant transformation. Methods Using previously published methods, Barrett's-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines and primary cultures of Barrett's esophageal tissue were exposed to short pulses of acid or bile salts followed by incubation in culture media at pH 7.4. A genome-wide assessment of gene expression was then determined for the samples using cDNA microarrays. Subsequent analysis evaluated for statistical differences in gene expression with and without treatment. Results The SEG-1 cell line showed changes in gene expression that was dependent on the length of exposure to pH 3.5. Further analysis using the Gene Ontology, however, showed that representation by genes associated with cell proliferation is not enhanced by acid exposure. The changes in gene expression also did not involve genes known to be differentially expressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. Similar experiments using short-term primary cultures of Barrett's esophagus also did not result in detectable changes in gene expression with either acid or bile salt exposure. Conclusion Short-term exposure of esophageal adenocarcinoma SEG-1 cells or primary cultures of Barrett's esophagus does not result in gene expression changes that are consistent with enhanced cell proliferation. Thus other model systems are needed that may reflect the impact of acid and bile salt exposure on the esophagus in vivo.

  9. In Barrett's esophagus patients and Barrett's cell lines, ursodeoxycholic acid increases antioxidant expression and prevents DNA damage by bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sui; Huo, Xiaofang; Rezaei, Davood; Zhang, Qiuyang; Zhang, Xi; Yu, Chunhua; Asanuma, Kiyotaka; Cheng, Edaire; Pham, Thai H; Wang, David H; Chen, Minhu; Souza, Rhonda F; Spechler, Stuart Jon

    2014-07-15

    Hydrophobic bile acids like deoxycholic acid (DCA), which cause oxidative DNA damage and activate NF-κB in Barrett's metaplasia, might contribute to carcinogenesis in Barrett's esophagus. We have explored mechanisms whereby ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, a hydrophilic bile acid) protects against DCA-induced injury in vivo in patients and in vitro using nonneoplastic, telomerase-immortalized Barrett's cell lines. We took biopsies of Barrett's esophagus from 21 patients before and after esophageal perfusion with DCA (250 μM) at baseline and after 8 wk of oral UDCA treatment. DNA damage was assessed by phospho-H2AX expression, neutral CometAssay, and phospho-H2AX nuclear foci formation. Quantitative PCR was performed for antioxidants including catalase and GPX1. Nrf2, catalase, and GPX1 were knocked down with siRNAs. Reporter assays were performed using a plasmid construct containing antioxidant responsive element. In patients, baseline esophageal perfusion with DCA significantly increased phospho-H2AX and phospho-p65 in Barrett's metaplasia. Oral UDCA increased GPX1 and catalase levels in Barrett's metaplasia and prevented DCA perfusion from inducing DNA damage and NF-κB activation. In cells, DCA-induced DNA damage and NF-κB activation was prevented by 24-h pretreatment with UDCA, but not by mixing UDCA with DCA. UDCA activated Nrf2 signaling to increase GPX1 and catalase expression, and protective effects of UDCA pretreatment were blocked by siRNA knockdown of these antioxidants. UDCA increases expression of antioxidants that prevent toxic bile acids from causing DNA damage and NF-κB activation in Barrett's metaplasia. Elucidation of this molecular pathway for UDCA protection provides rationale for clinical trials on UDCA for chemoprevention in Barrett's esophagus. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Reduced Risk of Barrett's Esophagus in Statin Users: Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beales, Ian L P; Dearman, Leanne; Vardi, Inna; Loke, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Use of statins has been associated with a reduced incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in population-based studies. However there are few studies examining statin use and the development of Barrett's esophagus. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between statin use and the presence of Barrett's esophagus in patients having their first gastroscopy. We have performed a case-control study comparing statin use between patients with, and without, an incident diagnosis of non-dysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Male Barrett's cases (134) were compared to 268 male age-matched controls in each of two control groups (erosive gastro-esophageal reflux and dyspepsia without significant upper gastrointestinal disease). Risk factor and drug exposure were established using standardised interviews. Logistic regression was used to compare statin exposure and correct for confounding factors. We performed a meta-analysis pooling our results with three other case-control studies. Regular statin use was associated with a significantly lower incidence of Barrett's esophagus compared to the combined control groups [adjusted OR 0.62 (95 % confidence intervals 0.37-0.93)]. This effect was more marked in combined statin plus aspirin users [adjusted OR 0.43 (95 % CI 0.21-0.89)]. The inverse association between statin or statin plus aspirin use and risk of Barrett's was significantly greater with longer duration of use. Meta-analysis of pooled data (1098 Barrett's, 2085 controls) showed that statin use was significantly associated with a reduced risk of Barrett's esophagus [pooled adjusted OR 0.63 (95 % CI 0.51-0.77)]. Statin use is associated with a reduced incidence of a new diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus.

  11. Barrett's esophagus: Ten years of experience at a tertiary care hospital center in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdovinos-Andraca, F; Bernal-Méndez, A R; Barreto-Zúñiga, R; Briseño-García, D; Martínez-Lozano, J A; Romano-Munive, A F; Elizondo-Rivera, J; Téllez-Ávila, F I

    The prevalence of Barrett's esophagus has been calculated at between 1.3 and 1.6%. There is little information with respect to this in Mexico. To determine the frequency and characteristics of Barrett's esophagus in patients that underwent endoscopy at a national referral center, within a 10-year time frame. The databases of the pathology and gastrointestinal endoscopy departments of the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición "Salvador Zubirán" were analyzed, covering the period of January 2002 to December 2012. Patients with a histologic diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus were included. The variables of age, sex, the presence of dysplasia/esophageal adenocarcinoma, Barrett's esophagus length, and follow-up were analyzed. Of 43,639 upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed, 420 revealed Barrett's esophagus, corresponding to a frequency of 9.6 patients for every 1,000 endoscopies. Of those patients, 66.9% (n=281) were men, mean patient age±SD was 57.2±15.3 years, 223 patients (53%) presented with long-segment Barrett's esophagus, and 197 (47%) with short-segment Barrett's esophagus. Dysplasia was not present in 339 patients (80.7%). Eighty-one (19.3%) patients had some grade of dysplasia or cancer: 48/420 (11.42%) presented with low-grade dysplasia, 20/420 (4.76%) with high-grade dysplasia, and 13/420 (3.1%) were diagnosed with esophageal cancer arising from Barrett's esophagus. Mean follow-up time was 5.6 years. The frequency of Barrett's esophagus was 9.6 cases for every 1,000 upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed. Dysplasia was not documented in the majority of the patients with Barrett's esophagus and they had no histopathologic changes during follow-up. A total of 19.3% of the patients presented with dysplasia or cancer. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. A survey on Barrett's esophagus analysis using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luis A; Palm, Christoph; Mendel, Robert; Hook, Christian; Ebigbo, Alanna; Probst, Andreas; Messmann, Helmut; Weber, Silke; Papa, João P

    2018-05-01

    This work presents a systematic review concerning recent studies and technologies of machine learning for Barrett's esophagus (BE) diagnosis and treatment. The use of artificial intelligence is a brand new and promising way to evaluate such disease. We compile some works published at some well-established databases, such as Science Direct, IEEEXplore, PubMed, Plos One, Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Springer, and Hindawi Publishing Corporation. Each selected work has been analyzed to present its objective, methodology, and results. The BE progression to dysplasia or adenocarcinoma shows a complex pattern to be detected during endoscopic surveillance. Therefore, it is valuable to assist its diagnosis and automatic identification using computer analysis. The evaluation of the BE dysplasia can be performed through manual or automated segmentation through machine learning techniques. Finally, in this survey, we reviewed recent studies focused on the automatic detection of the neoplastic region for classification purposes using machine learning methods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Multiscale Model Evaluates Screening for Neoplasia in Barrett's Esophagus.

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    Kit Curtius

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus (BE patients are routinely screened for high grade dysplasia (HGD and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC through endoscopic screening, during which multiple esophageal tissue samples are removed for histological analysis. We propose a computational method called the multistage clonal expansion for EAC (MSCE-EAC screening model that is used for screening BE patients in silico to evaluate the effects of biopsy sampling, diagnostic sensitivity, and treatment on disease burden. Our framework seamlessly integrates relevant cell-level processes during EAC development with a spatial screening process to provide a clinically relevant model for detecting dysplastic and malignant clones within the crypt-structured BE tissue. With this computational approach, we retain spatio-temporal information about small, unobserved tissue lesions in BE that may remain undetected during biopsy-based screening but could be detected with high-resolution imaging. This allows evaluation of the efficacy and sensitivity of current screening protocols to detect neoplasia (dysplasia and early preclinical EAC in the esophageal lining. We demonstrate the clinical utility of this model by predicting three important clinical outcomes: (1 the probability that small cancers are missed during biopsy-based screening, (2 the potential gains in neoplasia detection probabilities if screening occurred via high-resolution tomographic imaging, and (3 the efficacy of ablative treatments that result in the curative depletion of metaplastic and neoplastic cell populations in BE in terms of the long-term impact on reducing EAC incidence.

  14. DUOX2 Expression Is Increased in Barrett Esophagus and Cancerous Tissues of Stomach and Colon

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    Ran Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To detect the expression of dual oxidase (DUOX 2 in Barrett esophagus, gastric cancer, and colorectal cancer (CRC. Materials and Methods. The endoscopic biopsies were collected from patients with Barrett esophagus, while the curative resection tissues were obtained from patients with gastric cancer, CRC, or hepatic carcinoma. The DUOX2 protein and mRNA levels were detected with immunohistochemistry (IHC and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. The correlation of DUOX2 expression with clinicopathological parameters of tumors was identified. Results. Low levels of DUOX2 mRNA were detected in Barrett esophagus and the adjacent normal tissues, and there was no difference between these two groups. DUOX2 protein was found in Barrett esophagus and undetectable in the normal epithelium. The DUOX2 mRNA and protein levels in the gastric cancer and CRC were increased compared to the adjacent nonmalignant tissues. The elevated DUOX2 in the gastric cancer was significantly associated with smoking history. In CRC tissues, the DUOX2 protein expression level in stages II–IV was significantly higher than that in stage I. In both hepatic carcinoma and the adjacent nonmalignant tissue, the DUOX2 was virtually undetectable. Conclusion. DUOX2 in Barrett esophagus, gastric cancer, and CRC may be involved in the tumorigenesis of these tissues.

  15. Expression of the bile acid receptor FXR in Barrett's esophagus and enhancement of apoptosis by guggulsterone in vitro

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    Frossard Jean-Louis

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barrett's esophagus, a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, is associated with reflux disease. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of bile acid receptors in the esophagus (normal, esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma and to investigate their possible function. Results the expression of the bile acid receptors FXR and VDR in esophageal biopsies from patients with a normal mucosa, esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus or adenocarcinoma (n = 6 per group and in cell lines derived from Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma, was assessed by real time Q-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The effect of guggulsterone, an antagonist of bile acid receptors, on apoptosis of Barrett's esophagus-derived cells was assessed morphologically, by flow cytometry and by measuring caspase 3 activity. The expression of FXR was increased in esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma compared to normal mucosa by a mean of 44, 84 and 16, respectively. Immunohistochemistry showed a weak expression in normal esophagus, a strong focal reactivity in Barrett's esophagus, and was negative in adenocarcinoma. VDR expression did not significantly differ between groups. In cell cultures, the expression of FXR was high in Barrett's esophagus-derived cells and almost undetectable in adenocarcinoma-derived cells, whereas VDR expression in these cell lines was not significantly different. In vitro treatment with guggulsterone was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells and of the caspase 3 activity. Conclusion the bile acid receptor FXR is significantly overexpressed in Barrett's esophagus compared to normal mucosa, esophagitis and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The induction of apoptosis by guggulsterone in a Barrett's esophagus-derived cell line suggests that FXR may contribute to the regulation of apoptosis.

  16. Development of a risk prediction model for Barrett's esophagus in an Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, C J; Fielder, A L; Thompson, S K; Laws, T A; Watson, D I; Esterman, A

    2017-11-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma has poor 5-year survival rates. Increased survival might be achieved with earlier treatment, but requires earlier identification of the precursor, Barrett's esophagus. Population screening is not cost effective, this may be improved by targeted screening directed at individuals more likely to have Barrett's esophagus. To develop a risk prediction tool for Barrett's esophagus, this study compared individuals with Barrett's esophagus against population controls. Participants completed a questionnaire comprising 35 questions addressing medical history, symptom history, lifestyle factors, anthropomorphic measures, and demographic details. Statistical analysis addressed differences between cases and controls, and entailed initial variable selection, checking of model assumptions, and establishing calibration and discrimination. The area under the curve (AUC) was used to assess overall accuracy. One hundred and twenty individuals with Barrett's esophagus and 235 population controls completed the questionnaire. Significant differences were identified for age, gender, reflux history, family reflux history, history of hypertension, alcoholic drinks per week, and body mass index. These were used to develop a risk prediction model. The AUC was 0.82 (95% CI 0.78-0.87). Good calibration between predicted and observed risk was noted (Hosmer-Lemeshow test P = 0.67). At the point minimizing false positives and false negatives, the model achieved a sensitivity of 84.96% and a specificity of 66%. A well-calibrated risk prediction model with good discrimination has been developed to identify patients with Barrett's esophagus. The model needs to be externally validated before consideration for clinical practice. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Prevalence of Barrett's esophagus: An observational study from a gastroenterology clinic

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    J.L. Herrera Elizondo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and aims: Barrett's esophagus is a condition that predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Our aim was to establish the prevalence of Barrett's esophagus at our center, as well as determine its associated factors. Materials and methods: We retrospectively assessed the endoscopic reports of 500 outpatients seen at our Gastroenterology Service from November 2014 to April 2016. We determined the prevalence of Barrett's esophagus and analyzed the demographic, clinical, and endoscopic findings associated with that pathology. Results: The prevalence of Barrett's esophagus was 1.8%. The mean age of the patients with Barrett's esophagus was 58.7 years (range: 45-70 and there was a predominance of men (66%. In the subgroup of patients with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (n = 125, Barrett's esophagus prevalence was 7.2%. In the multivariate analysis, the factors that were independently associated with Barrett's esophagus were gastroesophageal reflux (P=.005 and hiatal hernia (P=.006. Conclusions: The overall prevalence of Barrett's esophagus was 1.8% in our population, with a prevalence of 7.2% in patients that had symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. Resumen: Introducción y objetivos: El esófago de Barrett es una condición que predispone al adenocarcinoma esofágico. Nuestro objetivo fue establecer la prevalencia de esófago de Barrett en nuestro centro, así como los factores asociados a esta condición. Material y métodos: Evaluamos retrospectivamente los reportes de 500 endoscopias superiores de pacientes ambulatorios de nuestro Servicio de Gastroenterología entre noviembre del 2014 y abril del 2016. Se determinó la prevalencia de esófago de Barrett y se analizaron los datos demográficos, clínicos y endoscópicos asociados a esta patología. Resultados: La prevalencia de esófago de Barrett fue del 1.8%. La edad media en los pacientes con esófago de Barrett fue de 58.7 años (rango: 45-70, con predominancia del sexo

  18. Structural alterations of the mucosa stroma in the Barrett's esophagus metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Killingsworth, Murray C; Lord, Reginald V N

    2012-09-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the extracellular matrix play important roles in intercellular communications and contribute to the development of a number of diseases, including diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. The present study examined the structural characteristics and alterations of the extracellular matrix of the mucosa stroma in the Barrett's esophagus metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence. A total of 41 esophageal tissue specimens (15 esophageal adenocarcinoma, 10 Barrett's esophagus intestinal metaplasia, seven dysplasia and nine normal esophagus) were studied. The present study used transmission electron microscopy and computerized quantitative electron-microscopic analysis in order to investigate the characteristics of the extracellular matrix of the mucosa. The study revealed that marked structural alterations of the mucosa stroma, relating to changes in the distribution and appearance of collagen fibers as well as to changes in numbers of matrix microvesicles, occur in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. It was found that there were 3.1 times more microvesicles in the stroma in Barrett's esophagus than in the stroma of the normal esophagus (P<0.0001) and that there were 5.8 times more microvesicles in esophageal adenocarcinoma than in the normal esophagus (P<0.0001). There were 1.9 times more microvesicles in esophageal adenocarcinoma than in Barrett's esophagus (P=0.0043). The study demonstrates distinctive alterations of the mucosa stroma extracellular matrix in the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence. The findings suggest that the redistribution of collagen fibers and increases in numbers of matrix microvesicles may play roles in the formation of specialized intestinal metaplasia and the development of adenocarcinoma. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Small cell carcinoma arising in Barrett's esophagus: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markogiannakis Haridimos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Gastrointestinal tract small cell carcinoma is an infrequent and aggressive neoplasm that represents 0.1–1% of gastrointestinal malignancies. Very few cases of small cell esophageal carcinoma arising in Barrett's esophagus have been reported in the literature. An extremely rare case of primary small cell carcinoma of the distal third of the esophagus arising from dysplastic Barrett's esophagus is herein presented. Case presentation A 62-year-old man with gastroesophageal reflux history presented with epigastric pain, epigastric fullness, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss. Esophagogastroscopy revealed an ulceroproliferative, intraluminar mass in the distal esophagus obstructing the esophageal lumen. Biopsy showed small cell esophageal carcinoma. Contrast-enhanced chest and abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a large tumor of the distal third of the esophagus without any lymphadenopathy or distant metastasis. Preoperative chemotherapy with cisplatine and etoposide for 3 months resulted in a significant reduction of the tumor. After en block esophagectomy with two field lymph node dissection, proximal gastrectomy, and cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, the patient was discharged on the 14th postoperative day. Histopathology revealed a primary small cell carcinoma of the distal third of the esophagus arising from dysplastic Barrett's esophagus. The patient received another 3 month course of postoperative chemotherapy with the same agents and remained free of disease at 12 month review. Conclusion Although small cell esophageal carcinoma is rare and its association with dysplastic Barrett's esophagus is extremely infrequent, the high carcinogenic risk of Barrett's epithelium should be kept in mind. Prognosis is quite unfavorable; a better prognosis might be possible with early diagnosis and treatment strategies incorporating chemotherapy along with oncological radical surgery and/or radiotherapy as part of a

  20. Scintigraphic assessment of Barrett's esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, J.A.; Sampliner, R.E.; Kogan, F.J.; Henry, R.E.; Mason, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    Barrett's (B) esophagus is defined by the presence of columnar epithelium above the gastroesophageal junction. Patients with 5cm histologically proven B were evaluated for mucosal labeling (ML), esophageal motility (EM), gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and gastric emptying (GE) of solids and liquids with and without iv metaclopramide (MCP). ML, after premedication with cimetidine, was evaluated 20 and 40 min after injection of Tc-99m04 with ANT and RAO views. Eight of 11 B and 0 of 2 controls (C) labeled esophageal mucosa. EM was assessed in the supine position over one min after a 15 ml swallow Tc-99mSc-H2O. The normal pattern shows sequential, aboral, discreet peaks with no retrograde movement over one min in three computer derived regions over the esophagus. Five of 16 B and 1 of 6 C demonstrated abnormal pattern. GER was assessed in the supine position by serially increasing extrinsic binder pressures from 0 to 100 Torr after ingestion of 300 ml of Tc-99mSc-orange juice (OJ). GER was present in 13 of 15 B and 0 of 11 C. Reflux ranged from 5.1% to 30% at 100 Torr. Hiatal hernia (HH) was identified in 14 of 16 B by endoscopy and in 10 of 16 by scintigraphy. GE was evaluated after a liquid meal of 300 ml Tc-99mSc-OJ and a solid meal of Tc-99mSc-egg salad sandwich. The supine subject was imaged anteriorly for 30 min (liquid) or 60 min (solid). GE was assessed an additional 10 min after MCP. Clearance time (50%) for solid Ge was calculated from extrapolated linear fits of decay corrected data. There was no significant difference in liquid or solid GE between B and C. The authors conclude the following: 1) ML detects B with lower sensitivity than previously reported; 2) EM disorders are frequently found in B; 3) GER is frequently identified in B; 4) HH can be identified by nuclear technique; and 5) B shows normal GE and responds to MCP.

  1. Stepwise circumferential and focal ablation of Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia: results of the first prospective series of 11 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gondrie, J. J.; Pouw, R. E.; Sondermeijer, C. M. T.; Peters, F. P.; Curvers, W. L.; Rosmolen, W. D.; Krishnadath, K. K.; ten Kate, F.; Fockens, P.; Bergman, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Stepwise circumferential and focal ablation of nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus has proven safe and effective. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of ablation for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (HGD), and residual Barrett's esophagus with dysplasia

  2. Three-tiered risk stratification model to predict progression in Barrett's esophagus using epigenetic and clinical features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Sato

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the value of endoscopic surveillance in Barrett's esophagus has been debated because of the low incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus. Moreover, high inter-observer and sampling-dependent variation in the histologic staging of dysplasia make clinical risk assessment problematic. In this study, we developed a 3-tiered risk stratification strategy, based on systematically selected epigenetic and clinical parameters, to improve Barrett's esophagus surveillance efficiency.We defined high-grade dysplasia as endpoint of progression, and Barrett's esophagus progressor patients as Barrett's esophagus patients with either no dysplasia or low-grade dysplasia who later developed high-grade dysplasia or esophageal adenocarcinoma. We analyzed 4 epigenetic and 3 clinical parameters in 118 Barrett's esophagus tissues obtained from 35 progressor and 27 non-progressor Barrett's esophagus patients from Baltimore Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care Systems and Mayo Clinic. Based on 2-year and 4-year prediction models using linear discriminant analysis (area under the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC curve: 0.8386 and 0.7910, respectively, Barrett's esophagus specimens were stratified into high-risk (HR, intermediate-risk (IR, or low-risk (LR groups. This 3-tiered stratification method retained both the high specificity of the 2-year model and the high sensitivity of the 4-year model. Progression-free survivals differed significantly among the 3 risk groups, with p = 0.0022 (HR vs. IR and p<0.0001 (HR or IR vs. LR. Incremental value analyses demonstrated that the number of methylated genes contributed most influentially to prediction accuracy.This 3-tiered risk stratification strategy has the potential to exert a profound impact on Barrett's esophagus surveillance accuracy and efficiency.

  3. Reproducibility of p53 and Ki-67 immunoquantitation in Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polkowski, W.; Meijer, G. A.; Baak, J. P.; ten Kate, F. J.; Obertop, H.; Offerhaus, G. J.; van Lanschot, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    To test the reproducibility and time effectiveness of two immunoquantitation and sampling methods in Barrett's esophagus (BE) mucosa. Measurements were performed using image cytometry (CAS 200/486) with "at convenience" sampling and stereology (QPRODIT 5.2) with both at convenience and systematic

  4. Polymorphisms near TBX5 and GDF7 are associated with increased risk for Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palles, Claire; Chegwidden, Laura; Li, Xinzhong; Findlay, John M.; Farnham, Garry; Castro Giner, Francesc; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Kovac, Michal; Adams, Claire L.; Prenen, Hans; Briggs, Sarah; Harrison, Rebecca; Sanders, Scott; MacDonald, David; Haigh, Chris; Tucker, Art; Love, Sharon; Nanji, Manoj; Decaestecker, John; Ferry, David; Rathbone, Barrie; Hapeshi, Julie; Barr, Hugh; Moayyedi, Paul; Watson, Peter; Zietek, Barbara; Maroo, Neera; Gay, Laura; Underwood, Tim; Boulter, Lisa; McMurtry, Hugh; Monk, David; Patel, Praful; Ragunath, Krish; Al Dulaimi, David; Murray, Iain; Koss, Konrad; Veitch, Andrew; Trudgill, Nigel; Nwokolo, Chuka; Rembacken, Bjorn; Atherfold, Paul; Green, Elaine; Ang, Yeng; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Chow, Wu; Paterson, Stuart; Kadri, Sudarshan; Beales, Ian; Grimley, Charles; Mullins, Paul; Beckett, Conrad; Farrant, Mark; Dixon, Andrew; Kelly, Sean; Johnson, Matthew; Wajed, Shahjehan; Dhar, Anjan; Sawyer, Elinor; Roylance, Rebecca; Onstad, Lynn; Gammon, Marilie D.; Corley, Douglas A.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Bird, Nigel C.; Hardie, Laura J.; Reid, Brian J.; Ye, Weimin; Liu, Geoffrey; Romero, Yvonne; Bernstein, Leslie; Wu, Anna H.; Casson, Alan G.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Whiteman, David C.; Risch, Harvey A.; Levine, David M.; Vaughan, Tom L.; Verhaar, Auke P.; van den Brande, Jan; Toxopeus, Eelke L.; Spaander, Manon C.; Wijnhoven, Bas P. L.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Krishnadath, Kausilia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; McManus, Ross; Reynolds, John V.; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; MacMathuna, Padraic; McGarrigle, Sarah A.; Kelleher, Dermot; Vermeire, Severine; Cleynen, Isabelle; Bisschops, Raf; Tomlinson, Ian; Jankowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) increases the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We found the risk to be BE has been associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 6p21 (within the HLA region) and on 16q23, where the closest protein-coding gene is FOXF1. Subsequently, the

  5. Polymorphisms near TBX5 and GDF7 are associated with increased risk for Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Palles (Claire); L. Chegwidden (Laura); X. Li (Xinzhong); J.M. Findlay (John M.); G. Farnham (Garry); F. Castro Giner (Francesc); M.P. Peppelenbosch (Maikel); M. Kovac (Michal); C.L. Adams (Claire); H. Prenen (Hans); S. Briggs (Sarah); R. Harrison (Rebecca); S. Sanders (Scott); D. Macdonald (David); K. Haigh (Katharina); A.T. Tucker (Art); S. Love (Sharon); M. Nanji (Manoj); J. Decaestecker (John); D.R. Ferry (David); B. Rathbone (Barrie); J. Hapeshi (Julie); H. Barr (Hugh); P. Moayyedi (Paul); P. Watson (Peter); B. Zietek (Barbara); N. Maroo (Neera); L. Gay (Laura); T. Underwood (Tim); L. Boulter (Lisa); H. McMurtry (Hugh); A.B. Monk (Alastair); P. Patel (Poulam); K. Ragunath (Krish); D. Al Dulaimi (David); I. Murray (Iain); C. Koss (Clara); A. Veitch (Andrew); N. Trudgill (Nigel); C. Nwokolo (Chuka); B. Rembacken; P. Atherfold (Paul); E.K. Green (Elaine K); Y. Ang (Yeng); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); W. Chow (Wu); S. Paterson (Stuart); S. Kadri (Sudarshan); I. Beales (Ian); C. Grimley (Charles); P. Mullins (Paul); C. Beckett (Conrad); M. Farrant (Mark); A. Dixon (Andrew); S. Kelly (Sean); M. Johnson (Matthew); S. Wajed (Shahjehan); A. Dhar (Archana); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); R. Roylance (Rebecca); L. Onstad (Lynn); M.D. Gammon (Marilie); D.A. Corley (Douglas); N. Shaheen (Nazima); N.C. Bird (Nigel); B.G.S. Hardie (Bruce); B.J. Reid (Brian); W. Ye (Weimin); G. Liu (Geoffrey); Y. Romero (Yvonne); L. Bernstein (Leslie); A.H. Wu (Anna H.); A.G. Casson (Alan); R.C. Fitzgerald (Rebecca); D.C. Whiteman (David C.); H. Risch (Harvey); D.M. Levine (David M.); T.L. Vaughan (Thomas); A.P. Verhaar (Auke); J. Van Den Brande (Jan); E.L.A. Toxopeus (Eelke); M.C.W. Spaander (Manon); B.P.L. Wijnhoven (Bas); L.J.W. van der Laan (Luc); K.K. Krishnadath (Kausilia); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); G. Trynka (Gosia); R. McManus (Ross); J.V. Reynolds (John V.); J. O'Sullivan (Jacintha); P. Macmathuna (Padraic); S.A. McGarrigle (Sarah A.); D. Kelleher (Dermot); S. Vermeire (Séverine); I. Cleynen (Isabelle); R. Bisschops (Raf); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); J.A. Jankowski (Janusz Antoni)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aims Barrett's esophagus (BE) increases the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We found the risk to be BE has been associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 6p21 (within the HLA region) and on 16q23, where the closest protein-coding gene is

  6. Polymorphisms Near TBX5 and GDF7 Are Associated With Increased Risk for Barrett's Esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palles, Claire; Chegwidden, Laura; Li, Xinzhong; Findlay, John M.; Farnham, Garry; Giner, Francesc Castro; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Kovac, Michal; Adams, Claire L.; Prenen, Hans; Briggs, Sarah; Harrison, Rebecca; Sanders, Scott; MacDonald, David; Haigh, Chris; Tucker, Art; Love, Sharon; Nanji, Manoj; Decaestecker, John; Ferry, David; Rathbone, Barrie; Hapeshi, Julie; Barr, Hugh; Moayyedi, Paul; Watson, Peter; Zietek, Barbara; Maroo, Neera; Gay, Laura; Underwood, Tim; Boulter, Lisa; McMurtry, Hugh; Monk, David; Patel, Praful; Ragunath, Krish; Al Dulaimi, David; Murray, Iain; Koss, Konrad; Veitch, Andrew; Trudgill, Nigel; Nwokolo, Chuka; Rembacken, Bjorn; Atherfold, Paul; Green, Elaine; Ang, Yeng; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Chow, Wu; Paterson, Stuart; Kadri, Sudarshan; Beales, Ian; Grimley, Charles; Mullins, Paul; Beckett, Conrad; Farrant, Mark; Dixon, Andrew; Kelly, Sean; Johnson, Matthew; Wajed, Shahjehan; Dhar, Anjan; Sawyer, Elinor; Roylance, Rebecca; Onstad, Lynn; Gammon, Marilie D.; Corley, Douglas A.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Bird, Nigel C.; Hardie, Laura J.; Reid, Brian J.; Ye, Weimin; Liu, Geoffrey; Romero, Yvonne; Bernstein, Leslie; Wu, Anna H.; Casson, Alan G.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Whiteman, David C.; Risch, Harvey A.; Levine, David M.; Vaughan, Tom L.; Verhaar, Auke P.; van den Brande, Jan; Toxopeus, Eelke L.; Spaander, Manon C.; Wijnhoven, Bas P. L.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Krishnadath, Kausilia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; McManus, Ross; Reynolds, John V.; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; MacMathuna, Padraic; McGarrigle, Sarah A.; Kelleher, Dermot; Vermeire, Severine; Cleynen, Isabelle; Bisschops, Raf; Tomlinson, Ian; Jankowski, Janusz

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Barrett's esophagus (BE) increases the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We found the risk to be BE has been associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 6p21 (within the HLA region) and on 16q23, where the closest protein-coding gene is FOXF1.

  7. Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Its Rare Association with Barrett's Esophagus in Henan, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzheng Liu

    Full Text Available Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC has increased sharply in Western Europe and United States over the past three decades. Nearly all cases of EAC in the west are thought to be associated with Barrett's esophagus (BE at the time of diagnosis. Regions in the Henan province of China have one of world's highest incidences of esophageal cancer, yet recent temporal trends in the relative rates of EAC with respect to esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC, as well as its association with Barrett's esophagus (BE, have not been reported. In this report, we present large-scale longitudinal clinical and histological data on 5401 esophageal cancers (EC patients diagnosed during the recent 10-year period (2002-2011 at Henan Cancer Hospital, China. All 217 esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC patients from these 5401 EC patients were examined to better understand the relationship between Barrett's esophagus (BE and EAC. We found that EAC was relatively rare and accounted for approximately 5% of all esophageal cancers each year during 2002-2011. There is no evidence of significant temporal trends in the rate of EAC relative to ESCC. Only 10 out of 217 (4.6% EAC cases were detected to have any evidence of Barrett's esophagus. This result raises the possibility of a different etiological basis for EAC in China motivating more detailed epidemiological, clinical and molecular characterization of EAC in China in order to better understand the neoplastic development of EAC.

  8. Stepwise radical endoscopic resection for Barrett's esophagus with early neoplasia: report on a Brussels' cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, R. E.; Peters, F. P.; Sempoux, C.; Piessevaux, H.; Deprez, P. H.

    2008-01-01

    Background and study aims: The aim of this retrospective study was to assess safety and efficacy of stepwise radical endoscopic resection (SRER) in patients with Barrett's esophagus with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIN) or early cancer. Patients and methods: Patients undergoing SRER

  9. Medical and endoscopic management of high-grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, K. K.; Tian, J. M.; Gorospe, E.; Penfield, J.; Prasad, G.; Goddard, T.; WongKeeSong, M.; Buttar, N. S.; Lutzke, L.; Krishnadath, S.

    2012-01-01

    The management of high-grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus has clearly changed over recent years. The risk of cancer development is still substantial, with about one in three patients developing cancer, but a number of patients do not develop cancer. The nature of high-grade dysplasia has also

  10. Alcohol consumption and the neoplastic progression in Barrett's esophagus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifeng Lou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In the developed countries, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC is increasing over recent decades. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to arrive at quantitative conclusions about the contribution of alcohol intakes and the progression of Barrett's esophagus. METHODS: A comprehensive, systematic bibliographic search of medical literature published up to Oct 2013 was conducted to identify relevant studies. A meta-analysis was conducted for alcohol consumption on the Barrett's esophagus progression. RESULTS: A total of 882 cases in 6,867 individuals from 14 observational studies were indemnified in this meta-analysis. The result of this current meta-analysis, including 10 case-control and 4 cohort studies, indicated that alcohol consumption was not associated with the neoplastic progression in Barrett's esophagus (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.93-1.48. When stratified by the study designs, no significant association was detected in either high vs low group or ever vs never group. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol drinking is not associated with risk of neoplastic progression in Barrett's esophagus. Further well designed studies are needed in this area.

  11. Toenail selenium status and the risk of Barrett's esophagus: The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steevens, J.; Schouten, L.J.; Driessen, A.L.C.; Huysentruyt, C.J.R.; Keulemans, Y.C.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between selenium and the risk of Barrett's esophagus (BE), the precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Methods: Data from the prospective Netherlands Cohort Study were used. This cohort study was initiated in 1986, when 120,852 subjects aged 55-69

  12. Gene therapy for barrett's esophagus: adenoviral gene transfer in different intestinal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, Willem A.; Buskens, Christianne J.; Wesseling, John G.; van Lanschot, J. Jan B.; Bosma, Piter J.

    2005-01-01

    Adenoviral gene therapy could potentially be used for treatment of patients with a Barrett's esophagus. In order to study the feasibility of this approach it is important to study adenoviral intestinal transduction both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we used differentiating Caco-2

  13. Nuclear translocation of glutathione transferase omega is a progression marker in Barrett's esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piaggi, Simona; Marchi, Santino; Ciancia, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) represents a major risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (AC). For this reason, patients with BE are subjected to a systematic endoscopic surveillance to detect initial evolution towards non-invasive neoplasia (NiN) and cancer, that eventually occurs only in a small......-S-transferase-omega 1 could be involved in the stress response of human cells playing a role in the cancer progression of Barrett's esophagus. Its immunohistochemical detection could represent a useful tool in the grading of Barrett's disease.......N in BE and to understand the mechanisms of the progression from BE to AC. We investigated the expression and subcellular localization of GSTO1 in biopsies from patients with BE and in human cancer cell lines subjected to heath shock treatment. A selective nuclear localisation of GSTO1 was found in 16/16 biopsies with low...

  14. Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of BETRNet is to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma by answering key questions related to the progression of the disease, especially in the premalignant stage. In partnership with NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology, multidisciplinary translational research centers collaborate to better understand the biology of Barrett's

  15. High definition versus standard definition white light endoscopy for detecting dysplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, S S; Subramanian, V; Butt, W M; Bejkar, G; Coleman, J; Mannath, J; Ragunath, K

    2015-01-01

    High-definition endoscopy systems provide superior image resolution. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of high definition compared with standard definition endoscopy system for detecting dysplastic lesions in patients with Barrett's esophagus. A retrospective cohort study of patients with non-dysplastic Barrett's esophagus undergoing routine surveillance was performed. Data were retrieved from the central hospital electronic database. Procedures performed for non-surveillance indications, Barrett's esophagus Prague C0M1 classification with no specialized intestinal metaplasia on histology, patients diagnosed with any dysplasia or cancer on index endoscopy, and procedures using advanced imaging techniques were excluded. Logistic regression models were constructed to estimate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals comparing outcomes with standard definition and high-definition systems. The high definition was superior to standard definition system in targeted detection of all dysplastic lesions (odds ratio 3.27, 95% confidence interval 1.27-8.40) as well as overall dysplasia detected on both random and target biopsies (odds ratio 2.36, 95% confidence interval 1.50-3.72). More non-dysplastic lesions were detected with the high-definition system (odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.33). There was no difference between high definition and standard definition endoscopy in the overall (random and target) high-grade dysplasia or cancers detected (odds ratio 0.93, 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.04). Trainee endoscopists, number of biopsies taken, and male sex were all significantly associated with a higher yield for dysplastic lesions. The use of the high-definition endoscopy system is associated with better targeted detection of any dysplasia during routine Barrett's esophagus surveillance. However, high-definition endoscopy cannot replace random biopsies at present time. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  16. O esôfago de Barrett associado à estenose cáustica do esôfago Barrett's esophagus associated to caustic stenosis of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Adami Andreollo

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: A estenose esofágica secundária à ingestão de produtos cáusticos é freqüente no Brasil, principalmente como tentativa de suicídio. O esôfago de Barrett surge como conseqüência do refluxo gastroesofágico crônico. A literatura pesquisada mostrou que esta associação é muito rara. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: De 1981 a 2000 foram admitidos e tratados no Gastrocentro-UNICAMP (Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP. 120 doentes com estenose cáustica do esôfago e durante o seguimento destes, foram encontrados 9 casos associados com o esôfago de Barrett (7,5%. O tempo de ingestão do cáustico variou de 4 a 54 anos (média de 29 anos e eram quatro homens e cinco mulheres, oito brancos e um negro, com idade média de 57,7 anos (43 a 72 anos. RESULTADOS: Todos os casos apresentavam disfagia e a endoscopia digestiva alta flexível mostrou áreas de estenose e seqüelas de esofagite cáustica. Três pacientes referiram sintomas de refluxo gastroesofágico, mas hérnia de hiato foi encontrada em apenas um caso. O esôfago de Barrett foi encontrado no terço médio do esôfago em três casos, acima das áreas de estenose, e nos demais, no terço distal. A disfagia foi tratada com dilatações esofágicas periódicas. Dois pacientes apresentando sintomas de refluxo grave foram submetidos a fundoplicatura à Nissen modificado através de videolaparoscopia, com bons resultados. CONCLUSÕES: O esôfago de Barrett nesses doentes poderia estar associado com a ingestão de cáustico, porque nem sempre esteve associado à esofagite por refluxo. É muito importante o seguimento desses doentes e realização periódica de endoscopias digestivas com biopsias do esôfago de Barrett, devido à possibilidade de malignização.BACKGROUND: The esophageal stenosis secondary to the ingestion of caustic products is frequent in Brazil, mainly due to an attempt suicide. The Barrett's esophagus is consequence of the chronic gastroesophageal reflux. The

  17. Cdx1 and c-Myc foster the initiation of transdifferentiation of the normal esophageal squamous epithelium toward Barrett's esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas B Stairs

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus is a premalignant condition whereby the normal stratified squamous esophageal epithelium undergoes a transdifferentiation program resulting in a simple columnar epithelium reminiscent of the small intestine. These changes are typically associated with the stratified squamous epithelium chronically exposed to acid and bile salts as a result of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Despite this well-defined epidemiologic association between acid reflux and Barrett's esophagus, the genetic changes that induce this transdifferentiation process in esophageal keratinocytes have remained undefined.To begin to identify the genetic changes responsible for transdifferentiaiton in Barrett's esophagus, we performed a microarray analysis of normal esophageal, Barrett's esophagus and small intestinal biopsy specimens to identify candidate signaling pathways and transcription factors that may be involved. Through this screen we identified the Cdx1 homeodomain transcription factor and the c-myc pathway as possible candidates. Cdx1 and c-myc were then tested for their ability to induce transdifferentiation in immortalized human esophageal keratinocytes using organotypic culturing methods. Analyses of these cultures reveal that c-myc and cdx1 cooperate to induce mucin production and changes in keratin expression that are observed in the epithelium of Barrett's esophagus.These data demonstrate the ability of Cdx1 and c-myc to initiate the earliest stages of transdifferentiation of esophageal keratinocytes toward a cell fate characteristic of Barrett's esophagus.

  18. Esophageal manometry findings and degree of acid exposure in short and long Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helman, Laura; Biccas, Beatriz Nunes; Lemme, Eponina M O; Novais, Paula; Fittipaldi, Viviane

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is characterized by intestinal metaplasia in the distal esophagus and is classified as short-segment (3 cm - LSSBE). It is suggested that LSSBE is associated with more severe esophageal motor abnormalities and increased acid exposure time than SSBE. To evaluate the prevalence of esophageal manometriy abnormalities and acid exposure times in patients with SSBE and LSSBE. Barrett's esophagus patients identified by upper endoscopy and confirmed by histopathology were, retrospectively, reviewed and divided into two groups: SSBE and LSBE. Demographic data, symptom duration, prevalence of hiatal hernia, lower esophagus sphincter basal pressure, prevalence of esophageal body abnormalities and acid exposure times were evaluated. Forty-six patients with SSBE (24 males - 52.2%, mean age of 55.2 years) and 28 patients with LSBE (18 males - 64.3%, mean age of 50.5 years). Mean symptom duration was 9.9 years for SSBE and 12.9 years for LSSBE. Hiatal hernia was present in 84.2% of SSBE, 96.3% of LSBE; average lower esophagus sphincter pressure in SSBE 9.15 mm Hg, in LSBE 6.99 mm Hg; lower esophagus sphincter hypotension in SSBE was 65.9%, in LSSBE 82.1%; aperistalsis in SSBE 6.5%, LSSBE 3.6%; mild/moderate ineffective esophageal motility in SSBE 34.8%, LSBE 46.4%; severe moderate ineffective esophageal motility in SSBE 10.9%, LSBE 7,1%; nutcracker esophagus/segmental nutcracker esophagus in SSBE 8.6%, LSBE 0%; normal body in SSBE 39.1%, in LSBE 42.9%, no statistical difference for any of these values (Pmotor disorders in patients with SSBE and LSSBE. Acid reflux in upright and supine positions was more intense in LSBE.

  19. A Tissue Systems Pathology Test Detects Abnormalities Associated with Prevalent High-Grade Dysplasia and Esophageal Cancer in Barrett's Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley-Thorne, Rebecca J; Davison, Jon M; Prichard, Jeffrey W; Reese, Lia M; Zhang, Yi; Repa, Kathleen; Li, Jinhong; Diehl, David L; Jhala, Nirag C; Ginsberg, Gregory G; DeMarshall, Maureen; Foxwell, Tyler; Jobe, Blair A; Zaidi, Ali H; Duits, Lucas C; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; Rustgi, Anil; Falk, Gary W

    2017-02-01

    There is a need for improved tools to detect high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in patients with Barrett's esophagus. In previous work, we demonstrated that a 3-tier classifier predicted risk of incident progression in Barrett's esophagus. Our aim was to determine whether this risk classifier could detect a field effect in nondysplastic (ND), indefinite for dysplasia (IND), or low-grade dysplasia (LGD) biopsies from Barrett's esophagus patients with prevalent HGD/EAC. We performed a multi-institutional case-control study to evaluate a previously developed risk classifier that is based upon quantitative image features derived from 9 biomarkers and morphology, and predicts risk for HGD/EAC in Barrett's esophagus patients. The risk classifier was evaluated in ND, IND, and LGD biopsies from Barrett's esophagus patients diagnosed with HGD/EAC on repeat endoscopy (prevalent cases, n = 30, median time to HGD/EAC diagnosis 140.5 days) and nonprogressors (controls, n = 145, median HGD/EAC-free surveillance time 2,015 days). The risk classifier stratified prevalent cases and non-progressor patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk classes [OR, 46.0; 95% confidence interval, 14.86-169 (high-risk vs. low-risk); P esophagus patients than pathologic variables. The results indicate that molecular and cellular changes associated with malignant transformation in Barrett's esophagus may be detectable as a field effect using the test. A tissue systems pathology test may provide an objective method to facilitate earlier identification of Barrett's esophagus patients requiring therapeutic intervention. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(2); 240-8. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Dietary fiber intake reduces risk for Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lingli; Zhang, Zhizhong; Xu, Jian; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2017-09-02

    Observational studies suggest an association between dietary fiber intake and risk of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer. However, the results are inconsistent. To conduct a meta-analysis of observational studies to assess this association. All eligible studies were identified by electronic searches in PubMed and Embase through February 2015. Dose-response, subgroup, sensitivity, and publication bias analyses were performed. A total of 15 studies involving 16,885 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratio for the highest compared with the lowest dietary fiber intake was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.43-0.64). Stratified analyses for tumor subtype, study design, geographic location, fiber type, publication year, total sample size, and quality score yielded consistent results. Dose-response analysis indicated that a 10-g/d increment in dietary fiber intake was associated with a 31% reduction in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer risk. Sensitivity analysis restricted to studies with control for conventional risk factors produced similar results, and omission of any single study had little effect on the overall risk estimate. Our findings indicate that dietary fiber intake is inversely associated with risk of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer. Further large prospective studies are warranted.

  1. Quality of life and fear of cancer recurrence after endoscopic and surgical treatment for early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosmolen, W. D.; Boer, K. R.; de Leeuw, R. J.; Gamel, C. J.; van Berge Henegouwen, M. I.; Bergman, J. J.; Sprangers, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic treatment of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus preserves the esophagus and is minimally invasive compared with surgical treatment. However, the influence of endoscopic therapy on quality of life (QOL) and fear of cancer recurrence is unknown. We explored

  2. Cost Effectiveness of Screening Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease for Barrett's Esophagus With a Minimally Invasive Cell Sampling Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.R. Heberle (Curtis); Omidvari, A.-H. (Amir-Houshang); A. Ali (Ayman); S. Kroep (Sonja); C.Y. Kong (Chung Yin); J.M. Inadomi (John); J.H. Rubenstein (J.); A.C. Tramontano (Angela C.); Dowling, E.C. (Emily C.); W. Hazelton (William); E.G. Luebeck (E. Georg); I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); C. Hur (Chin)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aims It is important to identify patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE), the precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Patients with BE usually are identified by endoscopy, which is expensive. The Cytosponge, which collects tissue from the esophagus noninvasively, could

  3. Endoscopic therapy in early adenocarcinomas (Barrett's cancer) of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, Mate; May, Andrea; Ell, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of early esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing significantly in recent decades. Prognosis depends greatly on the choice of treatment. Early cancers can be treated by endoscopic resection, whereas advanced carcinomas have to be sent for surgery. Esophageal resection is associated with high perioperative mortality (1-5%) even in specialized centers. Early diagnosis enables curative endoscopic treatment option. Patients with gastrointestinal symptoms and a familial risk for esophageal cancer should undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. High-definition endoscopes have been developed with technical add-on that helps endoscopists to find fine irregularities in the esophageal mucosa, but interpreting the findings remains challenging. In this review we discussed novel and old diagnostic procedures and their values, as well as our own recommendations and those of the authors discussed for the diagnosis and treatment of early Barrett's carcinoma. Endoscopic resection is the therapy of choice in early esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is mandatory to perform a subsequent ablation of all residual Barrett's mucosa to avoid metachronous lesions. © 2015 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease complicated by Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasyshyn, Andriy

    2017-08-31

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for gastroesophageal reflux disease complicated by Barrett's esophagus in 46 patients. A diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for complicated GERD was developed. To describe the changes in the esophagus with reflux esophagitis, the Los Angeles classification was used. Intestinal metaplasia of the epithelium in the lower third of the esophagus was assessed using videoendoscopy, chromoscopy, and biopsy. Quality of life was assessed with the Gastro-Intestinal Quality of Life Index. The used methods were modeling, clinical, analytical, comparative, standardized, and questionnaire-based. Results and their discussion. Among the complications of GERD, Barrett's esophagus was diagnosed in 9 (19.6 %), peptic ulcer in the esophagus in 10 (21.7 %), peptic stricture of the esophagus in 4 (8.7 %), esophageal-gastric bleeding in 23 (50.0 %), including Malory-Weiss syndrome in 18, and erosive ulcerous bleeding in 5 people. Hiatal hernia was diagnosed in 171 (87.7 %) patients (sliding in 157 (91.8%), paraesophageal hernia in 2 (1.2%), and mixed hernia in 12 (7.0%) cases). One hundred ninety-five patients underwent laparoscopic surgery. Nissen fundoplication was conducted in 176 (90.2%) patients, Toupet fundoplication in 14 (7.2%), and Dor fundoplication in 5 (2.6%). It was established that the use of the diagnostic and treatment algorithm promoted systematization and objectification of changes in complicated GERD, contributed to early diagnosis, helped in choosing treatment, and improved quality of life. Argon coagulation and use of PPIs for 8-12 weeks before surgery led to the regeneration of the mucous membrane in the esophagus. The developed diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm facilitated systematization and objectification of changes in complicated GERD, contributed to early diagnosis, helped in choosing treatment, and improved quality of life.

  5. Dendritic cell-associated immune inflammation of cardiac mucosa: a possible factor in the formation of Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Tran, Dinh; Killingsworth, Murray C; Buckland, Michael; Lord, Reginald V N

    2009-03-01

    The development of Barrett's esophagus is poorly understood, but it has been suggested that cardiac mucosa is a precursor of intestinal type metaplasia and that inflammation of cardiac mucosa may play a role in the formation of Barrett's esophagus. The present study was undertaken to examine the presence and distribution of immune-inflammatory cells in cardiac mucosa, specifically focusing on dendritic cells because of their importance as regulators of immune reactions. Endoscopic biopsy specimens were obtained from 12 patients with cardiac mucosa without Barrett's esophagus or adenocarcinoma and from 21 patients with Barrett's esophagus without dysplasia (intestinal metaplasia). According to histology, in nine of the 21 specimens with Barrett's esophagus, areas of mucosa composed of cardiac type epithelium-lined glands were present as well. Immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy were used to examine immune-inflammatory cells in paraffin-embedded sections. Immune-inflammatory cells, including T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, and mast cells, were present in the connective tissue matrix that surrounded cardiac type epithelium-lined glands in all patients with cardiac mucosa. Clustering of dendritic cells with each other and with lymphocytes and the intrusion of dendritic cells between glandular mucus cells were observed. In the Barrett's esophagus specimens that contained cardiac type glands, computerized CD83 expression quantitation revealed that there were more dendritic cells in cardiac mucosa than in intestinal metaplasia. Immune-inflammatory infiltrates containing dendritic cells are consistently present in cardiac mucosa. The finding of a larger number of dendritic cells in areas of cardiac mucosa in Barrett's esophagus biopsies suggests that the immune inflammation of cardiac mucosa might play a role in modifying the local tissue environment to promote the development of specialized intestinal type metaplasia.

  6. [Comparison of surgical patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsolt, Simonka; Paszt, Attila; Géczi, Tibor; Abrahám, Szabolcs; Tóth, Illés; Horváth, Zoltán; Pieler, József; Tajti, János; Varga, Akos; Tiszlavicz, László; Németh, István; Izbéki, Ferenc; Rosztóczy, András; Wittmann, Tibor; Lázár, György

    2014-10-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor of adenocarcinoma occuring in the lower third of the esophagus. According to statistics, severity and elapsed time of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are major pathogenetic factors in the development of Barrett's esophagus. In a retrospective study between 2001 and 2008, we compared the preoperative results (signs and sympthoms, 24 hour pH manometry, esophageal manometry, Bilitec) and treatment efficacy of 176 GERD patients and 78 BE patients, who have undergone laparoscopic Nissen procedure for reflux disease. The two groups of patients had similar demographic features, and elapsed time of reflux sympthoms were also equal. Both groups were admitted for surgery after a median time of 1.5 years (19.87 vs. 19.20 months) of ineffective medical (proton pump inhibitors) treatment. Preoperative functional tests showed a more severe presence of acid reflux in the BE group (DeMeester score 18.9 versus 41.9, p reflux complaints (group I: 73%, group II: 81% of patients), LES functions improved (17.58 vs.18.70 mmHg), and the frequency and exposition of acid reflux decreased (DeMeester score 7.73 vs. 12.72). The severity of abnormal acid reflux occuring parallel with the incompetent function of the damaged LES triggers not only inflammation in the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), but also metaplastic process, and the development of Barrett's esophagus. Laparoscopic Nissen procedure for reflux disease can further improve outcome among patients with GERD not responding to conservative therapy.

  7. Pilot randomized crossover study comparing the efficacy of transnasal disposable endosheath with standard endoscopy to detect Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Mohammed K; Varghese, Sibu; O'Donovan, Maria; Abdullahi, Zarah; Liu, Xinxue; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; di Pietro, Massimiliano

    2016-02-01

    The transnasal endosheath endoscope is a new disposable technology with potential applicability to the primary care setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of transnasal endosheath endoscopy (TEE) for the detection of Barrett's esophagus, by comparing the diagnostic accuracy of TEE with that of standard endoscopy. This was a prospective, randomized, crossover study performed in a single tertiary referral center. Consecutive patients undergoing surveillance for Barrett's esophagus or referred for diagnostic assessment were recruited. All patients were randomized to undergo TEE followed by standard endoscopy or the reverse. Endoscopy experiences and patient preferences were evaluated using a questionnaire. Endoscopic and histologic diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus, and optical image quality of both endoscopic procedures, were compared. A total of 21 of 25 patients completed the study. TEE had sensitivity and specificity of 100 % for an endoscopic diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus, and of 66.7 % and 100 %, respectively, for the histologic diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus. The mean optical quality of standard endoscopy was significantly better than that of TEE (7.11 ± 0.42 vs. 4.06 ± 0.27; P evaluation in primary care as an initial diagnostic tool. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Esophageal manometry findings and degree of acid exposure in short and long Barrett's esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Helman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Barrett's esophagus (BE is characterized by intestinal metaplasia in the distal esophagus and is classified as short-segment (3 cm - LSSBE. It is suggested that LSSBE is associated with more severe esophageal motor abnormalities and increased acid exposure time than SSBE. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of esophageal manometriy abnormalities and acid exposure times in patients with SSBE and LSSBE. METHODS: Barrett's esophagus patients identified by upper endoscopy and confirmed by histopathology were, retrospectively, reviewed and divided into two groups: SSBE and LSBE. Demographic data, symptom duration, prevalence of hiatal hernia, lower esophagus sphincter basal pressure, prevalence of esophageal body abnormalities and acid exposure times were evaluated. RESULTS: Forty-six patients with SSBE (24 males - 52.2%, mean age of 55.2 years and 28 patients with LSBE (18 males - 64.3%, mean age of 50.5 years. Mean symptom duration was 9.9 years for SSBE and 12.9 years for LSSBE. Hiatal hernia was present in 84.2% of SSBE, 96.3% of LSBE; average lower esophagus sphincter pressure in SSBE 9.15 mm Hg, in LSBE 6.99 mm Hg; lower esophagus sphincter hypotension in SSBE was 65.9%, in LSSBE 82.1%; aperistalsis in SSBE 6.5%, LSSBE 3.6%; mild/moderate ineffective esophageal motility in SSBE 34.8%, LSBE 46.4%; severe moderate ineffective esophageal motility in SSBE 10.9%, LSBE 7,1%; nutcracker esophagus/segmental nutcracker esophagus in SSBE 8.6%, LSBE 0%; normal body in SSBE 39.1%, in LSBE 42.9%, no statistical difference for any of these values (P<0.05. Average % total time pH<4 in SSBE 9.12, LSBE 17.27 (P<0.000; % time pH<4 upright in SSBE 11.91; LSBE 24.29 (P=0.003; % time pH<4 supine in SSBE 10.86, LSBE 33.26 (P = 0.000. CONCLUSION: There was no difference between the prevalence of motor disorders in patients with SSBE and LSSBE. Acid reflux in upright and supine positions was more intense in LSBE.

  9. The Role of Adjunct Imaging in Endoscopic Detection of Dysplasia in Barrett's Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Pujan; Wallace, Michael B

    2017-07-01

    Advances in imaging technologies have demonstrated promise in early detection of dysplasia and cancer in Barrett's esophagus (BE). Optical chromoendoscopy, dye-based chromoendoscopy, and novel technologies have provided the opportunity to visualize the cellular and subcellular structures. Only narrow-band imaging and acetic acid chromoendoscopy have reached benchmarks for clinical use. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy and molecular imaging are not established for routine use. Best practice in management of BE should be focused on careful endoscopic examination, resection, or ablation of the entire abnormal lesion, as well as the use of available imaging technique that has good diagnostic accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Detection of Residual Barrett's Esophagus after Radiofrequency Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Diamantis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic endoluminal radiofrequency ablation (RFA is a novel and promising modality for Barrett's esophagus (BE treatment. Actually the only surveillance method after the ablation treatment is random biopsies throughout the whole treated area. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE is a new endoscopic imaging tool that permits high-resolution microscopic examination of the gastrointestinal tract. The technology has garnered increasing attention because of its ability to provide real-time “optical” biopsy specimens, with a very high sensitivity and specificity. This paper summarize the potential application of CLE in the surveillance of the reepithelialization of BE, after endoscopic RFA.

  11. CYR61 and TAZ Upregulation and Focal Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition May Be Early Predictors of Barrett's Esophagus Malignant Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Cardoso

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus is the major risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. It has a low but non-neglectable risk, high surveillance costs and no reliable risk stratification markers. We sought to identify early biomarkers, predictive of Barrett's malignant progression, using a meta-analysis approach on gene expression data. This in silico strategy was followed by experimental validation in a cohort of patients with extended follow up from the Instituto Português de Oncologia de Lisboa de Francisco Gentil EPE (Portugal. Bioinformatics and systems biology approaches singled out two candidate predictive markers for Barrett's progression, CYR61 and TAZ. Although previously implicated in other malignancies and in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotypes, our experimental validation shows for the first time that CYR61 and TAZ have the potential to be predictive biomarkers for cancer progression. Experimental validation by reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry confirmed the up-regulation of both genes in Barrett's samples associated with high-grade dysplasia/adenocarcinoma. In our cohort CYR61 and TAZ up-regulation ranged from one to ten years prior to progression to adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus index samples. Finally, we found that CYR61 and TAZ over-expression is correlated with early focal signs of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Our results highlight both CYR61 and TAZ genes as potential predictive biomarkers for stratification of the risk for development of adenocarcinoma and suggest a potential mechanistic route for Barrett's esophagus neoplastic progression.

  12. Association of Visceral Fat Area, Smoking, and Alcohol Consumption with Reflux Esophagitis and Barrett's Esophagus in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntaro Matsuzaki

    Full Text Available Central obesity has been suggested as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of visceral fat area and other lifestyle factors with reflux esophagitis or Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.Individuals who received thorough medical examinations including the measurement of visceral fat area by abdominal computed tomography were enrolled. Factors associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, the severity of reflux esophagitis, or the presence of Barrett's esophagus were determined using multivariable logistic regression models.A total of 2608 individuals were eligible for the analyses. Visceral fat area was associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis both in men (odds ratio, 1.21 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.01 to 1.46 and women (odds ratio, 2.31 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.57 to 3.40. Current smoking and serum levels of triglyceride were also associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis in men. However, significant association between visceral fat area and the severity of reflux esophagitis or the presence of Barrett's esophagus was not shown. In men, excessive alcohol consumption on a drinking day, but not the frequency of alcohol drinking, was associated with both the severity of reflux esophagitis (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confident interval, 1.03 to 4.41 and the presence of Barrett's esophagus (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confident interval, 1.14 to 2.56.Visceral fat area was independently associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, but not with the presence of Barrett's esophagus. On the other hand, quantity of alcohol consumption could play a role in the development of severe reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.

  13. Confocal laser endomicroscopy for diagnosis of Barrett´s esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut eNeumann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Barrett´s esophagus (BE is established as a premalignant condition in the distal esophagus. Current surveillance guidelines recommend random biopsies every 1-2 cm at intervals of 3-5 years. Advanced endoscopic imaging of BE underwent several technical revolutions within the last decade including broad-field (red-flag techniques (e.g. chromoendoscopy and small-field techniques with confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE at the forefront. In this review we will focus on advanced endoscopic imaging using CLE for the diagnosis and characterization of BE and associated neoplasia. In addition, we will critically discuss the technique of CLE and provide some tricks and hints for the daily routine practice of CLE for diagnosis of BE.

  14. Use of a novel monoclonal antibody in diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffel, L H; Amenta, P S; Das, K M

    2000-01-01

    A novel monoclonal antibody (MAbDAS-1), that specifically reacts with colonic but not small intestinal epithelium, recognizes specialized columnar epithelium (SCE) in the esophagus. The frequency of its reactivity in biopsy specimens of patients with endoscopically suspected Barrett's Esophagus (BE) is examined. Fifty-two biopsy specimens of the distal esophagus from 38 patients were tested by immunoperoxidase method using MAbDAS-1. Fifty-four samples of cardia-type mucosa biopsied from the stomach were used as controls. Results were compared with histology and Alcian blue/high iron diamine (AB/HID). Of the 52 specimens, 29 had glandular epithelium and the rest had only squamous epithelium. Ten were diagnosed to have SCE by histology. All 10 samples reacted with MAbDAS-1 and with Alcian blue. Of the remaining 19 specimens, five also reacted with MAbDAS-1. None of the squamous epithelium and cardia specimens reacted with MAbDAS-1. MAbDAS-1 may detect intestinal metaplasia of the esophagus of colonic phenotype in the absence of histological evidence of SCE.

  15. Cost Effectiveness of Screening Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease for Barrett's Esophagus With a Minimally Invasive Cell Sampling Device

    OpenAIRE

    Heberle, Curtis; Omidvari, A.-H. (Amir-Houshang); Ali, Ayman; Kroep, Sonja; Kong, Chung Yin; Inadomi, John; Rubenstein, J.; Tramontano, Angela C.; Dowling, E.C. (Emily C.); Hazelton, William; Luebeck, E. Georg; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Hur, Chin

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aims It is important to identify patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE), the precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Patients with BE usually are identified by endoscopy, which is expensive. The Cytosponge, which collects tissue from the esophagus noninvasively, could be a cost-effective tool for screening individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who are at increased risk for BE. We developed a model to analyze the cost effectiveness of using the ...

  16. Acid suppression increases rates of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal injury in the presence of duodenal reflux.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The contribution of gastric acid to the toxicity of alkaline duodenal refluxate on the esophageal mucosa is unclear. This study compared the effect of duodenal refluxate when acid was present, decreased by proton pump inhibitors (PPI), or absent. METHODS: We randomized 136 Sprague-Dawley rats into 4 groups: group 1 (n = 33) were controls; group 2 (n = 34) underwent esophagoduodenostomy promoting "combined reflux"; group 3 (n = 34) underwent esophagoduodenostomy and PPI treatment to decrease acid reflux; and group 4, the \\'gastrectomy\\' group (n = 35) underwent esophagoduodenostomy and total gastrectomy to eliminate acid in the refluxate. Esophaguses were examined for inflammatory, Barrett\\'s, and other histologic changes, and expression of proliferative markers Ki-67, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). RESULTS: In all reflux groups, the incidence of Barrett\\'s mucosa was greater when acid was suppressed (group C, 62%; group D, 71%) than when not suppressed (group B, 27%; P = 0.004 and P < .001). Erosions were more frequent in the PPI and gastrectomy groups than in the combined reflux group. Edema (wet weight) and ulceration was more frequent in the gastrectomy than in the combined reflux group. Acute inflammatory changes were infrequent in the PPI group (8%) compared with the combined reflux (94%) or gastrectomy (100%) groups, but chronic inflammation persisted in 100% of the PPI group. EGFR levels were greater in the PPI compared with the combined reflux group (P = .04). Ki-67, PCNA, and combined marker scores were greater in the gastrectomy compared with the combined reflux group (P = .006, P = .14, and P < .001). CONCLUSION: Gastric acid suppression in the presence of duodenal refluxate caused increased rates of inflammatory changes, intestinal metaplasia, and molecular proliferative activity. PPIs suppressed acute inflammatory changes only, whereas chronic inflammatory changes persisted.

