WorldWideScience

Sample records for bangladesh organizations

  1. ADOPTION OF ORGANIC RICE FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Shaikh Tanveer; Sugimoto, Hideki; Ueno, Hideto; Huque, Sheikh Muhammad Rafiul

    2007-01-01

    Bangladesh now needs to thank its soil health, environment and human health for the country being almost self-sufficient in rice production. The present study has been undertaken to gain knowledge of the level of awareness by farmers and consumers regarding the status of organic rice, and knowledge of demand and marketing opportunities and limitations for organic rice in the country. The present study has highlighted the overall organic rice situation in Bangladesh, which is not yet well docu...

  2. Key Performance Characteristics of Organic Shrimp Aquaculture in Southwest Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Reinhard Vogl

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon; Fabricius, 1798 aquaculture has come to be one of the most important sectors in both the rural and national economies. Likewise, organic shrimp aquaculture has emerged as an alternative farming enterprise for farmers especially in the southwestern districts of Bangladesh. The present study aims to show key performance characteristics of organic shrimp farmers and farming in a prototypical shrimp farming area in Bangladesh. Data was collected in 2009 from organic shrimp farmers in the Kaligonj and Shyamnagar sub-districts through questionnaire interviews, transect walks and focus group discussions. The mean productivity of organic shrimp farming in the area is 320 kg ha−1 yr−1 (ranging from 120 to 711 kg ha−1year−1. Organic farmers are more likely to have a higher monthly income and less aquaculture experience. Moreover, suitable landholdings and classified labor distribution have been found to play an important role in the development of organic shrimp aquaculture. The most common assets of organic shrimp aquaculture are high yield, low production cost, available post larvae and high market prices. Small business farmers are likely to earn more income benefits from organic shrimp aquaculture than their larger-scale counterparts. Finally, the paper suggests that more research is needed to stimulate the success of organic shrimp aquaculture.

  3. Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Kojo, Naoko C.

    2010-01-01

    The overall fiscal position of Bangladesh looks sustainable, but there are concerns that the country may be trapped in a low revenue-low capital spending equilibrium, which is holding back Bangladesh’s growth potential. Eliminating wasteful spending and halting fiscal drains through inefficient non-financial public corporations (NFPCs) are important ways to create fiscal space, particularly in the area of infrastructure. This paper reviews the financial performance of the NFPC ...

  4. Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    The population of Bangladesh was 104 million in 1986, with an annual growth rate of 2.6%. The country's infant mortality rate is 12.1%, and life expectancy stands at 54 years. The literacy rate is 29%. The work force of 34.1 million is distributed among agriculture (74%), industry (11%), and services (15%). The gross domestic product (GDP) is US$15.3 billion, with a real annual growth rate of 3.6% and a per capita GDP of $151. As one of the world's poorest and most densely populated countries, Bangladesh must struggle to produce domestically and import enough food to feed its rapidly increasing population. The country's transportation, communications, and power infrastructure is relatively poorly developed. Since 1971, an emphasis has been placed on developing new industrial capacity and rehabilitating the economy. The statist economic model, including nationalization of the key jute industry, had resulted in inefficiency and economic stagnation. At present, rapid population growth, inefficiency in the public sector, and restricted natural resources and capital continue to impede economic development. On the other hand, economic policies aimed at encouraging private enterprise and investment, denationalizing public industries, reinstating budgetary discipline, and mobilizing domestic resources are beginning to have an impact. Underemployment remains a serious problem, and there are growing concerns regarding the ability of the agricultural sector to absorb additional manpower. To reach the goal of 10% annual industrial growth for the 1986-89 period, the government is aggressively seeking foreign investment. PMID:12177915

  5. The Accountability of non-governmental organizations: A case of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Mizanur

    2014-01-01

    NGOs are playing a crucial role in the development of developing countries. NGOs accountability is gradually emerging as a pressing issue in the development arena. The NGOs' effectiveness can be amplified by ensuring accountability. The study was initiated to address a vital issue: how NGOs' are ensuring accountability to diverse stakeholders. The study carried out in Bangladesh. Bangladesh has possibly been the most important hearth on the world for non-governmental organizations. NGOs in Ba...

  6. Changes of organic phosphorus in river waters in northern Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Islam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The variability in phosphorus concentrations and the decomposition rates of organic phosphorus were measured in five selected rivers through four surveys in July and November of 2012, and February and May of 2013. After collection the water samples were incubated for 20 days in a dark incubator and the change of forms of phosphorus such as particulate organic phosphorus (POP, dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP and dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP were analyzed. By fitting the changes to two types of models, the decomposition rates of organic phosphorus were determined. The mean total organic phosphorus (TOP decomposition rate coefficients in the studied rivers was 0.039 day-1. The average POP decomposition rate coefficient (POP→DOP→DIP model was 0.038 day-1 while the mean DOP decomposition rate coefficient was 0.251 day-1. The decomposition rate coefficients measured in this study might be applicable for modeling of river water quality.

  7. Natural resource conflicts and community organizations in Bangladesh:

    OpenAIRE

    Parvin SULTANA; Thompson, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    This analysis assesses community based organization (CBO) performance including conflict management over three years among about 150 floodplain CBOs and reviews experience in the five forest protected areas with co-management.

  8. Organic farming in populated area: Bangladesh – an example of case study

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Shaikh Tanveer

    2012-01-01

    Agriculture plays a very important role in populated countries like Bangladesh. Bangladesh ranks eighth in World population rank and fifth in Asia. The conventional agriculture of Bangladesh after green revolution heavily depended on chemical fertilizers and pesticides causing several problems to human health and the environment. As a result, food safety has now become a big issue. Moreover, the cost of agriculture has increased manifold with declining yield levels and growing dependence on m...

  9. The character of organic carbon in recharge water and arsenic mobilization in Bangladesh aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracht, L. E.; Fussell, A. H.; Polizzotto, M.; Badruzzaman, A. M.; Ali, M. A.; Neumann, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    In Bangladesh, arsenic-contaminated groundwater, used for both drinking and irrigation supplies, negatively affects the health of millions of people. Past work at our site in Munshiganj suggests that current patterns of arsenic concentration in the aquifer are related to groundwater flow and recharge chemistry. Constructed ponds and groundwater-irrigated rice fields serve as the primary aquifer recharge sources, with pond recharge evolving into high-arsenic groundwater and rice field recharge evolving into low-arsenic groundwater. The composition of these water types vary in concentrations and character of dissolved organic carbon, a presumed key component in the mechanism of arsenic release from sediments. Here we present results from an experiment-based laboratory study that directly tests the role of organic carbon character and bioavailability on arsenic mobilization. Incubation experiments using sediment samples collected from Bangladesh and waters with different carbon sources (e.g., pond and rice field recharge water and artificial water with model carbon compounds) were conducted to show the phase transformations carbon undergoes during arsenic mobilization processes, to isolate the carbon components and characteristics most responsible for mobilization reactions, and to investigate the importance of secondary chemical constituents for completion of these physiochemical reactions. Water, gas, and sediment samples collected from the incubations were analyzed for nutrient, metal, anion, and carbon concentrations, as well as carbon character. The results clarify the chemical components most critical in arsenic mobilization and provide insight into the in situ chemical reactions occurring in the aquifer. Moreover, this better chemical understanding helps elucidate the potential impact of altered recharge patterns and recharge chemistry on arsenic concentrations of Bangladeshi groundwater supplies.

  10. Analysis the Plant Nutrients and Organic Matter in Textile Sludge in Gazipur, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Islam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research was carried out to determine the content of essential macro nutrients (N, P, K and S as well as Fe, total organic carbon and total organic matter in textile sludge of Apex Weaving and Finishing Mills Ltd., Gazipur, Bangladesh and assess its possibility to use as a soil conditioner or fertilizer in agricultural land. The results revealed that plant macro nutrients Nitrogen (N, Phosphorous (P, Potassium (K and Sulphur (S were found in significant amount compared to some commonly used organic manures. The range of various macro nutrients was 1.53-2.37, 0.09-0.14, 0.11-0.17 and 2.69-3.42% for N, P, K and S, respectively. The concentration of iron (19.52% was also very high in the sludge than that of in soil. Moreover; total organic carbon (19.89% and total organic matter (34.67% were abundantly available in sludge. In addition, thermal study explores that after 400 °C the sludge was thermally stable and it was also confirmed by IR study that dried sludge samples showed significant presence of water at room temperature while the samples heated up to 400 °C, the presence of water was barely indicated.

  11. Trace element accumulation and trophic relationships in aquatic organisms of the Sundarbans mangrove ecosystem (Bangladesh).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Asunción; Tornero, Victoria; Bhattacharjee, Dola; Aguilar, Alex

    2016-03-01

    The Sundarbans forest is the largest and one of the most diverse and productive mangrove ecosystems in the world. Located at the northern shoreline of the Bay of Bengal in the Indian Ocean and straddling India and Bangladesh, the mangrove forest is the result of three primary river systems that originate further north and northwest. During recent decades, the Sundarbans have been subject to increasing pollution by trace elements caused by the progressive industrialization and urbanization of the basins of these three rivers. As a consequence, animals and plants dwelling downstream in the mangroves are exposed to these pollutants in varying degrees, and may potentially affect human health when consumed. The aim of the present study was to analyse the concentrations of seven trace elements (Zn, Cu, Cr, Hg, Pb, Cd and As) in 14 different animal and plant species collected in the Sundarbans in Bangladesh to study their transfer through the food web and to determine whether their levels in edible species are acceptable for human consumption. δ(15)N values were used as a proxy of the trophic level. A decrease in Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd levels was observed with increasing trophic position. Trace element concentrations measured in all organisms were, in general, lower than the concentrations obtained in other field studies conducted in the same region. When examined with respect to accepted international standards, the concentrations observed in fish and crustaceans were generally found to be safe for human consumption. However, the levels of Zn in Scylla serrata and Cr and Cd in Harpadon nehereus exceeded the proposed health advisory levels and may be of concern for human health. PMID:26748006

  12. Farmers' view on soil organic matter depletion and its management in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, M.Z

    2001-01-01

    Metadata only record Bangladesh is an agricultural country. About 80% of the total population lives in rural areas. The contribution of agriculture to the gross domestic product is 30%. Rice is the major food crop while jute, sugarcane and tea are the main cash crops. Other important crops are wheat, tobacco, pulses, vegetables and fruits. Overall productivity in Bangladesh is stagnating or declining. The implication of yield stagnation or declining productivity is severe, since these tren...

  13. High Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in Air from Ship Breaking Activities in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nøst, Therese H; Halse, Anne K; Randall, Scott; Borgen, Anders R; Schlabach, Martin; Paul, Alak; Rahman, Atiqur; Breivik, Knut

    2015-10-01

    The beaches on the coast of Chittagong in Bangladesh are one of the most intense ship breaking areas in the world. The aim of the study was to measure the concentrations of organic contaminants in the air in the city of Chittagong, including the surrounding ship breaking areas using passive air samplers (N = 25). The compounds detected in the highest amounts were the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs), whereas dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were several orders of magnitude lower in comparison. PCBs, PAHs, and HCB were highest at sites near the ship breaking activities, whereas DDTs and SCCPs were higher in the urban areas. Ship breaking activities likely act as atmospheric emission sources of PCBs, PAHs, and HCB, thus adding to the international emphasis on responsible recycling of ships. Concentrations of PAHs, PCBs, DDTs, HCB, and SCCPs in ambient air in Chittagong are high in comparison to those found in similar studies performed in other parts of Asia. Estimated toxic equivalent quotients indicate elevated human health risks caused by inhalation of PAHs at most sites. PMID:26351879

  14. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of causative organisms of neonatal septicemia in an urban hospital of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forhad Monjur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The information of the sensitivity pattern of the causative organisms is very important for effective control of septicemia in neonates. OBJECTIVE: To determine the proportion and profile of pathogenic bacteria in the blood cultures of the neonates with clinically suspected septicemia and their susceptibility pattern to antimicrobial agents for developing a unified antibiotic treatment protocol. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted over a period of 3 year and 4 months (39 months. The study included 1000 patients admitted in the selected hospital in Bangladesh. Blood samples for culture were taken aseptically before starting antibiotic therapy. Microorganisms were isolated and identified by standard microbiological processes which include colony morphology, Gram stain, and biochemical profiles. Antimicrobial sensitivity patterns were performed by Kirby-Bauer′s disc diffusion method against imipenem, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, chloramphenicol, netilmicin, gentamicin, ceftriaxone, aztreonam, cefotaxime, cephalexin, and ampicillin. Results: Among the patients, 633 (63.3% were males and 367 (36.7% were females. Blood cultures were found positive in 194 (19.4% neonates. The organisms isolated were Pseudomonas spp. (31.4%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (23.2%, Staphylococcus aureus (12.4%, Escherichia coli (7.2%, Acinatobactor (5.7%, Gram-negative Bacilli (4.1%, Flavobacterium spp. (3.6%, Serratia spp. (5.7%, Citrobacter fruendi (3.1%, Streptococcus species (2.6%, and Enterobacter spp. (1.0%. A majority of the bacterial isolates in neonatal sepsis were found sensitive to imipenem (91.8% and ciprofloxacin (57.2% and resistant to commonly used antibiotics, eg. ampicillin (96.4% and cephalexin (89.2%. Conclusion : The problem can be mitigated by careful selection and prudent use of available antibiotics.

  15. Eco-friendly and organic farming in Bangladesh : International classification and local practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hoque, Md. Nazmul

    2012-01-01

    Agriculture plays a crucial role in overall economic development of agro –based developing countries like Bangladesh. In those countries, green revolution emerged in 1960s with the slogan of "produce more food". Within a couple of years, farmers received "package technologies" of HYV seed-fertilizer-irrigation. With the adoption of these technologies, farmers started to use chemicals and they were getting more production for a decade. Most of the newly developed inputs and technologies were s...

  16. Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  17. Towards sustainable co-management organization: a case study of the Baikka Beel, Moulvibazar, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahidul Islam Bhuiya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted in Baikka Beel, Moulvibazar, Bangladesh from July, 2012 to October, 2012. This paper examined the role and performance of the CMOs in the Beel management and the challenges faced by the CMO members. Primary information were collected through focus group discussions using conceptual framework. Organizational development, leadership development, capital formation, women and gender development and conflict resolution were used to examine the performance of the CMOs. The result revealed that the RMO and FRUG were in satisfactory level in sustainability except RMO network. However CMOs were facing some challenges. These included policy level (amendment of Fish Act 1950 regarding permanent sanctuary, lease period extension complexity, no national and social recognition of CMO members, less awareness program to the non-CMO respondents, few scope of media highlight and no fund especially in RMO network operation and operational level (no vehicle to rush to protect the poaching, no provision of honorary for RMO members, less training in capacity building and regional and statewide interactions. At last some recommendations were made for both policy and operational level. Finally new project could be implemented through the implementation of the research findings towards sustainable CMOs.

  18. Burkholderia pseudomallei: Its Detection in Soil and Seroprevalence in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Jilani, Md. Shariful Alam; Robayet, Jamshedul Alam Mohammad; Mohiuddin, Md.; Hasan, Md. Rokib; Ahsan, Chowdhury Rafiqul; Haq, Jalaluddin Ashraful

    2016-01-01

    Background Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an endemic disease in Bangladesh. No systematic study has yet been done to detect the environmental source of the organism and its true extent in Bangladesh. The present study attempted to isolate B. pseudomallei in soil samples and to determine its seroprevalence in several districts in Bangladesh. Methodology and Results Soil samples were collected from rural areas of four districts of Bangladesh from where culture confirmed me...

  19. Country programme review Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A five-expert mission was organized from 21-26 August 1993 and this document reflects the findings and recommendations of the team. Intensive contacts with heads of institutions, scientists and decision making persons in various sectors in the country were co-ordinated by the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission. The terms of reference of the mission were: To assess the on-going TC projects; to assist the Bangladesh nationals to finalize the formulation of the new requests for 1995-96 TC programme and to establish priority areas with regard to the introduction of national projects involving accelerated technological transfer in order to catalyze national development plans in specific areas; to examine institutional framework suitable for the introduction of these priority nuclear techniques

  20. Studies of organic matter turnover and nutrient buildup in a Bangladesh soil for sustainable agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field experiment was conducted with a wheat-rice cropping system over four consecutive years, 1996 to 2000. The objective was to assess whether an adapted residue-management system would enhance the potential to retain added nutrients within the crop-soil system with concomitant increases in yields. To synchronize nutrient release from organic amendments with nutrient uptake by the crop, another experiment was conducted in 1997/98. The rate of decomposition and the release of N from crop residues were determined in an incubation study conducted under field conditions in small 15N microplots contained within cylinders. Results indicated that wheat residue was enriched in 15N at 4.3 to 5.5% a.e., where 10.5% 15N a.e. labelled ammonium sulphate had been applied. Total yields of rice (grain + straw) increased significantly in treatment T2 where 15N-labelled crop residue was applied at 5 Mg ha-1, i.e. 14.0, 11.6, 12.6 and 12.6 Mg ha-1 in the first, second, third and fours years, respectively. The 15N-labelled wheat residue contributed about 3 kg N ha-1 to the total N pool of the first crop of rice in treatment T2 and 0.99, 0.39 and 0.15 N kg ha-1 in the second, third, and fourth years respectively. The 15N fertilizer, which was applied to the first crop (wheat), was gradually recovered in the subsequent crops in plots where 15 N-labelled crop residues were incorporated, and more 15N was retained in the soil than was taken up by plants. In the incubation study, N release from crop residues showed an irregular relationship with crop-N uptake. Changes were observed in soil mineral N following addition of crop residues. The greatest release of 15N from residues was recorded with the longest incubation period. (author)

  1. Child Marriage in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Saalfeldt, Rie

    2014-01-01

    Child marriage is a major health and security concern that still prevails in Bangladesh. The paper attempts to investigate and tries to understand the societal and cultural context of the problem. By applying Mary Douglas’ Socio-Cultural Viability theory and her parsimonious model onto the issue of child marriage in Bangladesh the four major opposing cultural camps are pointed out (Plan Bangladesh, Bangladesh government, the garment factory owners, and the individual Bangladeshi citizen). The...

  2. Fertility Status of Bangladesh Soils -A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Moslehuddin, Abu Zofar Md.; Salma, Laizoo; Egashira, Kazuhiko

    1997-01-01

    Fertility status of Bangladesh soils was critically evaluated by reviewing the studies which have been carried out in universities and research institutes of Bangladesh. Almost all upland soils are low in organic matter and deficient in N. Availability of P to the crops is a problem mainly in calcareous soils of Ganges floodplain and acidic soils of terrace and hill areas. Status of K is not a great problem in floodplain areas, but terrace and Piedmont soils are not capable of supplying enoug...

  3. Pond Fish Production Through People's Participation in Rural Bangladesh 【Article】

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Masudul Hoq; Maharjan, Keshav Lall

    2001-01-01

    Aquaculture is currently responsible for a significant proportion of total fish production in Bangladesh. Fish is the main animal sources of protein for the rural people of Bangladesh. However,given increasing demand for fish, the per capita production of fish is declining. The present studyhighlights the development of fresh water pond fish culture through grassroots level organization inBangladesh. The study was conducted in rural area of Bangladesh. The result of the study reveals that,man...

  4. Bangladesh : Accounting and Auditing

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2003-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of accounting and auditing practices within the broader context of the Bangladesh institutional framework and capacity needed to ensure the quality of corporate financial reporting. The accounting and auditing practices in Bangladesh suffer from institutional weaknesses in regulation, compliance, and enforcement of standards and rules. The preparation of ...

  5. Inclusive Education in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Mohammad Tariq; Burnip, Lindsay

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on inclusive education in Bangladesh for children with special needs. Bangladesh is not behind other developed countries in enacting laws and declarations in favour of inclusive education, but a lack of resources is the main barrier in implementing inclusive education. Special education and integrated education models exist in…

  6. Energy poverty in rural Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy poverty is a well-established concept among energy and development specialists. International development organizations frequently cite energy-poverty alleviation as a necessary condition to reduce income poverty. Several approaches used to measure energy poverty over the past 20 years have defined the energy poverty line as the minimum quantity of physical energy needed to perform such basic tasks as cooking and lighting. This paper uses a demand-based approach to define the energy poverty line as the threshold point at which energy consumption begins to rise with increases in household income. At or below this threshold point, households consume a bare minimum level of energy and should be considered energy poor. This approach was applied using cross-sectional data from a comprehensive 2004 household survey representative of rural Bangladesh. The findings suggest that some 58 percent of rural households in Bangladesh are energy poor, versus 45 percent that are income poor. The findings also suggest that policies to support rural electrification and greater use of improved biomass stoves might play a significant role in reducing energy poverty. - Research Highlights: →We estimate energy poverty for rural Bangladesh adopting a demand-based approach. →Findings suggest that energy poverty does not necessarily follow the same pattern as income poverty. →Access to modern energy and efficient use of traditional energy help alleviate energy poverty. →Energy poverty indicator can help track the effectiveness of a wide range of energy policies.

  7. Economic Development of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mohajan, Haradhan

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh is a developing country in the South Asia. Its illiterate and unskilled large population is a burden to the country. Agriculture is the main source of the income of the country. Government of the country is taking various steps to decrease poverty, but yet about one-third of people of Bangladesh are living below the national poverty line. More than half of the children of Bangladesh are underweight. The gross domestic product (GDP) is hovering around 6% for the last decade. Migrate...

  8. Child Rights in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mohajan, Haradhan

    2014-01-01

    Bangladesh is a densely populated country with populations about 160 millions. About half of the populations of Bangladesh are under the age of 18 who are considered as children and more than 20 million of them are under the age of 5. About 73% of children live in the rural areas and 27% live in the urban areas. One-third of these children continue to live below the international poverty line. The violation of child rights is a common matter in Bangladesh. The children have basic rights to e...

  9. Poverty Maps of Bangladesh 2010 : Key Findings

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank; World Food Programme; Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics

    2010-01-01

    Poverty mapping is a statistical exercise to estimate the incidence of poverty at sub-national levels to enable the government, civil society organizations, and development partners to accurately identify locations with a relatively higher concentration of poor people. The current poverty mapping exercise was initiated in September 2012 by the Bangladesh bureau of statistics (BBS), the Wor...

  10. Poverty Maps of Bangladesh 2010 : Technical Report

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank, (WB); World Food Programme; Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics

    2010-01-01

    Poverty mapping is a statistical exercise to estimate the incidence of poverty at sub-national levels to enable the government, civil society organizations, and development partners to accurately identify locations with a relatively higher concentration of poor people. The current poverty mapping exercise was initiated in September 2012 by the Bangladesh bureau of statistics (BBS), the Wor...

  11. Rape in Rural Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Nowsher Ali; Sanjida Akhter; Nur Hossain; Nashid Tabassum Khan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rape is one of the silent brutal sexual offences in Bangladesh. Despite strong laws against it, the evil of rape continues to rise. Increasing trend of the silent cruel sexual offence (rape) represents a major psychopath sexual disorder and public health problem and progress of the country. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the pattern of alleged rape victims in a rural district of Bangladesh with the ultimate aim to create public awareness about the brutal crim...

  12. Recognizing child maltreatment in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, N Z; Lynch, M A

    1997-08-01

    Concern is increasing in Bangladesh over child abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Children from all walks of life are being treated at the Child Development Center (CDC) Dhaka Shishu Hospital for neurodevelopmental problems resulting from abuse and neglect. Efforts to protect children from sexual harassment result in girls being isolated at home or married at an early age. Some young brides are eventually abandoned and forced into prostitution. Early marriage reflects the lack of acknowledgement of a period of adolescence and the belief that puberty is a marker of adulthood. Many girls aged 8-16 are employed as live-in domestic servants, and many suffer sexual as well as emotional abuse. Garment factories, on the other hand, offer girls an escape from extreme poverty, domestic service, and early marriage but are threatened by forces that condemn child labor. Rather than ending such opportunities, employers should be encouraged to provide employees with educational and welfare facilities. The CDC seeks to explore the extent and depth of the problem of child abuse while recognizing the special circumstances at work in Bangladesh. It is also necessary to raise awareness of these issues and of the discrepancies between the law and cultural practices. For example, the legal marriage age of 18 years for a woman and 21 years for a man is often ignored. Additional forms of abuse receiving the attention of women's organizations and human rights groups include the trafficking of children. A network of concerned organizations should be created to work against the child abuse, neglect, and exploitation that Bangladesh has pledged to overcome by signing the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. PMID:9280385

  13. Aspects of microfinance system of Grameen Bank of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Jamal; Mohajan, Haradhan; Datta, Rajib

    2012-01-01

    The microfinance system of Grameen Bank is a revolutionary tool to eradicate poverty of the rural people especially the women of Bangladesh. At present GB is the largest microfinance bank in Bangladesh and probably the biggest microcredit organization in the world. It provides loans to assetless and landless poor people whom no commercial bank give loan. Microcredit is the most useful and popular financial system in the world to face financial crisis of the poor people. Grameen Bank loan dist...

  14. Lentil: the Bangladesh breakthrough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangladesh has made great strides in food production. Recently it has achieved a worthwhile improvement in productivity of lentil—one of its most important crops. And ICARDA had a part to play. Lentil is the most important pulse in Bangladesh. It is the most popular pulse in both urban and rural areas, and rice with lentil soup (known as dhal) is often eaten in the villages; most people try to include it in their daily diet. So it is not surprising that Bangladesh is the world’s fourth largest lentil producer, exceeded only by India, Turkey and Canada—all of which have a far greater land area. The sown area of lentil in Bangladesh is about 210,000 ha, giving a production of 160,000 tonnes at an average yield of 769 t/ha. Even so, this is not enough. In 1994, according to FAO, Bangladesh imported 75,000 tonnes of pulses with a value of around US $19.8 million. This was high; the figure fluctuates, but there is an obvious need to improve production. This can not be done by increasing the sown area. In an intensive cropping pattern, lentil faces tough competition from cereals and oilseeds and from other winter pulses. Indeed, lentil is grown as a sole crop in Bangladesh but also as a mix or intercropped with cereals, oilseeds and sugarcane. Intercropping and mix-cropping are age-old practices, particularly in the north and north-western parts of the country. In this situation, an increase in production can come only from better yield

  15. Cancer Control in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Syed Akram; Sullivan, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is predicted to be an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh in the next few decades. The estimated incidence of 12.7 million new cancer cases will rise to 21.4 million by 2030. More than two-thirds of the total expenditure on health is through out-of-pocket payments. According to the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, cancer is the sixth leading cause of death. International Agency for Research on Cancer has estimated cancer-related death rates in Banglade...

  16. Arsenic pollution in groundwater: a self-organizing complex geochemical process in the deltaic sedimentary environment, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareq, Shafi M; Safiullah, S; Anawar, H M; Rahman, M Majibur; Ishizuka, T

    2003-09-01

    The presence of considerable concentrations of As (Sonargon: below detection limit (bdl)-1.46 mg/l; Faridpur: bdl-1.66 mg/l) and some other elements (like B, F, U) in groundwater of the Ganges-Meghna-Brahmaputra (G-M-B) rivers flood plain indicate that several millions of people are consuming contaminated water. Conditions regulating the mobilization and diagenetic behavior of arsenic in sediments are not well characterized, although understanding these conditions is essential in order to predict the modes of transfer of this contaminant from sediments to groundwater. Analyses of vertical profiles of total arsenic and iron as well as easily soluble As and reducible (reactive) iron concentrations in sediments of the Ganges and Meghna flood plains show no arsenic-enriched layer up to 36-m depth. However, arsenic content in sediments is relatively higher than mean crustal concentration, showing some peaks (Sonargaon: 27.9 mg/kg; 3 m, 31.5 mg/kg; 9 m, 27.30 mg/kg; 16 m, 37.70 mg/kg; 29.5 m, Faridpur: 19.80 mg/kg; 6 m, 26.60 mg/kg; 14.5 m, 29.40 mg/kg; 25 m) depending on the periodical differences in sedimentary cycling of arsenic, metal (hydr)oxides and organic matter. Seasonal changes have no clear or consistent effect on the groundwater arsenic concentrations; with the exception of a small-scale localized irregular change (10-16%). However, easily reducible metal oxides and hydroxides were significant factors affecting the retention of arsenic by sediments during leaching. The biogeochemical cycling of arsenic and iron is closely coupled in deltaic systems where iron oxy-hydroxides provide a carrier phase for the deposition of arsenic in sediments. Analytical results of mimic leaching experiments strongly supported the reduction (Fe oxy-hydroxides) mechanism for arsenic mobilization in alluvial aquifer of deltaic sedimentary environment of G-M-B rivers flood plain. PMID:12922072

  17. Progress report: Bangladesh [CSC Project on Management of Water Hyacinth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CSC Project on Management of Water Hyacinth in Bangladesh was started in only April 1981. The present report from Bangladesh is based on the interim progress reports, submitted by the project coordinators of the organizations concerned, for the work during the short intervening period to 4th June 1981. It is obvious that the report deals mainly with the preliminary preparations and observations on the various aspects of the investigations. The research components assigned to various organisations in Bangladesh are: Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology; - Growth rate and biogas production; Housing and Building Research Institute; - Paper and board, and biogas; Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research - Protein, enzymes and ammoacids; Dacca University - Pollution removal and studies of biomass production. Bangladesh is a flat deltaic plain formed from old and new alluvium. The areas of old alluvium are located above the general level, while the vast areas of new alluvium are situated m the flood plain of the modern rivers. The whole country is intersected by a network of rivers; the areas comprising the alluvial plains are very large. The river bank levees are high and the land gradually slopes inland away from the levees. The tract of land between two rivers are shaped like a furrow and in most cases form elongated 'beels' or swamps which are ideal place for the growth and propagation of aquatic plants particularly water hyacinth along with other aquatic organisms, both of plant and animal origin due to eutrophication. It is in the shallow swamps and derelict ponds that luxuriant growth and proliferation of water hyacinth is generally observed in Bangladesh. However, there is a feeling that much of the water hyacinth population in the open countryside was depleted during the severe drought which prevailed during the summer of 1979. But Bangladesh has the ideal water and climatic environment for conditions of rapid growth and spread

  18. Bangladesh; Statistical Appendix

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents statistical data on gross domestic product, agricultural production, manufacturing production, energy statistics, retail prices of petroleum products, consumer price index, central government operations, revenues, and central expenditure in Bangladesh. It also presents the central government food account, consolidated accounts and profits of nonfinancial public enterprises, government domestic securities, monetary survey, balance sheet of the monetary authorities, interest ...

  19. Made In Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUCHEN

    2004-01-01

    It is nothing new for global consumers to find the tag ‘Made in China' on the back of products from famous brands such as Nike or Panasonic.or will it surprise North American or European customers to find clothes from big brands like Esprit or GAP containing the mark ‘Made in Bangladesh'.

  20. The Role of Training in Reducing Poverty: The Case of the Ultra-Poor in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Aktaruzzaman; Ali, Anees Janee

    2014-01-01

    Although microcredit is considered the main vehicle for increasing the income of the poor and alleviating poverty in Bangladesh, it is now well recognised that more than this is needed to reach the ultra poor in rural areas. Consequently, almost half of the Bangladesh population is in some way linked to non-governmental organizations'…

  1. Evaluation of Long-Term Application of Organic Residues on Accumulation of Organic Matter and Improvement of Soil Chemical Properties in a Clay Terrace Soil of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Egashira, Kazuhiko; Han, Jing-Long; Karim, A.J.M. Sirajul; Abu Zofar Md. Moslehuddin; Yamada, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    The field experiment on the long-term application of organic residues was started in 1988 at the farm of Bangabandhu Shekh Mujibur Rahamn Agricultural University (BSMRAU; named as Institute of Postgraduate Studies in Agriculture (ISPA)until 1998) and is continued until now. Five kinds of organic residues (no-application, rice straw green manure, compost and cowdung) were applied every June to cover soil surface uniformly as a thin layer and incorporated into soil to the depth of 10cm. Rice(Ju...

  2. OPPORTUNITIES OF DEVELOPING TOURISM INDUSTRY IN BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayub CHOWDHURY

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Tourism appeal includes natural places like beaches, eco-parks, lakes, valleys, rivers, islands etc., archeological sites, historic mosques and monuments, resorts, picnic spots, forest and wildlife. Bangladesh is a riverine country having attractive panoramic beauty. There are hills, valley, canals, lake, eco-park and mangrove forests, rivers, so many islands and the longest beach in the world. In this country, the scope of nature based tourism, resource based tourism, culture based tourism and eco-tourism is quite evident. Bangladesh is trying hard to develop its tourism industry. Therefore the whole situation deserves to be seen from right perspectives. Role of government is positive since the last twenty years both private and public organizations have come forwarded to attract the local and foreign tourists. The cracks of problem could not identify accurately because of the paucity number of researches and investigations in our country. Developed and organized tourism industry could change the economic condition and contribute a big share in the GDP of Bangladesh. This study will impede the opportunities of developing tourism industry in the light of existing resources.

  3. Present status of radiation education in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes and Radiation are being widely used in the fields of agriculture, medicine, industry for the benefit of people throughout the world. At the same time the use of radiation sources can do harm to man and environment. In order to ensure the satiety against radiation hazards and safe use of radiation, proper education, training, knowledge and awareness are essential. Like other achieve economic development through application f count rues Bangladesh is flying to in agriculture, food, industry, power; health or medi of isotopes and radiation technology cine. Basic education about radiation is incorporated in the school curriculum. Courses on radiation are also given in college and university education. Research organizations, universities carry out research and development works on different disciplines using radiation and radioisotopes. Seminars, workshops, conferences, takings on isotopes and radiation are also being organized. In 1993 Government of Bangladesh passed the Nuclear Satiety and Radiation Control Act 1993 for see use of radiation. The present paper win cover the radiation education, research and development works on radiation, applications of radiation in agriculture, medicine and industry, personal safety and radiation protection against radiation hazard and rules and regulations of the nuclear safety and radiation control act practised in Bangladesh. (author)

  4. Present status of radiation education in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullah, Sana [Atomic Energy Centre, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    1999-09-01

    Radioisotopes and Radiation are being widely used in the fields of agriculture, medicine, industry for the benefit of people throughout the world. At the same time the use of radiation sources can do harm to man and environment. In order to ensure the satiety against radiation hazards and safe use of radiation, proper education, training, knowledge and awareness are essential. Like other achieve economic development through application f count rues Bangladesh is flying to in agriculture, food, industry, power; health or medi of isotopes and radiation technology cine. Basic education about radiation is incorporated in the school curriculum. Courses on radiation are also given in college and university education. Research organizations, universities carry out research and development works on different disciplines using radiation and radioisotopes. Seminars, workshops, conferences, takings on isotopes and radiation are also being organized. In 1993 Government of Bangladesh passed the Nuclear Satiety and Radiation Control Act 1993 for see use of radiation. The present paper win cover the radiation education, research and development works on radiation, applications of radiation in agriculture, medicine and industry, personal safety and radiation protection against radiation hazard and rules and regulations of the nuclear safety and radiation control act practised in Bangladesh. (author)

  5. Informal Employment in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    S. Maligalig, Dalisay; Cuevas, Sining; Rosario, Aleli

    2009-01-01

    The paper developed a methodology for classifying workers into formal and informal employment using the 2005 Bangladesh Labor Force Survey (LFS). Although the 2005 LFS was not designed to collect data for this purpose, it included questions that can be used to determine whether workers are engaged in formal or informal employment. However, the process of identifying the combination of questions that could distinguish between formal and informal workers was hampered by data inconsistencies tha...

  6. Rape in Rural Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowsher Ali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rape is one of the silent brutal sexual offences in Bangladesh. Despite strong laws against it, the evil of rape continues to rise. Increasing trend of the silent cruel sexual offence (rape represents a major psychopath sexual disorder and public health problem and progress of the country. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the pattern of alleged rape victims in a rural district of Bangladesh with the ultimate aim to create public awareness about the brutal crime. Materials and method: This retrospective study was carried out on 330 sexually assailed alleged rape victims’ report forms, who reported at Faridpur Medical College, Bangladesh from 2007 to 2011 for medical examination. Results: Among the study subjects maximum number (70.0% of alleged rape cases were under the age of 20 years. More than two-thirds (64.60% of the assailants were known to the victims, most of the incidents (64.20% occurred in the victims’ houses and nearby places. The study also revealed that minimum number of victims (14.20% reported within 24 hours for medical examination. Almost one fourth of the alleged rape cases were gang rape and no positive finding in favour of sexual intercourse was found in about three fourth (72.40% of cases. Conclusion: Public awareness about rape would be effective to report in due time with preserving the evidence of crime and modern techniques like DNA diagnosis may be of help to detect the assailant.

  7. Jute breeding in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution, domestication, variability and adaptation of fibre jutes in Bangladesh are described. Domestication of fibre jutes, in evolutionary terms, is recent and the spectrum of variability within them is narrow. Yield improvement by breeding has been minimal and the reasons for this are suggested. Recent germplasm collecting expeditions to the eastern hill tracts of Bangladesh have revealed wide-spectrum diversity among the vegetable jutes grown there. Variability among the vegetable types can be utilized to improve the fibre types and to this end various hybridization schemes have now been initiated by the Bangladesh Jute Research Institute. The initial breeding priority is yield per se but ideotype characteristics have been delineated. The objectives of the breeding programme are likely to become more specific as the agronomic worth of these characteristics becomes more clearly defined. The rationale for mutation breeding in jute has been the narrow-spectrum diversity within the fibre types; the wide-spectrum diversity among the hill tract vegetable jutes should, however, be exploited in imaginative hybridization programmes before resorting to large-scale mutation breeding programmes. Mutation breeding may, however, be a valuable tool for inducing changes in fibre quality characteristics when technologists identify new uses for jute and specify their requirements. At present, however, quality is assessed subjectively. (author)

  8. A Pilot Astronomy Outreach Project in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Dipen; Mridha, Shahjahan; Afroz, Maqsuda

    2015-08-01

    In its strategic planning for the "Astronomy for Development Project," the International Astronomical Union (IAU) has ecognized, among other important missions, the role of astronomy in understanding the far-reaching possibilities for promoting global tolerance and citizenship. Furthermore, astronomy is deemed inspirational for careers in science and technology. The "Pilot Astronomy Outreach Project in Bangladesh"--the first of its kind in the country--aspires to fulfill these missions. As Bangladesh lacks resources to promote astronomy education in universities and schools, the role of disseminating astronomy education to the greater community falls on citizen science organizations. One such group, Anushandhitshu Chokro (AChokro) Science Organization, has been carrying out a successful public outreach program since 1975. Among its documented public events, AChokro organized a total solar eclipse campaign in Bangladesh in 2009, at which 15,000 people were assembled in a single open venue for the eclipse observation. The organization has actively pursued astronomy outreach to dispel public misconceptions about astronomical phenomena and to promote science. AChokro is currently working to build an observatory and Science Outreach Center around a recently-acquired 14-inch Scmidt-Cassegrain telescope and a soon-to-be-acquired new 16-inch reflector, all funded by private donations. The telescopes will be fitted with photometers, spectrometers, and digital and CCD cameras to pursue observations that would include sun spot and solar magnetic fields, planetary surfaces, asteroid search, variable stars and supernovae. The Center will be integrated with schools, colleges, and community groups for regular observation and small-scale research. Special educational and observing sessions for adults will also be organized. Updates on the development of the Center, which is expected to be functioning by the end of 2015, will be shared and feedback invited on the fostering of

  9. Modeling and forecasting natural gas demand in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural gas is the major indigenous source of energy in Bangladesh and accounts for almost one-half of all primary energy used in the country. Per capita and total energy use in Bangladesh is still very small, and it is important to understand how energy, and natural gas demand will evolve in the future. We develop a dynamic econometric model to understand the natural gas demand in Bangladesh, both in the national level, and also for a few sub-sectors. Our demand model shows large long run income elasticity - around 1.5 - for aggregate demand for natural gas. Forecasts into the future also show a larger demand in the future than predicted by various national and multilateral organizations. Even then, it is possible that our forecasts could still be at the lower end of the future energy demand. Price response was statistically not different from zero, indicating that prices are possibly too low and that there is a large suppressed demand for natural gas in the country. - Highlights: → Natural gas demand is modeled using dynamic econometric methods, first of its kind in Bangladesh. → Income elasticity for aggregate natural gas demand in Bangladesh is large-around 1.5. → Demand is price insensitive, indicating too low prices and/or presence of large suppressed demand. → Demand forecasts reveal large divergence from previous estimates, which is important for planning. → Attempts to model demand for end-use sectors were successful only for the industrial sector.

  10. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raihan Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh is one of the smaller states in Asia. But it has a long and rich history of nuclear medicine for over sixty years. The progress in science and technology is always challenging in a developing country. In 1958, work for the first Nuclear Medicine facility was commenced in Dhaka in a tin-shed known as ‘Radioisotope Centre’ and was officially inaugurated in 1962. Since the late 50s of the last century nuclear medicine in Bangladesh has significantly progressed through the years in its course of development, but still the facilities are inadequate. At present there are 20 nuclear medicine establishments with 3 PET-CTs, 42 gamma camera/SPECTs with 95 physicians, 20 physicists, 10 radiochemists and 150 technologists. The Society of Nuclear Medicine, Bangladesh (SNMB was formed in 1993 and publishing its official journal since 1997. Bangladesh also has close relationships with many international organizations like IAEA, ARCCNM, AOFNMB, ASNM, WFNMB and WARMTH. The history and the present scenario of the status of nuclear medicine in Bangladesh are being described here.

  11. The Role of the Private Sector in Reproductive Health Services in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Al-Sabir; Bushra Binte Alam; Sameh El-Saharty

    2014-01-01

    The key actors in Bangladesh's Health, Population and Nutrition Sector Development Program (HPNSDP) are the public sector, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), the non-profit private sector, and the for-profit private sector. The public health infrastructure is considered one of the largest in the health sector; RH providers and facilities are available at all levels. Several NGOs are active in Bangladesh's health sector, including international organizations such as CARE, Save the Children ...

  12. International Briefing 24: Training and Development in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Monowar; Akhter, Salma

    2011-01-01

    Training and development activities in Bangladesh have yet to be systematic and able to fulfil the needs of the economy and industry. The national educational and training system failed to provide adequate knowledge and skills to the workforce. However, private sector organizations are undertaking different initiatives to cope with the industry…

  13. Bangladesh floods, cyclones and ENSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been found that in general there is a reduction of rainfall in all the regions of Bangladesh in all the seasons - premonsoon, monsoon and post monsoon during El Nino years. It has also been observed that in strong El Nino year Bangladesh is not hit by a catastrophic flood or a catastrophic cyclone. In the past, occurrence of famines in this region of the world coincided with El Nino years. The years of weak El Nino or when the El Nino index is positive seem to be favourable for the occurrence of floods and cyclones in Bangladesh. A theory of the modulation of the monsoon in Bangladesh by the Walker circulation has been described in the paper. (author). 14 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  14. H&m i Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Refsøe, Anna; Sørensen, Johan; Skytte, Josephine; Skovgaard, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Outsourcing remains an increasingly attractive strategy for many large companies. The enormous distance between the companies and its suppliers, has resulted in a hazy labor policy in the companies suppliers' production factories. Companies find it difficult to maintain ideal working conditions in developing countries due to the geographical distance. This project, focus on H&M's outsourcing to Bangladesh. Bangladesh is interesting because H&M gets 25% of their products produced in the cou...

  15. Research achievements in Bangladesh agriculture using nuclear techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattar, M.A. [Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture, Mymensingh, (Bangladesh)

    1997-10-01

    Application of isotope and radiation techniques in Bangladesh agriculture has been initiated in 1961 with the establishment of Atomic Energy Agricultural Research Centre, Dhaka under the then Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. The activity of the centre was strengthened and upgraded to the level of an institute as a constituent organization of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission in 1972. It was further reorganized, made an autonomous research organization under the Ministry of Agriculture in 1982 and renamed as Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture. The other organizations involved in nuclear agricultural research are Institute of Food and Radiation Biology and Bangladesh Agricultural University. A number of technologies have been developed using nuclear techniques that imparted on agricultural development. Sixteen new crops were developed using physical (200-700 Gy gamma rays) and chemical mutagen (NaN{sub 3}). Soil fertility and plant nutrition technologies were developed using both stable and radio isotopes. The improved feeding strategies and utilization of locally available low quality feed material (rice straw) were determined using {sup 51}Cr-EDTA and {sup 125}I in order to have better livestock growth and reproduction ability. Several constraints related to nuclear research were identified. Increased government commitment and international cooperation are of the utmost importance for effective utilization of the benefits of nuclear technology and to face the increasing demand for food for the ever increasing population in years to come 32 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Research achievements in Bangladesh agriculture using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of isotope and radiation techniques in Bangladesh agriculture has been initiated in 1961 with the establishment of Atomic Energy Agricultural Research Centre, Dhaka under the then Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. The activity of the centre was strengthened and upgraded to the level of an institute as a constituent organization of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission in 1972. It was further reorganized, made an autonomous research organization under the Ministry of Agriculture in 1982 and renamed as Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture. The other organizations involved in nuclear agricultural research are Institute of Food and Radiation Biology and Bangladesh Agricultural University. A number of technologies have been developed using nuclear techniques that imparted on agricultural development. Sixteen new crops were developed using physical (200-700 Gy gamma rays) and chemical mutagen (NaN3). Soil fertility and plant nutrition technologies were developed using both stable and radio isotopes. The improved feeding strategies and utilization of locally available low quality feed material (rice straw) were determined using 51Cr-EDTA and 125I in order to have better livestock growth and reproduction ability. Several constraints related to nuclear research were identified. Increased government commitment and international cooperation are of the utmost importance for effective utilization of the benefits of nuclear technology and to face the increasing demand for food for the ever increasing population in years to come

  17. Progress report: Bangladesh [CSC Project on Management of Water Hyacinth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, S.Z. [Department of Chemistry, Dacca University (Bangladesh)

    1981-11-15

    The CSC Project on Management of Water Hyacinth in Bangladesh was started in only April 1981. The present report from Bangladesh is based on the interim progress reports, submitted by the project coordinators of the organizations concerned, for the work during the short intervening period to 4th June 1981. It is obvious that the report deals mainly with the preliminary preparations and observations on the various aspects of the investigations. The research components assigned to various organisations in Bangladesh are: Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology; - Growth rate and biogas production; Housing and Building Research Institute; - Paper and board, and biogas; Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research - Protein, enzymes and ammoacids; Dacca University - Pollution removal and studies of biomass production. Bangladesh is a flat deltaic plain formed from old and new alluvium. The areas of old alluvium are located above the general level, while the vast areas of new alluvium are situated m the flood plain of the modern rivers. The whole country is intersected by a network of rivers; the areas comprising the alluvial plains are very large. The river bank levees are high and the land gradually slopes inland away from the levees. The tract of land between two rivers are shaped like a furrow and in most cases form elongated 'beels' or swamps which are ideal place for the growth and propagation of aquatic plants particularly water hyacinth along with other aquatic organisms, both of plant and animal origin due to eutrophication. It is in the shallow swamps and derelict ponds that luxuriant growth and proliferation of water hyacinth is generally observed in Bangladesh. However, there is a feeling that much of the water hyacinth population in the open countryside was depleted during the severe drought which prevailed during the summer of 1979. But Bangladesh has the ideal water and climatic environment for conditions of rapid growth

  18. Dynamics of Rural Growth in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Gautam, Madhur; Faruqee, Rashid

    2016-01-01

    The rural economy in Bangladesh has powerfully advanced economic growth and substantially reduced poverty, especially since 2000, but the remarkable transformation and unprecedented dynamism in rural Bangladesh remain an underexplored, underappreciated, and largely untold story. Dynamics of Rural Growth in Bangladesh: Sustaining Poverty Reduction tells that story and inquires what specific actions Bangladesh might take—given the residual poverty and persistent malnutrition—to accelerate and c...

  19. Regulatory system for control of nuclear facilities in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All human activities have associated risks. Nuclear programme is no exception. The Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC), constituted in February 1973 through the promulgation of the Presidential order 15 of 1973. Functions of BAEC include research and development in peaceful application of atomic energy, generation of electricity and promotion of international relations congenial to implementation of its programmes and projects. In 1993 the Government of Bangladesh promulgated the law on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control. Considering the human resources, expertise and facilities needed for implementation of the provisions of the NSRC law, BAEC was entrusted with the responsibility to enforce it. The responsibilities of the BAEC cover nuclear and radiological safety within the installations of BAEC and radiological safety in the manifold applications of radioisotopes and radiation sources within the country. An adequate and competent infrastructure has been built to cater to the diverse nuclear and radiation protection requirements of all nuclear facilities in Bangladesh, arising at different stages from site selection to day-to-day operation. In addition, periodic inspections of the nuclear facilities are carried out. The licensing and regulatory inspection systems for controlling of nuclear installations and radiation sources are established. The paper describes the legal provisions, responsibilities and organization of BAEC with special emphasis on nuclear safety and radiation protection of nuclear facilities in Bangladesh. (author)

  20. IMPACT OF MARKETING STRATEGIES ON SACHET PRODUCTS IN BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Shahid SHOHROWARDHY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A product is anything that can be accessible to the market for satisfaction. The basic objective of marketing is maximum satisfaction since satisfaction of consumer and business performance is positively related to each other. For satisfaction, product is diversified in different categories i.e. generic product, product type product, substitute product and product line etc. Sachet product is one of the expansions of product line. The term ‘Sachet’ is originated from the French word which means “mini”. In Bangladesh, sachet product has a strong market share. Thus, this study attempts to determine the exiting share of sachet product and measure the impact of marketing strategies on sachet product in Bangladesh. This study uses the selective 22 dimensions to favor the sachet product on the basis of 4Ps (Product, Price, Place and Promotion. To accomplish the study, 125 samples have been taken from selective markets in Cosmopolitan city, Chittagong. The study found that sachet product has strong market position comparative with other categories of products, where promotional effect is the dominant factor who played the vital role to sustain the sachet product in Bangladesh. The results of this study will be constructive for executives and policy-makers of business organization who works with fast moving consumer good (FMCG items effectively in Bangladesh.

  1. IMPACTS OF REMITTANCE ON THE SOCIOECONOMIC CONDITION OF BANGLADESH: AN ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Ahmed Chowdhury

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Remittance is considered to be one of the influential sectors of the socioeconomic development of the Third World countries, particularly countries like Bangladesh. In Bangladesh, remittance contributes to the socioeconomic development, maintain foreign exchange reserves, and manage balance of payment, etc. This paper particularly explains the impacts of remittance on the socioeconomic condition of Bangladesh. The paper is written based on secondary sources, published documents on the impacts of remittance. The paper reveals that remittance has both positive and negative impacts on the socioeconomic condition of Bangladesh. However, the positive impacts are more influential than negative one. In Bangladesh, remittance helps people generate income, provide children advanced education, increase social status, create employment opportunities for poor, and above all empower women. People can avail material and non-material culture and can enjoy civic amenities of the modern era. Although, it creates inequality in the society and cultural lag among people, its influential aspect to the socioeconomic development of Bangladesh is more prevailing. As a result, this paper recommends for necessary initiatives from Government Organizations and Non Government Organizations to maintain both remittance and migration flow normal and congenial.

  2. Bangladesh Policy Note : Procurement Management Capacity Development in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    Bangladesh has reshaped the landscape of procurement policy reform and capacity development over the last several years, and has taken lead in the South Asia region. Though reasonably good progress has been made in policy reform, yet its application has proven to be relatively inconsistent. Effective implementation of the law requires a public and a private sector that have the skills and ...

  3. Seismicity and tectonics of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northern and eastern Bangladesh and surrounding areas belong to a seismically active zone and are associated with the subduction of the Indian plate. The seismicity and tectonics have been studied in detail and the observations have been correlated to understand the earthquake phenomenon in the region. The morphotectonic behaviour of northern Bangladesh shows that it is deeply related to the movement of the Dauki fault system and relative upliftment of the Shillong plateau. Contemporary seismicity in the Dauki fault system is relatively quiet comparing to that in the Naga-Disang-Haflong thrust belt giving rise to the probability of sudden release of energy being accumulated in the vicinity of the Dauki fault system. This observation corresponds with the predicted average return period of a large earthquake (1897 type) and the possibility of M > 8 earthquake in the vicinity of the Dauki fault within this century should not be ruled out. The seismicity in the folded belt in the east follows the general trend of Arakan-Yoma anticlinorium and represents shallow and low-angled thrust movements in conformity with the field observation. Seismotectonic behaviour in the deep basin part of Bangladesh demonstrates that an intraplate movement in the basement rock has been taking place along the deep-seated faults causing relative upliftment and subsidence in the basin. Bangladesh has been divided into three seismic zones on the basis of morphotectonic and seismic behaviour. Zone-I has been identified as the zone of high seismic risk. (author). 43 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Women in physics in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Shamima K.

    2013-03-01

    Bangladesh has had a glorious physics tradition since the beginning of the last century, when the physicist S.N. Bose published a groundbreaking paper with Albert Einstein on Bose-Einstein statistics. However, women in Bangladesh traditionally have not been able to make their way in the realm of science in general and physics in particular. Since Bangladesh achieved independence in 1971, the situation has gradually changed and more and more women choose physics as an academic discipline. The percentage of women students in physics rose from 10% in 1970 to almost 30% in 2010. In recent years, women physicists have actively participated in many activities promoting science and technology, creating awareness among the public about the importance of physics education. The present status of women physicists in academic, research, and administrative programs in the government and private sectors in Bangladesh is reported. The greater inclusion of women scientists, particularly physicists, in policy-making roles on important issues of global and national interest is suggested.

  5. Wind Energy Potential in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Z.A. Saifullah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh is encountering difficulties in supplying energy to maintain its economic growth. Government of Bangladesh is looking for renewable energy sources to meet up the total power demand in this country. The present study aims to assess wind energy potential in Bangladesh as a sustainable solution to overcome the energy crisis. Wind speed at six coastal zones Patenga, Cox’s Bazar, Teknaf, Char Fassion, Kuakata and Kutubdia at Bay of Bengal of Bangladesh have been analyzed. A near shore wind farm has been considered at these locations having a coastal line of 574 km. The turbines are spaced 7D apart in the prevailing wind direction, and 3D apart in the perpendicular direction, where D is rotor diameter. This near shore wind farm with an array of 5104 horizontal axis wind turbines with hub height of 100 m and rotor diameter of 75 m with a wind speed of 7 m/sec is capable to generate 1855.25 MW of electrical power. This can mitigate 55.93 per cent of energy shortage in 2016. By developing renewable energy sources it is possible to compensate 11.25 per cent of total power demand by 2020.

  6. Modern population trends in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abul-basher, M M

    1985-01-01

    Population growth trends in Bangladesh in the 1871-1981 period were analyzed, with emphasis on fertility and mortality differentials, to provide a basis for population planning. Following proclamation of British Imperial Rule in 1857, mortality rates in Bangladesh began to decline as a result of preventive measures against natural disasters such as draught and famine, but the fertility rate remained unaltered. The demographic pattern was unstable over time, reflecting the impact of the influenza epidemic of 1918-19, war, migration, and economic development. Population growth accelerated greatly during the 1961-74 period, when industrialization emerged and job opportunities were created in the urban centers. Economic hardship, food shortages, and the introduction of family planning curbed urban growth drastically and total growth to some extent in 1974-81. On the average, growth has been higher in the Dhaka and Chittagong Divisions of Bangladesh than in the Khulna and Rajshahi Divisions. Differences in population growth among the regions are attributable largely to internal and external migration. The regression polynomial model best fits past population trends in Bangladesh and can reproduce the observed population by 99.60%. This polynomial is most suitable for graduation and prediction of population trends. PMID:12280834

  7. Bangladesh Development Update, April 2016

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this report is to update the Government of Bangladesh, think tanks and researchers, the general public as well as the Bank’s senior management on the state of the economy, outlook, risks, progress on structural policy reforms, and key challenges the economy is currently facing. The coverage includes developments in the real sector focusing on growth, inflation, and poverty...

  8. Leptospirosis during Dengue Outbreak, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    LaRocque, Regina C.; Breiman, Robert F.; Ari, Mary D.; Morey, Roger E.; Janan, Firdous Ara; Hayes, John Mosely; Hossain, M. Anowar; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Levett, Paul N

    2005-01-01

    We collected acute-phase serum samples from febrile patients at 2 major hospitals in Dhaka, Bangladesh, during an outbreak of dengue fever in 2001. A total of 18% of dengue-negative patients tested positive for leptospirosis. The case-fatality rate among leptospirosis patients (5%) was higher than among dengue fever patients (1.2%).

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF LIVESTOCK SECTOR THROUGH LEADING NGO IN BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad SHAMSUDDOHA

    2009-01-01

    In Bangladesh, more than half of the total popula tion is based on agricultural product and livestock. Recognizing this fact, Government has changed its development policy. Government has recognized the fact that equal participation of public and private organization can solve the problem by doing various activities. Apart from this Government encouraged NGOs and private sectors to undertake steps for the development of livestock by liberalizing its policy. Therefore, the study has tried to u...

  10. Appraisal of domestic biogas plants in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Kabir, H.; Palash, M S; Bauer, S

    2012-01-01

    Bangladesh. Biogas activities in Bangladesh have been expanding to meet the needs of alternative energy sources and reduce of the country dependence on biomass energy. Biogas is viewed an innovative and most promising option toward a partial mitigation of the existing energy problems in Bangladesh. This study examined the cost-capacity relationships of biogas plant use while considering the financial and economic feasibility with several decision making tools. Data were collected from 150 sma...

  11. Monsoon definition discrepancies in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, M. A.; Chu, P.-S.

    2012-04-01

    This study applies different definitions of what previous authors have called the monsoon over Bangladesh. The aim is to identify the definitions that most resemble the perceptions of the local rural communities and how they define the monsoon. Considering how the local communities define the monsoon is extremely important since these populations are most vulnerable to future changes in climate and more specifically monsoon rainfall. It has been pointed out previously that the monsoon research community had not reached a consensus on a unified definition of the monsoon rainy season. This problem seems to be profound in Bangladesh where results from the application of different definitions show very large discrepancies. Since these discrepancies exist, confusing terms such as monsoon, summer rainy season, and monsoon rainy season can have large implications for impact studies and interpretations of future climate projections. The results in this paper show that these terms need to be explicitly and carefully defined with regards to Bangladesh. Wind-, rain- and OLR-based definitions are applied to several different datasets to show how large these discrepancies can be over Bangladesh. Differences in onset dates are found to be around 8-9 pentads (40-45 days) in some regions of the country. The largest differences are seen in the north-east region, where rain-based definitions give much earlier onsets than wind- or OLR-based definitions. The results show that mesoscale phenomena could be influencing the climate in the north-east part of Bangladesh and causing much earlier summer rainfall. According to the results from a previous social study, the local communities in fact consider this early rainfall as the monsoon onset. By identifying the definition that best resembles the local community perceptions through out Bangladesh, then future information can be constructed, so that it is more easily understood by and applicable to the millions of people climate change will

  12. ASPECTS OF MICROFINANCE SYSTEM OF GRAMEEN BANK OF BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Nazrul Islam

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The microfinance system of Grameen Bank is a revolutionary tool to eradicate poverty of the rural people especially the women of Bangladesh. At present GB is the largest microfinance bank in Bangladesh and probably the biggest microcredit organization in the world. It provides loans to assetless and landless poor people whom no commercial bank give loan. Microcredit is the most useful and popular financial system in the world to face financial crisis of the poor people. Grameen Bank loan distribution has risk of default andsometimes the loans are used even dowry which is crime against women right. The rate of interest in Grameen Bank is very high and due to high interest rate the poor women can not use the loan in a high profitable business to bear this burden, so some of the borrowers lose lands and assets to pay the loan. The paper discusses both advantages and drawbacks of Grameen Bank with mathematical calculations in some details.

  13. THE ROLE OF NGOs IN THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizul Hassan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-governmental organizations are claimed to have impacts on the sustainable development in rural areas of the developing countries and the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC is identified as an example. This study has considered BRAC as the case and has been aimed to critically outline the roles of this selected non-governmental organization (BRAC in sustainable development process. With this particular aim, this study has also explored the trends of current poverty situations in Bangladesh. In addition, impacts of the BRAC sustainable development initiatives have also been analyzed, to some extent. This study has selected two villages of the Chandpur district of Bangladesh, where BRAC has been operating intense programmes. This study has used both the qualitative and quantitative methods of research. Results suggest that programmes undertaken by NGOs are capable of having positive contributions in the sustainable development process to a certain level. The fact is that the programme implementation, where efficiency of the NGO employees is an indicator of success factor. The research is empirical and is expectedly fill the gap of literature.

  14. Radiation protection infrastructure and regulatory activities in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes briefly and in general terms past and present activities regarding radiation protection and the proposed programmes, including setting up an infrastructure with a legal framework in Bangladesh. The peaceful applications of radioactive materials and ionizing radiations, including X rays, for socioeconomic development in diverse sectors have been increasing steadily in Bangladesh over the years. Since 1964, the Atomic Energy Commission has been the only organization in the country offering radiation protection services covering its own activities and, on request, those of some other national organizations, on a very limited scale. As there is no legal framework in the country for controlling and regulating the uses of ionizing radiation there are reports of considerable misuses, particularly in diagnostic X rays and in industry, leading to damage to public health and the environment. In order to ensure safe usage, radiation protection rules, regulations, etc., are to be formulated under the umbrella of a Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Act, the promulgation of which has been long awaited. For the enforcement and implementation of the provisions of the Act and the rules, regulations, etc., framed thereunder, the creation of a radiation protection infrastructure with the establishment of an optimum organizational set-up having trained manpower, laboratory equipment and supporting facilities has been suggested. The active co-operation and support of the IAEA and other international communities in the implementation of the proposed radiation protection programmes in Bangladesh are strongly urged. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  15. Wishing for a World without "Theatre for Development": Demystifying the Case of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Jamil

    2002-01-01

    Argues that Theatre for Development in Bangladesh practiced by Non-Governmental Organizations, which is almost entirely funded by international donor organizations, serves globalization in the name of poverty alleviation. Concludes by advocating for the necessity of exploring alternatives by which indigenous theatre performers may access directly…

  16. Wife abuse in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Koustuv; Rahman, Fazlur; Jansson, Bjarne

    2009-09-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global public health and gender problem, especially in low-income countries. The study focused on verbal abuse, physical abuse and abuse by restricting food provision to wives by their husbands by victim and perpetrator characteristics, emphasizing the socioeconomic context of rural Bangladesh. Using a cross-sectional household survey of 4411 randomly selected married women of reproductive age, the study found that a majority of the respondents are exposed to verbal abuse (79%), while 41% are exposed to physical abuse. A small proportion (5%) of the women had suffered food-related abuse. Risk factors observed were age of the wife, illiteracy (of both victims and perpetrators), alcohol misuse, dowry management, husband's monetary greed involving parents-in-law, and wife's suspicions concerning husband's extramarital affairs. Well-established risk factors for wife abuse, along with dowry and husband's monetary greed, have a relatively high prevalence in rural Bangladesh. PMID:19534836

  17. Hypertension in Bangladesh: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, A.K.M. Monwarul; Majumder, Abdullah A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is an increasingly important medical and public health problem. In Bangladesh, approximately 20% of adult and 40–65% of elderly people suffer from HTN. High incidence of metabolic syndrome, and lifestyle-related factors like obesity, high salt intake, and less physical activity may play important role in the pathophysiology of HTN. The association of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism and low birth weight with blood pressure has been studied inadequately....

  18. Inequality in Disability in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Tareque, Md. Ismail; Begum, Sharifa; Saito, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate inequality in disability in Bangladesh. Methods The study used both household level and individual level data from a large nationally representative data set, Bangladesh’s Household Income and Expenditure Survey - 2010. Principal component analysis was used to construct a wealth index based on household assets from household level data. Then, using data from 49,809 individuals aged 5 years and over, chi-square tests and logistic regression were performed to test the a...

  19. Application of radiation in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naiyyum Choudhury; Najmul Alam Chowdhury; Feroza Akhtar [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2001-03-01

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various field. All over the world, this technology is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation sterilisation of medical products, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, radiation processing of polymeric materials and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission mainly using Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The investigation covers medical sterilisation, food preservation and development and modification of polymeric materials by gamma radiation. Both food preservation and radiation sterilisation of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. As a result of successful achievement of R and D activities in all these projects, a pilot plant project involving about US$ 4.00 million is under implementation at the Atomic energy Research Establishment campus of BAEC. In addition a project on 'National Polymer Centre' at a cost of US$ 2.00 million has already been approved. It is expected that work on radiation processing including commercialization will be accelerated with the implementation of these projects. The impact of radiation

  20. Assessing Fiscal Risks in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Leandro Medina

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies, quantifies, and assesses fiscal risks in Bangladesh. By performing sensitivity analysis and using stochastic simulations, it measures risks arising from shocks to GDP growth, the exchange rate, commodity prices, and interest rates. It also analyzes specific fiscal and institutional risks, such as those related to the pension system, the issuance of guarantees, the state-owned commercial banks, and the external borrowing and debt management strategy. The paper finds that...

  1. Application of radiation in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various field. All over the world, this technology is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation sterilisation of medical products, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, radiation processing of polymeric materials and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission mainly using Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The investigation covers medical sterilisation, food preservation and development and modification of polymeric materials by gamma radiation. Both food preservation and radiation sterilisation of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. As a result of successful achievement of R and D activities in all these projects, a pilot plant project involving about US$ 4.00 million is under implementation at the Atomic energy Research Establishment campus of BAEC. In addition a project on 'National Polymer Centre' at a cost of US$ 2.00 million has already been approved. It is expected that work on radiation processing including commercialization will be accelerated with the implementation of these projects. The impact of radiation processing

  2. Foreign Exchange Reserves: Bangladesh Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Zahangir Alam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is about foreign exchangereserves of Bangladesh. The mainpurpose of this study is to the influence of exchange rates on foreign exchangereserves to the Bangladesh context.  Both the primary and secondary data has been used inthis study. The primary data has been collected through a structuredquestionnaire from 50 respondents. The secondary data, namely Bangladeshforeign exchange reserves (FER, Bangladesh current account balance (CAB,Bangladesh capital andfinancial account balance (CFAB, and BDT/USD exchange rates (ER.  This study covers yearly data from July 01,1996 to June 30, 2005 and quarterly data from July 01, 2005 to June 30, 2012. Findingsof this study shows that out of the selected 16 factors affecting foreignexchange reserves, exchange rates occupy the first position, weighted averagescore (WAS being 4.56. Foreign exchange reserves (FER and current accountbalance (CAB have increased by 502.9087% and 1451.218%,whereas capital and financial account (CFAB has decreased by -649.024% on June30, 2012 compared to June 30, 1997. The influence of other factors heldconstant, as ER changes by 285.6894 units due to one unit change in FER, onaverage in the same direction which represents that ER has positive effect on theFER and this relationship is statistically significant.  62.1526 percentof the variation in FER is explained by ER. The outcomes of Breusch-Godfrey test (LM test, ARCHtest, and the Normality test are that there is a serial correlation among residuals, the variance of residuals is notconstant, and the residuals are not normally distributed.

  3. Energy Flow in Agriculture: Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. R.; K. K. Islam

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a qualitative energy flow analysis in Bangladesh agriculture has been made for a period from 1980-81 to 2000-01 to evaluate the impact of energy input to produce output. Human & animal muscle power and machinery energy for tillage operation, electricity and diesel energy for irrigation, fertilizer and pesticides energy for growth and protection are taken into account. Energy values are calculated by multiplying respective quantity by their respective energy equivalents with...

  4. Bangladesh; Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2005-01-01

    The Sixth Five Year Plan, as outlined in Bangladesh's Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper, targets strategic growth and employment. The medium-term macroeconomic framework plan entails the involvement of both the private and public sectors. Human resources development strategy programs reaching out to the poor and the vulnerable population, as well as environment, climate change, and disaster risk management, have been included in the plan. Managing regional disparities for shared growth and str...

  5. A wind map of Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M.J.; Iqbal, M.T.; Mahboob, S. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada), Faculty of Engineering

    2004-04-01

    Utilization of wind energy in Bangladesh has been slow mainly due to lack of quality wind data. Recent measurements in some places have shown significant wind energy potentials in Bangladesh. In this paper, a wind map is presented which incorporates several microscale features, such as terrain roughness, elevation etc. with a mesoscale model. Several mesomaps were obtained from global databases and a suitable model was chosen and modified for a 30-m elevation. Ground data from various sources were collected and modified for height and land condition adjustments based on local knowledge and GIS information. It was found that, the generated wind map and the modified ground data resemble. Annual average wind speed at 30 m height along the coastal belt is above 5 m/s. Wind speed in northeastern parts is above 4.5 m/s while inland wind speed is around 3.5 m/s for most part of Bangladesh. Small-scale wind turbines could be installed and tested in locations such as St. Martins Island, Cox's Bazar, Patenga, Bhola, Barguna, Dinajpur, Thakurgaon and Panchagar. (author)

  6. Innovating veterinary public health challenges of Bangladesh to integrate the concept of ‘one world, one health’

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Mufizur Rahman; Hasibur Muhammad Rahman

    2012-01-01

    The present paper addresses relevant problems and constraints of VPH in Bangladesh in the light of global concept “One World, One Health” that need to be overcome and to ask for help, coordination and collaboration of international organization to promote and build the capacity for the spectrum of important VPH issues contributing to zoonoses, food-borne disease control, food safety and fostering better and living condition. In Bangladesh the loss of border controls within countries and the g...

  7. Screening of Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Freshwater and Marine Algae as a Prominent Natural Antibiotic Available in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Mehadi Hassan Chowdhury; Khadizatul Kubra; Mohammad Belal Hossain; M. Golam Mustafa; Tahsina Jainab; M. Reazul Karim; M. Elias Mehedy

    2015-01-01

    In Bangladesh, algae have not been adequately explored for their potential as a source of bioactive substances. So, present work provides the eligibility of algae commonly found in Bangladesh as a prominent natural antibiotic against various pathogens. In vitro screening of organic solvent extracts (methanol, ethanol and chloroform) of ten fresh water and marine algae showed antimicrobial activity carried out by disc diffusion method against two gram positive, four gram negative bacteria and ...

  8. Understanding arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    underneath Bangladesh. Logically, arsenic is likely to be present as compounds within sediments comprising the aquifer systems and may be associated with iron oxides, organic matter, sulfides etc. High arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh is a serious issue requiring appropriate understanding of the phenomenon relating to the occurrence and release of arsenic in groundwater. The water supply challenge is as much one of quantity as of quality. In many regions of the world, it means bringing water closer to the house. Further, if the water supply is of good quality, it improves public health. Three developments of the past decades have spurred new approaches to water supply and public health. First, the capacity to analyze smaller amounts of constituents in water has advanced substantially. Second, the health status and life expectancy have risen substantially across most countries. Finally, health and epidemiological research have advanced as well, and we are now much better informed of longer-term health effects of prolonged ingestion of contaminants. There are, at present, few (if any) low-cost technology and affordable solutions for the treatment of arsenic in non-piped water systems. Proposed interventions in rural areas must include alternative water sources such as rainwater harvesting, more efficient use of non-contaminated wells in the area, treated surface water, selective well drilling to deeper aquifers, and simple arsenic removal techniques as they are found effective. Arsenic contamination apparently can occur in a wide variety of hydrogeological and socioeconomic conditions. Therefore, any mitigation strategy will have to be tailored to suit the local geological, institutional and financial situation. However, the experience with water supply across the world demonstrates that the offered technical options will be sustainable only when the local community, or the customers, are truly committed to it and are willing to contribute financially to (at

  9. ISSUES AND DEVELOPMENTS BETWEEN INDIA AND BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Sachinkumar M Kattimani

    2015-01-01

    India's links with Bangladesh are civilization, cultural, social and economic. There is much that unites the two countries – a shared history and common heritage, linguistic and cultural ties, passion for music, literature and the arts. With Bangladesh, India shares not only a common history of struggle for freedom and liberation but also enduring feelings of both fraternal as well as familial ties.

  10. Stresses and storms: the case of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, N

    1993-01-01

    The problems of women and environmental degradation have recently come to be addressed by women's groups, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and government policies in Bangladesh. NGOs have been the most active, with 600 registered organizations: 40% international, 38% national, and 22% local. NGOs have promoted the recent inclusion of environmental concerns into development plans. About 100 NGOs are engaged in forestry projects. The National Association for Resource Improvement, for example, involves women in tree planting along roadsides and income-generating activities. About 75% of upazilas (administrative units) have environmental and women's projects, but under 20% of all villages are affected and 1% of landless people are reached. Women's groups have created awareness of women's problems and advocated for socioeconomic changes. Women, despite cultural and social restrictions on their social behavior, have changed environmental and economic conditions. Women's leadership and organizing abilities have contributed to public awareness of environmental degradation. Because Bangladesh is a delta, a rise in sea level from greenhouse effects would have serious consequences for the land and population. Global warming has contributed to river flooding and climate changes that have increased rainfall and tropical storms. Deforestation upriver adds to the water runoff problems. About 20% of the cultivable land area is affected by natural disasters. Population density is 760 persons per sq km. About 50% of forested areas have been destroyed within the past 20 years. 4% of gross domestic product comes from forest activity. The lack of wood fuel limits the ability of people to boil water and contributes to the increased incidence of diarrhea, other intestinal problems, and less nutritious food. Drought is another problem. Urban migration has overwhelmed the ability of urban centers to provide basic services. Coastal areas have been settled by 20% of total population

  11. Solar Home System (SHS) in rural Bangladesh: Ornamentation or fact of development?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy requirement has been growing every day due to higher population growth, and consequently higher consumption. About one third of rural households of Bangladesh are connected to the grid. To meet the gap, solar energy has been treated as a feasible option for people in rural areas where grid connections are not available. A good number of organizations have been working together to provide Solar Home System (SHS) in rural Bangladesh. There is little evidence that supply of small scale energy supports significant rural development. This paper aims at understanding how increased energy access through SHS in rural Bangladesh contributes towards rural development. Recent published literatures on SHS in Bangladesh have been studied to get insight into the technical, financial, and operational as well as economic and social issues. Later the findings have been critically analyzed with respect to selected indicators of rural development. The study identified that increased access to energy through SHS in rural Bangladesh provides mostly recreational and leisure benefits with the so called ‘social status’; income generation is negligible while support for education is average. - Highlights: • No specific proof is there to conclude that SHS has contributed to development. • SHS's contribution to income generation and employment is not significant. • SHS is mostly used for entertainment and to uplift the so called ‘social status’

  12. Pheromone use for insect control: present status and prospect in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Azharul Islam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The insect’s world is filled with many odors. Insects use these odors to cue them in a variety of complex social behaviors, including courtship, mating, and egg laying. Scientists and pest control specialists have known about these complex communication systems for decades. The main aim of this study was to visualize the availability, trends and differences in the sources of pheromone control in agricultural growth of Bangladesh. It also concerned on constrains and present use of pheromone and their possible recommendation on behalf of Bangladesh agriculture. It concentrated on the data during last three decades (1980-2010, comprising status of pheromone use in Bangladesh agriculture and its future. Review revealed that Bangladesh has been enormously successful in increasing pheromone use in agricultural production (especially for vegetables. Understanding of the nature of pheromones and their potential for pest control along with the future prospective of pheromone technique in agriculture were stated. Since the pheromone, technologies for control of major crop pests in Bangladesh are still limited. So that this review emphasized on more attention to the authority to increase the research works and project facilities related to develop and promote pheromone techniques. It is highly recommended to increase availability of pheromone in market, more investment in research and development, introduction of newly identified pheromone for specific pest, to assist government and non-government organizations to work with farmers to reduce harmful insecticide use and promote pheromone tactics as one part of integrated crop management (ICM.

  13. Rice price instability in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mili, Jobaida Yeasmin

    2012-01-01

    In the 2000s, the global attention was concentrated at the food price stability because of the rapid increase in cereal and other food prices. This rapid increase of food price has become a burden for the developing countries as well as for Bangladesh where households spend a large share of their income on food. Among the cereals rice has a strategic importance because it is the central to food security and economic and political stability of the country. Fluctuation in rice prices is not rar...

  14. Bridging Digital Divide: case study of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Shuva, Nafiz Zaman

    2010-01-01

    Bangladesh emerged as an independent and sovereign country in 1971 following a nine month war of liberation. It is one of the largest deltas of the world with a total area of 147,570 sq km. With a unique communal harmony, Bangladesh has a population of about 140 million, making it one of the densely populated countries of the world. The literacy rate of Bangladeshi people is 43.1%. Over 98% of the people speak in Bengali, English however is widely spoken (National Web Portal of Bangladesh, 20...

  15. Italian Textile Machinery Seminar in Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The Association of Italian Textile Machinery Manufacturers (ACIMIT) and the Italian Trade Commission will hold a technological seminar on "Italian textile machinery: the way to improve Bangladesh textile competitiveness"

  16. Surface Geology of Bangladesh (geo8bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage includes arcs, polygons, and polygon labels that describe the geologic age and type of surface outcrops of bedrock of the Bangladesh. It also includes...

  17. Impacts of floods on forest trees and their coping strategies in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla Rani Basak; Anil Chandra Basak; Mohammed Ataur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    During recent years, the Government of Bangladesh, Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), semi-government organizations, private organizations and individuals have established a large number of plantations under different programs viz. social forestry, agro-forestry and avenue plantations with indigenous and exotic tree species without considering their habit and habitats. Along with the indigenous species like Albizia procera, Albizia lebbeck, Mangifera indica, Azadirachta indica, Gmelina arbo...

  18. Arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shallow groundwater with high arsenic concentrations from naturally occurring sources is the primary source of drinking water for millions of people in Bangladesh. It has resulted in a major public health crisis with as many as 70 million people possibly at risk. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is supporting international efforts and the Government of Bangladesh to find alternative, safe and sustainable sources of drinking water. (IAEA)

  19. Is growth in Bangladesh's rice production sustainable?

    OpenAIRE

    Baffes, John; Gautam, Madhur

    1996-01-01

    The recent growth of food grain (primarily rice) production in Bangladesh has outpaced population growth largely due to the spread of green revolution technology. The transition from a"basket case"in the early 1970s to the virtual elimination of rice imports in the early 1990s is particularly remarkable considering the severe land constraint in Bangladesh. Two decades of concerted government efforts to achieve rice self-sufficiency have created both an atmosphere of optimism and concerns abou...

  20. A Study of Bangladesh Telecom Market

    OpenAIRE

    Alamgir, Rana; Anand, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    Target Audience: The management of TeliaSonera is our main target audience. Also students from management, marketing and business administration are our secondary concern. Problem Statement: “How suitable is Bangladesh telecom market for an internationalized telecom company (TeliaSonera), and what could be a preferable entry strategy for such market?” Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate Bangladesh telecom market in order to find out the potentiality of the market which could ...

  1. Modeling the Macro-Economy of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Lord, Montague J.

    2002-01-01

    The study develops a parsimonious representation of the macro economy of Bangladesh. It aims to serve a dual purpose. First, it provides a framework for making rational and consistent predictions about Bangladesh's overall economic activity, the standard components of the balance of payments, the expenditure concepts of the national accounts, and the financial sector balances. Secondly, it offers a means of quantitatively evaluating the impact of alternative policy reforms on the economy, and...

  2. Health Consequences of Child Labour in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Salma Ahmed; Ranjan Ray

    2012-01-01

    Background: The paper examines the effect of child labour on child health outcomes in Bangladesh, advancing the methodologies and the results of papers published in different journals. Objective: We examine the effect of child labour on child health outcomes. Methods: We used Bangladesh National Child Labour Survey data for 2002-2003 for our analysis. Results: The main finding of the paper suggests that child labour is positively and significantly associated with the probability of b...

  3. Identifying Potential Factors of Childbearing in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Asaduzzaman; Md. Hasinur Rahaman Khan

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to identify different potential factors associated with childbearing pattern among the ever-married women in Bangladesh. Childbearing pattern is directly related to fertility level and rapid population growth is the major consequence of more childbearing. Bearing more children affects adversely on social and economic opportunities and produces substantial risks to the health of mothers and children. Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey data 1999-2000 and 2004 have been used fo...

  4. Climate change -- Its impacts on Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predictions regarding the possible effects of global warming on Bangladesh's climate are uncertain. However, the predictions for 2030 made by four General Circulation Models all suggest that there might be increased precipitation, with estimates ranging between 5 and 100% increases in rainfall. Increases of these magnitudes, if they were to occur, would have significant implications for agriculture, flooding, river sediment loads, and flood protection works. Increased flooding of the coastal areas of countries like Bangladesh is a possibility, and enormous health and economic distress and human suffering may follow. With the change in temperature, there may be unpredictable change in bacterial and viral morphology with health hazards of unpredictable limits. It has been estimated that a 100 cm rise in sea level in the Bay of Bengal would result in 12--18% of land areas of Bangladesh being lost to the sea, including most of the Sundarbans. Although it is difficult to predict the timing and magnitude of all the global changes including sea-level rise, climate change, etc., it is anticipated that one of the most serious consequence for Bangladesh would be the reduction of already minimal land: person ratio and consequently exacerbating pressure on the remaining natural resources. Bangladesh is in favor of an international agreement for assistance to vulnerable countries like Bangladesh to take necessary preparations and adopt measures to survive a sea-level rise, climate change, increased flooding, and more frequent storm surges

  5. Floods in Northeast India and Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    For the past two weeks floods have ravaged Bangladesh (center) and eastern India (draped around Bangladesh to the north), killing over 50 people and displacing hundreds of thousands from their homes. These false-color images acquired on July 15 and 16, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite show some of the worst flooding. The dark brown, swollen river in the images (top right on July 16; center on July 15) is the Brahmaputra River, which flows through the middle of the Indian state of Assam at the foothills of the Himalaya Mountains. A large, black area south of the Brahmaputra (partially obscured by clouds) shows flooded areas in Bangladesh. Floods of this magnitude have been known to occur in southern Bangladesh and are caused by storms washing seawater over coastal regions. This year, however, unrelenting torrential rains across the entire eastern sub-continent gave rise to the deluge. The massive amounts of rainwater that fell on Nepal and Assam drained into an already waterlogged eastern Bangladesh. Normally, the Brahmaputra River and its tributaries would resemble a tangle of thin lines, and the large black patches in Bangladesh would be the color of the rest of the land surface, tan. In these false-color images, land is tan, and clouds are pink and white. Water comes across as black or dark brown, depending on its sediment level, with clearer water being closer to black. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  6. [Children and bankers in Bangladesh].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, B

    1991-06-01

    This critique of the World Bank's role in developing country population programs begins with a description of a 1987 case in which an 80-year- old Bangladeshi man was persuaded to undergo vasectomy and then robbed of his incentive payment by the health agent. For over 20 years, the World Bank has pressured 3rd World governments to implement population control programs. Although there are divergent opinions within the World Bank, the most dominant is the neomalthusian view that the poor through their high fertility help perpetuate their own poverty. This view hides the real source of poverty in the Third World: the unequal distribution of resources within these countries and between the developed and developing countries. The World Bank has always been blind to the inequalities, and has associated with the elites of developing countries who monopolize the resources of their countries and thereby impede authentic development. Furthermore, the emphasis on population control distorts social policy and hinders the implementation of safe and voluntary family planning services. In many countries the World Bank has required governments to give greater priority to population control than to basic health services. It has pressured them to relax contraceptive prescription norms and has promoted the more effective methods without regard to proper use or side effects. In Bangladesh the World Bank has sponsored sterilization programs that rely on coercion and incentives. In that country of enormous inequities, 10% of landowners control over 50% of lands, while nearly half the population is landless and chronically underemployed. Political power is concentrated in the military government, which annually receives over 1.5 billion dollars in external aid. External aid primarily benefits the wealthy. 3/4 of the population are undernourished and less than 1/3 are literate or have access to basic health care. The poor of Bangladesh, as in many other countries, feel that their only

  7. Sustainable agriculture: a challenge in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.A. Faroque

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The sustainability of conventional agriculture in Bangladesh is under threat from the continuous degradation of land and water resources, and from declining yields due to indiscriminate use of agro-chemicals. Government is pursuing efforts to promote sustainable agriculture with emphasis on better use of on-farm resources and the reduction of external inputs. This paper presents four dimensions of agricultural sustainability as productivity, environmental stability, economical profitability, and social and economic equity. Six characters were selected to evaluate sustainability. Significant differences were found between the two systems (conventional and sustainable agriculture in crop diversification, soil fertility management, pests and diseases management, use of agro-chemicals and environmental issues. However, no significant variations were found in other indicators such as land-use pattern, crop yield and stability, risk and uncertainties, and food security. Although crop yield and financial return were found to be slightly higher in the conventional system, the economic return and value addition per unit of land did not show any difference. It can be suggested that sustainable agriculture has a tendency towards becoming environmental, economically and socially more sound than conventional agriculture, as it requires considerably less agro-chemicals, adds more organic matter to the soil, provides balanced food, and requires higher local inputs without markedly compromising output and financial benefits. Broad-policy measures, including the creation of mass awareness of adverse health effects of agrochemical-based products, are outlined for the promotion of sustainable agriculture.

  8. Ebola Virus Disease – Global Scenario & Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Rezwanur Rahman

    2015-03-01

    test, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay, electron microscopy and virus isolation by cell culture.1 Supportive care - rehydration with oral or intravenous fluids - and treatment of specific symptoms, improves survival. There is as yet no proven treatment available for EVD.1 Raising awareness of risk factors for Ebola infection and protective measures that individuals can take is an effective way to reduce human transmission. Risk reduction messaging should focus on several factors like reducing the risks of wildlife-to-human transmission and human-to-human transmission and also on outbreak containment measures.1 Health care workers caring for patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus should apply extra infection control measures to prevent contact with the patient’s blood and body fluids and contaminated surfaces or materials such as clothing and bedding, wear face protection besides routine measures. Samples taken from humans and animals for investigation of Ebola infection should be handled by trained staff with utmost care and processed in suitably equipped laboratories.1 The infections of two health care workers in Dallas, USA and a nurse in Madrid, Spain have revealed the truth that even highly developed nations are not immune. Still, Asia has some advantages as it readies itself for Ebola. Flight patterns suggest that the influx of travelers from Ebola-stricken West African countries to the Asian continent is far less than it is to Africa, Europe or North America.10 The recent outbreak affecting several nations also alarmed the public health sector of Bangladesh. But virus and healthcare experts have assured that there is nothing to be anxious about Ebola in Bangladesh as it has been categorized as among the least threatened countries by the World Health Organization (WHO on August 8, 2014 in its first Emergency Committee meeting.11 Bangladesh Government has already taken effective preventive measures suggested by WHO, which

  9. Chemical and environmental vector control as a contribution to the elimination of visceral leishmaniasis on the Indian subcontinent: cluster randomized controlled trials in Bangladesh, India and Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Das Pradeep; Kumar Vijay; Mondal Dinesh; Chowdhury Rajib; Akhter Shireen; Das Murari L; Joshi Anand B; Kroeger Axel; Boelaert Marleen; Petzold Max

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Bangladesh, India and Nepal are working towards the elimination of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) by 2015. In 2005 the World Health Organization/Training in Tropical Diseases launched an implementation research programme to support integrated vector management for the elimination of VL from Bangladesh, India and Nepal. The programme is conducted in different phases, from proof-of-concept to scaling up intervention. This study was designed in order to evaluate the efficacy of ...

  10. Impact of Education Expansion on Employment in Bangladesh : Comparing Two Cases of Villages in Remote and Suburban Rural Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Kusakabe, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    A number of institutions and organizations such as the government, NGOs, international development partners and agencies and religious groups have been working to develop education in Bangladesh. Educational development projects related to the Education for All (EFA) have contributed to the development of the education sector. As a result, enrolment rates have increased significantly over the past two decades in Bangladesh, not only in primary schools but also at the secondary level. As a res...