  17. Single-session endoscopic resection and focal radiofrequency ablation for short-segment Barrett's esophagus with early neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, Maximilien; Belghazi, Kamar; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Pouw, Roos E.

    2016-01-01

    The management of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE) requires endoscopic resection of visible lesions, followed by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the remaining BE. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of combining endoscopic resection and focal RFA in a single endoscopic session in

  18. High-resolution endoscopy plus chromoendoscopy or narrow-band imaging in Barrett's esophagus: a prospective randomized crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kara, M. A.; Peters, F. P.; Rosmolen, W. D.; Krishnadath, K. K.; ten Kate, F. J.; Fockens, P.; Bergman, J. J. G. H.

    2005-01-01

    Background and study aims: High-resolution endoscopy (HRE) may improve the detection of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus. Indigo carmine chromoendoscopy (ICc) and narrow-band imaging (NBI) may be useful techniques to complement HRE. The aim of this study was to compare HRE-ICC with HrE-NBI for

  19. Zoning of mucosal phenotype, dysplasia, and telomerase activity measured by telomerase repeat assay protocol in Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Going, JJ; Fletcher-Monaghan, AJ; Neilson, L; Wisman, BA; van der Zee, A; Stuart, RC; Keith, WN

    2004-01-01

    Glandular dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus may regress spontaneously but can also progress to cancer. The human telomerase RNA template and the human telomerase reverse transcriptase enzyme which do not, of themselves, correlate strongly with telomerase activity, are too often overexpressed in

  20. DNA methylation as an adjunct to histopathology to detect prevalent, inconspicuous dysplasia and early-stage neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvi, Muhammad A.; Liu, Xinxue; O'Donovan, Maria; Newton, Richard; Wernisch, Lorenz; Shannon, Nicholas B.; Shariff, Kareem; Di Pietro, Massimiliano; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Ragunath, Krish; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic surveillance of Barrett's esophagus is problematic because dysplasia/early-stage neoplasia is frequently invisible and likely to be missed because of sampling bias. Molecular abnormalities may be more diffuse than dysplasia. The aim was therefore to test whether DNA methylation,

  1. Common variants at the MHC locus and at chromosome 16q24.1 predispose to Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhan; Gay, Laura J.; Strange, Amy; Palles, Claire; Band, Gavin; Whiteman, David C.; Lescai, Francesco; Langford, Cordelia; Nanji, Manoj; Edkins, Sarah; van der Winkel, Anouk; Levine, David; Sasieni, Peter; Bellenguez, Céline; Howarth, Kimberley; Freeman, Colin; Trudgill, Nigel; Tucker, Art T.; Pirinen, Matti; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Peters, Wilbert H.; Reynolds, John V.; Kelleher, Dermot P.; McManus, Ross; Grabsch, Heike; Prenen, Hans; Bisschops, Raf; Krishnadath, Kausila; Siersema, Peter D.; van Baal, Jantine W. P. M.; Middleton, Mark; Petty, Russell; Gillies, Richard; Burch, Nicola; Bhandari, Pradeep; Paterson, Stuart; Edwards, Cathryn; Penman, Ian; Vaidya, Kishor; Ang, Yeng; Murray, Iain; Patel, Praful; Ye, Weimin; Mullins, Paul; Wu, Anna H.; Bird, Nigel C.; Dallal, Helen; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Murray, Liam J.; Koss, Konrad; Bernstein, Leslie; Romero, Yvonne; Hardie, Laura J.; Zhang, Rui; Winter, Helen; Corley, Douglas A.; Panter, Simon; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brian J.; Sargeant, Ian; Gammon, Marilie D.; Smart, Howard; Dhar, Anjan; McMurtry, Hugh; Ali, Haythem; Liu, Geoffrey; Casson, Alan G.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Rutter, Matt; Tawil, Ashref; Morris, Danielle; Nwokolo, Chuka; Isaacs, Peter; Rodgers, Colin; Ragunath, Krish; MacDonald, Chris; Haigh, Chris; Monk, David; Davies, Gareth; Wajed, Saj; Johnston, David; Gibbons, Michael; Cullen, Sue; Church, Nicholas; Langley, Ruth; Griffin, Michael; Alderson, Derek; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah E.; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Anderson, Mark; Brooks, Claire; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Atherfold, Paul; Nicholson, Anna M.; Gellatly, Nichola L.; Glancy, Deborah; Cooper, Sheldon C.; Cunningham, David; Lind, Tore; Hapeshi, Julie; Ferry, David; Rathbone, Barrie; Brown, Julia; Love, Sharon; Attwood, Stephen; Macgregor, Stuart; Watson, Peter; Sanders, Scott; Ek, Weronica; Harrison, Rebecca F.; Moayyedi, Paul; de Caestecker, John; Barr, Hugh; Stupka, Elia; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Peltonen, Leena; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Tomlinson, Ian; Donnelly, Peter; Jankowski, Janusz A. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is an increasingly common disease that is strongly associated with reflux of stomach acid and usually a hiatus hernia, and it strongly predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a tumor with a very poor prognosis. We report the first genome-wide association study on

  2. Endoscopic treatments for Barrett's esophagus: a systematic review of safety and effectiveness compared to esophagectomy

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    Lau Darren

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, several new endoscopic treatments have been used to treat patients with Barrett's esophagus with high grade dysplasia. This systematic review aimed to determine the safety and effectiveness of these treatments compared with esophagectomy. Methods A comprehensive literature search was undertaken to identify studies of endoscopic treatments for Barrett's esophagus or early stage esophageal cancer. Information from the selected studies was extracted by two independent reviewers. Study quality was assessed and information was tabulated to identify trends or patterns. Results were pooled across studies for each outcome. Safety (occurrence of adverse events and effectiveness (complete eradication of dysplasia were compared across different treatments. Results The 101 studies that met the selection criteria included 8 endoscopic techniques and esophagectomy; only 12 were comparative studies. The quality of evidence was generally low. Methods and outcomes were inconsistently reported. Protocols, outcomes measured, follow-up times and numbers of treatment sessions varied, making it difficult to calculate pooled estimates. The surgical mortality rate was 1.2%, compared to 0.04% in 2831 patients treated endoscopically (1 death. Adverse events were more severe and frequent with esophagectomy, and included anastomotic leaks (9.4%, wound infections (4.1% and pulmonary complications (4.1%. Four patients (0.1% treated endoscopically experienced bleeding requiring transfusions. The stricture rate with esophagectomy (5.3% was lower than with porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (18.5%, but higher than aminolevulinic acid (ALA 60 mg/kg PDT (1.4%. Dysphagia and odynophagia varied in frequency across modalities, with the highest rates reported for multipolar electrocoagulation (MPEC. Photosensitivity, an adverse event that occurs only with photodynamic therapy, was experienced by 26.4% of patients who received porfimer sodium. Some

  3. Barrett's Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants Definition & ...

  4. Ectopic Cdx2 expression in murine esophagus models an intermediate stage in the emergence of Barrett's esophagus.

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    Jianping Kong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus (BE is an intestinal metaplasia that occurs in the setting of chronic acid and bile reflux and is associated with a risk for adenocarcinoma. Expression of intestine-specific transcription factors in the esophagus likely contributes to metaplasia development. Our objective was to explore the effects of an intestine-specific transcription factor when expressed in the mouse esophageal epithelium. Transgenic mice were derived in which the transcription factor Cdx2 is expressed in squamous epithelium using the murine Keratin-14 gene promoter. Effects of the transgene upon cell proliferation and differentiation, gene expression, and barrier integrity were explored. K14-Cdx2 mice express the Cdx2 transgene in esophageal squamous tissues. Cdx2 expression was associated with reduced basal epithelial cell proliferation and altered cell morphology. Ultrastructurally two changes were noted. Cdx2 expression was associated with dilated space between the basal cells and diminished cell-cell adhesion caused by reduced Desmocollin-3 mRNA and protein expression. This compromised epithelial barrier function, as the measured trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER of the K14-Cdx2 epithelium was significantly reduced compared to controls (1189 Ohm*cm(2 ±343.5 to 508 Ohm*cm(2±92.48, p = 0.0532. Secondly, basal cells with features of a transitional cell type, intermediate between keratinocytes and columnar Barrett's epithelial cells, were observed. These cells had reduced keratin bundles and increased endoplasmic reticulum levels, suggesting the adoption of secretory-cell features. Moreover, at the ultrastructural level they resembled "Distinctive" cells associated with multilayered epithelium. Treatment of the K14-Cdx2 mice with 5'-Azacytidine elicited expression of BE-associated genes including Cdx1, Krt18, and Slc26a3/Dra, suggesting the phenotype could be advanced under certain conditions. We conclude that ectopic Cdx2 expression in

  5. Warburg and Crabtree effects in premalignant Barrett's esophagus cell lines with active mitochondria.

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    Martin T Suchorolski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased glycolysis is a hallmark of cancer metabolism, yet relatively little is known about this phenotype at premalignant stages of progression. Periodic ischemia occurs in the premalignant condition Barrett's esophagus (BE due to tissue damage from chronic acid-bile reflux and may select for early adaptations to hypoxia, including upregulation of glycolysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared rates of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in four cell lines derived from patients with BE (CP-A, CP-B, CP-C and CP-D in response to metabolic inhibitors and changes in glucose concentration. We report that cell lines derived from patients with more advanced genetically unstable BE have up to two-fold higher glycolysis compared to a cell line derived from a patient with early genetically stable BE; however, all cell lines preserve active mitochondria. In response to the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose, the most glycolytic cell lines (CP-C and CP-D had the greatest suppression of extra-cellular acidification, but were able to compensate with upregulation of oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, these cell lines showed the lowest compensatory increases in glycolysis in response to mitochondrial uncoupling by 2,4-dinitrophenol. Finally, these cell lines also upregulated their oxidative phosphorylation in response to glucose via the Crabtree effect, and demonstrate a greater range of modulation of oxygen consumption. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that cells from premalignant Barrett's esophagus tissue may adapt to an ever-changing selective microenvironment through changes in energy metabolic pathways typically associated with cancer cells.

  6. Development and Validation of a Classification System to Identify High-Grade Dysplasia and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma in Barrett's Esophagus Using Narrow-Band Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Prateek; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Goda, Kenichi; Kato, Mototsugu; Messmann, Helmut; Alsop, Benjamin R.; Gupta, Neil; Vennalaganti, Prashanth; Hall, Matt; Konda, Vani; Koons, Ann; Penner, Olga; Goldblum, John R.; Waxman, Irving

    2016-01-01

    Although several classification systems have been proposed for characterization of Barrett's esophagus (BE) surface patterns based on narrow-band imaging (NBI), none have been widely accepted. The Barrett's International NBI Group (BING) aimed to develop and validate an NBI classification system for

  7. Affinity fluorescence-labeled peptides for the early detection of cancer in Barrett's esophagus

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    Li, Meng; Lu, Shaoying; Piraka, Cyrus; Appelman, Henry; Kwon, Rich; Soetikno, Roy; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Wang, Thomas D.

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence-labeled peptides that affinity bind to neoplastic mucsosa are promising for use as a specific contrast agent in the detection of pre-malignant tissue in the esophagus. This method is can be used to identify expression of biological markers associated with dysplasia on endoscopic imaging as a guide for biopsy and represents a novel method for the early detection and prevention of cancer. We demonstrate the use of phage display to select affinity peptides and identify the sequence "ASYNYDA" that binds with high target-to-background ratio to dysplastic esophageal mucosa compared to that of intestinal metaplasia. Validation of preferential binding is demonstrated for neoplasia in the setting of Barrett's esophagus. An optimal tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 85% was found at the relative threshold of 0.60 with a target-to-background ratio of 1.81 and an area under the ROC curve of 0.87. Peptides are a novel class of ligand for targeted detection of pre-malignant mucosa for purposes of screening and surveillance.

  8. Altered Expression of TFF-1 and CES-2 in Barrett's Esophagus and Associated Adenocarcinomas

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    Charles A. Fox

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Identification of biomarkers to recognize individuals with Barrett's esophagus (BE predisposed to develop malignancy is currently a pressing issue. We utilized gene expression profiling to compare molecular signatures of normal esophagus and stomach, BE, and adenocarcinoma (AC to identify such potential biomarkers. Over 22,000 genes were analyzed by oligonucleotide microarrays on 38 unique RNA. Unsupervised and supervised clusterings were performed on a subset of 2849 genes that varied most significantly across the specimens. Unsupervised clustering identified two discernable molecular BE profiles, one of which was similar to normal gastric tissue (“BE1”, and another that was shared by several of the AC specimens (“BE2”. The BE1 profile included expression of several genes that have been described as tumor-suppressor genes, most notably trefoil factor 1 (TFF-1. The BE2 profile included expression of genes previously found overexpressed in cancers, such as carboxylesterase-2 (CES-2. IHC demonstrated the loss of TFF-1 late in the progression of BE to AC. It also revealed CES-2 as being upregulated in AC documented to have arisen in the presence of BE. These potential biomarkers, as well as the relative expression of genes from BE1 versus those from BE2, may be validated in the future to aid in risk stratification and guide treatment protocols in patients with BE and associated AC.

  9. Epidemiology of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma in Spain: a unicentric study

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    Quetzalihuitl Arroyo-Martínez

    Full Text Available Background: Barrett's esophagus (BE is an acquired disease defined by the presence of intestinal metaplasia with goblet cells in the distal esophagus. The prevalence of BE has increased dramatically over the last years. Aims: The primary aims of the study were to analyze the characteristics of BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC in a Spanish health district during a follow-up period. Methodology: Sociodemographic factors, alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking were analyzed. We also studied the histological behavior and cause of death in each group. Results: In the present study 430 patients were included, 338 with BE and 92 with EAC. Incidence rates have risen from 2.25 and 1.25 per 100,000 inhabitants in 1996 to 6.5 and 4.75 per 100,000 in 2011, respectively. In the EAC group, male gender, age and alcohol consumption were higher in comparison to the BE group, and the overall survival was 23 months. In the BE group, the main causes of death were non-esophageal cancer and cardiovascular disease. Conclusions: The incidence and prevalence rates of AEC and BE have risen over the past years. Risk factors for these conditions were male gender, age and alcohol consumption. Long BE (> 3 cm is involved in dysplasia progression. AEC diagnosis mainly occurs after neoplasia is detected and, in a few cases, due to a previous BE. Cardiovascular diseases and non-esophageal cancers have been found to be the main cause of death in BE patients.

  10. Development and Validation of a Model to Determine Risk of Progression of Barrett's Esophagus to Neoplasia.

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    Parasa, Sravanthi; Vennalaganti, Sreekar; Gaddam, Srinivas; Vennalaganti, Prashanth; Young, Patrick; Gupta, Neil; Thota, Prashanthi; Cash, Brooks; Mathur, Sharad; Sampliner, Richard; Moawad, Fouad; Lieberman, David; Bansal, Ajay; Kennedy, Kevin F; Vargo, John; Falk, Gary; Spaander, Manon; Bruno, Marco; Sharma, Prateek

    2018-04-01

    A system is needed to determine the risk of patients with Barrett's esophagus for progression to high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We developed and validated a model to determine of progression to HGD or EAC in patients with BE, based on demographic data and endoscopic and histologic findings at the time of index endoscopy. We performed a longitudinal study of patients with BE at 5 centers in United States and 1 center in Netherlands enrolled in the Barrett's Esophagus Study database from 1985 through 2014. Patients were excluded from the analysis if they had less than 1 year of follow-up, were diagnosed with HGD or EAC within the past year, were missing baseline histologic data, or had no intestinal metaplasia. Seventy percent of the patients were used to derive the model and 30% were used for the validation study. The primary outcome was development of HGD or EAC during the follow-up period (median, 5.9 years). Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. We assigned a specific number of points to each BE risk factor, and point totals (scores) were used to create categories of low, intermediate, and high risk. We used Cox regression to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals to determine associations between risk of progression and scores. Of 4584 patients in the database, 2697 were included in our analysis (84.1% men; 87.6% Caucasian; mean age, 55.4 ± 20.1 years; mean body mass index, 27.9 ± 5.5 kg/m 2 ; mean length of BE, 3.7 ± 3.2 cm). During the follow-up period, 154 patients (5.7%) developed HGD or EAC, with an annual rate of progression of 0.95%. Male sex, smoking, length of BE, and baseline-confirmed low-grade dysplasia were significantly associated with progression. Scores assigned identified patients with BE that progressed to HGD or EAC with a c-statistic of 0.76 (95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.80; P Esophagus score) based on male sex, smoking, length of BE, and baseline low-grade dysplasia

  11. Location, location, location: does early cancer in Barrett's esophagus have a preference?

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    Enestvedt, Brintha K; Lugo, Ricardo; Guarner-Argente, Carlos; Shah, Pari; Falk, Gary W; Furth, Emma; Ginsberg, Gregory G

    2013-09-01

    Early cancer (high-grade dysplasia [HGD] and intramucosal carcinoma [ImCa]) associated with Barrett's esophagus (BE) may have a circumferential spatial predilection. To describe the esophageal circumferential location of early cancer in BE. Retrospective study, single tertiary referral center. One hundred nineteen patients were referred for endoscopic eradication therapy for early cancer associated with BE. Endoscopic images and reports and pathology were reviewed. Circumferential location designation of early cancer in BE by using a clock-face orientation. One hundred nineteen of 131 patients referred for endoscopic eradication therapy had a location designation for their advanced histology (91.9%). There were a total of 57 patients (47.9%) with HGD and 62 patients (52.1%) with ImCa. There was a significantly higher rate of early cancer (HGD or ImCa) in the right hemisphere (12 to 6 o'clock location) compared with the left hemisphere (84.9% vs 15.1%, P cancer was found in the 12 to 3 o'clock quadrant (64.7%); 71.9% of HGD and 58.1% of ImCa lesions were located in the 12 to 3 o'clock quadrant. Retrospective design, single center. Early cancer associated with BE is far more commonly found in the right hemisphere of the esophagus (12 to 6 o'clock) with the highest rate in the 12 to 3 o'clock quadrant. These findings support enhanced scrutiny of the right hemisphere of the esophagus during surveillance and endoscopic treatment of patients with BE. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Performance characteristics of optical coherence tomography in assessment of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer: systematic review.

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    Kohli, D R; Schubert, M L; Zfass, A M; Shah, T U

    2017-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can generate high-resolution images of the esophagus that allows cross-sectional visualization of esophageal wall layers. We conducted a systematic review to assess the utility of OCT for diagnosing of esophageal intestinal metaplasia (IM; Barrett's esophagus BE)), dysplasia, cancer and staging of early esophageal cancer. English language human observational studies and clinical trials published in PubMed and Embase were included if they assessed any of the following: (i) in-vivo features and accuracy of OCT at diagnosing esophageal IM, sub-squamous intestinal metaplasia (SSIM), dysplasia, or cancer, and (ii) accuracy of OCT in staging esophageal cancer. Twenty-one of the 2,068 retrieved citations met inclusion criteria. In the two prospective studies that assessed accuracy of OCT at identifying IM, sensitivity was 81%-97%, and specificity was 57%-92%. In the two prospective studies that assessed accuracy of OCT at identifying dysplasia and early cancer, sensitivity was 68%-83%, and specificity was 75%-82%. Observational studies described significant variability in the ability of OCT to accurately identify SSIM. Two prospective studies that compared the accuracy of OCT at staging early squamous cell carcinoma to histologic resection specimens reported accuracy of >90%. Risk of bias and applicability concerns was rated as low among the prospective studies using the QUADAS-2 questionnaire. OCT may identify intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia, but its accuracy may not meet recommended thresholds to replace 4-quadrant biopsies in clinical practice. OCT may be more accurate than EUS at staging early esophageal cancer, but randomized trials and cost-effective analyses are lacking. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Efficacy and safety of Hybrid-APC for the ablation of Barrett's esophagus.

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    Manner, Hendrik; May, Andrea; Kouti, Ioanna; Pech, Oliver; Vieth, Michael; Ell, Christian

    2016-04-01

    After thermal ablation of Barrett's esophagus (BE), stricture formation is reported in 5 to over 10% of patients. The question arises whether submucosal fluid injection prior to ablation may lower the risk of stricture formation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new technique of Hybrid-APC which combines submucosal injection with APC. Patients who had a residual BE segment of at least 1 cm after endoscopic resection of early Barrett's neoplasia underwent thermal ablation of BE by Hybrid-APC. Prior to thermal ablation, submucosal injection of sodium chloride 0.9% was carried out using a flexible water-jet probe (Erbejet 2; Erbe Elektromedizin, Tuebingen, Germany). Check-up upper GI endoscopy was carried out 3 months after macroscopically complete ablation including biopsies from the neo-Z-line and the former BE segment, and recording of stricture formation. From May 2011 to November 2012, a total of 60 patients (pt) were included in the study [55 pt male (92%); mean age 62 ± 9 years, range 42-79]. Ten patients were excluded from the study. In the remaining 50 pt, Hybrid-APC ablation and check-up endoscopy at 3 months were carried out. Forty-eight out of 50 pt (96%; ITT: 49/60, 82%) achieved macroscopically complete remission after a median of 3.5 APC sessions [SD 2.4; range 1-10]. Freedom from BE was histopathologically observed in 39/50 patients (78%). There was one treatment-related stricture (2%). Minor adverse events of Hybrid-APC were observed in 11 patients (22%). According to this pilot series, Hybrid-APC was effective and safe for BE ablation in a tertiary referral center. The rate of stricture formation was only 2%. Further studies are required to confirm the present results. DRKS00003369.

  14. Inverse Association Between Gluteofemoral Obesity and Risk of Barrett's Esophagus in a Pooled Analysis.

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    Kendall, Bradley J; Rubenstein, Joel H; Cook, Michael B; Vaughan, Thomas L; Anderson, Lesley A; Murray, Liam J; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Corley, Douglas A; Chandar, Apoorva K; Li, Li; Greer, Katarina B; Chak, Amitabh; El-Serag, Hashem B; Whiteman, David C; Thrift, Aaron P

    2016-10-01

    Gluteofemoral obesity (determined by measurement of subcutaneous fat in the hip and thigh regions) could reduce risks of cardiovascular and diabetic disorders associated with abdominal obesity. We evaluated whether gluteofemoral obesity also reduces the risk of Barrett's esophagus (BE), a premalignant lesion associated with abdominal obesity. We collected data from non-Hispanic white participants in 8 studies in the Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium. We compared measures of hip circumference (as a proxy for gluteofemoral obesity) from cases of BE (n = 1559) separately with 2 control groups: 2557 population-based controls and 2064 individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD controls). Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using individual participant data and multivariable logistic regression and combined using a random-effects meta-analysis. We found an inverse relationship between hip circumference and BE (OR per 5-cm increase, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.96), compared with population-based controls in a multivariable model that included waist circumference. This association was not observed in models that did not include waist circumference. Similar results were observed in analyses stratified by frequency of GERD symptoms. The inverse association with hip circumference was statistically significant only among men (vs population-based controls: OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76-0.96 for men; OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.74-1.16 for women). For men, within each category of waist circumference, a larger hip circumference was associated with a decreased risk of BE. Increasing waist circumference was associated with an increased risk of BE in the mutually adjusted population-based and GERD control models. Although abdominal obesity is associated with an increased risk of BE, there is an inverse association between gluteofemoral obesity and BE, particularly among men. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by

  15. Longitudinal outcomes of radiofrequency ablation versus surveillance endoscopy for Barrett's esophagus with low-grade dysplasia.

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    Kahn, A; Al-Qaisi, M; Kommineni, V T; Callaway, J K; Boroff, E S; Burdick, G E; Lam-Himlin, D M; Temkit, M; Vela, M F; Ramirez, F C

    2018-04-01

    Radiofrequency ablation of Barrett's esophagus with low-grade dysplasia is recommended in recent American College of Gastroenterology guidelines, with endoscopic surveillance considered a reasonable alternative. Few studies have directly compared outcomes of radiofrequency ablation to surveillance and those that have are limited by short duration of follow-up. This study aims to compare the long-term effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation versus endoscopic surveillance in a large, longitudinal cohort of patients with Barrett's esophagus, and low-grade dysplasia.We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with confirmed low-grade dysplasia at a single academic medical center from 1991 to 2014. Patients progressing to high-grade dysplasia or esophageal adenocarcinoma within one year of index LGD endoscopy were defined as missed dysplasia and excluded. Risk factors for progression were assessed via Cox proportional hazards model. Comparison of progression risk was conducted using a Kaplan-Meier analysis. Subset analyses were conducted to examine the effect of reintroducing early progressors and excluding patients diagnosed prior to the advent of ablative therapy. Of 173 total patients, 79 (45.7%) underwent radiofrequency ablation while 94 (54.3%) were untreated, with median follow up of 90 months. Seven (8.9%) patients progressed to high-grade dysplasia or adenocarcinoma despite ablation, compared with 14 (14.9%) undergoing surveillance (P = 0.44). This effect was preserved when patients diagnosed prior to the introduction of radiofrequency ablation were excluded (8.9% vs 13%, P = 0.68). Reintroduction of patients progressing within the first year of follow-up resulted in a trend toward significance for ablation versus surveillance (11.1% vs 23.8%, P = 0.053).In conclusion, progression to high-grade dysplasia or adenocarcinoma was not significantly reduced in the radiofrequency ablation cohort when compared to surveillance. Despite recent studies

  16. Active matrix metalloproteases are expressed early on and are high during the Barrett's esophagus malignancy sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davelaar, Akueni L.; Straub, Daniëlle; Buttar, Navtej S.; Fockens, Paul; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Molecular processes underlying Barrett's malignant development are poorly understood. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are enzymes involved in inflammation, tissue remodeling, and malignant development. Therefore, active MMPs may have a role in early metaplasia development and Barrett's

  17. Endoscopic therapy of neoplasia related to Barrett's esophagus and endoscopic palliation of esophageal cancer.

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    Vignesh, Shivakumar; Hoffe, Sarah E; Meredith, Kenneth L; Shridhar, Ravi; Almhanna, Khaldoun; Gupta, Akshay K

    2013-04-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the most important identifiable risk factor for the progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma. This article reviews the current endoscopic therapies for BE with high-grade dysplasia and intramucosal cancer and briefly discusses the endoscopic palliation of advanced esophageal cancer. The diagnosis of low-grade or high-grade dysplasia (HGD) is based on several cytologic criteria that suggest neoplastic transformation of the columnar epithelium. HGD and carcinoma in situ are regarded as equivalent. The presence of dysplasia, particularly HGD, is also a risk factor for synchronous and metachronous adenocarcinoma. Dysplasia is a marker of adenocarcinoma and also has been shown to be the preinvasive lesion. Esophagectomy has been the conventional treatment for T1 esophageal cancer and, although debated, is an appropriate option in some patients with HGD due to the presence of occult cancer in over one-third of patients. Endoscopic ablative modalities (eg, photodynamic therapy and cryoablation) and endoscopic resection techniques (eg, endoscopic mucosal resection) have demonstrated promising results. The significant morbidity and mortality of esophagectomy makes endoscopic treatment an attractive potential option.

  18. Validation of a risk prediction model for Barrett's esophagus in an Australian population.

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    Ireland, Colin J; Gordon, Andrea L; Thompson, Sarah K; Watson, David I; Whiteman, David C; Reed, Richard L; Esterman, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a disease that has a high mortality rate, the only known precursor being Barrett's esophagus (BE). While screening for BE is not cost-effective at the population level, targeted screening might be beneficial. We have developed a risk prediction model to identify people with BE, and here we present the external validation of this model. A cohort study was undertaken to validate a risk prediction model for BE. Individuals with endoscopy and histopathology proven BE completed a questionnaire containing variables previously identified as risk factors for this condition. Their responses were combined with data from a population sample for analysis. Risk scores were derived for each participant. Overall performance of the risk prediction model in terms of calibration and discrimination was assessed. Scores from 95 individuals with BE and 636 individuals from the general population were analyzed. The Brier score was 0.118, suggesting reasonable overall performance. The area under the receiver operating characteristic was 0.83 (95% CI 0.78-0.87). The Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic was p =0.14. Minimizing false positives and false negatives, the model achieved a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 73%. This study has validated a risk prediction model for BE that has a higher sensitivity than previous models.

  19. DNA index determination with Automated Cellular Imaging System (ACIS in Barrett's esophagus: Comparison with CAS 200

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    Klein Michael

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For solid tumors, image cytometry has been shown to be more sensitive for diagnosing DNA content abnormalities (aneuploidy than flow cytometry. Image cytometry has often been performed using the semi-automated CAS 200 system. Recently, an Automated Cellular Imaging System (ACIS was introduced to determine DNA content (DNA index, but it has not been validated. Methods Using the CAS 200 system and ACIS, we compared the DNA index (DI obtained from the same archived formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded tissue samples from Barrett's esophagus related lesions, including samples with specialized intestinal metaplasia without dysplasia, low-grade dysplasia, high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. Results Although there was a very good correlation between the DI values determined by ACIS and CAS 200, the former was 25% more sensitive in detecting aneuploidy. ACIS yielded a mean DI value 18% higher than that obtained by CAS 200 (p t test. In addition, the average time required to perform a DNA ploidy analysis was shorter with the ACIS (30–40 min than with the CAS 200 (40–70 min. Results obtained by ACIS gave excellent inter-and intra-observer variability (coefficient of correlation >0.9 for both, p Conclusion Compared with the CAS 200, the ACIS is a more sensitive and less time consuming technique for determining DNA ploidy. Results obtained by ACIS are also highly reproducible.

  20. Health-related quality of life of subjects with Barrett's esophagus in a Chinese population.

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    Shou-Wu Lee

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQoL of a Chinese population with Barrett's esophagus (BE.Data from subjects with BE from a single hospital were prospectively collected from October 2012 to December 2014. The exclusion criteria included total esophagectomy, severe cardiopulmonary deficiency, malignancy, or other unsuitable conditions for scope. All the enrolled cases were asked to complete the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ, the short form-12, (SF-12, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS.In total, 139 subjects were enrolled, and the mean age of the cases was 61.85 years old. Most subjects had short-segment BE (SSBE (92.8% and non-dysplastic BE tissue (94.2%. The mean physical and mental composite scores, PCS and MCS, of SF-12 were 44.14 and 45.53, respectively. The SF-12 scores in BE individuals were similar in men and women, elderly and non-elderly, LSBE and SSBE, coexisting EE and no-EE, and dysplastic and non-dysplastic. The appearance of reflux symptoms tended to decrease SF-12 scores in affected individuals, especially heartburn. The rates of anxiety and depression accounted for 25.2% and 17.3% of these cases, respectively.Our study found HRQoL in BE patients was strongly associated with presentation of reflux symptoms.

  1. Bacterial Composition of the Human Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiome Is Dynamic and Associated with Genomic Instability in a Barrett's Esophagus Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alevtina Gall

    Full Text Available The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC has increased nearly five-fold over the last four decades in the United States. Barrett's esophagus, the replacement of the normal squamous epithelial lining with a mucus-secreting columnar epithelium, is the only known precursor to EAC. Like other parts of the gastrointestinal (GI tract, the esophagus hosts a variety of bacteria and comparisons among published studies suggest bacterial communities in the stomach and esophagus differ. Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori in the stomach has been inversely associated with development of EAC, but the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear.The bacterial composition in the upper GI tract was characterized in a subset of participants (n=12 of the Seattle Barrett's Esophagus Research cohort using broad-range 16S PCR and pyrosequencing of biopsy and brush samples collected from squamous esophagus, Barrett's esophagus, stomach corpus and stomach antrum. Three of the individuals were sampled at two separate time points. Prevalence of H. pylori infection and subsequent development of aneuploidy (n=339 and EAC (n=433 was examined in a larger subset of this cohort.Within individuals, bacterial communities of the stomach and esophagus showed overlapping community membership. Despite closer proximity, the stomach antrum and corpus communities were less similar than the antrum and esophageal samples. Re-sampling of study participants revealed similar upper GI community membership in two of three cases. In this Barrett's esophagus cohort, Streptococcus and Prevotella species dominate the upper GI and the ratio of these two species is associated with waist-to-hip ratio and hiatal hernia length, two known EAC risk factors in Barrett's esophagus. H. pylori-positive individuals had a significantly decreased incidence of aneuploidy and a non-significant trend toward lower incidence of EAC.

  2. Detection of genetic changes in Barrett's adenocarcinoma and Barrett's esophagus by DNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnadath, K. K.; Tilanus, H. W.; Alers, J. C.; Mulder, A. H.; van Dekken, H.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the occurrence of chromosomal DNA and cell cycle-related protein changes in Barrett's epithelium and adenocarcinoma. The presence of numerical chromosomal aberrations was studied by applying nonisotopic in situ hybridization (ISH) with (peri-)centromeric DNA probes, specific for

  3. Control of acid and duodenogastroesophageal reflux (DGER) in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachimski, Patrick; Maqbool, Sabba; Bhat, Yasser M; Richter, Joel E; Falk, Gary W; Vaezi, Michael F

    2015-08-01

    Symptom eradication in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) does not guarantee control of acid or duodenogastroesophageal reflux (DGER). Continued reflux of acid and/or DGER may increase risk of neoplastic progression and may decrease the likelihood of columnar mucosa eradication after ablative therapy. To date, no study has addressed whether both complete acid and DGER control is possible in patients with BE. This prospective study was designed to assess the effect of escalating-dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy on esophageal acid and DGER. Patients with BE (≥3 cm in length) underwent simultaneous ambulatory prolonged pH and DGER monitoring after at least 1 week off PPI therapy followed by testing on therapy after 1 month of twice-daily rabeprazole (20 mg). In those with continued acid and/or DGER, the tests were repeated after 1 month of double-dose (40 mg twice daily) rabeprazole. The primary study outcome was normalization of both acid and DGER. Symptom severity was assessed on and off PPI therapy employing a four-point ordinal scale. A total of 29 patients with BE consented for pH monitoring, of whom 23 also consented for both pH and DGER monitoring off and on therapy (83% male; mean age 58 years; mean body mass index 29; mean Barrett's length 6.0 cm). Median (interquartile range) total % time pH 0.14 off PPI therapy were 18.4 (11.7-20.0) and 9.7 (5.0-22.2), respectively. In addition, 26/29 (90%) had normalized acid and 18/23 (78%) had normalized DGER on rabeprazole 20 mg. Among those not achieving normalization on 20 mg twice daily, 3/3 (100%) had normalized acid and 4/5 (80%) had normalized DGER on rabeprazole 40 mg twice daily. All subjects had symptoms controlled on rabeprazole 20 mg twice daily. Univariate analysis found no predictor for normalization of physiologic parameters based on demographics. Symptom control does not guarantee normalization of acid and DGER at standard dose of twice-daily PPI therapy. Normalization of

  4. Similarity of aberrant DNA methylation in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma

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    Gotley David C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barrett's esophagus (BE is the metaplastic replacement of squamous with columnar epithelium in the esophagus, as a result of reflux. It is the major risk factor for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC. Methylation of CpG dinucleotides of normally unmethylated genes is associated with silencing of their expression, and is common in EAC. This study was designed to determine at what stage, in the progression from BE to EAC, methylation of key genes occurs. Results We examined nine genes (APC, CDKN2A, ID4, MGMT, RBP1, RUNX3, SFRP1, TIMP3, and TMEFF2, frequently methylated in multiple cancer types, in a panel of squamous (19 biopsies from patients without BE or EAC, 16 from patients with BE, 21 from patients with EAC, BE (40 metaplastic, seven high grade dysplastic and 37 EAC tissues. The methylation frequency, the percentage of samples that had any extent of methylation, for each of the nine genes in the EAC (95%, 59%, 76%, 57%, 70%, 73%, 95%, 74% and 83% respectively was significantly higher than in any of the squamous groups. The methylation frequency for each of the nine genes in the metaplastic BE (95%, 28%, 78%, 48%, 58%, 48%, 93%, 88% and 75% respectively was significantly higher than in the squamous samples except for CDKN2A and RBP1. The methylation frequency did not differ between BE and EAC samples, except for CDKN2A and RUNX3 which were significantly higher in EAC. The methylation extent was an estimate of both the number of methylated alleles and the density of methylation on these alleles. This was significantly greater in EAC than in metaplastic BE for all genes except APC, MGMT and TIMP3. There was no significant difference in methylation extent for any gene between high grade dysplastic BE and EAC. Conclusion We found significant methylation in metaplastic BE, which for seven of the nine genes studied did not differ in frequency from that found in EAC. This is also the first report of gene silencing

  5. Esophageal Motor Disorders Are a Strong and Independant Associated Factor of Barrett's Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Camille; Benezech, Alban; Alessandrini, Marine; Grimaud, Jean-Charles; Vitton, Veronique

    2018-04-30

    Esophageal motor disorder (EMD) has been shown to be associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, the association of EMD with a Barrett's esophagus (BE) is controversial. Our objective was to evaluate whether the presence of EMD was an independent factor associated with BE. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in GERD patients who all had oeso-gastroduodenal endoscopy and high-resolution esophageal manometry. The clinical data collected was known or potential risk factors for BE: male gender, smoking and alcohol consumption, age, body mass index, presence of hiatal hernia, frequency, and age of GERD. EMD were classified according to the Chicago classification into: ineffective motor syndrome, fragmented peristalsis and absence of peristalsis, lower esophageal sphincter hypotonia. Two hundred and one patients (101 in the GERD + BE group and 100 in the GERD without BE) were included. In univariate analysis, male gender, alcohol consumption, presence of hiatal hernia, and EMD appeared to be associated with the presence of BE. In a multivariate analysis, 3 independent factors were identified: the presence of EMD (odds ratio [OR], 3.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-9.28; P = 0.001), the presence of hiatal hernia (OR, 5.60; 95% CI, 2.45-12.76; P < 0.001), Helicobacter pylori infection (OR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.84; P = 0.035). The presence of EMD (particularly ineffective motor syndrome and lower esophageal sphincter hypotonia) is a strong independent associated factor of BE. Searching systematically for an EMD in patients suffering from GERD could be a new strategy to organize the endoscopic follow-up.

  6. Necrotizing sialometaplasia-like change of the esophageal submucosal glands is associated with Barrett's esophagus.

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    Braxton, David R; Nickleach, Dana C; Liu, Yuan; Farris, Alton B

    2014-08-01

    The esophageal submucosal glands (SMG) protect the squamous epithelium from insults such as gastroesophageal reflux disease by secreting mucins and bicarbonate. We have observed metaplastic changes within the SMG acini that we have termed oncocytic glandular metaplasia (OGM), and necrotizing sialometaplasia-like change (NSMLC). The aim of this study is to evaluate the associated clinicopathological parameters of, and to phenotypically characterize the SMG metaplasias. Esophagectomy specimens were retrospectively assessed on hematoxylin and eosin sections and assigned to either a Barrett's esophagus (BE) or non-BE control group. Clinicopathologic data was collected, and univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were performed to assess the adjusted associations with NSMLC and OGM. Selected cases of SMG metaplasia were characterized. SMG were present in 82 esophagi that met inclusion criteria. On univariate analysis, NSMLC was associated with BE (p = 0.002). There was no relationship between NSMLC and patient age, sex, tumor size, or treatment history. OGM was associated with BE (p = 0.031). No relationship was found between OGM and patient age, sex, or tumor size. On multivariate analysis, BE was independently associated with NSMLC (odds ratio [OR] 4.95, p = 0.003). Treatment history was also independently associated with OGM (p = 0.029), but not NSMLC. Both NSMLC and OGM were non-mucinous ductal type epithelia retaining a p63-smooth muscle actin co-positive myoepithelial cell layer. NSMLC and OGM were present in endoscopic mucosal resection specimens. Our study suggests that SMG metaplasia is primarily a reflux-induced pathology. NSMLC may pose diagnostic dilemmas in resection specimens or when only partially represented in mucosal biopsies or endoscopic resection specimens.

  7. Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in the Intestinal Metaplasia of Stomach and Barrett's Esophagus.

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    Bo Gun Jang

    Full Text Available Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM is a highly prevalent preneoplastic lesion; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating its development remain unclear. We have previously shown that a population of cells expressing the intestinal stem cell (ISC marker LGR5 increases remarkably in IM. In this study, we further investigated the molecular characteristics of these LGR5+ cells in IM by examining the expression profile of several ISC markers. Notably, we found that ISC markers-including OLFM4 and EPHB2-are positively associated with the CDX2 expression in non-tumorous gastric tissues. This finding was confirmed in stomach lesions with or without metaplasia, which demonstrated that OLFM4 and EPHB2 expression gradually increased with metaplastic progression. Moreover, RNA in situ hybridization revealed that LGR5+ cells coexpress several ISC markers and remained confined to the base of metaplastic glands, reminiscent to that of normal intestinal crypts, whereas those in normal antral glands expressed none of these markers. Furthermore, a large number of ISC marker-expressing cells were diffusely distributed in gastric adenomas, suggesting that these markers may facilitate gastric tumorigenesis. In addition, Barrett's esophagus (BE-which is histologically similar to intestinal metaplasia-exhibited a similar distribution of ISC markers, indicating the presence of a stem cell population with intestinal differentiation potential. In conclusion, we identified that LGR5+ cells in gastric IM and BE coexpress ISC markers, and exhibit the same expression profile as those found in normal intestinal crypts. Taken together, these results implicate an intestinal-like stem cell population in the pathogenesis of IM, and provide an important basis for understanding the development and maintenance of this disease.

  8. Central Obesity and H. pylori Infection Influence Risk of Barrett's Esophagus in an Asian Population.

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    Chih-Cheng Chen

    Full Text Available The prevalence rates of Barrett's esophagus (BE in western countries are higher than Asian ones, but little is known about their difference among risk factors of BE. The aim of this study is to investigate the associations of various risk factors including central obesity, body mass index (BMI, metabolic syndrome and H. pylori infection, with BE.A total of 161 subjects with BE were enrolled and compared to age- and gender-matched controls randomly sampled (1:4 from check-up center in same hospital. Central obesity was defined by waist circumference (female>80cm; male>90cm, metabolic syndrome by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in Taiwan. Independent risk factors for BE were identified by multiple logistic regression analyses.The mean age for BE was 53.8±13.7 years and 75.8% was male. H. pylori infection status was detected by the rapid urease test with the prevalence of 28.4% and 44.4% in the BE patients and controls, respectively. The univariate logistic regression analyses showed the risk was associated with higher waist circumference (odds ratio [OR], 2.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.78-3.60, metabolic syndrome (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.38-2.96 and negative H. pylori infection (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.34-0.74. However, multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BE associated with higher waist circumference (adjusted OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.89-4.12 and negative H. pylori infection (adjusted OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30-0.70.Central obesity is associated with a higher risk of BE whereas H. pylori infection with a lower risk in an ethnic Chinese population.

  9. A Molecular Clock Infers Heterogeneous Tissue Age Among Patients with Barrett's Esophagus.

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    Kit Curtius

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers that drift differentially with age between normal and premalignant tissues, such as Barrett's esophagus (BE, have the potential to improve the assessment of a patient's cancer risk by providing quantitative information about how long a patient has lived with the precursor (i.e., dwell time. In the case of BE, which is a metaplastic precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC, such biomarkers would be particularly useful because EAC risk may change with BE dwell time and it is generally not known how long a patient has lived with BE when a patient is first diagnosed with this condition. In this study we first describe a statistical analysis of DNA methylation data (both cross-sectional and longitudinal derived from tissue samples from 50 BE patients to identify and validate a set of 67 CpG dinucleotides in 51 CpG islands that undergo age-related methylomic drift. Next, we describe how this information can be used to estimate a patient's BE dwell time. We introduce a Bayesian model that incorporates longitudinal methylomic drift rates, patient age, and methylation data from individually paired BE and normal squamous tissue samples to estimate patient-specific BE onset times. Our application of the model to 30 sporadic BE patients' methylomic profiles first exposes a wide heterogeneity in patient-specific BE onset times. Furthermore, independent application of this method to a cohort of 22 familial BE (FBE patients reveals significantly earlier mean BE onset times. Our analysis supports the conjecture that differential methylomic drift occurs in BE (relative to normal squamous tissue and hence allows quantitative estimation of the time that a BE patient has lived with BE.

  10. Gastric Polyp Growth during Endoscopic Surveillance for Esophageal Varices or Barrett's Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livovsky, Dan M; Pappo, Orit; Skarzhinsky, Galina; Peretz, Asaf; Turvall, Elliot; Ackerman, Zvi

    2016-05-01

    We recently observed patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) or chronic reflux symptoms (CRS) who developed gastric polyps (GPs) while undergoing surveillance gastroscopies for the detection of esophageal varices or Barrett's esophagus, respectively. To identify risk factors for GP growth and estimate its growth rate. GP growth rate was defined as the number of days since the first gastroscopy (without polyps) in the surveillance program, until the gastroscopy when a GP was discovered. Gastric polyp growth rates in CLD and CRS patients were similar. However, hyperplastic gastric polyps (HGPs) were detected more often (87.5% vs. 60.5%, P = 0.051) and at a higher number (2.57 ± 1.33 vs. 1.65 ± 0.93, P = 0.021) in the CLD patients. Subgroup analysis revealed the following findings only in CLD patients with HGPs: (i) a positive correlation between the GP growth rate and the patient's age; the older the patient, the higher the GP growth rate (r = 0.7, P = 0.004). (ii) A negative correlation between the patient's age and the Ki-67 proliferation index value; the older the patient, the lower the Ki-67 value (r = -0.64, P = 0.02). No correlation was detected between Ki-67 values of HGPs in CLD patients and the presence of portal hypertension, infection with Helicobacter pylori, or proton pump inhibitor use. In comparison with CRS patients, CLD patients developed HGPs more often and at a greater number. Young CLD patients may have a tendency to develop HGPs at a faster rate than elderly CLD patients.

  11. Liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy in Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia: long-term results.

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    Gosain, Sonia; Mercer, Kim; Twaddell, William S; Uradomo, Lance; Greenwald, Bruce D

    2013-08-01

    Liquid nitrogen endoscopic spray cryotherapy can safely and effectively eradicate high-grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE-HGD). Long-term data on treatment success and safety are lacking. To assess the long-term safety and efficacy of spray cryotherapy in patients with BE-HGD. Single-center, retrospective study. Tertiary-care referral center. A total of 32 patients with BE-HGD of any length. Patients were treated with liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy every 8 weeks until complete eradication of HGD (CE-HGD) and intestinal metaplasia (CE-IM) was found by endoscopic biopsy. Surveillance endoscopy with biopsies was performed for at least 2 years. CE-HGD, CE-IM, durability of response, disease progression, and adverse events. CE-HGD was 100% (32/32), and CE-IM was 84% (27/32) at 2-year follow-up. At last follow-up (range 24-57 months), CE-HGD was 31/32 (97%), and CE-IM was 26/32 (81%). Recurrent HGD was found in 6 (18%), with CE-HGD in 5 after repeat treatment. One patient progressed to adenocarcinoma, downgraded to HGD after repeat cryotherapy. BE segment length ≥3 cm was associated with a higher recurrence of IM (P = .004; odds ratio 22.6) but not HGD. No serious adverse events occurred. Stricture was seen in 3 patients (9%), all successfully dilated. Retrospective study design, small sample size. In patients with BE-HGD, liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy has an acceptable safety profile and success rate for eliminating HGD and IM and is associated with a low rate of recurrence or progression to cancer with long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Feasibility of liquid nitrogen cryotherapy after failed radiofrequency ablation for Barrett's esophagus.

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    Trindade, Arvind J; Inamdar, Sumant; Kothari, Shivangi; Berkowitz, Joshua; McKinley, Matthew; Kaul, Vivek

    2017-09-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for dysplastic Barrett's esophagus (BE) is highly effective. RFA failures are infrequent but can be a challenging cohort to manage. There are limited data on the feasibility of liquid nitrogen cryospray ablation for complete eradication of dysplasia (CE-D) and/or intestinal metaplasia (CE-IM) after RFA has failed to achieve CE-IM in patients with dysplastic BE. This is a retrospective review from two medical centers of prospectively maintained databases looking at patients that underwent liquid nitrogen cryospray ablation for refractory intestinal metaplasia post failed RFA. Eighteen patients were identified that met inclusion criteria. Eleven patients had persistent dysplasia and IM following RFA and seven had persistent non-dysplastic IM. More than 80% of patients were male with long-segment BE (median length 8 cm). Seventy two percent of patients with dysplasia achieved CE-D after cryotherapy. Fifty percent (9/18) of all RFA failures achieved CE-IM with cryotherapy. In comparison, RFA has a CE-IM of 78% in a less challenging treatment naïve cohort from a large-scale meta-analysis of 3802 patients. No adverse events occurred in our cohort. Cryospray ablation is feasible and safe for achieving CE-D and CE-IM after RFA failure. The CE-D rates are high with cryotherapy in this population. CE-IM with cryotherapy is acceptable in this difficult-to-treat cohort when compared to CE-IM rates with RFA in dysplastic BE treatment naïve patients (50% vs 78%). © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  13. Linkage and related analyses of Barrett's esophagus and its associated adenocarcinomas.

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    Sun, Xiangqing; Elston, Robert; Falk, Gary W; Grady, William M; Faulx, Ashley; Mittal, Sumeet K; Canto, Marcia I; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Wang, Jean S; Iyer, Prasad G; Abrams, Julian A; Willis, Joseph E; Guda, Kishore; Markowitz, Sanford; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Chandar, Apoorva; Brock, Wendy; Chak, Amitabh

    2016-07-01

    Familial aggregation and segregation analysis studies have provided evidence of a genetic basis for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and its premalignant precursor, Barrett's esophagus (BE). We aim to demonstrate the utility of linkage analysis to identify the genomic regions that might contain the genetic variants that predispose individuals to this complex trait (BE and EAC). We genotyped 144 individuals in 42 multiplex pedigrees chosen from 1000 singly ascertained BE/EAC pedigrees, and performed both model-based and model-free linkage analyses, using S.A.G.E. and other software. Segregation models were fitted, from the data on both the 42 pedigrees and the 1000 pedigrees, to determine parameters for performing model-based linkage analysis. Model-based and model-free linkage analyses were conducted in two sets of pedigrees: the 42 pedigrees and a subset of 18 pedigrees with female affected members that are expected to be more genetically homogeneous. Genome-wide associations were also tested in these families. Linkage analyses on the 42 pedigrees identified several regions consistently suggestive of linkage by different linkage analysis methods on chromosomes 2q31, 12q23, and 4p14. A linkage on 15q26 is the only consistent linkage region identified in the 18 female-affected pedigrees, in which the linkage signal is higher than in the 42 pedigrees. Other tentative linkage signals are also reported. Our linkage study of BE/EAC pedigrees identified linkage regions on chromosomes 2, 4, 12, and 15, with some reported associations located within our linkage peaks. Our linkage results can help prioritize association tests to delineate the genetic determinants underlying susceptibility to BE and EAC.

  14. Quality indicators for the management of Barrett's esophagus, dysplasia, and esophageal adenocarcinoma: international consensus recommendations from the American Gastroenterological Association Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prateek; Katzka, David A; Gupta, Neil; Ajani, Jaffer; Buttar, Navtej; Chak, Amitabh; Corley, Douglas; El-Serag, Hashem; Falk, Gary W; Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Goldblum, John; Gress, Frank; Ilson, David H; Inadomi, John M; Kuipers, Ernest J; Lynch, John P; McKeon, Frank; Metz, David; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Pech, Oliver; Peek, Richard; Peters, Jeffrey H; Repici, Alessandro; Seewald, Stefan; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Souza, Rhonda F; Spechler, Stuart J; Vennalaganti, Prashanth; Wang, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The development of and adherence to quality indicators in gastroenterology, as in all of medicine, is increasing in importance to ensure that patients receive consistent high-quality care. In addition, government-based and private insurers will be expecting documentation of the parameters by which we measure quality, which will likely affect reimbursements. Barrett's esophagus remains a particularly important disease entity for which we should maintain up-to-date guidelines, given its commonality, potentially lethal outcomes, and controversies regarding screening and surveillance. To achieve this goal, a relatively large group of international experts was assembled and, using the modified Delphi method, evaluated the validity of multiple candidate quality indicators for the diagnosis and management of Barrett's esophagus. Several candidate quality indicators achieved >80% agreement. These statements are intended to serve as a consensus on candidate quality indicators for those who treat patients with Barrett's esophagus. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mucin pattern reflects the origin of the adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus: a retrospective clinical and laboratorial study

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    Corbett Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucin immunoexpression in adenocarcinoma arising in Barrett's esophagus (BE may indicate the carcinogenesis pathway. The aim of this study was to evaluate resected specimens of adenocarcinoma in BE for the pattern of mucins and to correlate to the histologic classification. Methods Specimens were retrospectively collected from thirteen patients who underwent esophageal resection due to adenocarcinoma in BE. Sections were scored for the grade of intestinal metaplasia. The tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry for MUC2 and MUC5AC antibodies. Results Eleven patients were men. The mean age was 61 years old (varied from 40 to 75 years old. The tumor size had a mean of 4.7 ± 2.3 cm, and the extension of BE had a mean of 7.7 ± 1.5 cm. Specialized epithelium with intestinal metaplasia was present in all adjacent mucosas. Immunohistochemistry for MUC2 showed immunoreactivity in goblet cells, while MUC5AC was extensively expressed in the columnar gastric cells, localizing to the surface epithelium and extending to a variable degree into the glandular structures in BE. Tumors were classified according to the mucins in gastric type in 7/13 (MUC5AC positive and intestinal type in 4/13 (MUC2 positive. Two tumors did not express MUC2 or MUC5AC proteins. The pattern of mucin predominantly expressed in the adjacent epithelium was associated to the mucin expression profile in the tumors, p = 0.047. Conclusion Barrett's esophagus adenocarcinoma shows either gastric or intestinal type pattern of mucin expression. The two types of tumors developed in Barrett's esophagus may reflect the original cell type involved in the malignant transformation.

  16. Symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Gastroesophageal Reflux and the Risk of Barrett's Esophagus in a Population-Based Case-Control Study.

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    Anna Lindam

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux is overrepresented in people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and it has been suggested that OSA worsens gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Aggravated reflux might lead to an increased risk of Barrett's esophagus.To assess the association between sleep apnea symptoms and Barrett's esophagus.Included in a case-control study in Brisbane, Australia were 237 patients with histologically confirmed Barrett's esophagus and 247 population controls. The controls were randomly selected from the electoral roll and frequency-matched to the cases by age and sex. Information on OSA symptoms (excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep related apnea symptoms, gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and anthropometric measures were collected through interviews and written questionnaires. Multivariable logistic regression provided odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, adjusted for potential confounding by BMI and gastroesophageal reflux.The prevalence of Barrett's esophagus was higher among people with excessive daytime sleepiness than those without (24% vs. 18%; p-value 0.1142 and in participants with sleep-related apnea symptoms (20% vs. 13%; p-value 0.1730. However, there were non-significantly increased ORs of Barrett's esophagus among people with excessive daytime sleepiness (OR 1.42, 95% CI 0.90-2.34 and sleep related apnea symptoms (OR 1.32, 95% CI 0.74-2.36 when adjusting for age, sex and BMI. After further adjustment for gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, the point ORs were no longer increased (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.61-1.70 for daytime sleepiness and OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.38-1.38 for sleep related apnea symptoms.Symptoms of OSA are possibly associated with an increased risk of Barrett's esophagus, an association that appears to be mediated entirely by gastroesophageal reflux.

  17. In vivo analysis of tissue by Raman microprobe: examination of human skin lesions and esophagus Barrett's mucosa on an animal model

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    Tfayli, Ali; Piot, Olivier; Derancourt, Sylvie; Cadiot, Guillaume; Diebold, Marie D.; Bernard, Philippe; Manfait, Michel

    2006-02-01

    In the last few years, Raman spectroscopy has been increasingly used for the characterization of normal and pathological tissues. A new Raman system, constituted of optic fibers bundle coupled to an axial Raman spectrometer (Horiba Jobin Yvon SAS), was developed for in vivo investigations. Here, we present in vivo analysis on two tissues: human skin and esophagus mucosa on a rat model. The skin is a directly accessible organ, representing a high diversity of lesions and cancers. Including malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma, skin cancer is the cancer with the highest incidence worldwide. Several Raman investigations were performed to discriminate and classify different types of skin lesions, on thin sections of biopsies. Here, we try to characterize in vivo the different types of skin cancers in order to be able to detect them in their early stages of development and to define precisely the exeresis limits. Barrett's mucosa was also studied by in vivo examination of rat's esophagus. Barrett's mucosa, induced by gastro-esophageal reflux, is a pretumoral state that has to be carefully monitored due to its high risk of evolution in adenocarcinoma. A better knowledge of the histological transformation of esophagus epithelium in a Barrett's type will lead to a more efficient detection of the pathology for its early diagnosis. To study these changes, an animal model (rats developing Barrett's mucosa after duodenum - esophagus anastomosis) was used. Potential of vibrational spectroscopy for Barrett's mucosa identification is assessed on this model.

  18. Glyco-centric lectin magnetic bead array (LeMBA − proteomics dataset of human serum samples from healthy, Barrett׳s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma individuals

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    Alok K. Shah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This data article describes serum glycoprotein biomarker discovery and qualification datasets generated using lectin magnetic bead array (LeMBA – mass spectrometry techniques, “Serum glycoprotein biomarker discovery and qualification pipeline reveals novel diagnostic biomarker candidates for esophageal adenocarcinoma” [1]. Serum samples collected from healthy, metaplastic Barrett׳s esophagus (BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC individuals were profiled for glycoprotein subsets via differential lectin binding. The biomarker discovery proteomics dataset consisting of 20 individual lectin pull-downs for 29 serum samples with a spiked-in internal standard chicken ovalbumin protein has been deposited in the PRIDE partner repository of the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002442. Annotated MS/MS spectra for the peptide identifications can be viewed using MS-Viewer (〈http://prospector2.ucsf.edu/prospector/cgi-bin/msform.cgi?form=msviewer〉 using search key “jn7qafftux”. The qualification dataset contained 6-lectin pulldown-coupled multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS data for 41 protein candidates, from 60 serum samples. This dataset is available as a supplemental files with the original publication [1].

  19. Efficacy of liquid nitrogen cryotherapy for Barrett's esophagus after endoscopic resection of intramucosal cancer: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Arvind J; Pleskow, Douglas K; Sengupta, Neil; Kothari, Shivangi; Inamdar, Sumant; Berkowitz, Joshua; Kaul, Vivek

    2018-02-01

    Liquid nitrogen cryotherapy (LNC) allows increased depth of ablation compared with radiofrequency ablation in Barrett's esophagus (BE). Expert centers may use LNC over radiofrequency ablation to ablate Barrett's esophagus after endoscopic resection of intramucosal cancer (IMCA). The aim of our study was to (1) evaluate the safety and efficacy of LNC ablation in patients with BE and IMCA and (2) to evaluate the progression to invasive disease despite therapy. This was a multicenter, retrospective study of consecutive patients with BE who received LNC following endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of IMCA. The outcomes evaluated were complete eradication of dysplasia and intestinal metaplasia and development of invasive cancer during follow up. The follow-up period was at least 1 year from initial LNC. Twenty-seven patients were identified. The median Prague score was C3M5 (range C0M1-C14M14). After EMR+LNC, the median Prague score was C0M1 (range C0M0-C9M10); 22/27 patients (82%) achieved complete eradication of dysplasia after cryotherapy, and 19/27 patients (70%) achieved complete eradication of intestinal metaplasia. One out of 27 patients (4%) developed invasive cancer (disease beyond IMCA) over the study period. Cryotherapy is an effective endoscopic tool for eradication of BE dysplasia after EMR for IMCA. Development of invasive cancer is low for this high-risk group. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Personal and family history of cancer and the risk of Barrett's esophagus in men.

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    Khalaf, N; Ramsey, D; Kramer, J R; El-Serag, H B

    2015-04-01

    The association between Barrett's esophagus (BE) and a personal or family history of cancer other than gastroesophageal remains unknown. To evaluate the effect of personal and family history of certain cancers and cancer treatments on the risk of BE, we analyzed data from a Veterans Affairs case-control study that included 264 men with definitive BE (cases) and 1486 men without BE (controls). Patients with history of esophageal or gastric cancer were excluded. Patients underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy or a study esophagogastroduodenoscopy concurrently with screening colonoscopy to determine BE status. Personal and family history of several types of cancer was obtained from self-reported questionnaires, supplemented and verified by electronic medical-record reviews. We estimated the association between personal and family history of cancer or radiation/chemotherapy, and BE. Personal history of oropharyngeal cancer (1.5% vs. 0.4%) or prostate cancer (7.2% vs. 4.4%) was more frequently present in cases than controls. The association between BE and prostate cancer persisted in multivariable analyses (adjusted odds ratio 1.90; 95% confidence interval 1.07-3.38, P = 0.028) while that with oropharyngeal cancer (adjusted odds ratio 3.63; 95% confidence interval 0.92-14.29, P = 0.066) was attenuated after adjusting for retained covariates of age, race, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hiatal hernia, and proton pump inhibitor use. Within the subset of patients with cancer, prior treatment with radiation or chemotherapy was not associated with BE. There were no significant differences between cases and controls in the proportions of subjects with several specific malignancies in first- or second-degree relatives. In conclusion, the risk of BE in men may be elevated with prior personal history of oropharyngeal or prostate cancer. However, prior cancer treatments and family history of cancer were not associated with increased risk of BE. Further studies are needed

  1. Dietary sugar/starches intake and Barrett's esophagus: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Petrick, Jessica Leigh; Steck, Susan Elizabeth; Bradshaw, Patrick Terrence; McClain, Kathleen Michele; Niehoff, Nicole Michelle; Engel, Lawrence Stuart; Shaheen, Nicholas James; Corley, Douglas Allen; Vaughan, Thomas Leonard; Gammon, Marilie Denise

    2017-11-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the key precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma, a lethal cancer that has increased rapidly in westernized countries over the past four decades. Dietary sugar intake has also been increasing over time, and may be associated with these tumors by promoting hyperinsulinemia. The study goal was to examine multiple measures of sugar/starches intake in association with BE. This pooled analysis included 472 BE cases and 492 controls from two similarly conducted case-control studies in the United States. Dietary intake data, collected by study-specific food frequency questionnaires, were harmonized across studies by linking with the University of Minnesota Nutrient Database, and pooled based on study-specific quartiles. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for age, sex, race, total energy intake, study indicator, body mass index, frequency of gastro-esophageal reflux, and fruit/vegetable intake. In both studies, intake of sucrose (cases vs. controls, g/day: 36.07 vs. 33.51; 36.80 vs. 35.06, respectively) and added sugar (46.15 vs. 41.01; 44.18 vs. 40.68, respectively) were higher in cases than controls. BE risk was increased 79% and 71%, respectively, for associations comparing the fourth to the first quartile of intake of sucrose (OR Q4vs.Q1  = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.07-3.02, P trend  = 0.01) and added sugar (OR Q4vs.Q1  = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.05-2.80, P trend  = 0.15). Intake of sweetened desserts/beverages was associated with 71% increase in BE risk (OR Q4vs.Q1  = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.07-2.73, P trend  = 0.04). Limiting dietary intake of foods and beverages that are high in added sugar, especially refined table sugar, may reduce the risk of developing BE.

  2. Discovery and validation of Barrett's esophagus microRNA transcriptome by next generation sequencing.

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    Ajay Bansal

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus (BE is transition from squamous to columnar mucosa as a result of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The role of microRNA during this transition has not been systematically studied.For initial screening, total RNA from 5 GERD and 6 BE patients was size fractionated. RNA <70 nucleotides was subjected to SOLiD 3 library preparation and next generation sequencing (NGS. Bioinformatics analysis was performed using R package "DEseq". A p value<0.05 adjusted for a false discovery rate of 5% was considered significant. NGS-identified miRNA were validated using qRT-PCR in an independent group of 40 GERD and 27 BE patients. MicroRNA expression of human BE tissues was also compared with three BE cell lines.NGS detected 19.6 million raw reads per sample. 53.1% of filtered reads mapped to miRBase version 18. NGS analysis followed by qRT-PCR validation found 10 differentially expressed miRNA; several are novel (-708-5p, -944, -224-5p and -3065-5p. Up- or down- regulation predicted by NGS was matched by qRT-PCR in every case. Human BE tissues and BE cell lines showed a high degree of concordance (70-80% in miRNA expression. Prediction analysis identified targets that mapped to developmental signaling pathways such as TGFβ and Notch and inflammatory pathways such as toll-like receptor signaling and TGFβ. Cluster analysis found similarly regulated (up or down miRNA to share common targets suggesting coordination between miRNA.Using highly sensitive next-generation sequencing, we have performed a comprehensive genome wide analysis of microRNA in BE and GERD patients. Differentially expressed miRNA between BE and GERD have been further validated. Expression of miRNA between BE human tissues and BE cell lines are highly correlated. These miRNA should be studied in biological models to further understand BE development.