  11. Genotype Analysis of Bacillus anthracis Strains Circulating in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rume, Farzana Islam; Affuso, Alessia; Serrecchia, Luigina; Rondinone, Valeria; Manzulli, Viviana; Campese, Emanuele; Di Taranto, Pietro; Biswas, Paritosh Kumar; Ahsan, Chowdhury Rafiqul; Yasmin, Mahmuda; Fasanella, Antonio; Hugh-Jones, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In Bangladesh, anthrax, caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is considered an endemic disease affecting ruminants with sporadic zoonotic occurrences in humans. Due to the lack of knowledge about risks from an incorrect removal of infected carcasses, the disease is not properly monitored, and because of the socio-economic conditions, the situation is under-reported and under-diagnosed. For sensitive species, anthrax represents a fatal outcome with sudden death and sometimes bleeding from natural orifices. The most common source of infection for ruminants is ingestion of spores during grazing in contaminated pastures or through grass and water contaminated with anthrax spores. Domestic cattle, sheep and goats can also become infected through contaminated bone meal (used as feed) originating from anthrax-infected carcasses. The present investigation was conducted to isolate B. anthracis organisms from 169 samples (73 soil, 1 tissue, 4 bone and 91 bone meal samples) collected from 12 different districts of Bangladesh. The sampling was carried out from 2012 to 2015. Twelve samples resulted positive for B. anthracis. Biomolecular analyses were conducted starting from the Canonical Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (CanSNP) to analyze the phylogenetic origin of strains. The analysis of genotype, obtained through the Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA) with the analysis of 15 Variable Number Tandem Repeats (VNTR), demonstrated four different genotypes: two of them were previously identified in the district of Sirajganj. The sub-genotyping, conducted with Single Nucleotide Repeats analysis, revealed the presence of eight subgenotypes. The data of the present study concluded that there was no observed correlation between imported cattle feed and anthrax occurrence in Bangladesh and that the remarkable genetic variations of B. anthracis were found in the soil of numerous outbreaks in this country. PMID:27082248

  12. Role of nuclear techniques in oncological practice in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Application of nuclear medicine techniques plays an integral part in the diagnosis, management and follow-up of cancer patients. Scintigraphic studies are able to detect primary and secondary malignant lesions in various organs e.g. bone, thyroid, breast, brain, lung, kidney, liver etc. Nuclear techniques are comparatively simple, non-invasive with minimum cost and radiation exposure. In recent years radio nuclide techniques are being widely accepted by the practicing oncologists especially for diagnosis, accurate assessment of the disease process and treatment planning. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission helped in establishing a Central Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound and 14 smaller sub centers in the periphery, equipped with SPECT Gamma camera, Ultrasound, RIA, and DEXA facilities. A retrospective analysis of data of clinically diagnosed cancer patients referred to the sub center for diagnosis showed a total of 117 cases, 62 (72.54 %) female and 55 (64.35 %) male in the age group 40-70 years. The incidence of malignancy was calculated based on the age and gender. The highest incidence among the women was of cancer breast (67.74%) followed by liver (11.29%) and thyroid (11.29%). Among the male population, the highest incidence was of cancer prostate (29.09%) followed by liver (9.09%) and renal cell carcinoma (9.09%). As far as therapy is concerned, only cancer thyroid cases were assessed and considered for I-131 therapy with successful results. Of these patients treated with radioiodine, 9 were for primary disease while one patient had bony metastasis also. No death or complication has yet been reported. There is no controlled program for screening cancer patients in Bangladesh, but with assistance from the Nuclear Oncologists it was possible to obtain a raw data on the incidence of different cancers in Bangladesh. This in future may help in the management strategy of various malignancies. (author)

  13. Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides are being widely used in medicine, agriculture, industry and research and development nowadays, and are likely to be incorporated to hazardous levels in the course of work. In order to ensure that the radiation doses received by the occupational workers, due to internal exposures, do not exceed the prescribed safe limits, proper internal contamination monitoring programmes are required. Internal doses due to incorporated radioactivity can conveniently be assessed directly through the in vivo measurement of body radioactivity externally by using a whole body counter (WBC) comprising of an appropriate detector assembly. Body monitoring provides direct information on the amount of radioactivity present inside the body in the case of most radionuclides and is an important part of the radiation protection programme. Body monitoring can be placed into two categories by energy: 1) low energy ( 100 keV) photon emitting radionuclides. The former category includes only a few radionuclides and requires much more sensitive detector/shield systems compared to the latter category that covers the majority of the radionuclides. In order to assess body radioactivity, a self-shielded chair geometry WBC has been designed and installed at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Savar. The external background contribution has been reduced using shielding materials made of high Z materials such as Pb and Fe. A shielding thickness of 3.5 cm Pb + 2.5 cm Fe was used around the detector. The detector is a 5 in x 5 in Nal(Tl) crystal. A 90% average background reduction in the energy range 0.1 to 3 MeV was achieved using this shielding configuration. For low energy photon (LEP) detection, the low energy background needs to be reduced, so the shielding configuration has been modified. The interior of the Pb + Fe shield is provided with 0.937 mm of Cu lining which serves to reduce background below 100 keV. The use of 0.937 mm Cu shield achieves the lowest possible low-energy ambient background up to 10 keV. An overall 94% background reduction was achieved. With this shielding configuration, several spectra were recorded with Canberra 35 + MCA. The recorded spectra of 241Am, 210Pb and 137Cs are shown in Figures 3-5. From the figures, it is apparent that the low energy photon emitters could be detected with this system. Further work on calibration of the system with low energy radionuclides is progress

  14. Criminal poisoning of commuters in Bangladesh: prospective and retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, M Mahbub Alam; Basher, Ariful; Faiz, M Abul; Kuch, Ulrich; Pogoda, Werner; Kauert, Gerold F; Toennes, Stefan W

    2008-08-25

    Travel-related poisoning is an emerging social and public health emergency in Bangladesh but its cause and significance have not been determined. To investigate this syndrome we performed a prospective clinical study and retrospective analysis of hospital records in a general medicine unit of a public tertiary care teaching hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh, using toxicological analysis by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) and liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF MS). The participants of the prospective study were 130 consecutive patients aged 16-80 years who were admitted with central nervous system depression (Glasgow Coma Score 3-14) after using public transportation, in the absence of other abnormalities, from January through June 2004, and a convenience sample of 15 such patients admitted during 3 days in May 2006. In 2004-2006, travel-related poisoning increased from 6.1 to 9.5% of all admissions (210-309 of 3266-3843 per year), representing 46.6-55.7% of all admitted poisoning cases. Incidents were associated with bus (76%), taxi, train, and air travel, or local markets; 98% of patients remembered buying or accepting food or drinks before losing consciousness. Direct financial damage (missing property) was diverse and frequently existential. Among 94 urine samples analyzed by FPIA, 74% tested positive for benzodiazepines. Among 15 urine samples analyzed by LC-TOF MS, lorazepam was detected in all; five also contained diazepam or metabolites; nitrazepam was present in three. FPIA results obtained for these 15 samples were below the recommended cut-off in eight (53%; lorazepam only). Our findings show that the massive medicosocial emergency of travel-related poisoning in Bangladesh is the result of drug-facilitated organized crime and that benzodiazepine drugs are used to commit these crimes, suggesting modifications to the local emergency management of the victims of this type of poisoning. They also highlight the

  15. Providing hope: midwifery teaching in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Bangladesh is recognised as a resource-poor country that has made some very positive steps to reducing maternal mortality over the last decade. However the death rate of women directly caused by pregnancy and childbirth still remains much higher than countries such as the UK, often due to lack of access to good quality and affordable basic health care. In this article, Anna Kent writes of her experiences teaching obstetric emergency clinical skills to Bangladesh's first ever student midwives. The students were recruited from rural villages to complete a three-year fully funded Midwifery Diploma Programme at one of seven education centres across the country. The goal of the programme is for the students to eventually return and practise as midwives in their home communities, enabling greater access for women to good quality basic health care, directly reducing maternal mortality across Bangladesh. PMID:26638653

  16. Health consequences of child labour in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The paper examines the effect of child labour on child health outcomes in Bangladesh, advancing the methodologies and the results of papers published in different journals. Objective: We examine the effect of child labour on child health outcomes. Methods: We used Bangladesh National Child Labour Survey data for 2002-2003 for our analysis. Results: The main finding of the paper suggests that child labour is positively and significantly associated with the probability of being injured or becoming ill. Intensity of injury or illness is significantly higher in construction and manufacturing sectors than in other sectors. Health disadvantages for different age groups are not essentially parallel. Conclusions: The results obtained in this paper strengthen the need for stronger enforcement of laws that regulate child labour, especially given its adverse consequences on health. Although the paper focuses on Bangladesh, much of the evidence presented has implications that are relevant to policymakers in other developing countries.

  17. Institutional Repositories and Open Access Initiatives in Bangladesh: A New Paradigm of Scholarly Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Anwarul Islam

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, open access (OA in its diverse forms constitutes the most interesting and promising model for the research output of an academic or research institution. The purpose of the present study is to discuss the situation of OA in the developing world, with a focus on Bangladesh. The study also addresses why OA is important for developing countries and which initiatives have been taken in Bangladesh. Finally, we discuss some challenging issues of OA and suggestions on how to overcome these issues. It is rather obvious that developing countries have always faced a lack of research information and were unable to afford sufficient subscriptions to journals. The other side of the picture is the poor dissemination of the research outcome in the developing world. In Bangladesh, only three organizations have their institutional repository and have a reasonable number of local OA journals. We will identify some problems that impede the process of building open access IR, or more generally an OA environment in Bangladesh. We are convinced, however, that we will witness in the near future a sustainable growth of open access initiatives, with more open access literature and digital repositories.

  18. Plasmodium falciparum Genetic Diversity in Bangladesh Does Not Suggest a Hypoendemic Population Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Shafiul; Elahi, Rubayet; Mohon, Abu Naser; Al-Amin, Hasan Mohammad; Kibria, Mohammad Golam; Khan, Wasif A; Khanum, Hamida; Haque, Rashidul

    2016-06-01

    Despite the recommendation for the use of merozoite surface protein 1 (msp1), merozoite surface protein 2 (msp2), and glutamate-rich protein (glurp) genes as markers in drug efficacy studies by World Health Organization and their limited use in Bangladesh, the circulating Plasmodium falciparum population genetic structure has not yet been assessed in Bangladesh. This study presents a comprehensive report on the circulating P. falciparum population structure based on msp1, msp2, and glurp polymorphic gene markers in Bangladesh. Among the 130 pretreatment (day 0) P. falciparum samples from seven malaria-endemic districts, 14 distinct genotypes were observed for msp1, 20 for msp2, and 13 for glurp Polyclonal infection was reported in 94.6% (N = 123) of the samples. Multiplicity of infection (MOI) for msp1 was the highest (1.5) among the MOIs of the markers. The heterozygosity for msp1, msp2, and glurp was 0.89, 0.93, and 0.83, respectively. Data according to different malaria-endemic areas are also presented and discussed. Bangladesh is considered as a malaria-hypoendemic country. However, the prevalence of polyclonal infection and the genetic diversity of P. falciparum do not represent hypoendemicity. PMID:27139455

  19. Grameen Bank women borrowers’ non-formal adult learning transformation in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Abdur Rouf

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Grameen Bank (GB is a micro credit organization established to address poverty to empower the poor women in Bangladesh. GB targets adult women who were illiterate. GB’s adult learning information has ‘Sixteen Decisions’ (inculcate the socio-economic messages aimed at improving the social, economic, health, and well-being of GB borrowers. This Sixteen Decision adult learning campaign empowers GB women borrowers in their familial and communal life. It is important to know the efficacy of adult learning strategies that has used by GB to create this paradigm shift and transformation in local communities. How does the Grameen Bank adult learning process enables GB’s women borrowers to mobilize group solidarity, leadership development and apply the sixteen decisions in their daily life? The study finds 87% GB women borrowers were able to make better family decision on behalf of the entire family. 25% of women vice-chairs won in local in Upzilla counsels in 2009 election in Bangladesh. This statistics indicate that gender changes are happening as women are becoming successful in representing their family and holding public offices in patriarchal Bangladesh. Exponential improvements in literacy is happening, (100% of GB borrowers are able to sign their names on the documents which show signs of achievements in adult learning. However, if GB non-formal adult learning strategies could streamline, this would generate more socio-economic consciousness and environmental awareness and social justice reforms to improve the life of GB women borrowers in Bangladesh.

  20. Public acceptance, market development and commercialization of food irradiation technology in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current status of food irradiation technology in Bangladesh with respect to public acceptance, commercial application, trade development and present research and development activities are summarized in the paper. Irradiated food products are generally accepted by people. To further boost public opinion on the usefulness of the technology, two national seminars were successfully organized in 1995 and 1996 respectively with wide participation and media coverage. A number of non-traditional items such as beef casing, flour, turtle meat, macaroni, peat soil, etc. were irradiated and successfully marketed during the last 5 years. Bangladesh adopted a ''Specification for Authorisation of Irradiation by Groups/Classes of Foods'' in 1995 in line with the ICGFI Guidelines. The Bangladesh Standard is essentially similar to the Harmonised Regulations adopted for the RCA countries in April 1998. About 1300 metric tons of different food items were irradiated for commercial purposes at the Gammatech Irradiation Facility in Chittagong during the past 5 years. Present research activities in Bangladesh include irradiation disinfestations of nematodes in ginger and turmeric, and mites and thrips from cut flowers. Work on identification of fruit flies, mites and thrips by using sensitive protein markers is in progress. (author)

  1. Comprehensive update on cancer scenario of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Md Akram Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh, at 142 million people, is the ninth most populous country in the world. There are 13 to 15 lakh cancer patients in Bangladesh, with about two lakh patients newly diagnosed with cancer each year. As an overview, lung cancer and mouth-oropharynx cancer rank as the top two prevalent cancers in males. Other types of cancers are esophagus cancer and stomach cancer. In women, cancer cervix uteri and breast cancer are most prevalent. Other cancer types, which affect women, are mouth and ...

  2. Teachers’ recruitment process via MCDM methods: A case study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Karmaker

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of faculty members is very significant for educational organization to prompt reputation of the organization and to provide quality education. Teaching staff, the pillars of the educational institution, can change the whole nation stimulating the magnet of interest, knowledge, and wisdom in the pupils. Selecting a better academic staff among the others is very crucial for Human Resources Management (HRM as the success of any organization solely depends on how well it selects its manpower. Institute managing committee must have a reliable technique to judge a teachers’ ranking through multiple conflicting criteria because different teachers have various capabilities. In Bangladesh, it is a common practice in public engineering universities to select teachers only having good academic records. But teaching staff selection problem is a multi-staged decision-making problem having both quantitative and qualitative criteria. It is evident that it has become challenging as the number of alternatives and conflicting criteria increases. In this paper, a structured framework has been developed using MCDM methods both in fuzzy as well as non-fuzzy environments in the renowned engineering university of Bangladesh, where seven candidates under fifteen different sub-criteria are evaluated and ranked. The study helps the recruitment panel of educational organization in Bangladesh select the most eligible academic staff for required posts.

  3. Avian Influenza Outbreaks in Chickens, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Paritosh K Biswas; Christensen, Jens P.; Ahmed, Syed S.U.; Barua, Himel; Das, Ashutosh; Rahman, Mohammed H.; Giasuddin, Mohammad; Hannan, Abu S. M. A.; Habib, Mohammad A.; Ahad, Abdul; Rahman, Abu S.M.S.; Faruque, Rayhan; Nitish C Debnath

    2008-01-01

    To determine the epidemiology of outbreaks of avian influenza A virus (subtypes H5N1, H9N2) in chickens in Bangladesh, we conducted surveys and examined virus isolates. The outbreak began in backyard chickens. Probable sources of infection included egg trays and vehicles from local live bird markets and larger live bird markets.

  4. First Outbreak of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Rahman, Khalilur; Siddque, A. K.; Shoma, Shereen; A. H. M. Kamal; Ali, K.S.; Nisaluk, Ananda; Breiman, Robert F.

    2002-01-01

    During the first countrywide outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Bangladesh, we conducted surveillance for dengue at a hospital in Dhaka. Of 176 patients, primarily adults, found positive for dengue, 60.2% had dengue fever, 39.2% dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 0.6% dengue shock syndrome. The Dengue virus 3 serotype was detected in eight patients.

  5. Partnership or PR? Chevron in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Katy

    2012-01-01

    Chevron are investing in communities and promoting human rights in Bangladesh, claiming that partnership with communities is not just good business practice, but crucial for social progress. But are these real partnerships - publishing what they pay, supporting anti-corruption measures and being accountable?

  6. Ebola Virus Antibodies in Fruit Bats, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin J Olival; Islam, Ariful; YU, Meng; Anthony, Simon J.; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Khan, Shahneaz Ali; Khan, Salah Uddin; Crameri, Gary; Wang, Lin-Fa; Lipkin, W. Ian; Luby, Stephen P.; Daszak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To determine geographic range for Ebola virus, we tested 276 bats in Bangladesh. Five (3.5%) bats were positive for antibodies against Ebola Zaire and Reston viruses; no virus was detected by PCR. These bats might be a reservoir for Ebola or Ebola-like viruses, and extend the range of filoviruses to mainland Asia.

  7. Bangladesh : Climate Change and Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2000-01-01

    The study examines Bangladesh's extreme vulnerability to climate change, whose low-lying topography, and funnel-shaped coast, further exposes the land to cyclones, and tidal surges, resulting in seasonal floods. These factors, and the large population base, widespread poverty, aggravated by the lack of strong institutional development, makes the country particularly vulnerable to climate v...

  8. Gender Disparities in Secondary Education in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, Molla; Rahman, Pk Md. Motiur

    2008-01-01

    Enrolment and success rates are very crucial for any educational system in the world but they are more important for the developing countries like Bangladesh. Gender differences in enrolment and success rates are also emerging issues. This study investigated the enrolment and success rate's status in secondary educational system of Bangladesh…

  9. Teacher Educators' Attitude towards Computer: Perspective Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Ataur

    2011-01-01

    This study examined how teacher educators perceive the attitude towards use of computer technology in Teachers' Training Colleges in Bangladesh. This study investigated teacher educators' computer attitudes by using the valid and reliable instruments of Loyd and Gressard's (1984) Computer Attitude Scale (CAS). The data was collected through …

  10. REGIONAL VARIATIONS IN CHILD MARRIAGE IN BANGLADESH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Kamrul; Haque, Md Rabiul; Hossain, Mohammad Bellal

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the regional variations in the prevalence of child marriage in Bangladesh with a view to providing recommendations for division-specific policy interventions. Data from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Substantial regional variations in child marriage were found in Bangladesh. Rangpur and Khulna had more than four times higher odds of child marriage than Sylhet (4.57 and 4.11 times, respectively). Barisal and Rajshahi had more than three times higher odds of child marriage than Sylhet (3.70 and 3.48 times, respectively). Chittagong and Dhaka had about two times odds of child marriage than Sylhet (1.98 and 2.67 times, respectively), even after controlling for selected socio-demographic, economic and cultural characteristics. Respondent's education, employment status, husband's education and wealth index were inversely associated with the prevalence of child marriage. The policy implications of these findings are discussed in the context of Bangladesh. PMID:27076200

  11. Gender, Parenting, and Adolescent Functioning in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sunita Mahtani; Bond, Michael Harris; Abdullah, Abu Saleh M.; Ma, Stefan S. L.

    2000-01-01

    Examined associations of self-esteem, relationship harmony, and academic achievement with perceptions of parents' styles and supervisory practices among 212 adolescents in Islamic Bangladesh. Found that parental supervisory practices were associated with a warm parental style for girls and parental dominating control for boys. Girls' (but not…

  12. First case of chromoblastomycosis from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brun Sophie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromoblastomycosis is a rare and chronic cutaneous and subcutaneous infection caused by black fungi and mostly reported in tropical and subtropical areas. Here we report the first case of chromoblastomycosis from Bangladesh. Molecular biology permitted to identify Fonsecaea nubica, and the patient responded well to antifungal treatment alone.

  13. Career choices among medical students in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Moslehuddin Ahmed

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available SM Moslehuddin Ahmed1, Md Anwarul Azim Majumdar2, Rezina Karim3, Sayeeda Rahman2, Nuzhat Rahman41Department of Community Medicine, Uttara Adhunik Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 2Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford, UK; 3Department of Microbiology, Uttara Adhunik Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 4Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAIntroduction: Information regarding career choices of medical students is important to plan human resources for health, design need-based educational programs, and ensure equitable and quality health care services in a country.Aim: The aim of the study is to identify career choices, nature of career, intended practice locations, and reasons for career choices of Bangladesh medical students.Method: First-, third-, and fifth-year students of Bangladesh Medical College and Uttara Adhunik Medical College completed a self-report questionnaire on career choices, nature of career, intended practice locations, and reasons for career choices. The students were requested to choose three long-term choices from the given specialties.Results: A total of 132 students responded (46 males and 86 females and response rate was 75%. The popular choices (first choice among males and females were medical specialty, surgical specialty, obstetrics and gynecology, and general practice. For first, second, and third choices altogether, male students chose surgical specialties and female students preferred medical specialties. The leading reasons for selecting a specialty were personal interest and wide job opportunity. More than 67% of respondents wanted to join private services and about 90% chose major cities as practice locations. About 43% of respondents expressed willingness to practice medicine in Bangladesh, whereas 51% of total respondents wanted to practice abroad.Discussion: Majority of students intended

  14. What Makes the Bangladesh Local Government Engineering Department (LGED) So Effective?

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    The Local Government Engineering Department (LGED) is renowned for its superior effectiveness compared with other public organizations in Bangladesh. Using the management and organizational theory framework, this paper attempts to answer the following two related questions: (i) why is LGED so effective, and (ii) has there been complementarity between LGED’s own strengths and the capacity development support of its donors. LGED’s business domain has been conducive to its effectiveness and to t...

  15. Prevention and control of tuberculosis in workplaces: how knowledgeable are the workers in Bangladesh?

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Qazi Shafayetul; Islam, Md Akramul; Islam, Shayla; Ahmed, Syed Masud

    2015-01-01

    Background The National Tuberculosis (TB) Control Programme (NTP) of Bangladesh succeeded in achieving the dual targets of 70 % case detection and 85 % treatment completion as set by the World Health Organization. However, TB prevention and control in work places remained largely an uncharted area for NTP. There is dearth of information regarding manufacturing workers’ current knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) on pulmonary TB which is essential for designing a TB prevention and control...

  16. Hydrocarbon Distribution in Sediments from the Southeast Coastal Region of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Biplob Das; Yusuf Sharif Ahmed Khan; Pranab Das; Sakhawat Hossain Likhon

    2002-01-01

    The research deals with the study of the nature of hydrocarbons occurring at the coastal region of Bangladesh to assess the extent of hydrocarbon pollution in the marine environment. Accordingly, five sediment samples were analyzed for extraction of soluble organic matter, fractionation of extract into aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and polar compounds, molecular composition analysis of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons� fractions and integration of results for the stud...

  17. A Novel Hierarchical Semi-centralized Telemedicine Network Architecture Proposition for Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury, Samiul; Peterson, Carrie Beth; Kyriazakos, Sofoklis; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major functions of telemedicine is the prompt delivery of modern healthcare to the remotest areas with reduced cost and efficient use of communication resources. The establishment of a well organized telemedicine system is therefore exigent for the developing countries like Bangladesh where there are extreme paucities of efficient healthcare professionals and equipments, specifically in the rural areas. In this paper a novel, hierarchical and semi-centralized telemedicine network a...

  18. Prevalence of Subclinical Caprine Mastitis in Bangladesh Based on Parallel Interpretation of Three Screening Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Aminul Islam; Abdus Samad; AKM Anisur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the point prevalence of subclinical caprine mastitis based on parallel interpretation of results of three screening test. A total of 462 milk samples from 231 lactating Black Bengal goats comprises of three organized goat farms in Bangladesh were collected and were screened for subclinical mastitis using California Mastitis Test (CMT), White Side Test (WST) and Surf Field Mastitis Test (SFMT) simultaneously. Integrated test results yield the preval...

  19. A systematic approach to Solid Waste Management in Bangladesh following the Finnish system

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Rakibul; Rahman, Md. Obaidur

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays Solid Waste Management (SWM) is recognized worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO), the European Union, and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have emphasized the need to handle and dispose of waste to make a clean and green environment all over the world. The research objective is to propose a sustainable and integrated solid waste management in Bangladesh by following the Finnish waste management system partially or fully. Finland has already developed an effective met...

  20. A study on job satisfaction and morale of commercial banks in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Jamal; Mohajan, Haradhan; Datta, Rajib

    2011-01-01

    In today’s changing world the business environment is changing rapidly. The emergence of e-commerce and development of information and technology plays a significant role in the nature of work as well as their attitude towards the organization. We have been experiencing a tremendous growth in banking sector of Bangladesh during the last decade of the twentieth century. Private commercial bank plays a vital role in the overall development of our economy. Though it is a challenging profession, ...

  1. Impacts of Dairy Cooperative on Rural Income Generation in Bangladesh 【Article】

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Ashoke Kumar; Maharjan, Keshav Lall

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight how small dairy farmers in Bangladesh are collectively oper-ating their dairy farming and generating employment for better earnings through a cooperative system.Adopting new technology in agriculture and providing an efficient marketing system is a complexprocess in developing countries where the majority of farmers are in subsistence level of farming.However, with democratic organization, a cooperative can play a vital role for the poor rural farmers...

  2. Electrical Energy Potential from Municipal Solid Waste in Rajshahi City Corporation, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    A.Z.A. Saifullah

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the assessment of the electrical power generation potential from municipal solid waste (MSW) in Rajshahi City Corporation (RCC), Bangladesh. RCC generates huge amount of solid waste (SW) which is left very poorly managed due to crisis in governance. About 80% of organic food wastes are the major constituents of SW generated in RCC in the year 2012. Electrical energy can be produced from SW generated in RCC as a sustainable commercial solution. The average calcu...

  3. CHANGES OF LEARNERS’ SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONTEXT AFTER COMPLETING A PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FROM BANGLADESH OPEN UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. M. Iftekhar KHALID

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Creating same opportunity in term of social and economic context for the learners of distance education as the students from conventional education is a challenging task since professional education through distance method is a new genre in Bangladesh. This genre of professional education starts successfully with the establishment of the Bangladesh Open University (BOU in 1992. The university creates immense opportunities to study anytime and anywhere. This paper explains what social and economic changes happened to the students who completed a professional programme like B.Ag.Ed, MBA, CEMBA and CEMPA at the Bangladesh Open University. As BOU is the first and pioneer organization, which provides education in distance mode, a study has been necessary for BOU to know what contribution it provides to the nation in social and economic aspects. This paper should be able to elevate the morale of the organizations like BOU in involving more effort for expanding the organization and also to understand how successful these organization in imparting the knowledge and skill and how effectively the students are able to use those knowledge and skill in their professional life which in turn affects the learners’ income and social esteem. The university has been established with aims to raise the standard of education and to give the people educational opportunities by democratizing education and to create a class of competent people by raising the standard of education of the people generally. The paper also shows how the professional programmes of BOU supports to achieve the Millennium Development Goals in Bangladesh.

  4. Nutrition: basis for healthy children and mothers in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruque, A S G; Ahmed, A M Shamsir; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Islam, M Munirul; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Roy, S K; Alam, Nurul; Kabir, Iqbal; Sack, David A

    2008-09-01

    Recent data from the World Health Organization showed that about 60% of all deaths, occurring among children aged less than five years (under-five children) in developing countries, could be attributed to malnutrition. It has been estimated that nearly 50.6 million under-five children are malnourished, and almost 90% of these children are from developing countries. Bangladesh is one of the countries with the highest rate of malnutrition. The recent baseline survey by the National Nutrition Programme (NNP) showed high rates of stunting, underweight, and wasting. However, data from the nutrition surveillance at the ICDDR,B hospital showed that the proportion of children with stunting, underweight, and wasting has actually reduced during 1984-2005. Inappropriate infant and young child-feeding practices (breastfeeding and complementary feeding) have been identified as a major cause of malnutrition. In Bangladesh, although the median duration of breastfeeding is about 30 months, the rate of exclusive breastfeeding until the first six months of life is low, and practice of appropriate complementary feeding is not satisfactory. Different surveys done by the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), and Bangladesh Breastfeeding Foundation (BBF) showed a rate of exclusive breastfeeding to be around 32-52%, which have actually remained same or declined over time. The NNP baseline survey using a strict definition of exclusive breastfeeding showed a rate of exclusive breastfeeding (12.8%) until six months of age. Another study from the Abhoynagar field site of ICDDR,B reported the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding to be 15% only. Considerable efforts have been made to improve the rates of exclusive breastfeeding. Nationally, initiation of breastfeeding within one hour of birth, feeding colostrum, and exclusive breastfeeding have been promoted through the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) implemented and supported by BBF and

  5. Societal impacts and vulnerability to floods in Bangladesh and Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Tanvir H. Dewan

    2015-01-01

    Bangladesh and Nepal lie between the Himalayas and low-lying coasts of the Bay of Bengal and are traversed by hundreds of rivers and tributaries. Historical data shows that, since 1970, the scale, intensity and duration of floods have increased in Bangladesh and Nepal, causing grave human suffering; disruptions in normal life and activity, damages of infrastructure, crops and agricultural land with severe impacts on the economy. Bangladesh is affected by torrential rain, glacier melt, upstrea...

  6. Menopausal symptoms assessment among middle age women in Kushtia, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal Asif; Salehin Faizus; Rahman Shahedur

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background There are few menopausal study data available in South East Asia especially in Bangladesh. This study was conducted in a well populated town named Kushtia, which is located in the western part of Bangladesh. Objectives This study was aimed to document the menopausal-related symptoms among middle age women of Kushtia region of Bangladesh. Methods By using modified MRS (Menopause Rating Scale) questionnaire, 509 women aged 40-70 years were interviewed to document symptoms co...

  7. Child Labour in Bangladesh: Trends, Patterns and Policy Options

    OpenAIRE

    Khanam, Rasheda

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the trends, patterns and policy options of child labour in Bangladesh particularly during the 1990s. The striking finding in the trend and incidence of child labour in Bangladesh is that while child labour is on a declining trend in other South Asian countries – India and Pakistan and in the world, it has been increasing in Bangladesh. This increasing trend in the incidence of child labour particularly focuses on the irrelevance or inadequacy of existing child labour laws...

  8. Preference for Institutional Delivery and Caesarean Sections in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Kamal, S M Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    In Bangladesh, preference for place of delivery and socioeconomic factors associated with caesarean section are not well-understood. This paper examines the socioeconomic correlates of preference for institutional delivery and caesarean sections in Bangladesh. The study used data from the nationally-representative 2007 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey. Both bivariate and multivariate binary logistic regression models were constructed to assess the effect of sociodemographic factors on...

  9. Implications of the global economic crisis for the Bangladesh economy

    OpenAIRE

    Raihan, Selim

    2012-01-01

    There is no denying the fact that the recent global economic crisis has profound implications for the developing countries like Bangladesh. This paper has explored the impacts of global economic crisis on the economy of Bangladesh in a general equilibrium framework. The CGE model for Bangladesh economy is developed with a Social Accounting Matrix for the year 2007 as the database. Analysis of the trend and pattern of the global economic crisis suggests that global economic crisis led to some ...

  10. Some banking activities of the Islami Bank Bangladesh Ltd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Abu Zafar Mahmudul Haq

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Banking sectors of Bangladesh are not going well in terms of investment. Among different banks in Bangladesh, Islami Bank Bangladesh Limited (IBBL is running good for the modes of investment. So this study is conducted of the investment modes of this bank. Study is based on secondary information of the IBBL and opinion survey among twenty clients which has been done through convenient sampling on a purposively selected branch. It concludes that trend of investment of the IBBL runs well.

  11. The prospects and challenges of plastic industries in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Pintu, MD. Nazmul Hossain

    2016-01-01

    Plastic is one of the most used engineered material in Bangladesh that has come out as im-portant industrial sector during the last few decades. The size of Domestic market is more than thousands of billions euros. The available cheap labor, vast population and fast development of plastics wastes recycling industries have given Bangladesh a huge potential advantages to compete in the global market. Although, plastics sector is one of the most growing markets in Bangladesh, but still it is fac...

  12. Fishing with Otters: a Traditional Conservation Practice in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Mostafa Feeroz; Sajeda Begum; Md Kamrul Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Fishing with otters has been practiced in Bangladesh for the last two hundred years. This traditional practice plays an important role in otter conservation in Bangladesh. Among the three species of otters found in Bangladesh, only Lutra perspicillata is currently used for fishing by the fishermen in and around the Sundarbans. Noraile and Khulna districts, near the Sundarbans, are the only districts in the country where this species is bred in captivity, tamed, and used for fishing by the fis...

  13. Some banking activities of the Islami Bank Bangladesh Ltd.

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Abu Zafar Mahmudul Haq

    2013-01-01

    Banking sectors of Bangladesh are not going well in terms of investment. Among different banks in Bangladesh, Islami Bank Bangladesh Limited (IBBL) is running good for the modes of investment. So this study is conducted of the investment modes of this bank. Study is based on secondary information of the IBBL and opinion survey among twenty clients which has been done through convenient sampling on a purposively selected branch. It concludes that trend of investment of the IBBL runs well.

  14. Why does Bangladesh remain so poor? Part I: the situation and efforts to change it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, C

    1985-01-01

    This 1st part of the discussion of the poverty in Bangladesh reviews efforts on the part of individuals, donor agencies, and the government to alleviate poverty, and some goals of the new Third Five Year Plan. More than 3/4 of the people of Bangladesh live in poverty or close to it, according to development and economic criteria. Bangladesh society has hardly any parallel in the world if viewed from the perspective of its capacity, like a biological species, to adapt to an ecological niche and then reproduce to fill that niche. This defines success in biological terms. The Bangladesh society that developed was highly in tune with the natural environment of the rice growing plains. Social organization, kinship, settlement pattern, economic transactions, beliefs systems, and reproductive biology all developed in close symbiosis with the land. From a humanitarian perspective, Bangladesh is also highly successful. The human interaction, the expressive culture, the fullness of life, and the verbal arts all are more fully expressed than in many cultures. By "development" criteria, Bangladesh appears highly unsuccessful. Per capita income is about $130 a year. Bangladesh ranks very low in such indices as literacy, housing, roads, health services, infant survival, loan recovery, exportable goods, and control of the population growth rate. There is no question but that individuals usually are well aware if their situation is precarious, and they take rational action to improve their security; the government and private agencies have a multitude of programs aimed at alleviating poverty. For Bangladesh as a whole, domestic savings in 1984-85 was 8%, and during the Second Five Year Plan the rate of domestic savings increased faster than was expected, compared with income. Almost all the nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), many bilateral donor agencies, and huge segments of government target their efforts to the poor and the small farmers. There are over 150 NGOs of

  15. Digital Bangladesh: Using Formative Research to Develop Phone Messages for the Prevention and Control of Diabetes in Rural Bangladesh.

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah Maria Jennings; Kohenour Akter

    2015-01-01

    Background: As with many low-income countries, diabetes is an increasing issue in Bangladesh affecting an estimated 20% to 30% of the population either as intermediate hyperglycaemia or fully expressed diabetes mellitus (Bhowmik et al., 2012). The Bangladesh D-MAGIC project is a cluster randomised control trial to test the effectiveness of interventions to improve detection, management and control of diabetes in rural Bangladesh. One of these interventions is an mHealth intervention, which in...

  16. Software Development Standard and Software Engineering Practice: A Case Study of Bangladesh

    CERN Document Server

    Begum, Zerina; Hafiz, Mohd Zulfiquar; Islam, Md Saiful; Shoyaib, Md; 10.3329/jbas.v32i2.2432

    2010-01-01

    Improving software process to achieve high quality in a software development organization is the key factor to success. Bangladeshi software firms have not experienced much in this particular area in comparison to other countries. The ISO 9001 and CMM standard has become a basic part of software development. The main objectives of our study are: 1) To understand the software development process uses by the software developer firms in Bangladesh 2) To identify the development practices based on established quality standard and 3) To establish a standardized and coherent process for the development of software for a specific project. It is revealed from this research that software industries of Bangladesh are lacking in target set for software process and improvement, involvement of quality control activities, and standardize business expertise practice. This paper investigates the Bangladeshi software industry in the light of the above challenges.

  17. Community economic status and intimate partner violence against women in bangladesh: compositional or contextual effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderEnde, Kristin E; Sibley, Lynn M; Cheong, Yuk Fai; Naved, Ruchira Tabassum; Yount, Kathryn M

    2015-06-01

    In this research, we used a multi-level contextual-effects analysis to disentangle the household- and community-level associations between income and intimate partner violence (IPV) against women in Bangladesh. Our analyses of data from 2,668 women interviewed as part of the World Health Organization (WHO) multi-country study on women's health and domestic violence against women showed that household income was negatively associated with women's risk of experiencing IPV. Controlling for residence in a low-income household, living in a low-income community was not associated with women's risk of experiencing IPV. These results support a household-level, not community-level, relationship between income and IPV in Bangladesh. PMID:25845617

  18. Perceived decline in intimate partner violence against women in Bangladesh: qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Sidney Ruth; Lenzi, Rachel; Nazneen, Sohela; Bates, Lisa M

    2013-09-01

    The Bangladesh government, nongovernmental organizations, donors, and advocacy groups have attempted various interventions to promote gender equality and reduce intimate partner violence (IPV) against women, but rigorous evaluations of these interventions are rare and few published studies have yet to show that any of them has had a substantial impact. This study presents qualitative evidence from four villages in central and northern Bangladesh drawn from 11 group discussions (6 with men, 5 with women), 16 open-ended interviews with men, and 62 women's life history narratives. The findings strongly suggest that IPV is declining in these villages as women's economic roles expand and they gain a stronger sense of their rights. Periodic surveys are recommended to measure trends in the incidence of IPV in settings where transitions in gender systems are under way. PMID:24006072

  19. Farmers’ Education and Farmers’ Wealth in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Zafar Mahmudul Haq

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of farmers’ education is examined with a view to evaluate the actual situation of farmers’ education in Bangladesh. Fifty samples were collected from two sub districts of the Gazipur district in Bangladesh. The selection of the study sites and collection of the samples such as the years of schooling of the farm household head, total income, farm size, number of earners of farm families, family size, years of farming experience of farm household head, number of times extension contacts and rice yield were done purposively. It is cleared from the study that education is necessary for farmers to raise their wealth. Results were derived through regression analysis. The study has also shown that size of family and years of farming experience contributed significantly to the wealth accumulation of farmers.

  20. Brief summary of the hydrogeology of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.R.

    1972-01-01

    The average annual precipitation in Bangladesh ranges from about 50 inches in the west-central part to about 200 inches in the northeast. Most of the rain falls during the southwest monsoon so that local precipitation is heavy at the same time flood waters of the Brahmaputra and Ganges rivers arrive. The result is that most years about 50 percent of Bangladesh is inundated; in very wet years inundation may exceed 70 percent of the total land area. Consequently, over much of the country the annual recharge to the ground-water reservoir is large. Annual fluctuations of the ground-water level are commonly about 10 feet in the northern part of the country. If a storage coefficient of 0.2 is assumed, annual recharge may be about 24 inches of water. Although the amount of recharge is different from area to area, it is almost everywhere very substantial in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta.

  1. Agribusiness Potentials for Bangladesh — an Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mahboob Ali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh cannot sustain long-run economic progress without having a strong agricultural sector accompanied by a dynamic agribusiness sub-sector. This study has been undertaken as an exploratory study to assess the role and significance of agribusiness in Bangladesh along with the current status and future potentials. Various institutional and other weaknesses and challenges were deemed to exist in the country that prevents full realization of the potentials of this industry. At a general level, the paper recommends various structural, institutional, and market-friendly policy reforms accompanied by infrastructural developments in order to encourage entrepreneurship, innovation, and investments along with better and more effective strategic management of this sector. Such reforms are expected to promote better utilization of scarce resources to promote a strong, dynamic, and sustainable agribusiness sector that would be able to contribute substantially to industrialization and economic development of the country.

  2. Microfinance, Efficiency and Agricultural Production in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, K. M. Zahidul

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to make a detailed and systematic empirical analysis of microfinance borrowers and non-borrowers in Bangladesh and also examine how efficiency measures are influenced by the access to agricultural microfinance. In the empirical analysis, this study used both parametric and non-parametric frontier approaches to investigate differences in efficiency estimates between microfinance borrowers and non-borrowers. This thesis, based on five articles, applied data obt...

  3. ESTIMATION OF POTATO DEMAND ELASTICITIES IN BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Huq, A. S. M. Anwarul; ALAM, SHAMSUL; Sabur, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    The study estimated potato demand elasticities in Bangladesh by using AIDS model with corrected Stone price index. The income elasticity of demand for potato was 0.632. The compensated and uncompensated own price elasticities indicated that all food items were price inelastic. The estimated own price elasticity indicated that if the potato price fell by 10 per cent, demand for potato would increase by 8.82 percent. The estimates of cross price elasticities indicated that the substitution effe...

  4. Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Nutrition in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmud, Iffat; Mbuya, Nkosinathi

    2015-01-01

    This report provides a systematic review of the evidence to date, both published and grey literature, on the relationship between water and sanitation and nutrition. We also survey the potential impact of improved water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) on undernutrition. This is the first report that undertakes a thorough review and discussion of WASH and nutrition in Bangladesh. The report is meant to serve two purposes. First, it synthesizes the results/evidence evolving on the pathway of WA...

  5. OPPORTUNITIES OF DEVELOPING TOURISM INDUSTRY IN BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad SHAMSUDDOHA; Tayub CHOWDHURY

    2009-01-01

    Tourism appeal includes natural places like beaches, eco-parks, lakes, valleys, rivers, islands etc., archeological sites, historic mosques and monuments, resorts, picnic spots, forest and wildlife. Bangladesh is a riverine country having attractive panoramic beauty. There are hills, valley, canals, lake, eco-park and mangrove forests, rivers, so many islands and the longest beach in the world. In this country, the scope of nature based tourism, resource based tourism, culture based tourism a...

  6. Natural disasters and population mobility in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Clark L.; Mueller, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of environmental change for human migration have gained increasing attention in the context of climate change and recent large-scale natural disasters, but as yet relatively few large-scale and quantitative studies have addressed this issue. We investigate the consequences of climate-related natural disasters for long-term population mobility in rural Bangladesh, a region particularly vulnerable to environmental change, using longitudinal survey data from 1,700 households spa...

  7. Sustainable agriculture: a challenge in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Faroque, M.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The sustainability of conventional agriculture in Bangladesh is under threat from the continuous degradation of land and water resources, and from declining yields due to indiscriminate use of agro-chemicals. Government is pursuing efforts to promote sustainable agriculture with emphasis on better use of on-farm resources and the reduction of external inputs. This paper presents four dimensions of agricultural sustainability as productivity, environmental stability, economical profitability, ...

  8. Rainfall variability and seasonality in northern Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Sheikh Hefzul; Hussain, Md. Manjurul; Husna, Noor-E.-Ashmaul

    2016-05-01

    This paper aimed at the analysis of rainfall seasonality and variability for the northern part of South-Asian country, Bangladesh. The coefficient of variability was used to determine the variability of rainfall. While rainfall seasonality index (SI ) and mean individual seasonality index ( overline{SI_i} ) were used to identify seasonal contrast. We also applied Mann-Kendall trend test and sequential Mann-Kendall test to determine the trend in seasonality. The lowest variability was found for monsoon among the four seasons whereas winter has the highest variability. Observed variability has a decreasing tendency from the northwest region towards the northeast region. The mean individual seasonality index (0.815378 to 0.977228) indicates that rainfall in Bangladesh is "markedly seasonal with a long dry season." It was found that the length of the dry period is lower at the northeastern part of northern Bangladesh. Trend analysis results show no significant change in the seasonality of rainfall in this region. Regression analysis of overline{SI_i} and SI, and longitude and mean individual seasonality index show a significant linear correlation for this area.

  9. Floods in Bangladesh and Northeast India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    For the past month heavy monsoon rains have led to massive flooding in eastern India, Nepal, and Bangladesh, which have killed over 500 people and left millions homeless. This false-color image acquired on August 5, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft shows the extent of this flooding. In the upper right-hand corner of the image, the swollen Brahmaputra River runs east to west through the Indian state of Assam. Normally, the river and its tributaries would resemble a tangle of thin lines. Moving to the upper left-hand corner, flooding can be seen along the Ganges River in the state of Bihar, India. Both of these rivers flow into Bangladesh along with many others from India and Nepal. Heavy monsoon rains from all across the region have inundated the small country with water this year. Floodwaters have all but covered northeastern Bangladesh, which is usually dry. The Jamuna River, which runs down the center of the country off of the Brahmaputra River, now resembles a narrow lake. Millions of dollars in crops have been destroyed and thousands have been left stranded in their villages or on rafts. Forecasters are warning that flooding could get worse. In the false-color image, land is green, and water is black and dark brown. Clouds appear pink, red and white. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  10. Identifying Potential Factors of Childbearing in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Asaduzzaman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify different potential factors associated with childbearing pattern among the ever-married women in Bangladesh. Childbearing pattern is directly related to fertility level and rapid population growth is the major consequence of more childbearing. Bearing more children affects adversely on social and economic opportunities and produces substantial risks to the health of mothers and children. Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey data 1999-2000 and 2004 have been used for this study. First bi-variate analysis method is carried out to identify different factors associated with childbearing. Then generalized linear modelling approach has been performed to quantify the simultaneous effect of key socio-economic and demographic factors. Our primary findings show that childbearing varied tremendously by education level and age at first marriage. From the generalized linear model analysis, mother's age group, types of place of residence, division, media exposure are found to be significantly associated with bearing more children among the ever-married women in Bangladesh. These findings suggest that government should continue its effort to ensure higher education for females and to promote to delay age at marriage.

  11. Enhancing Sustainable Development of Diverse Agriculture in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Jahangir

    2005-01-01

    The report presents the current status of some selected CGPRT Crops (secondary crops) and examines their potentials in enhancing the sustainable development of diverse agriculture in Bangladesh. Agriculture in Bangladesh is composed of crop, livestock, fisheries and forestry subsectors. This study deals primarily with crop agriculture and the scope of diversification is limited to crop rather than agricultural diversification.

  12. Bangladesh - Non-Lending Technical Assistance on Capital Markets

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2011-01-01

    The Bangladesh stock market experienced significant volatility in late 2010 and early 2011 which took stock values high above fundamentals and threatened the stability of the financial system. This note takes a systematic look at the capital markets underpinnings in Bangladesh, including the regulatory framework, the rule-making bodies and enforcement issues. It also addresses systemic wea...

  13. Vegetable leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) and their plant hosts in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mazumdar, S.; B.A. Bhuiya

    2014-01-01

    Most leafminer flies (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are serious polyphytophagous insect pests of vegetables. In the present communication an account of four species of agromyzid flies, viz., Liriomyza chinensis (Kato), L. sativae Blanchard, Melanagromyza obtusa Malloch and Ophiomyia phaseoli (Tryon) is provided. Of these, L. chinensis is new to Bangladesh fauna. All these agromyzids were reared from 17 economic vegetable host plants in Bangladesh.

  14. Effects and Roles of Laws of Bangladesh Against Crimes: A Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiul Pervez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh officially the people’s republic of Bangladesh is a country of South Asia. The independence day of Bangladesh is 26 March. After getting independence in 1971, there was established laws in Bangladesh. Which is under legislative and parliamentary affairs division. Bangladesh people have 23 fundamentals right’s under the constitution of Bangladesh, Part 3 and Articles 26 to 47A. The Judiciary of Bangladesh consists of a Supreme Court, Subordinate courts and Tribunals Total 956 Acts, Ordinances and President’s Orders have been compiled in the Bangladesh Code from September, 1836 to January, 2007. The first Act in the Bangladesh Code is accumulated from 11th September, 1836 and the first Act title is ‘The Districts Act, 1836. Our main objective is to establish a thesis paper on lows of Bangladesh.

  15. Isolation and identification of Avibacterium paragallinarum, the causal agent of infectious coryza (IC) from layer chickens in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Akter, S.; Ali, M.; Das, P.M; Hossain, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out for the isolation and identification of Avibacterium paragallinarum, the etiological agent of infectious coryza (IC). Pathological changes were also investigated that occurred in organs in layer chickens obtained from some selected areas of Bangladesh. A nasal swabs (n=30) from dead chickens and four swabs from live chickens were collected aseptically. The organisms from swabs were cultured in different media, stained, and followed by sugar fermentation and biochemi...

  16. Socioeconomic and Demographic Disparities in Knowledge of Reproductive Healthcare among Female University Students in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Nazrul Islam Mondal, PhD,

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reproductive health (RH is a critical component of women’s health and overall well-being around the world, especially in developing countries. We examine the factors that determine knowledge of RH care among female university students in Bangladesh. Methods: Data on 300 female students were collected from Rajshahi University, Bangladesh through a structured questionnaire using purposive sampling technique. The data were used for univariate analysis, to carry out the description of the variables; bivariate analysis was used to examine the associations between the variables; and finally, multivariate analysis (binary logistic regression model was used to examine and fit the model and interpret the parameter estimates, especially in terms of odds ratios. Results: The results revealed that more than one-third (34.3% respondents do not have sufficient knowledge of RH care. The X2 -test identified the significant (p < 0.05 associations between respondents’ knowledge of RH care with respondents’ age, education, family type, watching television; and knowledge about pregnancy, family planning, and contraceptive use. Finally, the binary logistic regression model identified respondents’ age, education, family type; and knowledge about family planning, and contraceptive use as the significant (p < 0.05 predictors of RH care. Conclusions and Global Health Implications: Knowledge of RH care among female university students was found unsatisfactory. Government and concerned organizations should promote and strengthen various health education programs to focus on RH care especially for the female university students in Bangladesh.

  17. In vivo analysis of toxic effect of hydrose used in food preparations in Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuhin; Reza; Sharmin; Aktar; Hasan; Al; Amin; Mashiur; Rahman; Afroza; Arefin; Nayan; Chandra; Mohanto; Shahnur; Alam; Abdullah; Al; Mamun; Anwar; Habib; Asafudullah; Farjana; Nikkon; Khaled; Hossain; Zahangir; Alam; Saud

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the toxic effect of hydrose used in the molasses preparation in Bangladesh.Methods:Molasses were collected from open markets in different parts of Bangladesh.The presence of hydrose in selected molasses was detected using commercial kit.To evaluate the toxic effect of hydrose.Swiss albino male mice were divided into four groups.Group Ⅰ was used as control,while Groups Ⅱ,Ⅲ and Ⅳ received hydrose mixing food(5.10 and 25 g/kg food),respectively,and these supplementations were continued to the end of the study(16weeks).Blood was collected from thoracic arteries of the mice under ether anesthesia and then organs were taken.To determine the effect of hydrose on host,blood indices related to liver,heart and kidney dysfunctions were measured.Result:Creatinine and urea levels were significantly(P<0.05) increased in a dose dependent manner in hydrose treated mice,whereas calcium level was significantly decreased in hydrose exposed mice compared to control mice.Histological study of kidney showed the glomeruler inflammation,increased diameter of renal glomeruli and enlargement of proximal tubular lumen of kidneys of mice exposed to hydrose compared to that of control animals.Conclusion:The results of this study indicated that use of hydrose in molasses and other food preparations in Bangladesh may cause kidney impairment.

  18. In vivo analysis of toxic effect of hydrose used in food preparations in Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuhin Reza; Asafudullah; Farjana Nikkon; Khaled Hossain; Zahangir Alam Saud; Sharmin Aktar; Hasan Al Amin; Mashiur Rahman; Afroza Arefin; Nayan Chandra Mohanto; Shahnur Alam; Abdullah Al Mamun; Anwar Habib

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the toxic effect of hydrose used in the molasses preparation in Bangladesh.Methods:Molasses were collected from open markets in different parts of Bangladesh. The presence of hydrose in selected molasses was detected using commercial kit. To evaluate the toxic effect of hydrose, Swiss albino male mice were divided into four groups. Group I was used as control, while Groups II, III and IV received hydrose mixing food (5, 10 and 25 g/kg food), respectively, and these supplementations were continued to the end of the study (16 weeks). Blood was collected from thoracic arteries of the mice under ether anesthesia and then organs were taken. To determine the effect of hydrose on host, blood indices related to liver, heart and kidney dysfunctions were measured.Results:Creatinine and urea levels were significantly (P<0.05) increased in a dose dependent manner in hydrose treated mice, whereas calcium level was significantly decreased in hydrose exposed mice compared to control mice. Histological study of kidney showed the glomeruler inflammation, increased diameter of renal glomeruli and enlargement of proximal tubular lumen of kidneys of mice exposed to hydrose compared to that of control animals. Conclusions: The results of this study indicated that use of hydrose in molasses and other food preparations in Bangladesh may cause kidney impairment.

  19. Trends in infant and young child feeding practices in Bangladesh, 1993–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Optimal infant and young child feeding practices are crucial to improving the health and nutritional status of children. Bangladesh Breastfeeding Foundation, UNICEF and several other organizations are working in the country for the promotion of healthy feeding practices. This article presents trends in breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices in Bangladesh from 1993–2011, based on data in Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys. The following Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys were studied: BDHS 93–94, BDHS 96–97, BDHS 99–00, BDHS 04, BDHS 07 and BDHS 11. Values of indicators for infant and young child feeding proposed by WHO, along with their 95% confidence intervals, were calculated, and trends were assessed. Findings Among the core indicators, early initiation of breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding under six months, introduction of solid, semi-solid and soft foods, and consumption of iron-rich foods have improved, while continued breastfeeding at one year does not display a statistically significant development. Of the optional indicators, the prevalence of age-appropriate breastfeeding and children ever breastfed improved, while the prevalence of predominant breastfeeding under six months witnessed a decline. Median duration of breastfeeding declined, and there was no change in the other optional indicators (continued breastfeeding at two years and bottle feeding). Developments in the other optional indicators were not statistically significant. The ratings of early initiation of breastfeeding and complementary feeding have gone up from poor to fair, those of exclusive breastfeeding under six months from fair to good, while those of bottle-feeding are fair. Conclusion The developments in breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices in the country have been considerable, but there is still substantial scope for improvement. PMID:24073918

  20. Prevalence of co-morbid depression in out-patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Tapash

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the prevalence of depression in people with diabetes in Bangladesh. This study examined the prevalence and factors associated with depression in out-patients with Type 2 diabetes in Bangladesh. Methods In this cross-sectional study a random sample of 483 diabetes out-patients from three diabetes clinics in Bangladesh was invited to participate. Of them 417 patients took part. Depressive symptoms were measured using previously developed and culturally standardized Bengali and Sylheti versions of the World HealthOrganization-5 Well Being Index (WHO-5 and the Patient Health Questionairre-9 (PHQ-9 with predefined cut-off scores. Data was collected using two different modes; e.g. standard assisted collection and audio questionnaire methods. Associations between depression and patient characteristics were explored using regression analysis. Results The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 34% (PHQ-9 score ≥ 5 and 36% (WHO-5 score  Conclusions This study demonstrated that depression prevalence is common in out-patients with type 2 diabetes in Bangladesh. In a setting where recognition, screening and treatment levels remain low, health care providers need to focus their efforts on diagnosing, referring and effectively treating this important disease in order to improve service delivery.

  1. The Institute of Nuclear Agriculture in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since as early as 1964, a small group of agricultural scientists of the Bangladesh Atomic Research Establishment have been using radioisotopes and radiation tools in their research. Realizing the potential use of nuclear tools in agriculture, this agricultural section was reorganized and expanded into a full-fledge institute. For this work the need for outside support was foreseen and in July 1973 the Government submitted a request for support from the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA). As a result, a technical assistance SIDA project was approved, with the IAEA being the executing agency. This US $1 million, 5 year-project provides for some 100 man-months of international expertise, some 200 man-months of fellowships, as well as for various equipment and supplies. The Institute of Nuclear Agriculture was formally inaugurated on 12 December 1977, by the Vice-President of the People's Republic of Bangladesh, Justice Abdus Sattar. Helio F.S. Bittencourt, the IAEA Deputy Director General for Technical Assistance and Publications, represented the Agency at this ceremony. The objectives of INA are: 1. To identify and solve basic agricultural problems of the country through inter-disciplinary approach, employing both nuclear and conventional research techniques. 2. To train scientists in appropriate fields of research at home and abroad, there by filling the gap of skilled manpower. 3. To conduct experiments in areas of agricultural research, such as breeding of cereals, fibre crops, legumes and oil-seed plants, irrigation and water management, soil-plant relationship studies and other related areas. 4. To perfect and apply a number of analytical techniques, which are rapid and accurate, for use in different fields of research. The physical facilities are made available to users from throughout the country. 5. To make use of international expertise in specific fields to provide on-the-spot analysis of problems, and to render advice and training to

  2. Harnessing pluralism for better health in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Masud; Evans, Timothy G; Standing, Hilary; Mahmud, Simeen

    2013-11-23

    How do we explain the paradox that Bangladesh has made remarkable progress in health and human development, yet its achievements have taken place within a health system that is frequently characterised as weak, in terms of inadequate physical and human infrastructure and logistics, and low performing? We argue that the development of a highly pluralistic health system environment, defined by the participation of a multiplicity of different stakeholders and agents and by ad hoc, diffused forms of management has contributed to these outcomes by creating conditions for rapid change. We use a combination of data from official sources, research studies, case studies of specific innovations, and in-depth knowledge from our own long-term engagement with health sector issues in Bangladesh to lay out a conceptual framework for understanding pluralism and its outcomes. Although we argue that pluralism has had positive effects in terms of stimulating change and innovation, we also note its association with poor health systems governance and regulation, resulting in endemic problems such as overuse and misuse of drugs. Pluralism therefore requires active management that acknowledges and works with its polycentric nature. We identify four key areas where this management is needed: participatory governance, accountability and regulation, information systems, and capacity development. This approach challenges some mainstream frameworks for managing health systems, such as the building blocks approach of the WHO Health Systems Framework. However, as pluralism increasingly defines the nature and the challenge of 21st century health systems, the experience of Bangladesh is relevant to many countries across the world. PMID:24268003

  3. Economic development and population policy in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M R

    1984-09-01

    This paper deals with Bangladesh's growth rate and the policy implications for its economy. Despite its obvious influence on the economy, population has never been integrated as an endogenous variable in any planning model. Development planning is mostly supported by donor agencies, involving little micro-level planning and practically no trickle-down effect. This paper examines the interaction of population and other development variables in the country's planning process. Much of the rural population consists of landless farmers share croppers, so that the land ownership pattern contributes to low productivity. Population increase is making the rural masses even poorer. This process is further compounded by increasing foreign aid dependence, adverse terms of trade in the international market, low savings and investments, and the rural sector's worsening terms of trade. During 1950-1970 real per capita gross domestic product (GDP) increased only at a rate of 1% per annum and during 1950-1970 real growth of GDP fell behind the population growth rate. A cost benefit analysis of fertility reduction is needed. The cost benefit ratio of most countries varies between 1:10 to 1:30; for Bangladesh it is 1:16. Macro-model studies indicate that the higher the fertility reduction and shorter the period of required decline, the higher will be the benefits in terms of gains in per capita income. There is, however, a contradiction between national and household interests. The latter's decision to have more children has a negative spillover effect, which nullifies the gains of the community. The national family planning program suffered a serious setback during and after the liberation of Bangladesh, mainly due to lack of administrative leadership and support. In order for the population growth rate to be checked and to increase the quality of life for the entire population, the family planning program must be revitalized by mobilizing the entire government machinery and

  4. Does January Effect Exist in Bangladesh?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. M. Mainul Ahsan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines existence of January effect in Dhaka Stock Exchange (DSE in Bangladesh. Regressionmodel combined with dummy variables and monthly DSE All Share Price Index (DSI from January 1987 toNovember 2012 has been used to test January effect in the stock return in DSE. It was empirically found that,although January anomaly doesn’t exist in DSE, there is significant positive return in June which raises questionagainst efficient market hypothesis (EMH. Thus, there is an opportunity for investors to take advantage of thisJune anomaly.

  5. Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addy, Susan Amrose [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a major public health problem threatening the lives of over 140 million people worldwide. In Bangladesh alone, up to 57 million people drink arsenic-laden water from shallow wells. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation(ECAR) overcomes many of the obstacles that plague current technologies and can be used affordably and on a small-scale, allowing for rapid dissemination into Bangladesh to address this arsenic crisis. In this work, ECAR was shown to effectively reduce 550 - 580 μg=L arsenic (including both As[III]and As[V]in a 1:1 ratio) to below the WHO recommended maximum limit of 10 μg=L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater containing relevant concentrations of competitive ions such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Arsenic removal capacity was found to be approximately constant within certain ranges of current density, but was found to change substantially between ranges. In order of decreasing arsenic removal capacity, the pattern was: 0.02 mA=cm2> 0.07 mA=cm2> 0.30 - 1.1 mA=cm2> 5.0 - 100 mA=cm2. Current processing time was found to effect arsenic removal capacity independent of either charge density or current density. Electrode polarization studies showed no passivation of the electrode in the tested range (up to current density 10 mA=cm2) and ruled out oxygen evolution as the cause of decreasing removal capacity with current density. Simple settling and decantation required approximately 3 days to achieve arsenic removal comparable to filtration with a 0.1 mu m membrane. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) showed that (1) there is no significant difference in the arsenic removal mechanism of ECAR during operation at different current densities and (2) the arsenic removal mechanism in ECAR is consistent with arsenate adsorption onto a homogenous Fe(III)oxyhydroxide similar in structure to 2-line ferrihydrite. ECAR effectively reduced high arsenic concentrations (100

  6. Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addy, Susan Amrose

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a major public health problem threatening the lives of over 140 million people worldwide. In Bangladesh alone, up to 57 million people drink arsenic-laden water from shallow wells. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation(ECAR) overcomes many of the obstacles that plague current technologies and can be used affordably and on a small-scale, allowing for rapid dissemination into Bangladesh to address this arsenic crisis. In this work, ECAR was shown to effectively reduce 550 - 580 mu g=L arsenic (including both As[III]and As[V]in a 1:1 ratio) to below the WHO recommended maximum limit of 10 mu g=L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater containing relevant concentrations of competitive ions such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Arsenic removal capacity was found to be approximately constant within certain ranges of current density, but was found to change substantially between ranges. In order of decreasing arsenic removal capacity, the pattern was: 0.02 mA=cm2> 0.07 mA=cm2> 0.30 - 1.1 mA=cm2> 5.0 - 100 mA=cm2. Current processing time was found to effect arsenic removal capacity independent of either charge density or current density. Electrode polarization studies showed no passivation of the electrode in the tested range (up to current density 10 mA=cm2) and ruled out oxygen evolution as the cause of decreasing removal capacity with current density. Simple settling and decantation required approximately 3 days to achieve arsenic removal comparable to filtration with a 0.1 mu m membrane. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) showed that (1) there is no significant difference in the arsenic removal mechanism of ECAR during operation at different current densities and (2) the arsenic removal mechanism in ECAR is consistent with arsenate adsorption onto a homogenous Fe(III)oxyhydroxide similar in structure to 2-line ferrihydrite. ECAR effectively reduced high arsenic concentrations (100 - 500 mu g=L) in real Bangladesh tube well water

  7. Poultry Diseases at Rajshahi in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. Jalil; M.R.R. Sarker; Kabir, H.; Ahmed, M.; Hossain, M. K.; G. N. Adhikary

    2004-01-01

    A pathological study was conducted on the poultry diseases occurring at Rajshahi region of Bangladesh during the period January,2001 to February,2002. A total of 327 cases were studied of which some are sick birds and others are dead. Diagnosis of different disease conditions were made on the basis of history, clinical findings, pathological findings, age(IBD) (12.53%),Infectious laryngo-tracheitis (ILT) (0.61%), Avian leucosis complex (3.36) , Mareks disease (0.61%), Duck plague(2.14%),Pullo...

  8. Status of radiation curing in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangladesh is a small country covering about 148 thousand square kilometer area with a population of 120 million. It has only 15% urban area; most of the people live in the rural area. It is neither industrial nor developed. It is trying hard to stand on its feet combating all damages caused by frequent natural calamities like cyclones and floods. Thus, most of the technological activities are still being carried out on turnkey basis. However, some research and development institutions have already been developed to such an extent that transfer of technology can occur and the local industries can also benefit out of this endeavour

  9. Private television ownership in Bangladesh : a critical qualitative inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Md. Abdur Razzaque

    2013-01-01

    Private television channels in Bangladesh have become a part of ruling parties’ politics. Without ruling party’s agreement none can get license of private television channels. Whenever a party goes to power it tries to give licenses to its cronies violating rules and regulations. It is an open secret in Bangladesh society. But the beginning of the private televisions in Bangladesh was a promising one. The first three channels--ATN Bangla, Channel-I and ETV-- got licences in a proper way durin...

  10. Regulatory control of radiation sources in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear and radiological practices are doing immense benefits to society but like all other practices nuclear and radiological practices also have risks. Necessary laws and regulatory bodies exist in many countries for a long time to control and keep the risks within acceptable limits. Bangladesh, though late, also enacted laws and initiated to implement the law. In this paper are presented the regulatory aspects of the radiation sources safety in Bangladesh, based on the Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Act and Rules. The radiation protection infrastructures and procedures are described as well as their functioning for the implementation of relevant activities such as licensing, regular inspection and enforcement. The issue of the security of radiation sources is dealt in close relation with the preparation and use of the inventory of all radiation sources in the country. This paper outlines the methodology of regulatory control exercised by the BAEC for safe use of the radioactive materials and the radiation generating equipment in the country. (author)

  11. Electricity Crisis and Load Management in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Kanti Das

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh is a densely populated country. Only a small part of her area is electrified which cover around 18% of total population. The people who are in the electrified area are suffering from severe load shedding. A systematic load management procedure related to demand side may improve the situation is the research problem. The major objectives serve by the research are to analyze contemporary electricity status with a view to drawing inference about demand supply gap and extracting benefits from load management. Data supplied by the Bangladesh Power Development Board, World Bank and outcome of survey are analyzed with some simple statistical tools to test the hypothesis. Analysis discloses that with properly managed uses of electricity with load switch and rotation week-end can improve the concurrent condition of electricity. Moreover, introducing smart distribution system, reducing system loss, shifting load to off-peak, large scale use of prepaid mete, observing energy week and using energy efficient home and office appliance are recommended to improve load through demand side management. Some other recommendations such as introducing alternative energy, public private partnership and using renewable energy development and producing energy locally are made for load management from the supply side.

  12. Launch disasters in Bangladesh: A geographical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Mahmood Dewan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh is a riverine country and communication by waterways is of great importance especially in the southern region of the country. From Chandpur southwards, waterway is the only means of transport and so a large number of people has to travel by motor launches in the coastal areas and inland. Since the early 1950's, motor launch services have become popular and in the period 1997-98 there were 1,853 registered launches operating 227 routes. But this important mode is ridden with tragic disasters every year, incurring a heavy toll of human lives. Since 1977, there were 248 motor launch accidents recorded by BIWTA (Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority with a loss of 2,309 1ives, 374 persons injured and 208 persons missing. This paper attempts to roughly trace out the causes and the geographical distribution of the accidents through an analysis of a time series data covering the period between 1977 and 2000. It was found that the most frequent type or cause of launch accidents was collision, followed by foundering and overloading. The least frequent accident types were due to under-water currents, shoals, leaning electricity poles and country boats travelling without lights at night and manned by untrained operators, followed by cyclones. Interestingly, overcrowding did not seem to be the most typical of launch disasters in the country.

  13. Medical Biotechnology: Problems and Prospects in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Mizan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biotechnology is the knowledge and techniques of developing and using biological systems for deriving special products and services. The age-old technology took a new turn with the advent of recombinant DNA techniques, and boosted by the development of other molecular biological techniques, cell culture techniques and bioinformatics. Medical biotechnology is the major thrust area of biotechnology. It has brought revolutions in medicine – quick methods for diagnosing diseases, generation of new drugs and vaccines, completely novel approach of treatment are only a few to mention. The industrial and financial bulk of the industry mushroomed very rapidly in the last three decades, led by the USA and western advanced nations. Asian countries like China, India, South Korea, Taiwan and Singapore joined late, but advancing forward in a big way. In all the Asian countries governments supported the initiatives of the expert and entrepreneur community, and invested heavily in its development. Bangladesh has got great potential in developing biotechnology and reaping its fruits. However, lack of commitment and patriotism, and too much corruption and irresponsibility in political and bureaucratic establishment are the major hindrance to the development of biotechnology in Bangladesh.

  14. Prevalence and associated factors of depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy: A population based study in rural Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Kabir Zarina N; Nasreen Hashima E; Forsell Yvonne; Edhborg Maigun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Few studies have examined the associated factors of antepartum depressive and anxiety symptoms (ADS and AAS) in low-income countries, yet the World Health Organization identifies depressive disorders as the second leading cause of global disease burden by 2020. There is a paucity of research on mental disorders and their predictors among pregnant women in Bangladesh. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms and explore the associated fa...

  15. From the politics of poverty to the politics of identity? Child rights and working children in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    White, Sarah C.

    2002-01-01

    Drawing on primary research in development organizations and with working children themselves, this paper questions the logic of child rights, and its validity for the cultural context of Bangladesh. A strong stress on child rights at the programme level may not be sustainable and can have contradictory outcomes for poor children. Working children place a premium on the quality of relationships and show a strong sense of (in)justice and entitlement. This suggests 'child rights' work should re...

  16. Can HRM Practices Improve Job Satisfaction of Ready Made Garment (RMG) Workers in Bangladesh? An Alternative Solution to Recent Unrest

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Atiqur Rahman Sarker; Rumana Afroze

    2014-01-01

    Labor unrest in RMG sector of Bangladesh has become a major problem in trade and finance due to whichorganizations are losing their business. RMG workers are not so happy with their employers because of improperlabor practices. However, employee’s job satisfaction is an important factor for organizational success. ThroughHRM practices, organizations try to increase satisfaction among the employees for goal achievement. Theobjective of this study is to examine the relationship among financial,...

  17. Impacts of floods on forest trees and their coping strategies in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Rani Basak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, the Government of Bangladesh, Non-Government Organizations (NGOs, semi-government organizations, private organizations and individuals have established a large number of plantations under different programs viz. social forestry, agro-forestry and avenue plantations with indigenous and exotic tree species without considering their habit and habitats. Along with the indigenous species like Albizia procera, Albizia lebbeck, Mangifera indica, Azadirachta indica, Gmelina arborea, Trewia nudiflora and Artocapus heterophyllus and many exotic species e.g. Swietenia macrophylla, Albizia saman, Dalbergia sissoo, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Acacia auriculiformis, Melia sempervirens, Acacia mangium etc. have been planted randomly. With increasing trend of climate-induced floods, millions of trees have been dying due to floods and water-logging. The most affected species are Dalbergia sissoo, Albizia saman, Acacia auriculiformis, Acacia mangium and Artocarpus heterophyllus etc. This situation has caused severe impacts on socio-economic conditions of Bangladesh. The impacts involved a significant loss in terms of investment, biodiversity and afforestation program. Little investigations have been conducted to find out the causes of the deaths and also to find out the suitable adaptation practices to reduce impacts of floods on trees. This synthesis focused on the impacts of floods on plantations and also assessed the potential role of traditional forest management practices in addressing the effects flooding on forests in Bangladesh. The study added important information and revealed knowledge gaps on the causes of large forest deaths. It also provided recommendations for policy on the establishment of frequent floods resilient tree crop plantations.

  18. Hepatitis B in Bangladesh: Further Suggestions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shafiul Jamal

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Iread with great interest Rashid and Rafiq's article published in the spring issue of this journal(1. The authors not only highlighted the shortcomings of the current hepatitis B vaccination strategy in Bangladesh but also prescribed awonderful policy, which is felt to be both costeffective and befitting with the country's existing programme on immunization. To complement thisI would like to add few more points: ||l|| Most neonates mount an immune response, which is believed to be adequate to reduce their risk of perinatal Hepatitis B Virus (HBV acquisition after vaccination(2. Though the pre-term babies (<37 weeks show a slower response than the term (||“||37 weeks babies, immunogenicity, which is inversely proportional to the gestational age, can be improved by increasing the vaccine dosage (2,3. l| Timing first dose of hepatitis B vaccine with BCG probably has a positive interaction: administration of BCG at the time of HBV vaccine priming at birth markedly increases the cytokines as well as ntibody responses to HBV vaccine(4. This astonishing finding might suggest that BCG has a synergistic effect on hepatitis B vaccination. Bangladesh is reported to have a very high (94% coverage of BCG vaccine(5; the uptake of HBV vaccine can be equally improved by timing it with BCG.l| The present infant vaccination policy will leave adolescents unguarded and hence nationwide prevention of the disease will be delayed. A recent survey unveils that available infrastructure in Bangladesh has sufficient spare capacity to sustain storage of an increased quantity of vaccines(5. To make good use of this unused legroom adolescent vaccination should be started along with infant vaccination. Countries such as Spain and Portugal have both neonatal and adolescent vaccination programmes in place, since 1993 and 2000 respectively, and these countries will be able to end the adolescent programme once the first immunised newborn cohort has reached the target age of the

  19. Digital Divide between Teachers and Students in Urban Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin

    2011-01-01

    Bangladesh. Male respondents were 53% and female 43%, remaining are missing. Responses collected using paper-based questionnaires were put on a learning management system’s (LMS) questionnaire survey module. Irrespective of type of ICT device higher percentage of English medium students ‘own’ and know ‘how...... data available on them in Bangladesh context. A study was conducted to study the digital divide and ICT usage pattern among the urban students and teachers of schools and colleges in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. About 75 students enrolled in probability and statistics course of Independent...... University, Bangladesh (IUB) in autumn 2009 participated in conducting survey activities. Total 33 academic institutes were south for approval and 11 could be surveyed before the Christmas and annual recess. Responses from 6 other academics institutes were collected from the personal networks of students. A...

  20. The Emaciated Buddha in Southeast Bangladesh and Pagan (Myanmar)

    OpenAIRE

    Bautze-Picron, Claudine

    2008-01-01

    Iconographical and iconological study of the ascetic Buddha in 11th to 13th-century sculpture from Southeast Bangladesh and Pagan and their relation to the image of the Buddha protected by the nâga Mucilinda.

  1. Aeromagnetic Anomaly Map of Bangladesh (mag8bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage includes arcs and arc labels that hold the Aeromagnetic anomaly value for contours and type contours of the original map of Bangladesh with the same...

  2. Bouguer Gravity Anomaly Map of Bangladesh (grav8bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage includes arcs and arc labels that hold the Bouguer Gravity anomaly value for contours and type contours of the original map of Bangladesh with the...

  3. Map Service Showing Geologic and Geophysical Data of Bangladesh

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service includes geology, major faults, geologic provinces, and political boundaries in Bangladesh. This compilation is part of an interim product of the...

  4. Epidemiology of brucellosis in humans and domestic ruminants in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Anisur

    2015-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is an ancient and one of the world’s most widespread zoonotic diseases affecting both, public health and animal production. It is endemic in many developing countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America including Bangladesh. Since the first report in 1970, a lot of brucellosis seroprevalence reports are available in cattle, goats, sheep and humans in Bangladesh. Most of the previously reported prevalence studies were based on non-random samples, which may not give a tr...

  5. Existing and Expected Service Quality of Grameenphone Users in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Azmat Ullah; Md. Hasebur Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The Grameenphone (GP) is a market leader in the telecommunication industry in Bangladesh. This study investigates the existing and expected service quality of Grameenphone users in Bangladesh. The Study reveals that there are significant gap between existing and expected perceived service network, 3G, customer care, physical facilities, billing cost, information service, mobile banking and GP offers. The study concludes that customer satisfaction is a dynamic phenomenon. Maintaining...

  6. Analyzing The Factors For Rejection Of Leather In Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Md.Farhad Ali; Umme Habiba Bodrun Naher; Md Mahamudul Hasan; Md.Shakil Nawze; Shahanama Ferdous

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Leather plays a vital role in earning the foreign currency for Bangladesh. Export of finished leather and leather products have an important impact on the economy of Bangladesh. Mainly cow goat sheep and buffalo leathers are produced in this country. Different defects of leather due to numerous numbers of diseases of animals of poor management of people deteriorate the quality of leather which has negative impact in this sector. This paper analyses the magnitude and category of major...

  7. A Rainfall simulation model for agricultural development in bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sayedur Rahman

    2000-01-01

    A rainfall simulation model based on a first-order Markov chain has been developed to simulate the annual variation in rainfall amount that is observed in Bangladesh. The model has been tested in the Barind Tract of Bangladesh. Few significant differences were found between the actual and simulated seasonal, annual and average monthly. The distribution of number of success is asymptotic normal distribution. When actual and simulated daily rainfall data were used to drive a crop simulation mod...

  8. High fertility regions in Bangladesh: A marriage cohort analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Sabina; Islam, Mohammad Amirul; Padmadas, Sabu S

    2011-01-01

    Bangladesh represents one of the few countries in south Asia where the pace of fertility decline has been unprecedented over the last three decades. Although there has been significant reduction in fertility levels at the national level, regional variations continue to persist, especially in Sylhet and Chittagong where the total fertility rates are well above the country average. Using data from three consecutive Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys (BDHSs) this paper assesses how fertil...

  9. Debating Diversity in Provision of Universal Primary Education in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Sabur, Zia-Us; Ahmed, Manzoor

    2010-01-01

    Multiple providers (including state, quasi-state and non-state ones) have contributed to raising initial enrolment and improving gender balance in Bangladesh. The critical question is how multiplicity and diversity of provision can contribute to achieving truly universal primary education with high completion rates and acceptable levels of learning. In this paper, these questions are addressed in the context of history and circumstances of educational development in Bangladesh, as the Governm...

  10. Health Insurance for Government Employees in Bangladesh: A Concept Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid, Syed Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Introducing compulsory health insurance for government employees bears immense importance for stepping towards universal healthcare coverage in Bangladesh. Lack of scientific study on designing such scheme, in the Bangladesh context, motivates this paper. The study aims at designing a comprehensive insurance package simultaneously covering health, life and accident related disability risks of the public employees, where the health component would extend to all dependent family members. ...

  11. Folk Medicinal Uses of Verbenaceae Family Plants in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmatullah, Mohammed; Jahan, Rownak; Azam, FM Safiul; Hossan, S; Mollik, MAH; Rahman, Taufiq

    2011-01-01

    Folk medicinal practitioners form the first tier of primary health-care providers to most of the rural population of Bangladesh. They are known locally as Kavirajes and rely almost solely on oral or topical administration of whole plants or plant parts for treatment of various ailments. Also about 2% of the total population of Bangladesh are scattered among more than twenty tribes residing within the country's borders. The various tribes have their own tribal practitioners, who use medicinal ...

  12. Female labour force participation in Bangladesh : trends, drivers and barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Rushidan I; Islam, Rizwanul

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to the stylized implications of the U-shaped hypothesis, there has been an increase in female labour force participation in Bangladesh, alongside the acceleration in economic growth since the 1990s. In this regard, Bangladesh has witnessed a substantial increase in female employment in labour- intensive export-oriented industries in urban areas. The study also finds that the rapid expansion of micro-finance in rural areas has supported women’s employment. However, the economy in g...

  13. Digital Bangladesh : Information and Communication Technology for Empowerment?

    OpenAIRE

    Asaduzzaman, A.S.M.

    2013-01-01

    This study critically investigates the concept of “digital Bangladesh” putting it in the wider debates surrounding ICT for Development (ICT4D). The original contribution of this thesis is that it problematizes empowerment in ICT4D approach within the human development paradigm in the context of Bangladesh. The main argument of the thesis is that digital Bangladesh as the local manifestation of ICT for Development is both outcome and facilitator of neoliberal globalization. Another argument is...

  14. Risk Factors for Premenopausal Breast Cancer in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Javaid; Ferdousy, Tahmina; Dipi, Rahela; Salim, Reza; Wei WU; Narod, Steven A.; Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Mostafa, Mohammad G.; Ginsburg, Ophira

    2015-01-01

    Background. The incidence of premenopausal breast cancer is rising throughout South Asia. Our objective was to determine the role of risk factors associated with Westernization for premenopausal breast cancer in Bangladesh. Methods. We conducted a matched case-control study between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010, at four hospitals in Bangladesh. Cases were premenopausal women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. Controls were premenopausal women with no personal history of breast ca...

  15. Formal and informal contract farming in poultry in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Jabbar, Mohammad A.; Rahman, Md. Habibur; Talukder, R. K.; Raha, S.K.

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, contract farming as a market institution in the poultry industry in Bangladesh has evolved along with the expansion of commercial poultry farming. Apart from classical contract farming within vertically integrated enterprises, there are also formal and informal contract arrangements in input marketing and output marketing. In this paper, characteristics of these forms of contract arrangements and their implications for the poultry industry in Bangladesh are discussed. A...

  16. Potential of Wind and Solar Electricity Generation in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Swapan Kumar Roy; Himangshu Ranjan Ghosh; Mohammad Nasirul Hoque; Sanjoy Kumar Nandi

    2012-01-01

    Wind and solar energies are the alternative energy sources that can be used to supplement the conventional energy sources particularly in Bangladesh. In this work, the aim is to assess the current wind and solar energy potential in Bangladesh. The wind data for the five stations obtained from Local Government Engineering Department have been assessed, but only two of them seem to be eligible for energy production. Annual average, monthly average, and hourly average wind speeds and wind power ...

  17. Remittances, Financial Development and Economic Growth in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Gazi Salah Uddin; Bo Sjö

    2013-01-01

    In Bangladesh, remittances from migrant workers are an important component of national income and a source for financing consumption and investment. This article investigates the relationship between remittances, financial sector development and economic growth in Bangladesh over the period of 1976–2011. In the long run, the inflow of remittances and the expansion of the financial sector drive the growth in GDP, whereas in the short run, remittances act as a shock absorber to income changes...

  18. Origins and Pitfalls of Confrontational Politics in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Mustafizur Rahaman

    2007-01-01

    Bangladesh is a relatively young democracy that gained its independence in 1971. The reestablishment of parliamentary democracy in 1991 following years of military dictatorship and the introduction of a non-party caretaker government were important achievements of the country in its democratic journey. In recent years however, confrontational politics has become a serious threat to democracy and development in Bangladesh. It is no longer an internal issue; it has also become a major concern o...

  19. Making Sense of India–Bangladesh Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Anindya Jyoti Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    India and Bangladesh are interrelated in geopolitical relations but their core objectives are different. While geopolitical compulsions introduce the never-ending challenges of proximity to the two parties, including crucial issues of security, migration and resource sharing, Bangladesh is yet to form its own identity in which the perceived image of India figures predominantly, and the attitudes and expectations they develop towards each other shape the pattern of bilateral interactions betwe...

  20. Causes of Maternal Mortality Decline in Matlab, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Mahbub Elahi; Ahmed, Anisuddin; Kalim, Nahid; Koblinsky, Marge

    2009-01-01

    Bangladesh is distinct among developing countries in achieving a low maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 322 per 100,000 livebirths despite the very low use of skilled care at delivery (13% nationally). This variation has also been observed in Matlab, a rural area in Bangladesh, where longitudinal data on maternal mortality are available since the mid-1970s. The current study investigated the possible causes of the maternal mortality decline in Matlab. The study analyzed 769 maternal deaths and...

  1. Tourism in Bangladesh: Present Status and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Chandra Roy; Mallika Roy

    2015-01-01

    Bangladesh is full of natural beauty. Rivers, coasts and beaches, archaeological sites, religious places, hills, forests, waterfalls, tea gardens surround it. The Sundarban, Historic Mosque in city of Bagerhat, Ruins of the Buddihist Vihara at Paharpur are the three world heritage sites in Bangladesh among 1007. To observe the beauty of nature, huge amount of domestic and foreign tourists visit the country and its tourist attraction sites. In 2012, around six-lakh (6 hundred thousand) tourist...

  2. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Bangladesh: Trends, Challenges, and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Joynal Abdin

    2015-01-01

    During the liberation war in 1971 a nationalist weave emerged which gives Bangladeshis a spirit of freedom and dignity of independence but it also results on more reserved position in case of economic policy. Policy makers at that period used to see foreign companies access with a negative eyes. Foreign investments were discouraged as a result foreign direct investment (FDI) inflow in Bangladesh till 1980 is very insignificant. The growth of Bangladesh's FDI inflow was around US$ 308 – 356 ...

  3. State of Governance in Bangladesh: Problems and Prospects.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Sayed Javed

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the problems and issues on the political failures in Bangladesh as well as identifies some possible solutions. The approach here is analytical mostly reviewing current news, reports and other related materials. A comparative study is also done between the present and proposed system to get a quick glimpse on the overall situation. The idea here is to seek out reasonable and practical solutions that would yield better result for Bangladesh and bring about positive changes ...

  4. Determinants of Contraception Use among Female Adolescents in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Musa Khan; Mohammad Emdad Hossain; Mohammad Nazmul Hoq

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine various socio-economic and demographic factors associated with contraception use among adolescents of Bangladesh. For this purpose, the present study utilizes the nationally representative survey data of Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, (National Institute of Population Research and Training (NIPORT), 2009). The cross-tabulation and Logistic regression analyses have been used to estimate the factors affected the use of contraception in Banglade...

  5. Tracing the Poverty Impact of Market Reforms in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Mohammad Jahangir; Bhuiyan, Nazmul; Begum, Ismat Ara; Van Huylenbroeck, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The paper analyse the impact of market reforms on poverty in Bangladesh. To estimate the poverty impact at household level, a binary logit model has been estimated with two latest waves of household income and expenditure data from Bangladesh. The results show that a significant improvement has been made in reducing poverty in the recent decades. As a net importing country, liberalization might has direct impact on household’s real income through the changes of real rice prices. The results a...

  6. Consumer Credit as Lifestyle Activities Facilitators for Consumers of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Ataur Rahman

    2009-01-01

    As middle class and fixed income group in Bangladesh are not solvent enough to pay the price of an essential product (TV, fridge etc.) at a time from their savings. They need consumer credit to buy these products for doing their lifestyle activities. The purpose of the study is to identify the consumer credit impacts on lifestyle activities of consumers of Bangladesh. 576 respondents in a survey were asked to rate the importance of 15 lifestyle activities variables related to consumer credit....

  7. JOB SATISFACTION AND RELATED CHARACTERISTICS OF BANGLADESH AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY GRADUATES

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, A. Rashid; Ahmad, Muzaffer

    1992-01-01

    This article is intended to focus on the extent of job satisfaction and its relationship with other characteristics of Bangladesh agricultural University (BAU) graduates in Bangladesh labour market. Further, it aims at exploring important characteristics which have influence on job satisfaction- of BAU graduates. The related characteristics include age, place of birth, year of graduation, highest degree, academic excellence, place of posting, professional training, publications, length of ser...