  3. Lack of differential pattern in central adiposity and metabolic syndrome in Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, L A

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, although the mechanism is unclear. A pathway from reflux to inflammation through metaplasia is the dominant hypothesis, and an added role relating to visceral adiposity and the metabolic syndrome has been mooted in Barrett\\'s esophagus (BE) patients. Whether BE differs from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in obesity and metabolic syndrome profiles is unclear, and this was the focus of this study. Patients with proven BE or GERD were randomly selected from the unit data registry and invited to attend for metabolic syndrome screening, anthropometry studies including segmental body composition analysis, and laboratory tests including fasting lipids, insulin, and C-reactive protein. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. One hundred and eighteen BE patients and 113 age- and sex-matched GERD controls were studied. The incidence of obesity (body mass index >30 kg\\/m(2)) was 36% and 38%, respectively, with the pattern of fat deposition predominantly central and an estimated trunk fat mass of 13 and 14 kg, respectively. Using the NCEP criteria, metabolic syndrome was significantly more common in the BE cohort (30% vs 20%, P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference using IDF criteria (42% vs 37%, P= 0.340). Central obesity and the metabolic syndrome are common in both Barrett\\'s and GERD cohorts, but not significantly different, suggesting that central obesity and the metabolic syndrome does not per se impact on the development of BE in a reflux population. In BE, the importance of obesity and the metabolic syndrome in disease progression merits further study.

  4. Aberrant TP53 detected by combining immunohistochemistry and DNA-FISH improves Barrett's esophagus progression prediction: a prospective follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davelaar, Akueni L.; Calpe, Silvia; Lau, Liana; Timmer, Margriet R.; Visser, Mike; ten Kate, Fiebo J.; Parikh, Kaushal B.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Bergman, Jacques J.; Fockens, Paul; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) goes through a sequence of low grade dysplasia (LGD) and high grade dysplasia (HGD) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). The current gold standard for BE outcome prediction, histopathological staging, can be unreliable. TP53 abnormalities may serve as prognostic biomarkers.

  5. Aberrant TP53 detected by combining immunohistochemistry and DNA-FISH improves Barrett's esophagus progression prediction : A prospective follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davelaar, Akueni L.; Calpe, Silvia; Lau, Liana; Timmer, Margriet R.; Visser, Mike; ten Kate, Fiebo J.; Parikh, Kaushal B.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Bergman, Jacques J.; Fockens, Paul; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) goes through a sequence of low grade dysplasia (LGD) and high grade dysplasia (HGD) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). The current gold standard for BE outcome prediction, histopathological staging, can be unreliable. TP53 abnormalities may serve as prognostic biomarkers.

  6. Poor results of 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy for residual high-grade dysplasia and early cancer in barrett esophagus after endoscopic resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, F.; Kara, M.; Rosmolen, W.; Aalders, M.; ten Kate, F.; Krishnadath, K.; van Lanschot, J.; Fockens, P.; Bergman, J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of residual high-grade dysplasia or early cancer (HGD/EC) after endoscopic resection in Barrett esophagus. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Study patients were separated into group A,

  7. Reproducibility of Protein Identification of Selected Cell Types in Barrett's Esophagus Analyzed by Combining Laser-Capture Microdissection and Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stingl, Christoph; van Vilsteren, Frederike G. I.; Guzel, Coskun; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Visser, Mike; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.; Bergman, Jacques J.; Luider, Theo M.

    2011-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is associated with increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and characterized by replacement of normal esophageal squamous epithelium by columnar epithelium. These alterations are also reflected in changes in the protein-expression profiles of the cell types

  8. Elastic scattering spectroscopy for detection of cancer risk in Barrett's esophagus: experimental and clinical validation of error removal by orthogonal subtraction for increasing accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Fearn, Tom; MacKenzie, Gary; Clark, Ben; Dunn, Jason M.; Bigio, Irving J.; Bown, Stephen G.; Lovat, Laurence B.

    2009-07-01

    Elastic scattering spectroscopy (ESS) may be used to detect high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or cancer in Barrett's esophagus (BE). When spectra are measured in vivo by a hand-held optical probe, variability among replicated spectra from the same site can hinder the development of a diagnostic model for cancer risk. An experiment was carried out on excised tissue to investigate how two potential sources of this variability, pressure and angle, influence spectral variability, and the results were compared with the variations observed in spectra collected in vivo from patients with Barrett's esophagus. A statistical method called error removal by orthogonal subtraction (EROS) was applied to model and remove this measurement variability, which accounted for 96.6% of the variation in the spectra, from the in vivo data. Its removal allowed the construction of a diagnostic model with specificity improved from 67% to 82% (with sensitivity fixed at 90%). The improvement was maintained in predictions on an independent in vivo data set. EROS works well as an effective pretreatment for Barrett's in vivo data by identifying measurement variability and ameliorating its effect. The procedure reduces the complexity and increases the accuracy and interpretability of the model for classification and detection of cancer risk in Barrett's esophagus.

  9. Persistence of nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus identifies patients at lower risk for esophageal adenocarcinoma: results from a large multicenter cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Srinivas; Singh, Mandeep; Balasubramanian, Gokulakrishnan; Thota, Prashanthi; Gupta, Neil; Wani, Sachin; Higbee, April D; Mathur, Sharad C; Horwhat, John D; Rastogi, Amit; Young, Patrick E; Cash, Brooks D; Bansal, Ajay; Vargo, John J; Falk, Gary W; Lieberman, David A; Sampliner, Richard E; Sharma, Prateek

    2013-09-01

    Recent population-based studies have shown a low risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in patients with nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus (NDBE). We evaluated whether persistence of NDBE over multiple consecutive surveillance endoscopic examinations could be used in risk stratification of patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE). We performed a multicenter outcomes study of a large cohort of patients with BE. Based on the number of consecutive surveillance endoscopies showing NDBE, we identified 5 groups of patients. Patients in group 1 were found to have NDBE at their first esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Patients in group 2 were found to have NDBE on their first 2 consecutive EGDs. Similarly, patients in groups 3, 4, and 5 were found to have NDBE on 3, 4, and 5 consecutive surveillance EGDs. A logistic regression model was built to determine whether persistence of NDBE independently protected against development of cancer. Of a total of 3515 patients with BE, 1401 patients met the inclusion criteria (93.3% white; 87.5% men; median age, 60 ±17 years). The median follow-up period was 5 ± 3.9 years (7846 patient-years). The annual risk of EAC in groups 1 to 5 was 0.32%, 0.27%, 0.16%, 0.2%, and 0.11%, respectively (P for trend = .03). After adjusting for age, sex, and length of BE, persistence of NDBE, based on multiple surveillance endoscopies, was associated with a gradually lower likelihood of progression to EAC. Persistence of NDBE over several endoscopic examinations identifies patients who are at low risk for development of EAC. These findings support lengthening surveillance intervals or discontinuing surveillance of patients with persistent NDBE. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genomic regions associated with susceptibility to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma in African Americans: The cross BETRNet admixture study.

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    Xiangqing Sun

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus (BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC are far more prevalent in European Americans than in African Americans. Hypothesizing that this racial disparity in prevalence might represent a genetic susceptibility, we used an admixture mapping approach to interrogate disease association with genomic differences between European and African ancestry.Formalin fixed paraffin embedded samples were identified from 54 African Americans with BE or EAC through review of surgical pathology databases at participating Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet institutions. DNA was extracted from normal tissue, and genotyped on the Illumina OmniQuad SNP chip. Case-only admixture mapping analysis was performed on the data from both all 54 cases and also on a subset of 28 cases with high genotyping quality. Haplotype phases were inferred with Beagle 3.3.2, and local African and European ancestries were inferred with SABER plus. Disease association was tested by estimating and testing excess European ancestry and contrasting it to excess African ancestry.Both datasets, the 54 cases and the 28 cases, identified two admixture regions. An association of excess European ancestry on chromosome 11p reached a 5% genome-wide significance threshold, corresponding to -log10(P = 4.28. A second peak on chromosome 8q reached -log10(P = 2.73. The converse analysis examining excess African ancestry found no genetic regions with significant excess African ancestry associated with BE and EAC. On average, the regions on chromosomes 8q and 11p showed excess European ancestry of 15% and 20%, respectively.Chromosomal regions on 11p15 and 8q22-24 are associated with excess European ancestry in African Americans with BE and EAC. Because GWAS have not reported any variants in these two regions, low frequency and/or rare disease associated variants that confer susceptibility to developing BE and EAC may be driving the observed European ancestry

  11. The role of argon plasma coagulation in the management of Barrett's esophagus: a single-center experience

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    Gad YZ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Yahia Z Gad1, Adel A Zeid21Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, Mansoura Specialized Medical Hospital, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt; 2Consultant Surgeon, Al Nil Hospital, Mansaura, EgyptBackground/aim: Patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE are 30 times more likely to develop esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC than the general population. Data regarding the use of argon plasma coagulation (APC for treatment of patients with BE in Egypt are still limited. This article discusses the efficacy and safety of APC as a thermoablative modality in Egyptian patients with BE.Materials and methods: A total of 73 referred eligible patients with a confirmed endoscopic and histopathologic diagnosis of BE were enrolled in this study and subjected to thermoablation by high-power (hp-APC equipment at a 60 W setting until complete ablation or a maximum of five sessions and were followed up clinically and endoscopically at 3-month intervals. Computer-generated randomization allocated patients into APC-treated and control groups (n = 75, all of whom were treated with a proton pump inhibitor.Results: Minor and major complications occurred in 8 of 73 (10.95% and 1 of 73 (1.36% patients, respectively. Macroscopic ablation was achieved after one session in 37 of 73 (50.63% patients, and complete histologic ablation was confirmed after 167 sessions in 69 of 73 (94.52% patients. At 1-year follow-up, no relapses of BE or progression to EAC were observed.Conclusion: hp-APC at a medium-energy setting of 60 W in an acid-reduced environment can ablate BE effectively and safely with promising initial results.Keywords: Barrett's esophagus, argon plasma coagulation

  12. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease symptoms and demographic factors as a pre-screening tool for Barrett's esophagus.

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    Xinxue Liu

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus (BE occurs as consequence of reflux and is a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. The current "gold-standard" for diagnosing BE is endoscopy which remains prohibitively expensive and impractical as a population screening tool. We aimed to develop a pre-screening tool to aid decision making for diagnostic referrals.A prospective (training cohort of 1603 patients attending for endoscopy was used for identification of risk factors to develop a risk prediction model. Factors associated with BE in the univariate analysis were selected to develop prediction models that were validated in an independent, external cohort of 477 non-BE patients referred for endoscopy with symptoms of reflux or dyspepsia. Two prediction models were developed separately for columnar lined epithelium (CLE of any length and using a stricter definition of intestinal metaplasia (IM with segments ≥ 2 cm with areas under the ROC curves (AUC of 0.72 (95%CI: 0.67-0.77 and 0.81 (95%CI: 0.76-0.86, respectively. The two prediction models included demographics (age, sex, symptoms (heartburn, acid reflux, chest pain, abdominal pain and medication for "stomach" symptoms. These two models were validated in the independent cohort with AUCs of 0.61 (95%CI: 0.54-0.68 and 0.64 (95%CI: 0.52-0.77 for CLE and IM ≥ 2 cm, respectively.We have identified and validated two prediction models for CLE and IM ≥ 2 cm. Both models have fair prediction accuracies and can select out around 20% of individuals unlikely to benefit from investigation for Barrett's esophagus. Such prediction models have the potential to generate useful cost-savings for BE screening among the symptomatic population.

  13. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease symptoms and demographic factors as a pre-screening tool for Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinxue; Wong, Angela; Kadri, Sudarshan R; Corovic, Andrej; O'Donovan, Maria; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Lovat, Laurence B; Burnham, Rodney W; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) occurs as consequence of reflux and is a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. The current "gold-standard" for diagnosing BE is endoscopy which remains prohibitively expensive and impractical as a population screening tool. We aimed to develop a pre-screening tool to aid decision making for diagnostic referrals. A prospective (training) cohort of 1603 patients attending for endoscopy was used for identification of risk factors to develop a risk prediction model. Factors associated with BE in the univariate analysis were selected to develop prediction models that were validated in an independent, external cohort of 477 non-BE patients referred for endoscopy with symptoms of reflux or dyspepsia. Two prediction models were developed separately for columnar lined epithelium (CLE) of any length and using a stricter definition of intestinal metaplasia (IM) with segments ≥ 2 cm with areas under the ROC curves (AUC) of 0.72 (95%CI: 0.67-0.77) and 0.81 (95%CI: 0.76-0.86), respectively. The two prediction models included demographics (age, sex), symptoms (heartburn, acid reflux, chest pain, abdominal pain) and medication for "stomach" symptoms. These two models were validated in the independent cohort with AUCs of 0.61 (95%CI: 0.54-0.68) and 0.64 (95%CI: 0.52-0.77) for CLE and IM ≥ 2 cm, respectively. We have identified and validated two prediction models for CLE and IM ≥ 2 cm. Both models have fair prediction accuracies and can select out around 20% of individuals unlikely to benefit from investigation for Barrett's esophagus. Such prediction models have the potential to generate useful cost-savings for BE screening among the symptomatic population.

  14. Os nitritos são importantes na gênese do adenocarcinoma associado ao esôfago de Barrett? Are the nitrites important in a genesis of the adenocarcinoma associated to the Barrett esophagus?

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    Sergio Ferreira Módena

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: O esôfago de Barrett é complicação do refluxo gastroesofágico e predispõe ao surgimento do adenocarcinoma, sendo que vários fatores têm sido relacionados à sua etiopatogenia. OBJETIVO: Analisar o modelo experimental de refluxo duodenogastroesofágico e a ingestão de solução de nitrito de sódio na gênese do adenocarcinoma associado ao esôfago de Barrett. MÉTODOS: Sessenta ratos machos Wistar foram divididos em quatro grupos, com 20 animais controles não operados (10 animais ingeriram somente água e 10 água mais solução de nitrito de sódio e 40 animais submetidos à anastomose duodenogastroesofágica látero-lateral (20 animais ingeriram somente água e 20 animais ingeriram água mais solução de nitrito de sódio. A ocorrência de esofagite, metaplasia, displasia, esôfago de Barrett e adenocarcinoma associado foram analisados. A classificação de Viena para displasia e adenocarcinoma foi empregada na análise dos resultados. RESULTADOS: Após 42 semanas de observação, nos animais operados sem ingestão de nitritos o esôfago de Barrett foi registrado em 26,3% (5/19, enquanto no grupo operado associado à ingestão de nitritos, foi encontrado em 72,3% (13/18 dos animais, sendo que neste grupo também foi encontrado seis adenocarcinomas (33,3%. Nenhum animal não operado apresentou o esôfago de Barrett. As categorias 2, 3 e 5 da classificação de Viena somente foram encontradas nos animais operados que ingeriram nitrito de sódio (66,7%. CONCLUSÃO: A ingestão de nitrito de sódio associado ao refluxo duodenogastroesofágico têm importante participação na gênese do adenocarcinoma associado ao esôfago de Barrett.BACKGROUND: Barrett's esophagus is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux and predisposes to adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric transition and several factors have been related to its pathogenesis. AIM: To evaluated the genesis of adenocarcinoma associated with Barrett's esophagus in an

  15. Association of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T-A1298C polymorphisms with risk for esophageal adenocarcinoma, Barrett's esophagus, and reflux esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiz, F; Ormeci, N; Coban, S; Karabulut, H G; Aktas, B; Tukun, A; Tuncali, T; Yüksel, O; Alkış, N

    2012-07-01

    Incidence of the esophagus adenocarcinoma has been dramatically increasing in Western countries since the last decade. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus are risk factors for adenocarcinoma. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genes play a key role not only in folate metabolism but also in esophagus, stomach, pancreatic carcinoma, and acute leukemias. Studies have suggested that genetic polymorphisms of MTHFR (C677T) may clarify the causes and events involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. In this study, we evaluated MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms, and vitamin B12, folate, and plasma homocystein levels in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), Barrett's esophagus (BE), chronic esophagitis, and healthy controls (n = 26, n = 14, n = 30, and n = 30, respectively). The mean age of patients in the EAC and BE groups was significantly higher compared with the control group (P homocystein, and B12 levels among the groups. MTHFR gene polymorphisms and folate deficiency are not predictors of early esophageal carcinoma. However, further studies using larger series of patients are needed to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the folate metabolic pathway and to clarify the role of folate deficiency and folate metabolism in the development of esophagus adenocarcinoma. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  16. Multilayered epithelium in a rat model and human Barrett's esophagus: Similar expression patterns of transcription factors and differentiation markers

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    Yang Chung S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In rats, esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis (EGDA without concomitant chemical carcinogen treatment leads to gastroesophageal reflux disease, multilayered epithelium (MLE, a presumed precursor in intestinal metaplasia, columnar-lined esophagus, dysplasia, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Previously we have shown that columnar-lined esophagus in EGDA rats resembled human Barrett's esophagus (BE in its morphology, mucin features and expression of differentiation markers (Lab. Invest. 2004;84:753–765. The purpose of this study was to compare the phenotype of rat MLE with human MLE, in order to gain insight into the nature of MLE and its potential role in the development of BE. Methods Serial sectioning was performed on tissue samples from 32 EGDA rats and 13 patients with established BE. Tissue sections were immunohistochemically stained for a variety of transcription factors and differentiation markers of esophageal squamous epithelium and intestinal columnar epithelium. Results We detected MLE in 56.3% (18/32 of EGDA rats, and in all human samples. As expected, both rat and human squamous epithelium, but not intestinal metaplasia, expressed squamous transcription factors and differentiation markers (p63, Sox2, CK14 and CK4 in all cases. Both rat and human intestinal metaplasia, but not squamous epithelium, expressed intestinal transcription factors and differentiation markers (Cdx2, GATA4, HNF1α, villin and Muc2 in all cases. Rat MLE shared expression patterns of Sox2, CK4, Cdx2, GATA4, villin and Muc2 with human MLE. However, p63 and CK14 were expressed in a higher proportion of rat MLE compared to humans. Conclusion These data indicate that rat MLE shares similar properties to human MLE in its expression pattern of these markers, not withstanding small differences, and support the concept that MLE may be a transitional stage in the metaplastic conversion of squamous to columnar epithelium in BE.

  17. The utility of cytokeratins 7 and 20 (CK7/20 immunohistochemistry in the distinction of short-segment Barrett esophagus from gastric intestinal metaplasia: Is it reliable?

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    Bakirci Nadi

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the present correlative immunohistochemical study was to assess the utility of cytokeratin (CK7 and CK20 expression in the diagnosis of short-segment Barrett esophagus, particularly its efficacy in differentiating Barrett mucosa from intestinal metaplasia of the gastric cardia and corpus. Methods Two groups of endoscopic biopsy specimens were examined, including 20 endoscopic biopsy specimens of short-segment Barrett esophagus (Group A and equal number exhibiting Helicobacter pylori associated intestinal metaplasia of the gastric cardia and corpus (Group B. All were investigated by immunohistochemistry using the standard ABC method for CK7 and CK20 expression. Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis of Barrett CK7/20 and gastric CK7/20 patterns between the groups. Results The anticipated pattern of reactivity in Barrett mucosa (CK7: strong diffuse positivity in superficial and deep glands; CK20: positivity in surface epithelium and superficial glands was seen in 2 cases of Group A specimens. The expected gastric pattern (CK7: patchy immunostaining with variable involvement of deep glands; CK20: patchy immunostaining of superficial and deep glands in incomplete intestinal metaplasia / absence of CK7 immunoreactivity with strong CK20 staining in superficial and deep glands in complete intestinal metaplasia was seen in 8 cases of Group B specimens. The respective sensitivity and false-negativity values of CK7/20 staining for Barrett pattern in Group A were 10% and 90%, respectively. These values for gastric pattern in Group B were 40% and 60%, respectively. The specificity and false-positivity values of both patterns were same (100% and 0%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference for Barrett pattern between the two groups (P = 0.487, while the observation of gastric pattern was significantly higher in Group B than in Group A (P = 0.02. Conclusions We concluded that these

  18. A randomized, prospective cross-over trial comparing methylene blue-directed biopsy and conventional random biopsy for detecting intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragunath, K; Krasner, N; Raman, V S; Haqqani, M T; Cheung, W Y

    2003-12-01

    The value of methylene blue-directed biopsies (MBDB) in detecting specialized intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of MBDB with random biopsy in detecting intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus. A prospective, randomized, cross-over trial was undertaken to compare MBDB with random biopsy in patients with Barrett's esophagus segments 3 cm or more in length without macroscopic evidence of dysplasia or cancer. Dysplasia was graded as: indefinite for dysplasia, low-grade dysplasia, high-grade dysplasia, or carcinoma, and was reported in a blinded fashion. Fifty-seven patients were recruited, 44 of whom were male. A total of 1,269 biopsies were taken (MBDB-651, random biopsie-618). Analysis of the results by per-biopsy protocol showed that the MBDB technique diagnosed significantly more specialized intestinal metaplasia (75 %) compared to the random biopsy technique (68 %; P = 0.032). The sensitivity and specificity rates of MBDB for diagnosing specialized intestinal metaplasia were 91 % (95 % CI, 88 - 93 %) and 43 % (95 % CI, 36 - 51 %), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity rates of MBDB for diagnosing dysplasia or carcinoma were 49 % (95 % CI, 38 - 61 %) and 85 % (95 % CI, 82 - 88 %), respectively. There were no significant differences in the diagnosis of dysplasia and carcinoma - MBDB 12 %, random biopsy 10 %. The methylene blue staining pattern appeared to have an influence on the detection of specialized intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia/carcinoma. Dark blue staining was associated with increased detection of specialized intestinal metaplasia (P biopsies. Although MBDB prolongs the endoscopy procedure slightly, it is a safe and well-tolerated procedure. Further clinical studies on the MBDB technique exclusively in endoscopically normal dysplastic Barrett's esophagus are needed.

  19. Esôfago de Barrett e displasia: critérios diagnósticos Barret's esophagus and dysplasia: diagnostic criteria

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    Maria Aparecida Marchesan Rodrigues

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A presente revisão focaliza aspectos conceituais e os principais problemas diagnósticos referentes ao esôfago de Barrett e à displasia. O esôfago de Barrett resulta de complicação da doença do refluxo gastroesofágico de longa duração. É identificado endoscopicamente pela presença de mucosa glandular no esôfago tubular acima da junção esofagogástrica. Histologicamente, é caracterizado pela substituição do epitélio estratificado pavimentoso por epitélio colunar especializado com células caliciformes, expresso como metaplasia intestinal. A importância biológica do esôfago de Barrett é o risco de progressão para câncer. A displasia é o principal marcador biológico preditivo de evolução para adenocarcinoma. Identificar e graduar a displasia constitui importante questão na prática diagnóstica. O diagnóstico patológico do esôfago de Barrett deve conter informações sobre a investigação de displasia. O principal diagnóstico diferencial da displasia é feito em relação a reatividade e regeneração epitelial no contexto de inflamação da mucosa. Como a variabilidade de interpretação é um dos principais problemas no diagnóstico da displasia, os casos de esôfago de Barrett devem ser enviados à consulta para segunda opinião diagnóstica. O exame anatomopatológico é fundamental para definir o diagnóstico de esôfago de Barrett e para rastrear a displasia, que é o principal marcador de risco para câncer nesta entidade.This review focuses on conceptual aspects of Barrett's esophagus and Barrett's related dysplasia and highlights current diagnostic problems on the interpretation of these lesions. Barrett's esophagus results from longstanding gastroesophageal reflux. Endoscopically it is recognized by the presence of glandular mucosa in the tubular esophagus above the esophagogastric junction at variable lenghts. Histologically it is characterized by the presence of specialized columnar epithelium with

  20. A labelled discrete choice experiment adds realism to the choices presented: preferences for surveillance tests for Barrett esophagus

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    Donkers Bas

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discrete choice experiments (DCEs allow systematic assessment of preferences by asking respondents to choose between scenarios. We conducted a labelled discrete choice experiment with realistic choices to investigate patients' trade-offs between the expected health gains and the burden of testing in surveillance of Barrett esophagus (BE. Methods Fifteen choice scenarios were selected based on 2 attributes: 1 type of test (endoscopy and two less burdensome fictitious tests, 2 frequency of surveillance. Each test-frequency combination was associated with its own realistic decrease in risk of dying from esophageal adenocarcinoma. A conditional logit model was fitted. Results Of 297 eligible patients (155 BE and 142 with non-specific upper GI symptoms, 247 completed the questionnaire (84%. Patients preferred surveillance to no surveillance. Current surveillance schemes of once every 1–2 years were amongst the most preferred alternatives. Higher health gains were preferred over those with lower health gains, except when test frequencies exceeded once a year. For similar health gains, patients preferred video-capsule over saliva swab and least preferred endoscopy. Conclusion This first example of a labelled DCE using realistic scenarios in a healthcare context shows that such experiments are feasible. A comparison of labelled and unlabelled designs taking into account setting and research question is recommended.

  1. Displasia no esôfago de Barrett - concordância intra e interobservador no diagnóstico histopatológico Dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus - intra- and interobserver variability in histopathological diagnosis

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    César Vivian Lopes

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: O potencial maligno do esôfago de Barrett é bem reconhecido. A vigilância endoscópica e a abordagem terapêutica se baseiam na presença e graduação da displasia. Contudo, a validade do diagnóstico histopatológico pode ser questionada devido à precária reprodutibilidade tanto intra como interobservador. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a concordância intra e interobservador no diagnóstico de displasia no esôfago de Barrett. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: O material foi constituído por 42 blocos de parafina contendo fragmentos de esôfago provenientes de biopsias endoscópicas de portadores de esôfago de Barrett. Cortes de 3 micrômetros foram corados pela hematoxilina-eosina e pelo PAS-alcian blue. A leitura das lâminas foi realizada de maneira cega, em microscópio óptico. A reprodutibilidade intra e interobservador utilizou o teste kappa. RESULTADOS: O número total de fragmentos foi de 229, com média de 5,45 (1 a 18 fragmentos por paciente. O diagnóstico de displasia de baixo grau firmado pelos diferentes patologistas variou de 21,4% a 52,4%. A concordância intra-observador para o diagnóstico de displasia de baixo grau foi fraca (kappa = 0,30. A concordância interobservador para o diagnóstico de displasia de baixo grau foi pobre, com escore kappa oscilando entre 0,05 e 0,16. O diagnóstico de displasia, firmado pela concordância entre todos os patologistas, foi de 14,3%. CONCLUSÕES: A concordância no diagnóstico histopatológico de displasia de baixo grau no esôfago de Barrett, tanto intra quanto interobservador, é ruim. Idealmente, à semelhança da displasia de alto grau, o diagnóstico de displasia de baixo grau no esôfago de Barrett também deveria ser confirmado por mais de um patologista.BACKGROUND: Barrett's esophagus is a well-known pre-malignant condition. Pathologic interpretation of biopsy specimens guides endoscopic surveillance as well as the therapeutic approach that will be carried out. However, the predictive

  2. Cost Effectiveness of Screening Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease for Barrett's Esophagus With a Minimally Invasive Cell Sampling Device.

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    Heberle, Curtis R; Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Ali, Ayman; Kroep, Sonja; Kong, Chung Yin; Inadomi, John M; Rubenstein, Joel H; Tramontano, Angela C; Dowling, Emily C; Hazelton, William D; Luebeck, E Georg; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Hur, Chin

    2017-09-01

    It is important to identify patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE), the precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Patients with BE usually are identified by endoscopy, which is expensive. The Cytosponge, which collects tissue from the esophagus noninvasively, could be a cost-effective tool for screening individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who are at increased risk for BE. We developed a model to analyze the cost effectiveness of using the Cytosponge in first-line screening of patients with GERD for BE with endoscopic confirmation, compared with endoscopy screening only. We incorporated data from a large clinical trial of Cytosponge performance into 2 validated microsimulation models of EAC progression (the esophageal adenocarcinoma model from Massachusetts General Hospital and the microsimulation screening analysis model from Erasmus University Medical Center). The models were calibrated for US Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data on EAC incidence and mortality. In each model, we simulated the effect of a 1-time screen for BE in male patients with GERD, 60 years of age, using endoscopy alone or Cytosponge collection of tissue, and analysis for the level of trefoil factor 3 with endoscopic confirmation of positive results. For each strategy we recorded the number of cases of EAC that developed, the number of EAC cases detected with screening by Cytosponge only or by subsequent targeted surveillance, and the number of endoscopies needed. In addition, we recorded the cumulative costs (including indirect costs) incurred and quality-adjusted years of life lived within each strategy, discounted at a rate of 3% per year, and computed incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) among the 3 strategies. According to the models, screening patients with GERD by Cytosponge with follow-up confirmation of positive results by endoscopy would reduce the cost of screening by 27% to 29% compared with screening by endoscopy, but led to 1.8 to 5

  3. Single-session endoscopic resection and focal radiofrequency ablation for short-segment Barrett's esophagus with early neoplasia.

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    Barret, Maximilien; Belghazi, Kamar; Weusten, Bas L A M; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; Pouw, Roos E

    2016-07-01

    The management of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE) requires endoscopic resection of visible lesions, followed by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the remaining BE. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of combining endoscopic resection and focal RFA in a single endoscopic session in patients with early BE neoplasia. This was a retrospective analysis of patients with early BE neoplasia and a visible lesion undergoing combined endoscopic resection and focal RFA in a single session. Consecutive ablation procedures were performed every 8 to 12 weeks until complete endoscopic and histologic eradication of dysplasia and intestinal metaplasia were reached. Forty patients were enrolled, with a median C1M2 BE segment, a visible lesion with a median diameter of 15 mm, and invasive carcinoma in 68% of cases. Endoscopic resection was performed by using the multiband mucosectomy technique in 80% of cases, and the Barrx(90) catheter (Barrx Medical, Sunnyvale, Calif) was used for focal ablation. When an intention-to-treat analysis was used, both complete remission of all neoplasia and intestinal metaplasia were 95% after a median follow-up of 19 months. Stenoses occurred in 33% of cases and were successfully managed with a median number of 2 dilations. In 43% of patients, 1 single-session treatment resulted in complete histologic remission of intestinal metaplasia. Combining endoscopic resection and focal RFA in a single session appears to be effective. Less-aggressive RFA regimens could limit the adverse event rates. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: a possible, underestimated long-term complication.

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    Genco, Alfredo; Soricelli, Emanuele; Casella, Giovanni; Maselli, Roberta; Castagneto-Gissey, Lidia; Di Lorenzo, Nicola; Basso, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Morbidly obese patients are affected by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia (HH) more frequently than lean patients. Because of conflicting results, the indication to sleeve gastrectomy (SG) in patients with GERD is still debated. To evaluate the incidence of GERD on the basis of clinical, endoscopic, and histologic data in patients undergoing SG. University hospital, Rome, Italy. From July 2007 to January 2010, 162 patients underwent primary SG. Preoperatively all patients underwent visual analogue scale (VAS) evaluation of GERD symptoms, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) consumption recording, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Stomach resection started 6 cm from pylorus on a 48Fr bougie. Staple line was reinforced by an oversewing suture. A postoperative clinical control with VAS evaluation, PPI consumption, and EGD was proposed to all patients. Three patients were excluded because of the occurrence of major postoperative complications. A total of 110 patients accepted to take part in the study (follow-up rate: 69.1%). At a mean 58 months of follow-up, incidence of GERD symptoms, VAS mean score, and PPI intake significantly increased compared with preoperative values (68.1% versus 33.6%: Preflux was found in 73.6% and 74.5% of cases, respectively. A significant increase in the incidence and in the severity of erosive esophagitis (EE) was evidenced, whereas nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus (BE) was newly diagnosed in 19 patients (17.2%). No significant correlations were found between GERD symptoms and endoscopic findings. In the present series the incidence of EE and of BE in SG patients was considerably higher than that reported in the current literature, and it was not related to GERD symptoms. Endoscopic surveillance after SG should be advocated irrespective of the presence of GERD symptoms. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of Barrett's esophagus with type II Diabetes Mellitus: results from a large population-based case-control study.

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    Iyer, Prasad G; Borah, Bijan J; Heien, Herbert C; Das, Ananya; Cooper, Gregory S; Chak, Amitabh

    2013-09-01

    Central obesity could increase the risk for Barrett's esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma by mechanical and/or metabolic mechanisms, such as hyperinsulinemia. We performed an epidemiologic study to determine whether prior type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is associated with BE. We performed a population-based case-control study using the General Practice Research Database, a UK primary care database that contains information on more than 8 million subjects, to identify cases of BE (using previously validated codes; n = 14,245) and matched controls without BE (by age, sex, enrollment date, duration of follow-up evaluation, and practice region by incidence density sampling; n = 70,361). We assessed the association of a prior diagnosis of DM2 with BE using conditional univariate and multivariable regression analysis. Confounders assessed included smoking, obesity measured by body mass index (BMI), and gastroesophageal reflux disease. BE cases were more likely than controls to have smoked (52.4% vs 49.9%), have a higher mean BMI (27.2 vs 26.9), and a higher prevalence of DM2 than controls (5.8% vs 5.3%). On multivariable analysis, DM2 was associated with a 49% increase in the risk of BE, independent of other known risk factors (odds ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-1.91). This association was stronger in women than men. Results remained stable with sensitivity analyses. In a large population-based case-control study, DM2 was a risk factor for BE, independent of obesity (as measured by BMI) and other risk factors (smoking and gastroesophageal reflux disease). These data suggest that metabolic pathways related to DM2 should be explored in BE pathogenesis and esophageal carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic Biomarkers of Barrett's Esophagus Susceptibility and Progression to Dysplasia and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

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    Findlay, John M; Middleton, Mark R; Tomlinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a common and important precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). A third of patients with BE are asymptomatic, and our ability to predict the risk of progression of metaplasia to dysplasia and EAC (and therefore guide management) is limited. There is an urgent need for clinically useful biomarkers of susceptibility to both BE and risk of subsequent progression. This study aims to systematically identify, review, and meta-analyze genetic biomarkers reported to predict both. A systematic review of the PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed in May 2014. Study and evidence quality were appraised using the revised American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines, and modified Recommendations for Tumor Marker Scores. Meta-analysis was performed for all markers assessed by more than one study. A total of 251 full-text articles were reviewed; 52 were included. A total of 33 germline markers of susceptibility were identified (level of evidence II-III); 17 were included. Five somatic markers of progression were identified; meta-analysis demonstrated significant associations for chromosomal instability (level of evidence II). One somatic marker of progression/relapse following photodynamic therapy was identified. However, a number of failings of methodology and reporting were identified. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate genetic biomarkers of BE susceptibility and risk of progression. While a number of limitations of study quality temper the utility of those markers identified, some-in particular, those identified by genome-wide association studies, and chromosomal instability for progression-appear plausible, although robust validation is required.

  7. Predictive Biomarkers of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Barrett's Esophagus in World Trade Center Exposed Firefighters: a 15 Year Longitudinal Study.

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    Haider, Syed H; Kwon, Sophia; Lam, Rachel; Lee, Audrey K; Caraher, Erin J; Crowley, George; Zhang, Liqun; Schwartz, Theresa M; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Liu, Mengling; Prezant, David J; Nolan, Anna

    2018-02-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and Barrett's Esophagus (BE), which are prevalent in the World Trade Center (WTC) exposed and general populations, negatively impact quality of life and cost of healthcare. GERD, a risk factor of BE, is linked to obstructive airways disease (OAD). We aim to identify serum biomarkers of GERD/BE, and assess the respiratory and clinical phenotype of a longitudinal cohort of never-smoking, male, WTC-exposed rescue workers presenting with pulmonary symptoms. Biomarkers collected soon after WTC-exposure were evaluated in optimized predictive models of GERD/BE. In the WTC-exposed cohort, the prevalence of BE is at least 6 times higher than in the general population. GERD/BE cases had similar lung function, D LCO , bronchodilator response and long-acting β-agonist use compared to controls. In confounder-adjusted regression models, TNF-α ≥ 6 pg/mL predicted both GERD and BE. GERD was also predicted by C-peptide ≥ 360 pg/mL, while BE was predicted by fractalkine ≥ 250 pg/mL and IP-10 ≥ 290 pg/mL. Finally, participants with GERD had significantly increased use of short-acting β-agonist compared to controls. Overall, biomarkers sampled prior to GERD/BE presentation showed strong predictive abilities of disease development. This study frames future investigations to further our understanding of aerodigestive pathology due to particulate matter exposure.

  8. Visceral obesity and the risk of Barrett's esophagus in Japanese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Kirikoshi Hiroyuki

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between obesity and the risk of Barrett's esophagus (BE is unclear. Furthermore, the association between visceral obesity and the risk of BE is entirely unknown. Methods We conducted a retrospective study in 163 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD who underwent both endoscopy and abdominal CT at an interval of less than a year at our institution. BE was endoscopically diagnosed based on the Prague C & M Criteria. The surface areas of visceral adipose tissue (VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT were calculated from CT images at the level of the umbilicus. The correlations between the BMI, VAT, and SAT and the risk of BE were examined by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Sixty-nine of the 163 study participants (42.3% were diagnosed to have endoscopic BE, which was classified as short-segment BE (SSBE in almost all of the cases. There were no significant differences in the age or gender distribution between the groups with and without BE. According to the results of the univariate analysis, VAT was significantly associated with the risk of BE; the BMI tended to be higher in the group with BE than in the group without BE, but this relation did not reach statistical significance. VAT was independently associated with the risk of BE even after adjustment for the BMI. Conclusion In Japanese patients with NAFLD, obesity tended to be associated with the risk of BE, and this risk appeared to be mediated for the most part by abdominal visceral adiposity.

  9. Genome-wide DNA Methylation Profiling of Cell-Free Serum DNA in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Barrett Esophagus

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    Rihong Zhai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation (DNAm is a feature of most types of cancers. Genome-wide DNAm profiling has been performed successfully on tumor tissue DNA samples. However, the invasive procedure limits the utility of tumor tissue for epidemiological studies. While recent data indicate that cell-free circulating DNAm (cfDNAm profiles reflect DNAm status in corresponding tumor tissues, no studies have examined the association of cfDNAm with cancer or precursors on a genome-wide scale. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the putative significance of genome-wide cfDNAm profiles in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA and Barrett esophagus (BE, EA precursor. We performed genome-wide DNAm profiling in EA tissue DNA (n = 8 and matched serum DNA (n = 8, in serum DNA of BE (n = 10, and in healthy controls (n = 10 using the Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip that covers 27,578 CpG loci in 14,495 genes. We found that cfDNAm profiles were highly correlated to DNAm profiles in matched tumor tissue DNA (r = 0.92 in patients with EA. We selected the most differentially methylated loci to perform hierarchical clustering analysis. We found that 911 loci can discriminate perfectly between EA and control samples, 554 loci can separate EA from BE samples, and 46 loci can distinguish BE from control samples. These results suggest that genome-wide cfDNAm profiles are highly consistent with DNAm profiles detected in corresponding tumor tissues. Differential cfDNAm profiling may be a useful approach for the noninvasive screening of EA and EA premalignant lesions.

  10. Value of cyclin A immunohistochemistry for cancer risk stratification in Barrett esophagus surveillance: A multicenter case-control study.

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    van Olphen, Sophie H; Ten Kate, Fiebo J C; Doukas, Michail; Kastelein, Florine; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Stoop, Hans A; Spaander, Manon C; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Bruno, Marco J; Biermann, Katharina

    2016-11-01

    The value of endoscopic Barrett esophagus (BE) surveillance based on histological diagnosis of low-grade dysplasia (LGD) remains debated given the lack of adequate risk stratification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of cyclin A expression and to combine these results with our previously reported immunohistochemical p53, AMACR, and SOX2 data, to identify a panel of biomarkers predicting neoplastic progression in BE.We conducted a case-control study within a prospective cohort of 720 BE patients. BE patients who progressed to high-grade dysplasia (HGD, n = 37) or esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC, n = 13), defined as neoplastic progression, were classified as cases and patients without neoplastic progression were classified as controls (n = 575). Cyclin A expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in all 625 patients; these results were combined with the histological diagnosis and our previous p53, AMACR, and SOX2 data in loglinear regression models. Differences in discriminatory ability were quantified as changes in area under the ROC curve (AUC) for predicting neoplastic progression.Cyclin A surface positivity significantly increased throughout the metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequences and was seen in 10% (107/1050) of biopsy series without dysplasia, 33% (109/335) in LGD, and 69% (34/50) in HGD/EAC. Positive cyclin A expression was associated with an increased risk of neoplastic progression (adjusted relative risk (RR) 2.4; 95% CI: 1.7-3.4). Increases in AUC were substantial for P53 (+0.05), smaller for SOX2 (+0.014), minor for cyclin A (+0.003), and none for AMARC (0.00).Cyclin A immunopositivity was associated with an increased progression risk in BE patients. However, compared to p53 and SOX2, the incremental value of cyclin A was limited. The use of biomarkers has the potential to significantly improve risk stratification in BE.

  11. Whole genome expression array profiling highlights differences in mucosal defense genes in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

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    Derek J Nancarrow

    Full Text Available Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC has become a major concern in Western countries due to rapid rises in incidence coupled with very poor survival rates. One of the key risk factors for the development of this cancer is the presence of Barrett's esophagus (BE, which is believed to form in response to repeated gastro-esophageal reflux. In this study we performed comparative, genome-wide expression profiling (using Illumina whole-genome Beadarrays on total RNA extracted from esophageal biopsy tissues from individuals with EAC, BE (in the absence of EAC and those with normal squamous epithelium. We combined these data with publically accessible raw data from three similar studies to investigate key gene and ontology differences between these three tissue states. The results support the deduction that BE is a tissue with enhanced glycoprotein synthesis machinery (DPP4, ATP2A3, AGR2 designed to provide strong mucosal defenses aimed at resisting gastro-esophageal reflux. EAC exhibits the enhanced extracellular matrix remodeling (collagens, IGFBP7, PLAU effects expected in an aggressive form of cancer, as well as evidence of reduced expression of genes associated with mucosal (MUC6, CA2, TFF1 and xenobiotic (AKR1C2, AKR1B10 defenses. When our results are compared to previous whole-genome expression profiling studies keratin, mucin, annexin and trefoil factor gene groups are the most frequently represented differentially expressed gene families. Eleven genes identified here are also represented in at least 3 other profiling studies. We used these genes to discriminate between squamous epithelium, BE and EAC within the two largest cohorts using a support vector machine leave one out cross validation (LOOCV analysis. While this method was satisfactory for discriminating squamous epithelium and BE, it demonstrates the need for more detailed investigations into profiling changes between BE and EAC.

  12. THE REAL PREVALENCE OF EROSIVE ESOPHAGITIS AND BARRETT'S ESOPHAGUS IN SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA: DATA FROM 12-MONTHS PROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    Andrey Evgenievich Karateev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Complicated forms of reflux-esophagitis, i.e., erosive esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus (BE — are common types of visceral pathology in systemic scleroderma (SSD, which require adequate therapy and follow up. Although real prevalence of esophageal involvement in SSD in Russian patients remains uncertain. Objective — to identify prevalence of erosive esophagitis and BE, and to quantify gastro-intestinal (GI symptoms in patients with SSD. Material and methods. During 1 year (December 2009 — January 2011 all consecutive SSD patients, hospitalized to FSBI «SRIR» RAMS, after signing informed consent, were subjected to esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy of esophageal mucosa in upper 1/3. Totally 123 patients were examined (96,8% females, 3,2% males, aged 50,5±13,1 years. Esophageal mucous was evaluated for presence of pathologic changes and BE (intestinal metaplasia in biopsy samples was a BE diagnostic criterion. SODA questionnaire was used to quantify GIT symptoms Results. Erosive esophagitis was detected in 30 (24,3% patients, BE — in 11 (8,9%. In 80% of patients marked changes in esophageal mucosa were associated with typical symptoms (heartburn, regurgitaion, dysphagia, while in some cases (in 3 patients erosive esophagitis and BE were asymptomatic. Quantitative evaluation of symptoms with SODA questionnaire demonstrated clear correlation between subjective assessment and severity of esophageal pathologic changes. In patients with erosive gastritis and BE the SODA «pain» and «non-pain» parameters scores were significantly higher and satisfaction in dyspepsia management was lower (p<0,05, then in individuals without erosions and mucosal inflammation. Here was no clear correlation between esophageal pathology and SSD type (limited, diffuse, age, duration of the disease, presence of pulmonary interstitial lesion and Sjogren's syndrome. Patients with erosive esophagitis were significantly more often (36,6% using proton pomp

  13. Selenium, selenoenzymes, oxidative stress and risk of neoplastic progression from Barrett's esophagus: results from biomarkers and genetic variants.

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    Yumie Takata

    Full Text Available Clinical trials have suggested a protective effect of selenium supplementation on the risk of esophageal cancer, which may be mediated through the antioxidant activity of selenoenzymes. We investigated whether serum selenium concentrations, selenoenzyme activity, oxidative stress and genetic variation in selenoenzymes were associated with the risk of neoplastic progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA and two intermediate endpoints, aneuploidy and tetraploidy. In this prospective cohort study, during an average follow-up of 7.3 years, 47 EA cases, 41 aneuploidy cases and 51 tetraploidy cases accrued among 361 participants from the Seattle Barrett's Esophagus Research Study who were free of EA at the time of blood draw and had at least one follow-up visit. Development to EA was assessed histologically and aneuploidy and tetraploidy by DNA content flow cytometry. Serum selenium concentrations were measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX 1 and GPX3 by substrate-specific coupled test procedures, selenoprotein P (SEPP1 concentrations and protein carbonyl content by ELISA method and malondialdehyde concentrations by HPLC. Genetic variants in GPX1-4 and SEPP1 were genotyped. Serum selenium was not associated with the risk of neoplastic progression to EA, aneuploidy or tetraploidy (P for trend = 0.25 to 0.85. SEPP1 concentrations were positively associated with the risk of EA [hazard ratio (HR = 3.95, 95% confidence intervals (CI = 1.42-10.97 comparing the third tertile with the first] and with aneuploidy (HR = 6.53, 95% CI = 1.31-32.58, but not selenoenzyme activity or oxidative stress markers. No genetic variants, overall, were associated with the risk of neoplastic progression to EA (global p = 0.12-0.69. Our results do not support a protective effect of selenium on risk of neoplastic progression to EA. Our study is the first to report positive associations of plasma SEPP1

  14. Risk Profiles for Barrett's Esophagus Differ between New and Prevalent, and Long- and Short-Segment Cases.

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    Mimi C Tan

    Full Text Available Previous studies on Barrett's esophagus (BE risk factors have had differing case definitions and control groups. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in risk factors between newly diagnosed vs. prevalent BE, long- vs. short-segment BE, and endoscopy-only BE without specialized intestinal metaplasia (SIM.We conducted a cross-sectional study among eligible patients scheduled for elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD and patients eligible for screening colonoscopy, recruited from primary care clinics at a Veterans Affairs center. All participants completed a survey on demographics, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD symptoms and medication use prior to undergoing study EGD. We compared BE cases separately to two control groups: 503 primary care controls and 1353 endoscopy controls. Associations between risk factors and differing BE case definitions were evaluated with multivariate logistic regression models.For comparisons with primary care controls, early onset frequent GERD symptoms were more strongly associated with risk of long-segment BE (OR 19.9; 95% CI 7.96-49.7 than short-segment BE (OR 8.54; 95% CI 3.85-18.9. Likewise, the inverse association with H. pylori infection was stronger for long-segment BE (OR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.26-0.79 than short-segment BE (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.48-1.05. GERD symptoms and H. pylori infection was also more strongly associated with prevalent BE than newly diagnosed BE. Few differences were observed between BE cases and endoscopy controls. Endoscopy-only BE was associated with GERD symptoms (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.32-3.85 and PPI/H2RA use (OR 4.44; 95% CI 2.61-7.54 but to a smaller degree than BE with SIM.We found differences in the strength and profiles of risk factors for BE. The findings support that epidemiological studies of BE should make a distinction between long and short, new and prevalent, endoscopy-only and BE with SIM as well as type of controls.

  15. Influence of genetics on tumoral pathologies: The example of the adenocarcinoma arising in Barrett's esophagus Influencia de la genética en la patología tumoral: El ejemplo del adenocarcinoma desarrollado sobre el esófago de Barrett

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    Vincenzo Villanacci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus (BE refers to an abnormal change (metaplasia in the cells of the inferior portion of the esophagus. About 10% of patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD have BE. In some cases, BE develops as an advanced stage of erosive esophagitis. The risk of esophageal cancer appears to be increased in patients with BE. The only way to diagnose BE is by endoscopy and histology. Some studies suggest that intensive treatment of Barrett's esophagus with effective acid suppression can reduce the amount of abnormal lining in the esophagus. It is not clear whether such treatment also prevents esophageal cancer. Generally, the cancer starts out as carcinoma of the esophagus on the surface, and then invades the surrounding tissue. Surgery offers the best chance of long-term survival. There are many events that occur in Barrett's esophagus that lead to the development of cancer and most of them appear to occur early, before high-grade dysplasia or cancer develops. No one knows what the late events are and how cells acquire the ability to leave their normal growth boundaries. It is now widely accepted that the development of most cancers is due to something called genomic or genetic instability. The aim of this review is to show BE pathology in its progression to cancer looking for new biomarkers to distinguish between BE-dysplasia (low grade and high grade- adenocarcinoma (ADC and to characterize the ADC, giving more hope for its treatment.

  16. CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with decreased risk of Barrett's esophagus in a population with high H. pylori infection rate

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    Ortego Javier

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim The role that H. pylori infection plays in the development of and Barrett's esophagus (BE is uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that infection with cagA+ Helicobacter pylori strains protects against the development of BE. Methods We studied 104 consecutive patients, residents in an area with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection, with BE and 213 sex- and age-matched controls. H. pylori infection and CagA antibody status were determined by western blot serology. Results H. pylori prevalence was higher in patients with BE than in controls (87.5% vs. 74.6%; OR. 2.3; 95% CI: 1.23–4.59. Increasing age was associated with a higher prevalence of H. pylori (p Conclusion Neither H. pylori infection nor H. pylori infection by CagA+ strains reduce the risk of BE in a population with high prevalence of H. pylori infection.

  17. Proton pump inhibitors suppress iNOS-dependent DNA damage in Barrett's esophagus by increasing Mn-SOD expression

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    Thanan, Raynoo [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie 513-8670 (Japan); Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Ma, Ning [Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie 513-0293 (Japan); Iijima, Katsunori; Abe, Yasuhiko; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyaki 980-8574 (Japan); Pinlaor, Somchai [Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Murata, Mariko [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Kawanishi, Shosuke, E-mail: kawanisi@suzuka-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie 513-8670 (Japan)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation by Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a risk factor of its adenocarcinoma (BEA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 8-Nitroguanine and 8-oxodG are inflammation-related DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA lesions and iNOS expression were higher in the order, BEA > BE > normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton pump inhibitors suppress DNA damage by increasing Mn-SOD via Nrf2 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA lesions can be useful biomarkers to predict risk of BEA in BE patients. -- Abstract: Barrett's esophagus (BE), an inflammatory disease, is a risk factor for Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma (BEA). Treatment of BE patients with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is expected to reduce the risk of BEA. We performed an immunohistochemical study to examine the formation of nitrative and oxidative DNA lesions, 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 Prime -deoxygaunosine (8-oxodG), in normal esophageal, BE with pre- and post-treatment by PPIs and BEA tissues. We also observed the expression of an oxidant-generating enzyme (iNOS) and its transcription factor NF-{kappa}B, an antioxidant enzyme (Mn-SOD), its transcription factor (Nrf2) and an Nrf2 inhibitor (Keap1). The immunoreactivity of DNA lesions was significantly higher in the order of BEA > BE > normal tissues. iNOS expression was significantly higher in the order of BEA > BE > normal tissues, while Mn-SOD expression was significantly lower in the order of BEA < BE < normal tissues. Interestingly, Mn-SOD expression and the nuclear localization of Nrf2 were significantly increased, and the formation of DNA lesions was significantly decreased in BE tissues after PPIs treatment for 3-6 months. Keap1 and iNOS expression was not significantly changed by the PPIs treatment in BE tissues. These results indicate that 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG play a role in BE-derived BEA. Additionally, PPIs treatment may trigger the activation and

  18. In-class didactic versus self-directed teaching of the probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) criteria for Barrett's esophagus.

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    Rzouq, Fadi; Vennalaganti, Prashanth; Pakseresht, Kavous; Kanakadandi, Vijay; Parasa, Sravanthi; Mathur, Sharad C; Alsop, Benjamin R; Hornung, Benjamin; Gupta, Neil; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-02-01

    Optimal teaching methods for disease recognition using probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) have not been developed. Our aim was to compare in-class didactic teaching vs. self-directed teaching of Barrett's neoplasia diagnosis using pCLE. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at a tertiary academic center. Study participants with no prior pCLE experience were randomized to in-class didactic (group 1) or self-directed teaching groups (group 2). For group 1, an expert conducted a classroom teaching session using standardized educational material. Participants in group 2 were provided with the same material on an audio PowerPoint. After initial training, all participants graded an initial set of 20 pCLE videos and reviewed correct responses with the expert (group 1) or on audio PowerPoint (group 2). Finally, all participants completed interpretations of a further 40 videos. Eighteen trainees (8 medical students, 10 gastroenterology trainees) participated in the study. Overall diagnostic accuracy for neoplasia prediction by pCLE was 77 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 74.0 % - 79.2 %); of predictions made with high confidence (53 %), the accuracy was 85 % (95 %CI 81.8 % - 87.8 %). The overall accuracy and interobserver agreement was significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2 for all predictions (80.4 % vs. 73 %; P = 0.005) and for high confidence predictions (90 % vs. 80 %; P didactic teaching enables significantly better recognition of the pCLE features of Barrett's esophagus than self-directed teaching. The in-class didactic group had a shorter learning curve and were able to achieve 90 % accuracy for their high confidence predictions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. MiRNA-Related SNPs and Risk of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Barrett's Esophagus: Post Genome-Wide Association Analysis in the BEACON Consortium.

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    Matthew F Buas

    Full Text Available Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA has increased substantially in recent decades. Multiple risk factors have been identified for EA and its precursor, Barrett's esophagus (BE, such as reflux, European ancestry, male sex, obesity, and tobacco smoking, and several germline genetic variants were recently associated with disease risk. Using data from the Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON genome-wide association study (GWAS of 2,515 EA cases, 3,295 BE cases, and 3,207 controls, we examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that potentially affect the biogenesis or biological activity of microRNAs (miRNAs, small non-coding RNAs implicated in post-transcriptional gene regulation, and deregulated in many cancers, including EA. Polymorphisms in three classes of genes were examined for association with risk of EA or BE: miRNA biogenesis genes (157 SNPs, 21 genes; miRNA gene loci (234 SNPs, 210 genes; and miRNA-targeted mRNAs (177 SNPs, 158 genes. Nominal associations (P0.50, and we did not find evidence for interactions between variants analyzed and two risk factors for EA/BE (smoking and obesity. This analysis provides the most extensive assessment to date of miRNA-related SNPs in relation to risk of EA and BE. While common genetic variants within components of the miRNA biogenesis core pathway appear unlikely to modulate susceptibility to EA or BE, further studies may be warranted to examine potential associations between unassessed variants in miRNA genes and targets with disease risk.

  20. Origin of adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus: P53 and Ki67 expression and histopathologic background Origem do adenocarcinoma no esôfago de Barrett: bases histopathológicas e expressão dos genes p53 e Ki67

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    Sergio Szachnowicz

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus is the substitution of squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus by columnar epithelium. Intestinal metaplasia in Barrett's esophagus is considered to be the main risk factor for the development of adenocarcinoma. Diffuse adenocarcinoma and Barrett's esophagus without intestinal metaplasia are rare, and reports on the subject are scarce. PURPOSE AND METHOD: To estimate the prevalence of adenocarcinoma in 297 patients with Barrett's esophagus, during the period of 1990 to 2002, and in 13 patients undergoing surgery, to conduct detailed macroscopic and microscopic analysis, with performance of immunohistochemical tests for p53 and Ki67, correlating the type of tumor with its adjacent epithelium. RESULTS: In our patients with Barrett's esophagus, there was a prevalence of 5.7% of adenocarcinoma. The tumors developed only when the Barrett's esophagus segment was long (>3.0 cm. Tumors were located close to the squamous-columnar junction. The histological study revealed 2 patients (15.4% with Barrett's esophagus adjacent to a tumor with gastric metaplasia without the presence of intestinal metaplasia. Tumors were classified according to Nakamura's classification (23% differentiated pattern, and 77% undifferentiated pattern and to Lauren's classification (61% intestinal and 39% diffuse. The difference is due to the migration of microtubular and foveolar tumors of undifferentiated (gastric pattern in Nakamuras classification to the Lauren's intestinal type. The immunohistochemical test for Ki67 was strongly positive in all the patients, thus evidencing intense cell proliferation in both the columnar epithelium and tumor. Expression of p53 was negative in 67% of the adjacent columnar epithelia and 42% of the tumors, without any correlation between the tissue types. CONCLUSION: Adenocarcinoma develops from mixed columnar epithelium, either intestinal or gastric, showing both the gastric and the intestinal patterns; thus, tumors can

  1. Barrett associated MHC and FOXF1 variants also increase esophageal carcinoma risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dura, P.; Veen, E.M. van; Salomon, J.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Kristinsson, J.O.; Wobbes, T.; Witteman, B.J.; Tan, A.C.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus, with gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity as risk factors, predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Recently a British genome wide association study identified two Barrett's esophagus susceptibility loci mapping within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC;

  2. Diagnostic performance of EUS in predicting advanced cancer among patients with Barrett's esophagus and high-grade dysplasia/early adenocarcinoma: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qumseya, Bashar J; Brown, Jessica; Abraham, Merna; White, Donna; Wolfsen, Herbert; Gupta, Neil; Vennalaganti, Prashanth; Sharma, Prateek; Wallace, Michael B

    2015-04-01

    The role of EUS among patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or suspected mucosal carcinoma is controversial. To define the role of EUS in detecting advanced disease among patients with BE. Systematic review and meta-analysis. MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central databases. Patients with BE and HGD or esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) who were referred for endoscopic evaluation and underwent EUS. EUS. Pooled proportion of patients with advanced EAC identified by EUS among patients with BE who are referred for HGD or EAC (with or without visible lesions). Forest plots were used to contrast effect sizes in each of the studies and random effect models when tests of heterogeneity were significant (I(2) > 50% or P statistic). Of 1278 articles, 47 were reviewed in full text, and 11 articles met the inclusion criteria, including a total of 656 patients. Based on a random-effects model, the proportion of patients with advanced disease detected on EUS was 14% (95% confidence interval, 8%-22%; P advanced disease on EUS in the absence of nodules was 4% (95% confidence interval, 2%-6%, P < .0001). Significant heterogeneity among studies. EUS will result in a change in the therapeutic approach among in a significant minority of patients with BE who are referred for HGD or EAC. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Advanced imaging technologies increase detection of dysplasia and neoplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qumseya, Bashar J; Wang, Haibo; Badie, Nicole; Uzomba, Rosemary N; Parasa, Sravanthi; White, Donna L; Wolfsen, Herbert; Sharma, Prateek; Wallace, Michael B

    2013-12-01

    US guidelines recommend surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) to detect dysplasia. BE conventionally is monitored via white-light endoscopy (WLE) and a collection of random biopsy specimens. However, this approach does not definitively or consistently detect areas of dysplasia. Advanced imaging technologies can increase the detection of dysplasia and cancer. We investigated whether these imaging technologies can increase the diagnostic yield for the detection of neoplasia in patients with BE, compared with WLE and analysis of random biopsy specimens. We performed a systematic review, using Medline and Embase, to identify relevant peer-review studies. Fourteen studies were included in the final analysis, with a total of 843 patients. Our metameter (estimate) of interest was the paired-risk difference (RD), defined as the difference in yield of the detection of dysplasia or cancer using advanced imaging vs WLE. The estimated paired-RD and 95% confidence interval (CI) were obtained using random-effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed by means of the Q statistic and the I(2) statistic. An exploratory meta-regression was performed to look for associations between the metameter and potential confounders or modifiers. Overall, advanced imaging techniques increased the diagnostic yield for detection of dysplasia or cancer by 34% (95% CI, 20%-56%; P advanced imaging techniques such as chromoendoscopy or virtual chromoendoscopy significantly increase the diagnostic yield for identification of dysplasia or cancer in patients with BE. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Presence or absence of intestinal metaplasia but not its burden is associated with prevalent high-grade dysplasia and cancer in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, A; McGregor, D H; Anand, O; Singh, M; Rao, D; Cherian, R; Wani, S B; Rastogi, A; Singh, V; House, J; Jones, P G; Sharma, P

    2014-01-01

    Universal agreement on the inclusion of intestinal metaplasia to diagnose Barrett's esophagus (BE) is lacking. Our aim was to determine the association of intestinal metaplasia and its density with the prevalence of dysplasia/cancer in columnar lined esophagus (CLE). Patients with CLE but no intestinal metaplasia (CLE-no IM) were identified by querying the clinical pathology database using SNOMED codes for distal esophageal biopsies. CLE-IM patients were identified from a prospectively maintained database of BE patients. Subsequently, relative risks for prevalent dysplasia and cancer were calculated. Since patients with CLE-no IM are not usually enrolled in surveillance, only prevalent dysplasia/cancer on index endoscopy was analyzed. Goblet cell density and percent intestinal metaplasia were estimated. All biopsy slides were reviewed for dysplasia by two experienced gastrointestinal pathologists. Two hundred sixty-two CLE-IM and 260 CLE-no IM patients were included (age 64±12 vs. 60±11 years, P=0.001; whites 92% vs. 82%, P=0.001; males 99.7% vs. 99.3%, P=NS; CLE length 3.4±3.2 vears 1.4±0.4 cm, P=0.001 and hiatus hernia 64% vs. 56%, P=0.013). The odds of finding low-grade dysplasia and of high-grade dysplasia (HGD)/cancer were 12.5-fold (2.9-53.8, P=0.007) and 4.2-fold (95% CI 1.4-13, P=0.01) higher, respectively, in the CLE-IM group. Reanalysis after controlling for important variables of age, race, and length did not significantly alter the overall results. In CLE-IM group, when patients with high (>50/LPF) versus low goblet cell density (10% intestinal metaplasia were compared, the odds of HGD/cancer, OR 1.5 (0.5-4.9, P=0.5) and 1.97 (0.54-7.22), respectively, were not significantly higher. Demonstration of intestinal metaplasia continues to be an essential element in the definition of BE, but its quantification may not be useful for risk stratification of HGD/cancer in BE. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of

  5. Immunoreactivity of cytokeratins 7 and 20 in goblet cells and columnar blue cells in patients with endoscopic evidence of Barrett's esophagus Imunoreatividade das citoqueratinas 7 e 20 nas células caliciformes e células colunares azuis em pacientes com evidência endoscópica de esôfago de Barrett

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    João Carlos Cantarelli Jr.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Barrett's esophagus is characterized by the presence of goblet cells. However, when alcian-blue is utilized, another type of cells, called columnar blue cells, is frequently present in the distal esophagus of patients with endoscopic evidence of Barrett's esophagus. Cytokeratin 7 and 20 immunoreactivity has been previously studied in areas of intestinal metaplasia at the esophagogastric junction. However, the expression of these cytokeratins in columnar blue cells has not been characterized. OBJECTIVE: To compare the expression of cytokeratin 7 and 20 in goblet cells and columnar blue cells in patients with endoscopic evidence of Barrett's esophagus. METHODS: Biopsies from 86 patients with endoscopic evidence of Barrett's esophagus were evaluated. The biopsies were stained for cytokeratin 7 and 20. RESULTS: Goblet cells were present in 75 cases and columnar blue cells in 50 cases. Overall, cytokeratin 7 expression was similar in goblet cells and columnar blue cells (P = 0.25, while cytokeratin 20 was more common in goblet cells (P CONTEXTO: Esôfago de Barrett é caracterizado pela presença de células caliciformes. Entretanto, quando "alcian blue" é utilizado, outro tipo de células, chamadas células colunares azuis, estão frequentemente presentes no esôfago distal de pacientes com evidência endoscópica de esôfago de Barrett. A imunoreatividade das citoqueratinas 7 e 20 tem sido estudada previamente em áreas de metaplasia intestinal na junção esôfago-gástrica. Entretanto, a expressão destas citoqueratinas nas células colunares azuis não foi caracterizada. OBJETIVO: Comparar a expressão das citoqueratinas 7 e 20 nas células caliciformes e células colunares azuis em pacientes com evidência endoscópica de esôfago de Barrett. MÉTODOS: Biopsias de 86 pacientes com evidência endoscópica de esôfago de Barrett foram avaliadas. Estas foram coradas com citoqueratinas 7 e 20. RESULTADOS: Células caliciformes estavam

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux in relation to adenocarcinomas of the esophagus: a pooled analysis from the Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON.