  8. Past and future flooding in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele-Eich, Insa; Hopson, Thomas; Simmer, Clemens; Simon, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Currently, an average of about 20 % of the land surface in Bangladesh is flooded each year, affecting one of the most densely populated regions in the world. We aim to understand the processes currently determining flooding in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) basin, in particular the role of precipitation and sea-level rise, as well as to assess how climate change might impact flood characteristics in the future. Water level and discharge data were provided by the Bangladesh Water Development Board on a daily basis for a period of 1909-2009. Monthly maps based on daily sea level anomalies from the Data Unification Altimeter Combination System DUACS are available on a 0.25° by 0.25° grid for the time period 1993-2014. Ensemble model output for upper catchment precipitation and annual mean thermosteric sea-level rise is taken from historical and RCP scenario runs conducted with the CCSM4. We first analyzed daily water levels of the past 100 years in order to detect potential shifts in extremes. The available observations are then used to set up a generalized linear model to detect how precipitation influences flooding in the GBM basin. This model can then be used to give a prognosis on changes in future flooding. Our analysis suggests that water levels have indeed changed over the course of the past century. While the magnitude and duration of average flood events decreased, the frequency of extreme flood events has increased. Low water levels have also changed, with a significant decrease in the annual minimum water level most noticeable when we compare the time periods 1909-1939 and 1979-2009. For the future, first results confirm the decrease in return periods of strong flood events found in previous studies. The impact of climate change on flooding will also be compared to the impact of man-made structures such as Farakka barrage, built across the Ganges on the border between India and Bangladesh and operating since 1975. This is of particular interest as

  9. Changing Climate; Bangladesh Facing the Challenge of Severe Flood Problems; A Comparison of Flood Management between Bangladesh and the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    BISWAS, KALLOL KUMAR

    2010-01-01

    Both Bangladesh and the Netherlands are the most flood prone countries in two continents Asia and Europe. Bangladesh is known to be highly vulnerable to floods. Frequent floods have put enormous constraints on its development potential. Unfortunately, the frequency of high intensity floods is increasing every year. So far the country has struggled to put a sizeable infrastructure in place to prevent flooding in many parts of the country with limited success. Where, the Netherlands has develop...

  10. Determinants that Influencing the Adoption of E-HRM: An Empirical Study on Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adbul Kadar Muhammad Masum

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, information systems (ISs have tremendous impact on processes and practices of human resource management (HRM. Realizing the effectiveness and efficiency of ISs, now, human resource (HR managers are reliant on electronic human resource management (E-HRM – an information system to accomplish HR activities. This system is implemented to reduce the administrative burden for HR professional thus they can deliver better services to firm’s stakeholders (e.g., employees, managers. If the E-HRM is not adopted properly, management of human resource in an organization cannot work smoothly. This paper aims at exploring the determinants that influence the adaptation decision for E-HRM among firms in Bangladesh. This study developed research framework based on the theoretical foundation and previous literature in order to better investigate the relationship between individual, organizational, technological, and environmental determinants, and E-HRM adoption. A total number of 331 respondents were considered from forty six large scale private sector organizations in Bangladesh using stratified random sampling. Employees of the organizations responded a close-ended questionnaire based on a 5-point Likert scale. Here, data was analyzed by statistical tools, for example, descriptive statistics, and factor analysis. They study found top level management support, employee’s individual attributes, system complexity, IT infrastructure, and industry pressure as the most influential determinants that influencing the adoption decision for E-HRM. Limitations and policy implications are discussed at the end of this paper. The scope of future studies is also addressed.

  11. MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE AND RECOVERY POTENTIAL: BANGLADESH PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alamgir, A. Ahsan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 7690 tons of municipal solid waste generated daily at the six major cities of Bangladesh, namely, Dhaka, Chittagong, Khulna, Rajshahi, Barisal and Sylhet, as estimated in 2005. Sampling was done at different waste generation sources such as residential, commercial, institutional and open areas, in different seasons. The composition of the entire waste stream was about 74.4% organic matter, 9.1% paper, 3.5% plastic, 1.9% textile and wood, 0.8% leather and rubber, 1.5% metal, 0.8% glass and 8% other waste. The per capita generation of municipal solid waste was ranged from 0.325 to 0.485 kg/cap/day while the average rate was 0.387 kg/cap/day as measured in the six major cities. The potential for waste recovery and reduction based on the waste characteristics are evaluated and it is predicted that 21.64 million US$/yr can be earned from recycling and composting of municipal solid waste.

  12. Rural Development Policy and Administrative Patterns in Bangladesh : A Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Taufiqul Islam; 大森, 賢一; Yoshizuka, Tohru

    2005-01-01

    The study examines the current framework implementation of rural development policy and administrative pattern in Bangladesh. Majority of the people in Bangladesh live in rural areas where problems of unemployment, inequality and poverty are common. Bangladesh has been undertaking rural development programs both at the government and non-government organizational levels. However, within the existing framework, rural development policies and poverty reduction programs in Bangladesh have been u...

  13. Bangladesh apparel industry and its workers in a changing world economy

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, N

    2006-01-01

    This thesis explores and analyses recent changes and challenges faced by the apparel industry of Bangladesh and the consequences of those for the Bangladesh economy. More specifically, it explores and analyses the importance of the apparel industry in the Bangladesh economy, the challenges faced by this industry, impacts of implementation of various international trade rules on the apparel industry, consequences of Bangladesh's attempts to enter in bilateral and regional free trade agreements...

  14. Aflatoxin contamination in food commodities in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Monika; Harris, Julie; Afreen, Sadia; Deak, Eszter; Gade, Lalitha; Balajee, S Arunmozhi; Park, Benjamin; Chiller, Tom; Luby, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    During September 2009, we performed a rapid cross-sectional study to investigate the extent of aflatoxin contamination among common Bangladeshi foods. We collected eight common human food commodities (rice, lentils, wheat flour, dates, betelnut, red chili powder, ginger and groundnuts) and poultry feed samples from two large markets in each of three cities in Bangladesh. We quantified aflatoxin levels from pooled subsamples using fluorescence high-performance liquid chromatography. Aflatoxin levels were highest in dates and groundnuts (maximum 623 and 423 ng/g), respectively. Samples of betelnut (mean 30.6 ng/g), lentils (mean 21.2 ng/g) and red chili powder (>20 ng/g) also had elevated levels. The mean aflatoxin level among poultry feed samples was 73.0 ng/g. Aflatoxin levels were above the US maximum regulatory levels of 20 ng/g in five of eight commonly ingested human food commodities tested. PMID:24786620

  15. Innovating veterinary public health challenges of Bangladesh to integrate the concept of ‘one world, one health’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mufizur Rahman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses relevant problems and constraints of VPH in Bangladesh in the light of global concept “One World, One Health” that need to be overcome and to ask for help, coordination and collaboration of international organization to promote and build the capacity for the spectrum of important VPH issues contributing to zoonoses, food-borne disease control, food safety and fostering better and living condition. In Bangladesh the loss of border controls within countries and the globalization of trade have led to an increasing trade in animals and products of animal origin. As a consequence there appears the demand and imperative need for new and elaborate surveillance strategies. The world is changing fast and new diseases are emerging and reemerging across the globe. Many of these new diseases can be linked to animals or changes occurring in environmental conditions. Bangladesh government has launched a collaborative effort and established increased participatory approach and joint venture activities with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE and the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC in respect of capacity building for surveillance and control of zoonotic diseases, and food safety. The four recommendations mentioned below could provide valuable direction to the future VPH program and activities linked to global concept “One World, One Health” These are (1 Development and Strengthening of VPH (2 Formation of Veterinary Public Health Forum (3 Establishment of National Communicable Disease Center (4 Foundation of National Institute of VPH Studies. 

  16. Drivers, barriers, and strategies for implementation of renewable energy technologies in rural areas in Bangladesh-An innovation system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangladesh has good potential for harnessing renewable energy sources such as solar, biomass, wind, and mini-hydropower. The country has been experiencing a gradual shift towards exploring renewable energy resources as a driving force for rural development. A few public sector and non-government organizations have started to develop renewable energy technology (RET) projects in rural areas. The lessons learnt from different demonstrations of RET projects reveal that with careful forward planning renewable energy can provide far-reaching economic, environmental, and social benefits to people living in remote rural areas in Bangladesh. This paper identifies some of the barriers that need to be overcome for the successful development of renewable energy technology sector and betterment of rural livelihoods. It does so through a critical review of policy and institutional settings, as well as present status and lessons learnt from pilot demonstration of a number of RET projects undertaken by different organizations. The study highlights policy implications of the review with the aim of supporting decision makers in formulating renewable energy policies and future plans for Bangladesh.

  17. Bangladesh apparel industry and its workers in a changing world economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, N.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis explores and analyses recent changes and challenges faced by the apparel industry of Bangladesh and the consequences of those for the Bangladesh economy. More specifically, it explores and analyses the importance of the apparel industry in the Bangladesh economy, the challenges faced by

  18. Influenza-associated mortality in 2009 in four sentinel sites in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusrat Homaira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate influenza-associated mortality in Bangladesh in 2009. METHODS: In four hospitals in Bangladesh, respiratory samples were collected twice a month throughout 2009 from inpatients aged 59 years, respectively. CONCLUSION: The highest burden of influenza-associated mortality in Bangladesh in 2009 was among the elderly.

  19. Development of agribiotechnology and biosafety regulations used to assess safety of genetically modified crops in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiruddin, Khondoker M; Nasim, Anwar

    2007-01-01

    Bangladesh is on the verge of adopting genetically modified (GM) crops for commercial cultivation and consumption as feed and food. Most of the laboratories are engaged in tissue culture and molecular characterization on plants, whereas some have started living modified organism research with shortages of trained manpower, infrastructure, and funding. Nutritionally improved Golden Rice, biotech brinjal, and late blight-resistant potato are in contained trials in a greenhouse, and potato ring spot virus-resistant papaya is in the process of approval for a field trial. The government has taken some initiative in support of GM organism research, which include the formation of a Biotechnology Department in all institutes and the formation of the apex body, the National Task Force Committee on Biotechnology of Bangladesh under the chairpersonship of the Prime Minister. Biosafety policy guidelines and related aspects of biotechnology issues have been approved, and the laws are in the process of being promulgated. Being a party to the Cartagena Protocol, proper biosafety measures are regulated by the appropriate authority as stated. Although there are no laws made yet directly for biosafety of GM crops/foods, the relevant laws on agriculture, medicine, food, import, trade, environment, etc. may suffice and explain the situation. PMID:17956000

  20. Impact of Coastal Pollution on Childhood Disabilities and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: The Case of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juma Rahman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this review was to explore the situation of coastal water pollution and its impact on child health and pregnancy outcomes in Bangladesh. Background: Globally coastal pollution is of greater significance than inland’s for its huge resources and contribution to livelihood. As a result it has been a source of increased Global Burden of Disease by means of consumption of seafood, involvement in risky jobs, and exposure to water related disastrous events. Almost sixty percent of the world’s population is at risk of costal contamination and developing countries like Bangladesh, geographically located at the tip of the Bay of Bengal, are facing significant challenges by this form of pollution. Method: This study was based on a critical review of published literature and unpublished documents from 1972 to 2011 retrieved from databases of scientific publications, from public-access search engines, reports from government, international organizations, and non-government agencies, and personal communications. Discussion: Huge noxious pollutants including heavy metals, oil spill and redionucleotides were found in the Bay of Bengal, those have enormous adverse impacts on child health and pregnancy outcomes. This review focuses on children and pregnant women because of their vulnerable physiological conditions to the impacts of environmental factors. The physiological systems of children and fetuses are developing fast and usually are sensitive to disruptions induced by environmental pollutants and exposures in utero increase the risk of future toxic insults. Conclusion: The coastal zone of Bangladesh is one of the vulnerable zones in the world which is predicted to disappear due to climate change impacts. This areas face huge weather-related disasters due to continuous changing coastal-configuration and man-made pollutions. However, these observations are indecisive due to limitations of supportive evidence. Therefore, further

  1. Transport of toxic metals through the major river systems of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangladesh having an area of about 144000 sq. km with a population of more than 120 millions is situated in the northeastern part of the south Asia subcontinent and a vast area to the south in the bay of Bengal. The largest delta in the world has a larger catchments area of about 1554000 sq. km spread over five countries namely Bhutan, Nepal, China, India and Bangladesh. Environmental pollution usually refers to biological, chemical and physical materials introduced largely as a result of human activities. Water is one of the main source of the environmental pollution and the contamination of water by the metal ions at the trace levels is generally occurred through natural processes or anthropogenic sources. Buriganga, Sitalaksma, Bramhaputra and Jamuna were selected for the present study. The toxic metal ions concentration in water samples of various region of different rivers were determined by ASS and GFAAS. The highest amount of As was found in the Karnafully River at KAFCOO (34.6 +-1.2 mug/L) in the dry season and lowest in the buriganga river at Badamtoli (5.3 +-0.1 mu g/L). the highest amount of Pb was found in the dry season at kalurghat (13. 0.05 mu g/L) in Karnafully River. The highest amount of Cd was found in the river of Karnafully at KAFCOO (27. 0.4 mu g/L) in dry season. These observations demand the need of regular monitoring of toxic metal ions concentration in different rivers especially Buriganga, Sitalaksma and Karnafully. The concentration of As, Pb and Cd determined in this study is below the recommended values of WHO (World Health Organization) and EQS (Environmental Quality Standards of Bangladesh). The methods that adopted to investigate these metals were in good agreement with standard solution (Merck, Germany, code no: J/4546/05), where +- .0% deviation was found. (author)

  2. Determinants of drinking arsenic-contaminated tubewell water in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M M H; Aklimunnessa, Khandoker; Kabir, M; Mori, Mitsuru

    2007-09-01

    Bangladesh has already experienced the biggest catastrophe in the world due to arsenic contamination of drinking water. This study investigates the association of drinking arsenic-contaminated water (DACW) with both personal and household characteristics of 9116 household respondents using the household data of the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS) 2004. Here DACW means that arsenic level in the drinking water is greater than the permissible limit (50 microg/l) of Bangladesh. The overall rate of DACW was 7.9%. It was found to be significantly associated with education, currently working, and division of Bangladesh, either by cross tabulation or multivariate logistic regression analyses or both. Similarly, household characteristics -- namely television, bicycle, materials of the wall and floor, total family members, number of sleeping rooms, and availability of foods -- were significantly associated in bivariate analyses. Many household characteristics -- namely electricity, television, wall and floor materials, and number of sleeping rooms -- revealed significant association in the logistic regression analysis when adjusted for age, education and division. This study indicates that respondents from Chittagong division and lower socio-economic groups (indicated by household characteristics) are at significantly higher risk of DACW. These findings should be taken into account during the planning of future intervention activities in Bangladesh. PMID:17584808

  3. The environment associated with significant tornadoes in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikos, Dan; Finch, Jonathan; Case, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the environmental parameters favoring significant tornadoes in Bangladesh through a simulation of ten high-impact events. A climatological perspective is first presented on classifying significant tornadoes in Bangladesh, noting the challenges since reports of tornadoes are not documented in a formal manner. The statistical relationship between United States and Bangladesh tornado-related deaths suggests that significant tornadoes do occur in Bangladesh so this paper identifies the most significant tornadic events and analyzes the environmental conditions associated with these events. Given the scarcity of observational data to assess the near-storm environment in this region, high-resolution (3-km horizontal grid spacing) numerical weather prediction simulations are performed for events identified to be associated with a significant tornado. In comparison to similar events over the United States, significant tornado environments in Bangladesh are characterized by relatively high convective available potential energy, sufficient deep-layer vertical shear, and a propensity for deviant (i.e., well to the right of the mean flow) storm motion along a low-level convergence boundary.

  4. Bangladesh Enterprises Continue to Participate in Trade Promotion Events in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan

    2007-01-01

    @@ On March 26, 2007,Bangladesh celebrated its 36th anniversary of the Independence and National Day.China and Bangladesh enjoy time tested friendly relations. The bilateral relations are characterized by sustained efforts to further broaden the nature and scope of the cooperation. In 2005, China emerged as the biggest source of import for Bangladesh, outstripping the volume of import from Bangladesh's other immediate neighbors. Bangladesh is the third largest trading partner of China in South Asia. The total bilateral trade volume has reached beyond US$ 3 billion in 2006.

  5. Carbon dioxide emission from brickfields around Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Imran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken at six divisions of Bangladesh to investigate the CO2 emission from brickfields. to explore the rate of carbon emission over the last 10 years, based on existing technology for brick production. The finding reveals that there were more than 45,000 Brick kilns in Bangladesh which together account for about 95% of operating kilns including Bull's Trench Kiln, Fixed Chimney Kiln, Zigzag Kiln and Hoffman Kiln. These kilns were the most carbon emitting source but it varies on fuel type, kiln type and also for location. It has been found that, maximum carbon emission area was Chittagong, which was 93.150 with percentage of last 10 years and 9.310 per cent per year. Whereas Sylhet was lower carbon emission area indicating percentage 17.172 of last 10 years and 4.218 percent per year. It has been found that total annual amount of CO2 emission for 4 types brick kilns from Dhaka, Chittagong, Rajshahi, Khulana, Sylhet and Barisal were 8.862 Mt yr-1, 10.048 Mt yr-1, 12.783 Mt yr-1, 15.250 Mt yr-1, in the year of 2002, 2005, 2007 and 2010 respectively. In Mymensingh district, the maximum CO2 emission and coal consumption was obtained in Chamak brick field, which was 1882 tons and 950 tons, respectively and minimum was obtained in Zhalak brick field, which was 1039.5 tons and 525.0 tons, respectively during the year of 2013. The percentage in last 10 years of CO2 emission was 72.784 and per cent per year 7.970, which is very alarming for us. The estimates obtained from surveys and on-site investigations indicate that these kilns consume an average of 240 tons of coal to produce 1 million bricks. This type of coal has a measured calorific value of 6,400 KJ, heating value of coal is 20.93 GJ t-1 and it produces 94.61 TJ t-1 and 56.1 TJ t-1 CO2 from coal and natural gas, respectively.

  6. ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER — RESULTS OF PROTOTYPE FIELD TESTS IN BANGLADESH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowolik, K; Addy, S.E.A.; Gadgil, A.

    2009-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 50 million people in Bangladesh drink arsenic-laden water, making it the largest case of mass poisoning in human history. Many methods of arsenic removal (mostly using chemical adsorbents) have been studied, but most of these are too expensive and impractical to be implemented in poor countries such as Bangladesh. This project investigates ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) as an affordable means of removing arsenic. Experiments were performed on site in Bangladesh using a prototype termed “sushi”. This device consists of carbon steel sheets that serve as electrodes wrapped into a cylinder, separated by plastic mesh and surrounded by a tube-like container that serves as a holding cell in which the water is treated electrochemically. During the electrochemical process, current is applied to both electrodes causing iron to oxidize to various forms of iron (hydr)oxides. These species bind to arsenic(V) with very high affi nity. ECAR also has the advantage that As(III), the more toxic form of arsenic, oxidizes to As(V) in situ. Only As(V) is known to complex with iron (hydr)oxides. One of the main objectives of this research is to demonstrate the ability of the new prototype to reduce arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh groundwater from >200 ppb to below the WHO limit of 10 ppb. In addition, varying fl ow rate and dosage and the effect on arsenic removal was investigated. Experiments showed that ECAR reduced Bangladeshi water with an initial arsenic concentration as high as 250 ppb to below 10 ppb. ECAR proved to be effective at dosages as high as 810 Coulombs/Liter (C/L) and as low as 386 C/L (current 1 A, voltage 12 V). These results are encouraging and provide great promise that ECAR is an effi cient method in the remediation of arsenic from contaminated groundwater. A preliminary investigation of arsenic removal trends with varying Coulombic dosage, complexation time and fi ltration methods is

  7. Board Composition and Firm Performance: Evidence from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzalur Rashid

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the influence of corporate board composition in the form of representation of outsideindependent directors on firm economic performance in Bangladesh. Two hypotheses are developed toexamine the relationship among composition of board memberships including independent directors andfirm performance. An observation of 274 Bangladeshi firm-years is used in the study. A linear regressionanalysis is used to test the hypotheses. Results reveal that the outside (independent directors cannot addpotential value to the firm’s economic performance in Bangladesh. The idea of the introduction ofindependent directors may have benefits for greater transparency, but the non-consideration of theunderlying institutional and cultural differences in an emerging economy such as Bangladesh may not resultin economic value addition to the firm. The findings provide an insight to the regulators in their quest forharmonization of international corporate governance practices.

  8. Challenges in Teaching Pronunciation at Tertiary Level in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanzina Tahereen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Teaching pronunciation is one the most challenging parts of ELT in Bangladesh. Very few research and least attention on pronunciation teaching has instigated those challenges more. Moreover, setting an ambitious target to achieve native like pronunciation and teaching without considering the Bangladeshi context are more specific reasons for creating those problems. Therefore, this paper concentrates on the discussion of the existing condition of teaching pronunciation in Bangladesh. Consequently, it starts with presenting existing circumstances of pronunciation teaching in Bangladesh, and showing what the achievable and realistic goal should be for this situation. Then, it talks about the challenges that the teachers face while teaching pronunciation in ELT classroom. This discussion provides deep insight into those challenges which are only applicable to Bangladeshi students. Finally, the paper suggests some contextual and practical solutions to those specific problems.

  9. Applicability of Telemedicine in Bangladesh: Current Status and Future Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Nessa, Ahasanun; Ullah, Sana; Kwak, Kyung Sup

    2009-01-01

    Telemedicine refers to the use of information and communication technology to provide and support health care mainly for the purpose of providing consultation. It is also a way to provide medical procedures or examinations to remote locations. It has the potential to improve both the quality and the access to health care services delivery while lowering costs even in the scarcity of resources. Understanding the potentiality of telemedicine, many developing countries are implementing telemedicine to provide health care facility to remote area where health care facilities are deficient. Bangladesh is not an exception to this either. In this paper we mention the reasons why Bangladesh has to move for telemedicine. We also present the past and on-going telemedicine activities and projects in Bangladesh. Analyzing these projects we have found out some factors which should be assessed carefully for successful implementation of telemedicine application. Finally we propose a prototype telemedicine network for Banglad...

  10. Preliminary evaluation of wind power potential in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available wind speed data for six locations of Bangladesh have been analyzed with a view to assess the wind power potential of these locations. Regions having high wind potential are identified for the generation of electric energy by wind energy conversion systems (WECS). The wind power density varies from 12 to 650 W/m/sup 2/ in Bangladesh depending on the location and time of year. Among the six locations, Chittagang, a coastal station in the southeastern region of the country, possesses the maximum wind power density (1670650 W/m/sup 2/) and seems to be the most suitable location for establishing WECS. This study could be considered as the basis for further research and development effort on wind power application in Bangladesh. (authors)

  11. The Most Serious Offenses and Penalties Concerning Unsafe Foods under the Food Safety Laws in Bangladesh, India, and Australia: A Critical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaiman, S M; Ali, Abu Noman M Atahar

    2015-01-01

    The right to food is an internationally recognized human rignt, which inherently denotes the right to safe food simply because unsafe foods cause different diseases resulting in consumer's disability, organ failure, or even early demise. Food safety currently may not be an issue of public concern in Australia, but it has been a "silent killer" for decades in both Bangladesh and India contributing to deaths of thousands and injuries of millions of others. Unscrupulous businesses have been making money at the cost of immense human casualties with almost complete impunity in Bangladesh. The situation in Bangladesh is so intractable that the government has been making laws one after another; but food traders remain undeterred, and consequently consumers continue to die from adulterated foods. This paper examines the loopholes in the definitions of the most serious offenses under three major pieces of legislation in Bangladesh, India, and Australia. It finds that all three statutes seem flawed to some extent, though they all may mutually benefit from one another in defining and clarifying the most serious food safety offenses and penalties with a view to strengthening their effectiveness. PMID:26630823

  12. Issues in developing a mitigation strategy for Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaduzzaman, M. [Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    1996-12-31

    Bangladesh, it is by now well-known, is at the receiving end, in the literal sense of the term, of the global climate change and its potential impacts. She contributes very little to the current global emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The Emission Inventory under the present umbrella project, Bangladesh Climate Change Study (BCCS), has found that her annual emission of carbon has been only 3.99 mn metric tons per year. An earlier study arrived at exactly the same figure. The figures for estimated release of methane is far less firm. The estimated methane emission in 1990 could be anywhere between 1 million and 6 million metric tons. In any case the total emission is unlikely to be more than one-half of one percent of the global total. On the other hand, however, she faces specter of widespread and more frequent floods, more frequent droughts, cyclones and above all sea-level rise (SLR) which may inundate a substantial part of the country all of these bringing in immeasurable misery and destitution and loss of income, employment and growth. One would expect that in such a situation, Bangladesh`s basic concern should be to prepare an appropriate adaptation strategy. This is already a major policy concern of the Government. There is, however, an increasing realization that Bangladesh should as well emphasize an appropriate mitigation strategy (MS). There may be at least three reasons why this should be so. The first is that she is a signatory of the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The second is that in the medium, if not short term she expects major growth due to a developing economy. Third is that Bangladesh depends primarily on fossil fuel imports for energy, and will become a larger source with further development.

  13. NEW TRENDS IN LEGAL EDUCATION AT BANGLADESH OPEN UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid FERDOUSI

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, Formal legal education is provided by either a department of a university or an affiliated college. There are four public universities and above twenty six private universities in our country with law as a regular subject of teaching. Besides, the National University imparts teaching of law through law colleges in the country. All public and private universities providing law graduate degree by conventional system but many people deprived from this opportunities. Thus to increase equitable access to education and to develop the human resources of the country the Bangladesh Open University playing significant role. Large numbers of students of rural areas, particularly women, out of school and adults who must do work to support their families are include with the university. Bangladesh Open University is the only institution in Bangladesh which imparts education in open and distance mode and offers 23 formal programmes, the demand for the introduction of LL.B programme for the benefit of those who have been, for various reasons, deprived of the opportunity of undertaking graduate course in law in conventional mode of education. The decision to offer the programme in distance mode is being taken in response to the earnest desire of the relevant quarters expressed in various dailies and formal applications submitted to the university authority as the learners in the open and distance mode learn at his own place and any time whenever he feels convenient to learn and is not for restricted by time, space or age. Distance learning is, indeed, presently considered as a viable alternative of the conventional system of education to fulfill the growing demand for legal education.This paper presents the new academic trends in Bangladesh Open University by distance learning Bachelor of Laws (LL.B. degree and modern aspects of the legal education at School of Law in Bangladesh Open University.

  14. Status of contamination monitoring in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Aleya [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Savar, Dacca (Bangladesh)

    1997-06-01

    The applications of radioisotopes and radiation sources to the research and development in medicine, food agriculture, industries and others are rapidly increasing in Bangladesh. The existing major nuclear facilites and allied laboratories of the country include 3 MW TRIGA Mark-2 research reactor for training, research and radioisotope production, 14 MeV neutron generator for nuclear data measurement and elemental analysis via neutron activation, 3 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator for the research and application of nuclear physics, and 50,000 Ci and 5,000 Ci Co-60 irradiators. About 10 Co-60 and Cs-137 teletherapy units are in operation in hospitals. The radioactive contamination of working areas, equipment, protective clothing and skin may result from normal operation and accidents, and contamination monitoring and decontamination are the essential part of radiation protection program. Surface contamination is monitored with Berthold survey meters. Hand and foot monitors have been used. Routine systematic search, continuous air monitoring, the examination of silt movement in Chittagong harbor using Sc-46 tracer and the measurement of tritium contamination for the neutron generator are reported. (K.I.)

  15. Sexual violence towards married women in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naved, Ruchira Tabassum

    2013-05-01

    This article explored the magnitude and nature of within marriage sexual violence against women and factors associated with physically forced sex by husbands in urban and rural Bangladesh using population-based survey data from 2001 (n = 2,702). Results showed high prevalence of lifetime sexual violence: 37 % in urban and 50 % in rural areas. An overwhelming majority of the women reported being sexually abused by husbands more than once. Logistic regression analyses revealed that six out of ten independent variables included in the models were significant. The factors positively associated with physically forced sex by husbands during the last 12 months were: history of physical abuse of husband's mother by his father; level of controlling behavior by husband; and forced or coerced first sex. Women's age (20-24 compared to 15-19) and dowry demand at marriage increased the likelihood of this violence in the rural area. Urban women in the second and third income quartiles were more likely to be exposed to this violence compared to women in the first quartile. Results highlight the need for prevention programs targeting men, which would help at the same time to break the cycle of intergenerational exposure and thereby transmission of violence. Notions of gender equality; women's sexual rights; and women's right to consent and choice need to be widely promoted particularly among men. PMID:23254953

  16. Status of contamination monitoring in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of radioisotopes and radiation sources to the research and development in medicine, food agriculture, industries and others are rapidly increasing in Bangladesh. The existing major nuclear facilites and allied laboratories of the country include 3 MW TRIGA Mark-2 research reactor for training, research and radioisotope production, 14 MeV neutron generator for nuclear data measurement and elemental analysis via neutron activation, 3 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator for the research and application of nuclear physics, and 50,000 Ci and 5,000 Ci Co-60 irradiators. About 10 Co-60 and Cs-137 teletherapy units are in operation in hospitals. The radioactive contamination of working areas, equipment, protective clothing and skin may result from normal operation and accidents, and contamination monitoring and decontamination are the essential part of radiation protection program. Surface contamination is monitored with Berthold survey meters. Hand and foot monitors have been used. Routine systematic search, continuous air monitoring, the examination of silt movement in Chittagong harbor using Sc-46 tracer and the measurement of tritium contamination for the neutron generator are reported. (K.I.)

  17. Coalbed Methane prospect of Jamalganj Coalfield Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five major Gondwana coalfields have been discovered in the half-graben type basins in the subsurface in the Precambrian platform area of the Northwest Bangladesh. The Jamalganj coalfields with an estimated reserve of about 1053 millions tons of coal, has seven coal seams in the depth range between 640 to 1158m below the ground surface. Compared to the other coalfields of the area, with coal occurring at 150 to 500m depth, Jamalganj coal is considered to be too deep to be exploited by conventional underground or open pit mining. Instead, developing coal bed methane from Jamalganj coalfield may be considered as a viable option for its exploitation. The positive factors of Jamalganj coal bed methane development include high net thickness of coal with at least one very thick (40m+) and widely developed seam, coal seam burial depth within optimum range, large coal reserves, indication of significant gas content from drilling data, and poor permeability in the rocks above and surrounding the coal layers. The thickest seam III can be primary target for CBM development especially where it combines with seam IV in the eastern part of coalfield. However, there are a number of unknown factors like actual gas content of coal, permeability, and in-seam pressure that need to be evaluated before deciding the viability of the project. An initial attempt to collect these base line data should include drilling test well or wells in the primary target area where seam III is most thick and widely developed. (author)

  18. Engineering education in Bangladesh - an indicator of economic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Harun; Alam, Firoz

    2012-05-01

    Developing nations including Bangladesh are significantly lagging behind the millennium development target due to the lack of science, technology and engineering education. Bangladesh as a least developing country has only 44 engineers per million people. Its technological education and gross domestic product growth are not collinear. Although limited progress was made in humanities, basic sciences, agriculture and medical sciences, a vast gap is left in technical and engineering education. This paper describes the present condition of engineering education in the country and explores ways to improve engineering education in order to meet the national as well as global skills demand.

  19. Renewable energy and rural development activities experience in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barua, D.C.

    1997-12-01

    The per capita per year fuel consumption in Bangladesh is only 56 kg oil equivalent. The supply of electricity by Bangladesh power development board (BPDB) and Dhaka electricity supply authority (DESA) is mainly confined to cities and towns. Rural Electrification Board (REB) distributes electricity to the rural people through cooperatives. The rural cooperatives cover only 10% of the total population. Only about 15% of the total population is directly connected to the electricity. In order to meet the increasing energy demand for development of agriculture and industry and for the generation of better employment opportunities, it will be necessary to harness all the available alternative sources of energy immediately.

  20. Human Resources Development for Rooppur Nuclear Power Programme in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conclusions: • Bangladesh faces a huge challenge in implementing the Rooppur NPP and its total nuclear power; • A preliminary assessment has been chalked out a plan to find out methods that can be applied to find out our gaps and then fill them up; • Bangladesh seeks cooperation from the Russian Federation in the form assistance package like National training courses, Seminar/Workshop, Expert Mission/Review and other form of bilateral arrangements in establishing infrastructure for “Rooppur NPP” building;

  1. Existing and Expected Service Quality of Grameenphone Users in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmat Ullah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The Grameenphone (GP is a market leader in the telecommunication industry in Bangladesh. This study investigates the existing and expected service quality of Grameenphone users in Bangladesh. The Study reveals that there are significant gap between existing and expected perceived service network, 3G, customer care, physical facilities, billing cost, information service, mobile banking and GP offers. The study concludes that customer satisfaction is a dynamic phenomenon. Maintaining desired level of customer satisfaction requires corporate proactive responsiveness in accessing, building & retaining satisfied customers for sustainable competitive advantages in the marketplace.Keywords: Service Quality, Customer Satisfaction, Existing Service Quality, Expected Service Quality, Grameenphone 

  2. A rainfall simulation model for agricultural development in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sayedur Rahman

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A rainfall simulation model based on a first-order Markov chain has been developed to simulate the annual variation in rainfall amount that is observed in Bangladesh. The model has been tested in the Barind Tract of Bangladesh. Few significant differences were found between the actual and simulated seasonal, annual and average monthly. The distribution of number of success is asymptotic normal distribution. When actual and simulated daily rainfall data were used to drive a crop simulation model, there was no significant difference of rice yield response. The results suggest that the rainfall simulation model perform adequately for many applications.

  3. DATA ENVELOPMENT ANALYSIS OF BANKING SECTOR IN BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rashedul Hoque

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Banking sector of Bangladesh is flourishing and contributing to its economy. In this aspect measuring efficiency is important. Data Envelopment Analysis technique is used for this purpose. The data are collected from the annual reports of twenty four different banks in Bangladesh. Data Envelopment Analysis is mainly of two types - constant returns to scale and variable returns to scale. Since this study attempts to maximize output, so the output oriented Data Envelopment Analysis is used. The most efficient bank is one that obtains the highest efficiency score.

  4. Serum lipid profile and its association with hypertension in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhury KN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kamrun Nahar Choudhury,1 AKM Mainuddin,2 Mohammad Wahiduzzaman,3 Sheikh Mohammed Shariful Islam4,51Department of Epidemiology, National Centre for Control of Rheumatic Fever and Heart Disease, 2Center for Communicable Diseases, International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, 3Department of Cardiology, Bangladesh Institute of Health Science, Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 4Center for Control of Chronic Diseases, International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 5Center for International Health, University of Munich, Munich, GermanyBackground: Hypertension and dyslipidemia are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease, accounting for the highest morbidity and mortality among the Bangladeshi population. The objective of this study was to determine the association between serum lipid profiles in hypertensive patients with normotensive control subjects in Bangladesh.Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 234 participants including 159 hypertensive patients and 75 normotensive controls from January to December 2012 in the National Centre for Control of Rheumatic Fever and Heart Disease in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data were collected on sociodemographic factors, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, and lipid profile including total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, low density lipoprotein (LDL, and high density lipoprotein (HDL.Results: The mean (± standard deviation systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure of the participants were 137.94±9.58 and 94.42±8.81, respectively, which were higher in the hypertensive patients (P<0.001. The serum levels of TC, TG, and LDL were higher while HDL levels were lower in hypertensive subjects compared to normotensives, which was statistically significant (P<0.001. Age, waist circumference, and body mass index showed significant association with hypertensive patients (P<0.001 but not with normotensives. The logistic regression analysis showed

  5. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Raihan Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the smaller states in Asia. But it has a long and rich history of nuclear medicine for over sixty years. The progress in science and technology is always challenging in a developing country. In 1958, work for the first Nuclear Medicine facility was commenced in Dhaka in a tin-shed known as ‘Radioisotope Centre’ and was officially inaugurated in 1962. Since the late 50s of the last century nuclear medicine in Bangladesh has significantly progressed through the years in its...

  6. Consumption in Rural Bangladesh : Households, Lifestyles, and Identities

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Md Motaher

    2011-01-01

    Bangladesh, often better known to the outside world as a country of natural calamities, is one of the most densely populated countries in the world. Despite rapid urbanization, more than 75% of the people still live in rural areas. The density of the rural population is also one of the highest in the world. Being a poor and low-income country, its main challenge is to eradicate poverty through increasing equitable income. Since its independence in 1971, Bangladesh has experienced many ups and...

  7. Ethical responsibility : a case study of Telenor in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Austnes, Synne Smedstad

    2009-01-01

    “This thesis will aim at giving an ethical reflection on ethical responsibility through a case study on Telenor in Bangladesh. Telenor is the majority shareholder in the Bangladeshi phone company Grameenphone. The case will focus on the misbehaviours of several of Grameenphone’s phone pole suppliers in Bangladesh presented in Tom Heinemann’s documentary “A Tower of Promises” (2008). The documentary was shown on both NRK and NRK2 in May 2008. It reveals bad working conditions, l...

  8. Developing non-craft employment for women in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M

    1984-01-01

    The Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) is a nongovernmental, rural development institution founded in 1972 and run by Bangladeshis to develop noncraft employment opportunities and participatory associations for poor rural women by organizing them into working groups of 20-25 members. Each group chooses 2 members to receive training in group management and leadership and 1 family planning helper. The group plans and undertakes a series of joint economic activities based on traditional or new skills, and a series of collective social actions. BRAC's field staff is responsible for organizing, each member working with the poor of 5-6 villages. Each group decides its own financial and production plans, with staff consulting on cost effectiveness and feasibility. Seeking to expand women's occupations, BRAC undertook schemes to: 1) commercialize traditional skills by creating new markets; 2) revive and adapt traditional skills to new lines of useful, marketable items; 3) train women in new or non-traditional skills; and 4) mobilize demand for women's labor by lobbing for women's participation in public employment schemes and agriculture. Between 1976 and 1984, BRAC's employment expansion schemes have been able to engage the largest number of women in rice processing (3810), animal husbandry (2344), horticulture (843), and poultry (800). Over 200 women each year have been encouraged to undertake collective agriculturl production on leased land. In 10 years, more than 20,000 women have been organized by BRAC into over 800 active groups, and 10,000 of these women are involved in viable economic activities, leading to an enhanced sense of personal, social, and economic worth and power. Lessons from the BRAC experience are: 1) begin with activities that produce quick, tangible results; 2) organize women into economically homogeneous groups: 3) begin by studying the overall economic situation, traditional skills, resources, markets; 4) build on traditional skills

  9. Deforestation effects on biological and other important soil properties in an upland watershed of Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.M. Sirajul Haque; Sanatan Das Gupta; Sohag Miah

    2014-01-01

    Deforestation occurs at an alarming rate in upland watersheds of Bangladesh and has many detrimental effects on the environment. This study reports the effects of deforestation on soil biological proper-ties along with some important physicochemical parameters of a southern upland watershed in Bangladesh. Soils were sampled at 4 paired sites, each pair representing a deforested site and a forested site, and having similar topographical characteristics. Significantly fewer (p≤0.001) fungi and bacteria, and lower microbial respiration, active microbial biomass, metabolic and microbial quotients were found in soils of the deforested sites. Soil physical properties such as moisture content, water holding capacity, and chemical properties such as organic matter, total N, avail-able P and EC were also lower in deforested soils. Bulk density and pH were significantly higher in deforested soils. Available Ca and Mg were inconsistent between the two land uses at all the paired sites. Re-duced abundance and biomass of soil mesofauna were recorded in defor-ested soils. However, soil anecic species were more abundant in defor-ested soils than epigeic and endogeic species, which were more abundant in forested soils than on deforested sites.

  10. Human Resource Management Practices and Employees’ Satisfaction Towards Private Banking Sector in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Tofael Hossain Majumder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dramatic advances of Information and Communication Technology (ICT, changing mix and personal values of the workforce, emergence of the knowledge economy and increasing global competition have created enormous challenges on organizations. To cope with the challenges efficiently, human resource has been considered as one of the most important factors in today’s hyper-competitive market place. The focus of this study is to gain an insight into the current HRM practices and its impact on employee’s satisfaction on the private banking sector in Bangladesh. For conducting this research, 100 bank employees are selected from the chosen banks and out of this 88 employees responses properly, the response rate is 88 percent. The questionnaire consists of different questions on nine HRM dimensions such as recruitment and selection systems, compensation package, job security, career growth, training and development, management style, job design and responsibilities, reward and motivation and working environment. The questionnaire was developed by using a five point Likert scale. In this study, some statistical measures such as Z-test, mean and proportion analysis is used to examine employee’s satisfaction. The study reveals that all HRM dimensions exercised in the private banking sector of Bangladesh does not satisfied to the employees equally. Most of the employees are dissatisfied with compensation package followed by reward and motivation, career growth, training and development, management style, and job design and responsibilities. So, these HRM dimensions quality should be improved for the betterment of the bank’s success.

  11. A Comparative Study on Knowledge about Reproductive Health among Urban and Rural Women of Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monoarul Haque

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To compare the level of knowledge on reproductive health among urban and rural women of selected area of Bangladesh.A descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken among 200 women selected purposively from different rural and urban areas of Bangladesh. Data were collected using a semi-structured interviewer-administered questionnaire by face to face interview. Knowledge level was analyzed according to poor, moderate and good knowledge by pre-defined knowledge scoring.Mean age of the respondents was 26 years and majority (66% of them was housewives. Most of them (61% had completed their primary level education. Around three-fourth of them belongs to lower-middle income group. Overall level of reproductive health knowledge was more evident among urban reproductive aged women than rural counterparts (p < 0.001. Moreover, significant knowledge gap was found regarding family planning (p = 0.005, care during pregnancy (p < 0.001, safe motherhood (p = 0.002, newborn care (p = 0.009 and birth spacing (p <0.001 between urban and rural women. Family members were the major source of information in both groups.A wide knowledge gap was found between Bangladeshi urban and rural respondents regarding their reproductive behaviors. Government and concerned organizations should promote and strengthen various health education programs to focus on reproductive health, especially among reproductive aged women in rural area.

  12. Battered bodies & shattered minds: violence against women in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahed, Tania; Bhuiya, Abbas

    2007-10-01

    Violence against women is a common and insidious phenomenon in Bangladesh. The types of violence commonly committed are domestic violence, acid throwing, rape, trafficking and forced prostitution. Domestic violence is the most common form of violence and its prevalence is higher in rural areas. A higher prevalence of verbal abuse than physical abuse by partners has been observed. The reasons mentioned for abuse were trivial and included questioning of the husband, failure to perform household work and care of children, economic problems, stealing, refusal to bring dowry, etc. The factors associated with violence were the age of women, age of husband, past exposure to familial violence, and lack of spousal communication. The majority of abused women remained silent about their experience because of the high acceptance of violence within society, fear of repercussion, tarnishing family honour and own reputation, jeopardizing children's future, and lack of an alternative place to stay. However, severely abused women, women who had frequent verbal disputes, higher level of education, and support from natal homes were more likely to disclose violence. A very small proportion of women approached institutional sources for help and only when the abuse was severe, became life threatening or children were at risk. Interestingly, violence increased with membership of women in micro-credit organizations initially but tapered off as duration of involvement increased. The high acceptability of violence within society acts as a deterrent for legal redress. Effective strategies for the prevention of violence should involve public awareness campaigns and community-based networks to support victims. PMID:18032809

  13. Trade Related Issues in the Bangladesh-India Joint Communique' : Maximising Bangladesh's Benefits and Strategies for the Future

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafizur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Issues of Trade and Connectivity with India have attracted renewed attention in recent times following the visit of the Hon’ble Prime Minister of Bangladesh to India during January 10†13, 2010. The joint communiqué emerging from this visit mentions deepening bilateral economic cooperation between the two countries in several areas. The task at hand now for Bangladesh is to design follow†up actions in line with the agreements and the understandings in the communiqué in a manner that best s...