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    Michael B Cook

    Full Text Available Previous studies have evidenced an association between gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA. It is unknown to what extent these associations vary by population, age, sex, body mass index, and cigarette smoking, or whether duration and frequency of symptoms interact in predicting risk. The Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON allowed an in-depth assessment of these issues.Detailed information on heartburn and regurgitation symptoms and covariates were available from five BEACON case-control studies of EA and esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (EGJA. We conducted single-study multivariable logistic regressions followed by random-effects meta-analysis. Stratified analyses, meta-regressions, and sensitivity analyses were also conducted.Five studies provided 1,128 EA cases, 1,229 EGJA cases, and 4,057 controls for analysis. All summary estimates indicated positive, significant associations between heartburn/regurgitation symptoms and EA. Increasing heartburn duration was associated with increasing EA risk; odds ratios were 2.80, 3.85, and 6.24 for symptom durations of <10 years, 10 to <20 years, and ≥20 years. Associations with EGJA were slighter weaker, but still statistically significant for those with the highest exposure. Both frequency and duration of heartburn/regurgitation symptoms were independently associated with higher risk. We observed similar strengths of associations when stratified by age, sex, cigarette smoking, and body mass index.This analysis indicates that the association between heartburn/regurgitation symptoms and EA is strong, increases with increased duration and/or frequency, and is consistent across major risk factors. Weaker associations for EGJA suggest that this cancer site has a dissimilar pathogenesis or represents a mixed population of patients.

  7. An inter-observer agreement study of autofluorescence endoscopy in Barrett's esophagus among expert and non-expert endoscopists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannath, J; Subramanian, V; Telakis, E; Lau, K; Ramappa, V; Wireko, M; Kaye, P V; Ragunath, K

    2013-02-01

    Autofluorescence imaging (AFI), which is a "red flag" technique during Barrett's surveillance, is associated with significant false positive results. The aim of this study was to assess the inter-observer agreement (IOA) in identifying AFI-positive lesions and to assess the overall accuracy of AFI. Anonymized AFI and high resolution white light (HRE) images were prospectively collected. The AFI images were presented in random order, followed by corresponding AFI + HRE images. Three AFI experts and 3 AFI non-experts scored images after a training presentation. The IOA was calculated using kappa and accuracy was calculated with histology as gold standard. Seventy-four sets of images were prospectively collected from 63 patients (48 males, mean age 69 years). The IOA for number of AF positive lesions was fair when AFI images were presented. This improved to moderate with corresponding AFI and HRE images [experts 0.57 (0.44-0.70), non-experts 0.47 (0.35-0.62)]. The IOA for the site of AF lesion was moderate for experts and fair for non-experts using AF images, which improved to substantial for experts [κ = 0.62 (0.50-0.72)] but remained at fair for non-experts [κ = 0.28 (0.18-0.37)] with AFI + HRE. Among experts, the accuracy of identifying dysplasia was 0.76 (0.7-0.81) using AFI images and 0.85 (0.79-0.89) using AFI + HRE images. The accuracy was 0.69 (0.62-0.74) with AFI images alone and 0.75 (0.70-0.80) using AFI + HRE among non-experts. The IOA for AF positive lesions is fair to moderate using AFI images which improved with addition of HRE. The overall accuracy of identifying dysplasia was modest, and was better when AFI and HRE images were combined.

  8. LgR5 expression and cancer stem cell hypothesis: clue to define the true origin of esophageal adenocarcinomas with and without Barrett's Esophagus?

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    Otto Christoph

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of the expression of an intestinal stem cell marker in esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC with and without Barrett's Esophagus (BE, with respect to a cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis. Materials and methods Expression of a putative intestinal stem cell marker LgR5 was analyzed in esophageal cancer specimen (n = 70: 41 EAC with BE, 19 EAC without BE, and n = 10 esophageal squamous-cell carcinomas, ESCC and in the adenocarcinoma cell line OE-33. Ki-67 and Cdx-2 were co-labelled with LgR5 in double staining experiments. Immunhistochemical expression results were confirmed by RT-PCR and correlated with tumor stage and five-year survival rates. Results LgR5was found expressed in 35 of 41 (85% EAC with BE and in 16 of 19 (81% EAC without BE. By contrast, LgR5 was not found to be expressed in ESCC. Quantification of immunolabeling showed 15% LgR5+ cells in EAC with BE, 32% LgR5+ cells in adjacent BE and 13% in EAC without BE. Immunofluorescence double staining experiments with LgR5 and Ki-67 revealed a subpopulation (~5% of proliferating LgR+/Ki-67+ cells. On mRNA-level, expression of LgR5 was higher in BE in comparison to EAC (p = 0.0159. High levels of LgR5 expression in BE associated EAC were associated with poorer survival in univariate analysis. Conclusion The stem cell marker LgR5 is expressed in EAC, irrespective of association with BE, and appears to have negative impact on survival. The subset of proliferating LgR5+ cells (

  9. A inter-relação das sialomucinas (antígenos Tn e Stn com o adenocarcinoma no esôfago de Barrett Relationship of the sialomucins (Tn and Stn antigens with adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus

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    Plínio Conte de Faria Júnior

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O esôfago de Barrett (EB é conseqüência do refluxo gastroesofágico crônico e considerado fator de risco para o desenvolvimento de adenocarcinoma. Estudos do muco, em especial das mucinas ácidas representadas pelas sialomucinas presentes nas células caliciformes, mostraram que na metaplasia do tipo intestinal, o epitélio do órgão pode expressar antígenos denominados Tn e Stn. Estes antígenos já foram analisados em tumores gástricos e colônicos, porém não foram encontradas referências à sua utilização no EB. Este trabalho objetivou analisar estes antígenos em doentes com EB e em adenocarcinoma associado ao EB. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados, utilizando testes imunohistoquímicos, os antígenos Tn e Stn, nas biópsias endoscópicas de 29 doentes com EB, sete com adenocarcinoma no EB, além de oito indivíduos com epitélio esofágico normal. RESULTADOS: Nas células caliciformes, foi observada positividade para Stn em 100% dos casos e para Tn em 48% dos casos. Nas células colunares, o Stn foi sempre negativo, enquanto o Tn foi positivo em 100% dos casos. Entretanto, nos doentes com adenocarcinoma no EB, a positividade para ambos os antígenos foi de 100%. Nos indivíduos normais, houve positividade para o antígeno Tn e negatividade para Stn em todos os casos (100%. CONCLUSÃO: É provável que nos doentes com EB a positividade para o Tn, à semelhança do ocorrido quanto à positividade do mesmo antígeno nos portadores de adenocarcinoma, possa significar maior suscetibilidade para ocorrência futura de câncer. Assim, a pesquisa das sialomucinas poderá ser rotineiramente utilizada, contribuindo como fator prognóstico para desenvolvimento de adenocarcinoma no EB.OBJECIVE: Barrett's esophagus (BE is a consequence of chronic gastroesophageal reflux and is considered a risk factor for adenocarcinoma. The study of the mucus, especially acid mucins, such as the sialomucins in the goblet cells which characterize BE, showed

  10. Outcomes after liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy in Barrett's esophagus-associated high-grade dysplasia and intramucosal adenocarcinoma: 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramay, Fariha H; Cui, Qingping; Greenwald, Bruce D

    2017-10-01

    Liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy (LNSCT) has been shown to be a safe, well-tolerated, and effective therapy for Barrett's esophagus (BE)-associated high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD) and intramucosal adenocarcinoma (IMC). Long-term follow-up is lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy, durability, and rate of neoplastic progression after LNSCT in BE-HGD/IMC at 3 and 5 years. In this single-center, retrospective study drawn from a prospective database, patients with BE-HGD/IMC of any length treated with LNSCT were followed with surveillance endoscopy with biopsy for 3 to 5 years. Patients with IMC completely removed by endoscopic resection were included. Outcome measures included complete eradication of HGD (CE-HGD), dysplasia, and intestinal metaplasia; incidence rates; durability of response; location of recurrent intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia; and rate of disease progression. A total of 50 and 40 patients were included in 3-year and 5-year analyses. Initial CE-HGD, dysplasia, and intestinal metaplasia achieved in 98%, 90%, and 60%, respectively. Overall CE-HGD, dysplasia, and intestinal metaplasia at 3 years were 96% (48/50), 94% (47/50), and 82% (41/50), and at 5 years were 93% (37/40), 88% (35/40), and 75% (30/40). Incidence rates of recurrent intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and HGD/esophageal adenocarcinoma per person-year of follow-up after initial complete eradication of intestinal metaplasia (CE-IM) were 12.2%, 4.0%, and 1.4% per person-year for the 5-year cohort. Most recurrences were found immediately below the neosquamocolumnar junction. Two of 7 HGD recurrences occurred later than 4 years after initial eradication, and 2 patients (4%) progressed to adenocarcinoma despite treatment. In patients with BE-HGD/IMC, LNSCT is effective in eliminating dysplasia and intestinal metaplasia. Progression to adenocarcinoma was uncommon, and recurrence of dysplasia was successfully treated in most cases. Long-term surveillance is necessary to

  11. Expression profiles of cancer stem cell markers: CD133, CD44, Musashi-1 and EpCAM in the cardiac mucosa-Barrett's esophagus-early esophageal adenocarcinoma-advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrowiecka, Anna; Veits, Lothar; Falkeis, Christina; Musial, Jacek; Kordek, Radzislaw; Lochowski, Mariusz; Kozak, Jozef; Wierzchniewska-Lawska, Agnieszka; Vieth, Michael; Malecka-Panas, Ewa

    2017-03-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE), which develops as a result of gastroesophageal reflux disease, is a preneoplastic condition for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). A new hypothesis suggests that cancer is a disease of stem cells, however, their expression and pathways in BE - EAC sequence are not fully elucidated yet. We used a panel of putative cancer stem cells markers to identify stem cells in consecutive steps of BE-related cancer progression. Immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks from 58 patients with normal cardiac mucosa (n=5), BE (n=14), early EAC (pT1) from mucosal resection (n=17) and advanced EAC (pT1-T4) from postoperative specimens (n=22). Expression of the CD133, CD44, Musashi-1 and EpCAM was analyzed using respective monoclonal antibodies. All markers showed a heterogeneous expression pattern, mainly at the base of the crypts of Barrett's epithelium and EAC, with positive stromal cells in metaplastic and dysplastic lesions. Immuno-expression of EpCAM, CD44 and CD133 in cardiac mucosa was significantly lower (mean immunoreactivity score (IRS)=1.2; 0.0; 0.4; respectively) compared to their expression in Barrett's metaplasia (mean IRS=4.3; 0.14; 0.7; respectively), in early adenocarcinoma (mean IRS=4.4; 0.29; 1.3; respectively) and in advanced adenocarcinoma (mean IRS=6.6; 0.7; 2.7; respectively) (p<0.05). On the contrary, Musashi-1 expression was higher in BE and early ADC compared to GM and advanced ADC (NS). Our results suggest that the stem cells could be present in premalignant lesions. EpCAM, CD44 and CD133 expression could be candidate markers for BE progression, whereas Musashi-1 may be a marker of the small intestinal features of Barrett's mucosa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Expressão de sulfomucinas e de carboidratos de mucinas simples no esôfago de Barrett Expression of sulphomucins and simple-mucin type carbohydrate in Barrett's esophagus

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    Frederico Henrique C. Melo

    2007-04-01

    of malignant transformation in the gastrointestinal tract. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the expression of sulphomucins and simple-mucin type carbohydrate antigens (Tn, sTn T and sT expression in Barrett's esophagus (BE in order to identify potential lesions of increased risk to malignant transformation. METHODS: Biopsies of 50 cases of BE processed routinely were studied; diagnosis was performed in hematoxylin and eosin (HE and periodic acid Schiff (PAS/alcian blue stained sections. Additional sections were stained by high iron diamine for subtype intestinal metaplasia and by immunohistochemistry for Tn, sTn, T and sT antigens, whose expression was analyzed in the columnar and goblet cells of BE. RESULTS: BE was detected in only 47 cases stained by histochemistry and all of them had sulphomucin expression. Type III intestinal metaplasia was detected in 44 cases (93.6%; three had only type II, and type I was not observed. Tn antigen was expressed in columnar cells in 94% of the cases and sTn was expressed in goblet cells in 88% of them. T and sT were negative in 82% and in 87.8% of the cases, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: BE showed a homogeneous pattern of expression of sulphomucins and simple-mucin type carbohydrate antigens. BE was characterized as incomplete-type intestinal metaplasia with type III component together with Tn and sTn expression. According to these data, these markers are not useful to discriminate lesions with different potential of malignant transformation.

  13. Prevalence of Barrett's esophagus in individuals without typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease Prevalência do esôfago de Barrett em indivíduos sem sintomas típicos da doença por refluxo gastroesofágico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carneiro de Freitas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Barrett’s esophagus, the major risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, is detected in approximately 10%-14% of individuals submitted to upper endoscopy for the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease related symptoms. Prevalence studies of Barrett’s esophagus in individuals without typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease have reported rates ranging from 0.6% to 25%. AIM: To determine the prevalence of Barrett’s in a Brazilian population older than 50 years without typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: A total of 104 patients (51 men, mean age of 65 years, with an indication for upper endoscopy but without symptoms of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation (determined with a validated questionnaire were recruited. Subjects submitted to upper endoscopic examination in the last 10 years or using antisecretory medication (proton pump inhibitors during the last 6 months were not included. Methylene blue chromoscopy was performed during the endoscopic exam to facilitate identification of the metaplastic epithelium. RESULTS: Barrett’s esophagus was diagnosed endoscopically and confirmed by histology in four patients, all of them males. The metaplastic segment was short (less than 3 cm and free of dysplasia in all patients. The prevalence of Barrett’s esophagus was 7.75% in the male population and 3.8% in the general population studied. CONCLUSION: Due to the low prevalence of Barrett’s esophagus found in the present study, associated with the finding of short-segment Barrett’s esophagus in all cases diagnosed and the absence of dysplasia in the material analyzed, endoscopic screening for Barrett’s esophagus in patients above the age of 50 without the classical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease is not indicated for the Brazilian population.RACIONAL: O esôfago de Barrett, principal fator de risco para o adenocarcinoma do esôfago, é uma complicação da doença por refluxo

  14. Expression of the Na+/l- symporter (NIS is markedly decreased or absent in gastric cancer and intestinal metaplastic mucosa of Barrett esophagus

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    Wapnir Irene L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS is a plasma membrane glycoprotein that mediates iodide (I- transport in the thyroid, lactating breast, salivary glands, and stomach. Whereas NIS expression and regulation have been extensively investigated in healthy and neoplastic thyroid and breast tissues, little is known about NIS expression and function along the healthy and diseased gastrointestinal tract. Methods Thus, we investigated NIS expression by immunohistochemical analysis in 155 gastrointestinal tissue samples and by immunoblot analysis in 17 gastric tumors from 83 patients. Results Regarding the healthy Gl tract, we observed NIS expression exclusively in the basolateral region of the gastric mucin-producing epithelial cells. In gastritis, positive NIS staining was observed in these cells both in the presence and absence of Helicobacter pylori. Significantly, NIS expression was absent in gastric cancer, independently of its histological type. Only focal faint NIS expression was detected in the direct vicinity of gastric tumors, i.e., in the histologically intact mucosa, the expression becoming gradually stronger and linear farther away from the tumor. Barrett mucosa with junctional and fundic-type columnar metaplasia displayed positive NIS staining, whereas Barrett mucosa with intestinal metaplasia was negative. NIS staining was also absent in intestinalized gastric polyps. Conclusion That NIS expression is markedly decreased or absent in case of intestinalization or malignant transformation of the gastric mucosa suggests that NIS may prove to be a significant tumor marker in the diagnosis and prognosis of gastric malignancies and also precancerous lesions such as Barrett mucosa, thus extending the medical significance of NIS beyond thyroid disease.

  15. [Clinical and endoscopic findings and magnitude of gastric and duodenal reflux in patients with cardial intestinal metaplasia, short Barrett esophagus, compared with controls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csendes, A; Burdiles, P; Smok, G; Rojas, J; Flores, N; Domic, S; Quiroz, J; Henríquez, A

    1999-11-01

    The diagnosis of patients with short segments of intestinal metaplasia in the distal esophagus, has increased in recent years. To assess the clinical, pathological and functional features of patients with esophageal intestinal metaplasia. A prospective study was performed in 95 control subjects, 115 patients with cardial intestinal metaplasia and 89 patients with short Barret esophagus with intestinal metaplasia. All had clinical and endoscopic assessments, esophageal manometry and determination of 24 h esophageal exposure to acid and duodenal content. Control patients were younger and, in this group, the pathological findings in the mucosa distal to the squamous-columnar change, showed a preponderance of fundic over cardial mucosa. In patients with intestinal metaplasia and short Barret esophagus, there was only cardial mucosa, that is the place where intestinal metaplasia implants. Low grade dysplasia was only seen in the presence of intestinal metaplasia. Gastroesophageal sphincter pressure decreased and gastric and duodenal reflux increased along with increases in the extension of intestinal metaplasia. These findings confirm the need to obtain multiple biopsies from the squamous-columnar mucosal junction in all patients with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, for the detection of early pathological changes of Barret esophagus and eventual dysplasia.

  16. Radiofrekvensablation reducerer risikoen ved dysplastisk Barretts oesophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Michael; Holm, Jakob; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) with dysplasia is generally accepted as the precursor to oesophageal cancer. Thus, methods to eradicate BE and dysplasia have been evaluated. Recently, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown promising results with few adverse effects. The studies concerning RFA are...

  17. Radiofrekvensablation reducerer risikoen ved dysplastisk Barrett oesophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Michael; Holm, Jakob; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) with dysplasia is generally accepted as the precursor to oesophageal cancer. Thus, methods to eradicate BE and dysplasia have been evaluated. Recently, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown promising results with few adverse effects. The studies concerning RFA are...

  18. Expressão de CDX2 e mucinas (MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC e MUC6 em esôfago de Barrett antes e após fundoplicatura de Nissen Expression of CDX2 and mucins (MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC and MUC6 in Barrett's esophagus before and after Nissen fundoplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Rodrigues de Meirelles

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O esôfago de Barrett (EB corresponde à substituição do epitélio escamoso por um do tipo intestinal, em resposta ao refluxo crônico nos pacientes com doença do refluxo gastroesofágico (DRGE. É um importante precursor do adenocarcinoma esofágico. A fundoplicatura de Nissen (FN é uma cirurgia antirrefluxo que visa a reduzir a agressão à mucosa esofágica. Alterações no padrão de expressão imuno-histoquímica de mucinas e de CDX2 no EB antes e depois da FN podem ser úteis na identificação de um padrão de expressão desses marcadores e, eventualmente, na identificação de casos com risco de evolução para malignidade. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar e comparar a imunoexpressão de CDX2 e mucinas no EB de pacientes com DRGE submetidos à FN antes e após a cirurgia. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo de 25 pacientes com diagnóstico de DRGE e EB submetidos à FN, acompanhados por, pelo menos, três anos. Foram feitos análise histológica e estudo imuno-histoquímico das biópsias endoscópicas antes e após a cirurgia, comparando-se a inflamação e a imunoexpressão de MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6 e CDX2. Estimou-se a porcentagem de células com expressão para os marcadores estudados na mucosa de Barrett: 0%-25%, 25%-75% e 75%-100% das células positivas. Foram utilizados os testes de McNemar e Stuart-William e adotou-se o nível de 5% de significância estatística. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÃO: Não houve diferenças significativas quanto a presença ou intensidade de inflamação, nem da imunoexpressão de mucinas e CDX2 no EB antes e após a FN. O tratamento cirúrgico não influenciou a mudança da expressão dessas glicoproteínas no EB.INTRODUCTION: Barrett´s esophagus (BE is characterized by the exchange of esophageal squamous epithelium for intestinal type in response to chronic reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD.It is an important precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Nissen

  19. Diabetes and the Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal-Robles, Roberto; Remes-Troche, José M

    2017-12-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia is a well-known cause of gastrointestinal motility disorders extending from the esophagus to the anorectum. Even though little attention has been paid to esophageal disorders in the context of DM, its prevalence is higher compared to gastroparesis. Heartburn, as a typical symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is the most prevalent symptom and has been found in 25 to 41% of patients with DM. Furthermore, DM has recently been established as possible independent factor for the development of Barrett's esophagus. The pathophysiology of esophageal disorders in patients with DM is complex and multifactorial, and the mechanisms described include the following: hyperglycemia, autonomic neuropathy, biomechanical and sensory alterations of the esophagus, presbyesophagus, and psychiatric comorbidity. Opportune detection, together with adequate glycemic control, can delay the onset of esophageal dysfunction and slow its progression in diabetic patients. There is limited evidence on patients with DM and esophageal dysfunction, with respect to medical treatment. Lifestyle modifications, prokinetics, and proton pump inhibitors should be indicated on an individual basis in patients that present with DM and esophageal disorders. A greater number of improved studies are needed to develop new therapeutic strategies. This chapter will review esophageal disorders associated with DM and the currently available treatment options.

  20. Esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Ways of metastatic spreading of esophagus cancer, depending on segmental division of esophagus are considered. Classification of esophagus cancer according to morphological structure, domestic clinical classification according to stages and international classification according to TNM system are presented. Diagnosis of esophagus cancer should be complex and based on results of clinical examination of patients, radiological, endoscopic and morphological investigations. Radiological, surgical and combined (preoperative radiotherapy with successive operation) methods of treatment are used in the case of esophagus cancer. Versions of preoperative radiotherapy are given. Favourable results of applying combined surgical treatment with preoperative radiotherapy are shown

  1. Update 2008: The Esophagus

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    Alan B.R. Thomson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The entire field of gastroenterology is primed to take an enormous step forward, with scientific and endoscopic advances which will be tothis decade what the treatments of peptic ulcer disease and viral hepatitis conditions were for the 80's and 90's. So also in the area of esophagology there are numerous emerging techniques and scientific advances in our understanding of the motor and sensory function of the esophagus. These contribute to our better understanding of common conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD including erosive esophagitis (EE, normal endoscopy reflux disease (NERD, Barrett's epithelium (BE, and esophageal adenocarcinoma (ECA, as well as the less common esophageal motility disorders, oro-pharyngeal dysphagia and eosinophilic esophagitis.

  2. Heterotopic Gastric Mucosa in the Distal Part of Esophagus in a Teenager: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, Vasile Valeriu; Ignat, Ancuta; Paduraru, Gabriela; Mihaila, Doina; Burlea, Marin; Ciubara, Anamaria

    2015-10-01

    Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM) of the esophagus is a congenital anomaly consisting of ectopic gastric mucosa. It may be connected with disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, exacerbated by Helicobacter pylori. The diagnosis of HGM is confirmed via endoscopy with biopsy. Histopathology provides the definitive diagnosis by demonstrating gastric mucosa adjacent to normal esophageal mucosa. HGM located in the distal esophagus needs differentiation from Barrett's esophagus. Barrett's esophagus is a well-known premalignant injury for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Malignant progression of HGM occurs in a stepwise pattern, following the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence.We present a rare case of a teenage girl with HGM located in the distal esophagus, associated with chronic gastritis and biliary duodenogastric reflux. Endoscopy combined with biopsies is a mandatory method in clinical evaluation of metaplastic and nonmetaplastic changes within HGM of the esophagus.

  3. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early Barrett's neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Cao, Dalhia Thao; Beuvon, Frédéric; Leblanc, Sarah; Terris, Benoit; Camus, Marine; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas; Prat, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    The possible benefit of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early neoplasia arising in Barrett's esophagus remains controversial. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of ESD for the treatment of early Barrett's neoplasia. All consecutive patients undergoing ESD for the resection of a visible lesion in a Barrett's esophagus, either suspicious of submucosal infiltration or exceeding 10 mm in size, between February 2012 and January 2015 were prospectively included. The primary endpoint was the rate of curative resection of carcinoma, defined as histologically complete resection of adenocarcinomas without poor histoprognostic factors. Thirty-five patients (36 lesions) with a mean age of 66.2 ± 12 years, a mean ASA score of 2.1 ± 0.7, and a mean C4M6 Barrett's segment were included. The mean procedure time was 191 ± 79 mn, and the mean size of the resected specimen was 51.3 ± 23 mm. En bloc resection rate was 89%. Lesions were 12 ± 15 mm in size, and 81% (29/36) were invasive adenocarcinomas, six of which with submucosal invasion. Although R0 resection of carcinoma was 72.4%, the curative resection rate was 66% (19/29). After a mean follow-up of 12.9 ± 9 months, 16 (45.7%) patients had required additional treatment, among whom nine underwent surgical resection, and seven further endoscopic treatments. Metachronous lesions or recurrence of cancer developed during the follow-up period in 17.2% of the patients. The overall complication rate was 16.7%, including 8.3% perforations, all conservatively managed, and no bleeding. The 30-day mortality was 0%. In this early experience, ESD yielded a moderate curative resection rate in Barrett's neoplasia. At present, improvements are needed if ESD is to replace piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection in the management of Barrett's neoplasia.

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Barret'ƒs Esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Wijaya, Adi; D, Dharmika; Syam, Ari F; Lalisang, Toar JM

    2005-01-01

    Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma is increasing in western countries and has poor prognosis due to late diagnosis. Barrett's esophagus is considered as premalignant lesion in which some of squamous epithelium in distal esophagus has been replaced by metaplastic columnar ephithelium. It occurs as complication of longstanding gastroesophageal reflux. Endoscopic examination is very important for early detection especially in patients with chronic symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease ...

  5. Esôfago de barrett após gastrectomia total com reconstrução em Y de roux

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    Deomir Germano Bassi

    Full Text Available Reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus after total gastrectomy is related to reconstructive procedure of intestinal continuity. The Roux-en-Y operation with length of limb of 40 cm occasionally is not enough to prevent biliary reflux to distal esophagus. Barrett's esophagus is thought to develop as a consequence of biliary reflux and has a malignant potential. Symptoms of retroesternal burning and dysphagia that does not improve with conservative management has to be treated by an operative procedure. To prevent biliary reflux to distal esophagus after total gastrectomy the lenght of limb of Roux-en-Y should be at lest 60 cm.

  6. Association Between Germline Mutation in VSIG10L and Familial Barrett Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecteau, Ryan E.; Kong, Jianping; Kresak, Adam; Brock, Wendy; Song, Yeunjoo; Fujioka, Hisashi; Elston, Robert; Willis, Joseph E.; Lynch, John P.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Guda, Kishore; Chak, Amitabh

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion Barrett esophagus have seen a dramatic increase in incidence over the past 4 decades yet marked genetic heterogeneity of this disease has precluded advances in understanding its pathogenesis and improving treatment. OBJECTIVE To identify novel disease susceptibility variants in a familial syndrome of esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett esophagus, termed familial Barrett esophagus, by using high-throughput sequencing in affected individuals from a large, multigenerational family. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) from peripheral lymphocyte DNA on 4 distant relatives from our multiplex, multigenerational familial Barrett esophagus family to identify candidate disease susceptibility variants. Gene variants were filtered, verified, and segregation analysis performed to identify a single candidate variant. Gene expression analysis was done with both quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and in situ RNA hybridization. A 3-dimensional organotypic cell culture model of esophageal maturation was utilized to determine the phenotypic effects of our gene variant. We used electron microscopy on esophageal mucosa from an affected family member carrying the gene variant to assess ultrastructural changes. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Identification of a novel, germline disease susceptibility variant in a previously uncharacterized gene. RESULTS A multiplex, multigenerational family with 14 members affected (3 members with esophageal adenocarcinoma and 11 with Barrett esophagus) was identified, and whole-exome sequencing identified a germline mutation (S631G) at a highly conserved serine residue in the uncharacterized gene VSIG10L that segregated in affected members. Transfection of S631G variant into a 3-dimensional organotypic culture model of normal esophageal squamous cells dramatically inhibited epithelial maturation compared with the wild-type. VSIG10L exhibited

  7. Association Between Germline Mutation in VSIG10L and Familial Barrett Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecteau, Ryan E; Kong, Jianping; Kresak, Adam; Brock, Wendy; Song, Yeunjoo; Fujioka, Hisashi; Elston, Robert; Willis, Joseph E; Lynch, John P; Markowitz, Sanford D; Guda, Kishore; Chak, Amitabh

    2016-10-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion Barrett esophagus have seen a dramatic increase in incidence over the past 4 decades yet marked genetic heterogeneity of this disease has precluded advances in understanding its pathogenesis and improving treatment. To identify novel disease susceptibility variants in a familial syndrome of esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett esophagus, termed familial Barrett esophagus, by using high-throughput sequencing in affected individuals from a large, multigenerational family. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) from peripheral lymphocyte DNA on 4 distant relatives from our multiplex, multigenerational familial Barrett esophagus family to identify candidate disease susceptibility variants. Gene variants were filtered, verified, and segregation analysis performed to identify a single candidate variant. Gene expression analysis was done with both quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and in situ RNA hybridization. A 3-dimensional organotypic cell culture model of esophageal maturation was utilized to determine the phenotypic effects of our gene variant. We used electron microscopy on esophageal mucosa from an affected family member carrying the gene variant to assess ultrastructural changes. Identification of a novel, germline disease susceptibility variant in a previously uncharacterized gene. A multiplex, multigenerational family with 14 members affected (3 members with esophageal adenocarcinoma and 11 with Barrett esophagus) was identified, and whole-exome sequencing identified a germline mutation (S631G) at a highly conserved serine residue in the uncharacterized gene VSIG10L that segregated in affected members. Transfection of S631G variant into a 3-dimensional organotypic culture model of normal esophageal squamous cells dramatically inhibited epithelial maturation compared with the wild-type. VSIG10L exhibited high expression in normal squamous esophagus with marked loss of expression in Barrett

  8. Transcriptional Analyses of Barrett's Metaplasia and Normal Upper GI Mucosae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Barrett

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA has increased dramatically in the US and Western Europe. It has been shown that EAs evolve from premalignant Barrett's esophagus (BE tissue by a process of clonal expansion and evolution. However, the molecular phenotype of the premalignant metaplasia, and its relationship to those of the normal upper gastrointestinal (GI mucosae, including gastric, duodenal, and squamous epithelium of the esophagus, has not been systematically characterized. Therefore, we used oligonucleotide-based microarrays to characterize gene expression profiles in each of these tissues. The similarity of BE to each of the normal tissues was compared using a series of computational approaches. Our analyses included esophageal squamous epithelium, which is present at the same anatomic site and exposed to similar conditions as Barrett's epithelium, duodenum that shares morphologic similarity to Barrett's epithelium, and adjacent gastric epithelium. There was a clear distinction among the expression profiles of gastric, duodenal, and squamous epithelium whereas the BE profiles showed considerable overlap with normal tissues. Furthermore, we identified clusters of genes that are specific to each of the tissues, to the Barrett's metaplastic epithelia, and a cluster of genes that was distinct between squamous and nonsquamous epithelia.

  9. Cytochromes P450 are Expressed in Proliferating Cells in Barrett's Metaplasia

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    Steven J. Hughes

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of cytochromes P450 (CYP in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal squamous mucosa was investigated. Esophagectomy specimens from 23 patients were examined for CYP expression of CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C9/10, and CYP2E1 by immunohistochemical analysis, and the expression of CYP1A1, CYP3A4, CYP1B1, CYP2E1, and CYP2C9/10 in these tissues was further confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical analysis of esophageal squamous mucosa (n = 12 showed expression of CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2E1, and CYP2C9/10 proteins, but it was noted that cells within the basal proliferative zone did not express CYPs. Immunohistochemical analysis of Barrett's esophagus (n = 13 showed expression of CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2E1, and CYP2C9/10 that was prominent in the basal glandular regions, which are areas containing a high percentage of actively proliferating cells. Immunohistochemical staining for both proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the CYPs further supported the colocalization of CYP expression to areas of active cell proliferation in Barrett's esophagus, whereas in the esophageal squamous epithelium, CYP expression is limited to cells that are not proliferating. RT-PCR with amplification product sequence analysis confirmed CYP1A1, CYP3A4, CYP1B1, CYP2E1, and CYP2C9/10 mRNA expression in Barrett's esophagus. These data suggest that the potential ability of cells in Barrett's esophagus to both activate carcinogens and proliferate may be important risk factors affecting carcinogenesis in this metaplastic tissue.

  10. Anatomy and physiology of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaghan, M

    1999-02-01

    Modern diagnosis and treatment of esophageal disease is a result of progress in assessing the anatomy and physiology of the esophagus, as well as refinements in anesthetic and surgical techniques. Esophageal carcinoma spreads rapidly and metastasizes easily. The tendency for early spread and the absence of symptoms result in late diagnosis that reduces treatment options and cure rates. Lifestyle (i.e., use of alcohol and tobacco), nutritional deficiencies, ingestion of nitrosamines, and mutagen-inducing fungi are blamed for cancer of the esophagus. Other pathologic conditions (e.g., achalasia, Barrett's epithelium, gastric reflux, hiatal hernia) are potential contributors to the development of carcinoma. Nurses are in key positions to identify the existence of factors contributing to premalignant or malignant lesions and to educate patients and make the appropriate referrals.

  11. Barrett's esophagus. Diagnosis, follow-up and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Lasse; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Eriksen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    gastroesophageal junction. The extent of the endoscopic findings is described by the Prague classification. The metaplasia is histologically confirmed by the presence of intestinal metaplasia. The diagnosis of BE can only be made by a combined macroscopic and microscopic examination. The histological description...... and it is not recommended outside controlled studies. Treatment of high grade dysplasia and carcinoma in situ is handled in departments treating esophageal cancer. Follow-up with endoscopy and biopsy can be offered. Follow-up endoscopy with biopsy can only be recommended after thorough information to the patients...

  12. Evaluation of a novel cryoballoon swipe ablation system in bench, porcine, and human esophagus models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louie, B. E.; Hofstetter, W.; Triadafilopoulos, G.; Weusten, B. L.

    2018-01-01

    Current ablation devices for dysplastic Barrett's esophagus are effective but have significant limitations. This pilot study aims to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and dose response of a novel cryoballoon swipe ablation system (CbSAS) in three experimental in vitro and in vivo models. CbSAS is a

  13. Immunohistochemical study of epithelial-myofibroblast interaction in Barrett metaplasia

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    Ochicha O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sub-epithelial myofibroblasts are known to influence the biology (proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of overlying epithelia. In the intestine, myofibroblasts have been demonstrated to be essential for epithelial differentiation. It is therefore hypothesized that myofibroblasts may also be involved in intestinal metaplasia that is characteristic of Barrett esophagus. Objective: This study endeavors to immunohistologically evaluate epithelial-myofibroblast interaction in Barrett′s metaplasia. Materials and Methods: Nineteen archival esophageal endoscopic biopsies of Barrett′s metaplasia were immune-phenotyped for the following epithelial and myofibroblast antigens - cytokeratins (CK 8, 13, 18, CDX2 (Caudal type homeobox 2, a-smooth muscle actin (SMA. Results: α-SMA immunostaining revealed close association between myofibroblasts and metaplastic Barrett′s epithelium but not with normal esophageal squamous epithelium. Myofibroblasts were more prominent in dysplastic than in non-dysplastic Barrett metaplasia. CDX2 and CK 8/18, indicators of intestinal differentiation were expressed in Barrett metaplasia but not normal esophageal squamous epithelium, while the reverse was the case for CK 13, which only stained normal esophageal squamous epithelium. Conclusion: Although their precise role is yet to be clearly defined, sub-epithelial myofibroblasts are very likely involved in the pathogenesis of Barrett′s metaplasia.

  14. Proceedings from an international conference on ablation therapy for Barrett's mucosa: Brittany, France, 31 August - 2 September 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, C G; Demeester, T R

    2017-11-01

    The increasing incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lower esophagus and cardia arising in Barrett's metaplastic epithelium continues to be of great concern because medical and surgical efforts to reverse the process have been disappointing. A potential answer to the problem is removal of the metaplastic epithelium. Modern technology has introduced physical and chemical modalities which facilitate ablation of the neo-epithelium endoscopically. These techniques have been used in several centers, and preliminary results are encouraging. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international symposium on ablative therapy held in Brittany, France in August 1997.Twenty-eight speakers contributed to the talks on the pathology, pathogenesis, current therapy experimental studies and clinical experience of ablation of Barrett's esophagus. © 1998 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus/Harcourt Brace & Co. Ltd.

  15. Cancer of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereslegin, I.A.

    1985-01-01

    Classification, clinical characters, diagnosis of the esophagus cancer are given. Radiotherapy for radical and palliative treatment of the esophagus cancer is described. Dose distributions in gamma therapy of different forms of the esophagus cancer are given. Combined treatment (preoperative radiotherapy and operation) is briefly described

  16. Clonal Ordering of 17p and 5q Allelic Losses in Barrett Dysplasia and Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Patricia L.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Yin, Jing; Huang, Ying; Krasna, Mark J.; Reid, Brian J.

    1993-04-01

    Both 17p and 5q allelic losses appear to be involved in the pathogenesis or progression of many human solid tumors. In colon carcinogenesis, there is strong evidence that the targets of the 17p and 5q allelic losses are TP53, the gene encoding p53, and APC, respectively. It is widely accepted that 5q allelic losses precede 17p allelic losses in the progression to colonic carcinoma. The data, however, supporting this proposed order are largely based on the prevalence of 17p and 5q allelic losses in adenomas and unrelated adenocarcinomas from different patients. We investigated the order in which 17p and 5q allelic losses developed during neoplastic progression in Barrett esophagus by evaluating multiple aneuploid cell populations from the same patient. Using DNA content flow cytometric cell sorting and polymerase chain reaction, 38 aneuploid cell populations from 14 patients with Barrett esophagus who had high grade dysplasia, cancer or both were evaluated for 17p and 5q allelic losses. 17p allelic losses preceded 5q allelic losses in 7 patients, both 17p and 5q allelic losses were present in all aneuploid populations of 4 patients, and only 17p (without 5q) allelic losses were present in the aneuploid populations of 3 patients. In no patient did we find that a 5q allelic loss preceded a 17p allelic loss. Our data suggest that 17p allelic losses typically occur before 5q allelic losses during neoplastic progression in Barrett esophagus.

  17. Frequent occurrence of mitochondrial DNA mutations in Barrett's metaplasia without the presence of dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soong Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Barrett's esophagus (BE is one of the most common premalignant lesions and can progress to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA. The numerous molecular events may play a role in the neoplastic transformation of Barrett's mucosa such as the change of DNA ploidy, p53 mutation and alteration of adhesion molecules. However, the molecular mechanism of the progression of BE to EA remains unclear and most studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations in BE have performed on BE with the presence of dysplasia. METHODS/FINDINGS: Thus, the current study is to investigate new molecular events (Barrett's esophageal tissue-specific-mtDNA alterations/instabilities in mitochondrial genome and causative factors for their alterations using the corresponding adjacent normal mucosal tissue (NT and tissue (BT from 34 patients having Barrett's metaplasia without the presence of dysplasia. Eighteen patients (53% exhibited mtDNA mutations which were not found in adjacent NT. mtDNA copy number was about 3 times higher in BT than in adjacent NT. The activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme complexes in tissues from Barrett's metaplasia without the presence of dysplasia was impaired. Reactive oxygen species (ROS level in BT was significantly higher than those in corresponding samples. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High ROS level in BT may contribute to the development of mtDNA mutations, which may play a crucial role in disease progression and tumorigenesis in BE.

  18. Treatment of squamous cell and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus

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    Rathbone B

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Barrie Rathbone,1 Janusz Jankowski,2 Michael Rathbone31University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester, 2Sir James Black Professor Queen Mary University of London, 3St George's University of London, London, United KingdomAbstract: Esophageal cancer is the sixth commonest cause of cancer death worldwide. It predominantly occurs in two histological types, ie, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, each with its own distinct geographical distribution and natural history. The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma is rising, as is that of its precursor lesion, Barrett's esophagus, which consists of metaplastic change in the squamous mucosa of the esophagus in response to damage by gastroesophageal reflux disease. The principal risk factors for esophageal cancer are cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, reflux disease, and obesity. In tumors without local invasion or distant metastases, surgery remains the treatment option of choice, although there are considerable differences of opinion regarding the roles of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. A wide variety of endoscopic treatments are available for dysplastic lesions and palliation. Despite the availability of increasingly complex imaging modalities and expensive and possibly ineffective attempts at screening, the evidence base is conflicted and the prognosis remains poor. However, from a recent large systematic review, three clear recommendations can be made, ie, use of endoscopic resection for high grade dysplasia, use of radiofrequency ablation for residual premalignant lesions, and, finally, prevention of risk factors for cancer, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and obesity.Keywords: cancer, Barrett's, esophagus, squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma

  19. Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Arising from Barrett's Epithelium in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Tu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Barrett's esophagus (BE in Eastern countries is rising to match the prevalence in the West. However, a corresponding trend of BE-associated adenocarcinoma has yet to be observed in Asia. Historically, adenocarcinoma complicating BE has been considered a rare event in Taiwan. In the present report, we collected three Taiwanese cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from BE. The first case was a 37-year-old man with an advanced cancer that developed on pre-existing BE after a 3-year interval without endoscopic surveillance. The second case was a 63-year-old man who presented with odynophagia and was found to have an ulcerative tumor centered on the characteristic Barrett's mucosa. The final case was a 44-year-old man who presented with gradual-onset dysphagia and weight loss, without typical reflux symptom. Our report emphasizes the need for an updated epidemiologic study to determine the incidence of BE-associated adenocarcinoma in Taiwan.

  20. Cell Cycle Phase Abnormalities Do Not Account for Disordered Proliferation in Barrett's Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Lao-Sirieix

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus (BE epithelium is the precursor lesion for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Cell cycle proteins have been advocated as biomarkers to predict the malignant potential in BE. However, whether disruption of the cell cycle plays a causal role in Barrett's carcinogenesis is not clear. Specimens from the Barrett's dysplasia—carcinoma sequence were immunostained for cell cycle phase markers (cyclin D1 for G1; cyclin A for S, G2, and M; cytoplasmic cyclin B1 for G2; and phosphorylated histone 3 for M phase and expressed as a proportion of proliferating cells. Flow cytometric analysis of the cell cycle phase of prospective biopsies was also performed. The proliferation status of nondysplastic BE was similar to gastric antrum and D2, but the proliferative compartment extended to the luminal surface. In dysplastic samples, the number of proliferating cells correlated with the degree of dysplasia (P < .001. The overall levels of cyclins A and B1 correlated with the degree of dysplasia (P < .001. However, the cell cycle phase distribution measured with both immunostaining and flow cytometry was conserved during all stages of BE, dysplasia, and cancer. Hence, the increased proliferation seen in Barrett's carcinogenesis is due to abnormal cell cycle entry or exit, rather than a primary abnormality within the cell cycle.

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of Barrett's Adenocarcinoma. A First Step Towards Identifying Patients at Risk and Developing Therapeutic Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyang Dai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Barrett's esophagus metaplasia is the key precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma. The aim of this study was to find a subset of markers that may allow the identification of patients at risk for esophageal adenocarcinoma, and to determine genes differentially expressed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. METHODS: Laser capture microdissection technique was applied to procure cells from defined regions. Genome-wide RNA profiling was performed on esophageal adenocarcinoma (n = 21, Barrett's esophagus (n = 20, esophageal squamous carcinoma (n = 9 and healthy esophageal biopsies (n = 18 using the Affymetrix Human Genome U133plus 2.0 array. Microarray results were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in a second and independent cohort and by immunohistochemistry of two putative markers in a third independent cohort. RESULTS: Through unsupervised hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis, samples were separated into four distinct groups that match perfectly with histology. Many genes down-regulated in esophageal cancers belong to the epidermal differentiation complex or the related GO-group “cornified envelope” of terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Similarly, retinol metabolism was strongly down-regulated. Genes showing strong overexpression in esophageal carcinomas belong to the GO groups extracellular region /matrix such as MMP1, CTHRC1, and INHBA. According to an analysis of genes strongly up-regulated in both esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett's esophagus, REG4 might be of particular interest as an early marker for esophageal adenocarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides high quality data, which could serve for identification of potential biomarkers of Barrett's esophagus at risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma progression.

  2. The sensory system of the esophagus--what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Christina; Gregersen, Hans; Gyawali, C Prakash; Lottrup, Christian; Furnari, Manuele; Savarino, Edoardo; Novais, Luis; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Bor, Serhat; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-09-01

    The nervous innervation and complex mechanical function of the esophagus make sensory evaluation difficult. However, during the last decades, several new techniques have made it possible to gain insight into pain processing of nociceptive signals. The current review highlights the sensory innervation and possibilities for quantitative sensory testing, the mechanosensory properties, the potential of high-resolution manometry and imaging, and the sensory system in special conditions, such as Barrett's esophagus. It is mandatory to understand the complex pathophysiology of the esophagus to enhance our understanding of esophageal disorders, but it also increases the complexity of future experimental and clinical studies. The new methods, as outlined in the current review, provide the possibility for researchers to enhance the quality of interdisciplinary research and to gain more knowledge about sensory symptoms and treatment possibilities. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Swallowable capsule with air channel for improved image-guided cancer detection in the esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Eric J.; Melville, C. David; Lung, Jonathan K. C.; Babchanik, Alexander P.; Lee, Cameron M.; Johnston, Richard S.; Dominitz, Jason A.

    2009-02-01

    A new type of endoscope has been developed and tested in the human esophagus, a tethered-capsule endoscope (TCE) that requires no sedation for oral ingestion and esophageal inspection. The TCE uses scanned red, green, and blue laser light to image the upper digestive tract using a swallowable capsule of 6.4mm in diameter and 18mm in length on a 1.4mm diameter tether. The TCE has been modified for image-guided interventions in the lower esophagus, specifically for more effective detection and measurement of the extent of Barrett's esophagus, a precursor to esophageal cancer. Three modifications have been tested in vivo: (1) weighting the capsule so it is negatively buoyant in water, (2) increasing the frame rate of 500-line images to 30 Hz (video rate), and (3) adding a 1.0mm inner diameter working channel alongside the tether for distending the lower esophagus with air pressure during endoscopy. All three modifications proved effective for more clearly visualizing the lower esophagus in the first few human subjects. The air channel was especially useful because it did not change tolerability in the first subject for unsedated endoscopy and the air easily removed bubbles obscuring tissue from the field of view. The air provided a non-invasive intervention by stimulating the mechanosensor of the lower esophageal sphincter at the precise time that the TCE was positioned for most informative imaging. All three TCE modifications proved successful for improved visualization of esophageal pathology, such as suspected Barrett's esophagus, without the use of sedation.

  4. The pharynx and esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amberg, J.R.; Juhl, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The most common symptom that leads to an examination of the esophagus is heartburn, followed by difficult or painful swallowing. Hematemesis is a symptom that may require examination of the entire upper gastrointestinal tract. Aspiration associated with swallowing directs attention to the pharynx. A more controversial indication for esophagography is sleep apnea, which some think is related to gastroesophageal reflux

  5. Ballmer, Barrett weigh in on security

    CERN Multimedia

    Sullivan, T

    2003-01-01

    ORLANDO, Fla. - Speaking in separate sessions Tuesday at the Gartner Symposium/ITxpo, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer and Intel's chief Craig Barrett discussed the problems of computer/network security (1/2 page).

  6. Dedicated Barrett's surveillance sessions managed by trained endoscopists improve dysplasia detection rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Joanne; Wilson, Patrick; Walker, Giles; Blaker, Paul; DeMartino, Sabina; O'Donohue, John; Reffitt, David; Lanaspre, Effie; Chang, Fuju; Meenan, John; Dunn, Jason M

    2017-06-01

    Background and study aim  Barrett's esophagus (BE)-associated dysplasia is an important marker for risk of progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and an indication for endoscopic therapy. However, BE surveillance technique is variable. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dedicated BE surveillance lists on dysplasia detection rate (DDR). Patients and methods  This was a prospective study of patients undergoing BE surveillance at two hospitals - community (UHL) and upper gastrointestinal center (GSTT). Four endoscopists (Group A) were trained in Prague classification, Seattle protocol biopsy technique, and lesion detection prior to performing BE surveillance endoscopies at both sites, with dedicated time slots or lists. The DDR was then compared with historical data from 47 different endoscopists at GSTT and 24 at UHL (Group B) who had undertaken Barrett's surveillance over the preceding 5-year period. Results  A total of 729 patients with BE underwent surveillance endoscopy between 2007 and 2012. There was no significant difference in patient age, sex, or length of BE between the two groups. There was a significant difference in detection rate of confirmed indefinite or low grade dysplasia and high grade dysplasia (HGD)/EAC between the two groups: 18 % (26 /142) Group A vs. 8 % (45/587) in Group B ( P  < 0.001). Documentation of Prague criteria and adherence to the Seattle protocol was significantly higher in Group A. Conclusion  This study demonstrated that a group of trained endoscopists undertaking Barrett's surveillance on dedicated lists had significantly higher DDR than a nonspecialist cohort. These findings support the introduction of dedicated Barrett's surveillance lists. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Radiology of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huepscher, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    Before the radiologist can decide on his approach to the examination, he needs clinical information and a short relevant medical history of the patient. These aspects are considered in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 covers the 'standard' examination of the esophagus, the contrast media, the relative values of the single contrast, mucosal relief and double contrast studies, the various techniques used to obtain double contrast films and, finally, several of the drugs administered during the examination. Since in cases of aspecific dysphagia the entire esophagus - including the pharynx - must be examined, this stepchild of the radiological examination is the focus of attention in Chapter 3 while an overview of the anatomy, physiology, roentgen anatomy and roentgen physiology of the esophageal body is presented in Chapter 4. Congenital abnormalities, displacement and impressions, diverticula, foreign bodies, perforation and tumors are considered in more detail in Chapters 5 to 10, respectively. The value of computed tomography for the staging of esophageal cancer is discussed in Chapter 11. Chapter 12 is devoted to the highly diversified spectrum of abnormalities of the esophageal wall. Disturbed motility is the subject of Chapter 13. In Chapter 14 the hiatal hernia, gastroesophageal reflux and its results are discussed in a somewhat broader context. In Chapter 15 the radiological aspects of the postoperative esophagus are described. (orig./MG)

  8. [Barret esophagus--molecular biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    Increasing incidence of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus is nowadays observed in western countries. Estimation of the unique molecules may, in the future, lead to early diagnostics of pathological changes in the Barret esophagus and identification of the patient at risk from cancerogenesis. The aim of this study is to explain terminology of Barret esophagus, basis of histopatology, diagnostics and to show molecules which have crucial significance in cancerogenesis.

  9. Diseases of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siewert, J.R.; Holscher, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the entire range of esophaegeal diseases with regard to epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnosis, as well as conservative and, above all, surgical treatment. The book is divided into two parts. The first describes esophaegeal cancer. The newest methods for preoperative staging, perioperative management, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy of esophageal cancer, the surgical techniques for the different types of carcinoma are covered in detail. The long-term results of surgical treatment are discussed, referring to functional results, recurrance, and survival times. The second part of the book describes benign diseases of the esophagus. New, yet proven diagnostic methods are described in detail, including from a cost-benefit perspective

  10. [Foreign Body in Esophagus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domeki, Yasushi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    An esophageal foreign body is the term for a foreign body in the esophagus. The 2 age groups most prone to this condition are children age 9 and under (and especially toddlers age 4 and under) and elderly individuals age 70 and over. A foreign body often lodges where the esophagus is most constricted. In toddlers, the foreign body is often currency or coins or a toy. In adults, the body is often a piece of fish, dentures, a piece of meat, a pin or needle, or a drug in its blister pack packaging. In children, an esophageal foreign body is treated by fluoroscopically guided removal of the body with a balloon catheter or magnetic catheter or removal of the body via endoscopy or direct esophagoscopy under general anesthesia. In adults, the best choice for treating an esophageal foreign body is removing the body with an endoscope but there are instances where surgery is performed because the body is hard to remove endoscopically, a puncture has occurred, or empyema or mediastinitis has developed. This paper reviews the diagnosis and treatment of an esophageal foreign body.

  11. Assessment of use of DcR 3 in diagnosis of dysplastic lesions and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragab Shalaby A.M.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because of confusion to gastric cancers arising at the gastro-esophageal junction, true esophageal adenocarcinoma was thought to be unusual. Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC is becoming more common worldwide with increasing incidences. Material and Methods: Overexpression of decoy receptor (DcR 3 protein, - a recently discovered member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor super-family, was examined in 60 esophagogastrectomy specimens containing areas of Barrett esophagus (n = 27, low-grade dysplasia (n = 40, high-grade dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (n = 33, and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC; n = 42 with immunohistochemical analysis. All cases were retrieved from the pathology files of Damanhour national medical institute hospital.  Results: The results of this study revealed more overexpression of DcR3 in high-grade dysplasia or carcinoma in situ and EAC than in benign esophageal mucosa (both P < 0.0001, Barrett esophagus (both P < 0.001, and low-grade dysplasia (P < 0.01 and P = 0.033, respectively significantly. Low-grade dysplasia also showed significant overexpression of DcR3 compared with benign esophagus (P < 0.05 but not with Barrett esophagus (P > 0.05. DcR3 overexpression seems negatively correlated with the grade of EAC. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that overexpression of DcR3 protein might be an aid in the diagnosis of high-grade dysplasia or carcinoma in situ and EAC and also might serve as a potential therapeutic target.

  12. Safety and efficacy of endoscopic spray cryotherapy for Barrett's dysplasia: results of the National Cryospray Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, S; Tsai, F C; Greenwald, B D; Jang, S; Dumot, J A; McKinley, M J; Shaheen, N J; Habr, F; Coyle, W J

    2016-04-01

    Retrospective series have shown the efficacy of endoscopic spray cryotherapy in eradicating high-grade dysplasia (HGD) in Barrett's esophagus (BE); however, prospective data are lacking, and efficacy for low-grade dysplasia (LGD) is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of spray cryotherapy in patients with LGD or HGD. A multicenter, prospective open-label registry enrolled patients with dysplastic BE. Spray cryotherapy was performed every 2-3 months until there was no endoscopic evidence of BE and no histological evidence of dysplasia, followed by surveillance endoscopies up to 2 years. Primary outcome measures were complete eradication of dysplasia (CE-D) and complete eradication of all intestinal metaplasia (CE-IM). Ninety-six subjects with Barrett's dysplasia (67% HGD; 65% long-segment BE; mean length 4.5 cm) underwent 321 treatments (mean 3.3 per subject). Mean age was 67 years, 83% were male. Eighty patients (83%) completed treatment with follow-up endoscopy (mean duration 21 months). In patients with LGD, rate of CE-D was 91% (21/23) and rate of CE-IM was 61% (14/23). In HGD, CE-D rate was 81% (46/57) and CE-IM was 65% (37/57). In patients with short-segment BE (SSBE) with any dysplasia, CE-D was achieved in 97% (30/31) and CE-IM in 77% (24/31). There were no esophageal perforations or related deaths. One subject developed a stricture, which did not require dilation. One patient was hospitalized for bleeding in the setting of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. In the largest prospective cohort to date, data suggest endoscopic spray cryotherapy is a safe and effective modality for eradication of BE with LGD or HGD, particularly with SSBE. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  13. [Motility disorders of the esophagus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, E; Rougemont, A-L; Furlano, R I; Schneider, J F; Mayr, J; Haecker, F-M; Beier, K; Schneider, J; Weber, P; Berberich, T; Cathomas, G; Meier-Ruge, W A

    2013-03-01

    Motility disorders of the esophagus comprise a heterogeneous spectrum of diseases. Primary malformations of the esophagus are now amenable to improved surgical and gastroenterological therapies; however, they often lead to persistent long-term esophageal dysmotility. Achalasia originates from impaired relaxation of the gastroesophageal sphincter apparatus. Systemic diseases may give rise to secondary disorders of esophageal motility. A number of visceral neuromuscular disorders show an esophageal manifestation but aganglionosis rarely extends into the esophagus. The growing group of myopathies includes metabolic and mitochondrial disorders with increasing levels of genetic characterization and incipient emergence of therapeutic strategies. Esophagitis with an infectious etiology causes severe dysmotility particularly in immunocompromised patients. Immunologically mediated inflammatory processes involving the esophagus are increasingly better understood. Finally, rare tumors and tumor-like lesions may impair esophageal motor function.

  14. O critério de positividade para a análise imunoistoquímica da p53 na confirmação da displasia do esôfago de Barrett faz diferença? Does positive criterium for p53 immunohistochemical analysis in the confirmation of Barrett's dysplasia make difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Vivian Lopes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: O esôfago de Barrett é uma complicação da doença do refluxo gastroesofágico com importante potencial de malignização. Relata-se que a expressão do marcador tumoral p53 se acentua com a progressão displasia-adenocarcinoma. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a expressão da p53 no epitélio de Barrett com presença ou não de displasia conforme dois critérios de positividade. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: O material foi constituído por biopsias endoscópicas de 42 doentes com esôfago de Barrett. Cortes histológicos foram corados pela hematoxilina-eosina, pelo PAS-alcian blue e avaliados quanto à expressão imunoistoquímica da p53. O diagnóstico de displasia foi firmado pela concordância entre três patologistas. Foram utilizados dois critérios de positividade para a p53: 1. a coloração de, pelo menos, metade dos núcleos e 2. o encontro de qualquer núcleo corado. RESULTADOS: O número total de fragmentos foi de 229, com média de 5,4 por paciente. A displasia foi detectada em seis (14,3% casos. Para diferentes critérios de positividade, a p53 foi detectada, respectivamente, em 5 (13,9% e 14 (38,9% com epitélio metaplásico não-displásico. Especificamente nos seis casos displásicos, a p53 foi detectada, conforme o critério de positividade, em um (16,7% e quatro (66,7% casos, respectivamente. CONCLUSÕES: Nesta pequena série, a expressão imunoistoquímica da p53, independente do critério de positividade, não foi de auxílio para a confirmação de alterações displásicas no esôfago de Barrett.BACKGROUND: Barrett's esophagus is the most serious complication of the gastroesophageal reflux disease and presents a malignant potential. The expression of the tumoral marker p53 increases with the dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence. AIMS: To evaluate the p53 expression in Barrett's esophagus with or without dysplasia according to the two positive immunostaining criteria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The material was constituted by endoscopic

  15. Active Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Does Impaired Gallbladder Function Contribute to the Development of Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nassr, Ayman O

    2011-06-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is aetiologically associated with gastro-esophageal reflux, but the mechanisms responsible for the metaplasia-dysplasia sequence are unknown. Bile components are implicated. Impaired gallbladder function may contribute to duodenogastric reflux (DGR) and harmful GERD.

  17. Giant fibrovascular polyp of esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakanth Sannidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign tumors of esophagus are uncommon and account for only 3% of all esophageal neoplasms. Fibrovascular polyps (FVP are rare intraluminal tumors of esophagus. They are composed of fibrous tissue, vascular structures and covered with normal Squamous epithelium. Here we present a case of a 45 yr old gentleman with progressive dysphagia since 3 months. UGI endoscopy showed a long, linear, compressible mass extending from cricoid area to gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ. Patient was operated, through cervical incision esophgectomy done and polyp of size 16 × 7 cm was removed. Histopathology of polyp was suggestive of fibrovascular polyp. Post surgery patient was asymptomatic and doing well.

  18. Barrett’s Esophagus: a Molecular Characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Bax (Dorine)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBarrett’s esophagus is a premalignant condition that is most likely caused by gastroesophageal reflux. In the western world, about 30% of adults have reflux complaints, such as heartburn, and about 10% of reflux patients will develop Barrett’s esophagus [1]. Barrett’s esophagus is

  19. The lymphatics of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okanobu, Koji

    1990-01-01

    For the studies of the esophageal lymphatics, endoscopic RI-lymphoscintigraphy was performed in 23 cases of esophageal cancer, 3 cases of lung cancer and 5 cases of gastric cancer. 99m Tc-Rhenium colloid was endoscopically injected into the submucosal layer of the esophagus near the tumor and the images of th lymph flow were obtained after about 3 hours. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was used to acquire the three-dimensional images of the esophageal lymph flow on 19 patients. RI-uptake of all dissected lymph nodes was also counted after the operation. The results were shown as follows. Whole neck, thoracic and abdominal lymph nodes could be imaged in any case injected at any part of the thoracic esophagus. But the lymph flow in the upper third of the esophagus tended to move mainly upward, and the lymph flow in the lower third tended to move mainly downward. The block of intra-mural lymph vessels by the tumor had very important roles upon the esophageal lymph flow. The removal of upper mediastinal lymph nodes and intraabdominal lumph nodes as well as paraesophageal lymph nodes seemed to be very important for curative resection of carcinoma of the esophagus. (author)

  20. Irradiation of the thoracic esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, S.; Muller-Runkel, R.

    1986-01-01

    A vast majority of patients with esophageal cancer receive radiation therapy for cure or palliation. Because of the close anatomic proximity of the esophagus to the spinal cord, and unusually long fields used in the irradiation of esophageal cancer, staying within the spinal cord tolerance is crucial. The present investigation shows how this can be achieved by delivering the radiation in prone position. (orig.)

  1. Laparoscopic Collis gastroplasty and Dor fundoplication for reflux esophagitis complicated by a penetrating ulcer and shortened esophagus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Fumiaki; Omura, Nobuo; Tsuboi, Kazuto; Nakada, Koji; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2007-08-01

    The patient was a 72-year-old man, who was referred to us at the beginning of July 2005 with a chief complaint of difficulty with swallowing. After a thorough medical examination, the patient was diagnosed with a penetrating ulcer due to reflux esophagitis, lower esophageal stricture, Barrett esophagus, and shortened esophagus. After administration of a proton pump inhibitor and 2 sessions of endoscopic dilatation, esophagitis was cured and the stricture was eliminated. Subsequently, Collis gastroplasty and Dor fundoplication, which seemed appropriate to certainly avoid injuring communication with the mediastinum created by the penetrating ulcer and provide radical cure, were performed laparoscopically. The patient made a good postoperative progress, was discharged on the 11th hospital day, and is now being followed up on an outpatient basis. There have been no signs of recurrence of esophagitis, and the penetrating ulcer was cured. To our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous laparoscopic Collis gastroplasty and Dor fundoplication in the English literature.

  2. Radiosensitivity of carcinoma of esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Hidenori

    1986-01-01

    With a detailed graphic reconstruction of radiation effects shown in 11 operation materials of carcinoma of esophagus with preoperative irradiation, histologic analysis of the radiosensitivity was made. Residual cancer lesions in 11 operation specimens contained adenocarcinoma elements. Carcinoma of esophagus belonged to mixed carcinoma (syn. metaplastic cancer). Radioresistant nature resulted from the remnant adenocarcinoma elements. Protruded type (3 cases) showed about 60 % of residual cancer after preoperative irradiation of 40 Gy (Lineac or 60 Co.). The residual cancer nests histologically revealed well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with a few signet-ring cells, compatible with mucoepidermoid carcinoma. In protruded type, the mixed carcinoma was composed of segmental, disproportioned zonal squamous metaplasia. As its histogenetic origin, a main duct of esophageal gland was suggested. In 9 autopsy cases of esophageal cancer, recurrent lesion within the field of irradiation failed to respond to radiotherapy. In recurrent residual lesions, a higher proportion of adenocarcinoma elements was noticed. Therefore, the cancer part formed by a high rate of metaplasia was markedly responsive to irradiation, whereas increased residue of adenocarcinoma elements was enhanced the radioresistant property. In a middle thoracic esophagus (Im) corresponding to the commonest site of esophageal cancer, the distribution of esohageal glands was in a high density with a constant ratio of density in each age group particularly in male. In age groups with higher incidence of carcinoma of esophagus, esophageal glands markedly increased especially in male, in contrast with the indefinite number and density ratio in female cases. A high density of esophageal glands was noticed in the upper (Iu) and lower (Im) parts of the 2nd physiologic constriction, in proportion to the commonest site of carcinoma of esophagus. (J.P.N.)

  3. Black esophagus: exploring the dark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Forster

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Black esophagus is a rare but underdiagnosed disease. It occurs most frequently in severely ill patients and carries a high mortality rate. Cause of death is usually attributed to the comorbid conditions. Treatment is directed at the underlying cause, acid suppression and keeping the patient nil-per-os. Surgery is needed in complicated cases and stenosis is the most feared longterm sequel. In the present article, two cases are described and literature is reviewed.

  4. Optical coherence tomography in the diagnosis of dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in Barret's esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladkova, N. D.; Zagaynova, E. V.; Zuccaro, G.; Kareta, M. V.; Feldchtein, F. I.; Balalaeva, I. V.; Balandina, E. B.

    2007-02-01

    Statistical analysis of endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) surveillance of 78 patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) is presented in this study. The sensitivity of OCT device in retrospective open detection of early malignancy (including high grade dysplasia and intramucosal adenocarcinoma (IMAC)) was 75%, specificity 82%, diagnostic accuracy - 80%, positive predictive value- 60%, negative predictive value- 87%. In the open recognition of IMAC sensitivity was 81% and specificity were 85% each. Results of a blind recognition with the same material were similar: sensitivity - 77%, specificity 85%, diagnostic accuracy - 82%, positive predictive value- 70%, negative predictive value- 87%. As the endoscopic detection of early malignancy is problematic, OCT holds great promise in enhancing the diagnostic capability of clinical GI endoscopy.

  5. Endoscopic Management of Early Adenocarcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus: Screening, Diagnosis, and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Pietro, Massimiliano; Canto, Marcia I; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2018-01-01

    Because the esophagus is easily accessible with endoscopy, early diagnosis and curative treatment of esophageal cancer is possible. However, diagnosis is often delayed because symptoms are not specific during early stages of tumor development. The onset of dysphagia is associated with advanced disease, which has a survival at 5 years lower than 15%. Population screening by endoscopy is not cost-effective, but a number of alternative imaging and cell analysis technologies are under investigation. The ideal screening test should be inexpensive, well tolerated, and applicable to primary care. Over the past 10 years, significant progress has been made in endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of dysplasia (squamous and Barrett's), and early esophageal cancer using resection and ablation technologies supported by evidence from randomized controlled trials. We review the state-of-the-art technologies for early diagnosis and minimally invasive treatment, which together could reduce the burden of disease. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nutcracker esophagus: Analysis of 80 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Csendes, Attila; Cárcamo, Carlos; Henríquez, Ana

    2004-01-01

    Background: The nutcracker esophagus, a primary motor disorder, is frequently associated with noncardic chest pain. Aim: To study the clinical, endoscopic, manometric, and pathological features and 24 h acid reflux in patients with nutcracker esophagus. Patients and methods: Eighty patients (63 females, aged 26 to 70 years) with nutcracker esophagus, defined as the presence of contraction waves of more than 180 mmHg in the esophageal manometry, were studied. All were subjected to an upper gas...

  7. [Transhiatal esophagectomy for cardia and esophagus cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseev, A Yu; Shulutko, A M; Gryaznov, S E

    To present the result of transhiatal esophagectomies with simultaneous repair. The study included 67 procedures. In 35 cases surgery was carried out for adenocarcinoma of distal esophagus or cardia with high transition to esophagus, in 32 cases - for epidermal carcinoma of the esophagus. Gastric graft and left half of the colon were used in 60 and 7 cases respectively for simultaneous repair. 29 patients underwent transhiatal instrumental esophagectomy using author's original technique.

  8. Expression of EpCam and Villin in Barrett’s Esophagus and in Gastric Cardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Anders

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study we aimed to clarify the potential of EpCAM and villin as in vivo biomarkers for both Barrett esophagus (BE-associated neoplasia and BE versus cardiac mucosa. Immunohistochemical staining in BE with various degrees of intraepithelial neoplasia (IN, Barrett carcinoma (BC and in normal cardiac mucosa (CM revealed a lack of EpCam and villin in squamous esophageal epithelium. All specimens of IN and BC showed EpCam with varying staining intensities. In 57% of CM samples a weak signal was detected; the remainder displayed strong EpCam expression. Villin was found in 97% of BE specimens and in all those with IN; 37% of BC and 75% of CM specimens were also positive. We conclude that expression of EpCam and villin differs only between squamous epithelium and BE. Determination of these proteins does not allow discrimination between different degrees of neoplasia or between esophageal intestinal metaplasia and cardiac mucosa.

  9. Non-neoplastic disorders of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Min Ji; Kim, Young Tong

    2013-01-01

    Non-neoplastic disorders of the esophagus include esophagitis, esophageal diverticulum, esophageal injury, foreign body, fistulous formation between the esophagus and the surrounding structures and mucocele. Since these disorders have variable symptoms and radiologic findings, it needs to differentiated from other disorders other than esophageal diseases. Being knowledgeable of CT findings suggest that these disorders can help diagnose non-neoplastic disorders of the esophagus. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of non-neoplastic disorders of the esophagus.

  10. Multiple metachronous cancer of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamontov, A.S.; Shlakov, S.L.; Bitotskij, P.G.; Volchenko, N.N.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of a patient with the most characteristics combination of primary multiple metachronous cancer of esophagus involving the esophagus tumor localization on the one hand and tumors in the head and neck organs, on the other hand is described. Remote radiation therapy has been applied in the area of the primary tumor ( 60 Co radiation - carrying needles) and interstitial cavitary therapy as been undertaken. According to the authors data in 1988-1995 in Moscow oncological institute named after Gertsen multiple metachronous cancer cases, esophagus being one of localizations were revealed in 7% of all the patients with esophagus cancer diagnosis [ru

  11. Metaplasia intestinal especializada de esôfago distal na doença do refluxo gastroesofágico: prevalência e aspectos clínico-epidemiológicos Specialized intestinal metaplasia of distal esophagus in the gastroesophageal reflux disease: prevalence and clinical-demographic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiber C. Caum

    2003-12-01

    , esofagite mais intensa e sem associação com tabaco ou álcool.BACKGROUND: Specialized intestinal metaplasia can be categorized according endoscopic and histological findings in long segment Barrett, short segment Barrett and specialized intestinal metaplasia of cardia. Barrett's esophagus is an acquired disease that is found in about 10%-13% of patients undergoing endoscopy for symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and it is well established as predisposing to esophageal adenocarcinoma. The columnar epithelium with goblet cells replaces the normal squamous epithelium. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and clinical-demographic characteristics of specialized intestinal metaplasia of distal esophagus in the gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: From April to October 2002, 402 patients referred to upper endoscopy due gastroesophageal reflux disease were evaluated through of a symptom questionnaire about clinical and demographic features and submitted to upper endoscopy with four-quadrant biopsies 1 cm below escamocolumnar junction. RESULTS: Eighteen point four percent of patients had specialized intestinal metaplasia, 0.5% long segment Barrett esophagus, 3.2% short segment Barrett's esophagus and 14.7% specialized intestinal metaplasia of cardia. Patients with Barrett's esophagus showed a tendency to be male and specialized metaplasia of cardia to be female. All patients with Barrett's esophagus were white. There was not association between symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and specialized intestinal metaplasia, but patients with Barrett's esophagus showed a tendency to have symptoms over 5 years and had more hiatal hernia and esophagitis. The use of alcohol and tobacco was not related to the presence of specialized intestinal metaplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Barrett's esophagus was more related to the male gender, gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms for 5 years or longer, more intense esophagitis and hiatal hernia, but was not related to the use of

  12. Radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhigaliev, N.; Kusherbaev, S.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    Indications and contraindications for radiation treatment of esophagus cancer are presented. The role of chemoradiation among esophagus cancer treatment methods is determined.Thechnical, dosimetric and clinical data are sequently delivered. Preparation of a patient for chemoradiation is described. Recommendations on their most efficient use are given

  13. Innervation of the mammalian esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhuber, Winfried L; Raab, Marion; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Wörl, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the innervation of the esophagus is a prerequisite for successful treatment of a variety of disorders, e.g., dysphagia, achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and non-cardiac chest pain. Although, at first glance, functions of the esophagus are relatively simple, their neuronal control is considerably complex. Vagal motor neurons of the nucleus ambiguus and preganglionic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus innervate striated and smooth muscle, respectively. Myenteric neurons represent the interface between the dorsal motor nucleus and smooth muscle but they are also involved in striated muscle innervation. Intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs) represent mechanosensory vagal afferent terminals. They also establish intricate connections with enteric neurons. Afferent information is implemented by the swallowing central pattern generator in the brainstem, which generates and coordinates deglutitive activity in both striated and smooth esophageal muscle and orchestrates esophageal sphincters as well as gastric adaptive relaxation. Disturbed excitation/inhibition balance in the lower esophageal sphincter results in motility disorders, e.g., achalasia and GERD. Loss of mechanosensory afferents disrupts adaptation of deglutitive motor programs to bolus variables, eventually leading to megaesophagus. Both spinal and vagal afferents appear to contribute to painful sensations, e.g., non-cardiac chest pain. Extrinsic and intrinsic neurons may be involved in intramural reflexes using acetylcholine, nitric oxide, substance P, CGRP and glutamate as main transmitters. In addition, other molecules, e.g., ATP, GABA and probably also inflammatory cytokines, may modulate these neuronal functions.

  14. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  15. Long-term expansion of epithelial organoids from human colon, adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and Barrett's epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshiro; Stange, Daniel E; Ferrante, Marc; Vries, Robert G J; Van Es, Johan H; Van den Brink, Stieneke; Van Houdt, Winan J; Pronk, Apollo; Van Gorp, Joost; Siersema, Peter D; Clevers, Hans

    2011-11-01

    We previously established long-term culture conditions under which single crypts or stem cells derived from mouse small intestine expand over long periods. The expanding crypts undergo multiple crypt fission events, simultaneously generating villus-like epithelial domains that contain all differentiated types of cells. We have adapted the culture conditions to grow similar epithelial organoids from mouse colon and human small intestine and colon. Based on the mouse small intestinal culture system, we optimized the mouse and human colon culture systems. Addition of Wnt3A to the combination of growth factors applied to mouse colon crypts allowed them to expand indefinitely. Addition of nicotinamide, along with a small molecule inhibitor of Alk and an inhibitor of p38, were required for long-term culture of human small intestine and colon tissues. The culture system also allowed growth of mouse Apc-deficient adenomas, human colorectal cancer cells, and human metaplastic epithelia from regions of Barrett's esophagus. We developed a technology that can be used to study infected, inflammatory, or neoplastic tissues from the human gastrointestinal tract. These tools might have applications in regenerative biology through ex vivo expansion of the intestinal epithelia. Studies of these cultures indicate that there is no inherent restriction in the replicative potential of adult stem cells (or a Hayflick limit) ex vivo. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Automated detection of esophageal dysplasia in in vivo optical coherence tomography images of the human esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassinopoulos, Michalis; Dong, Jing; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Pitris, Costas

    2018-02-01

    Catheter-based Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) devices allow real-time and comprehensive imaging of the human esophagus. Hence, they provide the potential to overcome some of the limitations of endoscopy and biopsy, allowing earlier diagnosis and better prognosis for esophageal adenocarcinoma patients. However, the large number of images produced during every scan makes manual evaluation of the data exceedingly difficult. In this study, we propose a fully automated tissue characterization algorithm, capable of discriminating normal tissue from Barrett's Esophagus (BE) and dysplasia through entire three-dimensional (3D) data sets, acquired in vivo. The method is based on both the estimation of the scatterer size of the esophageal epithelial cells, using the bandwidth of the correlation of the derivative (COD) method, as well as intensity-based characteristics. The COD method can effectively estimate the scatterer size of the esophageal epithelium cells in good agreement with the literature. As expected, both the mean scatterer size and its standard deviation increase with increasing severity of disease (i.e. from normal to BE to dysplasia). The differences in the distribution of scatterer size for each tissue type are statistically significant, with a p value of < 0.0001. However, the scatterer size by itself cannot be used to accurately classify the various tissues. With the addition of intensity-based statistics the correct classification rates for all three tissue types range from 83 to 100% depending on the lesion size.

  17. Carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herskovic, A.M.; Leichman, L.; Lattin, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors analyzed all cases of thoracic esophagel carcinoma seen from 1980 to 1984 inclusive, plus an additional 22 cases from a pilot study at Wayne State University. Most patients received preoperative combination radiation and chemotherapy. Eighty-nine patients completed treatment (5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, and radiation therapy) as in both the RTOG and SWOG national studies. Of these 89, 39 refused or were not offered planned surgery. Four patients are still alive and well. Fifty patients underwent esophagectomy; 12 patients were free of tumor at esophagectomy, and four of these are alive and well. One patient with a tumor in the resected esophagus alone is still alive. Twenty-two patients were enrolled in the pilot study in which surgery was reserved for salvage, the initial radiation volume was increased, the tumor dose was increased to 5,000 rad give continuously, and chemotherapy was increased to four courses

  18. Autopsy findings in carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, A.; Frias, Z.; Caldwell, W.L.; Jaeschke, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    At autopsy of 82 cases of carcinoma of the esophagus over a period of 25 years metastatic tumor was found in 42 cases (51%) and residual tumor in the esophagus in 56 cases (86%). The most frequent site of metastases was in the lymph nodes, followed by liver, lung, and adrenal gland. Direct extension of the tumor to adjacent structures was established in 30 cases (36%), and the most frequent structure involved was the trachea. Five cases had a second primary and two cases a second separate lesion at another level of the esophagus. (Auth.)

  19. [Functional methods of the esophagus examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valitova, E R; Bordin, D S; Ianova, O B; Vasnev, O S; Masharova, A A

    2010-01-01

    Manometry of the esophagus is the "gold standard" in diagnosing diseases of the esophagus associated with motor disorders. The combination of manometry with impedance gives an indication of violation of bolus transport along the esophagus. High resolution manometry is new method that provides the most accurate information about the functional anatomy of the esophagus and its sphincters, as well as accurately characterizes the esophageal-gastric junction. We can increase the diagnostic value of daily pH-monitoring by analyzing communication with reflux symptoms. The combination of pH and impedance can identify different types of reflux (acid, sour, gas, liquid and mixed) in patients with symptoms of GERD and related Ahil, after gastric resection in children and infants, to evaluate the effectiveness of antireflux therapy.

  20. Antiinflammatory agents protect opossum esophagus during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northway, M.G.; Eastwood, G.L.; Libshitz, H.I.; Feldman, M.S.; Mamel, J.J.; Szwarc, I.A.

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen opossums received 2250 rad 60 Co to the entire esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Animals received treatment with 600 mg aspirin, 25 mg/kg hydrocortisone, or saline before irradiation and twice daily for 1 week after irradiation. At 10 days postirradiation, animals were evaluated for signs of acute esophagitis by esophagoscopy and barium esophagram. Each animal was then killed and the esophagus removed and evaluated histologically. Animals treated with either aspirin or hydrocortisone had significantly milder esophagitis than control irradiated animals

  1. Radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhigaliev, N.; Kusherbaev, S.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical and practical substantiation of dose fractionation regimes in radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer are presented. The indications and contraindications to radiotherapy, radiation reactions and complications resulting from the treatment process are considered. The preparation of patients to the application of chemoradiation treatment methods is described. The recommentations for the improvement of immediate and delayed results of treatment of esophagus cancer patients are given. 99 refs.; 15 figs

  2. Recurrent giant fibrovascular polyp of the esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ser Yee; Chan, Weng Hoong; Sivanandan, Ranjiv; Lim, Dennis Teck Hock; Wong, Wai Keong

    2009-01-01

    Giant fibrovascular polyps of the esophagus and hypopharynx are rare benign esophageal tumors. They arise most commonly in the upper esophagus and may, rarely, originate in the hypopharynx. They can vary significantly in size. Even though they are benign, they may be lethal due to either bleeding or, rarely, asphyxiation if a large polyp is regurgitated. Patients commonly present with dysphagia or hematemesis. The polyps may not be well visualized on endoscopy and imaging plays a vital role i...

  3. Comparative genomic hybridization of cancer of the gastroesophageal junction: deletion of 14Q31-32.1 discriminates between esophageal (Barrett's) and gastric cardia adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dekken, H; Geelen, E; Dinjens, W N; Wijnhoven, B P; Tilanus, H W; Tanke, H J; Rosenberg, C

    1999-02-01

    Incidence rates have risen rapidly for esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinomas. These cancers, arising at and around the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), share a poor prognosis. In contrast, there is no consensus with respect to clinical staging resulting in possible adverse effects on treatment and survival. The goal of this study was to provide more insight into the genetic changes underlying esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinomas. We have used comparative genomic hybridization for a genetic analysis of 28 adenocarcinomas of the GEJ. Eleven tumors were localized in the distal esophagus and related to Barrett's esophagus, and 10 tumors were situated in the gastric cardia. The remaining seven tumors were located at the junction and could not be classified as either Barrett-related, or gastric cardia. We found alterations in all 28 neoplasms. Gains and losses were distinguished in comparable numbers. Frequent loss (> or = 25% of all tumors) was detected, in decreasing order of frequency, on 4pq (54%), 14q (46%), 18q (43%), 5q (36%), 16q (36%), 9p (29%), 17p (29%), and 21q (29%). Frequent gain (> or = 25% of all tumors) was observed, in decreasing order of frequency, on 20pq (86%), 8q (79%), 7p (61%), 13q (46%), 12q (39%), 15q (39%), 1q (36%), 3q (32%), 5p (32%), 6p (32%), 19q (32%), Xpq (32%), 17q (29%), and 18p (25%). Nearly all patients were male, and loss of chromosome Y was frequently noted (64%). Recurrent high-level amplifications (> 10% of all tumors) were seen at 8q23-24.1, 15q25, 17q12-21, and 19q13.1. Minimal overlapping regions could be determined at multiple locations (candidate genes are in parentheses): minimal regions of overlap for deletions were assigned to 3p14 (FHIT, RCA1), 5q14-21 (APC, MCC), 9p21 (MTS1/CDKN2), 14q31-32.1 (TSHR), 16q23, 18q21 (DCC, P15) and 21q21. Minimal overlapping amplified sites could be seen at 5p14 (MLVI2), 6p12-21.1 (NRASL3), 7p12 (EGFR), 8q23-24.1 (MYC), 12q21.1, 15q25 (IGF1R), 17q12-21 (ERBB2/HER2-neu), 19q

  4. Comparison of cancer-associated genetic abnormalities in columnar-lined esophagus tissues with and without goblet cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandla, Santhoshi; Peters, Jeffrey H; Ruff, David; Chen, Shiaw-Min; Li, Chieh-Yuan; Song, Kunchang; Thoms, Kimberly; Litle, Virginia R; Watson, Thomas; Chapurin, Nikita; Lada, Michal; Pennathur, Arjun; Luketich, James D; Peterson, Derick; Dulak, Austin; Lin, Lin; Bass, Adam; Beer, David G; Godfrey, Tony E; Zhou, Zhongren

    2014-07-01

    To determine and compare the frequency of cancer-associated genetic abnormalities in esophageal metaplasia biopsies with and without goblet cells. Barrett's esophagus is associated with increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), but the appropriate histologic definition of Barrett's esophagus is debated. Intestinal metaplasia (IM) is defined by the presence of goblet cells whereas nongoblet cell metaplasia (NGM) lacks goblet cells. Both have been implicated in EAC risk but this is controversial. Although IM is known to harbor genetic changes associated with EAC, little is known about NGM. We hypothesized that if NGM and IM infer similar EAC risk, then they would harbor similar genetic aberrations in genes associated with EAC. Ninety frozen NGM, IM, and normal tissues from 45 subjects were studied. DNA copy number abnormalities were identified using microarrays and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Targeted sequencing of all exons from 20 EAC-associated genes was performed on metaplasia biopsies using Ion AmpliSeq DNA sequencing. Frequent copy number abnormalities targeting cancer-associated genes were found in IM whereas no such changes were observed in NGM. In 1 subject, fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed loss of CDKN2A and amplification of chromosome 8 in IM but not in a nearby NGM biopsy. Targeted sequencing revealed 11 nonsynonymous mutations in 16 IM samples and 2 mutations in 19 NGM samples. This study reports the largest and most comprehensive comparison of DNA aberrations in IM and NGM genomes. Our results show that IM has a much higher frequency of cancer-associated mutations than NGM.

  5. Esôfago de Barrett: aspectos fisiopatológicos e moleculares da seqüência metaplasia-displasia-adenocarcinoma - artigo de revisão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Silveira Volkweis

    Full Text Available The Barrett's esophagus (BE is defined as endoscopically visible columnar mucosa at the distal esophagus, of any extension, proved to harbor intestinal metaplasia on biopsy, highlighted by the presence of goblet cells. BE denotes long-standing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD and is an important risk factor for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC. Therefore, these patients must be on follow-up, in order to diagnose cancer early. BE patients have frequent alterations in esophageal physiologyc studies. Alkaline duodenogastroesophageal reflux seems to have important role. The development BE occurs in steps, initially with formation of cardiac type mucosa subsequent intestinalization. Futher progression can follow a sequence, from low grade dysplasia, to high grade dysplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Current follow-up is based on the presence of dysplasia. It has limitations, grouping patients heterogeneously. Different steps of carcinogenesis have been studied looking for an ideal prognostic marker. Uncontrolled proliferative activity, apoptosis inhibition, angiogenesis, tissue invasion and metastases formation are all implicated in cancer origin. Some cycle cell molecules have been studied in BE, such as retinoblastoma protein, ciclins, kinase dependent ciclins and cell cycle inhibitors. The P53 protein is one of the most investigated in the metaplasia-adenocarcinoma progression. Growth Factors, apoptotic proteins, telomers and DNA ploidy have also been searched. Increased proliferative activity has been implicated in Barrett's carcinogenesis and the Ki-67 antigen, through imunohistochemical analysis, has become the the method of choice. Present in the nucleus, it is found in proliferative cells only. Some studies suport association between Ki-67 activity and the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence.The results, however, are inconclusive and research should follow this way.

  6. Loss of heterozygosity at thymidylate synthase locus in Barrett's metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallbohmer Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymidylate synthase (TS is known to have a unique 28 bp tandemly repeated sequence in the promoter region, and the majorities of subjects have a heterozygous double repeat/triple repeat genotype in their non-cancerous tissue. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH at the TS locus is known to occur in cancer patients, but there is no evidence that it is present in precancerous tissue. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency and timing of LOH at the TS locus in Barrett-associated adenocarcinoma (BA and its precursory lesions, such as intestinal metaplasia (IM and dysplasia. Methods One hundred twenty-three samples (including 37 with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, 29 with IM, 13 with dysplasia, and 44 with BA were obtained from 100 patients. Biopsies were obtained from the lower esophageal mucosa/IM/dysplasia/BA, when available. Normal squamous tissue from the upper esophagus was taken as a control. All tissues were analyzed for the TS genotype and TS mRNA expression using the real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR method after laser-capture microdissection. Results Among the patients with informative heterozygous genotype in their control samples, no sample with LOH at the TS locus was observed in the lower esophageal mucosa in GERD patients (0/22 samples. However, 6 out of 21 samples (28.6% had LOH in IM, 2 of 7 (28.6% in dysplasia, and 10 of 25 (40.0% in BA. No significant difference in TS mRNA expression levels was observed between TS genotypes. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that LOH is a relatively frequent and early event in the IM-BA sequence.

  7. Quantitative attenuation analysis for identification of early Barrett's neoplasia in volumetric laser endomicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swager, Anne-Fre; Faber, Dirk J.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Weusten, Bas L.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Bergman, Jacques J.; Curvers, Wouter L.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2017-08-01

    Early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE) is difficult to detect. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy (VLE) incorporates optical coherence tomography, providing a circumferential scan of the esophageal wall layers. The attenuation coefficient (μVLE) quantifies decay of detected backscattered light versus depth, and could potentially improve BE neoplasia detection. The aim is to investigate feasibility of μVLE for identification of early BE neoplasia. In vivo and ex vivo VLE scans with histological correlation from BE patients ± neoplasia were used. Quantification by μVLE was performed manually on areas of interest (AoIs) to differentiate neoplasia from nondysplastic (ND)BE. From ex vivo VLE scans from 16 patients (13 with neoplasia), 68 AoIs were analyzed. Median μVLE values (mm-1) were 3.7 [2.1 to 4.4 interquartile range (IQR)] for NDBE and 4.0 (2.5 to 4.9 IQR) for neoplasia, not statistically different (p=0.82). Fourteen in vivo scans were used: nine from neoplastic and five from NDBE patients. Median μVLE values were 1.8 (1.5 to 2.6 IQR) for NDBE and 2.1 (1.9 to 2.6 IQR) for neoplasia, with no statistically significant difference (p=0.37). In conclusion, there was no significant difference in μVLE values in VLE scans from early neoplasia versus NDBE. Future studies with a larger sample size should explore other quantitative methods for detection of neoplasia during BE surveillance.

  8. Carcinoma of the esophagus: sites of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantravadi, R.V.P.; Lad, T.; Briele, H.; Liebner, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    A clinico-pathologic study of 173 patients with esophageal cancer was done. The median survival for all patients was 6.4 months. Persistent tumor in esophagus at the time of death was present in 78% of patients treated with radiation alone. Metastases to mediastinal, intraabdominal and supraclavicular nodes were found in 73%, 49% and 20% of patients respectively. Systemic metastases were found in 57% of patients, liver being the most common site. In 15% of patients, fistulae developed between esophagus and trachea or bronchus because of direct extension of the primary tumor. Local and regional tumor caused the death of 111 patients, whereas distant metastases led to death in only 27 patients. This study confirms the extensive intra- and extrathoracic spread of malignancy in a majority of patients with cancer of the esophagus

  9. Verrucous Squamous Cell Cancer in the Esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeland, C; Achiam, M P; Federspiel, B

    2016-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma is a rare, slow-growing type of squamous cell cancer. Fewer than 50 patients with verrucous carcinoma in the esophagus have been described worldwide. In 2014, two male patients were diagnosed with verrucous carcinoma in the distal part of the esophagus. The endoscopic...... examinations showed a similar wart-like, white, irregular mucosa in both cases. The diagnosis was difficult to make since all biopsies taken from the affected area showed no malignancy. This cancer type has a relatively good prognosis when the diagnosis is finally obtained. Both our patients presented...

  10. The Barrett-Crane model: asymptotic measure factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Wojciech; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2014-04-01

    The original spin foam model construction for 4D gravity by Barrett and Crane suffers from a few troubling issues. In the simple examples of the vertex amplitude they can be summarized as the existence of contributions to the asymptotics from non-geometric configurations. Even restricted to geometric contributions the amplitude is not completely worked out. While the phase is known to be the Regge action, the so-called measure factor has remained mysterious for a decade. In the toy model case of the 6j symbol this measure factor has a nice geometric interpretation of V-1/2 leading to speculations that a similar interpretation should be possible also in the 4D case. In this paper we provide the first geometric interpretation of the geometric part of the asymptotic for the spin foam consisting of two glued 4-simplices (decomposition of the 4-sphere) in the Barrett-Crane model in the large internal spin regime.

  11. The stem cell organisation, and the proliferative and gene expression profile of Barrett's epithelium, replicates pyloric-type gastric glands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavery, Danielle L.; Nicholson, Anna M.; Poulsom, Richard; Jeffery, Rosemary; Hussain, Alia; Gay, Laura J.; Jankowski, Janusz A.; Zeki, Sebastian S.; Barr, Hugh; Harrison, Rebecca; Going, James; Kadirkamanathan, Sritharan; Davis, Peter; Underwood, Timothy; Novelli, Marco R.; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Shepherd, Neil; Jansen, Marnix; Wright, Nicholas A.; McDonald, Stuart A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Barrett's oesophagus shows appearances described as 'intestinal metaplasia', in structures called 'crypts' but do not typically display crypt architecture. Here, we investigate their relationship to gastric glands. Cell proliferation and migration within Barrett's glands was assessed by Ki67 and

  12. Benign intramural schwannoma of the esophagus ? case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kozak, Katarzyna; Kowalczyk, Mateusz; Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Kozak, J?zef

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas of the esophagus are rare peripheral nerve tumors. A 37-year-old woman with dysphagia was found to have an intramural tumor of the upper esophagus. The lesion was revealed on computed tomography. Endoscopic ultrasound biopsy was nondiagnostic. Through right thoracotomy, the mass was enucleated from the wall of the esophagus. Benign schwannoma was diagnosed only after immunological staining examination.

  13. Prevalence and predictors of columnar lined esophagus in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients undergoing upper endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Gokulakrishnan; Singh, Mandeep; Gupta, Neil; Gaddam, Srinivas; Giacchino, Maria; Wani, Sachin B; Moloney, Brian; Higbee, April D; Rastogi, Amit; Bansal, Ajay; Sharma, Prateek

    2012-11-01

    Chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a risk factor for Barrett's esophagus (BE), the most important surrogate marker for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). The need to document the presence of intestinal metaplasia in esophageal biopsies from a columnar lined esophagus (CLE) to diagnose BE is debated. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of CLE in a large cohort of GERD patients undergoing upper endoscopy. Consecutive patients presenting to the endoscopy unit at a tertiary referral center for their index upper endoscopy for evaluation of GERD symptoms were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Patients were asked to complete a validated GERD questionnaire that documents the onset of GERD symptoms (heartburn and acid regurgitation) and grades the frequency and severity of symptoms experienced over the past year. Demographic information, body mass index, and use of aspirin/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs were recorded. Endoscopic details including length of CLE, presence and size of hiatal hernia were noted. Patients with CLE (cases) were compared with those without CLE (controls) using Fischer's exact test and t-test. All factors that were statistically significant (PGERD symptoms were prospectively enrolled. On index endoscopy, the prevalence of CLE was 23.3%, whereas of CLE with documented intestinal metaplasia was 14.1%. On univariate analysis, male gender, Caucasian race, heartburn duration of >5 years, presence and size of hiatal hernia were significantly associated with the presence of CLE compared with controls (P5 years (odds ratio (OR): 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-2.09, P=0.01), Caucasian race (OR: 2.40, 95% CI: 1.42-4.03, P=0.001), and hiatal hernia (OR: 2.07, 95% CI: 1.50-2.87, PGERD patients are diagnosed with this lesion. Enrolling all these patients in surveillance programs would have significant ramifications on health-care resources.

  14. Rupture of esophagus by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Tan, Yuyong; Huo, Jirong

    2016-11-01

    Currently, beverages containing compressed air such as cola and champagne are widely used in our daily life. Improper ways to unscrew the bottle, usually by teeth, could lead to an injury, even a rupture of the esophagus. This letter to editor describes a case of esophageal rupture caused by compressed air.

  15. Chemotherapy in cancer of the esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Kok (Tjebbe)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAl though cancer of the esophagus has been recogni zed as a fatal disease as long ago as the start of the Christian era, the present outlook remains dismal. Less than 10 percent of patients with seemingly localized disease, surgically treated with curative intent, will survive five years

  16. Emerging optical methods for surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Matthew B; Wang, Thomas D

    2015-11-01

    The rapid rise in incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has motivated the need for improved methods for surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus. Early neoplasia is flat in morphology and patchy in distribution and is difficult to detect with conventional white light endoscopy (WLE). Light offers numerous advantages for rapidly visualising the oesophagus, and advanced optical methods are being developed for wide-field and cross-sectional imaging to guide tissue biopsy and stage early neoplasia, respectively. We review key features of these promising methods and address their potential to improve detection of Barrett's neoplasia. The clinical performance of key advanced imaging technologies is reviewed, including (1) wide-field methods, such as high-definition WLE, chromoendoscopy, narrow-band imaging, autofluorescence and trimodal imaging and (2) cross-sectional techniques, such as optical coherence tomography, optical frequency domain imaging and confocal laser endomicroscopy. Some of these instruments are being adapted for molecular imaging to detect specific biological targets that are overexpressed in Barrett's neoplasia. Gene expression profiles are being used to identify early targets that appear before morphological changes can be visualised with white light. These targets are detected in vivo using exogenous probes, such as lectins, peptides, antibodies, affibodies and activatable enzymes that are labelled with fluorescence dyes to produce high contrast images. This emerging approach has potential to provide a 'red flag' to identify regions of premalignant mucosa, outline disease margins and guide therapy based on the underlying molecular mechanisms of cancer progression. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. An unusual foreign body of esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder K Singhal

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of an unusually long foreign body (Datun impacted in the esophagus of a 56 year-old gentleman. He was literate, without any psychiatric illness and had been using “Neem” (Azadirachta indica stick for cleaning his teeth for the past twenty years. Neem sticks are used for brushing teeth, perhaps one of the earliest and very effective dental care. On closer questioning he revealed his habit of passing the Neem stick into his throat with the aim of cleaning it too while cleaning his teeth. He presented to our emergency early in the morning with this strange long foreign body impacted in his esophagus which was removed successfully using a Jackson’s adult rigid oesophagoscope. We believe this to be the first case of such an unusually long foreign body to be reported in the literature.

  18. Palliation of Dysphagia in Carcinoma Esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala; Malage, Somanath; Sreenath, G.S.; Kotlapati, Sudhakar; Cyriac, Sunu

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma has a special place in gastrointestinal carcinomas because it contains two main types, namely, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma esophagus patients require some form of palliation because of locally advanced stage or distant metastasis, where it cannot be subjected to curable treatment with surgery and chemoradiation. Many modalities of palliation of dysphagia are available, but the procedure with least morbidity, mortality, and long-term palliation of...

  19. Primary Malignant Melanoma of the Esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Oya Yonal; Duygu Ibrisim; Yıldıran Songur; Yılmaz Cakaloglu; Koray Tuncer; Hale Kırımlıoglu; Sadakat Ozdil

    2013-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus (PMME) comprises only 0.1?0.2% of all malignant esophageal tumors. PMME tumors are highly aggressive and metastasize early via hematogenic and lymphatic pathways. Treatment outcome is poor because the cancer has often advanced at the time of diagnosis. Inoperability, unsuccessful treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy in advanced tumors and metastases have contributed to its poor prognosis. Here, we present the endoscopic features, endoscopic ...

  20. Spindle-cell carcinoma of esophagus: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Chang; Lee, Jae Mun; Jung, Seung Eun; Lee, Kyo Young; Hahn, Seong Tai; Kim, Man Deuk

    2001-01-01

    Spindle-cell carcinoma of the esophagus is a rare malignant tumor composed of both carcinomatous and sarcomatous elements, and has generated many terminology problems. It is characterized by a bulky polypoid intraluminal mass with a lobulated surface located in the middle third of the esophagus. Local expansion of this organ is observed. The lesion may be pedunculated but despite its bulk, causes little obstruction. We report the imaging findings of a case of spindle-cell carcinoma arising in the upper esophagus

  1. The immune cell composition in Barrett's metaplastic tissue resembles that in normal duodenal tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lind

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Barrett's esophagus (BE is characterized by the transition of squamous epithelium into columnar epithelium with intestinal metaplasia. The increased number and types of immune cells in BE have been indicated to be due to a Th2-type inflammatory process. We tested the alternative hypothesis that the abundance of T-cells in BE is caused by a homing mechanism that is found in the duodenum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Biopsies from BE and duodenal tissue from 30 BE patients and duodenal tissue from 18 controls were characterized by immmunohistochemistry for the presence of T-cells and eosinophils(eos. Ex vivo expanded T-cells were further phenotyped by multicolor analysis using flowcytometry. RESULTS: The high percentage of CD4(+-T cells (69±3% (mean±SEM/n = 17, by flowcytometry, measured by flowcytometry and immunohistochemistry, and the presence of non-activated eosinophils found in BE by immunohistochemical staining, were not different from that found in duodenal tissue. Expanded lymphocytes from these tissues had a similar phenotype, characterized by a comparable but low percentage of αE(CD103 positive CD4(+cells (44±5% in BE, 43±4% in duodenum of BE and 34±7% in duodenum of controls and a similar percentage of granzyme-B(+CD8(+ cells(44±5% in BE, 33±6% in duodenum of BE and 36±7% in duodenum of controls. In addition, a similar percentage of α4β7(+ T-lymphocytes (63±5% in BE, 58±5% in duodenum of BE and 62±8% in duodenum of controls was found. Finally, mRNA expression of the ligand for α4β7, MAdCAM-1, was also similar in BE and duodenal tissue. No evidence for a Th2-response was found as almost no IL-4(+-T-cells were seen. CONCLUSION: The immune cell composition (lymphocytes and eosinophils and expression of intestinal adhesion molecule MAdCAM-1 is similar in BE and duodenum. This supports the hypothesis that homing of lymphocytes to BE tissue is mainly caused by intestinal homing signals rather than to an

  2. Effect of Slip Time in Forming Neo-Esophageal Stenosis After Replacement of a Thoracic Esophagus With Nitinol Artificial Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xian-Liang; Liang, Jian-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Attempts have been made to investigate the effect of slip time of nitinol artificial esophagus for forming neo-esophageal stenosis after replacement of a thoracic esophagus with nitinol artificial esophagus in 20 experimental pigs. The pigs whose slip time was less than 90 days postoperatively had severe dysphagia (Bown's III) immediately after they were fed, and the dysphagia aggravated gradually later on (Bown's III-IV). The pigs whose slip time was more than 90 days postoperatively had mild/moderate dysphagia (Bown's I-II) immediately after they were fed, and the dysphagia relieved gradually later on (Bown's II-I-0). The ratios between the diameter of neo-esophagus in different slip time and normal esophagus were 25% (at 2 months postoperatively), 58% (at 4 months postoperatively), and 93% (at 6 months postoperatively), respectively. The relationship between nitinol artificial esophagus slip time and neo-esophageal stenosis showed a positive correlation. After replacement of a thoracic esophagus with nitinol artificial esophagus, the artificial esophageal slip time not only affected the original diameter of the neo-esophagus immediately, but also affected the neo-esophageal scar stricture forming process later on. The narrowing of neo-esophagus is caused by overgrowth of scar tissue. But there is the positive correlation between artificial esophagus slip time and neo-esophageal stenosis, so this can be a way of overcoming neo-esophageal stenosis by delaying slip time of artificial esophagus. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The socioeconomic profile of a Barrett's oesophagus cohort assessed by the 2010 Index of Multiple Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Santanu; Caygill, Christine P J; Charlett, Andre; Fox, Anthony J; Gatenby, Piers A C; Watson, Anthony; Royston, Christine; Bardhan, Karna D

    2016-02-01

    Several reports have described the relationship between socioeconomic status and oesophageal adenocarcinoma but only one with its precursor condition, Barrett's oesophagus. We therefore investigated such an association. The majority (88%) of patients diagnosed with Barrett's at Rotherham District General Hospital between 28 April 1978 and 31 August 2012 consented to inclusion in the UK Barrett's Oesophagus Registry. Those residing within Rotherham form the basis of this study. We assessed socioeconomic status using the Index of Multiple Deprivation 2010 scores which can be assigned to every English postcode. The scores for the whole of England were divided into five equal groups; those of the 6257 postcodes within Rotherham (including those of Barrett's patients) were compared against the national quintile relevant to their score. We examined the ratio of observed against expected numbers of Barrett's in each quintile before and since 2001, the median year of diagnosis. The study group comprised 1076 patients with Barrett's oesophagus. Before 2001 their distribution across the deprivation quintiles was similar to that expected. Since then it has changed significantly, with 37% more Barrett's patients than expected among the two least deprived quintiles, but 11% fewer than expected in the larger population comprising the two most deprived quintiles (P=0.0001). There was no significant difference in the distribution of sex (P=0.27), nor the mean age at diagnosis between the two time periods (P=0.92). Since 2001, there has been a major change in the distribution of Barrett's in relation to socioeconomic status, measured by the Index of Multiple Deprivation.

  4. Benign Strictures of the Esophagus and Gastric Outlet: Interventional Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Benign strictures of the esophagus and gastric outlet are difficult to manage conservatively and they usually require intervention to relieve dysphagia or to treat the stricture-related complications. In this article, authors review the non-surgical options that are used to treat benign strictures of the esophagus and gastric outlet, including balloon dilation, temporary stent placement, intralesional steroid injection and incisional therapy

  5. Giant fibrovascular polyp of the esophagus: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryoo, Jae Wook; Kim, Jeung Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lim, Jae Hoon; Shim, Young Mog; Han, Joung Ho

    1995-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyp of the esophagus is a rare and benign pedunculated intraluminal tumor. The tumor consists of varying amount of vascular fibrous and adipose tissue that arises in the submucosa and is covered by squamous epithelium. We report the typical radiographic, CT and MR findings of a case of giant fibrovascular polyp of the esophagus

  6. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Esophagus: Report of a Case

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Erol

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are rare neoplasms to be thought to arise from mesenchymal cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) of the esophagus are well documented but are very much rarer than gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach and small bowel. We describe a case of GIST of the esophagus that was resected with wide surgical resection.

  7. Result of Radiotherapy for Esophagus Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Taesig; Moon, Changwoo; Yum, Hayong; Yang, Chilyong

    1988-01-01

    Among 165 patients of esophagus cancer treated by either radiation alone or postoperative radiation, median survival period was 6.6 months, 16% 3 years and 8% 5 years crude survival in biphasic plotting of survival curve semilogarithmically all nonresponder died within one year regardless of treatments and in responder each 1, 2, 3 years survival rate was 80%, 70%, 60% in the group of postoperative radiation among 20 patients (54% of 37 patients) respectively and 62%, 38%, 23% each in the group of radiation alone among 61 patients (48% of 128 patients) respectively, better survival rate of postoperative radiation vs radiation alone in 3 year (P<0.01). The most common cause of death was dysphagia 55%, and majority of patients died by failure to control the disease locally 62%, 88% of stricture were associated with persistenece of cancer in esophagus. 50% of patients was found to have locoregional metastatic nodes. Preoperative diagnostic failure rate was for metastatic locoregional nodes was 54%, for grossly metastatic nodes 29.7%, for blood borne organ metastasis 13.5%, and for local extent of the disease 14%. The residual cancer at surgical margin on positive node was not effectively killed by either 5000 to 5500 cGy conventional radiation or 5290 to 5750 cGy with 115 cGy fraction in 2 times daily; hyperfractionated radiation. However hyperfractionation schedule decreased the both acute and late complications in this study

  8. Cough reflex sensitization from esophagus and nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennel, Michal; Brozmanova, Mariana; Kollarik, Marian

    2015-12-01

    The diseases of the esophagus and nose are among the major factors contributing to chronic cough although their role in different patient populations is debated. Studies in animal models and in humans show that afferent C-fiber activators applied on esophageal or nasal mucosa do not initiate cough, but enhance cough induced by inhaled irritants. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of esophageal and nasal C-fibers contribute to cough reflex hypersensitivity observed in chronic cough patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic rhinitis, respectively. The afferent nerves mediating cough sensitization from the esophagus are probably the neural crest-derived vagal jugular C-fibers. In addition to their responsiveness to high concentration of acid typical for gastroesophageal reflux (pH acidic reflux such as receptors highly sensitive to acid and receptors for bile acids. The nature of sensory pathways from the nose and their activators relevant for cough sensitization are less understood. Increased cough reflex sensitivity was also reported in many patients with GERD or rhinitis who do not complain of cough indicating that additional endogenous or exogenous factors may be required to develop chronic coughing in these diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Conformal, Riemannian and Lagrangian geometry the 2000 Barrett lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Sun-Yung A; Grove, Karsten; Yang, Paul C; Freire, Alexandre

    2002-01-01

    Recent developments in topology and analysis have led to the creation of new lines of investigation in differential geometry. The 2000 Barrett Lectures present the background, context and main techniques of three such lines by means of surveys by leading researchers. The first chapter (by Alice Chang and Paul Yang) introduces new classes of conformal geometric invariants, and then applies powerful techniques in nonlinear differential equations to derive results on compactifications of manifolds and on Yamabe-type variational problems for these invariants. This is followed by Karsten Grove's lectures, which focus on the use of isometric group actions and metric geometry techniques to understand new examples and classification results in Riemannian geometry, especially in connection with positive curvature. The chapter written by Jon Wolfson introduces the emerging field of Lagrangian variational problems, which blends in novel ways the structures of symplectic geometry and the techniques of the modern calculus...

  10. Loss of heterozygosity at thymidylate synthase locus in Barrett's metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramochi, Hidekazu; Uchida, Kazumi; Peters, Jeffery H; Shimizu, Daisuke; Vallbohmer, Daniel; Schneider, Sylke; Danenberg, Kathleen D; Danenberg, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is known to have a unique 28 bp tandemly repeated sequence in the promoter region, and the majorities of subjects have a heterozygous double repeat/triple repeat genotype in their non-cancerous tissue. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TS locus is known to occur in cancer patients, but there is no evidence that it is present in precancerous tissue. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency and timing of LOH at the TS locus in Barrett-associated adenocarcinoma (BA) and its precursory lesions, such as intestinal metaplasia (IM) and dysplasia. One hundred twenty-three samples (including 37 with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), 29 with IM, 13 with dysplasia, and 44 with BA) were obtained from 100 patients. Biopsies were obtained from the lower esophageal mucosa/IM/dysplasia/BA, when available. Normal squamous tissue from the upper esophagus was taken as a control. All tissues were analyzed for the TS genotype and TS mRNA expression using the real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method after laser-capture microdissection. Among the patients with informative heterozygous genotype in their control samples, no sample with LOH at the TS locus was observed in the lower esophageal mucosa in GERD patients (0/22 samples). However, 6 out of 21 samples (28.6%) had LOH in IM, 2 of 7 (28.6%) in dysplasia, and 10 of 25 (40.0%) in BA. No significant difference in TS mRNA expression levels was observed between TS genotypes. Our results demonstrate that LOH is a relatively frequent and early event in the IM-BA sequence

  11. Synchronous primary adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirillo, L.C.; Franco, R.; Gatta, G.; Rosa, G. de; Mainenti, P.P.; Imbriaco, M.; Salvatore, M.

    2001-01-01

    Multiple malignant esophageal tumors of the same cell type are described. In the esophageal mucosa, widespread carcinomatous transformation may be observed and multicentric invasive squamous cell carcinomas may develop. The concomitance of two independent esophageal malignant neoplasms of different epithelial histogenesis is uncommon. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is reported. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the esophagus is a rare tumor. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus represents 10% of esophageal cancer. We report a case of a synchronous primary invasive adenosquamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Both tumors were demonstrated radiographically. The peculiarity of this neoplastic association and the importance of complete radiographic esophageal evaluation in patients with one obvious obstructing tumor of the esophagus are emphasized. (orig.)

  12. Mussel Shell Impaction in the Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunmin Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mussels are commonly used in cooking around the world. The mussel shell breaks more easily than other shells, and the edge of the broken mussel shell is sharp. Impaction can ultimately cause erosion, perforation and fistula. Aside from these complications, the pain can be very intense. Therefore, it is essential to verify and remove the shell as soon as possible. In this report we describe the process of diagnosing and treating mussel shell impaction in the esophagus. Physicians can overlook this unusual foreign body impaction due to lack of experience. When physicians encounter a patient with severe chest pain after a meal with mussels, mussel shell impaction should be considered when diagnosing and treating the patient.

  13. Watermelon esophagus: a new visual paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Cowley

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old male with no prior medical history presented for evaluation of multi-year history of dysphagia to both solids and liquids. He underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealing linear furrows with ring-like esophagus. Pathology of biopsies showed findings consistent with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE. This is a newly recognized disease entity with a rapidly increasing prevalence that cannot be entirely accounted for by the increasing awareness in medicine. All patients with clinical suspicion of EoE should undergo esophageal biopsies regardless of endoscopic findings, as normal endoscopy can be seen in up to 17% of cases. Numerous non-specific endoscopic findings have been described, including trachealization, felinization, linear furrows, crepe paper mucosa, and longitudinal shearing. We present a unique and neverbefore seen image of EoE that accentuates the findings that may be seen endoscopically

  14. Endoscopic therapy for Barrett′s esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Shaheen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Barrett′s esophagus (BE is the precursor lesion to esophageal adenocarcinoma. This cancer has undergone a rapid increase in incidence in Western societies in the last 30 years. Current practices seek to lower the risk of death from this cancer by performing screening upper endoscopy on those with chronic reflux symptoms, and then surveillance upper endoscopy on those found to have BE at periodic intervals. While this approach is intuitively appealing, no data substantiate a decreased cancer risk with these practices, and substantial issues limit the effectiveness of this approach. This article outlines the current approaches to BE, their shortcomings, and presents data supporting the use of endoscopic therapy for subjects with BE and dysplasia. A significant and growing literature supports the use of endoscopic therapy in BE, and this approach, combined with improved risk stratification, may improve our care of subjects with BE.

  15. Tumor of granular cells of esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Fabian, Licet; Diaz Anaya, Amnia; Perez de la Torre, Georgina

    2010-01-01

    Granular cells tumors are rare and asymptomatic lesions and by general, it is an incidental finding en high or low endoscopy. They were described for the first time by Abrikossoff in 1926. The more frequent locations are the buccal mucosa, dermis and subcutaneous cellular tissue, most of these tumors has a benign origin. This is the case of a woman aged 44 with a pyrosis history from a year ago; by high endoscopy it is noted a 8 mm lesion distal to esophagus and confirmed by histological study of granular cells tumor. Elective treatment of this lesion is the endoscopic polypectomy. Despite that the malign potential is low; we suggested a close clinical and endoscopic follow-up.

  16. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Bin; Weng, Hong-Rui; Wang, Geng; Yang, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Ping; Li, Hua; Liu, Di-Tian; Chen, Yu-Ping

    2012-07-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC) of the esophagus is a rare carcinoma with distinct characteristics. No standard treatment has been established. This retrospective study was designed to investigate the clinical and pathological characteristics, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of esophageal BSCC. Clinical data were retrospectively analyzed from 26 patients with pathologically confirmed esophageal BSCC who underwent transthoracic esophagectomy with lymphadenectomy between January 1995 and June 2010 at the Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College. Clinicopathologic data between BSCC patients and different histologic grades of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients were statistically compared by means of the χ(2) test or Fisher's exact test. The Kaplan-Meier and log-rank methods were used to estimate and compare survival rates. Microscopically, BSCC was characterized by a nesting, lobular, or trabecular arrangement of small crowded cells with scant cytoplasm. None of the histologic specimens taken at preoperative esophagoscopy were diagnosed as BSCC. The median survival time (MST) of the 26 patients was 29.0 months (95% confidence interval, 9.0-49.0), and the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 73.1, 42.7, and 36.6%, respectively. The MST for BSCC patients was significantly lower than that of well-differentiated SCC patients (P = 0.024), but there were no significant differences between the MST for BSCC patients and that of moderately or poorly differentiated SCC patients (P > 0.05). BSCC of the esophagus is a rare but distinctive disease and is prone to be misdiagnosed by endoscopic biopsy. The prognosis is poorer than well-differentiated SCC, but similar to moderately or poorly differentiated SCC.

  17. Radiotherapy of carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Suzumiya, Junji; Koga, Kenji; Sumiyoshi, Akinobu; Kusuhara, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1984-01-01

    The specimens obtained from 32 patients with carcinoma of the esophagus were histologically studied to evaluate the radiation effect on the primary lesions and regional lymph node metastases. The patients consist of 21 preoperatively irradiated cases and 11 autopsy cases. Radiation effect was divided into three grades according to Ohboshi-Shimosato's classification. A total dose of 20 to 55 Gy was given to preoperatively irradiated cases and that of 38 to 80 Gy to autopsy cases. The microscopic examination of the primary lesions revealed marked effect in 11 cases, moderate effect in 12 cases and mild or none effect in 9 cases. Radiation effect on carcinoma of the esophagus seemed to be related to the length of the primary lesion (p<0.001); the tumor of 6 cm or less showed marked effect in 9 out of 12 cases (75%), and that of more than 6 cm in only 1 of 19 cases (5%). As for the radiological type of the primaty lesions, superficial or tumorous type seemed to be more effective than serrated or spiral type. As for the histological subtypes, poorly defferentiated squamous cell carcinoma seemed to be more radiosensitive than moderately or well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Radiation effect on lymph node metastases within radiation field was correlated to that of the primary lesions. Our results suggest that for radical treatment of esophageal cancer a patient with the tumor length of 6 cm or less should be chosen, although radiological type and/or tumor grade can't also be ignored as a predictor. (author)

  18. MIS approach for diverticula of the esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Diverticula of the esophagus represent a rare pathological entity. Distinct classifications of the disease imply different surgical concepts. Surgery should be reserved for symptomatic patients only. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for treatment of esophageal diverticula encompasses rigid and flexible intraluminal endoscopy, thoracoscopy and laparoscopy. We here give an overview on the pathogenesis of esophageal diverticula, the minimally invasive surgical techniques for treatment and the recent literature. Additionally, we present our own experience with MIS for midthoracic diverticula. Methods We analyzed the cases of patients who underwent MIS for midthoracic diverticula with regard to preoperative symptoms, perioperative and follow-up data. Results Three patients (two female, one male, age 79, 78 and 59 years) received thoracoscopic surgery for midthoracic diverticula. All patients reported of dysphagia and regurgitation. In two patients pH-investigation showed pathological reflux but manometry was normal in all patients. Operating time was 205, 135 and 141 minutes. We performed intraoperative intraluminal endoscopy in all patients. There were no intraoperative complications and although no surgical complications occured postoperatively one patient developed pneumonia which advanced to sepsis and lethal multi organ failure. Upon follow-up the two patients did not have recurrent diverticula or a recurrence of previous symptoms. Conclusions Surgery for diverticular disease of the esophagus has been associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Despite the lethal non-surgical complication we encountered, with regard to recent publications minimally invasive apporaches to treat patients with symptomatic esophageal diverticula entail lower rates of complications with better long term results in comparison to open surgery. PMID:20952348

  19. Delineation of the normal esophagus at computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelsson, L.; Tylen, U.; Sahlgrenska Sjukhuset, Goeteborg

    1985-01-01

    It has been accepted by many that the esophagus in its entire length is easy to delineate at CT in most patients due to surrounding fat planes. As this is not the experience of the present authors, the CT of the thorax in 100 normal men and women without mediastinal disease and in good nutritional status was reviewed, to record the relationship between the esophagus and neighbouring structures. In the upper third of the esophagus there is almost never a definite border between its wall and that of the trachea, while a separating border or even a fat plane can be seen to the spine in between 25 and 50 per cent of those tested. The vessels, as a rule, have a flat plane towards the esophagus. The middle part of the esophagus has the same intimate relationship to the trachea and left main bronchus, i.e. almost never any separating border. Two thirds of the cases have no border to the upper part of the pericardium (left atrium), while about 70 per cent have a border or fat plane towards the aorta. The middle and lower third of the esophagus has, as a rule, a distinct border or fat plane to the spine. In about 50 per cent of the patients the anterior wall of the lower esophagus is separable from the pericardium. (orig.)

  20. Longitudinal muscle dysfunction in achalasia esophagus and its relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Hong, Su Jin; Bhargava, Valmik

    2013-04-01

    Muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Goal of this review is to summarize the role of longitudinal muscle in physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging that measure circular and longitudinal muscle contraction respectively reveal that during peristalsis 2 layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the other hand, during transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), longitudinal muscle contracts independently of circular muscle. Recent studies provide novel insights, i.e., longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus induces LES relaxation and possibly descending relaxation of the esophagus. In achalasia esophagus and other motility disorders there is discoordination between the 2 muscle layers. Longitudinal muscle contraction patterns are different in the recently described three types of achalasia identified by high-resolution manometry. Robust contraction of the longitudinal muscle in type II achalasia causes pan-esophageal pressurization and is the mechanism of whatever little esophageal emptying that take place in the absence of peristalsis and impaired LES relaxation. It may be that preserved longitudinal muscle contraction is also the reason for superior outcome to medical/surgical therapy in type II achalasia esophagus. Prolonged contractions of longitudinal muscles of the esophagus is a possible mechanism of heartburn and "angina like" pain seen in esophageal motility disorders and possibly achalasia esophagus. Novel techniques to record longitudinal muscle contraction are on the horizon. Neuro-pharmacologic control of circular and longitudinal muscles is different, which provides an important opportunity for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to treat sensory and motor disorders of the esophagus.

  1. MMP-1 is a (pre-invasive factor in Barrett-associated esophageal adenocarcinomas and is associated with positive lymph node status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Christoph

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs arise due to gastroesophageal reflux, with Barrett's esophagus (BE regarded as precancerous lesion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs might play a role during the multistep carcinogenetic process. Methods Expression of MMP-1 and -13 was analyzed in esophageal cancer (n = 41 EAC with BE, n = 19 EAC without BE, and n = 10 esophageal squamous-cell carcinomas, ESCC, furthermore in BE without intraepithelial neoplasia (IN (n = 18, and the cell line OE-33. MMP-1 was co-labelled with Ki-67 (proliferation, Cdx-2 (marker for intestinal metaplasia, BE and analyzed on mRNA level. MMP-1 staining results were correlated with clinicopatholocical parameters. Results On protein level, MMP-1 expression was found in 39 of 41 (95% EAC with BE, in 19 of 19 (100% EAC without BE, in 6 of 10 (60% ESCC, and in 10 of 18 (56% BE without IN. No expression of MMP-13 was found in these specimens. Quantification showed 48% MMP-1 positive cells in EAC with BE, compared to 35% in adjacent BE (p Conclusions Our findings suggest that MMP-1 plays a role as preinvasive factor in BE-associated EAC. Expression of MMP-1 in proliferating BE and EAC cells suggest malignant proliferation following the clonal expansion model.

  2. Vegetable, fruit and nitrate intake in relation to the risk of Barrett's oesophagus in a large Dutch cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keszei, A.P.; Schouten, L.J.; Driessen, A.L.C.; Huysentruyt, C.J.R.; Keulemans, Y.C.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2014-01-01

    There are few epidemiological data on the dietary risk factors of Barrett's oesophagus, a precursor of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The present study investigated the association between vegetable, fruit and nitrate intake and Barrett's oesophagus risk in a large prospective cohort. The Netherlands

  3. Staging by tomography: Lung, esophagus, mama and pleural cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigirey, V.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation shows images of different types of cancer in the lung, esophagus, mama and pleura. The chest radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and PET CT contribute to detect the morphology, size, location, metastasize, malignant and benign nodules, lymph glands.

  4. Air column in esophagus and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosavi, Alijavad; Raji, Hanieh; Teimoori, Mojtaba; Ghourchian, Shadi

    2012-01-01

    During imaging of the normal esophagus, air is often detected. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between the appearance of air bubbles on imaging and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) symptoms. The cross-sectional imaging study was conducted at Rasole Akram Hospital, Tehran, Iran. A total of 44 patients underwent X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning; the presence of air in the esophagus and visible on CT imaging was scrutinized. The average age of the subjects was 59 and the male to female ratio was 0.83. We found a significant relationship between the presence of GERD symptoms, the size of air bubbles and esophageal dilation (ED) on the CT scan. Air bubbles in the esophagus may be seen frequently in CT scans, but their size and location can vary. The GERD symptoms can arise when a small diameter air column is present within the esophagus, especially in the middle and lower parts

  5. Granular cell tumor of the esophagus. Report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohle, S D; McKechnie, J C; Truong, L; Jurco, S

    1981-06-01

    Granular cell tumors, (formerly called myoblastomas) involving the esophagus were encountered in three patients. In all three the tumors were asymptomatic and in two they were multiple. The first published endoscopic photographs of such a tumor are presented. The successful total removal of this neoplasm using the endoscope is described. The pathologic, radiologic and therapeutic aspects of previously reported cases of granular cell tumor of the esophagus are reviewed and compared with the three reported herein.

  6. Longitudinal Muscle Dysfunction in Achalasia Esophagus and Its Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Hong, Su Jin; Bhargava, Valmik

    2013-01-01

    Muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Goal of this review is to summarize the role of longitudinal muscle in physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging that measure circular and longitudinal muscle contraction respectively reveal that during peristalsis 2 layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the other hand, during transient relaxation of the...

  7. Diagnostic ability of Barrett's index to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy using multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Mario L.R.; Goncalves, Allan C.P.; Silva, Carla T.M.; Moura, Janete P.; Ribeiro, Carolina S.; Gebrim, Eloisa M.M.S.; Universidade de Sao Paulo; Universidade de Sao Paulo

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a muscular index (Barrett's Index), calculated with multidetector computed tomography, to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy in patients with Graves' orbitopathy. Methods: Thirty-six patients with Graves' orbitopathy were prospectively studied and submitted to neuro-ophthalmic evaluation and multidetector computed tomography scans of the orbits. Orbits were divided into two groups: those with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy. Barrett's index was calculated as the percentage of the orbit occupied by muscles. Sensitivity and specificity were determined for several index values. Results: Sixty-four orbits (19 with and 45 without dysthyroid optic neuropathy) met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean Barrett's index values (±SD) were 64.47% ± 6.06% and 49.44% ± 10.94% in the groups with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy, respectively (p 60% should be carefully examined and followed for the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy. (author)

  8. p53 and Ki-67 in Barrett's carcinoma: is there any value to predict recurrence after circumferential endoscopic mucosal resection? p53 e Ki-67 no carcinoma do esôfago de Barrett: algum valor na predição da recurrência após mucosectomia endoscópica circunferencial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Vivian Lopes

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are situations in which the specimens obtained after endoscopic mucosal resection of superficial adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett's esophagus are not adequate for histopathological assessment of the margins. In these cases, immunohistochemistry might be an useful tool for predicting cancer recurrence. AIM: To evaluate the value of p53 and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry in predicting the cancer recurrence in patients with Barrett's esophagus-related cancer referred to circumferential endoscopic mucosal resection. METHODS: Mucosectomy specimens from 41 patients were analyzed. All endoscopic biopsies prior to endoscopic mucosal resection presented high-grade dysplasia and cancer was detected in 23 of them. Positive reactions were considered the intense coloration in the nuclei of at least 90% of the cells in each high-power magnification field, and immunostaining could be classified as superficial or diffuse according to the mucosal distribution of the stained nuclei. RESULTS: Endoscopic mucosal resection samples detected cancer in 21 cases. In these cases, p53 immunohistochemistry revealed a diffuse positivity for the great majority of these cancers (90.5% vs. 20%, and Ki-67 showed a diffuse pattern for all cases (100% vs. 30%; conversely, patients without cancer revealed a superficial or negative pattern for p53 (80% vs. 9.5% and Ki-67 (70% vs. 0%. During a mean follow-up of 31.6 months, 5 (12.2% patients developed six episodes of recurrent cancer. Endoscopic mucosal resection specimens did not show any significant difference in the p53 and Ki-67 expression for patients developing cancer after endoscopic treatment. CONCLUSIONS: p53 and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry were useful to confirm the cancer; however, they had not value for predicting the recurrent carcinoma after circumferential endoscopic mucosal resection of Barrett's carcinoma.RACIONAL: Há situações nas quais o material obtido após mucosectomia endoscópica do

  9. Surgical procedures in esophagus cancer treatment. Our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villena, Freddy; Carrasco, Edgar

    2005-01-01

    Esophagus cancer represents a very lethal neoplasm. Esophageal resection is going to be the therapeutic alternative to patients considered surgical candidates. It had been described some esophagus resection procedure. Although, there is not any agreement between surgeon about which are best procedure to patients with esophagus carcinoma. Most of patients who came advanced phase have poor prognostic and only patients, who have illness in early stage, exist expectative to improve survival with lymphadenectomy extended and neoadjuvant. We analyzes retrospectively files of 23 patients submitted to esophagectomy in hospital Solca Quito from 1985 to 2004 with the diagnostic of esophagus carcinoma, considering histology type, location, surgical proceeded, pathologic staging, surgical mortally, mobility and survival time live. Also it makes a review about proceeds of esophagus resection and adjuvant therapy to the esophagus cancer. Conclusions: Esophagectomy transhiatal has limitations in oncological resection and recommend it early lower esophagus lesions and cardiac orifice (dysplasia high grade, T is, TI, NO, MO) in patients of high risk. Right trans thoracic esophagectomy it is considered in all lesions advanced locally lower middle third, and cardias orifice with lymphadenectomy of two areas and have avoid of trans thoracic anastomotic risk. Trans operatively margins upper have been 10 cm and 5 cm distal, always freeze those margins trans operatively. Extended lymphadenectomy to three areas we have no order yet conclusive dates and the chemotherapy neoadjuvant had been a positive impact in the survival in those chemosensitive tumors with appropriate answer and could be totally remove, but randomized testing future could determine his efficacy real. (The author)

  10. Risk of Barrett's oesophagus, oesophageal adenocarcinoma and reflux oesophagitis and the use of nitrates and asthma medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladanchuk, Todd C; Johnston, Brian T; Murray, Liam J; Anderson, Lesley A

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between use of asthma medication and nitrates and risk of reflux oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Data were collected on use of asthma medication and nitrates at least 1 year before interview from patients with reflux oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Associations between use of asthma medications and nitrates and the risk of reflux oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma were estimated using multiple logistic regression. Nine hundred and forty-one subjects were recruited: 230 reflux oesophagitis, 224 Barrett's oesophagus, 227 oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients and 260 population controls. Barrett's oesophagus patients were more likely than controls to have had a diagnosis of asthma (odds ratio 2.15, 95% confidence interval 1.15-4.03) and to have used asthma medications (odds ratio 2.13, 95% confidence interval 1.09-4.16). No significant associations were observed between use of asthma medication or nitrates and reflux oesophagitis or oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms appear to confound the association between asthma medication use and Barrett's oesophagus. However, it is possible that asthma medications may increase the risk of Barrett's oesophagus by other mechanisms.