  14. The advantages of micro-credit lending programs and the human capabilities approach for women’s poverty reduction and increased human rights in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouf, Kazi Abdur

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fifty percent of people all over the world are suffering from a lack basic needs. Even poor women are denied their equality of human rights. Equality of rights for these women would mean access to food, clothing, shelter, and credit as well as liberation from exploitative forms of income generation such as domestic work, child labor and trafficking. Women in Bangladesh suffer from inequality of rights on quite an unimaginable level and their socio-economic development has been largely impeded. Thus, these poor women depend on others to survive. Human capability services like education and skills development services are not generated nor tailored to them particularly at the village level which affects the basic human rights of these women. Without educational, health, economic and social services at the village grass-roots level, poor people suffer most in Bangladesh. Although the Constitution of Bangladesh appears to strongly approve gender equality and positive action that guarantees women’s full participation in social, economic and political life, it is clear that full support is absent. Ironically, the disadvantaged poor people specifically are struggling to fulfill their basic human needs and are aware of their basic human rights. Although some steps have been made to reduce gender inequality, some laws still lag behind and many discriminatory practices are found in the customary laws, which still remain in force. A solution that has offered to assist poor women in Bangladesh through micro-credit organizations (MFIs like Grameen Bank credit, that create opportunities for these women to help educate themselves and overcome poverty in Bangladesh. However, human rights education at the grass roots level is very nominal. Hence focus on human rights education extension programs are urgently required to establish basic human rights.

  15. Abundance of sardine fish species in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Bikram Jit

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted during January, 2012 to December 2012 in the sardine fisheries which is occurred both in artisanal and industrial fishing sector in the marine water of the Bay of Bengal of Bangladesh region. During this study period the total landing amounts by weight of sardines were 7352.99 MT, among these 23.76% (1747.22 MT was exploited by the artisanal mechanized boats and 76.24% (5605.77 MT captured through different industrial fishing trawlers and contributed 17.51% of the total marine fish production by commercial fish trawlers during the study period. 4 sardine species have been recorded from our marine territory. Among them, 2 sardine species are highly abundant, Sardinella fimbriata total production volumes was 5495.79 MT (74.74% contributed 1747.22MT (31.79% from the artisanal and 3748.57MT (68.21% from the industrial sector and Dussumieria acuta production amounts was 1857.20MT (25.26% contributed only from the industrial fishing sector.Species wise contribution shows that S. fimbriata contributed 100% in the artisanal sector and in the industrial fishing S. fimbriata contributed 66.87% and D. acuta contributed the rest 33.13%. The distribution of the S. fimbriata is within 10-20 meters depth and abundance was observed in the southern part of the South patches and South of south patches (N: 210.09// -22, E: 920.04/-07 to N: 200.45/-25, E: 920.18/-56 and 10-50m depth in onshore and off shore areas in the north-west to north-east of Middle ground (Kohinoor point -N: 210.36/.23, E: 900.06/.43 to N: 210.18/.18, E 910.17/.57. The distribution of the D. acuta is within 40-60 m. depth and abundance was observed in the north-west to north-east of Middle ground areas (Kohinoor point - N: 210.36/.23, E: 900.06/.43 to N: 210.18/.18, E 910.17/.57 and south-west to south-east of Middle ground (Kohinoor point- N: 200-17/.29, E: 900.15/.21 to N: 200.29/.56, E: 910.24/.22 in the Bay of Bengal of Bangladesh region. The peak capture season of

  16. Differential fertility in Bangladesh: a path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, B

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies of fertility in Bangladesh have mostly used crosstabular and multivariate analyses revealing the direct effect of selected socioeconomic and background variables. The indirect effects are relatively unknown. Analysis of data from the 1975-1976 Bangladesh Fertility Survey seeks to identify variables that significantly affect the cumulative fertility of both urban and rural women and to construct causal models to clarify the complex set of relationships. Path analysis is used on 8 variables: fertility index (number of children ever born to ever married women aged 9-49, age of wife (respondent), age at marriage, religion, childhood background of wife and husband, and educational attainment of both wife and husband. Data obtained from a sample of 4875 rural and 1403 urban women are used. Causal ordering of the variables began with the 4 exogenous variables: age, religion, and childhood backgrounds of the wife and husband. Education of husband and wife are placed next in sequence, followed by age at marriage and the fertility index. Path coefficients are estimated by applying ordinary least squares regression to the equations. "Children ever born" is regressed on all other variables for urban and rural areas. The 2 sets of coefficients are not equivalent and urban and rural data are analyzed separately. 13 paths are significant in the urban model and 11 in the rural model. The coefficients are small suggesting that other variables not included in the study effect fertility. In the urban model, 5 variables were found to have a statistically significant effect on fertility: age, religion, education for both husband and wife, and age at marriage. The indirect effect of religion operating through a network of compound paths suggests that Muslim affiliation tends to depress wife's and husband's education and age at marriage. Holding other variables constant, Muslim women tend to have more children than non-Muslim women. Wife's age at marriage negatively

  17. Financial Liberalization, Savings and the Banking Sector in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Murshed (Syed); I.A. Robin (Iftekhar Ahmed)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis article explores the consequences of financial liberalization policy on the banking sector in Bangladesh. Following a motivating portfolio selection theor-etical model on the impact of liberalization, it applies time series techniques with annual banking sector data for the period 1

  18. Skill Intensity and Skills Development in Bangladesh Manufacturing Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comyn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on recent research into enterprise skill profiles and workplace training practices in the Bangladesh manufacturing industry. The article presents survey and interview data for 37 enterprises across eight manufacturing sectors collected during a study for the International Labour Organisation. The research analysed enterprise and…

  19. Dengue Fever Outbreak in a Recreation Club, Dhaka, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Breiman, Robert F.; Hossain, Anowar; Rahman, Mahbubur

    2004-01-01

    An outbreak of dengue fever occurred among employees of a recreation club in Bangladesh. Occupational transmission was characterized by a 12% attack rate, no dengue among family contacts, and Aedes vectors in club areas. Early recognition of the outbreak likely limited its impact.

  20. Serologic Evidence of Dengue Infection before Onset of Epidemic, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, M Anowar; Khatun, Mahmuda; Arjumand, Farzana; Nisaluk, Ananda; Breiman, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    Dengue fever emerged in Bangladesh in 2000. We tested 225 serum and plasma samples from febrile patients and 184 blood donors in 1996 and 1997 for dengue antibodies; 55 (24.4%) febrile patients had dengue antibodies (65.5% with secondary infection pattern), compared with one (0.54%) donor (p < 0.001), suggesting that dengue transmission was ongoing well before 1996.

  1. E-Banking of Economical Prospects in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Azizul Baten

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Now a day’s due to emerging global economy, e-commerce and e-business have increasingly become a necessary component of business strategy and a strong catalyst for economic development. The new information technology is becoming an important factor in the future development of financial services industry, and especially banking industry. As a third-world developing country, Bangladesh is far behind to reach the expected level in global banking system. So it is our urgent need to upgrade its banking system. This paper is aimed at to determine economical prospects of e-banking and to explain the present scenario of banking sectors in Bangladesh and at the same time it demonstrates the scope and benefits of e-banking compared with the existing system. This paper also tries to present actual sit uation of e-banking in the marketing point of view in Bangladesh. The results of th is study shows that e-banking serves several advantages to Bangladeshi banking sector, however, the study also shows that the Bangladeshi customers have not enough knowledge regarding e-banking which is rendering by banking sector in Bangladesh. A discussion of the implications of these results and limitations are provided at the end.

  2. Determinants of Operational Efficiency of Microfinance Institutions in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Abdur Rahman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the performance of operational self-sufficiency and its determinants of Microfinance Institutions (MFIs and compared their positions in Bangladesh. The study used secondary quantitative data from the MIX market website where containing information from financial statements from the MFIs operating in Bangladesh. Toward the achievement of its objectives the study used descriptive statistical and financial ratio analysis techniques as well as econometric technique on the several performance indicators standardized by CGAP to measure of MFIs performance. The multiple regression technique used to measure the determinants of operational self-sufficiency to justify with yield on gross loan portfolio (nominal, cost per borrower, average loan balance per borrowers, age of MFIs, and number of active borrowers and operating expense ratio of MFIs in Bangladesh. The multiple regression output revealed that most of the MFIs are operational self-sufficiency to operate their operations in this region. However, study recommended for policy considerations of the successful and effective operation of microfinance programs through simplify of distribution of loan, improve yield on gross loan portfolio, personnel productivity and reduces of borrowing fund from the donors, reducing operating cost, utilize resources to generate financial revenue and focused on increase of value of their total assets in Bangladesh.

  3. Transglossic Language Practices of Young Adults in Bangladesh and Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shaila; Dovchin, Sender; Pennycook, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores the use of varied semiotic resources in the linguistic, social and cultural practices of young adults in the context of Bangladesh and Mongolia. Based on a translinguistic analysis (including pre-textual history, contextual relations, sub-textual meaning, intertextual echoes and post-textual interpretation) of these practices,…

  4. Children's Rights and the Imagination of Community in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sarah C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper suggests that sharply divergent images of children in Bangladesh reflect different "imagined communities" of society and polity, local and global. Universal concepts of "the rights of the child" contrast strongly with a local culture of "guardianship", as the key social institution that governs children's lives. How might bringing these…

  5. Compliance with diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis immunisation in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitlyn, S; Rahman, A K; Nielsen, B H;

    1992-01-01

    the vaccine and followed up six weeks later to ascertain compliance with having second dose. Factors associated with non-compliance were evaluated. SETTING: Dhaka treatment centre of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. SUBJECTS: 136 unimmunised children aged 6 weeks...

  6. Neoliberalism, Policy Reforms and Higher Education in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Ariful Haq

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh has introduced neoliberal policies since the 1970s. Military regimes, since the dramatic political changes in 1975, accelerated the process. A succession of military rulers made rigorous changes in policy-making in various sectors. This article uses a critical approach to document analysis and examines the perceptions of key…

  7. Impact of an aquaculture extension project in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, John; Tarp, Finn

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an impact study of key short- and long-run effects of the Danida supported Mymensingh Aquaculture Extension Project (MAEP) in Bangladesh, applying different matching and double difference estimators. Results are mixed. First, the paper finds a positive short-run impact on pond...

  8. Enhanced Ties with China Can Help Bangladesh Develop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihabur; Rahman

    2013-01-01

    <正>Construction of a deep seaport in Chittagong and establishment of Chittagong-Kunming rail and road communications have been a much-talked-about issue following Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina’s visit to China.She went for the trip in the rising economic superpower in one and a half years of her assuming office early 2009.During

  9. Distributing and Showing Farmer Learning Videos in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Jeffery W.; Van Mele, Paul; Harun-ar-Rashid, Md.; Krupnik, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of showing farmer learning videos through different types of volunteers. Design/Methodology/Approach: Semi-structured interviews with volunteers from different occupational groups in Bangladesh, and a phone survey with 227 respondents. Findings: Each occupational group acted differently. Shop keepers, tillage…

  10. Private University Librarian's Experience on Procurement of Books in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Muhammad Hossam Haider

    2011-01-01

    The private universities in Bangladesh are playing an important role in modernizing the higher education system in the country and the role of librarians is also different and challenging. Specially, procuring books and monographs is an exigent function being this lost its demand very quickly. In some cases, titles bear only one semester…

  11. Infant Mortality in Rural Bangladesh : State Dependence vs. Unobserved Heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saha, U.R.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    2009-01-01

    Using longitudinal data of the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in Matlab, Bangladesh, covering the time period 1982 – 2005, and exploiting dynamic panel data models, we analyze siblings’ death at infancy, controlling for unobserved heterogeneity and a causal effect of death of one

  12. Living Sexualities: Negotiating Heteronormativity in Middle Class Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Karim (Shuchi)

    2012-01-01

    textabstract‘Living Sexualities’ is a study of erotic desires, practices and identities, lived within the heteronormative and marriage-normative socio-sexual structures of the urban middle class in contemporary Bangladesh. The study is based on two years fieldwork during which data was generated thr

  13. School drop out in Bangladesh: Insights using panel data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabates, R.; Hossain, A.; Lewin, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relative strength of different factors associated with school drop out using data collected between 2007 and 2009 in Bangladesh. A sample of 9046 children, aged 4-15, was selected across six districts for a household survey focusing on children's school access and experiences. Two groups of children were identified: those…

  14. New Trends in Legal Education at Bangladesh Open University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdousi, Nahid

    2008-01-01

    In Bangladesh, formal legal education is provided by either a department of a university or an affiliated college. There are four public universities and above twenty six private universities in our country with law as a regular subject of teaching. Besides, the National University imparts teaching of law through law colleges in the country. All…

  15. Household Schooling and Child Labor Decisions in Rural Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, M. Najeeb

    2007-01-01

    Using empirical methods, this paper examines household schooling and child labor decisions in rural Bangladesh. The results suggest the following: poverty and low parental education are associated with lower schooling and greater child labor; asset-owning households are more likely to have children combine child labor with schooling; households…

  16. Iodized salt induced thyrotoxicosis: Bangladesh perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, S; Latif, S A; Kamal, M M; Asaduzzaman, M; Akther, A; Laila, Z H

    2009-07-01

    The effects of iodized and non-iodized salt on the thyroid gland and its hormones T3, T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were studied in 200 individuals who were the residents of plain areas of greater Mymensingh district. The subjects were collected from the Center for Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound, Mymensingh. Out of 200 individuals 150 were using iodized salt and 50 were using non-iodized salt. The iodized and non-iodized salt users were marked as study and control groups respectively. Blood samples were taken from both the groups and T3 and T4 in blood serum were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA) while TSH was determined by immunoradiometricassay (IRMA). The mean concentration of T3 were 2.633 nmol/L and 2.223 nmol/L and T4 concentration were 122.444 nmol/L and 110.355 nmol/L in study and control group respectively. The mean TSH concentration was 5.044 mIU/L and 9.622 mIU/L in study and control group respectively. The data indicated that continuous and long term use of iodized salt increased both T3 and T4 and decreased TSH in study group. The results were significant (piodinated salt induced thyrotoxicosis (ISIT) in peoples living in plain areas of Bangladesh. We suggest close regular monitoring of T3, T4 and TSH and urinary excretion of iodine of individuals who are using iodized salt for better management of iodinated salt program in our setting. PMID:19623141

  17. Societal impacts and vulnerability to floods in Bangladesh and Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir H. Dewan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh and Nepal lie between the Himalayas and low-lying coasts of the Bay of Bengal and are traversed by hundreds of rivers and tributaries. Historical data shows that, since 1970, the scale, intensity and duration of floods have increased in Bangladesh and Nepal, causing grave human suffering; disruptions in normal life and activity, damages of infrastructure, crops and agricultural land with severe impacts on the economy. Bangladesh is affected by torrential rain, glacier melt, upstream water flow and tidal surges. In 1988, Bangladesh experienced one of the most severe floods of the twentieth century which aroused significant concern internationally and triggered the Bangladesh Action Plan for Flood Control. The Government of Bangladesh (GOB has so far constructed a number of flood shelters and carried out 482 water and flood control projects involving flood protection embankments, drainage channels, sluice gates and regulators on different rivers and canals. These also provided safety measures against inundation by tidal waves, storm-surges and flooding. The Terai region of Nepal is highly prone to hydrological risks including torrential rain, floods, glaciers resulting in erosion and landslides. The Government of Nepal (GON has implemented different mitigation measures mainly early warning awareness, rescue measure, relief, and post-flood rehabilitation programs etc. Disaster Management Bureaus of both the countries have already conducted many trainings, workshops and seminars to disseminate scientific knowledge and coping up practices to disaster managers and to create public awareness. Besides the contemporary approaches to mitigating flood effects, people of these countries have coped with floods through generations relying on traditional/indigenous knowledge and other local adaptation practices. It is crucial that along with scientific process, indigenous, traditional and conventional practices are to be integrated for a national

  18. Impacts of policy and market incentives for solid waste recycling in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Anne; Ahsan, Mehedi; Marbach, Michelle; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Solid waste mismanagement in Dhaka, Bangladesh, illustrates a well-known market failure which can be summarized as: waste is a resource in the wrong place. Inorganic materials such as plastic or paper can be used to feed the demand for recycled materials in the industrial sector. Organic materials can be converted and used in the nutrient-starved agricultural sector which is currently heavily depending on chemical fertilizers. They are also a feedstock to generate renewable energy in the form of biogas for this energy-starved country relying on diminishing natural gas reserves and increasing import of coal. Reality however does not capitalize on this potential; instead the waste is a burden for municipal authorities who spend large portions of their budgets attempting to transport it out of the city for discharge into landfills. The major part of these materials still remains uncollected in the residential areas and is discarded indiscriminately in open spaces, polluting the residents' living environment including water, soil and air resources, in the city and beyond. Bangladeshi authorities have, to some extent, recognized this market failure and have developed policies to encourage the development of waste recycling activities. It is also important to note that this market failure is only partial: a large, mostly informal recycling sector has developed in Bangladesh, focusing on inorganic recyclables of market value. The fact that this sector remains largely informal means that these actors perceive significant barriers to formalization. Comparatively, the organic waste recycling sector is less driven by market mechanisms. Competition from chemical fertilizers and fossil fuels is fierce and hinders the development of market opportunities for compost and renewable energy. Nevertheless commercial production of compost and biogas from organic municipal waste is formalized and benefiting from policy incentives. PMID:25736579

  19. Perceptions of Firms Learning and Growth under Knowledge Management Approach with Linkage to Balanced Scorecard (BSC): Evidence from a Multinational Corporation of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Habib- Uz- Zaman Khan; Abdel Karim Halabi

    2009-01-01

    The study attempts to measure organization’s perception on learning and growth with the help of Balanced scorecard model  in a multinational firm of Bangladesh.That is to say, in this paper it has been shown how a proper and effective knowledge management can make possible the organization's financial success that can be revealed using the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) framework. Additionally, the perception about knowledge management , its linkage to the BSC and its usage have been identified. Pr...

  20. Impact of NGO Training and Support Intervention on Diarrhoea Management Practices in a Rural Community of Bangladesh: An Uncontrolled, Single-Arm Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Ahmed S.; Mohammad Rafiqul Islam; Koehlmoos, Tracey P; Mohammad Jyoti Raihan; Mohammad Mehedi Hasan; Tahmeed Ahmed; Larson, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: The evolving Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) sector in Bangladesh provides health services directly, however some NGOs indirectly provide services by working with unlicensed providers. The primary objective of this study was to examine the impact of NGO training of unlicensed providers on diarrhoea management and the scale up of zinc treatment in rural populations. METHODS: An uncontrolled, single-arm trial for a training and support intervention on diarrhoea outcomes w...

  1. Human rights, health and the state in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Redwanur M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper broadly discusses the role of the State of Bangladesh in the context of the health system and human rights. The interrelation between human rights, health and development are well documented. The recognition of health as a fundamental right by WHO and subsequent approval of health as an instrument of welfare by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR and the International Covenant on Social, Economic and Cultural Rights (ICSECR further enhances the idea. Moreover, human rights are also recognized as an expedient of human development. The state is entrusted to realize the rights enunciated in the ICSECR. Discussion In exploring the relationship of the human rights and health situation in Bangladesh, it is argued, in this paper, that the constitution and major policy documents of the Bangladesh government have recognized the health rights and development. Bangladesh has ratified most of the international treaties and covenants including ICCPR, ICESCR; and a signatory of international declarations including Alma-Ata, ICPD, Beijing declarations, and Millennium Development Goals. However the implementation of government policies and plans in the development of health institutions, human resources, accessibility and availability, resource distribution, rural-urban disparity, the male-female gap has put the health system in a dismal state. Neither the right to health nor the right to development has been established in the development of health system or in providing health care. Summary The development and service pattern of the health system have negative correlation with human rights and contributed to the underdevelopment of Bangladesh. The government should take comprehensive approach in prioritizing the health rights of the citizens and progressive realization of these rights.

  2. Non-power application of nuclear energy: Bangladesh perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various fields. All over the world, this non-power nuclear energy is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation processing of polymeric materials, non-destructive testing, nuclear and nuclear-related analytical techniques, radiation sterilization of medical products and human tissue allografts, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, nuclear technology in agriculture and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission in the planning and development of non-power nuclear technology for peaceful uses in the fields of food, agriculture, medicine, industry and environment. Both food preservation and medical sterilization of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. Application of nuclear techniques in agriculture is also quite intensive. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. Bangladesh has also made a very good progress in the fields of non-destructive testing, tracer technology, nuclear analytical techniques and nucleonic control. The impact of non-power nuclear energy in selected areas will no doubt be significant in coming years. (Author)

  3. Perceptions of Ayurvedic medicine by citizens in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Harun-Or-Rashid, Md; Yoshida, Yasuko; Alim, Md Abdul

    2016-02-01

    Bangladesh is now facing the public health problems of deficiency of iron and iodine, especially for women. The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of Bangladesh has implemented strong countermeasures to enhance the health condition of the nation. On the other hand, based on the concept of the Declaration of Alma-Ata, complementary and alternative medicine should be used more vigorously to enhance public health in the world. The usage of complementary and alternative medicine such as ayurvedic medicine (AM) should be increased in Bangladesh. Therefore we conducted the study on perceptions of AM by citizens in Dhaka, Bangladesh in order to promote and enhance the effective usage of AM, including herbal medicines as medical resources, from December 2010 to January 2011. This study showed younger citizens (61.1%) did not get more benefit from AM than elder citizens (48.0%). On the other hand, younger citizens (76.8%) did not get more harm from AM than elder citizens (70.1%). We think that in terms of effectiveness of AM, the younger generation in Dhaka seems to be more skeptical to AM than the elder generation in Dhaka, even though the younger generation are more satisfied with AM than the elder generation. With viewpoint of enhancement of usage of AM in Dhaka, we think that scientifically sound information on AM should be collected rigorously and brought to the citizens vigorously to remove the skeptical feeling of AM from younger citizen in Dhaka. In terms of the effective utilization of limited medical resources, AM should be used appropriately in Bangladesh, Asia and the world. PMID:27019531

  4. Jobs, gender and small enterprises in Bangladesh : factors affecting women entrepreneurs in small and cotage industries in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Karim, Nilufer A

    2001-01-01

    Analyses the constraints faced by women entrepreneurs in Bangladesh, followed by an overview on programmes and projects supporting women entrepreneurs, including training, advice on technology, marketing and financial support. Suggests practical solutions and recommendations that could ease the situation of women in small and cottage industries.

  5. Geographic information system (GIS) representation of coal-bearing areas in India and Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippi, Michael H.; Tewalt, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) information may facilitate energy studies, which in turn provide input for energy policy decisions. Prior to this study, no GIS file representing the occurrence of coal-bearing units in India or Bangladesh was known to exist. This Open-File Report contains downloadable shapefiles representing the coalfields of India and Bangladesh and a limited number of chemical and petrographic analyses of India and Bangladesh coal samples. Also included are maps of India and Bangladesh showing the locations of the coalfields and coal samples in the shapefiles, figures summarizing the stratigraphic units in the coalfields of India and Bangladesh, and a brief report summarizing the stratigraphy and geographic locations of coal-bearing deposits in India and Bangladesh.

  6. Distribution system in Bangladesh spurs decline in growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Fertility reductions in Bangladesh have contributed to a reduction in population growth from 2.5% between 1981 and 1991 to 2.3% in 1991. The average density of 800 persons/sq. km means competition for resources in a subsistence level economy. There is scarcity of land, food shortages, and an abundance of labor. Rapid socioeconomic development is not possible even with an average annual economic growth rate of 3.7% because of population growth. Birth control has doubled to 18.6% in 1991. Sterilization is no longer the primary means of contraception. Contraceptive usage increases are more widespread among young women who are spacing births. A recent study reports that fertility declines are due to increases in the expansion of family planning field workers over the past decade. Home distribution is considered compatible with sociocultural traditions. In 1990, there was 1 field worker/856 married women of reproductive age. 120 private voluntary organizations and the government provide contraceptive services. In 1989, 40% of pill and condom users obtained their supplies from commercial channels. This is possible because of the successful social marketing available through 130,000 commercial retail outlets. Nongovernmental organizations have also been given the freedom to operate independently from government programs. The International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research contributed to the contraceptive effort by field testing in Matlab, Aboynagar, and Sirajganj the introduction of door-to-door injectable contraception services and the building of satellite clinics. The information, education, and communications (IEC) activities also contributed to the 95.4% of women knowledgeable about at least 4 methods of contraception. Kantner and Noor reported that 14.4 million births were averted due to an increase in marriage age (from 16.3 years in 1974) to (17.7 years in 1989). Program efforts are being accelerated because of the 45% of the population that is presently under

  7. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become in...... considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  8. Ethnomedicinal plants used by the Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribe of Moulvibazar district, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Protiva Rani Das; Md Tabibul Islam; Rownak Jahan; Mohammed Rahmatullah

    2013-01-01

    Context: Medicinal practices of the tribes of Bangladesh remain largely un-documented. Aims: The aim of the present study was to conduct an ethnomedicinal survey and documentation among the Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribe of Bangladesh. Settings and Design: The survey was carried out among the Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribal community of Moulvibazar district. The clan, according to them, is the only Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribe in Bangladesh. The clan has three tribal healer...

  9. Cost recovery of NGO primary health care facilities: a case study in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Alam Khurshid; Ahmed Shakil

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about the cost recovery of primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. This study estimated the cost recovery of a primary health care facility run by Building Resources Across Community (BRAC), a large NGO in Bangladesh, for the period of July 2004 - June 2005. This health facility is one of the seven upgraded BRAC facilities providing emergency obstetric care and is typical of the government and private primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. Give...

  10. Art of Bangladesh: the Changing Role of Tradition, Search for Identity and Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Selim, Lala Rukh

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of configurations of Bangladeshi cultural identity as manifested in the art of Bangladesh. It reviews the politics of identity and the concomitant changes in artistic forms during the struggle for independence from Britain and the liberation of Bangladesh from Pakistan. It focuses on artistic practices in post-liberation Bangladesh and the evolving current scene, influenced by currents of globalization, holding new challenges for artists. The emergence of Bangla...

  11. Delinking of Local and International Prices: Exploring Competition in the Bangladesh Rice Market

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmud, Minhaj; Wadood, Syed Naimul

    2012-01-01

    We take a broader perspective on the issue of recent price increases in the domestic rice market in Bangladesh. The query that follows is that: what exactly is the nature of competition at different stages of the domestic rice market of Bangladesh? This can be addressed only if we examine the agents, their strategies and incentives at different stages of the rice market value chain. The structure of rice markets in Bangladesh is generally considered to be competitive. But it is entirely possi...

  12. Risk Management Practices in Islamic Bank: A Case Study of Islami Bank Bangladesh Limited

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, Md Akther

    2015-01-01

    Islamic banking industry has been growing rapidly for last three decades. As risk is inherent in banking business it is necessary to develop a comprehensive risk management framework and process. In this paper, a humble attempt has been made to study and analyze risk management practices of Islami Bank Bangladesh Limited (IBBL), one of the leading Islamic banks in Bangaladesh. Annual reports of IBBL and 7 other full-fledged Islamic banks, Bangladesh Bank, the central bank of Bangladesh, publi...

  13. Women Empowerment and Its Relation with Health Seeking Behavior in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Akm Mainuddin; Housne Ara Begum; Rawal, Lal B; Anwar Islam; S M Shariful Islam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Over the last few decades, Bangladesh has made significant progress towards achieving targets for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and women empowerment. This study is aimed at identifying the levels and patterns of women empowerment in relation to health seeking behavior in Bangladesh. Materials and methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 200 rural married women in Cox’s Bazar district in Bangladesh using multi stage sampling technique and face-to-face interview...

  14. Effect of shifting cultivation on soil physical and chemical properties in Bandarban hill district, Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khandakar Showkat Osman; M. Jashimuddin; S. M. Sirajul Haque; Sohag Miah

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the effects of shifting cultivation at slashing stage on soil physicochemical properties at Bandarban Sadar Upazila in Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh. At this initial stage of shifting cultivation no general trend was found for moisture content, maximum water holding capacity, field capacity, dry and moist bulk density, parti-cle density for some chemical properties between shifting cultivated land and forest having similar soil texture. Organic matter was significantly (p≤0.05) lower in 1-year and 3-year shifting cultivated lands and higher in 2-year shifting cultivation than in adjacent natural forest. Significant differences were also found for total N, exchangeable Ca, Mg and K and in CEC as well as for available P. Slashed area showed higher soil pH. Deterioration in land quality starts from burning of slashing materials and continues through subsequent stages of shifting cultivation.

  15. Birds in Kurigram district of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Khan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A study of the birds in the area adjacent to the Dharala and Brahmaputra rivers in Kurigram District, Bangladesh, was conducted between November 2000 and February 2002. A total of 105 species of birds belonging to 12 orders, 35 families and 77 genera were recorded. Out of 105 species, 51 (48.6% were non-passerine and 54 (51.4% passerine, 33 (31.4% migratory and 72 (68.6% resident. Of the non-passerine birds, 15 (29.4% were migratory and 36 (70.6% were resident, while, among the passerines 18 (33.3% were migratory and 36 (66.7% were resident. Of the total (105 species 14 (13.3% were found to be very common, 30 (28.6% common, 25 (23.8% fairly common and 36 (34.3% were rare or few. Out of 105 species, 30 (28.6% were aquatic and semiaquatic birds and 75 (71.4% were terrestrial. Among 105 species, 52 (49.5% were widely distributed in Kurigram, 31 (29.5% restricted only to the northern side, five (4.8% to the central side, eight (7.6% to the southern side, and nine (8.6% species were common in two or three parts of the study area. Among the three canopy categories, 16 (15.2% species were observed in lower canopy, 32 (30.5% species were recorded from both lower and middle canopies, 19 (18.1% species from upper and middle canopies and only one (1% species was recorded from upper canopy. In the study area 37 (35.2% species of birds used all levels of the canopy. Out of 105 species, 48 (45.7% were insectivorous, 11 (10.4% were grainivorous, five (4.8% frugivorous, 10 (9.5% were piscivorous, five (4.8% were predatory, and 19 (18.1% species of birds were omnivorous. Only one (1% was vegetarian and the diet of 6 (5.7% species could not be determined.

  16. Household Transmission of Vibrio cholerae in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Sugimoto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae infections cluster in households. This study's objective was to quantify the relative contribution of direct, within-household exposure (for example, via contamination of household food, water, or surfaces to endemic cholera transmission. Quantifying the relative contribution of direct exposure is important for planning effective prevention and control measures.Symptom histories and multiple blood and fecal specimens were prospectively collected from household members of hospital-ascertained cholera cases in Bangladesh from 2001-2006. We estimated the probabilities of cholera transmission through 1 direct exposure within the household and 2 contact with community-based sources of infection. The natural history of cholera infection and covariate effects on transmission were considered. Significant direct transmission (p-value<0.0001 occurred among 1414 members of 364 households. Fecal shedding of O1 El Tor Ogawa was associated with a 4.9% (95% confidence interval: 0.9%-22.8% risk of infection among household contacts through direct exposure during an 11-day infectious period (mean length. The estimated 11-day risk of O1 El Tor Ogawa infection through exposure to community-based sources was 2.5% (0.8%-8.0%. The corresponding estimated risks for O1 El Tor Inaba and O139 infection were 3.7% (0.7%-16.6% and 8.2% (2.1%-27.1% through direct exposure, and 3.4% (1.7%-6.7% and 2.0% (0.5%-7.3% through community-based exposure. Children under 5 years-old were at elevated risk of infection. Limitations of the study may have led to an underestimation of the true risk of cholera infection. For instance, available covariate data may have incompletely characterized levels of pre-existing immunity to cholera infection. Transmission via direct exposure occurring outside of the household was not considered.Direct exposure contributes substantially to endemic transmission of symptomatic cholera in an urban setting. We provide the first estimate of

  17. Responsive complementary feeding in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Anna C; Akhter, Sadika; Aboud, Frances E

    2006-04-01

    It is now widely recognized that malnutrition can partly be attributed to caregiver-child interaction during feeding episodes. Current conceptual frameworks emphasize the importance of responsiveness (including active and social behaviour), psychomotor abilities of the child to self-feed, and a non-distracting feeding environment. The present observational study had three main objectives: (1) to define operationally key terms such as responsive and active feeding and observe their frequency in a rural Bangladesh sample; (2) to examine whether self-feeding, responsive and active behaviours of the mother and child varied with child's age and amounts eaten; and (3) to determine associations between mother and child behaviours. Fifty-four mother-child pairs were observed during one feeding episode and behaviours were coded for 5 categories, namely self-feeding, responsive, active, social and distracting behaviours. Children were between 8 and 24 months of age. Results indicated that the five behaviours could be observed and reliably coded. Two-thirds of mothers had an active feeding style but only a third were responsive; the two styles did not overlap. With older children, mothers encouraged more eating and more self-feeding, but children did not feed themselves more; instead older children were more negatively responsive (refusing offered food). Positively responsive mothers tended to have active children who explicitly signaled their desire for food or water, and who ate more mouthfuls of food. Positively active mothers adopted different strategies to encourage eating, such as verbally directing the child to eat, focusing, and temporarily diverting. These mothers tended to have children who were negatively responsive and refused food. Children accepted on average 5.31 mouthfuls of food and rejected 2.13. Mothers who used intrusively active strategies (e.g. force feeding) tended to have children who were both positively and negatively responsive, thus partially

  18. Multi-antibiotic resistant bacteria in frozen food (ready to cook food) of animal origin sold in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fouzia Sultana; Kamrunnahar; Hafsa Afroz; Afroz Jahan; Md Fakruddin; Suvamoy Datta

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the bacterial load and antibiotic resistance pattern of bacterial isolates obtained from (ready to cook) frozen food samples of animal origin in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Methods: A total of 20 samples of frozen ready to cook food of animal origin were purchased from different separate grocery stores in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Bacteria were isolated and identified based on the basis of biochemical properties. Results: A total of 57 isolates has been isolated from 20 samples, of them 35.08% were Gram positive and 64.92% were Gram negative organisms. Highest percentages of isolated organisms were Staphylococcocus spp. (24.56%), Alcaligene spp. (17.54%), Klebshiella spp. (12.28%) and the lowest percentages of organisms were Enterococcus spp., Actinobacillus spp. and Proteus spp. Antibiogram results clearly showed that levofloxacin and imipenem were the most effective drug against the isolates. The less effective antibiotics were chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid and resistance was highest against ciprofloxacin. The most contaminated food was chicken nuggets. Conclusions: This type of frozen food contaminated with multi-antibiotic resistant microorganisms can be potential vehicles for transmitting food-borne diseases.

  19. Trends in Growth and Macro Indicators: A Study on Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shahedur Rahaman Chowdhury

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, I examine the actual growth path, the trends of other macro variables, policies affect actual growth path, and policies would help to raise growth in Bangladesh. First, data are analyzed from 1960 to 2012 using regression analysis of time series. The result suggests agriculture, employment, population growth, and last year’s GDP per capita significantly affect GDP per capita. In addition, I make caparison between Bangladesh with other south Asian countries. This result suggests Bangladesh’s performance is poor compared to its neighbors. Therefore, Government should devote considerable effort to improve performance, so that people might enjoy better standard of life .However, reason for poor performance is not clear in this study, which is left for future research.

  20. Epidemiological investigation of rotavirus infection in buffalo calves in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study on rotavirus infection in buffalo calves in Bangladesh was carried out to detect its association with diarrhoea. An overall 28% incidence of diarrhoeal diseases was recorded in rural buffalo calves. Rotavirus was detected in faecal samples from both diarrhoeic (12%) and non-diarrhoeic (3%) calves by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. An association between diarrhoea and rotavirus infection was recorded in buffalo calves below 1 month of age in both diarrhoeic (27%) and non-diarrhoeic (7%) calves. Rotavirus infection in diarrhoeic buffalo calves was found to be highest in winter (16.7%), followed by summer (9.1%) and lowest in the rainy season (7.7%). Further studies on the epidemiological and prophylactic aspects of rotavirus infection should be conducted to control this infection in Bangladesh. (author). 21 refs, 2 tabs

  1. Bangladesh: currently the worst, but possibly the future's best.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Garrett

    2015-02-01

    Garment workers in Bangladesh producing clothing for international brands have experienced repeated factory fires and building collapses in the last 10 years, resulting in more than 1,600 deaths and hundreds of disabling injuries. After the Tazreen Fashion fire in December 2012 and the Rana Plaza building collapse in April 2013, more than 190 international clothing brands and retailers signed an "Accord on Fire and Building Safety" with two international union federations. Full implementation of the provisions of the Accord would change "business as usual" in Bangladesh's garment industry and set a positive example for other countries and other industries with global supply chains. The components, challenges, and controversies of the Accord are detailed in the article. PMID:25816164

  2. Observations of cyclone-induced storm surge in coastal Bangladesh

    CERN Document Server

    Chiu, Soyee

    2015-01-01

    Water level measurements from 15 tide gauges in the coastal zone of Bangladesh are analyzed in conjunction with cyclone tracks and wind speed data for 54 cyclones between 1977 and 2010. Storm surge magnitude is inferred from residual water levels computed by subtracting modeled astronomical tides from observed water levels at each station. Observed residual water levels are generally smaller than reported storm surge levels for cyclones where both are available, and many cyclones produce no obvious residual at all. Both maximum and minimum residual water levels are higher for west-landing cyclones producing onshore winds and generally diminish for cyclones making landfall on the Bangladesh coast or eastward producing offshore winds. Water levels observed during cyclones are generally more strongly influenced by tidal phase and amplitude than by storm surge alone. In only 7 of the 15 stations does the highest plausible observed water level coincide with a cyclone. While cyclone-coincident residual water level ...

  3. FDI, Economic Growth, Energy Consumption & Environmental Nexus in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip SARKER

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to investigate the relationship among economic growth, energy consumption, CO2 emission, FDI and natural gas usage in Bangladesh through co-integration and Vector Error Correction model (VECM over the period 1978 to 2010. Using ADP unit root tests it is found that all the four variables are integrated in first difference. The Johansen co-integration tests indicate that there is existence of long-run relationship among the variables. The VECM long run causality model indicates that there is a long run causality running from energy consumption and natural gas usage by industrial sector to GDP as well as from CO2 emission to FDI. Likewise in the short run a causal relationships have also been found among the variables. Moreover our model is found be error free based on several statistical test. Our results provide important policy suggestions regarding our foreign direct investment, environmental issues and economic growth nexus in Bangladesh.

  4. Analysis and Evaluation of Government-Websites’ Accessibility: Bangladesh Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhra Prosun Paul

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Web is a progressively more important resource in many aspects of life: education, employment, government, commerce, healthcare, recreation, and more. It is essential that the web be accessible to people with equal access and equal opportunity to all also with disabilities. An accessible web can also help people with disabilities more actively contribute in society. This paper concentrates on mainly two things; firstly, it briefly examines accessibility guidelines, evaluation methods and analysis tools. Secondly, it analyzes and evaluates the web accessibility of e-Government websites of Bangladesh according to the „W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines‟. We also present a recommendation for improvement of e-Government website accessibility in Bangladesh.

  5. Farmers' Use of Integrated Soil Fertility and Nutrient Management Practices for Sustainable Crop Production: A Field-level Study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Farouque

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The most pressing problem for Bangladesh agriculture is the current state of gradual decreasing of soil fertility, stagnating crop yields and declining productivity in a range of food crops. According to crop production scientists, Integrated Soil Fertility (ISF and Nutrient Management (NM is an advanced approach that can serve as a remedy to improve crop yields and to preserve soil fertility in the long run. Approach: This study was therefore conducted to determine the extent of use ISF and NM practices by the farmers for their crop production in Bangladesh. Data were collected from 120 farmers (39 landless, 34 marginal, 19 small, 20 medium and 8 large farmers from eight villages located in four districts in Bangladesh through face-to-face interviews from December 2005 to January 2006. Results: Most of the farmers were landless, marginal or small farm holders who rarely practiced soil fertility management means. Medium and large farmers did practice soil fertility management either occasionally or regularly. The use of organic manures by different categories of farmers indicated that medium and large farm holders were more careful about the use of cow dung, farmyard manure, crop residues, green manure and oil cakes as sources of organic manures than landless, marginal and small farm holders. Findings related to use of chemical fertilizers revealed that medium and large farmers often followed the recommended doses while landless, marginal and small farmers mostly applied chemical fertilizers based on their own assessment of soil conditions. Conclusion/Recommendations: Medium and large farmers are more prompt than landless, marginal and small farmers in terms of use of different components of ISF and NM practices for their crop production. The findings of this study might be helpful for the agricultural policy planners both from GOs and NGOs for developing effective crop

  6. Does the Labor Market Reward Easy Certificates? Evidence from Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Munshi Sulaiman

    2012-01-01

    Using a "natural experiment" in the secondary school exit exam in Bangladesh, this paper evaluates the labor market effects of lowering exam difficulty. When exam standards are high, passing the exit exam increases the likelihood of attaining formal employment by 12-13 percentage points (compared to those who completed a similar number of years of education but did not pass the exam) for the male sample and by about 7 percentage points for females. When exam standards are low, these labor mar...

  7. Relationship between Stock Prices and Exchange Rates: Evidence from Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Lutfur Rahman; Jashim Uddin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the interactions between stock prices and exchange rates in the emerging economy of Bangladesh. We have considered monthly nominal exchange rates of US dollar, euro, Japanese yen, pound sterling and monthly values of Dhaka Stock Exchange General Index for period of June 2003 to March 2008 to conduct the study. Empirical result shows that exchange rates and stock prices data series are non stationary and integrated of order one. Then we have applied Johansen ...

  8. Civil Society, Health, and Social Exclusion in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Schurmann, Anna T; Mahmud, Simeen

    2009-01-01

    Civil society has the potential to have a positive impact on social exclusion and health equity through active monitoring and increased accountability. This paper examines the role of civil society in Bangladesh to understand why this potential has not been realized. Looking at two models of civil society action—participation in decentralized public-sector service provision and academic think-tank data analysis—this analysis examines the barriers to positive civil society input into public po...

  9. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE AND FOOD PRODUCTION SUSTAINABILITY IN BANGLADESH AGRICULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Sanzidur

    1999-01-01

    Although `Green Revolution' technology is the major technological breakthrough in agricultural history, which is adopted by nations worldwide, including Bangladesh, to boost their foodgrain production, it is increasingly felt that productivity from this new agricultural technology is declining and is a threat to sustainability of economic development. The present study attempted to evaluate the role of technological change in augmenting aggregate crop growth and sustaining food production for...

  10. E-Banking of Economical Prospects in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Azizul Baten; Anton Abdulbasah Kamil,

    2010-01-01

    Now a day’s due to emerging global economy, e-commerce and e-business have increasingly become a necessary component of business strategy and a strong catalyst for economic development. The new information technology is becoming an important factor in the future development of financial services industry, and especially banking industry. As a third-world developing country, Bangladesh is far behind to reach the expected level in global banking system. So it is our urgent n...

  11. Bangladesh: an Emerging Centre for Terrorism in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Sajjan M. Gohel

    2014-01-01

    This Research Note examines the political developments that have occurred in Bangladesh in 2013 and explores how these have fed into the rise of religious militancy. The ongoing conflicts not only intensify the instability and schisms within the country, but also illustrate that there is a rise in religious militancy that the country can ill afford at this juncture. Furthermore, it highlights how some members of the Bangladeshi diaspora in the United States and United Kingdom have been recrui...

  12. Households' characteristics and the modes of remittances in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    The modes of remittances of households in Bangladesh have been categorised as `No Remit- tances', `Internal Remittances' and `International Remittances'. This paper using a Multinomial Logit Model studies the associations between these modes and the households' basic character- istics. The study reveals that household level variables like rural-urban locations, age and sex of the households heads, religion, ratio of male, adult and young members etc. are potentially significant in households'...

  13. Sexual Health of Women with Spinal Cord Injury in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Huib Cornielje; Reshma Parvin Nuri; Noortje Pauline Maria Lubbers; van Brakel, Wim H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify factors influencing the sexual health of women with spinal cord injury (SCI) in Bangladesh.Methods: This study used both qualitative and quantitative methods. The quantitative part used a case-control design. Cases were women with SCI and controls were age-matched women without SCI.  Questionnaires were used to collect data concerning the sexual health status of women. Multivariate logistic regression was done to determine which factors had an independent effect on sexual...