  11. Diagnostic ability of Barrett's index to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy using multidetector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Mario L.R.; Goncalves, Allan C.P.; Silva, Carla T.M.; Moura, Janete P.; Ribeiro, Carolina S.; Gebrim, Eloisa M.M.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Division of Ophthalmology; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. of Endocrinology; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Division of Radiology]. E-mail: mlrmonteiro@terra.com.br

    2008-07-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a muscular index (Barrett's Index), calculated with multidetector computed tomography, to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy in patients with Graves' orbitopathy. Methods: Thirty-six patients with Graves' orbitopathy were prospectively studied and submitted to neuro-ophthalmic evaluation and multidetector computed tomography scans of the orbits. Orbits were divided into two groups: those with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy. Barrett's index was calculated as the percentage of the orbit occupied by muscles. Sensitivity and specificity were determined for several index values. Results: Sixty-four orbits (19 with and 45 without dysthyroid optic neuropathy) met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean Barrett's index values ({+-}SD) were 64.47% {+-} 6.06% and 49.44% {+-} 10.94% in the groups with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy, respectively (p<0.001). Barrett's index sensitivity ranged from 32% to 100%, and Barrett's index specificity ranged from 24% to 100%. The best combination of sensitivity and specificity was 79%/72% for BI=60% (odds ratio: 9.2). Conclusions: Barrett's Index is a useful indicator of dysthyroid optic neuropathy and may contribute to early diagnosis and treatment. Patients with a Barrett's index >60% should be carefully examined and followed for the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy. (author)

  12. Optimized endoscopic autofluorescence spectroscopy for the identification of premalignant lesions in Barrett's oesophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holz, Jasmin A.; Boerwinkel, David F.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Visser, Mike; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has the potential to detect early cellular changes in Barrett's oesophagus before these become visible. As the technique is based on varying concentrations of intrinsic fluorophores, each with its own optimal excitation wavelength, it is important to assess the optimal

  13. Corpus gastritis in patients with endoscopic diagnosis of reflux oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, R.J.F.; Rossum, L.G.M. van; Boer, W.A. de; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A high level of gastric acid secretion is considered to be a risk factor for reflux oesophagitis or Barrett's oesophagus. Corpus gastritis may have a protective effect on the oesophagus, because of decreased gastric acid output. AIM: To determine if corpus gastritis is associated with

  14. Searching for Evidence, Not a War: Reply to Lindquist, Siegel, Quigley, and Barrett (2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lench, Heather C.; Bench, Shane W.; Flores, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Lindquist, Siegel, Quigley, and Barrett (2013) critiqued our recent meta-analysis that reported the effects of discrete emotions on outcomes, including cognition, judgment, physiology, behavior, and experience (Lench, Flores, & Bench, 2011). Lindquist et al. offered 2 major criticisms--we address both and consider the nature of emotion and…

  15. Endoscopic and radiological diagnostics of esophagus diseases in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Vanja

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to expand the range of diagnostic methods for determining diseases of the esophagus and to make them more present in everyday practise, it is desirable to work out in more detail the procedure of endoscopic and radiological examinations, determine their limitations and possibilities, describe the topographic-anatomical and morphological status of the esophagus in an endoscopic and radiological picture, as well as to define which diseases of this organ are most represented. The paper presents the results of six-month investigations of esophagus diseases in dogs of different breeds and ages. A total of 15 animals were examined: 2 golden retrievers, 2 rottweilers, 5 German shepherds, 3 giant schnauzers, 2 cross-breeds, and 1 dalmatian. Cases of chronic esophagitis were described, as well as the presence of a foreign body and megaesophagus, and the prescribed therapy for all these diseases.

  16. ECG changes in gamma-therapy of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khajrushev, Zh.A.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.N.

    1978-01-01

    Effect of ionizing radiation dose distribution with time in gamma therapy of esophagus cancer has been studied on the basis of the results obtained with electrocardiography. 700 persons were examined before treatment and after completing the full course of irradiation, 426 persons were examined repeatedly. Radiation treatment methods used are given. In most cases ECG changes result in the quickened systole rhythm and diffuse changes in the myocardium due to intoxication. ECG changes associated with the irradiation for patients with esophagus cancer amounted to 16%. Frequency of postirradiation ECG changes depends on the position of esophagus area under irradiation. Different variants of mean dose fractionation were the most sparing with respect to the heart

  17. High risk factors in patient with carcinoma esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afridi, S.P.; Khan, A.; Waheed, I.

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the presence of high risk factors in carcinoma esophagus from February, 1992 to August, 1995 at Surgical unit 1, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC), Karachi. In all 37 patients, 22 males and 15 females, were included in the study through outpatient department, surgical emergency and those referred from other cities of the country. All patients were cachectic. Diagnosis was made by detailed history, examination and laboratory investigations. Diagnosis was confirmed on barium swallow and endoscopic biopsy. Highest number of patients were in their 6th decade of life. History of snuff inhalation and opium was present in 2.7% cases each. Lower 3rd of the esophagus was affected in 62.16% middle third in 21.62% and upper third in 16.21% cases. Smoking, pan chewing, naswar eating and snuff inhalation were identified as high risk factors among patients of carcinoma esophagus. (author)

  18. Dynamic scintigraphy of esophagus in gastroesophageal reflux patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltynova, V.; Brousil, J.; Belohlavek, O.; Rehak, F.; Pafko, P.

    1988-01-01

    Scintigraphic examination of esophagus was performed in 24 patients with clinical signs of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). The results were divided into five different types of clinical findings representing different disorders in esophageal motility. The results were compared with radiological examinations, pH-metry and endoscopy. Sensitivity of the scintigraphy was 94.1%, specificity 50%, and accuracy 89.5%. The results are much better than those of radiological examinations and are comparable with pH-metry. Esophageal scintigraphy a good noninvasive method providing information about the motility of the esophagus not obtainable with other methods. (author). 8 figs., 9 refs

  19. Distant gammatherapy results of patients with esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraliyev, O.K.; Beibutov, Sh.M.; Quilieva, A.O.; Nasirova, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The problem of esophagus cancer therapy gains the particular meaning for Azerbaijan where this disease incidence exceeds the parameters of neighboring countries by almost two times. 1240 patients with esophagus cancer were under our observation for more than 15 years who had been subjected to the distant static gamma therapy on apparatuses 'Agat-R' and 'Rockus M'. There were 732 men (59 % )and 508 women (41 %). The patients' age ranged from 24-88 years. Disease duration since the appearance of the first symptoms till entering to the department was 4-8 months on the average. Esophagus cancer is often localized in the places of the physiological stenosis. So tumour was localised in the neck region esophagus in 45 patients (4.1%), in upper pectoral in 104 ones (9.5%), in middle pectoral in 594 ones (54.5%) in lower pectoral in 299 ones (27.4%) in abdominal regions of esophagus 48 patients(4.5%).The extent of dimensions of tumour esophagus was ranged within 2-13 cm, only it was less than 5 cm in 6.5% patients. The opportune surgical treatment ensures the perfect recovery. However, the early stage of the disease can develop asymptomatically. The patients with the 1st stage of lesion were only 8 (0.8%) with the 2nd one 408(37.4%), with the 3rd one 607(55.7%), with the 4th one 67(6.1%). Radiation therapy was applied in the cases of inoperable and also in patient who were older than 60 or refused operation. 1090 patients (88%) finished the treatment course. Local summary doses have formed 50-70 Grey, the momentary ones-2-2.5 Grey on the medium. The rest of the patients haven't finished the treatment due to several reasons. The results of the treatment are as follows: We observed clinical cure in 389 patients (35.7%), an improvement in 541 (499%), the process stabilisation or an absence of effect in 160 (14.3%). 40.1% of patients lived for more than 1 year, 18.4% for more than 2 years,12.0% for more than 3 years and 7.0% for more than 5 years. It was established

  20. Irradiation of esophagus carcinoma with small single doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalluege, K.H.; Grunau, H.

    1984-01-01

    In a prospective study 30 patients with histologically proved esophagus carcinomas were irradiated after a beginning target dosis of 4.5 Gy with daily 1.8 Gy up to 56.0 Gy, 32.0 Gy of which were applied in a long radiation field. 33% of the patients lived longer than one year. Three patients survived 5 years. Nine of the patients underwent perforation of the esophagus in the tumor area. In 20 autopsies only 3 local tumors were detected. (author)

  1. Radiation therapy for primary undifferentiated carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Tatsuya; Yamakawa, Michitaka; Shiojima, Kazumi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Nakayama, Yuko; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    Eight patients with undifferentiated carcinoma of the esophagus were treated by radiation therapy. Loco-regional control was easily achieved by radiation therapy alone and no loco-regional recurrence was observed for six patients treated with total dose of more than 30 Gy. However four patients developed distant metastases and died of tumor. Median survival was 3.5 months with a range of 0 to 48 months. Only one patient is alive with no evidence of tumor for 48 months. Combination chemotherapy should be recommended for primary undifferentiated carcinoma of the esophagus because of having a high incidence of distant metastases. (author)

  2. Breast Metastasis in Esophagus Cancer: Literature Review and Report on a Case

    OpenAIRE

    Ghibour, Abdulaziz; Shaheen, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Esophagus cancer metastases often involve locoregional lymph nodes, lung, bone, liver, and brain. Metastatic involvement of the breast from esophagus cancer is uncommon, but if it happened, it usually presents as a part of multiple organ distal metastases. Here we report a case of the largest metastatic esophagus cancer of the breast and the chest wall, and we review the similar reported cases.

  3. N-acetylcysteine for the prevention of stricture after circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection of the esophagus: a randomized trial in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Batteux, Frédéric; Beuvon, Frédéric; Mangialavori, Luigi; Chryssostalis, Ariane; Pratico, Carlos; Chaussade, Stanislas; Prat, Frédéric

    2012-05-28

    Circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection (CESD) of the esophagus would allow for both the eradication of Barrett's esophagus and its related complications, such as advanced neoplasia. However, such procedures generally induce inflammatory repair resulting in a fibrotic stricture. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is an antioxidant that has shown some efficacy against pulmonary and hepatic fibrosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the benefit of NAC in the prevention of esophageal cicatricial stricture after CESD in a swine model. Two groups of six pigs each were subjected to general anesthesia and CESD: after randomization, a first group received an oral NAC treatment regimen of 100 mg/kg/day, initiated one week before the procedure, whereas a second group was followed without any prophylactic treatment. Follow-up endoscopies took place seven, fourteen, twenty-one, and twenty-eight days after CESD. Necropsy, histological assessment of esophageal inflammation, and fibrosis were performed on day 28. The median esophageal lumen diameter on day 21 (main judgment criterion) was 4 mm (range 2 to 5) in group 1 and 3 mm (range 1 to 7) in group 2 (P = 0.95). No significant difference was observed between the two groups regarding clinical evaluation (time before onset of clinically significant esophageal obstruction), number of dilations, esophageal inflammation and fibrosis, or oxidative stress damage on immunohistochemistry. Despite its antioxidant effect, systemic administration of NAC did not show significant benefit on esophageal fibrosis in our animal model of esophageal wound healing within the experimental conditions of this study. Since the administered doses were relatively high, it seems unlikely that NAC might be a valuable option for the prevention of post-endoscopic esophageal stricture.

  4. Oat cell carcinoma of the esophagus: Unusual radiological appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedi, D.G.; Shaw, M.T.

    1986-08-01

    Primary oat cell carcinoma of the esophagus is a very rare tumour. The radiographic appearance of the three cases described in this paper are unusual because they resemble benign lesions such as leiomyoma, fibrous polyp and candidiasis. It would be interesting to investigate whether such an unusual appearance is common for this neoplasm.

  5. Oat cell carcinoma of the esophagus: Unusual radiological appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedi, D.G.; Shaw, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    Primary oat cell carcinoma of the esophagus is a very rare tumour. The radiographic appearance of the three cases described in this paper are unusual because they resemble benign lesions such as leiomyoma, fibrous polyp and candidiasis. It would be interesting to investigate whether such an unusual appearance is common for this neoplasm. (orig.)

  6. Current status of surgery for benign disorders of the esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draaisma, Werner Adriaan

    2006-01-01

    This thesis aimed at exploring new techniques for the surgical treatment of benign disorders of the esophagus. Specifically, studies were performed on surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease and large (type II-IV) hiatal hernia. The chapters presented in this thesis involve studies that have

  7. Histomorphometry of the esophagus of adult ross broilers | Mobini ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the histomorphometrical variations of esophagus at different regions in Ross broilers. Twenty four apparently healthy adult Ross broilers (12 females and 12 males), aged from 7 to 9 weeks, were used. Tissue samples were taken from middle parts of cervical and thoracic regions of ...

  8. Liposarcoma of Hypopharynx and Esophagus: a Unique Entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Sensini, Matteo; Corvino, Andrea; Garzaro, Massimiliano; Pecorari, Giancarlo

    2016-06-01

    Liposarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in adults. It represents approximately 20 % of all mesenchymal malignancies. It most frequently involves retroperitoneum, trunk, and extremities. Hypopharyngeal and esophageal localization of liposarcoma is extremely rare. We performed a systematic review of literature and reported 26 and 33 cases of hypopharyngeal and esophageal liposarcoma. We analyzed natural history, imaging features, histology, treatment, and prognosis, with a specific focus to similarities and differences between tumors of hypopharynx and esophagus. Hypopharyngeal and esophageal liposarcomas have more similarities than differences. Incidence has a peak at 6th and 7th decades. The diagnostic procedures are barium swallow, endoscopic examination, and CT/MR imaging. Well-differentiated liposarcoma represents the most frequent histological subtype. Surgical excision is the main treatment. Endoscopic resection can be useful for pedunculated tumors of hypopharynx and cervical esophagus. Differences between hypopharyngeal and esophageal liposarcoma are represented by local recurrence rate (greater for hypopharyngeal tumors), number of giant tumors, and time to recurrence (greater for esophageal tumors). Finally, liposarcomas of distal esophagus need more extended approaches. Liposarcomas of hypopharynx and cervical esophagus could be considered a unique pathological entity, with similar features and treatment options. Survival rate is dependent on histological type and location. Local recurrence is common, especially for hypopharyngeal liposarcoma, while the risk of lymph node or distant metastasis is very low. Patients should undergo regular examinations to rule out local recurrence, also for a long time, especially for esophageal tumors.

  9. Difficult factors in Management of Impacted Dental Prosthesis in Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efiaty A. Soepardi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A dental prosthesis which ingested and impacted in esophagus, is an emergency case and life threatening, so require immediate esophagoscopy intervention for removing. The objective of this study is to assess some factors can caused dtfficulties in diagnosing and treating the ingested and impacted dental prosthesis in the esophagus and their complications. This retrospective study analyzed patient’s chart whose underwent esophagoscopy for removing the impacted dental prosthesis in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia during a period between January 1997 and December 2003. Neck-chest X-ray and esophagoscopy were performed in all patients to identify the existence of the dental prosthesis as a diagnostic and treatment procedure. The length of time for removing the dental prosthesis was recorded and stated as a less difficult esophagoscopy when it takes time less than 60 minutes and as a difficult  esophagoscopy takes 60 minutes or longer. Some risk difficulties factors were statistically analyzed. There were 53 patients of ingested dental prosthesis in esophagus. Only 51 cases were analyzed According to the length of time for removing the dental prosthesis by esophagoscopy, 22 patients were recorded as less difficult cases and 29 patients as difficult cases. Two cases among the cases needed cervicotomy after unsuccessful esophagoscopy removal. The difficulties to diagnose an impacted dental prosthesis in the esophagus caused by unreliable clinical history, unclear signs and symptoms, unable to be detected by X-ray and was not found during esophagoscopy. The difficulties in treating due to mucosal laceration, edema, bleeding, failure of the first extraction and conformity with the size and shape, the wire outside the dental prosthesis and the length of time stayed in the esophagus. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 33-6Keywords: ingested dental prosthesis, radioluscent foreign body, length of time of esophagoscopy

  10. The cover stent custody case that acknowledged QOL improvement on traffic between trachea and esophagus of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Hirotsugu; Okada, Kazuyuki; Murata, Kohei

    2011-01-01

    The case was a 60-year-old man. The patient with a main complaint of husky voice was introduced by a nearby doctor to our otolaryngology department at the end of August 2009. Because of the wall thickening image of the upper part (Ut domain) esophagus, left infraclavicular lymph node and mediastium lymphadenopathy syndrome observed by head and neck CT, the patient was transferred to surgery department. Squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed based on the upper part gastrointestinal tract endoscopy showing a type-3 advanced cancer of the upper thoracic esophagus sized 25-30 cm from nostril. The patient was in progressive disease (PD), fever and coughing, though we performed 2 FAP therapies. A chest CT revealed that there was a passage between the trachea and esophagus. Then, radiation therapy (a total of 60 Gy, 2 Gy at a time) was enforced. After the radio therapy, a covered type Ultraflex esophagus stent was inserted due to a fistula, though the tumor was reduced to 6 mm in size. The patient was passed away five months after the stent custody; a solid food intake was possible until just before he died. (author)

  11. Research priority setting in Barrett's oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, James; Gadeke, Lisa; Lovat, Laurence; Hamdy, Shaheen; Hawkey, Chris; McLaughlin, John; Ang, Yeng

    2017-11-01

    The incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus is increasing. Barrett's oesophagus is the main precursor to oesophageal adenocarcinoma, which has a poor prognosis. In view of the vast potential burden of these diseases on patients and health-care resources, there is a real need to define and focus research efforts. This priority setting exercise aimed to produce a list of the top ten uncertainties in the field that reflect the priorities of patients and health-care providers. We adopted the robust and transparent methodologies previously outlined by the James Lind Alliance. This qualitative approach firstly involves an ideas gathering survey that, once distilled, generates a longlist of research uncertainties. These uncertainties are then prioritised via an interim ranking survey and a final workshop to achieve consensus agreement. The initial 629 uncertainties, generated from a survey of 170 individual respondents (47% professional, 53% non-professional) and one workshop, were narrowed down to the final top ten uncertainties of priority for future research. These priorities covered a range of issues, including a need for improved patient risk stratification, alternative diagnostic and surveillance tests, efficacy of a dedicated service for Barrett's oesophagus, cost-effectiveness and appropriateness of current surveillance, advances in development of non-drug treatments for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, safety of long-term drug treatment, and questions regarding the durability and role of different endoscopic therapies for dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus. This is the first patient-centred assessment of priorities for researchers in this chronic disease setting. We hope that recognition and dissemination of these results will shape the future direction of research and translate into meaningful gains for patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Oesophageal diseases: gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's disease, achalasia and eosinophilic oesophagitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Xavier

    2015-09-01

    The most important novel findings presented on oesophageal disease in DDW 2015 were the following: 1) GERD: a) hypervigilance seems to be a key pathogenic factor in reflux symptoms refractory to PPI; b) post-reflux swallowing-induced peristaltic waves could be an excellent diagnostic criterion for GERD; c) laryngeal pH-metry is not useful in the diagnosis of extra-oesophageal symptoms; d) the recommendation of weight loss adequately recorded in the clinical reports of patients with GERD and obesity or overweight is an excellent quality indicator and is associated with better outcomes. 2) Barrett's oesophagus: a) persistent low-grade dysplasia in more than one endoscopy and a diagnosis of "indefinite for dysplasia" are associated with a high risk of neoplastic progression; b) narrow-band imaging allows areas of dysplasia on Barrett's oesophagus to be identified with high sensitivity and specificity; c) initial endoscopy fails to identify a high percentage of advanced neoplasms in Barrett's oesophagus. Early re-endoscopy should be considered; d) endoscopists specialized in Barret's oesophagus obtain a much higher yield in the diagnosis of advanced lesions. Patients at high risk-men, older patients, smokers and those with long-segment Barrett's oesophagus-could benefit from follow-up in a referral center. 3) Achalasia: POEM seems safe and effective, independently from patient characteristics (age, comorbidity) and the technical variations used. 4) Eosinophilic esophagitis: topical budesonide and exclusion diets are reasonably effective in PPI non-responders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnostic ability of barrett's index to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy using multidetector computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário L. R. Monteiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a muscular index (Barrett's Index, calculated with multidetector computed tomography, to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy in patients with Graves' orbitopathy. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with Graves' orbitopathy were prospectively studied and submitted to neuro-ophthalmic evaluation and multidetector computed tomography scans of the orbits. Orbits were divided into two groups: those with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy. Barrett's index was calculated as the percentage of the orbit occupied by muscles. Sensitivity and specificity were determined for several index values. RESULTS: Sixty-four orbits (19 with and 45 without dysthyroid optic neuropathy met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean Barrett's index values (± SD were 64.47% ± 6.06% and 49.44% ± 10.94%in the groups with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy, respectively (p60% should be carefully examined and followed for the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy.

  14. Role of XPC, XPD, XRCC1, GSTP genetic polymorphisms and Barrett’s esophagus in a cohort of Italian subjects. A neural network analysis

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    Tarlarini C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Claudia Tarlarini,1 Silvana Penco,1 Massimo Conio,2 Enzo Grossi3 On behalf of the Barrett Italian Study Group 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Medical Genetics, Niguarda Ca’ Granda Hospital, Milan, Italy; 2Department of Gastroenterology, General Hospital, San Remo, Italy; 3Medical Department, Bracco Imaging SpA, Milan, ItalyBackground: Barrett’s esophagus (BE, a metaplastic premalignant disorder, represents the primary risk factor for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease and central obesity have been associated with BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma, but relatively little is known about the specific genes that confer susceptibility to BE carcinogenesis.Methods: A total of 74 patients with BE and 67 controls coming from six gastrointestinal Italian units were evaluated for six polymorphisms in four genes: XPC, XPD nucleotide excision repair (NER genes, XRCC1 (BER gene, and glutathione S-transferase P1. Smoking status was analyzed together with the genetic data. Statistical analysis was performed through Artificial Neural Networks.Results: Distributions of sex, smoking history, and polymorphisms among BE cases and controls did not show statistically significant differences. The r-value from linear correlation allowed us to identify possible protective factors as well as possible risk factors. The application of advanced intelligent systems allowed for the selection of a subgroup of nine variables. Artificial Neural Networks applied on the final data set reached mean global accuracy of 60%, reaching as high as 65.88%.Conclusion: We report here results from an exploratory study. Results from this study failed to find an association among the tested single nucleotide polymorphisms and BE phenotype through classical statistical methods. On the contrary, advanced intelligent systems are really able to handle the disease complexity, not treating the data with reductionist approaches unable to detect

  15. MicroRNA-196a & microRNA-101 expression in Barrett's oesophagus in patients with medically and surgically treated gastro-oesophageal reflux

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    Bright Tim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proton pump inhibitor (PPI medication and surgical fundoplication are used for the control of gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with Barrett's oesophagus, but differ in their effectiveness for both acid and bile reflux. This might impact on the inflammatory processes that are associated with progression of Barrett's oesophagus to cancer, and this may be evident in the gene expression profile and microRNA expression pattern in Barrett's oesophagus mucosa. We hypothesised that two miRNAs with inflammatory and oncogenic roles, miR-101 and miR-196a, are differentially expressed in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients with reflux treated medically vs. surgically. Findings Mucosal tissue was obtained at endoscopy from patients with Barrett's oesophagus whose reflux was controlled by proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy (n = 20 or by fundoplication (n = 19. RNA was extracted and the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a was measured using real-time reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. There were no significant differences in miR-101 and miR-196a expression in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients treated by PPI vs. fundoplication (p = 0.768 and 0.211 respectively. Secondary analysis showed a correlation between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus segment length (p = 0.014. Conclusion The method of reflux treatment did not influence the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus. This data does not provide support to the hypothesis that surgical treatment of reflux better prevents cancer development in Barrett's oesophagus. The association between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus length is consistent with a tumour promoting role for miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus.

  16. MicroRNA-196a & microRNA-101 expression in Barrett's oesophagus in patients with medically and surgically treated gastro-oesophageal reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medication and surgical fundoplication are used for the control of gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with Barrett's oesophagus, but differ in their effectiveness for both acid and bile reflux. This might impact on the inflammatory processes that are associated with progression of Barrett's oesophagus to cancer, and this may be evident in the gene expression profile and microRNA expression pattern in Barrett's oesophagus mucosa. We hypothesised that two miRNAs with inflammatory and oncogenic roles, miR-101 and miR-196a, are differentially expressed in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients with reflux treated medically vs. surgically. Findings Mucosal tissue was obtained at endoscopy from patients with Barrett's oesophagus whose reflux was controlled by proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy (n = 20) or by fundoplication (n = 19). RNA was extracted and the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a was measured using real-time reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. There were no significant differences in miR-101 and miR-196a expression in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients treated by PPI vs. fundoplication (p = 0.768 and 0.211 respectively). Secondary analysis showed a correlation between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus segment length (p = 0.014). Conclusion The method of reflux treatment did not influence the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus. This data does not provide support to the hypothesis that surgical treatment of reflux better prevents cancer development in Barrett's oesophagus. The association between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus length is consistent with a tumour promoting role for miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus. PMID:21352563

  17. El fenotipo de las mucinas en el esófago de Barrett

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, Julio; Piazuelo, María Blanca; Ruiz, Irune; Izarzugaza, María Isabel; Camargo, María Constanza; Delgado, Alberto; Abdirad, Afshin; Correa, Pelayo

    2011-01-01

    Antecedentes El esófago de Barrett es una reconocida lesión precursora de adenocarcinoma esofágico. Aunque generalmente asociada al reflujo gastroesofágico, los mecanismos patogénicos de la enfermedad no son bien conocidos. El objetivo del presente estudio es explorar la historia natural e identificar marcadores de progreso del proceso precanceroso. Material y métodos Se utilizaron cortes histológicos de 67 especímenes de esófago correspondientes a 14 pacientes con esófago de Barrett, a los que se siguió entre 1 – 9 años. Se clasificaron las lesiones en: esófago de Barrett sin displasia, indefinido para displasia o con displasia. Se evaluó la expresión de diferentes mucinas en las células caliciformes y en las columnares usando técnicas de histoquímica e inmunohistoquímica. Resultados En todos los casos se comprobó la presencia de metaplasia intestinal incompleta. Las células columnares dentro del epitelio metaplásico contenían mucinas neutras. A mayor severidad de la lesión se encontró significativamente menor expresión de sialomucinas en las células columnares (p de tendencia igual a 0,03). En sujetos con lesiones indefinidas para displasia se observó un mayor contenido de sulfomucinas en las células caliciformes (p=0,034) y de MUC2 en las células columnares (p=0,029) que en sujetos con esófago de Barrett sin displasia. Se observó expresión de la mucina intestinal MUC2 y de la mucina gástrica MUC5AC en todas las muestras. MUC6, una mucina de las glándulas profundas gástricas, se presentó ocasionalmente. Conclusión La evaluación de los perfiles de mucinas en el esófago de Barrett sugiere una transición gradual del fenotipo del epitelio metaplásico a medida que la lesión avanza en el tiempo. PMID:21804831

  18. Intramural Hematoma of the Esophagus Complicating Severe Preeclampsia

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    Simone Garzon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramural hematoma of the esophagus is a rare injury causing esophageal mucosal dissection. Forceful vomiting and coagulopathy are common underlying causes in the elderly population taking antiplatelets or anticoagulation agents. Acute retrosternal pain followed by hematemesis and dysphagia differentiates the hematoma from other cardiac or thoracic emergencies, including acute myocardial infarction or aortic dissection. Direct inspection by endoscopy is useful, but chest computed tomography best assesses the degree of obliteration of the lumen and excludes other differential diagnoses. Intramural hematoma of the esophagus is generally benign and most patients recover fully with conservative treatment. Bleeding can be managed medically unless in hemodynamically unstable patients, for whom surgical or angiographic treatment may be attempted; only rarely esophageal obstruction requires endoscopic decompression. We report an unusual case of esophageal hematoma, presenting in a young preeclamptic woman after surgical delivery of a preterm twin pregnancy, with a favorable outcome following medical management.

  19. Case of radiation induced carcinoma of the cervical esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, K.; Miura, K.; Kawase, K.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kondo, S. (Fujita-Gakuen Univ., Nagoya (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1980-07-01

    A patient with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus who visited a hospital with a complaint of difficulty in swallowing was reported. This patient was a 50 year old woman. It was 32 years since she had had external irradiation with x- ray over the neck for Basedow's disease at the age of 18. From the age of 30, she had had hypothyroidism and had used thyroid. She became aware of difficulty in swallowing in October, 1976. Then this symptom progressed gradually, and she also had hoarseness. She visited a hospital in August, 1977. At the first medical examination, pigmentation and atrophic changes in the neck induced by radiation were observed, and some lymphnodes with the size of a red bean were palpated. Esophageal roentogenography revealed circular and spiral type lesion in the cervical esophagus, which was 4 cm in length and had a clear boundary. Endoscopic examination revealed circular stenotic lesion. This lesion was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma by biopsy. Total of 3,000 rad of Linac x-ray was irradiated over the neck and the clavicle before operation. Operation findings revealed fibrosis, atrophy, and hardening of the thyroid gland caused by radiation. Carcinoma with the size 35 mm x 18 mm was limited to the cervical esophagus, and the degree of the progress was A/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, M/sub 0/ (Pl/sub 0/). Histological findings revealed moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and its metastases to the right supraclaviclar lymphnodes. This carcinoma was diagnosed as radiation-induced carcinoma of the cervical esophagus, because this patient had had irradiation over the neck, locally marked atrophic changes and scar remained, and carcinoma occurred in the area which had been irradiated with x-ray.

  20. Efficacy of radiology of the esophagus for evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.

    1981-05-15

    The efficacy of radiology in evaluating dysphagia was studied in 86 patients by comparison to endoscopic findings. In the 66 patients with endoscopic abnormalities radiology was correct in 54, for a sensitivity of 82%. Sensitivity of radiology improved to 95% if mild esophagitis was excluded. In the 20 patients with normal endoscopy, radiology was normal in 18 (90%). Thus radiology proved to be a reliable means of evaluating the esophagus in patients with dysphagia.

  1. DISK BATTERIES IN THE ESOPHAGUS OF NIGERIAN CHILDREN: CASE SERIES

    OpenAIRE

    LUCKY OBUKOWHO ONOTAI; ADAOBI ELIZABETH OSUJI

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) ingestion is common in clinical practice especially in children. Its impaction in the esophagus constitutes an important cause of morbidity and mortality in our environment. Due to technological advancement and increase use of disk batteries to power children toys and remote control gadgets, ingestion of disk batteries is now commonplace. In our environment there is paucity of information on disk batteries hence we decided to present case series of disk batteries in the esop...

  2. Extraosseous Osteosarcoma of the Esophagus: A Case Report

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    Rodney E. Wegner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraosseous osteosarcoma (EOO is a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm that is located in the soft tissues without direct attachment to the skeletal system and that produces osteoid, bone, or chondroid material. EOO is an extremely rare disease, accounting for only 1% of soft tissue sarcomas, and typically presents in either an extremity or the retroperitoneum. This paper presents the case of a 45-year-old Caucasian male with extraosseous osteosarcoma of the esophagus.

  3. Epidermolysis bullosa of the esophagus: A case report

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    Radić Maja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Epidermolysis bullosa is a rare skin disease which could be hereditary or acquired with autoimmune mechanism. Even though it is known that epidermolysis bullosa appears on various mucosa, the esophagus is seldom affected. Case report. We reported 19-year-old female patient who had been admitted due to dysphagia and odynophagia to solid food. Erythematous changes with bullae and excoriations could be found on the hands, feet, elbows and knees. The patient underwent barium swallow which revealed retaining of contrast in the valleculas and piriform recesses, as well as dilatation of meso- and hypopharynx - upper achalasia syndrome. The cause was stenosis at the level of upper functional sphincter of the esophagus, 10 mm in length with benign apperance. Small leakage of contrast into the trachea was visible at the later stage of examination, concomitant with volume load of the pharynx. Bullae were not detected. The whole esophagus was fairly uniformly stenotic and had fibrotic appearance. Conclusion. The authors emphasize that barium swallow can provide sufficient information regarding stenosis, dynamics of the disorder, as well as the stage of the disease. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of providing a complete diagnostic strategy in all dermatology patients who could simultaneously have mucous changes.

  4. Treatment results of radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervical esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazunari; Okuno, Yoshishige; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Kusumi, Fusako; Takakuwa, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Satoru; Murakami, Masao; Okamoto, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The methods and results of treatment for cancer of the cervical esophagus differ from those for cancer of the thoracic esophagus. Our objective was to retrospectively review the outcome for cervical esophageal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with definitive radiotherapy from 1988 to 2002 were enrolled in the study. Clinical stage (UICC 1997) was stage I in five, II in six, III in 12 and IV in four. Concurrent head and neck malignancy was found in six patients (22%). The mean radiation dose was 66 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil) was performed in 23 patients. The actuarial overall survival rates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 55.6%, 37.9% and 37.9%, respectively, with a median survival of 13.9 months. In the patients with stage I, the 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 75% and 75%, respectively. With univariate analysis, only two of the possible prognostic factors were found to actually influence survival: performance status (p<0.01) and tumor length (p<0.01). The survival of patients with cervical esophageal cancer remains poor. It is thought that organ preservation is possible by definitive chemoradiation for early cancer

  5. A manometric study of the esophagus in adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naranjo Hernandez, Daysi; Garcia Freyre, Irma; Borbolla Busquets, Elvira; Companioni Acosta, Susana; Pascau Illas, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    112 patients over 65 with an average age of 71.6 years old were studied. 65 of them were females and 47 were males. A manometric study of the esophagus was conducted in all cases and the results were compared with those of a groups of 48 sound individuals, 38 males and 10 females with an average age of 28.7 years old. The manometric diagnosis in 61.6 % of the cases was unspecific motor disorder; in 31.2 %, hiatus hernia; in 26.7 %, esophageal achalasia; and only 5.3 % presented a normal manometric study. It was proved that the resting pressure of the upper esophageal sphincter, the intensity and duration of the primary wave in the upper esophagus, and the lenght and percentage of relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter were significantly inferior, for a p < 0.05 in elderly patients compared with the control group. The duration of the primary wave in the middle and lower esophagus was augmented, for a p < 0.05 in our studied group. Morphological alterations of the primary wave were found, where as tertiary and non-peristaltic waves were also observed, which is attributed to the progressive deterioration of the esophageal function with aging. These results confirm the presence of specific manometric alterations in the third age that must be known in order to improve the attention and treatment of these patients

  6. Experimental replacement of esophagus with a short segment of trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasidezfouli, Azizollah; Ansari, Damoon; Sheikhy, Kambiz; Abarkar, Mohammad; Sadeghbeigi, Farahnaz; Abbasidezfouli, Sepehr; Sharifi, Davood

    2016-03-01

    Segmental resection of esophagus with primary anastomosis is prohibited because of the risk of dehiscence. We previously have shown that replacement of a segment of cervical esophagus with a tracheal segment of the same length could successfully be performed in a canine model. In this study, we sought to assess the feasibility of replacement of the esophageal defect with a shorter segment of trachea. In five mongrel dogs weighting 20-30 kg, under general anesthesia and after a cervical incision, 8 cm of the cervical esophagus was resected and replaced by a 4-cm segment of the adjacent trachea. The animals were evaluated clinically for signs and symptoms of stenosis and dehiscence and then euthanized after 2 mo of follow-up. All dogs recovered from surgery and started regular diet on the seventh postoperative day. No clinical or endoscopic sign of stenosis or voice change was seen. Squamous metaplasia and atrophy of mucosal glands and cartilage were detected in the histopathologic examination of the replaced segments. Replacement of a cervical esophageal defect with a shorter segment of trachea can be performed successfully in dogs. This procedure can be potentially used for the treatment of cervical esophageal lesions in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Response of canine esophagus to intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Barnes, M.; DeLuca, A.M.; Tochner, Z.; Pass, H.I.; Kranda, K.C.; Terrill, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Tolerance of esophagus to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated in dogs. Thirteen adult foxhounds were subjected to right thoractomy, mobilization of the intrathoracic esophagus, and IORT to a 6 cm full-thickness esophageal segment using 9 MeV electrons at doses of 0, 2,000, or 3,000 cGy. Dogs were followed clinically and were evaluated at regular intervals after treatment with fiberoptic esophagoscopy, barium swallows, and postmortem histologic evaluations. One sham-irradiated control dog showed no abnormalities during follow-up of 24 months. Seven dogs receiving 2,000 cGy IORT showed transient mild dysphagia and mild esophagitis, but no clinically or pathologically significant complications. Five dogs receiving 3,000 cGy demonstrated severe ulcerative esophagitis within 6 weeks of treatment which progressed to chronic ulcerative esophagitis with stricture formation by 9 months following IORT. One 3,000 cGy dog died at 13 months from an esophageal perforation. On the basis of a pilot experience using 13 experimental animals, it was concluded that intact canine esophagus tolerates IORT well to doses of 2,000 cGy, but doses of 3,000 cGy pose serious and potentially lethal risks. The clinical application of IORT to the treatment of human intrathoracic neoplasms requiring esophageal irradiation should be approached with caution, particularly at doses exceeding 2,000 cGy

  8. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Denis, F.; Dupuis, O.; Orain, I.; Crehange, G.

    2010-01-01

    The esophagus is a musculo-membranous tube through which food passes from the pharynx to the stomach. Due to its anatomical location, it can be exposed to ionizing radiation in many external radiotherapy indications. Radiation-induced esophageal mucositis is clinically revealed by dysphagia and odynophagia, and usually begins 3 to 4 weeks after the start of radiation treatment. With the rise of multimodality treatments (e.g., concurrent chemoradiotherapy, dose escalation and accelerated fractionation schemes), esophageal toxicity has become a significant dose-limiting issue. Understanding the predictive factors of esophageal injury may improve the optimal delivery of treatment plans. It may help to minimize the risks, hence increasing the therapeutic ratio. Based on a large literature review, our study describes both early and late radiation-induced esophageal injuries and highlights some of the predictive factors for cervical and thoracic esophagus toxicity. These clinical and dosimetric parameters are numerous but none is consensual. The large number of dosimetric parameters strengthens the need of an overall analysis of the dose/volume histograms. The data provided is insufficient to recommend their routine use to prevent radiation-induced esophagitis. Defining guidelines for the tolerance of the esophagus to ionizing radiation remains essential for a safe and efficient treatment. (authors)

  9. Palliative treatment of patients with malignant structures of esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodnov, Victor Y.; Kuzin, M. I.; Kharnas, Sergey S.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Posypanova, Anna M.

    1996-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy with the use of laser endoscopic spectrum analyzer (LESA-5), spectral- analyzing video-imaging system, Kr laser and various types of catheters for different localizations and different geometry of tumor, and phthalocyanine aluminum photosensitizers in patients with malignant strictures of esophagus is discussed. Photodynamic therapy was carried out to four patients: with esophageal cancer (3 patients) and gastric cancer with infiltration of lower esophagus (1 patient). All patients suffered from severe dysphagia. Photosensitizer was used in a dose 1-1.5 mg/kg of weight. Usually we used 3-4 seances of laser treatment 10-30 minutes long. The accumulation of photosensitizer was controlled by LESA-5. Laser induced fluorescent image was monitored by the video-imaging system in order to control laser treatment. There were no side-effects. The results show high efficiency of photodynamic therapy. There was marked reduction of dysphagia symptoms in all cases. It seems that photodynamic therapy is a good alternative to palliative surgical treatment of patients with malignant strictures of esophagus.

  10. Foreign body impaction in the esophagus: are there underlying motor disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzadi, S; Salis, G B; García, A; Iannicillo, H; Fucile, V; Chiocca, J C

    2017-11-01

    Compared with the control group, the impacted subjects presented marked reduction in amplitude and duration of esophageal contraction in the proximal esophagus. These motor disorders could be responsible for the foreign body impaction in the esophagus. However, we believe this patient group should be further studied by 24-hour esophageal manometry to reach a more accurate diagnosis by studying each patient's entire circadian cycle. © 1998 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus/Harcourt Brace & Co. Ltd

  11. Deanxit relieves symptoms in a patient with jackhammer esophagus: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jin-Ying; Zhang, Wen-Huan; Huang, Chun-Ling; Huang, Dang; Zuo, Guo-Wen; Liang, Lie-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Jackhammer (hypercontractile) esophagus presents with dysphagia and chest pain. Current treatments are limited. We describe a 60-year-old man who presented with dysphagia, chest pain and heartburn for a period of 1 year. His workup showed Barrett’s esophagus on endoscopy and high-resolution manometry demonstrated jackhammer esophagus with esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. The patient was treated with proton pump inhibitor and nifedipine but without resolution of his symptoms. He w...

  12. Platinum derivatives in chemoradiotherapy of patients with cancer of esophagus and stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monakhov, B.V.; Chichka, N.A.; Fedina, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigation into the testing of a complex platinum compound-platidiam as part of chemoradiotherapy in 101 patients suffering from cancer of esophagus and stomach is conducted. Schemes of combined chemoradio treatment and evaluation of results of treatment of patients suffering from esophagus and stomach cancer are presented. Side effects under the treatment realized are studied. Advisability of platidiam inclusion into the complex programs of chemoradiotherapy of spread form of esophagus and stomach cancer is demonstrated

  13. Efficiency of dynamic esophagoscintigraphy for evaluation of therapy of patients with esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkina, V.V.; Polyakova, N.I.; Zamyatin, S.S.; Grinevich, S.Yu.; Mikhajlenko, V.E.; Krakhmalev, S.N.

    1991-01-01

    The evaluation of efficiency was given of dynamic esophagoscintigraphy (ES) for revealing possible postoperative complications before and after conducted treatment in 38 patients with esophagus cancer. Esophageal transit time (ETT) of hard and liquid food and per cent of esophagus clearance (C %) were evaluated when analyzing dynamic ES. Quantitative indices -ETT and C% - are characteristic for esophagus function. Control radionuclide examination is expedient to conduct not early than 1.5-2 mos after operative and other treatment methods

  14. Radiation-induced cancer of the esophagus after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Ichiro; Miyaishi, Kazuo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Ito, Jun; Inoue, Tomio

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of radiation-induced cancer of the esophagus after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer were reported. Latent period of case 1 (cervical esophagus) was 12 years, and case 2 (middle thoracic esophagus) was 16 years. Radiographically the lesions were both serrated, and histologically, case 1 was ''poorly differentiated'' and case 2 was ''moderately differentiated'' squamous cell carcinoma. Histological types of basic breast cancer were both papillotubular carcinomas. Previous irradiation doses were 4180 rads for case 1 and 1860 rads for case 2. The esophageal cancers were remarkably improved by radiation therapy. It should be emphasized that radiation therapy is useful for the radiation-induced cancer of the esophagus. (author)

  15. Optimized endoscopic autofluorescence spectroscopy for the identification of premalignant lesions in Barrett's oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Jasmin A; Boerwinkel, David F; Meijer, Sybren L; Visser, Mike; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Aalders, Maurice C G; Bergman, Jacques J G H M

    2013-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has the potential to detect early cellular changes in Barrett's oesophagus before these become visible. As the technique is based on varying concentrations of intrinsic fluorophores, each with its own optimal excitation wavelength, it is important to assess the optimal excitation wavelength(s) for identification of premalignant lesions in patients with Barrett's oesophagus. The endoscopic spectroscopy system used contained five (ultra)violet light sources (λexc=369-416 nm) to generate autofluorescence during routine endoscopic surveillance. Autofluorescence spectroscopy was followed by a biopsy for histological assessment and spectra correlation. Three intensity ratios (r1, r2, r3) were calculated by dividing the area, A, under the spectral curve of selected emission wavelength ranges for each spectrum generated by each excitation wavelength λexc as follows (Equation is included in full-text article.). Double intensity ratios were calculated using two excitation wavelengths. Fifty-eight tissue areas from 22 patients were used for autofluorescence spectra analysis. Excitation with 395, 405 or 410 nm showed a significant (P≤0.0006) differentiation between intestinal metaplasia and grouped high-grade dysplasia/early carcinoma for intensity ratios r2 and r3. A sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 89.5% with an area under the ROC curve of 0.85 was achieved using 395 nm excitation and intensity ratio r3. Double excitation showed no additional value over single excitation. The combination of 395 nm excitation and intensity ratio r3 showed optimal conditions to discriminate nondysplastic from early neoplasia in Barrett's oesophagus.

  16. Clarifying the Conceptualization, Dimensionality, and Structure of Emotion: Response to Barrett and Colleagues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Alan S; Keltner, Dacher

    2018-04-01

    We present a mathematically based framework distinguishing the dimensionality, structure, and conceptualization of emotion-related responses. Our recent findings indicate that reported emotional experience is high-dimensional, involves gradients between categories traditionally thought of as discrete (e.g., 'fear', 'disgust'), and cannot be reduced to widely used domain-general scales (valence, arousal, etc.). In light of our conceptual framework and findings, we address potential methodological and conceptual confusions in Barrett and colleagues' commentary on our work. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Barrett Foundation: Undergraduate Research Program for Environmental Engineers and Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, D. M.; Paul, M.; Farmer, C.; Larson, P.; Matt, J.; Sentoff, K.; Vazquez-Spickers, I.; Pearce, A. R.

    2007-12-01

    A new program sponsored by The Barrett Foundation in the University of Vermont College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences (UVM) supports undergraduate students in Environmental Engineering, Earth and Environmental Sciences to pursue independent summer research projects. The Barrett Foundation, a non-profit organization started by a UVM Engineering alum, provided a grant to support undergraduate research. Students must work with at least two different faculty advisors to develop project ideas, then independently prepare a research proposal and submit it to a faculty panel for review. The program was structured as a scholarship to foster a competitive application process. In the last three years, fourteen students have participated in the program. The 2007 Barrett Scholars projects include: - Using bacteria to change the chemistry of subsurface media to encourage calcite precipitation for soil stability and pollutant sequestration - Assessing structural weaknesses in a historic post and beam barn using accelerometers and wireless data collection equipment - Using image processing filters to 1) evaluate leaf wetness, a leading indicator of disease in crops and 2) assess the movement of contaminants through building materials. - Investigating the impact of increased water temperature on cold-water fish species in two Vermont streams. - Studying the impacts of light duty vehicle tailpipe emissions on air quality This program supports applied and interdisciplinary environmental research and introduces students to real- world engineering problems. In addition, faculty from different research focuses are presented the opportunity to establish new collaborations around campus through the interdisciplinary projects. To date, there is a successful publication record from the projects involving the Barrett scholars, including students as authors. One of the objectives of this program was to provide prestigious, competitive awards to outstanding undergraduate engineers

  18. Motion of the esophagus due to cardiac motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Palmer

    Full Text Available When imaging studies (e.g. CT are used to quantify morphological changes in an anatomical structure, it is necessary to understand the extent and source of motion which can give imaging artifacts (e.g. blurring or local distortion. The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude of esophageal motion due to cardiac motion. We used retrospective electrocardiogram-gated contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography images for this study. The anatomic region from the carina to the bottom of the heart was taken at deep-inspiration breath hold with the patients' arms raised above their shoulders, in a position similar to that used for radiation therapy. The esophagus was delineated on the diastolic phase of cardiac motion, and deformable registration was used to sequentially deform the images in nearest-neighbor phases among the 10 cardiac phases, starting from the diastolic phase. Using the 10 deformation fields generated from the deformable registration, the magnitude of the extreme displacements was then calculated for each voxel, and the mean and maximum displacement was calculated for each computed tomography slice for each patient. The average maximum esophageal displacement due to cardiac motion for all patients was 5.8 mm (standard deviation: 1.6 mm, maximum: 10.0 mm in the transverse direction. For 21 of 26 patients, the largest esophageal motion was found in the inferior region of the heart; for the other patients, esophageal motion was approximately independent of superior-inferior position. The esophagus motion was larger at cardiac phases where the electrocardiogram R-wave occurs. In conclusion, the magnitude of esophageal motion near the heart due to cardiac motion is similar to that due to other sources of motion, including respiratory motion and intra-fraction motion. A larger cardiac motion will result into larger esophagus motion in a cardiac cycle.

  19. Esophageal contractions in type 3 achalasia esophagus: simultaneous or peristaltic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Patel, Nirali; Ledgerwood-Lee, Melissa; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-05-01

    Absence of peristalsis and impaired relaxation of lower esophageal sphincter are the hallmarks of achalasia esophagus. Based on the pressurization patterns, achalasia has been subdivided into three subtypes. The goal of our study was to evaluate the esophageal contraction pattern and bolus clearance in type 3 achalasia esophagus. High-resolution manometry (HRM) recordings of all patients diagnosed with achalasia esophagus in our center between the years 2011 and 2013 were reviewed. Recordings of 36 patients with type 3 achalasia were analyzed for the characteristics of swallow-induced "simultaneous esophageal contraction." The HRM impedance recordings of 14 additional patients with type 3 achalasia were analyzed for bolus clearance from the impedance recording. Finally, the HRM impedance along with intraluminal ultrasound imaging was conducted in six patients to further characterize the simultaneous esophageal contractions. Among 187 achalasia patients, 30 were type 1, 121 type 2, and 36 type 3. A total of 434 swallows evaluated in type 3 achalasia patients revealed that 95% of the swallow-induced contractions met criteria for simultaneous esophageal contraction, based on the onset of contraction. Interestingly, the peak and termination of the majority of simultaneous esophageal contractions were sequential. The HRM impedance revealed that 94% of the "simultaneous contractions" were associated with complete bolus clearance. Ultrasound image analysis revealed that baseline muscle thickness of patients in type 3 achalasia is larger than normal but the pattern of axial shortening is similar to that in normal subjects. The majority of esophageal contractions in type 3 achalasia are not true simultaneous contractions because the peak and termination of contraction are sequential and they are associated with complete bolus clearance.

  20. Pneumatic rupture of the esophagus caused by carbonated drinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerovitch, J.; Barzilay, Z.; Tel Aviv Univ.; Ben Ami, T.; Rozenman, J.; Tel Aviv Univ.

    1988-01-01

    Pneumatic rupture of the esophagus occurs when gas under pressure is accidentally delivered into the oral cavity. To the 4 cases previously described we add 2 pediatric patients and in both the source of the offending gas was a bottle of carbonated drink. The mild initial symptoms were followed in both by physical and radiographic findings suggesting pharyngoesophageal perforation. Early radiologic findings included free subcutaneous and mediastinal air, followed later by hydropneumothorax and mediastinal widening as well as leak of contrast material on gastrografin swallow. CT findings contributed to patient evaluation and management. (orig.)

  1. The criteria of radiotherapy for the carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Michio; Ando, Nobutoshi; Ishikawa, Tatsuo

    1987-01-01

    These are the criteria of radiation therapy for the carcinoma of the esophagus decided by the committee of the Japanese association for Radiotherapy Systems under the request of the Japan Radiological Society. The indication for radiation therapy is described to adapt to the new TNM Classification, based on the depth of the invasion of the tumor. Depth of tumor invasion is divided into 4 stages, and the radiological images for each are shown. To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy, cases are divided into curable and non curable groups according to degree of changes of the radiological findings after irradiation, and each group is subdivided into absolute and relative ones. (author)

  2. Gastrointestinal leiomyosarcoma - unusual sites: Esophagus, colon and porta hepatis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balthazar, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is based on a retrospective analysis of the radiologic findings of 6 newly proven cases of primary gastrointestinal leiomyosarcomas located in unusual sites. The radiographic and angiographic features of esophageal, colonic, and porta hepatis leiomyosarcomas are described and illustrated. General background information together with a brief review of the literature regarding these lesions are provided. The difficulties encountered in the preoperative diagnosis are explained by the protean and nonspecific clinical and radiographic features of many of these tumors. In addition, although myomatous tumors of the liver and porta hepatis are angiogaphically hypervascular, similar tumors of the colon are slight to moderately vascular, and tumors of the esophagus are avascular. (orig.)

  3. Mucosal integrity and sensitivity to acid in the proximal esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Weijenborg, Pim W; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; Verheij, J; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Acid reflux episodes that extend to the proximal esophagus are more likely to be perceived. This suggests that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to acid than the distal esophagus, which could be caused by impaired mucosal integrity in the proximal esophagus. Our aim was to explore sensitivity to acid and mucosal integrity in different segments of the esophagus. We used a prospective observational study, including 12 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After stopping acid secretion-inhibiting medication, two procedures were performed: an acid perfusion test and an upper endoscopy with electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and esophageal biopsies. Proximal and distal sensitivity to acid and tissue impedance were measured in vivo, and mucosal permeability and epithelial intercellular spaces at different esophageal levels were measured in vitro. Mean lag time to heartburn perception was much shorter after proximal acid perfusion (0.8 min) than after distal acid perfusion (3.9 min) (P = 0.02). Median in vivo tissue impedance was significantly lower in the distal esophagus (4,563 Ω·m) compared with the proximal esophagus (8,170 Ω·m) (P = 0.002). Transepithelial permeability, as measured by the median fluorescein flux was significantly higher in the distal (2,051 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) than in the proximal segment (368 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) (P = 0.033). Intercellular space ratio and maximum heartburn intensity were not significantly different between the proximal and distal esophagus. In GERD patients off acid secretion-inhibiting medication, acid exposure in the proximal segment of the esophagus provokes symptoms earlier than acid exposure in the distal esophagus, whereas mucosal integrity is impaired more in the distal esophagus. These findings indicate that the enhanced sensitivity to proximal reflux episodes is not explained by increased mucosal permeability. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Morphological featuresof metaplasia and dysplasia of epithelium in Barret’s esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Vitkovska S.V.

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the morphological features of metaplasia and dysplasia of epithelium in Barret’s esophagus. The role of biopsy in the diagnostic of Barret’s esophagus and results of morphological research in the choice of follow-up and treatment of patients is shown.

  5. Motor and sensory function of the esophagus: revelations through ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2005-04-01

    Catheter based high frequency intraluminal ultrasound (HFIUS) imaging is a powerful tool to study esophageal sensory and motor function and dysfunction in vivo in humans. It has provided a number of important insights into the longitudinal muscle function of the esophagus. Based on the ultrasound images and intraluminal pressure recordings, it is clear that there is synchrony in the timing as well as the amplitude of contraction between the circular and the longitudinal muscle layers of the esophagus in normal subjects. On the other hand, in patients with spastic disorders of the esophagus, there is an asynchrony of contraction related to the timing and amplitude of contraction of the two muscle layers during peristalsis. Achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, and nutcracker esophagus (spastic motor disorders of the esophagus) are associated with hypertrophy of the circular as well as longitudinal muscle layers. A sustained contraction of the longitudinal muscle of the esophagus is temporally related to chest pain and heartburn and may very well be the cause of symptoms. Longitudinal muscle function of the esophagus can be studied in vivo in humans using dynamic ultrasound imaging. Longitudinal muscle dysfunction appears to be important in the motor and sensory disorders of the esophagus.

  6. Sensory-motor responses to mechanical stimulation of the esophagus after sensitization with acid

    OpenAIRE

    Drewes, Asbjorn Mohr; Reddy, Hariprasad; Staahl, Camilla; Pedersen, Jan; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gregersen, Hans

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Sensitization most likely plays an important role in chronic pain disorders, and such sensitization can be mimicked by experimental acid perfusion of the esophagus. The current study systematically investigated the sensory and motor responses of the esophagus to controlled mechanical stimuli before and after sensitization.

  7. Unusual presentation of foreign bodies in esophagus-our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha A Suman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body (FB in esophagus is not a very rare entity. The main risks are to the children under 3 years of age. In this age group, the second molars have not yet developed, the child′s grinding and swallowing mechanisms are poor, and glottis closure is immature. Some patients at risk for FB ingestion may not be able to give an accurate medical history of ingestion, either due to age or mental illness. Coins are the most commonly ingested FBs, with button batteries, fish bone, marble, stone, and pieces of meat, etc., being other forms of ingested FB. In the majority of cases, it is accidental in nature, but can be occasionally homicidal, as was probably in one of our patients. Patient can be asymptomatic or can present with dysphagia, drooling of saliva, FB sensation, vomiting or pain. Patients with long-standing esophageal FBs may present with weight loss, aspiration pneumonia, fever, or signs and symptoms of esophageal perforation including crepitus, pneumomediastinum, or gastrointestinal bleeding. Here, we present four case reports of unusual presentation of FB in esophagus that were successfully removed by rigid esophagoscopy without any complication

  8. Trimodal therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matuschek C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with ESCC (squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus are most commonly diagnosed with locally advanced tumor stages. Early metastatic disease and late diagnosis are common reasons responsible for this tumor's poor clinical outcome. The prognosis of esophageal cancer is very poor because patients usually do not have symptoms in early disease stages. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus frequently complicates patients with multiple co-morbidities and these patients often require interdisciplinary diagnosis and treatment procedures. At present time, neoadjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy followed by surgery are regarded as the international standard of care. Meta-analyses have confirmed that this approach provides the patient with better local tumor control and an increased overall survival rate. It is recommended that patients with positive tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy and who are poor surgical candidates should consider definitive radiochemotherapy without surgery as a treatment option. In future, EGFR antibodies may also be administered to patients during therapy to improve the current treatment effectiveness. Positron-emission tomography proves to be an early response-imaging tool used to evaluate the effect of the neoadjuvant therapy and could be used as a predictive factor for the survival rate in ESCC. The percentage proportions of residual tumor cells in the histopathological analyses represent a gold standard for evaluating the response rate to radiochemotherapy. In the future, early response evaluation and molecular biological tests could be important diagnostic tools in influencing the treatment decisions of ESCC patients.

  9. Screening esophagus during routine ultrasound: medical and cost benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek M A; Eid, Khaled A; El-Sherif, Abd Elhalim A; Abd El Al, Usama M; El-Sherbiny, Samir M; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis is an approach used to determine the value of a medical care option and refers to a method used to assess the costs and health benefits of an intervention. Upon the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis, the current guidelines recommend that all cirrhotic patients have to be screened for the presence of esophageal varices by endoscopy. In addition, patients with a positive family history of esophageal cancer are screened annually. These approaches place a heavy burden on endoscopy units, and repeated testing over time may have a detrimental effect on patient compliance. Following the recommendations of a recent study entitled 'Detection of risky esophageal varices using two dimensional ultrasound: when to perform endoscopy', the intra-abdominal portion of the esophagus of 1100 patients was divided into a hepatic group, which included 650 patients, and a nonhepatic group, which included 450 patients, who presented with manifestations of liver diseases and gastrointestinal symptoms, respectively, and were examined using standard two-dimensional ultrasound (US) to evaluate cost effectiveness, standard issues, and medical benefits using conventional US. The overall effectiveness analysis of 1100 patients yielded a 41% cost standard benefit calculated to be $114,760 in a 6-month study. Two-dimensional US can play an important role in screening for esophageal abnormalities, thus saving money and time. The esophagus should be screened during routine conventional abdominal US.

  10. Preliminary findings from tests of a microwave applicator designed to treat Barrett's oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeson, S; Reeves, J W; Birch, M J; Swain, C P; Ikeda, K; Feakins, R M

    2005-01-01

    Barrett's oesophagus is considered to increase the risk of cancer 30-fold. Helical microwave antennas have been developed for ablative treatment of Barrett's. A microwave balloon applicator was tested in an initial animal study using adult white pigs. For treatment, a balloon filled with tissue-equivalent material encapsulated the antenna. A range of different treatment temperatures and durations was used to investigate a range of thermal ablations of the oesophageal epithelium. Eight animals were investigated, five non-survival and three with a 1-week survival period. The balloon was fitted with an array of temperature sensors, which gave an indication of the treatment in situ and allowed modifications to be performed in real time. Temperature data were recorded from all four quadrants of the balloon throughout and test sites were collected and analysed histologically. All experiments were successfully completed without perforation, serious adverse effects or death. Sites of discrete ulceration were induced in the survival tests, whereas the non-survival tests yielded little reproducible tissue modification. Results suggested that an activation temperature of ∼55 deg. C needed to be reached during the treatment for tissue damage to be induced. Once damage had been triggered the severity was related to the mean temperature attained during the treatment period. A mean temperature of 52 deg. C or more resulted in substantial damage, whilst a mean temperature of ∼50 deg. C resulted in the desired surface damage with sparing of subjacent tissues

  11. Preliminary findings from tests of a microwave applicator designed to treat Barrett's oesophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeson, S [Department of Clinical Physics, Royal London Hospital, London E1 1BB (United Kingdom); Reeves, J W [Department of Clinical Physics, Royal London Hospital, London E1 1BB (United Kingdom); Birch, M J [Department of Clinical Physics, Royal London Hospital, London E1 1BB (United Kingdom); Swain, C P [Department of Clinical Physics, Royal London Hospital, London E1 1BB (United Kingdom); Ikeda, K [Department of Clinical Physics, Royal London Hospital, London E1 1BB (United Kingdom); Feakins, R M [Department of Histopathology, Royal London Hospital, London E1 1BB (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-07

    Barrett's oesophagus is considered to increase the risk of cancer 30-fold. Helical microwave antennas have been developed for ablative treatment of Barrett's. A microwave balloon applicator was tested in an initial animal study using adult white pigs. For treatment, a balloon filled with tissue-equivalent material encapsulated the antenna. A range of different treatment temperatures and durations was used to investigate a range of thermal ablations of the oesophageal epithelium. Eight animals were investigated, five non-survival and three with a 1-week survival period. The balloon was fitted with an array of temperature sensors, which gave an indication of the treatment in situ and allowed modifications to be performed in real time. Temperature data were recorded from all four quadrants of the balloon throughout and test sites were collected and analysed histologically. All experiments were successfully completed without perforation, serious adverse effects or death. Sites of discrete ulceration were induced in the survival tests, whereas the non-survival tests yielded little reproducible tissue modification. Results suggested that an activation temperature of {approx}55 deg. C needed to be reached during the treatment for tissue damage to be induced. Once damage had been triggered the severity was related to the mean temperature attained during the treatment period. A mean temperature of 52 deg. C or more resulted in substantial damage, whilst a mean temperature of {approx}50 deg. C resulted in the desired surface damage with sparing of subjacent tissues.