  14. Chikungunya – an emerging infection in Bangladesh: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Rashedul; Rahman, Md. Mujibur; Moniruzzaman, Md; RAHIM, Abdur; Barua, Satyajit; Biswas, Rajib; Biswas, Pijous; Mowla, Syed Ghulam Mogni; Chowdhury, MA Jalil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chikungunya is an arthropod-borne virus endemic to Africa, Southeast Asia and India that causes acute febrile polyarthralgia and arthritis. In this short case series, we discuss six Bangladeshi patients with chikungunya fever. Though Bangladesh is in endemic zone, it is not common here, hence it demands attention for proper diagnosis and management. Case presentation The six cases of chikungunya we report occurred in native Bangladeshi women with ages ranging from 20 to 50 years ...

  15. Modelling malaria treatment practices in Bangladesh using spatial statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Haque Ubydul; Scott Lauren M; Hashizume Masahiro; Fisher Emily; Haque Rashidul; Yamamoto Taro; Glass Gregory E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Malaria treatment-seeking practices vary worldwide and Bangladesh is no exception. Individuals from 88 villages in Rajasthali were asked about their treatment-seeking practices. A portion of these households preferred malaria treatment from the National Control Programme, but still a large number of households continued to use drug vendors and approximately one fourth of the individuals surveyed relied exclusively on non-control programme treatments. The risks of low-contr...

  16. Municipal solid waste (MSW) management in Dhaka City, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    A.Z.A. SAIFULLAH; Md. Tasbirul Islam

    2016-01-01

    Dhaka is the capital city of Bangladesh, with the highest population density (129,501 people/square km) in the world. Municipal solid waste (MSW) generation in the city is 4634.52 tons/day. This study aims to explore current MSW management scenario which is found one of the most underestimated sectors of Dhaka City Corporation (DCC) – the responsible authority for MSW management. Overall operational and collection efficiency of DCC MSW management is 45% and 60%, respectively. Vehicle fleet...

  17. Inside Productivity of Microcredit in Bangladesh: A Surgical Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Mahmudul Alam; Rafiqul Islam Molla

    2012-01-01

    Microcredit typically refers to petty collateral-free credits given to groups of poor members in the society for their socioeconomic emancipation. It is claimed to be an effective tool for enhancing income of the poor primarily through creation of self-employment opportunities for them in a variety of small economic activities. However, in this survey of microcredit borrowers in Bangladesh it is found that when self-employed family labor is paid wages at market rate, under the framework of ec...

  18. Duration of Breastfeeding and Its Correlates in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Akter, Shamima; Rahman, Md. Mizanur

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the duration of breastfeeding and the sociodemographic factors affecting it. Data for the study were drawn from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2004. In total 5,364 mothers were included in the study. The life table and Cox's proportional hazards model were employed for the analysis of breastfeeding-related data, which showed that the average duration of breastfeeding was 31.9 months. Cox regression analysis revealed that the duration of br...

  19. Ethical reporting in Islami Bank Bangladesh Limited (1983–2010).

    OpenAIRE

    Belal, A.; Abdelsalam, O.; Nizamee, S.

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to undertake a critical examination of the ethical and developmental performance of an Islamic bank as communicated in its annual reports over a period of 28 years (1983–2010). Islami Bank Bangladesh Limited’s (IBBL hereafter) ethical performance and disclosures are further analyzed through interviews conducted with the bank’s senior management. The key findings include an overall increase in ethical disclosures during the study period. However, the focus on vari...

  20. Social networking in Bangladesh: Boon or curse for academic engagement?

    OpenAIRE

    Mouri Dey; Ali Arshad Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    The number of social networking services (SNSs) users in Bangladesh is increasing at an accelerating rate. There are many who argue that SNS usage is destroying the students’ future by diminishing their academic engagement. The authors aim to investigate whether there is any relationship between students’ academic performance and their SNS usage. The study chose Facebook as a representative of SNSs because this is the most popular platform for online social connectivity and conducted a survey...

  1. Self-medication among medical and pharmacy students in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Naznin; Saffoon, Nadia; Uddin, Riaz

    2015-01-01

    Background This cross-sectional survey examined the pattern of self-medication and factors associated with this practice among medical and pharmacy students in context to Bangladesh. Methods The study used a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 500; 250 medical and 250 pharmacy, students participated in the study. As it is a comparative analysis between the medical and pharmacy students, we used independent t test and Chi square test. Results The findings indicated that the impact of s...

  2. Determinants of Customer Satisfaction of Banking Industry in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Belal Uddin; Bilkis Akhter

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate, through the development and operationalized constructs of service quality, service charge, perceived value, and customer satisfaction; customersatisfaction and its determinants of the banking industry in Bangladesh. An exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modeling was used to analyze data. Measurement model and structural model indicate that service quality and fair service charge both havepositive direct impact on customer satisfaction in a mass...

  3. Perinatal mortality attributable to complications of childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    OpenAIRE

    Kusiako, T.; Ronsmans, C.; van der Paal, L

    2000-01-01

    Very few population-based studies of perinatal mortality in developing countries have examined the role of intrapartum risk factors. In the present study, the proportion of perinatal deaths that are attributable to complications during childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh, was assessed using community-based data from a home-based programme led by professional midwives between 1987 and 1993. Complications during labour and delivery--such as prolonged or obstructed labour, abnormal fetal position, ...

  4. Community fisheries management of freshwater lakes in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Middendorp, H.A.J.; M. R. Hasan; Apu, N.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Oxbow Lakes Small Scale Fishermen Project in western Bangladesh is primarily a Social Fisheries Project. The project aims at self-management of the Oxbow lakes fishing and fish farming by members of the local communities and the sharing of the benefits in an equitable manner. Project emphasis is on social and institutional aspects of the community water resource management and on improving the fish yields through better fisheries practices.

  5. Corporate Responsibility Practices in Bangladesh: Results from a Benchmark Study

    OpenAIRE

    Centre for Policy Dialogue (CPD)

    2002-01-01

    This paper aims to provide useful insights in understanding the overall corporate responsibility status in the corporate world of Bangladesh as well as to obtain perception of the relationship of corporations with civil society, workers and the consumers. The study, thereby, recognises the valuable views of the representatives of the civil society organisations on issues such as labour rights, community relations, workplace environment and sustainable development. A set of policy recommendati...

  6. Human rights, health and the state in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman Redwanur M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper broadly discusses the role of the State of Bangladesh in the context of the health system and human rights. The interrelation between human rights, health and development are well documented. The recognition of health as a fundamental right by WHO and subsequent approval of health as an instrument of welfare by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Covenant on Social, Economic and Cultural Rights (ICSECR) further enhances the ide...

  7. Grameen and the Politics of Development in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Tahmina Rashid

    2012-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the countries with a thriving political culture, vibrant civil society and a huge development sector, yet struggling with the issues of persisting poverty as a substantial majority still lives below the poverty line. The development sector has largely maintained an apolitical posture focusing on expanding their outreach, commercial enterprises and access to donor assistance. As a consequence of new economic realities and dynamics of financial markets at local and global l...

  8. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON INTEGRATED FARMING IN BANGLADESH AND OTHER COUNTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, Mohammad Taj; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    This paper evaluates the different variations of integrated farming that are prevalent in developing countries in Asia. A cross-country comparison was done using productivity analysis on duck-fish integrated farming in India, poultry-fish in Thailand, rice-fish in the Philippines, and crop-livestock-fish-homestead integrated farming in Vietnam. The study findings indicate farmers in Bangladesh could add additional components to their on-going farming practices to increase not only the product...

  9. Inflation and Financial Sector Correlation: The Case of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu N.M. Wahid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the impact of inflation on financial development in case of Bangladesh for the period of 1985-2005. In doing so, ARDL bounds testing approach and Error Correction Method (ECM have been employed. Empirical findings reveal that high trends of inflation impede the performance of financial markets. GDP per capita promotes development of financial sector through its causal channels.

  10. Influence of Cobalamin on Arsenic Metabolism in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Megan N.; Liu, Xinhua; Slavkovich, Vesna; Ilievski, Vesna; Mi, Zhongyuan; Alam, Shafiul; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Ahsan, Habibul; Graziano, Joseph H.; Gamble, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a carcinogen to which 35 million people in Bangladesh are chronically exposed. The enzymatic transfer of methyl groups to inorganic As (iAs) generates monomethylarsonic (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acids (DMA) and facilitates urinary As (uAs) elimination. This process is dependent on one-carbon metabolism, a pathway in which folate and cobalamin have essential roles in the recruitment and transfer of methyl groups. Although DMAV is the least toxic metabolite, increasing evi...

  11. Economic growth and child poverty reduction in Bangladesh and China

    OpenAIRE

    Begum, Syeda Shahanara; Quheng, Deng; Gustafsson, Björn

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes child poverty in Bangladesh and China during periods of rapid economic growth in both countries. It compares the extent as well as profile of child poverty in both countries. Comparisons on the extent of child poverty, over time and across countries, are made using a decomposition framework attributing child poverty differences to differences in the three components mean child income, demographic circumstances and the distribution of child income. Child poverty is found to...

  12. Coal mining in Bangladesh: Options to mitigate environmental impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Angen, Meara Rose

    2008-01-01

    This study examines methods of mitigating the environmental impacts of coal mining in Bangladesh. Coal is expected to aid in providing energy security for the country in the short-term. The coal mining industry is currently in its infancy, and no policy exists. This study examines the government policies of three diverse countries and discovers that there are several instruments commonly used to reduce the environmental impacts of coal mining. These instruments include regulations that set st...

  13. Forest-based Tourism in Bangladesh: Status, Problems and Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Mahbubul; Furukawa, Yasushi; Akter, Salma

    2009-01-01

    Bangladesh is a land of diverse forest-based natural attractions throughout the evergreen, semi-evergreen, and mangrove forest ecosystems. The article attempts at exploring various dimensions of ecotourism industry and critically analyzes the relationship among the stakeholders, overall strength-weakness of ecotourism sector and impediments hindering its development. National Parks, Ecoparks, Wildlife Sanctuaries, Game Reserves, and the like have been developed in the natural forest ecosystem...

  14. Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development in Bangladesh (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.; Sandor, D.; Butheau, M.

    2013-11-01

    Bangladesh is widely considered to be one of the nations most threatened by climate change. With two-thirds of the country less than 20 feet above sea level, the intrusion of salt into freshwater wells, frequent flooding, and the displacement of people from their homes is an ongoing threat. At the same time, the country's cities are rapidly growing, and the demand for energy is increasing at a corresponding rate.

  15. ANALYZING AND ESTIMATING PORTFOLIO PERFORMANCE OF BANGLADESH STOCK MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Zobaer Hasan; Anton Abdulbasah Kamil; Adli Mustafa; Md. Azizul Baten

    2013-01-01

    Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) is one of the most important developments in the finance literature. Simply, CAPM is a model that describes the relationship between risk and expected return. The theoretical validity of CAPM is well tested and accepted but the practical validity of CAPM is in questioned. This study is designed to analyze and estimate the portfolio performance of Bangladesh stock market in a CAPM framework. For this study, monthly stock returns from 80 companies for the peri...

  16. Factors Determining Inpatient Satisfaction with Hospital Care in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Laila Ashrafun; Mohammad Jasim Uddin

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify factors associated with satisfaction among inpatients receiving medical and surgical care for urinary, cardiovascular, respiratory, and ophthalmology diseases at Dhaka Government Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh. The data of this study is collected from 190 inpatients by using a patient judgments questionnaire covering 10 dimensions of satisfaction (appointment waiting time for doctor after admission, doctor’s treatment and behavior, behavior and...

  17. THE STATE OF FOOD SECURITY IN BANGLADESH: AN ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Akhter, Yesmin; Rahman, Pk. Md. Motiur

    2010-01-01

    The main concern of this paper is to examine the food availability, self-sufficiency rate and food gap situation in Bangladesh. Attempt has been made to estimate food gaps between production and requirement for the last thirteen years. Future productions of rice and wheat have been forecasted by using appropriate econometric methods such as ARIMA and Holt's linear smoothing parameter approach. Forecasting of future food grain availability, food grain requirement and food gaps between producti...

  18. Review of national tuberculosis programmes: the experience in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaresan, J A; de Colombani, P; Smith, I

    1999-12-01

    Tuberculosis control efforts should be evaluated periodically to assess progress made by national programmes and to plan for the future. Simple and reliable tools are required for such assessments. This paper summarises the methodology and results of the review of the national tuberculosis programme in Bangladesh conducted in 1997. The authors conclude that similar reviews would not only help to verify the reports from the routine recording system, but would also assist policy development and future planning. PMID:10599021

  19. BRAC's experience in scaling-up MNP in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsana, Kaosar; Haque, Mohammad Raisul; Sobhan, Shafinaz; Shahin, Shaima Arjuman

    2014-01-01

    Despite progress in health status and achievements in Millennium Development Indicators, Bangladesh presents a gloomy scenario for nutrition. In 2009, BRAC (formerly known as Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee) has begun to implement a community-based approach of Alive & Thrive with Family Health International 360, aiming to reduce undernutrition among children under two by promoting exclusive breastfeeding and appropriate complementary feeding practices. To address anemia and other micronutrient deficiencies, home-fortification with micronutrient powders (MNP) has been promoted among under-fives across Bangladesh along with the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN). BRAC's frontline community health workers play a critical role in promoting micronutrient powders with better feeding practices. Over the years, improvements have been observed in the intervention areas: exclusive breastfeeding rose from 49% to 83% of children (0-6 months), 86% of children received complementary feeding at 6-8 months with about two/thirds being fed the recommended number of times; and 70% of children (6-59 months) adhered to MNP use, ie consumption of 1 sachet per day in the past 60 days. However, many challenges are still observed in traditional feeding practices, along with limited skills of community health workers and households' poor access to quality food, necessitating constant interactions between caregivers, mothers-in-law and fathers with the frontline workers. Maintaining the supply chain of micronutrient powders and a visible and convincing change in nutritional status of children are key success factors. The partnerships between BRAC, GAIN and Renata, the producer of MNP in Bangladesh, have given birth to a home-fortification model that can deliver impact at scale. PMID:25164447

  20. The vulnerability of the Dupi Tila Aquifer, Dhaka, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, M. K.

    1999-01-01

    The Dupi Tila aquifer in Bangladesh is of national importance, providing over 95% of the water supply for the capital city, Dhaka. The demand for water is rising inexorably. There is concern about the sustainability of the aquifer and its vulnerability to contamination. In Dhaka, the Dupi Tila aquifer is confined by the Madhupur Clay. Natural recharge to the aquifer is by vertical leakage through the Madhupur Clay. However, large-scale development of the aquifer since 1971 has ...

  1. IMPACT OF INSTITUTIONAL CREDIT ON FOOD GRAIN PRODUCTION IN BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Mian, M.R.U.; M.F. Alam; M A Jabbar

    1998-01-01

    This study is aimed at developing a theoretically consistent methodology to measure the impact of institutional credit on food grain production in Bangladesh using time series data from various government and non-government sources. This paper has made use of a multi equation model consisting of a production function and a set of input demand function to determine the impact of credit on food gain production. Elasticities of production with respect to institutional credit were found to be pos...

  2. Estimating Revenue Losses Evolve from Tax Evasions in Bangladesh:

    OpenAIRE

    AKM Matiur Rahman; Sabera Yasmin

    2008-01-01

    This empirical study estimates the revenue losses derived from different categories of taxpayers who used Self-assessment System (SAS) under direct taxation in Bangladesh. Even though a small portion of populations live in urban areas (over 80 percent live in rural areas) that used the SAS in filing tax-returns, they significantly contributed to the problem. Revenue loss due to these taxpayers’ noncompliance with laws of income is a growing problem where the past five year (2000-2004) data st...

  3. An Empirical Testing of Capital Asset Pricing Model in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafizur Rahman; Azizul Baten; Ashraf-Ul-Alam

    2006-01-01

    Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) provides an equilibrium linear relationship between expected return and risk of an asset. The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk-return relationship within the CAPM framework. The study also aims at exploring whether CAPM is a good indicator of asset pricing in Bangladesh. For this the period 1999-2003 have been considered. Fama-French (1992) methodology on five variables-Stock market return, Beta, Book to market value, Size (Market capitalizat...

  4. Determinants of malnutrition among urban slum children in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Fakir, Adnan M S; Khan, M Wasiqur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper analyzes the role of child, maternal and household variables on weight-for-age nutritional status of children in the largest urban slum of Bangladesh. Methods We use anthropometric weight-for-age nutrition status of children for an ordered logistic analysis. Our dataset gives us the advantage of segregating health knowledge into three indices: health-seeking practices index, child health precautions index and medical cost knowledge index, which are used as covariates to ...

  5. Improvement of Deep Tubwell Irrigation Project Performance in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Miah, Md. Mirjahan

    1984-01-01

    A computer model for use in predicting the impact of various improvement options on command area expansion of a deep tubewell irrigation system has been developed. A field study was conducted on 11 selected deep tubewells located at two sites, namely Dhamrai and Thakurgaon, in Bangladesh to collect necessary physical data to provide irrigation engineering insight and a basis for testing and application of the model. The results of the investigation revealed that the actual discharge of most o...

  6. Secondary Educational Institution Centered Diffusion of ICT in Rural Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation presents a holistic approach for exploring, analyzing, solving, and circumventing the barriers to the integration and adoption of ICT in relation to the learning environments of secondary educational institutions in rural Bangladesh. It contributes to the fields of ICT for development (ICT4D) and educational technology in the scope and findings as follows. The current literature lacks a holistic understanding of the complexities of the barriers that are rooted and entangled ...

  7. A Model for sustainable biomass electricity generation in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, A. K. M. S.

    2005-01-01

    Bangladesh, where only 20% of the total population are connected to grid electricity, has a promising scope to utilise biomass for decentralised electricity generation. In this study, sustainable biomass electricity generation model was developed for the country, by combining tech no-econometric and optimisation modelling techniques. The developed model addresses the biomass generation and availability, feasible technologies, cost and efficiency correlations, economic plant siz...

  8. Customer Satisfaction of Retail Chain Stores: Evidence from Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Sohel Rana; Abdullah Osman; Md. Aminul Islam

    2014-01-01

    As retail chain store business is gaining popularity very quickly, people engaged in this sector should pay special attention to the growth of this sector. The present study aims at determining the factors constituting customer satisfaction of retail chain stores in Bangladesh. Customer satisfaction of this sector can be a pivotal indicator of how well the stores are meeting the expectations of the customers. Customers of three big retail chain stores have been interviewed for the study. From...

  9. Use of environmental isotopes to study the recharge mechanisms and arsenic pollution of Bangladesh groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater is the main source of drinking water supply for over one hundred million inhabitants in Bangladesh. It is severely contaminated with arsenic, resulting in a major public health crisis for millions of people. It is now widely believed that the source of arsenic is geological in origin, not anthropogenic. But the actual release mechanisms are yet to be known. The young (Holocene) alluvial and deltaic deposits are most affected, whereas the older alluvial sediments in the north-west and the Pleistocene sediments of the uplifted Madhupur and Barind Tracts normally provide low arsenic water. Environmental isotopes like 2H, 18O, 13C, 3H and 14C are the most suitable tools for investigating a series of problems linked with the management of water resources in the alluvial and deltaic sediments of Bangladesh. Isotope Hydrology of Groundwater in Bangladesh: Implications for Characterisation and Mitigation of Arsenic in Groundwater (BGD/8/016), a Technical Cooperation Project sponsored by IAEA, carried out in 1999-2000. Total 56 nos. water samples from shallow and deep tubewells, ranging in depth 10 to 335 meters, located mostly in south-east, southwest and north-west of the country were collected for hydro-chemical and isotopic analyses. Results of isotope techniques have provided adequate information on recharge conditions and age of groundwater in the basin, that is very important and open up prospects for further investigations using isotope techniques. Shallow groundwaters (13C of As-bearing shallow waters range mostly from -3.0 per mille to -15.0 per mille. Higher arsenic concentrations are associated with higher carbon isotopic values, indicating that organic matter oxidation is not likely to play a role in arsenic mobilization in the aquifer. The carbon isotopic data indicate that the most likely process of arsenic mobilization may involve desorption from the sediments as a result of the relatively rapid and continuing (natural) renewal of shallow

  10. Chemical and environmental vector control as a contribution to the elimination of visceral leishmaniasis on the Indian subcontinent: cluster randomized controlled trials in Bangladesh, India and Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Pradeep

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bangladesh, India and Nepal are working towards the elimination of visceral leishmaniasis (VL by 2015. In 2005 the World Health Organization/Training in Tropical Diseases launched an implementation research programme to support integrated vector management for the elimination of VL from Bangladesh, India and Nepal. The programme is conducted in different phases, from proof-of-concept to scaling up intervention. This study was designed in order to evaluate the efficacy of the three different interventions for VL vector management: indoor residual spraying (IRS; long-lasting insecticide treated nets (LLIN; and environmental modification (EVM through plastering of walls with lime or mud. Methods Using a cluster randomized controlled trial we compared three vector control interventions with a control arm in 96 clusters (hamlets or neighbourhoods in each of the 4 study sites: Bangladesh (one, India (one and Nepal (two. In each site four villages with high reported VL incidences were included. In each village six clusters and in each cluster five households were randomly selected for sand fly collection on two consecutive nights. Control and intervention clusters were matched with average pre-intervention vector densities. In each site six clusters were randomly assigned to each of the following interventions: indoor residual spraying (IRS; long-lasting insecticide treated nets (LLIN; environmental management (EVM or control. All the houses (50-100 in each intervention cluster underwent the intervention measures. A reduction of intra-domestic sand fly densities measured in the study households by overnight US Centres for Disease Prevention and Control light trap captures (that is the number of sand flies per trap per night was the main outcome measure. Results IRS, and to a lesser extent EVM and LLINs, significantly reduced sand fly densities for at least 5 months in the study households irrespective of type of walls or whether or

  11. Menopausal symptoms assessment among middle age women in Kushtia, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Asif

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few menopausal study data available in South East Asia especially in Bangladesh. This study was conducted in a well populated town named Kushtia, which is located in the western part of Bangladesh. Objectives This study was aimed to document the menopausal-related symptoms among middle age women of Kushtia region of Bangladesh. Methods By using modified MRS (Menopause Rating Scale questionnaire, 509 women aged 40-70 years were interviewed to document symptoms commonly associated with menopause. Findings The mean age of menopause was 51.14 years. The most prevalent symptoms reported include, feeling tired (92.90%; headache (88.80%; joint and muscular discomfort (76.20%; physical and mental exhaustion (60.90% and sleeplessness (54.40% which are followed by depressive mood (37.30%; irritability (36%; dryness of vagina (36%; hot flushes and sweating (35.80%; anxiety (34.20%. However, noted less frequent symptoms were sexual problem (31.20%; cardiac discomfort (19.10% and bladder problem (12.80%. Conclusions The prevalence of menopausal symptoms found in this study correspond to other studies on Asian women however the prevalence of classical menopausal symptoms of hot flushes and sweating were lower compared to studies on Caucasian women.

  12. Status of zinc nutrition in Bangladesh: the underlying associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Sabuktagin; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Rahman, Ahmed Shafiqur; Alam, Nurul; Ahmed, A M Shamsir; Ireen, Santhia; Chowdhury, Ireen Akhter; Chowdhury, Fatima Parveen; Rahman, S M Mustafizur

    2016-01-01

    Bangladesh is a country with a high burden of micronutrient malnutrition. Stunting affects 41 % of children aged under 5 years. Zn is one of the key micronutrients that is associated with stunting. The present study, as part of the national micronutrient survey 2011-2012, revealed for the first time the nationally representative prevalence of Zn deficiency and determined the associations of the condition. A cross-sectional 'nationwide' survey was conducted in pre-school-age children (6-59 months; PSAC) and non-pregnant non-lactating women (15-49 years; NPNLW). Multistage random sampling was done in 150 clusters; fifty in each of the rural, urban and slum strata. Data were analysed on 662 PSAC and 1073 NPNLW. Serum Zn was assayed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Zn deficiency was defined as serum Zn of origin Zn (β = -0·13; P = 0·038) determined higher and lower status of Zn in PSAC, respectively. Zn deficiency was highly prevalent in Bangladesh, and it was principally related to inadequate quality of diet. To improve Zn nutrition, Bangladesh needs to strengthen research and programmes related to Zn biofortification, fortification and phytate-reducing technologies in the food system in the short and medium term. In addition, promotion of animal-source Zn for all is important in the long run. PMID:27547388

  13. High fertility regions in Bangladesh: a marriage cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sabina; Islam, Mohammad Amirul; Padmadas, Sabu S

    2010-11-01

    Bangladesh represents one of the few countries in south Asia where the pace of fertility decline has been unprecedented over the last three decades. Although there has been significant reduction in fertility levels at the national level, regional variations continue to persist, especially in Sylhet and Chittagong where the total fertility rates are well above the country average. Using data from three consecutive Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys (BDHSs) this paper assesses how fertility patterns in Sylhet and Chittagong differ from the rest of Bangladesh through a marriage cohort analysis of the parity progression ratios, and examines the factors determining the transition rates to higher parity in these two regions. Three cohorts of women are identified: those married during 1965-1974, 1975-84 and 1985-94. The results show that the probability that a woman from the recent cohort in Sylhet or Chittagong who had a third birth will have a fourth birth is nearly twice that of her counterpart in other regions. Social characteristics such as education, occupation, religion and residence have no effect on fertility in Sylhet and Chittagong. Additional period-specific analyses using the 2007 BDHS data show that women in Sylhet are considerably more likely to have a third or fourth birth sooner than those in other divisions, especially Khulna. The findings call for specific family planning policy interventions in Sylhet and Chittagong ensuring gender equity, promoting female education and delaying entry into marriage and childbearing. PMID:20868540

  14. Unofficial fees in Bangladesh: price, equity and institutional issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, J R; Hossain, N; Hedrick-Wong, Y; Thomas, S D; Rahman, A; Begum, T

    1999-06-01

    The widespread collection of unofficial fees at health facilities is a common form of rent-seeking behaviour in Bangladesh. Typically, unofficial fees come in the form of cash payments for the performance of required services, for direct purchase of drugs and medical-surgical requisites, and for service access. Using observational and interview methods, this study explores linkages between official and unofficial fees at three Bangladesh health facility levels; primary care Thana Health Complexes, secondary or district hospitals, and medical college hospitals. The study estimates payment levels for different income classes and different payor types at these facilities, thereby highlighting potential equity, price and institutional questions associated with unofficial fees. Not only does the practice have clear income and equity effects, there also appear to be direct effects upon patient satisfaction, perception of quality, and the ability to pay for health services. The article concludes with a discussion of 'rent capture' processes at Bangladesh facilities and the effect of unofficial fees in six areas of health sector reform: displaced official policies, reduced merit goods production, upward income redistribution, distorted human resource development, growth of facility inefficiency, and obstruction of market reforms. PMID:10538718

  15. A demographic study on vitiligo (sheti in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Hafizur Rahman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is quite prevalent and constitutes a major psychological health problem in Bangladesh. To determine the effects and extent distribution of Vitiligo among the people, we mainly focused on the sociodemographic studies on Vitiligo in Bangladesh. The patients volunteered in this study were randomly selected from the Skin and Venereal disease department of Rajshahi Medical college hospital, Rajshahi, Bangladesh during 2009-2011. In this sociodemographic studies 125 vitiligo patients of different age groups were carried out. Age distribution, Sex incidence, occupation, itching, life living status, food allergy, social problem were studied. In this study, disease incidence was the highest 44% among 11-20 years age group. In case of sex incidence the female patients were 56%, on the other hand, male recorded 44%. The demographic characteristic showed that the students were the highest percentage (48% suffering with Vitiligo by occupation. Family history was the most important survey in this study. 32% patients said they had prior to family history. The maximum patients had living status of middle class (40%. In this study 24% patient complained about Food allergy and the participant patient also complained the social problem of Vitiligo. Eighty percent patients reported that most of the person avoids them because general people know that Vitiligo is an infectious disease. This study will give the social consciousness about Vitiligo i.e. it is not an infectious disease. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(2.000: 123-128

  16. Population growth and development: the case of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakibullah, A

    1998-04-01

    In a poor, overly populated country such as Bangladesh, some believe that a high rate of population growth is a cause of poverty which impedes economic development. Population growth would therefore be exogenous to economic development. However, others believe that rapid population growth is a consequence rather than a cause of poverty. Population growth is therefore endogenous to economic development. Findings are presented from an investigation of whether population growth has been exogenous or endogenous with respect to Bangladesh's development process during the past 3 decades. The increase in per capita real gross domestic product (GDP) is used as a measure of development. Data on population, real GDP per capita, and real investment share of GDP are drawn from the Penn World Table prepared by Summers and Heston in 1991. The data are annual and cover the period 1959-90. Analysis of the data indicate that population growth is endogenous to Bangladesh's development process. These findings are reflected both in the Granger causality tests and the decompositions of variances of detrended real GDP per capita and population growth. PMID:12294506

  17. Mangrove wetland ecosystems in Ganges-Brahmaputra delta in Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shafi Noor ISLAM; Albrecht GNAUCK

    2008-01-01

    The Sundarbans is one of the productive man-grove wetland ecosystems in the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta in Bangladesh. The delta is undergoing rapid eco-logical changes due to human activity. In the present study, surface water salinity data from 13 rivers of the Sundarbans were collected in order to investigate the sal-ine water intrusion in the mangrove wetlands. Results demonstrate that saline water has penetrated the upstream area as river water salinity has increased signifi-cantly in 1976 compared to the year 1968. The soil and river water salinity data also shows that it has crossed the water salinity threshold line in most parts of the Sundarbans wetlands. These observations are due to the construction of Farakka Barrage in 1975, which reduced the water discharge of the Ganges River from 3700 m3/s in 1962 to 364 m3/s in 2006. The shortage of freshwater dis-charge to the deltaic area is trailing active ecosystems function, especially in the dry season in the south western region in Bangladesh. The objective of this study is to understand and analyze the present degraded mangrove wetland ecosystems and their negative impacts. The find-ings of this study would contribute to the formulation of the mangrove wetland ecosystems management plan inthe Ganges delta of Bangladesh.

  18. Commercial cultivation by farmers of medicinal plants in northern Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. M. Manzoor Rashid

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants (MPs are an important component of non-timber forest products (NTFPs, which are traditionally used in healthcare and source of livelihood all over the world. In an over-populated country like Bangladesh, the pressure on natural forests is immense; thus the cultivation of MPs can significantly contribute towards improving the livelihood of poor people, reducing the pressure on natural forests and enhancing biological diversity. Notwithstanding the growing recognition of its importance and economic and ecological potential, there has been little research on MPs, especially the cultivation, management and marketing aspects, in Bangladesh. Based on extensive fieldwork in a northern district of Bangladesh, this study explores various aspects of the cultivation, management and marketing of MPs. How collective efforts have brought economic and social benefits to communities was also examined in this study. It assesses the major processes and elements of management, identifies key problems and challenges and indicates ways of maximizing the potential of this important sector. The issues covered in this research include: farmers ’ perceptions and experiences; existing research and policy-making processes related to the MP sector; constraining factors (such as lack of processing technology, inadequate transportation, logistics, financial and storage infrastructure, lack of institutional capacity; markets, finance and networking; land use; pattern of livelihood and value chain issue.

  19. Prospect of PET-CT in a developing and transition economy like Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    with rapid adoption of the technique especially for cardiac investigations. Nuclear medicine techniques for diagnosis, management and therapy in most diseases are well recognized by the medical community in Bangladesh. Both in-vitro and in-vivo services are offered by all the Nuclear Medicine centers in the country. In addition to conventional scintigraphy, therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer and hyperthyroid disorder forms the bulk of nuclear medicine services in almost all the centers. SPECT myocardial scintigraphy and SPECT neuroimaging are done routinely in a few more technically advanced nuclear medicine centers in Dhaka. Clinical collaborations have helped to build multidisciplinary teams in areas of major interests such as endocrinology, cardiology, neurology and nephrology. Interactive discussions with different specialists reveal that there is much awareness of new and improved techniques that modern Nuclear Medicine can offer. Particularly the use of molecular imaging with positron-labeled 18F-FDG is maintained to be in high demand in oncology. The pivotal role of PET in the staging of cancer, assessment of tumor response, selection or delineation of radiotherapy target volumes, detection of early recurrence, and as a tool to evaluate modifications in organ function as published in literature are aspects that the clinical oncologist in Bangladesh aspires for in clinical practice. Further the potentialities of PET and hybrid imaging techniques in the evaluation and management of cardiac and neurological conditions are well recognized. Discussion: In perspective of the many problems that plague developing nations such as disease, malnutrition, population stress, environmental degradation etc, one may argue against the validity of incorporating the latest achievement of modem technology into these countries. However, it can also be reasonably assumed that any technology that will save life and help improve the quality of health care is totally not out of

  20. An inter-laboratory comparison of arsenic analysis in Bangladesh. Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducted an evaluation of the quality of arsenic analysis in Bangladesh through an inter-laboratory comparison of the analysis of synthetic standards and field samples. A set of 8 synthetic standards with arsenic concentrations ranging from 0 to about 500 μg/kg, traceable to an internationally recognized standard solution of arsenic, were prepared by the IAEA and provided to the participating laboratories. In addition, two samples of drinking water were collected from near Dhaka by the local office of the World Health Organization (WHO) and provided to all participating laboratories and the IAEA for analysis. Out of the 25 laboratories who received the synthetic standards and field samples, 17 laboratories submitted results to the IAEA for comparison. The reported arsenic concentrations have a wide range with values much higher or much lower than the expected value. Analysis of field samples shows a range of values from 0 to 396 μg/kg. Less than one third of the participating laboratories obtained results that were within about 20% of the expected values (about 60 μg/kg) obtained by a laboratory cooperating with the IAEA (University of Rochester). Results of this inter-laboratory comparison point to a lack of consistency in the analytical results that have been and are being obtained in Bangladesh. More importantly, drinking water wells where elevated arsenic concentrations have been found may in fact have low concentrations. Similarly, wells that have been found to be free of arsenic may in fact have substantially higher arsenic concentrations. The quality and reliability of arsenic analysis needs to be established and continually evaluated in order to identify all affected areas and to provide appropriate mitigation

  1. Water and sediment quality parameters in the Chalan Beel, the largest wetland of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeed, Md. Abu; Hossain, Mostafa Ali Reza; Wahab, Md. Abdul; Hasan, Md. Tawheed; Simon, Kumar Das; Mazumder, Sabuj Kanti

    2015-07-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the status of the water and sediment quality in the Chalan Beel-a major fresh water fish reservoir of the country for a period of one year from July 2007 to June 2008. The mean values of water quality parameters (depth: 214.73±152.22 cm, temperature 27.68±4.26°C, transparency 123±82 cm, pH 9.7±0.47, total alkalinity 137±42 mg/L, conductivity 307±147 μs/cm, total dissolved solids 183±89 mg/L, ammonia-N 0.27±0.39 mg/L, nitrate-N 0.09±0.07 mg/L, phosphate-P 2.01±2.53 mg/L) and sediment quality parameters (pH 7.21±0.35, organic matter 2.59±0.52%, total nitrogen 0.09±0.04%, available phosphorus 5.4±3.6 Meq./100 g and exchangeable potassium 0.43±0.14 Meq./100 g) were within the range recommended for most of the inland fishes of Bangladesh. Although the water and sediment quality parameters except ammonia and phosphate are in the suitable range, the overall results suggest that better management techniques should be practiced in order to overcome the declining trend of associated aquatic life (fauna and flora) of this important fresh water body of Bangladesh.

  2. Value of Play as An Early Learning Instrument in Bangladesh Context: A Socio-Cultural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Nurun Nahar; Rivalland, Corine

    2012-01-01

    In early childhood education the dominant discourse of play-based pedagogy is greatly influenced by a western play approach. This paper examines how play is valued as early learning in Bangladesh. It reports on a qualitative study that explored the understandings of four parents and four early childhood educators in semi-rural Bangladesh. Findings…

  3. Approaches to Increase Arsenic Awareness in Bangladesh: An Evaluation of an Arsenic Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Christine Marie; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Khan, Khalid; Islam, Tariqul; Singha, Ashit; Moon-Howard, Joyce; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a household-level arsenic education and well water arsenic testing intervention to increase arsenic awareness in Bangladesh. The authors randomly selected 1,000 study respondents located in 20 villages in Singair, Bangladesh. The main outcome was the change in knowledge of arsenic from…

  4. Antimicrobial Drug–Resistant Escherichia coli in Wild Birds and Free-range Poultry, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Badrul; Sandegren, Linus; Melhus, Åsa; Drobni, Mirva; Hernandez, Jorge; Waldenström, Jonas; Alam, Munirul; Olsen, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance was found in 22.7% of Escherichia coli isolates from bird samples in Bangladesh; 30% produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases, including clones of CTX-M genes among wild and domestic birds. Unrestricted use of antimicrobial drugs in feed for domestic birds and the spread of resistance genes to the large bird reservoir in Bangladesh are growing problems.

  5. Epidemiology of childhood and adolescent cancer in Bangladesh, 2001-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Hossain (Mohammad Sorowar); M. Begum (Mamtaz); M.M. Mian (Md Mahmuduzzaman); S. Ferdous (Shameema); S. Kabir (Shahinur); H.K. Sarker (Humayun Kabir); S. Karim (Sabina); S. Choudhury (Salma); A. Khan (Asaduzzaman); Z.J. Khan (Zohora Jameela); H.E. Karim-Kos (Henrike)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Cancer burden among children and adolescents is largely unknown in Bangladesh. This study aims to provide a comprehensive overview on childhood and adolescent cancers and to contribute to the future strategies to deal with these diseases in Bangladesh. Methods: Data on malign

  6. Young Adults' Linguistic Manipulation of English in Bangla in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shaila

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed in the print media that bilingual young adults in Bangladesh are subjugated by the colonial legacy of English and they are "polluting" Bangla, the national language of Bangladesh, by their indiscriminate insertion of English in it. However, this ethnographic study on a group of young adults in a university in…

  7. The Role of Pre-School Education on Learning Achievement at Primary Level in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Samir Ranjan

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of pre-school education on learning achievement at primary level in Bangladesh. Evidence from learning achievement test and household and school-related data were obtained from 7093 pupils attending 440 primary schools in Bangladesh. Findings suggest that a small proportion (15.3%) of primary school pupils attended…

  8. Usefulness of plasmid profiles for differentiation of Shigella isolates in Bangladesh.

    OpenAIRE

    Tacket, C O; Shahid, N.; Huq, M I; Alim, A R; Cohen, M L

    1984-01-01

    We studied the plasmid profiles of 136 Shigella isolates in Bangladesh to determine whether plasmid profiles could be used for differentiation of strains for epidemiological studies. Many different plasmid patterns were observed within each species, indicating that many genetically different strains of Shigella are responsible for illness in Bangladesh.

  9. A comprehensive assessment of arsenic in commonly consumed foodstuffs to evaluate the potential health risk in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Md Kawser; Shaheen, Nazma; Islam, Md Saiful; Habibullah-Al-Mamun, Md; Islam, Saiful; Islam, Md Monirul; Kundu, Goutam Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Lalita

    2016-02-15

    Arsenic (As), particularly of its inorganic form (iAs) is highly toxic, and its presence in food composites is a matter of concern for the public health safety, specifically in Bangladesh which is regarded as the most arsenic affected country throughout the world. This study was carried out to investigate the levels of As in the composite samples of commonly consumed foodstuffs collected from 30 different agro-ecological zones for the first time in Bangladesh. Most of the individual food composites contain a considerable amount of As which was, as a whole, in the range of 0.077-1.5mg/kg fw which was lower than those reported from Spain, EU, France, Korea, whereas higher than those of Mexico, Chile, Japan, Cambodia, Hong Kong, Serbia, respectively. Cereals, vegetables, milk, and fish contribute about 90% to the daily intake of inorganic arsenic. Human health risk of dietary iAs was assessed separately for both the rural and urban adults. The estimated daily dietary intakes (EDI) of iAs for the exposed rural (3.5) and urban residents (3.2 μg/kg-BW/day) clearly exceeded the previous provisional tolerable daily intake (PTDI) value of 2.1 μg/kg-BW/day, recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). From the health point of view, this study concluded that both the rural and urban residents of Bangladesh are exposed to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks who consume As-contaminated water and foodstuffs. PMID:26657358

  10. Exports, Equity, and Empowerment : The Effects Of Readymade Garments Manufacturing Employment On Gender Equality In Bangladesh Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    Bangladesh has become known as something of a success in advancing gender equity since the 1990s. There have been rapid gains in a number of social and economic domains, yet by most objective standards the current condition and status of women and girls within Bangladeshi society remain low. Rapid progress has come about under conditions of mass poverty and interlocking forms of social disadvantage, political instability and under-development, overlain with persistent 'classic' forms of patri...

  11. Temporal trends in severe malaria in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maude Richard

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological data on malaria in Bangladesh are sparse, particularly on severe and fatal malaria. This hampers the allocation of healthcare provision in this resource-poor setting. Over 85% of the estimated 150,000-250,000 annual malaria cases in Bangladesh occur in Chittagong Division with 80% in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT. Chittagong Medical College Hospital (CMCH is the major tertiary referral hospital for severe malaria in Chittagong Division. Methods Malaria screening data from 22,785 inpatients in CMCH from 1999–2011 were analysed to investigate the patterns of referral, temporal trends and geographical distribution of severe malaria in Chittagong Division, Bangladesh. Results From 1999 till 2011, 2,394 malaria cases were admitted, of which 96% harboured Plasmodium falciparum and 4% Plasmodium vivax. Infection was commonest in males (67% between 15 and 34 years of age. Seasonality of malaria incidence was marked with a single peak in P. falciparum transmission from June to August coinciding with peak rainfall, whereas P. vivax showed an additional peak in February-March possibly representing relapse infections. Since 2007 there has been a substantial decrease in the absolute number of admitted malaria cases. Case fatality in severe malaria was 18% from 2008–2011, remaining steady during this period. A travel history obtained in 226 malaria patients revealed only 33% had been to the CHT in the preceding three weeks. Of all admitted malaria patients, only 9% lived in the CHT, and none in the more remote malaria endemic regions near the Indian border. Conclusions The overall decline in admitted malaria cases to CMCH suggests recent control measures are successful. However, there are no reliable data on the incidence of severe malaria in the CHT, the most endemic area of Bangladesh, and most of these patients do not reach tertiary health facilities. Improvement of early treatment and simple supportive care for

  12. IMPACT OF CURRENCY DEVALUATION ON THE EXPORTS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON PAKISTAN, BANGLADESH AND INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Shahzad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the impact of currency devaluation on exports of three major economies of South Asian (i.e., Pakistan, Bangladesh and India over the period 1980 to 2012, by implementing the multiple regression models. Results reveales that currency devaluation encourages exports of Pakistan and Bangladesh. Lending interest rate significant negative effect in Pakistan and Bangladesh but insignificant in India. Government expenditure encouraged the export of Pakistan while not significaant in Bangladesh while depress in India. Money supply also enhanced the export of Pakistan, Bangladesh and India. Result suggest that concerned authorities should manage and use the resources properly in such a way which may assist to develop the economies.

  13. Comparative Performance Analysis between Conventional and Islamic Banks in Bangladesh- An Application of Binary Logistic Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Hanifa Md. Noman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to answer the research question of what type of banks between Islamic and Conventional banks are doing well on bank level performance in Bangladesh? In order to answer the research question the study uses binary logistic regression. Using 223 observations of 23 convention banks and 7 Islamic banks of Bangladesh during 2003 to 2013, the study shows an existence of a significant difference between conventional and Islamic bank in Bangladesh on profitability, credit risk, capitalization and bank size. The investigation further finds that profitability, efficiency, liquidity and size of Islamic banks are lower than conventional banks in Bangladesh. However, the results confirm that Islamic banks have higher capitalization and better credit risk management than conventional banks in Bangladesh. The study incorporates some significant policy implications for Islamic banks.