  12. ESÓFAGO DE BARRETT: REVISIÓN DE LA LITERATURA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. ANTONIETA RAMÍREZ R., DRA.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available El Esófago de Barrett (EB es una patología adquirida producto del reflujo gastroesofágico crónico que provoca la lesión de la mucosa esofágica normal y su reemplazo por mucosa metaplásica. La importancia clínica del EB radica en que constituye un factor de riesgo para el desarrollo de adenocarcinoma esofágico. La incidencia del adenocarcinoma esofágico se encuentra en aumento y su diagnóstico se realiza generalmente en etapas avanzadas, teniendo un pronóstico sombrío. Actualmente el objetivo es detectar el cáncer en etapas iniciales y eventualmente tratables, para lo cual se han planteado distintos protocolos de vigilancia y numerosas alternativas de tratamiento del epitelio metaplásico del esófago de Barrett. En el siguiente artículo se revisan los conceptos más recientes de manejo.

  13. The Durability of Endoscopic Therapy for Treatment of Barrett's Metaplasia, Dysplasia, and Mucosal Cancer After Nissen Fundoplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Corey S; Louie, Brian E; Wille, Aaron; Dunst, Christy M; Worrell, Stephanie G; DeMeester, Steven R; Reynolds, Jessica; Dixon, Joe; Lipham, John C; Lada, Michal; Peters, Jeffrey H; Watson, Thomas J; Farivar, Alexander S; Aye, Ralph W

    2015-05-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) ± endoscopic resection (EMR) is an established treatment strategy for neoplastic Barrett's and intramucosal cancer. Most patients are managed with proton pump inhibitors. The incidence of recurrent Barrett's metaplasia, dysplasia, or cancer after complete eradication is up to 43 % using this strategy. We hypothesize the addition of fundoplication should result in a lower recurrence rates after complete eradication. Multi-institutional retrospective review of patients undergoing endotherapy followed by Nissen fundoplication A total of 49 patients underwent RFA ± EMR followed by Nissen fundoplication. Complete remission of intestinal metaplasia (CR-IM) was achieved in 26 (53 %) patients, complete remission of dysplasia (CR-D) in 16 (33 %) patients, and 7 (14 %) had persistent neoplastic Barrett's. After fundoplication, 18/26 (70 %) remained in CR-IM. An additional 10/16 CR-D achieved CR-IM and 4/7 with persistent dysplasia achieved CR-IM. One patient progressed to LGD while no patient developed HGD or cancer. Endoscopic therapy for Barrett's dysplasia and/or intramucosal cancer followed by fundoplication results in similar durability of CR-IM to patients being managed with PPIs alone after endoscopic therapy. However, fundoplication may be superior in preventing further progression of disease and the development of cancer. Fundoplication is an important strategy to achieve and maintain CR-IM, and facilitate eradication of persistent dysplasia.

  14. Hypertrophy of the muscularis propria of the lower esophageal sphincter and the body of the esophagus in patients with primary motility disorders of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Kassab, Ghassan; Puckett, James L; Liu, Jianmin

    2003-08-01

    Patients with diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) and nutcracker esophagus/high amplitude esophageal contraction (HAEC) have a thicker esophageal muscularis propria than do healthy subjects. The goals of this study were to determine the esophageal muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA), a measure of muscle mass, in patients with achalasia of the esophagus; and to compare it with that in patients with DES, patients with HAEC, and normal subjects. Using a high-frequency ultrasound probe catheter, concurrent manometry and ultrasound images of the esophagus were recorded in four subject groups: normal volunteers, patients with HAEC, patients with DES, and patients with achalasia of the esophagus. Recordings were obtained from the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and multiple sites in the esophagus 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 cm above the LES. The LES and esophageal muscle thickness as well as esophageal MCSA were greater in all three patient groups than in the normal subject group. Muscle thickness and MCSA were observed to be greatest in patients with achalasia, which were greater than in patients with DES, which were greater than in those with HAEC, which in turn were greater than in normal subjects. We propose that an increase in the MCSA is an important feature of patients with primary motility disorders of the esophagus. The degree of increase in muscle mass may be an important determinant of the type and the severity of esophageal motor dysfunction.

  15. Study on prevalence of neoplastic lesions of the esophagus in patients referred to health centers of Ahvaz in the years 2001-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ebrahimi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Esophageal cancer is a common malignancy that is fatal to a large extent. The incidence of esophageal cancer is significantly variable worldwide and squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type. About 15% of cancer cases raise in the region of the upper 1/3, 35% in the middle and 50% are in the area. Materials and methods: This is a retrospective study on 102 pathology reports for 4 years between the years 2001-2004 from the Department of Pathology University of Medical Sciences carried out and the following results were obtained. This is a retrospective study conducted on 102 pathology reports for 4 years between the years 2001-2004 from the Department of Pathology in Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences and the following results were obtained. Findings: 102 cases develop 49% cancer cases and 18.5% pre-cancerous cases and normal cases developed only 12%. The most common age group has been the eighth decade of life (40% and 92% of their age has been above 50 years old. The most common type is squamous cell carcinoma with 68% and adenocarcinoma developed 22% of cases. Among 35 cases that their area had been specified, cases develop from 11.5% upper 1/3 area, 34% middle area, 40% lower area and 14.5% of gastroesophageal junction. The average age of individuals with esophageal cancer, squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, Barrett's esophagus and Esophagitis has been 68.12, 67.4, 68.3, 50.8 and 46.3 years old, respectively. Male-to-female sex ratio was obtained for Esophageal cancer, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma equal to 1.27/1, 1/1, 1.75/1, respectively. Conclusion: with regard to the results from this study, rate of incidence of esophageal cancer has reduced in men than other population and/or the rate of incidence of esophageal cancer has increased in women. The most area involved with 11 cases has been in the middle area of esophagus and by squamous cell carcinoma.

  16. Esophagectomy - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lewis esophagectomy, Blunt esophagectomy; Esophageal cancer - esophagectomy - open; Cancer of the esophagus - esophagectomy - open ... lining of the esophagus that can lead to cancer ( Barrett esophagus ) Severe trauma Destroyed esophagus Severely damaged stomach

  17. [Partial regression of Barret esophagus with high grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma after photocoagulation and endocurietherapy under antisecretory treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremond, L; Bouché, O; Diébold, M D; Demange, L; Zeitoun, P; Thiefin, G

    1995-01-01

    Barrett's oesophagus is a premalignant condition. The possibility of eradicating at least partially the metaplastic epithelium has been reported recently. In this case report, a patient with Barrett's oesophagus complicated by high grade dysplasia and focal adenocarcinoma was treated by Nd:Yag laser then high dose rate intraluminal irradiation while on omeprazole 40 mg/day. A partial eradication of Barrett's oesophagus and a transient tumoural regression were obtained. Histologically, residual specialized-type glandular tissue was observed beneath regenerative squamous epithelium. Four months after intraluminal irradiation, a local tumoural recurrence was detected while the area of restored squamous epithelium was unchanged on omeprazole 40 mg/day. This indicates that physical destruction of Barrett's oesophagus associated with potent antisecretory treatment can induce a regression of the metaplastic epithelium, even in presence of high grade dysplasia. The persistence of specialized-type glands beneath the squamous epithelium raises important issues about its potential malignant degeneration.

  18. Nonspecific motility disorders, irritable esophagus, and chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krarup, Anne Lund; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Hejazi, Reza A; McCallum, Richard W; Vega, Kenneth J; Frazzoni, Marzio; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Clarke, John O; Achem, Sami R

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents commentaries on whether Starling's law applies to the esophagus; whether erythromycin affects esophageal motility; the relationship between hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter and vigorous achalasia; whether ethnic- and gender-based norms affect diagnosis and treatment of esophageal motor disorders; health care and epidemiology of chest pain; whether normal pH excludes esophageal pain; the role of high-resolution manometry in noncardiac chest pain; whether pH-impedance should be included in the evaluation of noncardiac chest pain; whether there are there alternative therapeutic options to PPI for treating noncardiac chest pain; and the usefulness of psychological treatment and alternative medicine in noncardiac chest pain. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Primary melanoma of the esophagus treated with esophagectomy. Clinical Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butte, Jean M; Visscher, Alvaro; De la Fuente, Hernan; Meneses, Manuel; Carrasco, Ana Maria; Amaral, Horacio; Waugh, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal melanomas correspond to 0.1 to 0.2% of esophageal tumors. We report two patients with the disease. The first patient is a 51 year-old woman pre-sentingwith dysphagia and weight loss. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a polypoid ulcerated lesion in the middle third of the esophagus. The pathological study of the biopsy disclosed a malignant melanoma. The patient was subjected to an esophagectomy with a satisfactory postoperative evolution. Four months later, liver metastases were detected and the patient died eleven months after the operation. The second patient is a 59 year-old mole that consulted by dysphagia. An endoscopy showed a pigmented esophageal lesion whose pathological diagnosis was a malignant melanoma. The patient was subjected to an esophagectomy and sixteen months after surgery there was no evidence of relaps

  20. Endoscopic mucosal resection with a multiband ligator for the treatment of Barrett's high-grade dysplasia and early gastric cancer Resección endoscópica de la mucosa con un ligador multibanda para el tratamiento de la displasia de Barret de alto grado y el cáncer gástrico precoz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Espinel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: due to surgery's high mortality and morbidity, local therapeutic techniques are required for Barrett's high-grade dysplasia (BHGD and early gastric cancer (EGC. Various techniques are available for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR in the GI tract. The "suck and cut" technique, which uses a transparent cap or modified multiband variceal ligator, is usually the most practiced method. A multiband ligator (ML allows sequential resection without the need for submucosal injection and endoscope withdrawal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of EMR with a ML device in the treatment of Barrett's high-grade dysplasia and early gastric cancer. Patients and methods: prospective study. Eight consecutive patients (4 men; median age, 62 years; range 38-89 years with BHGD (4 or EGC (4 were treated. EMR was performed with a multiband ligator in order to create a pseudopolyp and then permit snare polypectomy of flat mucosal lesions. The pseudopolyp was resected by using pure coagulating current. No submucosal saline injection was administered before resection. Results: a total of 8 consecutive patients were treated with the multiband ligator (ML technique. Barrett's esophagus (BE: one patient with long BE received 3 EMR sessions. Three patients presented with short BE and received 1 EMR session each. The histology of the EMR specimens confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma with submucosal infiltration (1 patient and BHGD (3 patients. Early gastric cancer (EGC: 3 patients had EGC (type IIa and 1 patient had high-grade dysplasia. EMR was accomplished in 1 session for each patient. The histology of EMR specimens confirmed a mucinous adenocarcinoma with submucosal infiltration (1 patient, EGC (2 patients, and HGD (1 patient. Complications (mild esophageal stenosis, minor bleeding occurred in 2 patients. Conclusions: EMR has diagnostic and therapeutic implications, and represents a superior diagnostic modality as

  1. Biodegradable stents in benign stenosis of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Benign stenosis of the esophagus can be postcorrosion peptic or postoperative. The treatment is difficult and traditionally consists of multiple dilatations. In refractory stenosis the placement of metal self-expanding stents is disputed because requiring their subsequent removal. New experience for therapeutic decision is self- degradable stents. Manipulation is a single and not requires their removal. What you will learn: Patients indicated for the treatment with self- degradable stents are with benign stenosis not suitable for balloon dilatation or bougienage dilation. The main groups are those with postcorrosion stenosis, peptic stenosis due to untreated gastroesophageal reflux disease with different prescription as well as post-surgical and post-radiation stenosis. Self-expanding stents made by monofilament polymer of polydioxanone, whose integrity and radial force remain 6-8 weeks depending on the gastric pH are used. Stents are applied in hard guide placed in the stenosis through the working channel of gastroscopy, and they are released under X-ray control. Putting is preceded by balloon dilatation due to the large diameter of the mounted stent. During the manipulations, several difficulties are encountered, which are missing in self-expanding metal stents. Discussion: Short-term results are satisfactory - Dysphagia in the patients is overcome and they recover their normal diet. The patients reported no pain. The control inspection of the 1st month showed partial degradation of the stents. On 3rd month it is set the complete degradation. Term follow-up shows resumption of dysphagia. Conclusion: Good short-term results make the use of self-degradable stents possible alternative for the treatment of the esophagus refractory stenosis. Long-term results are contradictory, still missing long enough randomized studies on this topic

  2. Investigations in the functional scintiscanning of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herholz, K.

    1981-01-01

    For a dynamic, scintigraphic investigation of the esophagus the radio-esopagogram (REG) according to Kazem (1971) is modified: the passage of a pudding bolus labelled with 0.5 to 1 mCi sup(99m)technetium through the esophagus is observed in patients who are sitting. The results are evaluated by means of a summation picture and time/activity diagrams over 3 regions. For each region, the time of passage and retention quotient are established. From investigations on 7 persons without esophageal affections normal values were determined; in all, 31 patients were examined by this technique. As a variation, 16 investigations were carried through with an equally labelled mouthful of water and the results compared with those of the pudding bolus REG. In different stenosing and more functional affections the pudding bolus REG regularly showed pathological results. The alterations seen in the REGs after swallowing labelled water were mostly less distinct; false negative findings did occur. Investigations on patients who were lying showed no prolonged passage time but did show increased retention quotients. When using other test meals, complete retentions were frequently observed. In 26 cases transport velocities could be established. They are in good correspondence with those reported in the literature on the basis of physiological investigations. In 10 patients suffering from reflux esophagitis the REG was combined with reflux scintiscanning using controlled abdominal compression. While passage disturbances of a functional nature could mostly be confirmed, reflux was successfully demonstrated only in 4 cases. All considered, the pudding bolus REG proved to be a sensitive investigation procedure permitting a differentiated quantitative assessment of esophageal passage disturbances. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Contributions to the Study of the Esophagus and Stomach Morphology in Guinea Pig

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    Carmen Berghes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study is to illuminate some data on gastric esophageal junction morphology in Guinea Pig brings explanations on mice unable to vomit. There are few literature data on the conformation and structure of the laboratory mouse esophagus and stomach. They try to explain why the mouse can not vomit. Deviating slightly to the left only in the cervical region the esophagus runs mainly in the cervical region the esophagus runs mainly mid sagittally along the dorsal aspect of the trachea. Its length is about 30 mm (3, 4. Through out its length the diameter is about 2 mm. Through out its length the diameter is about 2 mm. The epithelium of the esophagus is moderately to extensively cornfield. The submucosa is free of gland. Both layers of the muscular coat are made buddle of skeletal muscle. The esophagus enters the middle of the lesser curvature. The esophageal sphincter is a circular muscle that surrounds the base of the esophagus. At its lower edge, it has muscle fibers that insert into the limiting ridge. So when the sphincter contracts, it not only constricts the walls of the esophagus, it also pulls the sides of the limiting ridge's "U" together, thus hiding and tightly closing the esophageal opening. Muscle layer is formed on the entire length of skeletal muscle fiber.

  4. Longitudinal muscle of the esophagus: its role in esophageal health and disease.

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    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2013-07-01

    The muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. The function of the longitudinal muscle and its role in bolus propulsion are not clear. The goal of this review is to summarize what is known of the role of the longitudinal muscle in health, as well as in sensory and motor disorders of the esophagus. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging reveal that, during peristalsis, the two muscle layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the contrary, during transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation, longitudinal muscle contracts independent of the circular muscle. Recent studies have provided novel insights into the role of the longitudinal muscle in LES relaxation and descending relaxation of the esophagus. In certain diseases (e.g. some motility disorders of the esophagus), there is discoordination between the two muscle layers, which likely plays an important role in the genesis of dysphagia and delayed esophageal emptying. There is close temporal correlation between prolonged contractions of the longitudinal muscles of the esophagus and esophageal 'angina-like' pain. Novel techniques to record longitudinal muscle contraction are reviewed. Longitudinal muscles of the esophagus play a key role in the physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Neuro-pharmacologic controls of circular and longitudinal muscle are different, which provides an opportunity for the development of novel pharmacological therapies in the treatment of esophageal sensory and motor disorders.

  5. Potential of non-invasive esophagus cancer detection based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaohua; Wang, Lan; Chen, Weisheng; Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Juqiang; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Li, Buhong; Chen, Rong

    2014-11-01

    Non-invasive esophagus cancer detection based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis was presented. Urine SERS spectra were measured on esophagus cancer patients (n = 56) and healthy volunteers (n = 36) for control analysis. Tentative assignments of the urine SERS spectra indicated some interesting esophagus cancer-specific biomolecular changes, including a decrease in the relative content of urea and an increase in the percentage of uric acid in the urine of esophagus cancer patients compared to that of healthy subjects. Principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was employed to analyze and differentiate the SERS spectra between normal and esophagus cancer urine. The diagnostic algorithms utilizing a multivariate analysis method achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 89.3% and specificity of 83.3% for separating esophagus cancer samples from normal urine samples. These results from the explorative work suggested that silver nano particle-based urine SERS analysis coupled with PCA-LDA multivariate analysis has potential for non-invasive detection of esophagus cancer.

  6. Potential of non-invasive esophagus cancer detection based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shaohua; Wang, Lan; Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Juqiang; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Li, Buhong; Chen, Rong; Chen, Weisheng

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive esophagus cancer detection based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis was presented. Urine SERS spectra were measured on esophagus cancer patients (n = 56) and healthy volunteers (n = 36) for control analysis. Tentative assignments of the urine SERS spectra indicated some interesting esophagus cancer-specific biomolecular changes, including a decrease in the relative content of urea and an increase in the percentage of uric acid in the urine of esophagus cancer patients compared to that of healthy subjects. Principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was employed to analyze and differentiate the SERS spectra between normal and esophagus cancer urine. The diagnostic algorithms utilizing a multivariate analysis method achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 89.3% and specificity of 83.3% for separating esophagus cancer samples from normal urine samples. These results from the explorative work suggested that silver nano particle-based urine SERS analysis coupled with PCA–LDA multivariate analysis has potential for non-invasive detection of esophagus cancer. (letter)

  7. The interpersonal relationship in clinical practice. The Barrett-Lennard Relationship Inventory as an assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, J; Roberge, L; Kendrick, S B; Richards, B

    1995-03-01

    The biomedical model that has long been central to medical practice is gradually being expanded to a broader biopsychosocial model. Relationship-building skills commensurate with the new paradigm need to be understood by educators and taught to medical practitioners. The person-centered, or humanistic, model of psychologist Carl Rogers provides a theoretical approach for the development of effective biopsychosocial relationships. The Barrett-Lennard Relationship Inventory (BLRI) was developed in 1962 as an assessment instrument for the person-centered model. In this article, the person-centered model and the use of the BLRI as an assessment instrument of this model are discussed. Current and potential uses of the BLRI are explored.

  8. Endoscopic Tri-Modal Imaging (ETMI With Optical Magnification in the Detection of Barrett's Early Neoplasia

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    Sarmed S. Sami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early lesion detection and characterisation is vital to ensure accurate management in patients with gastrointestinal neoplasia. Endoscopic Tri-modal Imaging (ETMI technology has been shown to improve the targeted detection of early dysplastic lesions in Barrett's Oesophagus, but these results were not confirmed in non-expert hands [1]. This technology incorporates high resolution while light endoscopy (HRE, Auto Fluorescence Imaging (AFI and Narrow Band Imaging (NBI in one endoscope. The mucosa is first inspected with HRE, and then AFI is switched on to help in highlighting any suspicious areas in the mucosa [2]. These areas can be further examined by switching to NBI mode with magnification which helps to characterise mucosal patterns and identify early neoplasia [3].

  9. Observation of normal appearance and wall thickness of esophagus on CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Fan; Mao Jingfang; Ding Jinquan; Yang Huanjun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought to observe the appearance of normal esophagus, measure and record the thickness of esophageal wall in order to offer reference for estimating esophageal wall abnormalities and delineating gross tumor target of esophageal carcinomas on CT images. Materials and methods: From September 2006 to February 2007, 110 consecutive CT films from adult patients without esophageal diseases were collected and studied. On CT images the entire esophagus was divided into cervical, thoracic, retrocardiac and intraabdominal segments. The appearance of esophagus was described when the esophagus contracted or dilated. Thickness of esophageal wall and diameters of esophageal cavities were measured by hard-copy reading with a magnifying glass. Age, sex and the thickness of subcutaneous fat of each patient were recorded. Results: It was observed that the esophagus presented both contracted and dilated status on CT images. In each segment there were certain portions of esophagus in complete contraction or dilatation. 47 images (42.7%) showed contracted esophagus in each segment available for measurement. The largest wall thickness when esophagus was in contraction and dilatation was 4.70 (95%CI: 4.44-4.95) mm and 2.11 (95%CI: 2.00-2.23) mm, respectively. When contracting, the intraabdominal esophagus was thicker than the cervical, thoracic and retrocardiac parts, and the average thickness was 5.68 (95%CI: 5.28-6.09) mm, 4.67 (95%CI: 4.36-4.86) mm, 4.56 (95%CI: 4.31-4.87) mm, and 4.05 (95%CI: 3.71-4.21) mm, respectively. When the esophagus was dilating, the average esophageal wall thickness was between 1.87 and 2.70 mm. The thickest part was cervical esophagus. Thickness of esophageal wall was larger in males than that of females (5.26 mm vs. 4.34 mm p < 0.001). Age and the thickness of subcutaneous fat had no significant impact on the thickness of esophageal wall (p-value was 0.056 and 0.173, respectively). Conclusion: The Observation of normal appearance and

  10. Obstruction of the esophagus 5 months after radiotherapy for a central lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zips, D.; Baumann, M.; Herrmann, T.

    2001-01-01

    Dysphagia after radiotherapy of thoracic tumors may be caused by recurrences or by radiation damage to the esophagus. Case Report: A 75-year-old patient presented with a complete obstruction of the esophagus 5 months after CHARTWEL radiotherapy for a non-small cell lung cancer. During the last week of radiotherapy mild dysphagia (Grade 1 EORTC/RTOG, Grade 2 MRC-CHART-Score) occurred that persisted over the following months. X-ray and endoscopic investigations revealed an easily removable food bolus without evidence of esophageal stricture or ulceration. Conclusion: The case report describes a mild but prolonged early radiation reaction of the esophagus. In comparison with conventional fractionation the incidence of dysphagia is higher after accelerated fractionation schedules. The pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying persistent dysphagia are currently unknown. Beside of recurrences, radiation effects to the esophagus should be considered if dysphagia after irradiation of thoracic tumors occurs, because, as in this case, therapy may rapidly improve the symptoms. (orig.) [de

  11. Large-Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Esophagus: A Case from Saudi Arabia

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    Hadi Kuriry

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine carcinomas of the esophagus are very rare, and the majority are high grade (poorly differentiated. They occur most frequently in males in their sixth and seventh decades of life. There have been no concrete data published on clinical features or on prognosis. We report a case of large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the esophagus in a 66-year-old Saudi female with progressive dysphagia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy revealed an esophageal ulcerated mass.

  12. Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation therapy for the prevention of esophageal cancer in Barrett’s esophagus

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    Ha NH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ngoc Hoang Ha, Richard Hummel, David I WatsonDepartment of Surgery, Flinders University, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Barrett’s esophagus is the only known precursor lesion for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Previous studies have shown that a variety of methods can be applied to destroy Barrett’s esophagus epithelium, and healing with a new esophageal squamous epithelium usually occurs following ablation. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA is a relatively new endoscopic technique. It has been claimed that ablation using RFA reduces the risk of cancer progression. RFA is usually easy to apply and is associated with a low risk of morbidity. It achieves complete eradication of (non dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus in most individuals, and the risk of progression to higher grades of dysplasia or cancer is reduced after RFA, although not completely eliminated. Limitations include recurrence of Barrett’s esophagus in up to one-third of individuals, a risk of “buried islands” of Barrett’s esophagus remaining below the regenerated mucosa, and uncertainty about the biological behavior of the new squamous epithelium after RFA. Current evidence supports the use of RFA in individuals with high-grade dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus, and early stage (T1a intramucosal cancer, and select individuals with low-grade dysplasia. As accurate diagnosis of low-grade dysplasia remains difficult outside expert centers, it is probably premature to recommend routine RFA for all patients diagnosed with low-grade dysplasia in the community, despite the favorable outcomes from one randomized trial. Furthermore, long-term outcomes following ablation remain uncertain, and ongoing endoscopy surveillance is still required after RFA as progression to cancer remains a possibility. Outcomes from large studies with long-term follow-up are needed to definitively confirm that RFA ablation can reliably prevent cancer

  13. High dose rate brachytherapy for superficial cancer of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, Philippe; D'Hombres, Anne; Truc, Gilles; Barillot, Isabelle; Michiels, Christophe; Bedenne, Laurent; Horiot, Jean Claude

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed our experience with external radiotherapy, combined modality treatment, or HDR brachytherapy alone to limited esophageal cancers. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 1996, 25 patients with limited superficial esophagus carcinomas were treated by high dose rate brachytherapy. The mean age was 63 years (43-86 years). Five patients showed superficial local recurrence after external radiotherapy. Eleven patients without invasion of the basal membrane were staged as Tis. Fourteen patients with tumors involving the submucosa without spreading to the muscle were staged as T1. Treatment consisted of HDR brachytherapy alone in 13 patients, external radiotherapy and brachytherapy in 8 cases, and concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy in 4 cases. External beam radiation was administered to a total dose of 50 Gy using 2 Gy daily fractions in 5 weeks. In cases of HDR brachytherapy alone (13 patients), 6 applications were performed once a week. Results: The mean follow-up is 31 months (range 24-96 months). Twelve patients received 2 applications and 13 patients received 6 applications. Twelve patients experienced a failure (48%), 11/12 located in the esophagus, all of them in the treated volume. One patient presented an isolated distant metastasis. In the patients treated for superficial recurrence, 4/5 were locally controlled (80%) by brachytherapy alone. After brachytherapy alone, 8/13 patients were controlled (61%). The mean disease-free survival is 14 months (1-36 months). Overall survival is 76% at 1 year, 37% at 2 years, and 14% at 3 years. Overall survival for Tis patients is 24% vs. 20% for T1 (p 0.83). Overall survival for patients treated by HDR brachytherapy alone is 43%. One patient presented with a fistula with local failure after external radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Four stenosis were registered, two were diagnosed on barium swallowing without symptoms, and two required dilatations. Conclusion: High dose rate brachytherapy permits the treating

  14. Power, trust, and Science of Unitary Human Beings influence political leadership: a celebration of Barrett's power theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Barbara W

    2010-01-01

    The importance of nurses' participation in health policy leadership is discussed within the context of Rogers' science of unitary human beings, Barrett's power theory, and one nurse-politician's experience. Nurses have a major role to play in resolving public policy issues that influence the health of people. A brief review of the history of nurses in the political arena is presented. Research related to power and trust is reviewed. Suggested strategies for success in political situations are offered.

  15. Three-dimensional photoacoustic endoscopic imaging of the rabbit esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Joon Mo; Favazza, Christopher; Yao, Junjie; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-01-01

    We report photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopic images of two intact rabbit esophagi. To investigate the esophageal lumen structure and microvasculature, we performed in vivo and ex vivo imaging studies using a 3.8-mm diameter photoacoustic endoscope and correlated the images with histology. Several interesting anatomic structures were newly found in both the in vivo and ex vivo images, which demonstrates the potential clinical utility of this endoscopic imaging modality. In the ex vivo imaging experiment, we acquired high-resolution motion-artifact-free three-dimensional photoacoustic images of the vasculatures distributed in the walls of the esophagi and extending to the neighboring mediastinal regions. Blood vessels with apparent diameters as small as 190 μm were resolved. Moreover, by taking advantage of the dual-mode high-resolution photoacoustic and ultrasound endoscopy, we could better identify and characterize the anatomic structures of the esophageal lumen, such as the mucosal and submucosal layers in the esophageal wall, and an esophageal branch of the thoracic aorta. In this paper, we present the first photoacoustic images showing the vasculature of a vertebrate esophagus and discuss the potential clinical applications and future development of photoacoustic endoscopy.

  16. Three-dimensional photoacoustic endoscopic imaging of the rabbit esophagus.

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    Joon Mo Yang

    Full Text Available We report photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopic images of two intact rabbit esophagi. To investigate the esophageal lumen structure and microvasculature, we performed in vivo and ex vivo imaging studies using a 3.8-mm diameter photoacoustic endoscope and correlated the images with histology. Several interesting anatomic structures were newly found in both the in vivo and ex vivo images, which demonstrates the potential clinical utility of this endoscopic imaging modality. In the ex vivo imaging experiment, we acquired high-resolution motion-artifact-free three-dimensional photoacoustic images of the vasculatures distributed in the walls of the esophagi and extending to the neighboring mediastinal regions. Blood vessels with apparent diameters as small as 190 μm were resolved. Moreover, by taking advantage of the dual-mode high-resolution photoacoustic and ultrasound endoscopy, we could better identify and characterize the anatomic structures of the esophageal lumen, such as the mucosal and submucosal layers in the esophageal wall, and an esophageal branch of the thoracic aorta. In this paper, we present the first photoacoustic images showing the vasculature of a vertebrate esophagus and discuss the potential clinical applications and future development of photoacoustic endoscopy.

  17. Predictive analysis of photodynamic therapy applied to esophagus cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; del Campo-Gutiérrez, M.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2008-04-01

    The use of optical techniques in medicine has revolutionized in many cases the medical praxis, providing new tools for practitioners or improving the existing ones in the fight against diseases. The application of this technology comprises mainly two branches, characterization and treatment of biological tissues. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) provides a solution for malignant tissue destruction, by means of the inoculation of a photosensitizer and irradiation by an optical source. The key factor of the procedure is the localization of the damage to avoid collateral harmful effects. The volume of tissue destroyed depends on the type of photosensitizer inoculated, both on its reactive characteristics and its distribution inside the tissue, and also on the specific properties of the optical source, that is, the optical power, wavelength and exposition time. In this work, a model for PDT based on the one-dimensional diffusion equation, extensible to 3D, to estimate the optical distribution in tissue, and on photosensitizer parameters to take into account the photobleaching effect is proposed. The application to esophagus cancer allows the selection of the right optical source parameters, like irradiance, wavelength or exposition time, in order to predict the area of tissue destruction.

  18. Ultrasonographic characteristics of the abdominal esophagus and cardia in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gory, Guillaume; Rault, Delphine N; Gatel, Laure; Dally, Claire; Belli, Patrick; Couturier, Laurent; Cauvin, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Differential diagnoses for regurgitation and vomiting in dogs include diseases of the gastroesophageal junction. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to describe ultrasonographic characteristics of the abdominal esophagus and gastric cardia in normal dogs and dogs with clinical disease involving this region. A total of 126 dogs with no clinical signs of gastrointestinal disease and six dogs with clinical diseases involving the gastroesophageal junction were included. For seven euthanized dogs, ultrasonographic features were also compared with gross pathology and histopathology. Cardial and abdominal esophageal wall thicknesses were measured ultrasonographically for all normal dogs and effects of weight, sex, age, and stomach filling were tested. Five layers could be identified in normal esophageal and cardial walls. The inner esophageal layer was echogenic, corresponding to the cornified mucosa and glandular portion of the submucosa. The cardia was characterized by a thick muscularis, and a transitional zone between echogenic esophageal and hypoechoic gastric mucosal layers. Mean (±SD) cardial wall thicknesses for normal dogs were 7.6 mm (±1.6), 9.7 mm (±1.8), 10.8 mm (±1.6), 13.3 mm (±2.5) for dogs in the dog weight group. Ultrasonography assisted diagnosis in all six clinically affected dogs. Findings supported the use of transabdominal ultrasonography as a diagnostic test for dogs with suspected gastroesophageal disease. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  19. Swallowing performance after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Rourke, I.C.; Tiver, K.; Bull, C.; Gebski, V.; Langlands, A.O.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study reported in this article was to tabulate the incidence and etiologic factors of importance in the development of strictures after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the esophagus and to analyze the outcome of patients who develop such strictures. Eighty patients were treated with radiotherapy, 50 having radical and 30 having palliative treatment. Sixty-nine patients had squamous cell carcinoma, four had adenocarcinoma, one had sarcoma, one had mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and five had undifferentiated tumors. Forty percent developed no stricture, 30% had benign fibrotic stricture, and 28% developed malignant stricture. The etiologic factors analysed included age, pretreatment swallowing score, histology and length (size) of tumor; stage of disease, dose of radiotherapy, and use of chemotherapy. None of these factors were shown to be of etiologic importance. The survival of patients who developed benign strictures was found to be significantly longer (1-year survival 88%) than those who developed no stricture (50%) or malignant stricture (19%). Using a success score for palliation of dysphagia, it was found that the majority of patients (71%) who developed a benign stricture had a moderately successful outcome--they were able to tolerate a full or soft diet and required dilatation with a median duration between dilatations of 5 months. Patients who developed a malignant stricture were palliated poorly by dilatation alone, and most required esophageal intubation

  20. A unique tripartite collision tumor of the esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schizas, Dimitrios; Michalinos, Adamantios; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Moris, Demetrios; Baliou, Evangelia; Tsilimigras, Diamantis; Throupis, Theodore; Liakakos, Theodore

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: We report a unique case of a tripartite esophageal collision tumor consisting of three separate histologic types. Patients concerns: Therapeutic dilemmas on the proper treatment of those rare neoplasms remain unanswered considering both proper surgical therapy and adjuvant therapy. Diagnose: In this paper, we report a unique case of a patient with a tripartite esophageal collision tumor consisting of a small cell carcinoma, an adenocarcinoma of medium differentiation and a signet ring cell carcinoma. Diagnosis is difficult as clinical presentation of the patient was undistinguishable from other, commoner tumor types. Interventions: The patient's diagnostic and therapeutic course along with available data on the collisions tumor's biological behavior and treatment are briefly discussed. Outcomes: Esophagectomy is the best treatment options for these patients. Unique nature of this tumor demands aggresive oncologic treatment. Lessons: Collision tumors are rare neoplasms consisting of distinct cell populations developing in juxtaposition to one another without any areas of intermingling. Various cell types can be found. However, collision neoplasms of the esophagus combining adenomatous and neuroendocrine components are exceedingly rare, with only 5 cases described to date in the literature. Given their rarity, limited information is available on their tumorigenesis, biological behavior and clinical course. In general, these tumors are aggressive neoplasms and significantly affect patient treatment and prognosis. PMID:29245236

  1. Cromoendoscopia com azul de metileno para diagnóstico de esôfago de Barrett

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    Saporiti Marcela Rocha Loures

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: O esôfago de Barrett é uma condição na qual a mucosa escamosa esofágica é substituída por metaplasia intestinal especializada, que predispõe o paciente ao desenvolvimento de adenocarcinoma esofágico. Este é precedido por displasia e carcinoma precoce; o rastreamento dessas lesões faz-se através de endoscopias digestivas periódicas com biopsias randomizadas. A incidência aumentada desse, tem despertado interesse no desenvolvimento de novas técnicas endoscópicas, como a cromoendoscopia com azul de metileno, para melhorar a identificação do esôfago de Barrett e suas complicações. OBJETIVO: Determinar se as biopsias dirigidas pela cromoendoscopia com azul de metileno oferecem vantagem em relação ao método convencional na detecção do esôfago de Barrett. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudaram-se 45 pacientes com diagnóstico prévio de esôfago de Barrett, todos submetidos a dois exames de endoscopia digestiva alta com biopsias, em intervalo de 4 semanas, um convencional e outro com aplicação do corante, no período entre abril e outubro de 2002. RESULTADOS: Os resultados histológicos das biopsias de todos os exames foram comparados. Observou-se sensibilidade de 62,5%, especificidade de 15,4%, valor preditivo positivo de 57,7% e valor preditivo negativo de 18,2%. Não houve diferença significativa quanto ao número de biopsias. O tempo de duração da técnica de cromoendoscopia foi significativamente maior quando comparado ao da técnica convencional. CONCLUSÃO: Não se observou vantagem na utilização da cromoendoscopia em relação à técnica randomizada no diagnóstico do esôfago de Barrett.

  2. Alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of erosive esophagitis and Barrett's epithelium in Japanese men

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    Goto Ayumu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence regarding the association between alcohol consumption and the gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD spectrum has been conflicting. We examined the association between alcohol consumption and erosive esophagitis and Barrett's epithelium in Japanese men. Methods The study population comprised 463 men subjects who had undergone an upper endoscopy at the Gastroenterology Division of Yokohama City University Hospital between August 2005 and July 2006. The presence of erosive esophagitis and Barrett's epithelium was diagnosed based on the Los Angeles Classification and the Prague C and M Criteria, respectively. We divided the study population into four groups: never drinkers, light drinkers (less than 25.0 g of ethanol per day, moderate drinkers (25.0 to 50.0 g of ethanol per day, and heavy drinkers (more than 50.0 g of ethanol per day. A linear regression of the logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the dose-response trends. Results Compared with never drinkers, light drinkers (less than 25.0 g ethanol per day, moderate drinkers (25.0 to 50.0 g per day, and heavy drinkers (more than 50.0 g per day had ORs for erosive esophagitis of 1.110 (95% CI: 0.553 – 2.228, p = 0.7688, 1.880 (95% CI: 1.015 – 3.484, p = 0.0445 and 1.988 (95% CI: 1.120 – 3.534, p = 0.0190, respectively. These groups had ORs for Barrett's epithelium of 1.278 (95% CI: 0.752 – 2.170, p = 0.3643, 1.458 (95% CI: 0.873 – 2.433, p = 0.1500, and 1.912 (95% CI: 1.185 – 3.086, p = 0.0079, respectively. The odds ratios/grams (alcohol/day of dose response trends for erosive esophagitis and Barrett's epithelium were 1.015 (95% CI: 1.004–1.026, p = 0.0066 and 1.012 (95% CI: 1.003–1.021, p = 0.0079, respectively. Conclusion These findings suggest that alcohol consumption in Japanese men tends to be associated with an increased risk of erosive esophagitis and Barrett's epithelium.

  3. Manejo del esófago de Barrett: del tamizaje a los nuevos tratamientos

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    V. Thoguluva Chandrasekar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available El esófago de Barrett es un trastorno premaligno del esófago en el cual el epitelio escamoso de la porción distal del esófago es reemplazado por epitelio columnar. Debido a que la incidencia de adenocarcinoma esofágico se encuentra al alza, la mayoría de las sociedades de Gastroenterología han emitido sus propias recomendaciones para el tamizaje y la vigilancia. Factores específicos como la obesidad, la raza blanca, la edad por encima de los 50 años, el inicio del ERGE a edad temprana, el tabaquismo y la hernia hiatal han sido identificados como factores que incrementan el riesgo de esófago de Barrett y adenocarcinoma. El diagnóstico requiere tanto de la identificación endoscópica de mucosa con revestimiento columnar como de la confirmación histológica con biopsia. La mayoría de las sociedades médicas recomiendan tamizar a todas las personas con ERGE, así como aquellos con otros factores de riesgo con endoscopia; sin embargo, otras alternativas que utilizan métodos menos invasivos se encuentran bajo estudio en la actualidad. Las estrategias de vigilancia varían dependiendo de los hallazgos endoscópicos y se recomienda el protocolo de biopsias de Seattle con un muestreo de 4 cuadrantes aleatorizado. Algunos biomarcadores han mostrado resultados prometedores, aunque se requieren de más estudios en el futuro. La endoscopia de luz blanca es el estándar en la práctica, sin embargo, otras modalidades de imagen más avanzadas han mostrado resultados variables y, por lo tanto, se esperan más estudios para obtener validación adicional. Las técnicas de erradicación endoscópica, incluyendo tanto la resección como la ablación, han mostrado buenos resultados, aunque variables, en el tratamiento de lesiones displásicas confinadas a la mucosa. Los procedimientos de resección para remover las lesiones visibles seguida por la ablación de la mucosa displásica han mostrado los mejores resultados, con tasas de erradicación m

  4. SU-F-T-115: Uncertainty in the Esophagus Dose in Retrospective Epidemiological Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, E; Kim, S; Lee, C [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C; Jung, J [Department of Physics, East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States); Jones, E [Radiology and Imaging Sciences Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in breast cancer radiotherapy patients often use generic patient anatomy to reconstruct normal tissue doses when CT images of patients are not available. To evaluate the uncertainty involved in the dosimetry approach, we evaluated the esophagus dose in five sample patients by simulating breast cancer treatments. Methods: We obtained the diagnostic CT images of five anonymized adult female patients in different Body Mass Index (BMI) categories (16– 36kg/m2) from National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. We contoured the esophagus on the CT images and imported them into a Treatment Planning System (TPS) to create treatment plans and calculate esophagus doses. Esophagus dose was calculated once again via experimentally-validated Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, XVMC under the same geometries. We compared the esophagus doses from TPS and the MC method. We also investigated the degree of variation in the esophagus dose across the five patients and also the relationship between the patient characteristics and the esophagus doses. Results: Eclipse TPS using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) significantly underestimates the esophagus dose in breast cancer radiotherapy compared to MC. In the worst case, the esophagus dose from AAA was only 40% of the MC dose. The Coefficient of Variation across the patients was 48%. We found that the maximum esophagus dose was up to 2.7 times greater than the minimum. We finally observed linear relationship (Dose = 0.0218 × BMI – 0.1, R2=0.54) between patient’s BMI and the esophagus doses. Conclusion: We quantified the degree of uncertainty in the esophagus dose in five sample breast radiotherapy patients. The results of the study underscore the importance of individualized dose reconstruction for the study cohort to avoid misclassification in the risk analysis of second cancer. We are currently extending the number of patients up to 30.

  5. SU-F-T-115: Uncertainty in the Esophagus Dose in Retrospective Epidemiological Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, E; Kim, S; Lee, C; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Jones, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in breast cancer radiotherapy patients often use generic patient anatomy to reconstruct normal tissue doses when CT images of patients are not available. To evaluate the uncertainty involved in the dosimetry approach, we evaluated the esophagus dose in five sample patients by simulating breast cancer treatments. Methods: We obtained the diagnostic CT images of five anonymized adult female patients in different Body Mass Index (BMI) categories (16– 36kg/m2) from National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. We contoured the esophagus on the CT images and imported them into a Treatment Planning System (TPS) to create treatment plans and calculate esophagus doses. Esophagus dose was calculated once again via experimentally-validated Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, XVMC under the same geometries. We compared the esophagus doses from TPS and the MC method. We also investigated the degree of variation in the esophagus dose across the five patients and also the relationship between the patient characteristics and the esophagus doses. Results: Eclipse TPS using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) significantly underestimates the esophagus dose in breast cancer radiotherapy compared to MC. In the worst case, the esophagus dose from AAA was only 40% of the MC dose. The Coefficient of Variation across the patients was 48%. We found that the maximum esophagus dose was up to 2.7 times greater than the minimum. We finally observed linear relationship (Dose = 0.0218 × BMI – 0.1, R2=0.54) between patient’s BMI and the esophagus doses. Conclusion: We quantified the degree of uncertainty in the esophagus dose in five sample breast radiotherapy patients. The results of the study underscore the importance of individualized dose reconstruction for the study cohort to avoid misclassification in the risk analysis of second cancer. We are currently extending the number of patients up to 30.

  6. Neuromedin B receptor in esophagus: evidence for subtypes of bombesin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Schrenck, T.; Heinz-Erian, P.; Moran, T.; Mantey, S.A.; Gardner, J.D.; Jensen, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    To identify receptors for bombesin-related peptides in the rat esophagus, we measured binding of 125I-Bolton-Hunter neuromedin B (125I-BH-neuromedin B) and 125I-[Tyr4]bombesin to tissue sections from the rat esophagus and compared the results with those for rat pancreas. Esophagus bound both tracers, whereas pancreas bound only 125I-[Tyr4]bombesin. In each tissue binding was saturable, dependent on pH, on time, and on temperature, reversible, and specific. Autoradiography demonstrated binding of both tracers only to the muscularis mucosae of the esophagus and binding of 125I-[Tyr4]bombesin diffusely over pancreatic acini. In the esophagus, the relative potencies for inhibition of binding of both tracers were as follows: neuromedin B greater than bombesin greater than GRP = neuromedin C; similar relative potencies were found for causing contraction of muscle strips from whole esophagus and from the isolated muscularis mucosae. In pancreas tissue sections and dispersed acini, the relative potencies for inhibition of binding of 125I-[Tyr4]bombesin were as follows: bombesin greater than GRP = neuromedin C much greater than neuromedin B. Similar relative potencies were found for stimulation of enzyme secretion from dispersed pancreatic acini. Computer analysis in both tissues demonstrated only a single binding site. The present study demonstrates that rat esophagus muscle possesses specific receptors for bombesin-related peptides. Furthermore, this study shows that the esophageal bombesin receptors represent a previously unidentified class of bombesin receptors in that they have a higher affinity for neuromedin B than for bombesin. In contrast, the pancreatic bombesin receptors have, like all other bombesin receptors described to date, a high affinity for bombesin, but low affinity for neuromedin B

  7. Improvement over time in outcomes for patients undergoing endoscopic therapy for Barrett's oesophagus-related neoplasia: 6-year experience from the first 500 patients treated in the UK patient registry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haidry, R J

    2015-08-01

    Barrett\\'s oesophagus (BE) is a pre-malignant condition leading to oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). Treatment of neoplasia at an early stage is desirable. Combined endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) followed by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an alternative to surgery for patients with BE-related neoplasia.

  8. Epigenetic regulation on the gene expression signature in esophagus adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Ting; Zhang, Guizhi

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms represents an important step in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic measures of esophagus adenocarcinoma (NOS). The objective of this study is to identify the epigenetic regulation on gene expression in NOS, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms of NOS. In this study, 78 patients with NOS were included and the data of mRNA, miRNA and DNA methylation of were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Differential analysis between NOS and controls was performed in terms of gene expression, miRNA expression, and DNA methylation. Bioinformatic analysis was followed to explore the regulation mechanisms of miRNA and DNA methylationon gene expression. Totally, up to 1320 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 32 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified. 240 DEGs that were not only the target genes but also negatively correlated with the screened differentially expressed miRNAs. 101 DEGs were found to be highlymethylated in CpG islands. Then, 8 differentially methylated genes (DMGs) were selected, which showed down-regulated expression in NOS. Among of these genes, 6 genes including ADHFE1, DPP6, GRIA4, CNKSR2, RPS6KA6 and ZNF135 were target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs (hsa-mir-335, hsa-mir-18a, hsa-mir-93, hsa-mir-106b and hsa-mir-21). The identified altered miRNA, genes and DNA methylation site may be applied as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of NOS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Hair Barrette Induced Cochlear Implant Receiver Stimulator Site Infection with Extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung N. Le

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cochlear implant infections and extrusion are uncommon but potentially devastating complications. Recent literature suggests conservative management can be employed. Local measures inclusive of aggressive surgical debridement with vascularized flaps and parenteral antibiotics represent a viable option and often permit device salvage. However, explantation should be considered if there is evidence of systemic, intracranial, or intractable infection. Method. A Case report and literature review. Case Report. This case illustrates a complicated local wound infection associated with cochlear implantation due to transcutaneous adherence of a ferrous hair barrette to a cochlear implant magnet. Reconstruction of computed tomography (CT data with 3D volume rendering significantly improved the value of the images and facilitated patient counseling as well as operative planning. Conclusion. Cochlear implant infections can be associated with foreign bodies. CT images are beneficial in the evaluation of cochlear implant complications. 3D CT images provide a comprehensive view of the site of interest, displaying the relationship of the hardware to the skull and soft tissues, while minimizing associated artifacts. Cochlear implant patients should consider use of nonmetallic hair devices.

  10. SU-F-J-128: Dosimetric Impact of Esophagus Motion in Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J; Wang, X; Zhao, Z; Yang, J; Zhang, Y; Court, L; Li, J; Brown, P; Ghia, A [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Acute esophageal toxicity is a common side effect in spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The respiratory motion may alter esophageal position from the planning scan resulting in excessive esophageal dose. Here we assessed the dosimetric impact resulting from the esophageal motion using 4DCT. Methods: Nine patients treated to their thoracic spines in one fraction of 24 Gy were identified for this study. The original plan on a free breathing CT was copied to each phase image of a 4DCT scan, recalculated, scaled, and accumulated to the free breathing CT using deformable image registration. A segment of esophagus was contoured in the vicinity of treatment target. Esophagus dose volume histogram (DVH) was generated for both the original planned dose and the accumulated 4D dose for comparison. In parallel, we performed a chained deformable registration of 4DCT phase images to estimate the motion magnitude of the esophagus in a breathing cycle. We examined the correlation between the motion magnitude and the dosimetric deviation. Results: The esophageal motion mostly exhibited in the superior-inferior direction. The cross-sectional motion was small. Esophagus motion at T1 vertebra level (0.7 mm) is much smaller than that at T11 vertebra level (6.5 mm). The difference of Dmax between the original and 4D dose distributions ranged from 9.1 cGy (esophagus motion: 5.6 mm) to 231.1 cGy (esophagus motion: 3.1 mm). The difference of D(5cc) ranged from 5 cGy (esophagus motion: 3.1 mm) to 85 cGy (esophagus motion: 3.3 mm). There was no correlation between the dosimetric deviation and the motion magnitude. The V(11.9Gy)<5cc constraint was met for each patient when examining the DVH calculated from the 4D dose. Conclusion: Respiratory motion did not result in substantial dose increase to esophagus in spine SBRT. 4DCT simulation may not be necessary with regards to esophageal dose assessment.

  11. Esophagus segmentation in CT via 3D fully convolutional neural network and random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter, Tobias; Adebahr, Sonja; Baltas, Dimos; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Desrosiers, Christian; Dolz, Jose

    2017-12-01

    Precise delineation of organs at risk is a crucial task in radiotherapy treatment planning for delivering high doses to the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. In recent years, automated segmentation methods have shown an increasingly high performance for the delineation of various anatomical structures. However, this task remains challenging for organs like the esophagus, which have a versatile shape and poor contrast to neighboring tissues. For human experts, segmenting the esophagus from CT images is a time-consuming and error-prone process. To tackle these issues, we propose a random walker approach driven by a 3D fully convolutional neural network (CNN) to automatically segment the esophagus from CT images. First, a soft probability map is generated by the CNN. Then, an active contour model (ACM) is fitted to the CNN soft probability map to get a first estimation of the esophagus location. The outputs of the CNN and ACM are then used in conjunction with a probability model based on CT Hounsfield (HU) values to drive the random walker. Training and evaluation were done on 50 CTs from two different datasets, with clinically used peer-reviewed esophagus contours. Results were assessed regarding spatial overlap and shape similarity. The esophagus contours generated by the proposed algorithm showed a mean Dice coefficient of 0.76 ± 0.11, an average symmetric square distance of 1.36 ± 0.90 mm, and an average Hausdorff distance of 11.68 ± 6.80, compared to the reference contours. These results translate to a very good agreement with reference contours and an increase in accuracy compared to existing methods. Furthermore, when considering the results reported in the literature for the publicly available Synapse dataset, our method outperformed all existing approaches, which suggests that the proposed method represents the current state-of-the-art for automatic esophagus segmentation. We show that a CNN can yield accurate estimations of esophagus location, and that

  12. Sensory-motor responses to mechanical stimulation of the esophagus after sensitization with acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Asbjørn-Mohr; Reddy, Hariprasad; Staahl, Camilla; Pedersen, Jan; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gregersen, Hans

    2005-07-28

    Sensitization most likely plays an important role in chronic pain disorders, and such sensitization can be mimicked by experimental acid perfusion of the esophagus. The current study systematically investigated the sensory and motor responses of the esophagus to controlled mechanical stimuli before and after sensitization. Thirty healthy subjects were included. Distension of the distal esophagus with a balloon was performed before and after perfusion with 0.1 mol/L hydrochloric acid for 30 min. An impedance planimetry system was used to measure cross-sectional area, volume, pressure, and tension during the distensions. A new model allowed evaluation of the phasic contractions by the tension during contractions as a function of the initial muscle length before the contraction (comparable to the Frank-Starling law for the heart). Length-tension diagrams were used to evaluate the muscle tone before and after relaxation of the smooth muscle with butylscopolamine. The sensitization resulted in allodynia and hyperalgesia to the distension volumes, and the degree of sensitization was related to the infused volume of acid. Furthermore, a nearly 50% increase in the evoked referred pain was seen after sensitization. The mechanical analysis demonstrated hyper-reactivity of the esophagus following acid perfusion, with an increased number and force of the phasic contractions, but the muscle tone did not change. Acid perfusion of the esophagus sensitizes the sensory pathways and facilitates secondary contractions. The new model can be used to study abnormal sensory-motor mechanisms in visceral organs.

  13. Possible radiation induced cancer of the thoracic esophagus after postoperative irradiation for the breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Mamoru; Matsubara, Toshiki; Kasumi, Fujio; Nishi, Mitsumasa; Kajitani, Tamaki

    1991-01-01

    We report 11 patients with cancer of the thoracic esophagus developing after postoperative irradiation therapy for breast cancer. Irradiation was done immediately after mastectomy in these patients and the irradiation field included the unilateral or bilateral parasternal region. They received a total dose ranging from 35 Gy to 60 Gy and the dose received to the thoracic esophagus was estimated from 10 Gy to 48 Gy. All cancer sites were involved in the irradiation field. The latent intervals of 10 patients from radiation to the manifest of cancer ranged from 10 to 19 years. Among 4777 women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer between 1946 and 1980 in our hospital, 8 women (0.17%) developed cancer of the thoracic esophagus, whereas 5 (0.335%) out of 1534 women treated with mastectomy and radiotherapy with Linac between 1964 and 1980 developed cancer of the thoracic esophagus. Higher incidence of esophageal cancer in patients treated with surgery and radiation suggests that these cancers might be induced by radiation. Eight patients had esophagectomy and 4 patients of them received postoperative irradiation. They have survived from 9 months to 13 years. Two patients were controlled well by the irradiation alone. It is interesting that radiation therapy is sensitive to the possible radiation induced cancer of the thoracic esophagus. Follow up study should be directed to the possible development of second malignancy in patients who survive for a long time after radiation therapy. (author)

  14. Barrett’s Esophagus: Frequency and Prediction of Dysplasia and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma is continuing to increase at an alarming rate in the Western world today. Barrett’s esophagus is a clearly recognized risk factor for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma, but the overwhelming majority of patients with Barrett’s esophagus will never develop esophageal cancer. A number of endoscopic, histologic and epidemiologic risk factors identify Barrett’s esophagus patients at increased risk for progression to high-grade dysplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic factors include segment length, mucosal abnormalities as seemingly trivial as esophagitis and the 12 to 6 o’clock hemisphere of the esophagus. Both intestinal metaplasia and low grade dysplasia, the latter only if confirmed by a pathologist with expertise in Barrett’s esophagus pathologic interpretation are the histologic risk factors for progression. Epidemiologic risk factors include aging, male gender, obesity, and smoking. Factors that may protect against the development of adenocarcinoma include a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and the use of proton pump inhibitors, aspirin/NSAIDs and statins. PMID:25743461

  15. Evaluation of Microvascularity by CD34 Expression in Esophagus and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Fatemeh; Farhadi, Sareh; Sadri, Donia; Sedehi, Marzieh

    2015-06-01

    The present study was scheduled to evaluate microvascularity by CD34 expression in esophagus and oral squamous cell carcinoma. This study was scheduled using 40 paraffin blocked samples including 20 of oral SCC and 20 of esophagus ones and Immunohistochemical staining was conducted using CD34 monoclonal antibody. Exact fisher test was used to evaluate frequency of expression between two studied groups. There was significant correlation between age and tumor size with CD34 expression in oral SCC samples (p 0.05). Also, there was no significant correlation between age, sex, tumor size and tumor differentiation level (grading) with CD34 expression in esophagus SCC samples (p > 0.05). There was no significant difference of CD34 expression frequency in oral and esophagus SCC (p = 0/583). Finally, CD34 expression was reported 'high' for major cases of esophagus and oral SCCs. It seems, other angiogenetic or nonangiogenetic factors except CD34 may play more important role and explain the different clinical behavior of SCC at recent different locations. Other factors would be considered along with CD34 expression to interpret different clinical behavior of SCC at recent different locations.

  16. Minimally Invasive, Organ-preserving Surgery for Large Submucosal Tumors in the Abdominal Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanehira, Eiji; Tanida, Takashi; Kamei, Aya; Takahashi, Kodai

    2017-06-01

    Surgical resection of submucosal tumors (SMTs) in the abdominal esophagus is not standardized. Enucleation may be a minimally invasive option, whereas its oncological validity is not very clear. Moreover, how to treat the esophageal wall defect after enucleation and necessity of additional antireflux procedure are also undetermined. In 13 patients with a SMT originating the abdominal esophagus laparoscopic enucleation was performed with preserving the integrity of submucosa. When the muscular layer defect was esophagus was dissected posteriorly or the myotomy was not closed. Tumors were resected en-bloc without rupture in all cases. In 5 patients myotomy was closed, whereas in the remaining 8 it was left open. In 11 patients fundoplication was added (Toupet in 5 and Dor in 6). The patients developed neither regurgitation nor stenosis postoperatively. The histopathologic findings revealed leiomyoma in 9 patients, whereas the other 4 were miscellaneous. The average tumor size was 5.5 cm (range, 2.8 to 8.8). Microscopically surgical margin was negative in all cases. Laparoscopic enucleation of SMTs in the abdominal esophagus seems to be safe, reproducible operation enabling preservation of function of the lower esophagus and esophagogastric junction. Even when the muscular defect is not approximated additional fundoplication can minimize the risk of postoperative reflux disease.

  17. The simultaneous expression of both ephrin B3 receptor and E-cadherin in Barrett`s adenocarcinoma is associated with favorable clinical staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schauer Matthias C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In intestinal epithelium, tyrosine kinase receptor Ephrin B3 (Eph B3 maintains the architecture of the crypt-villus axis by repulsive interaction with its ligand ephrin-B1. While loss of Eph B3 is linked to colorectal cancer initiation, overexpression of Eph B3 in cancer cell lines inhibits growth and induces functional changes with decreased mesenchymal and increased epithelial markers. In order to study this tumor suppressor activity of Eph B3 in esophageal adenocarcinoma we analyzed the simultaneous expression of Eph B3 and E-cadherin in both the healthy esophagus and in Barrett’s carcinoma. Methods Simultaneous expression of Eph B3 and E-cadherin was investigated in samples from 141 patients with Barrett’s carcinoma and from 20 healthy esophagi using immunhistology and quantitative PCR. Results from healthy squamous epithelium, Barrett’s metaplasia and staging-specific esophageal adenocarcinoma were correlated. Results A significantly reduced E-cadherin mRNA expression could be detected in adenocarcinoma compared to dysplasia. The immunhistological activity of E-cadherin and Eph B3 was reduced in adenocarcinoma compared to dysplasia or healthy esophageal mucosa. The intracellular E-cadherin distribution changed significantly from the cytoplasm to the membrane, when the Eph receptor was simultaneously expressed. Simultaneous expression of E-cadherin and Eph B3 showed a significant inverse correlation to tumor stage. Conclusions We present novel evidence of the tumor suppressor activity of Eph B3 in esophageal adenocarcinoma possibly due to the impact on redistribution of cellular E-cadherin to the membrane. Our results suggest that this effect might play a role in the dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence, the infiltrative growth pattern and the development of lymph node metastases.

  18. Treating mediastinoesophageal fistula with covered stent through nasal esophagus drainage tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xinwei; Wu Gang; Li Yongdong; Ma Nan; Wang Yanli; Gao Xuemei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of treating mediastinoesophageal fistula with covered stent through nasal esophagus drainage tube. Methods: Ten patients with mediastinoesophageal fistula were treated by 5F catheter inserting into the abscess cavities through nasal esophageal fistula, with stent placement in the esophagus. The abscess cavities were washed and angiograghied through drainage tube and the sites of the drainage tube were adjusted in time until withdrawal of the tube. Results: The drainage tubes were pulled out within 10-25 days with disappearance of the abscess cavities and normal diet intake without difficulty. Conclusions: Treating mediastinoesophageal fistula with covered stent through nasal esophagus drainage tube is safe, microinvasive economic and acceptable, worth to be recommended. (authors)

  19. Scintigraphy of the esophagus in normal and in its tumorous involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkina, V.V.; Piperkova, E.N.; Okulov, L.V.

    1988-01-01

    Esophagoscintigraphy with labelled liquid and solid food (water solution of radioactive colloid and mixture of egg with radioactive colloid coagulated by heating) was performed in patients without a history of esophageal diseases permitting qualitative and quantitative characterization of normal motor-evacuatory function of the esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). In cancer of the esophagus its function failed with relation to a tumor site and was in direct proportion to a stage of tumor spreading. The method permitted the determination of the level of a pathological focus, a degree of esophageal permeability, quantification of a degree of esophageal disfunction, the improvement of functional diagnosis of the esophagus and LES, and the determination of motor disorders at the earliest stages of tumor development

  20. Interstitial cells of Cajal in the striated musculature of the mouse esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, A; Mignon, S

    2001-01-01

    . Sections and whole-mounts were studied by immunohistochemistry. KitW-lacZ transgenic mice, which carry the lacZ reporter gene inserted in place of the first exon of the Kit gene, were processed for Xgal histochemistry, for quantitative analysis and for ultrastructural studies. Spindle-shaped ICC were...... scarce in both muscle layers of the thoracic esophagus, while their number increased steeply toward the cardia in the striated portion of the intraabdominal esophagus. They did not form networks and had no relationship with intrinsic myenteric ganglia and motor end-plates. They were often close to nerve...... between striated muscle cells in the mouse esophagus. They are close to nerves with defined neurochemical coding and could possibly represent specialized esophageal spindle proprioceptors....

  1. Esophageal carcinoma treatment with self-expanding covered stent implanted in esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Mingguo; Ji Yan; He Nengwei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of the treatment to esophageal cancer by self- expanding covered stent implanted into esophagus. Methods: Under fluoroscopic guidance and with guidance wire , 20 self-expanding covered stents were implanted into stenotic part of esophagus to recanalize the esophagus, then follow up to observe the clinical symptom improved. Results: Technical success was obtained 20 cases without any complication. Clinical symptom were improved in shot time. Conclusions: self-expanding covered stent is implanted in stenotic part of esophageal carcinoma to treat esophageal stenosis and enable to improved clinical symptom in shot time, if combined with transcatheter arterial infusion and embolization, Radiotherapy, Chinese medical treatment, it enable to lengthen life time remarkably. (authors)

  2. Laparoscopic approach in the treatment of large leiomyoma of the lower third of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnickas, Vytautas; Beiša, Augustas; Makūnaitė, Gabija; Strupas, Kęstutis

    2017-12-01

    Leiomyoma of the lower third of the esophagus is a relatively rare disorder but the most common benign tumor of the esophagus. We present a case of an involuted esophageal leiomyoma, 11 cm in size, treated by the laparoscopic approach. The preoperative computed tomogram visualized a mass 3 × 1.5 cm in diameter in the lower esophagus without an eccentric lumen or compression of nearby organs. Resection of the tumor was indicated according to the patient's symptoms and to exclude malignancy. Laparoscopic enucleation of esophageal leiomyoma was performed. The overall operative time was 205 min. The diagnosis of leiomyoma was established on histopathology and immunohistochemistry staining. The patient resumed the intake of a normal diet on the 5 th postoperative day and was discharged from hospital 8 days after the surgery. We have found this minimally invasive operation to be an effective and well-tolerated treatment option, determined by the experience of the surgeon.

  3. Spindle-cell squamous carcinoma of the esophagus: a tumor with biphasic morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agha, F.P.; Keren, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    Spindle-cell squamous carcinoma of the esophagus is a rare malignant tumor. It is characterized by a large bulky mass in the middle third of the esophagus with a lobulated surface and local expansion of the esophagus. This lesion may be pedunculated and cause relatively little obstruction despite its bulk. The current view, based on ultrastructure and immunohistochemical evidence, has confirmed that the sarcomatous component of the squamous cell carcinoma originates from mesenchymal metaplasia of squamous cells. On the basis of this evidence and clinical behavior, it seems appropriate to consider carcinosarcoma and pseudosarcoma as equivalents and as variants of squamous cell carcinoma. Four patients with spindle-cell squamous carcinoma, an unusual subset of squamous carcinoma, are described, and the salient radiographic and pathologic features of this disorder's distinctive biphasic morphology are discussed

  4. Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery and Erlotinib Hydrochloride After Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cancer of the Esophagus or Gastroesophageal Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-17

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage II Esophageal Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer

  5. Complete thoracoscopic enucleation of giant leiomyoma of the esophagus: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, XiaoXing; Lee, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal leiomyoma is one of the most common types of benign esophagus tumors. Giant leiomyoma of the esophagus is traditionally treated by open thoracotomy, which has large incision. We report a case of complete thoracoscopic enucleation of giant leiomyoma in a chinese patient.

  6. Scientific attitude towards the interventional treatment of the lesions of esophagus and esophagogastric junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xinwei; Gao Xuemei

    2005-01-01

    The diseases of esophagus and stomach possess highest morbidity in China. For decades the interventional radiology has effectively solved a lot of clinical puzzles upon the lesions of esophagus and esophagogastric junction. Rapid development and extensive application often induce the exaggeration of indication and improper choice of the procedure, resulting in clinical disposal for various complications. Scientific attitude should be taken on the utilization of interventional method: possessing rich imaging and clinical knowledge; understanding the property of various interventional instruments; strictly grasping indications of arterial infusion chemotherapy, balloon catheter dilation and stent placement; perfectly mastering the operation technology; well controlling complications. (authors)

  7. Regeneration of Surgically Excised Segments of Dog Esophagus using Biodegradable PLA Hollow Organ Grafts,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    7 AG 396 ARMY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC FIG 6/5 REGENERATION OF SURGICALLY EXCISED SEGMENTS OF DOG ESOPHAGUS US-ETC(W) U15 G’OE UN8 N F...the graft; infection; inadequate blood supply; difficulties in suture retention; leakage at the anastomatic sites; stenosis of the anasto- mosis...excised segment of the dog esophagus. On a conceptual L- J basis, the use of a biodegradable polymer to fabricate a successful J hollow organ graft holds

  8. Dynamic, diagnostic, and pharmacological radionuclide studies of the esophagus in achalasia: correlation with manometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozen, P.; Gelfond, M.; Zaltzman, S.; Baron, J.; Gilat, T.

    1982-08-01

    The esophagus was evaluated in 15 patients with achalasia by continuous gamma camera imaging following ingestion of a semi-solid meal labeled with /sup 99//sup m/Tc. The images were displayed and recorded on a simple computerized data processing/display system. Subsequent cine' mode images of esophagela emptying demonstrated abnormalities of the body of the esophagus not reflected by the manometric examination. Computer-generated time-activity curves representing specific regions of interest were better than manometry in evaluating the results of myotomy, dilatation, and drug therapy. Isosorbide dinitrate significantly improved esophageal emptying.

  9. Dynamic, diagnostic, and pharmacological radionuclide studies of the esophagus in achalasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozen, P.; Gelfond, M.; Zaltzman, S.; Baron, J.; Gilat, T.

    1982-08-01

    The esophagus was evaluated in 15 patients with achalasia by continuous gamma camera imaging following ingestion of a semi-solid meal labeled with /sup 99m/Tc. The images were displayed and recorded on a simple computerized data processing/display system. Subsequent cine mode images of esophageal emptying demonstrated abnormalities of the body of the esophagus not reflected by the manometric examination. Computer-generated time-activity curves representing specific regions of interest were better than manometry in evaluating the results of myotomy, dilatation, and drug therapy. Isosorbide dinitrate significantly improved esophageal emptying.

  10. Role of body composition and metabolic profile in Barrett's oesophagus and progression to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caro, Simona; Cheung, Wui Hang; Fini, Lucia; Keane, Margaret G; Theis, Belinda; Haidry, Rehan; Di Renzo, Laura; De Lorenzo, Antonino; Lovat, Laurence; Batterham, Rachel L; Banks, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk for Barrett's oesophagus (BE) on the basis of body composition, metabolic pathways, adipokines and metabolic syndrome (MS), as well as their role in cancer progression. In patients with and without BE at gastroscopy, data on MS, BMI, waist/hip ratio for abdominal obesity (AO) and body fat percentage by bioimpedance were obtained. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, HbA1c, lipid, serum adiponectin and leptin levels were measured. The homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) was used to estimate insulin resistance. Histological findings for BE were correlated with the above parameters. Risk factors for BE identified using univariate analysis were entered into a multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 250 patients and 224 controls (F/M: 189/285, mean age 58.08±15.51 years) were enroled. In the BE and control groups, 39.6 versus 31.3% were overweight, 32 versus 22.8% were obese, 75.6 versus 51.3% had AO, and 28.1 versus 18.9% were metabolically obese, respectively. AO [odds ratio (OR) 3.08], increased body fat percentage (OR 2.29), and higher BMI (overweight: OR 2.04; obese: OR 2.26) were significantly associated with BE. A positive trend was found in Normal Weight Obese Syndrome (OR 1.69). MS was associated with BE (overweight: OR 3.05; obese: OR 5.2; AO: OR 8.08). Insulin levels (P=0.05) and HOMA-IR (Pbody composition.

  11. Dermatan sulfate is involved in the tumorigenic properties of esophagus squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thelin, Martin A; Svensson, Katrin J; Shi, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    . The unique feature that distinguishes DS from CS is the presence of iduronic acid (IdoA) in DS. Here, we report that CS/DS is increased five-fold in human biopsies of esophagus squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), an aggressive tumor with poor prognosis, as compared with normal tissue. The main Ido...

  12. Non-invasive optical detection of esophagus cancer based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaohua; Wang, Lan; Chen, Weiwei; Lin, Duo; Huang, Lingling; Wu, Shanshan; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) approach was utilized for urine biochemical analysis with the aim to develop a label-free and non-invasive optical diagnostic method for esophagus cancer detection. SERS spectrums were acquired from 31 normal urine samples and 47 malignant esophagus cancer (EC) urine samples. Tentative assignments of urine SERS bands demonstrated esophagus cancer specific changes, including an increase in the relative amounts of urea and a decrease in the percentage of uric acid in the urine of normal compared with EC. The empirical algorithm integrated with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were employed to identify some important urine SERS bands for differentiation between healthy subjects and EC urine. The empirical diagnostic approach based on the ratio of the SERS peak intensity at 527 to 1002 cm-1 and 725 to 1002 cm-1 coupled with LDA yielded a diagnostic sensitivity of 72.3% and specificity of 96.8%, respectively. The area under the receive operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.954, which further evaluate the performance of the diagnostic algorithm based on the ratio of the SERS peak intensity combined with LDA analysis. This work demonstrated that the urine SERS spectra associated with empirical algorithm has potential for noninvasive diagnosis of esophagus cancer.

  13. A case of cancer of the cervical esophagus developed after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kenji; Sugihara, Hideo; Mita, Saburo

    1981-01-01

    A case of radiation-induced cancer of the cervical esophagus which seem to have developed in 51 years following the irradiation of cervical region for tuberculous lymphoadenitis was reported. And bibliographies of radiation-induced cancer following the irradiation of the thoracic organs were reviewed. (J.P.N.)

  14. Misplaced Priorities and Barrett’s Esophagus | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker | "Misplaced Priorities and Barrett’s Esophagus" will be presented by Nicholas J. Shaheen, MD, MPH, the Bozymski-Heizer Distinguished Professor of Medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and Chief of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at UNC. Date: April 3, 2018; Time: 11:00 am- 12:00 pm; Location: NCI Shady Grove, Conference Room:

  15. High energy protons application for radiotherapy of the esophagus affected with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruderman, A.I.; Astrakhan, B.V.; Kulakov, G.A.; Makarova, G.V.; Zhuravleva, N.T.

    1975-01-01

    As in radiation therapy of tumours located elsewhere, local radiation treatment of an esophagus tumour is often aggravated by the development, after some time, of a trophic ulcer as a result of decreased regenerative ability of the irradiated sound tissues and also of newly formed hystostructures which have replaced the destroyed tumorous tissue. It has been established that the number of complications increases with the total focal dose, but at the same time (up to a certain point) the number of local curings increases as well. Some promise was shown by high-energy protons with their physical advantages unique for radiation therapy, such as the strictly controlled free path length of particles in the tissues, the presence of the Bragg peak, the absence of lateral scattering, i.e. features which permit of a high dose in the target with a minimum injury to the sound tissues surrounding the tumour. Proton therapy of esophagus cancer was carried out by two techniques, static and shuttle-rotary. The results of proton therapy of esophagus cancer indicate that the use of high-energy protons for treating esophagus cancer holds promise

  16. Role of concurrent chemoradiation in inoperable carcinoma esophagus: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The treatment of choice in cancer esophagus is controversial. Radiation therapy oncology group, Eastern cooperative oncology group and Cochrane studies have shown superiority of concurrent chemoradiation in inoperable carcinoma esophagus. In these studies full dose cisplatin was given every 3 weeks along with radiotherapy and hence had some toxicity. So, we started treating inoperable carcinoma esophagus patients with low dose weekly cisplatin given concurrently with radiotherapy aiming at low toxicity and similar results. Materials and Methods: A total of 31 cases of inoperable cases of carcinoma esophagus were treated with once weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 along with radiotherapy 60 Gy in 30 fractions in 6 weeks on Telecobalt/Linear accelerator. Results : w0 e could achieve lower toxicity with 80%, 35% and 19% with 1, 2, and 3 year′s survival with a median survival of 18 months. So, we conclude that this regimen is better than 3 weekly chemotherapy regimen as is better tolerated with less toxicity and similar outcome.

  17. Perforation of the Esophagus Secondary to Insertion of Covered Wallstent Endoprostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrugia, Mark; Morgan, Robert A.; Latham, Jennifer A.; Glynos, Michael; Mason, Robert C.; Adam, Andreas

    1997-01-01

    Perforation of the esophagus is a very rare complication of metallic esophageal stent insertion. Two cases are presented in which esophageal perforations were caused by the sharp ends of metallic stents impinging on the esophageal wall. In retrospect, both perforations might have been prevented by additional stent insertion

  18. Historia morbi atrocis--2 new cases of spontaneous rupture of the esophagus (Boerhaave syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagan, D; Boesch, C; Baur, A; Berger, J P

    1990-11-24

    We report the case of two patients hospitalized within a few weeks of each other and both presenting with spontaneous rupture of the esophagus whose evolution proved fatal. We take the opportunity of drawing attention to this rare and challenging disease, which is often diagnosed too late.

  19. Predisposing Role of Immunologic determinants in the Etiology of Barrett’s Esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M.G. Moons (Leon)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractGastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined as the presence of symptoms or lesions that can be attributed to reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus. In the Western world, GERD represent one of the most common gastrointestinal problems [1,2]. Cardinal manifestations of GERD

  20. Spontaneous rupture of the esophagus associated with intramural rupture caused by ingestion of weeding medicine (Lasso)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Keon; Park, Heung Il; Kwun, Chung Sik [Chun Nam University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1975-06-15

    This is a report of a case of spontaneous rupture of the esophagus associated with intramural rupture caused by ingestion of weeding medicine for the purpose of suicide in a 27 year old Korean male whose chief complaints were dyspnea, epigastric pain, swallowing disturbance, and hoarseness for 3 days prior to admission. A review of literature is submitted.

  1. Small-cell carcinoma of the esophagus with regression after combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.A.; Levine, M.S.; Silberg, D.G.; Phillipe, L.

    1995-01-01

    The authors present an unusual case of small-cell carcinoma of the esophagus, which manifested on double-contrast esophagography as an ulcerated submucosal mass. The lesion underwent dramatic regression after combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy, which has occasionally been used as an alternative to surgery in patients with this rare but aggressive esophageal neoplasm. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  2. Loss of heterozygosity and immunohistochemistry of adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and gastric cardia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, Willem A.; Birjmohun, Rakesh S.; van Rees, Bastiaan P.; Caspers, Eric; Johan, G.; Offerhaus, A.; Bosma, Piter J.; Jan, J.; van Lanschot, B.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: Adenocarcinomas of the distal esophagus and gastric cardia are two tumors that have many features in common. They have similar prognoses, treatment modalities, and patterns of dissemination. The etiology is different, with gastroesophageal reflux disease playing a major role for esophageal

  3. Outcome of surgical treatment for early adenocarcinoma of the esophagus or gastro-esophageal junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, Marinke; Koppert, Linetta B.; Buskens, Christianne J.; Tilanus, Hugo W.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Bergman, Jacques J. H. G. M.; Siersema, Peter D.; van Dekken, Herman; van Lanschot, Jan J. B.

    2005-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, or GEJ, has a poor prognosis. Early lesions [i.e. high grade dysplasia (HGD) or T1-carcinoma] are potentially curable. Local endoscopic therapies are promising treatment options for superficial lesions; however, for deeper lesions, surgical resection is considered to

  4. Endoscopic fluorescent diagnostics and PDT of early malignancies of lung and esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Victor V.; Chissov, Valery I.; Trakhtenberg, A. K.; Mamontov, A. S.; Frank, George A.; Filonenko, E. V.; Telegina, L. V.; Gladunov, V. K.; Belous, T. A.; Aristarkhova, E. I.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Smirnov, V. V.; Kozlov, Dmitrij N.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the results of fluorescence diagnostics and photodynamic therapy of early stage malignancies of lung (17 patients) and esophagus (8 patients) are presented. 13 patients had multiple primary tumors. As photosensitizers the new drugs Photoheme and Photosense were used. Complete remission was obtained in 92%. The patients are followed up without relapses to 2,5 years.

  5. Current relevance of cervical ultrasonography in staging cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, Liesbeth; Verhoef, C.C.; van der Jagt, E.J.; van Dam, G.M.; Groen, H.; Plukker, J.T.

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of external ultrasonography (US) of the neck in current dedicated preoperative staging of patients with cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Materials and methods: We analyzed 180 consecutive patients (154 men, 26 women, and mean age 63 (38-84)

  6. Photodynamic therapy of early stage cancer of lung, esophagus, and stomach with two different photosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chissov, Valery I.; Sokolov, Victor V.; Trakhtenberg, A. K.; Mamontov, A. S.; Vaschakmadze, L. A.; Frank, George A.; Filonenko, E. V.; Telegina, L. V.; Belous, T. A.; Gladunov, V. K.; Aristarkhova, E. I.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Menenkov, V. D.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of early-stage cancer of lung (17 patients), esophagus (8 patients) and stomach (10 patients). Fifteen patients had second primary tumors. New drugs photoheme and photosens were used as photosensitizers. Complete remission was obtained in 87%. The patients are followed up without relapses to 2.5 years.

  7. LOW PREVALENCE OF BARRETT’S ESOPHAGUS IN A RISK AREA FOR ESOPHAGEAL CANCER IN SOUTH OF BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Michelon DE CARLI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Barrett’s esophagus a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma. The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing in most Western countries. Rio Grande do Sul (RS, the Southernmost state of Brazil has the highest rates of esophageal cancer with low prevalence of esophageal adenocarcinoma. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of Barrett’s esophagus among patients underwent to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in the last 5 years. METHODS: The records of patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between 2011 and 2015 were analyzed. Demographic data, GERD symptoms, endoscopic findings, extension and histological diagnosis of columnar epithelia of the esophagus were recorded. Significance among the variables was accessed by chi-square test and Fisher’s exact test with 95% CI. RESULTS: A total of 5996 patients underwent to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in the period were included. A total of 1769 (30% patients with GERD symptoms or esophagitis and 107 (1.8% with columnar lined esophagus were identified. Except for eight patients, the others with columnar lined esophagus had GERD symptoms or esophagitis. Barrett’s esophagus defined by the presence of intestinal metaplasia occurred in 47 patients; 20 (43% with segments over 3 cm and 27 (57% with segments shorter than 3 cm. The global prevalence of Barrett’s esophagus was 0.7% and in GERD patients 2.7%. The odds ratio for the occurrence of columnar lined esophagus in patients with GERD was 30 (95%CI=15.37-63.34. The odds ratio for the presence of intestinal metaplasia in long segments was 8 (95%CI=2.83-23.21. CONCLUSION: GERD patients had a risk 30-folds greater to present columnar lined esophagus than patients without GERD symptoms. Long segments of columnar lined esophagus, had a risk eight-folds higher to have Barrett’s esophagus than short segments. Barrett’s esophagus overall

  8. Early Involvement of Death-Associated Protein Kinase Promoter Hypermethylation in the Carcinogenesis of Barrett's Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Its Association with Clinical Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerthe Kuester

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal Barrett's adenocarcinoma (BA develops through a multistage process, which is associated with the transcriptional silencing of tumor-suppressor genes by promoter CpG island hypermethylation. In this study, we explored the promoter hypermethylation and protein expression of proapoptotic deathassociated protein kinase (DAPK during the multistep Barrett's carcinogenesis cascade. Early BA and paired samples of premalignant lesions of 61 patients were analyzed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. For the association of clinicopathological markers and protein expression, an immunohistochemical tissue microarray analysis of 66 additional BAs of advanced tumor stages was performed. Hypermethylation of DAPK promoter was detected in 20% of normal mucosa, 50% of Barrett's metaplasia, 53% of dysplasia, and 60% of adenocarcinomas, and resulted in a marked decrease in DAPK protein expression (P < .01. The loss of DAPK protein was significantly associated with advanced depth of tumor invasion and advanced tumor stages (P < .001. Moreover, the severity of reflux esophagitis correlated significantly with the hypermethylation rate of the DAPK promoter (P < .003. Thus, we consider DAPK inactivation by promoter hypermethylation as an early event in Barrett's carcinogenesis and suggest that a decreased protein expression of DAPK likely plays a role in the development and progression of BA.

  9. Severe late esophagus toxicity in NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Bois, Josien de; Heuvel, Michel van den; Belderbos, José

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: We reported the incidence of severe late esophagus toxicity (LET) in locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Acute esophagus toxicity (AET) and the dose to the esophagus were analyzed for their associations with severe LET. Material and methods: Two hundred and thirty-one patients treated from 2008 to 2011 with hypofractionated IMRT (66 Gy/24 fx) and concurrent daily low dose cisplatin were included. The association between AET and severe LET (grade ⩾3 RTOG/EORTC) was tested through Cox-proportional-hazards model. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to the esophagus and the volume percentage receiving more than x Gy (V x ) were applied by Lyman–Kutcher–Burman (LKB) model. Results: A total of 171 patients were eligible for this study. Severe LET was observed in 6% patients. Both the maximum grade and the recovery rate of AET were significantly associated with severe LET. In the EUD n -LKB model, the fitted values and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were TD 50 = 76.1 Gy (73.2–78.6), m = 0.03 (0.02–0.06) and n = 0.03 (0–0.08). In the V x -LKB model, the fitted values and 95% CIs were Tx 50 = 23.5% (16.4–46.6), m = 0.44 (0.32–0.60) and x = 76.7 Gy (74.7–77.5). Conclusions: Severe AET, EUD (n = 0.03) and V76.7 to the esophagus were significantly associated with severe LET. An independent validation study is required

  10. Cancer incidence and mortality risks in a large US Barrett's oesophagus cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Michael B; Coburn, Sally B; Lam, Jameson R; Taylor, Philip R; Schneider, Jennifer L; Corley, Douglas A

    2018-03-01

    Barrett's oesophagus (BE) increases the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma by 10-55 times that of the general population, but no community-based cancer-specific incidence and cause-specific mortality risk estimates exist for large cohorts in the USA. Within Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC), we identified patients with BE diagnosed during 1995-2012. KPNC cancer registry and mortality files were used to estimate standardised incidence ratios (SIR), standardised mortality ratios (SMR) and excess absolute risks. There were 8929 patients with BE providing 50 147 person-years of follow-up. Compared with the greater KPNC population, patients with BE had increased risks of any cancer (SIR=1.40, 95% CI 1.31 to 1.49), which slightly decreased after excluding oesophageal cancer. Oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk was increased 24 times, which translated into an excess absolute risk of 24 cases per 10 000 person-years. Although oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk decreased with time since BE diagnosis, oesophageal cancer mortality did not, indicating that the true risk is stable and persistent with time. Relative risks of cardia and stomach cancers were increased, but excess absolute risks were modest. Risks of colorectal, lung and prostate cancers were unaltered. All-cause mortality was slightly increased after excluding oesophageal cancer (SMR=1.24, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.31), but time-stratified analyses indicated that this was likely attributable to diagnostic bias. Cause-specific SMRs were elevated for ischaemic heart disease (SMR=1.39, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.63), respiratory system diseases (SMR=1.51, 95% CI 1.29 to 1.75) and digestive system diseases (SMR=2.20 95% CI 1.75 to 2.75). Patients with BE had a persistent excess risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma over time, although their absolute excess risks for this cancer, any cancer and overall mortality were modest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  11. Esophagus sparing with IMRT in lung tumor irradiation: An EUD-based optimization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapet, Olivier; Thomas, Emma; Kessler, Marc L.; Fraass, Benedick A.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate (1) the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) to optimize dose escalation of lung tumors when the esophagus overlaps the planning target volume (PTV) and (2) the potential benefit of further dose escalation in only the part of the PTV that does not overlap the esophagus. Methods and Materials: The treatment-planning computed tomography (CT) scans of patients with primary lung tumors located in different regions of the left and right lung were used for the optimization of beamlet intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. In all cases, the PTV overlapped part of the esophagus. The dose in the PTV was maximized according to 7 different primary cost functions: 2 plans that made use of mean dose (MD) (the reference plan, in which the 95% isodose surface covered the PTV and a second plan that had no constraint on the minimum isodose), 3 plans based on maximizing gEUD for the whole PTV with ever increasing assumptions for tumor aggressiveness, and 2 plans that used different gEUD values in 2 simultaneous, overlapping target volumes (the whole PTV and the PTV minus esophagus). Beam arrangements and NTCP-based costlets for the organs at risk (OARs) were kept identical to the original conformal plan for each case. Regardless of optimization method, the relative ranking of the resulting plans was evaluated in terms of the absence of cold spots within the PTV and the final gEUD computed for the whole PTV. Results: Because the MD-optimized plans lacked a constraint on minimum PTV coverage, they resulted in cold spots that affected approximately 5% of the PTV volume. When optimizing over the whole PTV volume, gEUD-optimized plans resulted in higher equivalent uniform PTV doses than did the reference plan while still maintaining normal-tissue constraints. However, only under the assumption of extremely aggressive tumors could cold spots in the PTV be avoided. Generally, high-level overall results are obtained

  12. Expression of Sex Steroid Hormone Receptors in Vagal Motor Neurons Innervating the Trachea and Esophagus in Mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukudai, Shigeyuki; Ichi Matsuda, Ken; Bando, Hideki; Takanami, Keiko; Nishio, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Yoichiro; Hisa, Yasuo; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The medullary vagal motor nuclei, the nucleus ambiguus (NA) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV), innervate the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. We conducted immunohistochemical analysis of expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor α (ERα), in relation to innervation of the trachea and esophagus via vagal motor nuclei in mice. AR and ERα were expressed in the rostral NA and in part of the DMV. Tracing experiments using cholera toxin B subunit demonstrated that neurons of vagal motor nuclei that innervate the trachea and esophagus express AR and ERα. There was no difference in expression of sex steroid hormone receptors between trachea- and esophagus-innervating neurons. These results suggest that sex steroid hormones may act on vagal motor nuclei via their receptors, thereby regulating functions of the trachea and esophagus

  13. Part of curietherapy at high rate of dose in the treatment of locally advanced esophagus carcinomas: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Bidault, F.; Barillot, I.; Bone-Lepinoy, M.C.; Coudert, B.; Horiot, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The technology of curietherapy for esophagus shows its feasibility and its interest in advanced tumors of esophagus, by association with external radiotherapy and/or association radio-chemotherapy. It allows to deliver a high dose in the heart of the tumor with a tolerable toxicity. Its efficiency and the analysis of toxicity should be reevaluated at long term. Its place should be discussed in randomized protocols proposed to this selection of patients

  14. Heterogeneous vesicles in mucous epithelial cells of posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese giant salamander belongs to an old lineage of salamanders and endangered species. Many studies of breeding and disease regarding this amphibian had been implemented. However, the studies on the ultrastructure of this amphibian are rare. In this work, we provide a histological and ultrastructural investigation on posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander. The sections of amphibian esophagus were stained by hematoxylin & eosin (H&E. Moreover, the esophageal epithelium was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The results showed that esophageal epithelium was a single layer epithelium, which consisted of mucous cells and columnar cells. The esophageal glands were present in submucosa. The columnar cells were ciliated. According to the diverging ultrastructure of mucous vesicles, three types of mucous cells could be identified in the esophageal mucosa: i electron-lucent vesicles mucous cell (ELV-MC; ii electron-dense vesicles mucous cell (EDV-MC; and iii mixed vesicles mucous cell (MV-MC.

  15. Role of retinoic acid receptors in squamous-cell carcinoma in human esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergheim, I.; Wolfgarten, E.; Bollschweiler, E.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Worldwide, cancer in the esophagus ranks among the 10 most common cancers. Alterations of retinoic acid receptors (e.g. RARalpha, beta, gamma, and RXRalpha, beta, gamma) expression is considered to play an important role in development of squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC), which is the most...... common esophageal cancer. Alcohol consumption and smoking, which can alter retinoic acid receptor levels, have been identified as key risk factors in the development of carcinoma in the aero-digestive tract. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate protein levels of retinoic acid receptors...... were found for RARalpha, beta, and RXRbeta protein levels between normal esophageal tissue of patients and that of controls. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, results of the present study suggest that alterations of retinoic acid receptors protein may contribute in the development of SCC in esophagus...

  16. Clinical usefulness of bleomycin combined with preoperative irradiation for cancer of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo; Takagi, Iwao

    1988-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of bleomycin combined with irradiation was evaluated using 154 preoperatively treated cases with cancer of the esophagus. With the appearance rate Ef-3 (highly effective: no viable tumor cell in the esophageal specimen resected after preoperative treatment) the radiation effect was observed, in comparison with those three groups (30 Gy alone, 40 Gy alone and 30 Gy + 67.5 mg of bleomycin). Dose modifying actor (DMF) of bleomycin for the preoperatively irradiated esophageal cancer was 1.2 - 1.3. As a serious interstitial pneumonitis was sometimes caused by the administration of bleomycin, it was concluded that the usage of bleomycin combind with preoperative irradiation for cancer of the esophagus, is less useful than that for cancer of the uterine cervix and the head and neck region. (author)

  17. Circular myotomy as an aid to resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attum, A A; Hankins, J R; Ngangana, J; McLaughlin, J S

    1979-08-01

    Segments ranging from 40 to 70% of the thoracic esophagus were resected in 80 mongrel dogs. End-to-end anastomosis was effected after circular myotomy either proximal or distal, or both proximal and distal, to the anastomosis. Among dogs undergoing resection of 60% of the esophagus, distal myotomy enabled 6 of 8 animals to survive, and combined proximal and distal myotomy permitted 8 of 10 to survive. Cineesophagography was performed in a majority of the 50 surviving animals and showed no appreciable delay of peristalsis at the myotomy sites. When these sites were examined at postmortem examination up to 13 months after operation, 1 dog showed a small diverticulum but none showed dilatation or stricture. It is concluded that circular myotomy holds real promise as a means of extending the clinical application of esophageal resection with end-to-end anastomosis.

  18. [Eight Cases of Esophagus and Tracheobronchial Stenting for Advanced Esophageal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Yujiro; Takachi, Ko; Tsujimura, Naoto; Wakasugi, Masaki; Hirota, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Oshima, Satoshi

    2017-11-01

    Malignant stricture and fistula of the esophagus and tracheobronchus adversely affect the quality of life(QOL)in patients with advanced esophageal cancer. Stenting is one ofthe therapies available for these patients. We investigated the outcomes ofesophagus and tracheobronchial stenting in our institution. Eight patients with advanced esophageal cancer underwent double stenting from 2010 to 2016. Among them, 4 patients underwent double stenting as planned. One patient underwent an emergency tracheal stenting because ofstenosis ofthe trachea caused by esophageal stenting. Three patients underwent tracheobronchial stenting later on because ofan increase in the tumor size after esophageal stenting. Dysphagia score was improved in 5(67.5%)out ofthe 8 patients. Respiratory symptoms were improved in all patients, and 4 patients(50.0%) were discharged. The median survival time after esophageal stenting was 70.5 days. Esophagus and tracheobronchial stenting for advanced esophageal cancer was useful for the improvement of the QOL.

  19. In-vivo cancer diagnosis of the esophagus using laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.; Buckley, Paul F., II; Edwards, Donna H.

    1995-04-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used for direct in-vivo cancer diagnosis of the esophagus without requiring biopsy. The methodology was applied to differentiate normal and malignant tumors of the esophagus. Endogenous fluorescence of normal and malignant tissues were measured directly using a fiberoptic probe inserted through an endoscope. The measurements were performed in vivo during routine endoscopy. Detection of the fluorescence signal from the tissue was performed using laser excitation. The results of this LIF approach were compared with histopathology results of the biopsy samples and indicated excellent agreement in the classification of normal and malignant tumors for the samples investigated. The LIF procedure could lead to the development of a rapid and cost-effective technique for cancer diagnosis.

  20. Surgical Treatment of the Giant Leiyomyoma of the Esophagus After Fifteen Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Bilgin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Leiyomyomas are benign intramural tumors of esophagus which are rarely seen. Nearly half of the patients are asymptomatic because leiyomyomas grow slowly and intramural. Dysphagia and retrosternal pain are the most common symptoms.Osephagus leiyomyomas may appear as mediastinal mass in chest radiography and may be recognised by coincidence. It is known that they are solitary, round or oval, and their diameter may reach 15-17cm size. When it grows up to the giant diamaters, surgery is the choice of treatment. Because tumors covering distal part of esophagus and cardia are ulcerated and adhesive to mucosa resection, esophagogastric anasthomosis may be required. We are presenting the clinical and radiologic findings of this giant leiyoma case who did not accept surgical treatment fifteen years ago, and whose leiomyoma reached up to a big diamater.

  1. Imaging rat esophagus using combination of reflectance confocal and multiphoton microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo, S M; Chen, J X; Jiang, X S; Lu, K C; Xie, S S

    2008-01-01

    We combine reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) with multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to image rat esophagus. The two imaging modalities allow detection of layered–resolved complementary information from esophagus. In the keratinizing layer, the keratinocytes boundaries can be characterized by RCM, while the keratinocytes cytoplasm (keratin) can be further imaged by multiphoton autofluorescence signal. In the epithelium, the epithelial cellular boundaries and nucleus can be detected by RCM, and MPM can be used for imaging epithelial cell cytoplasm and monitoring metabolic state of epithelium. In the stroma, multiphoton autofluorescence signal is used to image elastin and second harmonic generation signal is utilized to detect collagen, while RCM is used to determine the optical property of stroma. Overall, these results suggest that the combination of RCM and MPM has potential to provide more important and comprehensive information for early diagnosis of esophageal cancer

  2. Deoxycholic acid promotes development of gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus by modulating integrin-αv trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, David O; Byrne, Anne Marie; Murphy, James O; Reynolds, John V; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; Feighery, Ronan; Doyle, Brendan; Eldin, Osama Sharaf; Finn, Stephen P; Maguire, Aoife; Duff, Deirdre; Kelleher, Dermot P; Long, Aideen

    2017-12-01

    The fundamental mechanisms underlying erosive oesophagitis and subsequent development of Barrett's oesophagus (BO) are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the contribution of specific components of the gastric refluxate on adhesion molecules involved in epithelial barrier maintenance. Cell line models of squamous epithelium (HET-1A) and BO (QH) were used to examine the effects of bile acids on cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins (Collagen, laminin, vitronectin, fibronectin) and expression of integrin ligands (α 3 , α 4, α 5 , α 6 and α ν ). Experimental findings were validated in human explant oesophageal biopsies, a rat model of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and in patient tissue microarrays. The bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) specifically reduced adhesion of HET-1A cells to vitronectin and reduced cell-surface expression of integrin-α ν via effects on endocytic recycling processes. Increased expression of integrin-α v was observed in ulcerated tissue in a rat model of GORD and in oesophagitis and Barrett's intestinal metaplasia patient tissue compared to normal squamous epithelium. Increased expression of integrin-α ν was observed in QH BO cells compared to HET-1A cells. QH cells were resistant to DCA-mediated loss of adhesion and reduction in cell-surface expression of integrin-α ν . We demonstrated that a specific component of the gastric refluxate, DCA, affects the epithelial barrier through modulation of integrin α ν expression, providing a novel mechanism for bile acid-mediated erosion of oesophageal squamous epithelium and promotion of BO. Strategies aimed at preventing bile acid-mediated erosion should be considered in the clinical management of patients with GORD. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  3. Ultrastructure of striated muscle fibers in the middle third of the human esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Faussone-Pellegrini, M.S; Cortesini, C.

    1986-01-01

    Striated muscle fibers and .their spatial relationship to smooth muscle cells have been studied in the middle third of human esophagus. Biopsies were obtained from 3 patients during surgery. In both the circular and longitudinal layers, the muscle coat of this transition zone was composed of fascicles of uniform dimensioi~ (100-200 pm of diameter); some of these bundles were made up of striated muscle fibers, others were pure bundles of smooth muscle cells and ...

  4. Statistical modeling of the response characteristics of mechanosensitive stimuli in the human esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewes, A.M.; Reddy, H.; Staahl, C.

    2005-01-01

    by using a statistical model based on correlation analysis. The esophagus was distended with a bag in 32 healthy subjects by using an inflation rate of 25 mL/min. The luminal cross-sectional areas and sensory ratings were determined during the distentions. The stimuli were repeated after relaxation...... of mechanical gut stimuli in human beings. This might increase our understanding of visceral pain in health and disease and guide the statistical analysis of experimental data obtained in the gastrointestinal tract....

  5. The effect on esophagus after different radiotherapy techniques for early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anni; Maraldo, M.; Brodin, Nils Patrik

    2013-01-01

    The cure rate of early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is excellent; investigating the late effects of treatment is thus important. Esophageal toxicity is a known side effect in patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the mediastinum, although little is known of this in HL survivors. This study inv...... investigates the dose to the esophagus in the treatment of early stage HL using different RT techniques. Estimated risks of early esophagitis, esophageal stricture and cancer are compared between treatments....

  6. Duplication of the cervical esophagus: a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Eckel, Gregory M.; Poulos, Nicholas D.; Kappler, Sherri; Milstein, Jay M.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes a newborn with a cervical esophageal duplication cyst, a rare developmental anomaly of the neck. Only a few cases of this cystic entity have been described in the literature to date. This case is unique in that the patient had an air-fluid level within the lesion as a result of communication of the duplication cyst with the native esophagus. (orig.)

  7. Peristaltic Transport of a Rheological Fluid: Model for Movement of Food Bolus Through Esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, J. C.; Maiti, S.

    2011-01-01

    Fluid mechanical peristaltic transport through esophagus has been of concern in the paper. A mathematical model has been developed with an aim to study the peristaltic transport of a rheological fluid for arbitrary wave shapes and tube lengths. The Ostwald-de Waele power law of viscous fluid is considered here to depict the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid. The model is formulated and analyzed with the specific aim of exploring some important information concerning the movement of food bo...

  8. How does esophagus look on barium esophagram in pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; AboZeid, Amany; Hai, Abdul

    2016-08-01

    The clinical, endoscopic, and histologic findings of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) are well characterized; however, there have been very limited data regarding the radiologic findings of pediatric EoE. We report on the radiologic findings of pediatric EoE observed on barium esophagram and correlate them with the endoscopic findings. We identified children diagnosed with EoE in our center from 2004 to 2015. Two pediatric radiologists met after their independent evaluations of each fluoroscopic study to reach a consensus on each case. Clinical and endoscopic data were collected by retrospective chart review. Twenty-six pediatric EoE cases (age range 2-13 years; median 7.5 years) had barium esophagram done as part of the diagnostic approach for dysphagia. Thirteen children had abnormal radiologic findings of esophagus (50%): rings formation (n = 4), diffuse irregularity of mucosa (n = 8), fixed stricture formation (n = 3), and narrow-caliber esophagus (n = 10). Barium esophagram failed to show one of 10 cases of narrow-caliber esophagus and 10 of 14 cases of rings formation visualized endoscopically. The mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis of EoE was longer (3.7 vs. 1.7 year; p value 0.019), and the presentation with intermittent food impaction was commoner in the group with abnormal barium esophagram as compared to the group with normal barium esophagram (69% vs. 8%; p value 0.04). Barium swallow study is frequently normal in pediatric EoE. With the exception of narrow-caliber esophagus, our data show poor correlation between radiologic and endoscopic findings.

  9. Demonstration of vascular abnormalities compressing esophagus by MDCT: Special focus on dysphagia lusoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alper, Fatih; Akgun, Metin; Kantarci, Mecit; Eroglu, Atilla; Ceyhan, Elvan; Onbas, Omer; Duran, Cihan; Okur, Adnan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia lusoria (DL) is described in the literature as difficulty in swallowing caused by vascular abnormalities. The most common cause is an aberrant right subclavian artery (SCA) which passes behind the esophagus and is also called arteria lusoria (AL). Our aim was to demonstrate the use of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the diagnosis of AL, as there is no comprehensive study investigating the role of MDCT in such cases. Material and methods: A total of 38 consecutive patients, comprising of 23 females (61%) and 15 males (39%), who had extrinsic compression were included in the study. These patients are selected from the cases who were admitted due to their gastrointestinal symptoms, such as dysphagia, epigastric pain, chronic nausea, vomiting, etc. The mean age of patients was 40 ± 25 years (range 15-65). Following barium esophagogram and then endoscopy performed, MDCT angiography was carried out on the same or the following few days. MDCT sections were examined to determine the following: presence of vascular abnormality; the diameter and angle of that vascular structure; and the compressed area of esophagus. Radiological findings and dysphagia scores were also compared. Results: In each of 15 cases, there was a compression due to vascular abnormality which were all located between the esophagus and the spine. There was an esophageal compression in each of 12 cases, due to right aberrant SCA, in one case due to right superior aortic arch and in two cases due to both right aortic arch and left SCA with Kommerell's diverticulum. The mean diameter and the angle of AL were 16.4 mm and 48.8 o , respectively, and the mean area of pressured esophagus was 194.7 mm 2 . Dysphagia scores of the cases was 1 in thirteen cases and 2 in two cases. However, dysphagia scores were not correlated with these parameters. Conclusions: MDCT angiography is a useful diagnostic tool for evaluation of patients with dysphagia, especially caused by a vascular

  10. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors in esophagus: Early alteration during carcinogenesis and prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianello Nicolau, Marina; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro; Nicolau-Neto, Pedro; de Pinho, Paulo Roberto Alves; Rossini, Ana; de Almeida Simão, Tatiana; Soares Lima, Sheila Coelho

    2016-08-21

    To compare expression of nicotinic cholinergic receptors (CHRNs) in healthy and squamous cell carcinoma-affected esophagus and determine the prognostic value. We performed RT-qPCR to measure the expression of CHRNs in 44 esophageal samples from healthy individuals and in matched normal surrounding mucosa, and in tumors from 28 patients diagnosed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Next, we performed correlation analysis for the detected expression of these receptors with the habits and clinico-pathological characteristics of all study participants. In order to investigate the possible correlations between the expression of the different CHRN subunits in both healthy esophagus and tissues from ESCC patients, correlation matrices were generated. Subsequently, we evaluated whether the detected alterations in expression of the various CHRNs could precede histopathological modifications during the esophageal carcinogenic processes by using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Finally, we evaluated the impact of CHRNA5 and CHRNA7 expression on overall survival by using multivariate analysis. CHRNA3, CHRNA5, CHRNA7 and CHRNB4, but not CHRNA1, CHRNA4, CHRNA9 or CHRNA10, were found to be expressed in normal (healthy) esophageal mucosa. In ESCC, CHRNA5 and CHRNA7 were overexpressed as compared with patient-matched surrounding non-tumor mucosa (ESCC-adjacent mucosa; P esophagus and the normal-appearing ESCC-adjacent mucosa, allowing for distinguishment between these tissues with a sensitivity of 75.86% and a specificity of 78.95% (P = 0.0002). Finally, CHRNA5 expression was identified as an independent prognostic factor in ESCC; patients with high CHRNA5 expression showed an increased overall survival, in comparison with those with low expression. The corresponding age- and tumor stage-adjusted hazard ratio was 0.2684 (95%CI: 0.075-0.97, P = 0.0448). Expression of CHRNs is homogeneous along healthy esophagus and deregulated in ESCC, suggesting a

  11. A Hill Gastropexy Combined with Nissen Fundoplication Appears Equivalent to a Collis-Nissen in the Management of Short Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellevue, Oliver C; Louie, Brian E; Jutric, Zeljka; Farivar, Alexander S; Aye, Ralph W

    2018-03-01

    A Collis gastroplasty combined with a Nissen fundoplication is commonly used when a shortened esophagus is encountered. An alternative combines intra-abdominal fixation of the gastroesophageal junction via a Hill gastropexy with a Nissen fundoplication to maintain length and avoid juxtaposing acid-secreting tissue against the diseased esophagus. A retrospective case-controlled analysis of 106 consecutive patients with short esophagus undergoing Hill-Nissen (HN) or Collis-Nissen (CN) was compared to a cohort of 105 matched patients without short esophagus undergoing primary Nissen fundoplication (NF). At a median follow-up of 27 months, all groups (HN:CN:NF) improved significantly over preoperative baseline with no differences in overall complications (18 vs 16 vs 19%, p = 0.78), DeMeester score (11.1 vs 19.1 vs 14.2, p = 0.49), postoperative PPI use (16 vs 22 vs 15%, p = 0.24), anatomic recurrences (11.7 vs 5.5 vs 7%, p = 0.43), or quality of life (6.8 vs 6.7 vs 6.4, p = 0.3). The management of shortened esophagus with Hill-Nissen is safe and as effective as Collis gastroplasty with Nissen fundoplication. Both options appear to produce similar outcomes to patients requiring only a Nissen fundoplication suggesting a shortened esophagus does not beget an inferior outcome.

  12. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  13. Magnitude of gastric or duodenal reflux, clinical and endoscopic findings in patients with cardial intestinal metaplasia, short Barrett esofhagus and controls

    OpenAIRE

    Csendes J, Attila; Burdiles P, Patricio; Smok S, Gladys; Rojas C, Jorge; Flores M, Noé; Domic P, Sergio; Quiroz G, Juan; Henríquez G, Ana

    1999-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of patients with short segments of intestinal metaplasia in the distal esophagus, has increased in recent years. Aim: To assess the clinical, pathological and functional features of patients with esophageal intestinal metaplasia. Patients and methods: A prospective study was performed in 95 control subjects, 115 patients with cardial intestinal metaplasia and 89 patients with short Barret esophagus with intestinal metaplasia. All had clinical and endoscopic assessmen...

  14. The Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Caustic Esophagus Injury: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kantarcioglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ingestion of corrosive substances may lead to stricture formation in esophagus as a late complication. Full thickness injury seems to exterminate tissue stem cells of esophagus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can differentiate into specific cell lineages and have the capacity of homing in sites of injury. Aim and Methods. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of MSC transplantation, on prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after caustic esophagus injury in rats. 54 rats were allocated into four groups; 4 rats were sacrificed for MSC production. Group 1, untreated controls (n: 10. Group 2, membrane labeled MSCs-treated rats (n: 20. Group 3, biodistribution of fluorodeoxyglucose labeled MSCs via positron emission tomography (PET imaging (n: 10. Group 4, sham operated (n: 10. Standard caustic esophageal burns were created and MSCs were transplanted 24 hours after. All rats were sacrificed at the 21st days. Results. PET scan images revealed the homing behavior of MSCs to the injury site. The histopathology damage score was not significantly different from controls. However, we demonstrated Dil labeled epithelial and muscle cells which were originating from transplanted MSCs. Conclusion. MSC transplantation after caustic esophageal injury may be a helpful treatment modality; however, probably repeated infusions are needed.

  15. Radiological imaging of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Pt. 1. The esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, J.; Grenacher, L.

    2006-01-01

    In the diagnosis of diseases of the esophagus, conventional x-ray evaluation still plays a more important role than endoscopy in the visualization of stenoses. CT plays a major role in the staging of malignancies of the esophagus, while MRI plays does not play a major part in the diagnostic evaluation of the upper GI-tract but is equal to CT for the staging and evaluation of the extent of local infiltration. The main indication for the radiological examination of the esophagus by barium studies is dysphagia. The use of barium allows a functional examination of esophageal motility. Swallow motility disorders can be diagnosed by videofluorography using high frame rate imaging. Zenker's diverticulum and other pulsion diverticula should also be investigated by functional esophageal imaging. Candida esophagitis can be identified by its characteristic ulcerations using barium swallow. The extension of gastroesophageal hernias are more accurately evaluated with barium studies than with endoscopy. The diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease should be made by barium studies, but discrete inflammation as well as epithelial dysplasia are best investigated by classic endoscopy and modern endoscopic techniques. In cases of esophageal carcinoma, radiology adds to the findings of endoscopy and endosonography. (orig.) [de

  16. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy and fundoplication in patients with Chagas' disease achalasia and massively dilated esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantanali, Carlos A R; Herbella, Fernando A M; Henry, Maria A; Mattos Farah, Jose Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic Heller myotomy and fundoplication is considered today the treatment of choice for achalasia. The optimal treatment for end-stage achalasia with esophageal dilation is still controversial. This multicenter and retrospective study aims to evaluate the outcome of laparoscopic Heller myotomy in patients with a massively dilated esophagus. Eleven patients (mean age, 56 years; 6 men) with massively dilated esophagus (esophageal diameter greater than 10 cm) underwent a laparoscopic Heller myotomy and anterior fundoplication between 2000 and 2009 at three different institutions. Preoperative workup included upper endoscopy, esophagram, and esophageal manometry in all patients. Average follow-up was 31.5 months (range, 3 to 60 months). Two patients (18%) had severe dysphagia, four patients (36%) had mild and occasional dysphagia to solid food, and five patients (45%) were asymptomatic. All patients gained or kept body weight, except for the two patients with severe dysphagia. Of the two patients with severe dysphagia, one underwent esophageal dilatation and the other a laparoscopic esophagectomy. They are both doing well. Heller myotomy relieves dysphagia in the majority of patients even when the esophagus is massively dilated.

  17. A mathematical model for the movement of food bolus of varying viscosities through the esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Dharmendra

    2011-09-01

    This mathematical model is designed to study the influence of viscosity on swallowing of food bolus through the esophagus. Food bolus is considered as viscous fluid with variable viscosity. Geometry of esophagus is assumed as finite length channel and flow is induced by peristaltic wave along the length of channel walls. The expressions for axial velocity, transverse velocity, pressure gradient, volume flow rate and stream function are obtained under the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number. The impacts of viscosity parameter on pressure distribution, local wall shear stress, mechanical efficiency and trapping are numerically discussed with the help of computational results. On the basis of presented study, it is revealed that swallowing of low viscous fluids through esophagus requires less effort in comparison to fluids of higher viscosity. This result is similar to the experimental result obtained by Raut et al. [1], Dodds [2] and Ren et al. [3]. It is further concluded that the pumping efficiency increases while size of trapped bolus reduces when viscosity of fluid is high.

  18. Mechanism for esophagus-jejunum stent bypass in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suo-lin FU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of endoscopic esophagus-jejunum covered stent bypass on the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and analyze the mechanism thereof. Methods Five obese Beagle dog models of T2DM underwent endoscopic esophagus-jejunum covered stent bypass to serve as operation group, and five normal Beagle dogs as control group receive endoscopy and exploratory laparotomy. The T2DM indices of both groups, including fast plasma glucose (FPG level, fast insulin (FINS level, intravenous glucose tolerance test-2h plasma glucose (IVGTT-2h PG and IVGTT-2h FINS, were determined regularly before operation and 4, 8 and 12 weeks after operation. The insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR and the function of islet β-cell (HOMA-β were calculated with Homeostasis Model Assessment. The levels of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP and glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1 were also determined. Results Four weeks after operation, FPG, FINS, IVGTT-2h PG, and IVGTT-2h FINS all decreased significantly in operation group (P 0.05. The HOMA-IR index declined distinctly and HOMA-β index ascended obviously in operation group 4 weeks after operation (P 0.05. The level of GIP lowered significantly (P 0.05. Conclusion T2DM may be treated with esophagus-jejunum covered stent bypass effectively and safely, and the mechanism thereof might be related to the changes in gastrointestinal hormones.

  19. Clinical observation of covered for malignant esophageal stricture and esophagus-bronchial fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Hailong; Lin Youen; Ye Zhi; Zhu Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical value of self-expanded covered stents for advanced stage esophageal cancer complicated by esophageal stricture and esophagus-bronchial fistula. Methods: Self-expanded covered stents were placed into 48 patients with advanced stage esophageal cancer under fluoroscopy. Of the 48 patients, 39 had malignant esophageal stricture and 9 had esophagus-bronchus fistula. Results: Stents were successfully inserted into all but one patient with lower esophageal cancer and gastric volvulus. Deglutition was improved in all patients and coughing resolved in patients with esophagus-bronchus fistula. Thoracodynia and foreign body sensation vanished within one week after operation in all patients. Dyspnea caused by compression of the left main bronchus occurred in one patient. Re-stenosis of the stents occurred three to seven months after operation in eight patients. The mean survival time was seven months in all patients. Conclusion: Self-expanded covered stent placement is a simple, safe and reliable treatment method for advanced stage esophageal cancer and can effectively lengthen survival time. (authors)

  20. Circumferential optical coherence tomography angiography imaging of the swine esophagus using a micromotor balloon catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Ahsen, Osman Oguz; Liang, Kaicheng; Wang, Zhao; Cleveland, Cody; Booth, Lucas; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex E; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni; Fujimoto, James G

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a micromotor balloon imaging catheter for ultrahigh speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) which provides wide area, circumferential structural and angiographic imaging of the esophagus without contrast agents. Using a 1310 nm MEMS tunable wavelength swept VCSEL light source, the system has a 1.2 MHz A-scan rate and ~8.5 µm axial resolution in tissue. The micromotor balloon catheter enables circumferential imaging of the esophagus at 240 frames per second (fps) with a ~30 µm (FWHM) spot size. Volumetric imaging is achieved by proximal pullback of the micromotor assembly within the balloon at 1.5 mm/sec. Volumetric data consisting of 4200 circumferential images of 5,000 A-scans each over a 2.6 cm length, covering a ~13 cm(2) area is acquired in <18 seconds. A non-rigid image registration algorithm is used to suppress motion artifacts from non-uniform rotational distortion (NURD), cardiac motion or respiration. En face OCT images at various depths can be generated. OCT angiography (OCTA) is computed using intensity decorrelation between sequential pairs of circumferential scans and enables three-dimensional visualization of vasculature. Wide area volumetric OCT and OCTA imaging of the swine esophagus in vivo is demonstrated.

  1. Investigations of disorders of motility of the esophagus in chronic diseases. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecklenbeck, W.; Vosberg, Henning

    1991-01-01

    Chronic diseases of the esophagus impair the transport function of this organ. Esophageal scintigraphy investigates the transport function under physiological circumstances. Various test meals are radioactively labelled and swallowed by the patient. depending on the cause of a transport disorder the investigation lasts only 60s up to half an hour. Parametric imaging techniques like the so called condensed pictures give information about extent and peristalsis of transport disorders. The determination of transit times and/or percent of residuum in the eso-phagus allows for quantitating functional disorders. The use of multiple swallow technique or of various tracers during one investigation leads to high sensitivity in the detection of esophageal transport disorders, even in an early stage of a chronic disease, like morphea or sclero-derma. The documentation of successful therapeutical interventions is possible, for example in achalasia. In obscure complaints or in thoracic pain without coronary heart disease esophageal scintigraphy may confirm or exclude a disease of the esophagus. (author). 40 refs.; 5 figs

  2. [Animal experiment study of anastomosis healing after partial resection of the pre-irradiated thoracic esophagus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, C; Nilles-Schendera, A; Frommhold, H

    2000-01-01

    Multimodal therapeutic concepts in cases of neoplasms of the intestinal tract entail the risk of undesirable complications with respect to healing of wounds and anastomoses. The separate steps of a combined treatment consisting radiation therapy and partial resection of the thoracic esophagus were performed in animal experiments to study the effect of radiation therapy on the healing of anastomoses. Adult non-purebred dogs were irradiated in a defined thoracic field with a Betatron (42 MeV) and subsequently underwent esophagectomy. After resection of a 2 cm segment of the esophagus end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Different methods of irradiation and postoperative observation times resulted in a total of 8 groups of 3 animals each. Fractionated irradiation was definitely better tolerated than irradiation with a high single doses. The temporary delay of the anastomotic healing was documented histologically. Only one case of anastomotic leakage occurred, and impaired wound healing was observed in only one animal. The mode of irradiation must be regarded as important for the clinical course. Fractionated preoperative irradiation in the area of the thoracic esophagus does not lead to any relevant disturbance of wound and anastomotic healing with meticulous surgical technique and adequate intensive postoperative care. The basic feasibility of surgical therapy combined with preoperative radiotherapy in tumors of the upper digestive tract was confirmed by our experimental work.

  3. Kaempferol inhibits cell proliferation and glycolysis in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma via targeting EGFR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shihua; Wang, Xiaowei; Li, Chunguang; Zhao, Tiejun; Jin, Hai; Fang, Wentao

    2016-08-01

    Antitumor activity of kaempferol has been studied in various tumor types, but its potency in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma is rarely known. Here, we reported the activity of kaempferol against esophagus squamous cell carcinoma as well as its antitumor mechanisms. Results of cell proliferation and colony formation assay showed that kaempferol substantially inhibited tumor cell proliferation and clone formation in vitro. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that tumor cells were induced G0/G1 phase arrest after kaempferol treatment, and the expression of protein involved in cell cycle regulation was dramatically changed. Except the potency on cell proliferation, we also discovered that kaempferol had a significant inhibitory effect against tumor glycolysis. With the downregulation of hexokinase-2, glucose uptake and lactate production in tumor cells were dramatically declined. Mechanism studies revealed kaempferol had a direct effect on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity, and along with the inhibition of EGFR, its downstream signaling pathways were also markedly suppressed. Further investigations found that exogenous overexpression of EGFR in tumor cells substantially attenuated glycolysis suppression induced by kaempferol, which implied that EGFR also played an important role in kaempferol-mediated glycolysis inhibition. Finally, the antitumor activity of kaempferol was validated in xenograft model and kaempferol prominently restrained tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, dramatic decrease of EGFR activity and hexokinase-2 expression were observed in kaempferol-treated tumor tissue, which confirmed these findings in vitro. Briefly, these studies suggested that kaempferol, or its analogues, may serve as effective candidates for esophagus squamous cell carcinoma management.

  4. Distribution of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in the Esophagus of Fetal Rats with Esophageal Atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Isbir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Scarcity of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC is related to motility disorders. In the study, we aimed to evaluate the number and density of ICCs in the fetal rat esophagus in the adriamycin - esophageal atresia (EA model. Material and Method: Rat fetuses were divided into three groups as a control, adriamycin group without EA and adriamycin group with EA. Four doses of adriamycin, 2 mg/kg each, were injected intraperitoneally to the adriamycin group rats between on 6 and 9 days of gestation. The presence of ICCs in the esophagus of the rat fetuses was determined by using an immunohistochemistry technique (c-kit, CD117. The average numbers of ICCs were calculated with microscopic evaluation by using a visual scoring system (range1 to 3. Results: Seven fetuses were included in each group. The ICCs score 3 distributions of fetuses were 5 (72% fetuses in the control group, 3 (43% fetuses in the adriamycin group without EA, 1 (14% fetus in the adriamycin group with EA. It have been found that there was a marked reduction of ICCs distribution in the adriamycin group with EA compared to control group (p 0.05. Discussion: ICCs density was significantly decreased in the rat fetuses with EA compared to the fetuses without EA. These findings support the idea that ICCs density may be congenitally abnormal in EA. This may be led to dismotility seen in the operated esophagus due to EA.

  5. RISK FACTORS OF ESOPHAGUS LESIONS IN CHILDREN WITH OVERWEIGHT AND MEASURES OF PROPHYLAXIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Dubrovskaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The work studied clinical and morphological peculiarities of esophagus lesions and factors favoring to its development in children with overweight. The vast majority of cases independently of body weight showed disregeneratory and dystrophic lesions of mucous tunic in distal part of esophagus. Morphological signs of reflux esophagitis were detected at 1 cm upper Z line in 78% of children with overweight. The main role in esophagus lesions’ forming play such habits as «stress limosis», use of high-calorie nutrition in big single dose in children with overweight and burden family history concerning diseases of gastrointestinal tract and obesity. Such children are characterized by active body weight increase during first year of life. Present study confirms the significance of proper food behavior and healthy nutrition habits forming in children from first months of life. This lay in the base of gastrointestinal system diseases prophylaxis and forming of overweight and obesity in future.Key words: children, reflux esophagitis, overweight, risk factors, prophylaxis.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(4:125-129

  6. Somatically Acquired LINE-1 Insertions in Normal Esophagus Undergo Clonal Expansion in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet-O'Hare, Tara T; Sharma, Reema; Rodić, Nemanja; Anders, Robert A; Burns, Kathleen H; Kazazian, Haig H

    2016-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (SCC) is the most common form of esophageal cancer in the world and is typically diagnosed at an advanced stage when successful treatment is challenging. Understanding the mutational profile of this cancer may identify new treatment strategies. Because somatic retrotransposition has been shown in tumors of the gastrointestinal system, we focused on LINE-1 (L1) mobilization as a source of genetic instability in this cancer. We hypothesized that retrotransposition is ongoing in SCC patients. The expression of L1 encoded proteins is necessary for retrotransposition to occur; therefore, we evaluated the expression of L1 open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p). Using immunohistochemistry, we detected ORF1p expression in all four SCC cases evaluated. Using L1-seq, we identified and validated 74 somatic insertions in eight tumors of the nine evaluated. Of these, 12 insertions appeared to be somatic, not genetically inherited, and sub-clonal (i.e., present in less than one copy per genome equivalent) in the adjacent normal esophagus (NE), while clonal in the tumor. Our results indicate that L1 retrotransposition is active in SCC of the esophagus and that insertion events are present in histologically NE that expands clonally in the subsequent tumor. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  7. Asia-Pacific consensus on the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: an update focusing on refractory reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fock, Kwong Ming; Talley, Nicholas; Goh, Khean Lee; Sugano, Kentaro; Katelaris, Peter; Holtmann, Gerald; Pandolfino, John E; Sharma, Prateek; Ang, Tiing Leong; Hongo, Michio; Wu, Justin; Chen, Minhu; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Law, Ngai Moh; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Zhang, Jun; Ho, Khek Yu; Sollano, Jose; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Bhatia, Shobna

    2016-09-01

    Since the publication of the Asia-Pacific consensus on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in 2008, there has been further scientific advancement in this field. This updated consensus focuses on proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus. A steering committee identified three areas to address: (1) burden of disease and diagnosis of reflux disease; (2) proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease; (3) Barrett's oesophagus. Three working groups formulated draft statements with supporting evidence. Discussions were done via email before a final face-to-face discussion. We used a Delphi consensus process, with a 70% agreement threshold, using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria to categorise the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. A total of 32 statements were proposed and 31 were accepted by consensus. A rise in the prevalence rates of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in Asia was noted, with the majority being non-erosive reflux disease. Overweight and obesity contributed to the rise. Proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease was recognised to be common. A distinction was made between refractory symptoms and refractory reflux disease, with clarification of the roles of endoscopy and functional testing summarised in two algorithms. The definition of Barrett's oesophagus was revised such that a minimum length of 1 cm was required and the presence of intestinal metaplasia no longer necessary. We recommended the use of standardised endoscopic reporting and advocated endoscopic therapy for confirmed dysplasia and early cancer. These guidelines standardise the management of patients with refractory gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus in the Asia-Pacific region. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Immunohistochemical assessment of Survivin and Bcl3 expression as potential biomarkers for NF-κB activation in the Barrett metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccio, Ignazio; Khan, Saif; Butt, Adil; Graham, David; Sehgal, Vinay; Patel, Dominic; Novelli, Marco; Lovat, Laurence B; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Hamoudi, Rifat A

    2018-02-01

    Non-dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus (NDBE) occurs as a consequence of an inflammatory response triggered through prolonged gastro-oesophageal reflux and it may precede the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. NF-κB activation as a result of the inflammatory response has been shown in NDBE, but the possible mechanism involved in the process is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess, using immunohistochemistry, Survivin and Bcl3 expression as potential biomarkers for NF-κB activation along the oesophageal metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence. Survivin is an NF-κB-inducible anti-apoptotic protein, and Bcl3 is a negative regulator of NF-κB. There was progressive upregulation of Survivin expression along the oesophageal metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence. Bcl3 expression was upregulated in non-dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus, low-grade, high-grade dysplasia and oesophageal adenocarcinoma when compared to squamous group. The study shows the differential expression of Bcl3 between the squamous and Barrett's stage, suggesting that Bcl3 could be a surrogate marker for early event involving constitutive NF-κB activation. In addition, the study suggests that NF-κB activation may infer resistance to apoptosis through the expression of anti-apoptotic genes such as Survivin, which showed progressive increase in expression throughout the oesophageal metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence. This ability to avoid apoptosis may underlie the persistence and malignant predisposition of Barrett's metaplasia. © 2018 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2018 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  9. Avaliação da expressão imunoistoquímica da proteína p16INK4a no adenocarcinoma de esôfago Protein p16INK4a immunohistochemical expression in adenocarcinoma of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Henrique Osanai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O adenocarcinoma de esôfago apresenta aumento de frequência nas últimas décadas, particularmente em países desenvolvidos. O esôfago de Barrett é reconhecido como a principal lesão precursora e o estudo da sequência metaplasia-displasia-adenocarcinoma mostra a ocorrência de alterações genéticas desde suas fases mais incipientes. As alterações no p16INK4a são relatadas como frequentes no esôfago de Barrett e no carcinoma de esôfago. OBJETIVO: Verificar a prevalência da expressão imunoistoquímica da proteína p16INK4a em exames anatomopatológicos de pacientes com adenocarcinoma de esôfago. MÉTODO: A população do estudo foi constituída de 37 pacientes com adenocarcinoma de esôfago. A expressão da proteína p16 foi detectada por meio de análise imunoistoquímica, com anticorpo primário p16INK4aAb-7, clone 16P07, NeoMarkers e avaliada de acordo com o Sistema de Escore de Imunorreatividade (Immunoreactive scoring system - IRS modificado. RESULTADOS: No grupo houve predominância de pacientes do sexo masculino (86,5% e a maioria dos casos correspondia a estádios avançados (III e IV = 67,5%. Em 12 casos (32,4% foi identificada expressão imunoistoquímica da proteína p16INK4a. Não foi observada relação significativa entre a perda da expressão da proteína p16INK4a e o grau de diferenciação histológica (p=0,81 nem com o estadiamento da doença (p=0,485. CONCLUSÃO: Ocorre perda da expressão imunoistoquímica da proteína p16INK4a, corroborando as informações de que a inativação do gene p16 é um evento frequente e que pode exercer papel importante na carcinogênese do adenocarcinoma de esôfago.BACKGROUND: The esophageal adenocarcinoma shows an increasing frequence in the last decades, specially in the developed countries. The Barrett´s esophagus is accepted as the major premalignant lesion and the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence presents a lot of genetic changes since its early

  10. Self-expandable metal stent for palliation of malignant dysphagia & quality of life improvement in advanced cancer esophagus: Upper Egypt experience

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abdelshafy; Mohammed A. Omar; Mohamed Abdel Bary; Mohamed Mostafa Wahaman; Rafaat Abd elaal Bakheet

    2017-01-01

    Background: In advanced cancer esophagus patients, self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) are utilized to relieve malignant difficulty in swallowing and improve their quality of the life. Retrospectively, we evaluated the efficacy, feasibility, and outcomes of SEMS in pa