  14. Prevalence and Determinants of the Gender Differentials Risk Factors of Child Deaths in Bangladesh: Evidence from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Md. Mosharaf; Mani, Kulanthayan K. C.; Islam, Md. Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of child deaths is a potential indicator to assess the health condition of a country, and represents a major health challenge in Bangladesh. Although the country has performed exceptionally well in decreasing the mortality rate among children under five over the last few decades, mortality still remains relatively high. The main objective of this study is to identify the prevalence and determinants of the risk factors of child mortality in Bangladesh. Methods The data we...

  15. Hydrogeochemistry and arsenic contamination of groundwater in the Ganges Delta Plain, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, M A; Majumder, R K; Nessa, S A; Hiroshiro, Y; Uddin, M J; Shimada, J; Jinno, K

    2009-05-30

    Geochemical composition and the level of Arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater in the Ganges Delta Plain, southwestern Bangladesh were elucidated. Hydrogeochemical data of tube well samples suggested that the groundwater is mostly Ca-Mg-HCO(3) type with bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) as the dominant anion, though other type waters are also observed. In contrast, the elevated EC, Cl(-) and high content of Na(+) relative to Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and K(+) in six groundwater samples suggest their saline origin. Low concentrations of NO(3)(-) and SO(4)(2-), and high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), HCO(3)(-) and PO(4)(3-) indicate the reducing conditions of subsurface aquifer where sediments are deposited with abundant organic matter. The total As concentration in the analyzed samples is very high (0.0431-1.352 mg/L) along with high Fe (2.791-17.058 mg/L) and relatively low Mn (0.134-1.972 mg/L) at different depths. Distinct relationship of As with Fe and Mn, and strong correlation with DOC suggests that the biodegradation of organic matter and reductive dissolution of Fe-oxyhydroxide is considered to be the dominant processes to release As in aquifers. Moreover, negative correlation between As and SO(4)(2-) demonstrates the As may not be directly mobilized from sulfide minerals like arsenopyrite. PMID:18977593

  16. Hydrocarbon Distribution in Sediments from the Southeast Coastal Region of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biplob Das

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The research deals with the study of the nature of hydrocarbons occurring at the coastal region of Bangladesh to assess the extent of hydrocarbon pollution in the marine environment. Accordingly, five sediment samples were analyzed for extraction of soluble organic matter, fractionation of extract into aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and polar compounds, molecular composition analysis of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons� fractions and integration of results for the study of the nature and origin of hydrocarbons in the marine environment. Hydrocarbons present in the sediment samples might have originated from three main sources: a biosynthesis of aquatic organisms and/or diagenesis of alteration of bacteria, zooplankton, phytoplankton and higher plant derived organic matters; b migration of immature oil seep from deeper sources and c direct incorporation of fossil hydrocarbons discharged into the sea water by various sea-going vessels. The total hydrocarbons in five sediment samples from the study area ranged from 71.73 to 359.21ppm. Recommendations are made to take appropriate measure for the protection of the marine environment from further pollution.

  17. Institutional Interplay in Natural Resources Governance: Toward a Sub-Sectoral Approach for Medicinal Plants Management in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. M. Shahidullah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing the significance of medicinal plants for rural livelihoods and primary healthcare, this paper attempted to analyze institutional interplays in medicinal plants management in Bangladesh. It assessed the governing process of natural resources by identifying cross-scale linkages of the institutions involved with managing medicinal plants. The study intended to delineate the interactional patterns and dynamics between existing formal and informal organizations toward exploring prospects of new medicinal plants governance institutions. Employing case study and participatory approaches to empirical field investigation, two intervention cases of the Livelihood and Agro-Forestry (LEAF and Sustainable Environmental Management Program (SEMP were assessed in two different social-ecological settings of the country. Involving 45 respondents in each site, Focus Group Discussions were carried out, and a total of 26 Key Informants were interviewed. The findings have revealed that undefined roles and responsibilities, inadequate coordination, and weak linkages among the cross-scale institutions resulted in ineffective management and relatively poor performance. Institutions with direct or indirect involvement in the process of managing medicinal plants interacted haphazardly, without much focus on the subsector and its local producers. Addressing the weaknesses, this study calls for formulating a national sub-sectoral approach focusing on strengthening and sustaining local producers and value addition to producer levels. Finally, this research offers a framework for developing a multi-stakeholder forum to govern medicinal plant resources coherently and effectively in Bangladesh.

  18. Screening of Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Freshwater and Marine Algae as a Prominent Natural Antibiotic Available in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mehadi Hassan Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, algae have not been adequately explored for their potential as a source of bioactive substances. So, present work provides the eligibility of algae commonly found in Bangladesh as a prominent natural antibiotic against various pathogens. In vitro screening of organic solvent extracts (methanol, ethanol and chloroform of ten fresh water and marine algae showed antimicrobial activity carried out by disc diffusion method against two gram positive, four gram negative bacteria and one fungus. Marine algal species performed better than fresh water algal species. Green algae are more potent than red and brown algae. Ethanolic extracts are more effective than methanolic and chloroform extracts. Ulva lactuca and Chlorella sp. revealed the best activity among other algal species in all solvent forms. Spirogyra crassa showed very poor antibacterial activity where its antifungal activity was moderate. Escherichia coli was more resistant bacteria in a comparison to others because it showed totally resistant against some algae. Highest zone of inhibition (26 mm was recorded for chloroform extract of Ulva lactuca against E. coli where chloroform extract of Dictyopteris membranacea didn’t show any microbial activity. At the end, it was clear that almost all extracts of all algal species revealed antimicrobial activity against all pathogens. These results give an indication of the presence of promising antimicrobial compounds in the algal species under studied. Further phytochemical studies are needed to elucidate these compounds structures and activity for use algae as an alternative natural antibiotic against synthetic conventional antibiotics.

  19. Impacts of policy and market incentives for solid waste recycling in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matter, Anne [Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec), Überlandstrasse 133, P.O. Box 611, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Swisscontact: Swiss Foundation for Technical Cooperation, South Asian Regional Office, House No. 19, Road No. 11, Baridhara, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Ahsan, Mehedi [KfW: Development Bank for Germany, Bangladesh Office, House 10/C, Road 90, Gulshan 2, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Marbach, Michelle [NADEL: Center for Development and Cooperation, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Clausiusstrasse 37, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Zurbrügg, Christian [Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec), Überlandstrasse 133, P.O. Box 611, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Bangladesh’s industry and population are growing rapidly, producing more urban waste. • Recycling reduces the solid waste management burden of Municipalities. • A wide array of informal and formal actors is involved in collection and recycling. • Demand for recycled materials and renewable energy creates market incentives. • Policy incentives exist, but they only reach the formal industry. - Abstract: Solid waste mismanagement in Dhaka, Bangladesh, illustrates a well-known market failure which can be summarized as: waste is a resource in the wrong place. Inorganic materials such as plastic or paper can be used to feed the demand for recycled materials in the industrial sector. Organic materials can be converted and used in the nutrient-starved agricultural sector which is currently heavily depending on chemical fertilizers. They are also a feedstock to generate renewable energy in the form of biogas for this energy-starved country relying on diminishing natural gas reserves and increasing import of coal. Reality however does not capitalize on this potential; instead the waste is a burden for municipal authorities who spend large portions of their budgets attempting to transport it out of the city for discharge into landfills. The major part of these materials still remains uncollected in the residential areas and is discarded indiscriminately in open spaces, polluting the residents’ living environment including water, soil and air resources, in the city and beyond. Bangladeshi authorities have, to some extent, recognized this market failure and have developed policies to encourage the development of waste recycling activities. It is also important to note that this market failure is only partial: a large, mostly informal recycling sector has developed in Bangladesh, focusing on inorganic recyclables of market value. The fact that this sector remains largely informal means that these actors perceive significant barriers to formalization

  20. Impacts of policy and market incentives for solid waste recycling in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Bangladesh’s industry and population are growing rapidly, producing more urban waste. • Recycling reduces the solid waste management burden of Municipalities. • A wide array of informal and formal actors is involved in collection and recycling. • Demand for recycled materials and renewable energy creates market incentives. • Policy incentives exist, but they only reach the formal industry. - Abstract: Solid waste mismanagement in Dhaka, Bangladesh, illustrates a well-known market failure which can be summarized as: waste is a resource in the wrong place. Inorganic materials such as plastic or paper can be used to feed the demand for recycled materials in the industrial sector. Organic materials can be converted and used in the nutrient-starved agricultural sector which is currently heavily depending on chemical fertilizers. They are also a feedstock to generate renewable energy in the form of biogas for this energy-starved country relying on diminishing natural gas reserves and increasing import of coal. Reality however does not capitalize on this potential; instead the waste is a burden for municipal authorities who spend large portions of their budgets attempting to transport it out of the city for discharge into landfills. The major part of these materials still remains uncollected in the residential areas and is discarded indiscriminately in open spaces, polluting the residents’ living environment including water, soil and air resources, in the city and beyond. Bangladeshi authorities have, to some extent, recognized this market failure and have developed policies to encourage the development of waste recycling activities. It is also important to note that this market failure is only partial: a large, mostly informal recycling sector has developed in Bangladesh, focusing on inorganic recyclables of market value. The fact that this sector remains largely informal means that these actors perceive significant barriers to formalization

  1. The aerodynamic performance of the water pumping wind turbine for Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to examine the feasibility of wind energy for water pumping in Bangladesh, an experimental investigation of performance characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbines has been conducted. Wind characteristics of various regions of Bangladesh have been analysed and hence a compatible design of horizontal axis wind turbine applicable to the pump has been suggested. The wind data collected by the meteorological department of Bangladesh for a period 16 years of 20 stations at different heights between 5m and 10m have been converted to 20m hub-height using power law. From these data monthly average speeds have been calculated. It is observed that for few regions of Bangladesh, there is reasonable wind speed available throughout the year to extract useful power. Considering a particular prospective region of Bangladesh a wind turbine has been designed for water pumping. The design incorporates the generalized procedure for determination of rotor and pump sizes. Thus it can be also used for any other region as well. In this paper, a generalized design for Bangladesh, a nomogram and an empirical relation have been developed for the rotor and the pump size for a particular region of Bangladesh.(author)

  2. Problems faced by Bangladesh in introducing a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The per capita energy resources and consumption of energy in Bangladesh are among the lowest in the world as in the per capita GDP of the country. The need for and importance of nuclear power in providing cheaper and reliable energy for economic development of the country is discussed in the light of this situation. The constraints faced by the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) in the initiation and development of a national nuclear power programme are detailed. Following the liberation of the country in 1971 its financial resources were mainly channelled to the rehabilitation and restoration of the economy. As the size of the national grid has remained relatively small, unit sizes in the range of 50-200MW(e) only could be considered for commissioning. Lack of vendor interest in such small sizes and the difficulty of arranging long-term investment for nuclear stations are the main constraints faced by the BAEC. Other bottlenecks are due to the uncertainty about the nature and extent of future economic development, pricing policy for available indigenous fossil fuel, and national energy planning criteria, which are mainly influenced by the limited financial resources, national priority for various essential non-development expenditures, which use up most of the country's own earnings and foreign aid, etc. Problems that are likely to be faced in future are discussed. These include public acceptability of nuclear power in Bangladesh, the obstacles to the transfer of nuclear technology that may be erected through the prospective growth of a cartel of nuclear-exporting countries, drainage of trained manpower, etc. (author)

  3. Fishing with Otters: a Traditional Conservation Practice in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mostafa Feeroz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fishing with otters has been practiced in Bangladesh for the last two hundred years. This traditional practice plays an important role in otter conservation in Bangladesh. Among the three species of otters found in Bangladesh, only Lutra perspicillata is currently used for fishing by the fishermen in and around the Sundarbans. Noraile and Khulna districts, near the Sundarbans, are the only districts in the country where this species is bred in captivity, tamed, and used for fishing by the fishermen. These fishermen are completely dependent on this technique for their livelihood. These tamed otters are used for fishing in rivers inside the Sundarbans during winter and pre-monsoon. Fishing occurs outside the Sundarbans only during monsoon. The whole fishing system is unique, involving three people, a boat, a net, two adult tamed otters, and an immature trainee otter. The tamed otters generally do not catch fish by themselves during fishing rather they chase fish towards a special fishing net placed in the water away from the boat. Otters start driving fish to the net from different directions and when they come close to the net, the fishermen pull the net into the boat. Fishing with otters occurs at night, mostly between 2100h and 0500h. Fish are captured during 8 to 12 periods by each fishing group per night. The total nightly weight of captured fish varies from 4 to 12 kg. We recorded 176 otters of different age and sex classes in captivity belonging to 46 fishermen groups in two districts. Among these, 138 adult otters are actively involved in fishing. The remaining animals are infants, juveniles, or very old. These otters breed successfully in captivity and maintain their population. Approximately 300 people are directly involved in this fishing technique and another 2,000 people indirectly depend on this method of fishing for their livelihood. This species of otter is conserved traditionally both in captivity and in the wild in this area.

  4. Performing monkeys of Bangladesh: characterizing their source and genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M Kamrul; Feeroz, M Mostafa; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Engel, Gregory A; Akhtar, Sharmin; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Smith, David Glenn

    2016-04-01

    The acquisition and training of monkeys to perform is a centuries-old tradition in South Asia, resulting in a large number of rhesus macaques kept in captivity for this purpose. The performing monkeys are reportedly collected from free-ranging populations, and may escape from their owners or may be released into other populations. In order to determine whether this tradition involving the acquisition and movement of animals has influenced the population structure of free-ranging rhesus macaques in Bangladesh, we first characterized the source of these monkeys. Biological samples from 65 performing macaques collected between January 2010 and August 2013 were analyzed for genetic variation using 716 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA. Performing monkey sequences were compared with those of free-ranging rhesus macaque populations in Bangladesh, India and Myanmar. Forty-five haplotypes with 116 (16 %) polymorphic nucleotide sites were detected among the performing monkeys. As for the free-ranging rhesus population, most of the substitutions (89 %) were transitions, and no indels (insertion/deletion) were observed. The estimate of the mean number of pair-wise differences for the performing monkey population was 10.1264 ± 4.686, compared to 14.076 ± 6.363 for the free-ranging population. Fifteen free-ranging rhesus macaque populations were identified as the source of performing monkeys in Bangladesh; several of these populations were from areas where active provisioning has resulted in a large number of macaques. The collection of performing monkeys from India was also evident. PMID:26758818

  5. Security of radioactive sources and nuclear materials in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Bangladesh, different type s of radioactive sources and nuclear materials are being used in various fields, such as medicine, industry, agriculture, industrial gauges and well logging, construction works, research, irradiation of medical products and food etc. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) has been operating 14 Nuclear Medical institutes and 04 research centres, in addition to other research and educational institutes. There is one 3MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor for production of radioisotopes and research activities. There are also 12 Nuclear Medical/Radiotherapy centres working in Government and 2 in private sectors. Several other users are using sealed radioactive sources for industrial purposes as well. Planning is in progress for a much larger irradiator for material processing plant of BAEC. The country is also considering building a nuclear power plant. The safety and security of radioactive and nuclear materials have long been a matter of national and international concern. Presently, BAEC is working with the USDOE for upgrading the physical/nuclear security system for different radioactive and nuclear facilities in the country to prevent the possibility of radiological threats. The same principles of physical protection to the security management of nuclear material, radioactive sources and the facilities are applied. The physical protection system consists of three elements of detection, delay and response. In order to protect the security of nuclear material, radioactive sources and nuclear facilities effectively, BAEC set up several protection layers for different locations. The detection is the first line of defence technical measures of perimeter detection, access control, video camera assessment, personnel identification are applied. Physical barriers is the second line of defence to delay adversary to reach the targets effectively, the technical measures such as fences, hardened doors, meshed windows, locks, fixed devices

  6. Energy productivity and efficiency of wheat farming in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat is the second most important cereal crop in Bangladesh and production is highly sensitive to variations in the environment. We estimate productivity and energy efficiency of wheat farming in Bangladesh by applying a stochastic production frontier approach while accounting for the environmental constraints affecting production. Wheat farming is energy efficient with a net energy balance of 20,596 MJ per ha and energy ratio of 2.34. Environmental constraints such as a combination of unsuitable land, weed and pest attack, bad weather, planting delay and infertile soils significantly reduce wheat production and its energy efficiency. Environmental constraints account for a mean energy efficiency of 3 percentage points. Mean technical efficiency is 88% thereby indicating that elimination of inefficiencies can increase wheat energy output by 12%. Farmers' education, access to agricultural information and training in wheat production significantly improves efficiency, whereas events such as a delay in planting and first fertilization significantly reduce it. Policy recommendations include development of varieties that are resistant to environmental constraints and suitable for marginal areas; improvement of wheat farming practices; and investments in education and training of farmers as well as dissemination of information. - Highlights: • Bangladesh wheat farming is energy efficient at 20,596 MJha−1; energy ratio 2.34. • Environmental factors significantly influence productivity and energy efficiency. • Environmental factors must be taken into account when estimating wheat productivity. • Government policies must focus on ways of alleviating environmental factors. • Farmers' education, training and information sources increase technical efficiency

  7. Are 'Village Doctors' in Bangladesh a curse or a blessing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahed Tania

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bangladesh is one of the health workforce crisis countries in the world. In the face of an acute shortage of trained professionals, ensuring healthcare for a population of 150 million remains a major challenge for the nation. To understand the issues related to shortage of health workforce and healthcare provision, this paper investigates the role of various healthcare providers in provision of health services in Chakaria, a remote rural area in Bangladesh. Methods Data were collected through a survey carried out during February 2007 among 1,000 randomly selected households from 8 unions of Chakaria Upazila. Information on health-seeking behaviour was collected from 1 randomly chosen member of a household from those who fell sick during 14 days preceding the survey. Results Around 44% of the villagers suffered from an illness during 14 days preceding the survey and of them 47% sought treatment for their ailment. 65% patients consulted Village Doctors and for 67% patients Village Doctors were the first line of care. Consultation with MBBS doctors was low at 14%. Given the morbidity level observed during the survey it was calculated that 250 physicians would be needed in Chakaria if the patients were to be attended by a qualified physician. Conclusions With the current shortage of physicians and level of production in the country it was asserted that it is very unlikely for Bangladesh to have adequate number of physicians in the near future. Thus, making use of existing healthcare providers, such as Village Doctors, could be considered a realistic option in dealing with the prevailing crisis.

  8. Municipal solid waste (MSW management in Dhaka City, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Z.A. Saifullah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dhaka is the capital city of Bangladesh, with the highest population density (129,501 people/square km in the world. Municipal solid waste (MSW generation in the city is 4634.52 tons/day. This study aims to explore current MSW management scenario which is found one of the most underestimated sectors of Dhaka City Corporation (DCC – the responsible authority for MSW management. Overall operational and collection efficiency of DCC MSW management is 45% and 60%, respectively. Vehicle fleet for waste transport showed considerably low efficiency in terms of load carrying capacity and fuel consumption. Residential waste is found potential source of composting. At present, a 500 tons/day compost plant has been operating since September 1998. Worth of recoverable recyclable material is found US$ 82,428,449.9989. Open dumping is a pressing problem leading to groundwater pollution, environmental contamination and emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs. Each day, approximately, 1800 tons of MSW is dumped in the only official landfill site – Matuail. DCC spends 1.5% (601,350 Bangladesh Taka (BDT/day of the total budget for landfilling operation and management. Land required for disposal of MSW in Dhaka is estimated to be 110 ha per year. Clean Development Mechanism (CDM projects in waste sector in Bangladesh are found promising. This study urge to prepare a detailed plan for sustainable MSW management in Dhaka for source separation, large scale investment on composting and Waste to Energy (WTE projects, recycling, state of the art landfill development, and optimized reverse logistic operation

  9. Analyzing The Factors For Rejection Of Leather In Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md.Farhad Ali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leather plays a vital role in earning the foreign currency for Bangladesh. Export of finished leather and leather products have an important impact on the economy of Bangladesh. Mainly cow goat sheep and buffalo leathers are produced in this country. Different defects of leather due to numerous numbers of diseases of animals of poor management of people deteriorate the quality of leather which has negative impact in this sector. This paper analyses the magnitude and category of major defects in case of cow goat and buffalo of Bangladesh. We have studied in sixteen tanneries of Hazaribagh Dhaka where 95 tanneries of the whole country are situated. This study found that in case of cow skin hair slip parasitic skin diseases wound and pox are mainly responsible for the defects in leather in raw condition. Again in case of the wet blue leather of cow flay cut pox mark parasitic diseases growth mark wound sun burn scratch dark mole are responsible for the defects. Further for crust leather of cow flay cut parasitic diseases pox looseness for bating scratch wrinkle grain damage are found as the reason of defects. In case of goat parasitic diseases pox growth mark mole scratch flay cut hair slip were found responsible mostly for the defects in Bangladesh. Moreover parasite pox wound branding growth mark wrinkle jam wrinkle mole scratch flay cut curing have been detected for the defects of buffalo in this country. Again in this study it is found that average leather grade A-D is 15 E-F is 25 G-H is 30 HH is 12.5 and again the rejection is 18.43. It is observed that most of the defects occur during animal life period. The rest of the defects happen during slaughter flaying preservation and processing period of hides and skins into leather. By proper caring of the farm level and at the point of slaughter and flaying desired quality of hides and skins could be obtained.

  10. Emerging equity market and economic development: Bangladesh perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Haradhan Kumar Mohajan; Rajib Datta; Arjun Kumar Das

    2011-01-01

    Bangladesh capital market is one of the smallest market in Asia but the third largest in the South Asian region. A stock market or equity market is a public entity for the trading of company stock and derivatives at an agreed price. These are securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. Economic development is a term that generally refers to the sustained, concerted effort of policymakers and community to promote the standard of living and economic health in a...

  11. Trends in indigenous radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radioisotope Production Division (RIPD) of the Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology started producing radioisotopes for medical use in 1987, as soon as the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor started operation. There are 17 nuclear medicine centres in Bangladesh and the RIPD partially meets domestic demand for medical radioisotopes, the balance being imported. The RIPD routinely produces 131I solution and 99mTc generator and from October 2005 it was scheduled to substitute the import of these items by indigenous production. The RIPD is planning to establish a 99mTc cold kit manufacturing facility by 2007-2008. (author)

  12. GROWTH ESTIMATION OF SELECTED MAJOR CROPS IN BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Yasmin, Sarah; Alam, Shamsul; M. Moniruzzaman

    2010-01-01

    The keen interest of this research paper is to estimate the growth rates of area, production and yield of selected major crops viz., aus, aman, boro, jute and wheat in Bangladesh. The time series data have been used for this purpose. This study covers the time period of 1980/81 to 2009/10. The study was entirely based on secondary data. Growth rates of area, production and yield of major crops were estimated by fitting exponential trend function. Aus, aman, boro, jute and wheat are major crop...

  13. Community Networks and PovertyReductionProgrammes: Evidence from Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Oriana Bandiera; Robin Burgess; Selim Gulesci; Imran Rasul

    2009-01-01

    Whether basic entrepreneurship can be inculcated amongst the poorest in society and serve as a route out of poverty remains an open question. We provide evidence on this issue by looking at the effects of a large-scale asset transfer and training programme which is targeted at the poorest women in rural Bangladesh. We use a randomized control trial research design, and survey all households in the community. This allows us to map the full social network of the beneficiaries, on multiple dimen...

  14. Community networks and poverty reduction programmes: evidence from Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Bandiera, Oriana; Gulesci, Selim; Rasul, Imran; Burgess, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Whether basic entrepreneurship can be inculcated amongst the poorest in society and serve as a route out of poverty remains an open question. We provide evidence on this issue by looking at the effects of a large-scale asset transfer and training programme which is targeted at the poorest women in rural Bangladesh. We use a randomized control trial research design, and survey all households in the community. This allows us to map the full social network of the beneficiaries, on multiple dimen...

  15. Wind energy assessment for the coastal part of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Martin's is one of the most beautiful Tourist Islands in Bangladesh where grid connected electric system for the inhabitants will not be possible to establish even in future. Diesel, Kerosene and wood are the main fuels for fulfilling the energy demand. Solar and Wind resources are the hybrid options for the Island. HOMER, a software for optimization of renewable based hybrid systems, has been used to find out the best technically viable renewable based energy efficient system for different numbers of households -1, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50. It shows that per unit (KWh) cost of energy varies from 48 to 19 taka. (author)

  16. Exposure to tobacco smoke among adults in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Mohan Palipudi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS at home, in workplace, and in various public places in Bangladesh. Materials and Methods: Data from 2009 Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS conducted in Bangladesh was analyzed. The data consists of 9,629 respondents from a nationally representative multi-stage probability sample of adults aged 15 years and above. Exposure to second-hand smoke was defined as respondents who reported being exposed to tobacco smoke in the following locations: Indoor workplaces, homes, government building or office, health care facilities, public transportation, schools, universities, restaurants, and cafes, coffee shops or tea houses. Exposure to tobacco smoke in these places was examined by gender across various socioeconomic and demographic sub-groups that include age, residence, education and wealth index using SPSS 17.0 for complex samples. Results: The study shows high prevalence of SHS exposure at home and in workplace and in public places. Exposure to SHS among adults was reported high at home (54.9% (male-58.2% and female-51.7%, in workplace (63% (male-67.8% and female-30.4%, and in any public place (57.8% (male-90.4% and female-25.1% 30 days preceding the survey. Among the public places examined exposure was low in the educational institutions (schools-4.3% and health care facilities (5.8%; however, exposure was high in public transportation (26.3%, and restaurants (27.6%. SHS exposure levels at home, in workplace and public places were varied widely across various socioeconomic and demographic sub-groups. Conclusions: Exposure was reported high in settings having partial ban as compared to settings having a complete ban. Following the WHO FCTC and MPOWER measures, strengthening smoke-free legislation may further the efforts in Bangladesh towards creating and enforcing 100% smoke-free areas and educating the public about the dangers of SHS. Combining these efforts can have a complementary effect on

  17. Regulations, Policies and Strategies for LLRW Management in Bangladesh - 12368

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollah, A.S. [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Agargaon, Dhaka-1207 (Bangladesh)

    2012-07-01

    Low level radioactive waste (LLW) is generated from various nuclear applications in Bangladesh. The major sources of radioactive waste in the country are at present: (a) the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor; (b) the radioisotope production facility; (c) the medical, industrial and research facilities that use radionuclides; and (d) the industrial facility for processing monazite sands. Radioactive waste needs to be safely managed because it is potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. According to Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Act-93, the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) is the governmental body responsible for the receipt and final disposal of radioactive wastes in the whole country. Waste management policy has become an important environmental, social, and economical issue for LLW in Bangladesh. Policy and strategies will serve as a basic guide for radioactive waste management in Bangladesh. The waste generator is responsible for on-site collection, conditioning and temporary storage of the waste arising from his practice. The Central Waste Processing and Storage Unit (CWPSU) of BAEC is the designated national facility with the requisite facility for the treatment, conditioning and storage of radioactive waste until a final disposal facility is established and becomes operational. The Regulatory Authority is responsible for the enforcement of compliance with provisions of the waste management regulation and other relevant requirements by the waste generator and the CWPSU. The objective of this paper is to present, in a concise form, basic information about the radioactive waste management infrastructure, regulations, policies and strategies including the total inventory of low level radioactive waste in the country. For improvement and strengthening in terms of operational capability, safety and security of RW including spent radioactive sources and overall security of the facility (CWPSF), the facility is expected to serve

  18. Deoxynivalenol Exposure Assessment for Pregnant Women in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurshad Ali

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON is a contaminant of crops worldwide and known to cause adverse health effects in exposed animals and humans. A small survey reported the presence of DON in maize samples in Bangladesh, but these data are insufficient to assess human exposure, and also, biomonitoring data are still scarce. The present study applied biomarker analysis to investigate the DON exposure of pregnant women in Bangladesh. Urine samples were collected from pregnant women living in a rural (n = 32 and in a suburban (n = 22 area of the country. Urines were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronic acid conjugates and to immunoaffinity column clean-up prior to LC-MS/MS analysis of DON and its de-epoxy metabolite DOM-1. The limits of detection (LOD for DON and DOM-1 in urine were 0.16 ng/mL and 0.10 ng/mL, respectively. DOM-1 was not detected in any of the urines, whilst DON was detectable in 52% of the samples at levels ranging from 0.18–7.16 ng/mL and a mean DON concentration of 0.86 ± 1.57 ng/mL or 2.14 ± 4.74 ng/mg creatinine. A significant difference in mean urinary DON levels was found between the rural (0.47 ± 0.73 ng/mL and suburban (1.44 ± 2.20 ng/mL cohort, which may be related to different food habits in the two cohorts. Analysis of food consumption data for the participants did not show significant correlations between their intake of typical staple foods and DON levels in urine. The biomarker concentrations found and published urinary excretion rates for DON were used to estimate daily mycotoxin intake in the cohort: the mean DON intake was 0.05 µg/kg b.w., and the maximum intake was 0.46 µg/kg b.w., values lower than the tolerable daily intake of 1 µg/kg b.w. These first results indicate a low dietary exposure of pregnant women in Bangladesh to DON. Nonetheless, further biomonitoring studies in children and in adult cohorts from other parts of the country are of interest to gain more insight into DON

  19. Deoxynivalenol Exposure Assessment for Pregnant Women in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nurshad; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Al Nahid, Abdullah; Rahman, Mustafizur; Degen, Gisela H

    2015-10-01

    The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a contaminant of crops worldwide and known to cause adverse health effects in exposed animals and humans. A small survey reported the presence of DON in maize samples in Bangladesh, but these data are insufficient to assess human exposure, and also, biomonitoring data are still scarce. The present study applied biomarker analysis to investigate the DON exposure of pregnant women in Bangladesh. Urine samples were collected from pregnant women living in a rural (n = 32) and in a suburban (n = 22) area of the country. Urines were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronic acid conjugates and to immunoaffinity column clean-up prior to LC-MS/MS analysis of DON and its de-epoxy metabolite DOM-1. The limits of detection (LOD) for DON and DOM-1 in urine were 0.16 ng/mL and 0.10 ng/mL, respectively. DOM-1 was not detected in any of the urines, whilst DON was detectable in 52% of the samples at levels ranging from 0.18-7.16 ng/mL and a mean DON concentration of 0.86 ± 1.57 ng/mL or 2.14 ± 4.74 ng/mg creatinine. A significant difference in mean urinary DON levels was found between the rural (0.47 ± 0.73 ng/mL) and suburban (1.44 ± 2.20 ng/mL) cohort, which may be related to different food habits in the two cohorts. Analysis of food consumption data for the participants did not show significant correlations between their intake of typical staple foods and DON levels in urine. The biomarker concentrations found and published urinary excretion rates for DON were used to estimate daily mycotoxin intake in the cohort: the mean DON intake was 0.05 µg/kg b.w., and the maximum intake was 0.46 µg/kg b.w., values lower than the tolerable daily intake of 1 µg/kg b.w. These first results indicate a low dietary exposure of pregnant women in Bangladesh to DON. Nonetheless, further biomonitoring studies in children and in adult cohorts from other parts of the country are of interest to gain more insight into DON exposure in the

  20. Women’s Status and Early Childhood Mortality in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mortuza Ahmmed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article , an attempt has been taken to focus light on the status of women in Bangladesh and also see its effect on early childhood mortality controlling the effect of other associated determinants. This paper examines the proposition that constraints on women’s status adversely affect the survival of their children. BDHS 2007 data have been used to construct indices of women’s household autonomy and authority , which are then linked to longitudinal data on survival of their neonates.

  1. Regulations, Policies and Strategies for LLRW Management in Bangladesh - 12368

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low level radioactive waste (LLW) is generated from various nuclear applications in Bangladesh. The major sources of radioactive waste in the country are at present: (a) the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor; (b) the radioisotope production facility; (c) the medical, industrial and research facilities that use radionuclides; and (d) the industrial facility for processing monazite sands. Radioactive waste needs to be safely managed because it is potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. According to Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Act-93, the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) is the governmental body responsible for the receipt and final disposal of radioactive wastes in the whole country. Waste management policy has become an important environmental, social, and economical issue for LLW in Bangladesh. Policy and strategies will serve as a basic guide for radioactive waste management in Bangladesh. The waste generator is responsible for on-site collection, conditioning and temporary storage of the waste arising from his practice. The Central Waste Processing and Storage Unit (CWPSU) of BAEC is the designated national facility with the requisite facility for the treatment, conditioning and storage of radioactive waste until a final disposal facility is established and becomes operational. The Regulatory Authority is responsible for the enforcement of compliance with provisions of the waste management regulation and other relevant requirements by the waste generator and the CWPSU. The objective of this paper is to present, in a concise form, basic information about the radioactive waste management infrastructure, regulations, policies and strategies including the total inventory of low level radioactive waste in the country. For improvement and strengthening in terms of operational capability, safety and security of RW including spent radioactive sources and overall security of the facility (CWPSF), the facility is expected to serve

  2. Assessing groundwater stoichiometric composition and its suitability in Northwestern Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Jahidul Islam; Abdul Hakim; Mohamed Musa Hanafi; Abdul Shukor Juraimi; Ratna Rani Sarkar; AKM Mosharof Hossain; Indira Chowdhury; Jafor Ali; Abul Kashem

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality analyses included pH, EC, cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Fe3+ and As3+), anions (CO32-, HCO3-, NO3-, SO42-, PO43- and Cl-) and TDS of northwestern Bangladesh. The samples contained Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ as the dominant cations and HCO3- and Cl- were the dominant anions. Ratios of major cations and anions of water samples suggest the predominance of Ca and Mg-containing minerals over Na-containing minerals. According to TDS and SAR values, all samples were cla...

  3. Long-term socioeconomic impacts of flooding in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jina, A.

    2013-05-01

    Natural disasters lead to myriad negative impacts upon society, causing loss of life, property, and income. Among disasters, floods annually affect the most people, and lead to widespread negative outcomes, particularly in developing countries. While immediate effects of disasters are readily observed, long-term socioeconomic effects have received little attention. Recent work in development economics finds that environmental exposure in early life can have negative impacts upon later outcomes in health, education, and labor markets. Such research is problematic for disasters, however, as objective measurements of hazard exposure are difficult to obtain. This study develops a remote sensing method to detect flooding in Bangladesh, one of the most flood-prone countries, using MODIS 8-day composite data. This approach addresses one of the main problems in the literature on the social impacts of disasters by deriving an objective measure rather than using self-reported damages. Flood data from 2000-2012 is matched to geolocated social surveys conducted by the Bangladesh government to identify impacts of exposure to floods at critical periods of life. While flooding is noted to be a natural and important part of ecosystem functioning in Bangladesh, we aim to understand the impacts of a flood of greater than normal magnitude or abnormal timing to identify the effects on human capital formation. We find that an increase in flooding of one standard deviation (SD) above the mean in the birth month leads to a 3% increase in stunting (2 SD below cohort height). This has implications for physical and cognitive development, shown elsewhere to persist to adulthood. We find that children from households that are exposed to floods while in elementary school are more likely to drop out. Other impacts will be identified in the course of this research. The stated impacts suggest that the long-term health and economic fortunes of the rural poor in Bangladesh are significantly

  4. Is Knowledge Shared within Households? Theory and Evidence for Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik Basu; Ambar Narayan; Martin Ravallion

    2001-01-01

    A member of a collective-action household may or may not share knowledge with others in that household. Shared income gains from shared knowledge may well be offset by a shift in the balance of power within the family. Using household survey data for Bangladesh we find strong external effects of education on individual earnings. Holding a range of personal attributes constant, an illiterate adult earns significantly more in the non-farm economy when living in a family with at least one litera...

  5. Genesis of avian influenza H9N2 in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; Alam, SMRabiul; Hasan, MKamrul; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2014-12-01

    Avian influenza subtype H9N2 is endemic in many bird species in Asia and the Middle East and has contributed to the genesis of H5N1, H7N9 and H10N8, which are potential pandemic threats. H9N2 viruses that have spread to Bangladesh have acquired multiple gene segments from highly pathogenic (HP) H7N3 viruses that are presumably in Pakistan and currently cocirculate with HP H5N1. However, the source and geographic origin of these H9N2 viruses are not clear. We characterized the complete genetic sequences of 37 Bangladeshi H9N2 viruses isolated in 2011-2013 and investigated their inter- and intrasubtypic genetic diversities by tracing their genesis in relationship to other H9N2 viruses isolated from neighboring countries. H9N2 viruses in Bangladesh are homogenous with several mammalian host-specific markers and are a new H9N2 sublineage wherein the hemagglutinin (HA) gene is derived from an Iranian H9N2 lineage (Mideast_B Iran), the neuraminidase (NA) and polymerase basic 2 (PB2) genes are from Dubai H9N2 (Mideast_C Dubai), and the non-structural protein (NS), nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein (MP), polymerase acidic (PA) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1) genes are from HP H7N3 originating from Pakistan. Different H9N2 genotypes that were replaced in 2006 and 2009 by other reassortants have been detected in Bangladesh. Phylogenetic and molecular analyses suggest that the current genotype descended from the prototypical H9N2 lineage (G1), which circulated in poultry in China during the late 1990s and came to Bangladesh via the poultry trade within the Middle East, and that this genotype subsequently reassorted with H7N3 and H9N2 lineages from Pakistan and spread throughout India. Thus, continual surveillance of Bangladeshi HP H5N1, H7N3 and H9N2 is warranted to identify further evolution and adaptation to humans. PMID:26038507

  6. The Determinants of Worker Remittance in Terms of Foreign Factors: The Case of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Rezwanul Hasan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the determinants of worker remittance of Bangladesh. Instead of traditional approach of estimating the remittance determinants, here we propose to use foreign macroeconomic indicators as a proxy determinant to avoid endogeneity. We also used panel estimation technique in our study to incorporate country specific heterogeneity of remittance inflow of Bangladesh. According our study any changes in the number of labor force, consumer price index, export, import, government expenditure and devaluation or appreciation of host countries (origin of the remittance income currency can significantly influence the inward remittance income of Bangladesh.

  7. Representation and Dissemination of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Bangladesh through Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Chowdhury, MD Saiful Alam

    2016-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the next eleven countries and home to more than 160 million people. The country is experiencing an exponential growth of social media users due to the increase in affordability of smartphones, literacy rate, education level, and adoption of Internet services and applications....... Bangladesh, with its digital agenda, has a favorable environment for the transformation and development of digital media and culture. There exists unexplored, assumably underutilized, and potential roles of Internet-mediated communication about the two nominated ICH of Bangladesh. Towards the goal of...

  8. ROLE OF PLANTS FOUND IN NORTH EAST INDIA AND BANGLADESH IN CONTROLLING POPULATION GROWTH

    OpenAIRE

    Jhimly Das; Hasina Akther; Robert Stawarz; Manabendra Dutta Choudhury; Shubhadeep Roychoudhury

    2014-01-01

    Being part of the Indian subcontinent both the North Eastern region of India and the Bangladesh share a long common cultural, economic and political history. One of the most critical problems of developing countries like India as well as Bangladesh is their enormous increase in human population. Contraceptive Prevalence Rate (CPR) of India is 48.3 and that of Bangladesh is 53.8. As the large majority of population of both the countries belong to rural area, the family planning programmes have...

  9. What is cholera? A preliminary study on caretakers knowledge in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamason, Charlotte Crim; Tulsiani, Suhella; Amin Hoque, Bilqis;

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cholera has afflicted the Indian sub-continent for centuries, predominantly in West Bengal and modern-day Bangladesh. This preliminary study aims to understand the current level of knowledge of cholera in female Bangladeshi caretakers, which is important in the outcome of the...... disease and its spread. A pilot study was conducted among 85 women in Bangladesh using qualitative questionnaires to explore the ability of female caretakers in identifying cholera and its transmission. Findings: The survey revealed that though all the female caretakers were aware of the term “cholera....... Keywords: Bangladesh, Cholera, Diarrhea, Qualitative research, Social stigma...

  10. Nutrient composition of important fish species in Bangladesh and potential contribution to recommended nutrient intakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogard, Jessica R.; Thilsted, Shakuntala H.; Marks, Geoffrey C.;

    2015-01-01

    Fish, in Bangladesh where malnutrition remains a significant development challenge, is an irreplaceable animal-source food in the diet of millions. However, existing data on the nutrient composition of fish do not reflect the large diversity available and have focused on only a few select nutrients....... The purpose of this study was to fill the gaps in existing data on the nutrient profiles of common fish in Bangladesh by analysing the proximate, vitamin, mineral and fatty acid composition of 55 fish, shrimp and prawn species from inland capture, aquaculture and marine capture fisheries. When...... small indigenous species, which should guide policy and programmes to improve food and nutrition security in Bangladesh....

  11. Geostatistical analysis of arsenic concentration in groundwater in Bangladesh using disjunctive kriging

    OpenAIRE

    Gaus, I.; Kinniburgh, D.G.; Talbot, J. C.; Webster, R

    2003-01-01

    The National Hydrochemical Survey of Bangladesh sampled the water from 3,534 tube wells for arsenic throughout most of Bangladesh. It showed that 27% of the shallow tube wells (less than 150 m deep) and 1% of the deep tube wells (more than 150 m deep) exceeded the Bangladesh standard for arsenic in drinking water (50 µg L–1). Statistical analyses revealed the main characteristics of the arsenic distribution. Concentrations ranged from less than the detection limit (0.5 µg L–1), to as much as ...

  12. Undiagnosed hypertension in a rural district in Bangladesh: The Bangladesh Population-based Diabetes and Eye Study (BPDES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, F M A; Bhuiyan, A; Chakrabarti, R; Rahman, M A; Kanagasingam, Y; Hiller, J E

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension is mainly asymptomatic and remains undiagnosed until the disease progresses. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for hypertension in rural Bangladesh. Using a population-based cluster random sampling strategy, 3096 adults aged ⩾30 years were recruited from a rural district in Bangladesh. Data collected included two blood pressure (BP) measurements, fasting blood glucose, socio-demographic and anthropometric measurements. Hypertension was defined as systolic BP (SBP) ⩾140 mm Hg or diastolic BP (DBP) ⩾90 mm Hg or self-reported diagnosed hypertension. Logistic regression techniques were used for data analyses. The crude prevalence of hypertension was 40% (95% confidence interval (CI) 38-42%) of which 82% were previously undiagnosed. People from lower socio-economic status (SES) had a significantly higher percentage of undiagnosed hypertension compared with people with higher SES (Plevel compared with no education had a higher prevalence of hypertension (odds ratio 2.34, 95% CI 1.49-3.69). Older age and waist circumference in both genders, and diabetes, lack of physical activity in females were found to be associated with higher prevalence of hypertension. Our research suggests the prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension was higher in the rural area in Bangladesh than that reported from the rural area in neighbouring India and China. Lower SES was associated with a higher risk of undiagnosed hypertension. Public health programs at the grass-roots level must emphasise the provision of primary care and preventive services in managing this non-communicable disease. PMID:26108363

  13. 137Cs-uptake into wheat (Triticum vulgare) plants from five representative soils of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monira, B; Ullah, S M; Mollah, A S; Chowdhury, N

    2005-05-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the uptake of 137Cs by wheat grown in five representative soils of Bangladesh having different soil characteristics. Artificial application of 137Cs increased the activity in soils up to 45.9 Bq/kg soil, measured at the end of the harvest of wheat crop. Different plant parts had different ability to accumulate 137Cs. Grains had the least activity and transfer factor, while the highest activity and lowest transfer factor were measured in roots, which restricted translocation of 137Cs to wheat straw. The result showed that the transfer factors (mean value) varied from 0.05 to 0.114 in wheat straw, 0.066-0.133 in roots and 0.011-0.043 in wheat grains. The activity and transfer factor of radioactive cesium in wheat plants were found to be greatly influenced by soil properties, i.e. clay content, K, organic matter, CEC, pH, exchangeable ions, etc. Cation exchange capacity and calcium in soils influenced positively, while clay minerals, exchangeable K and organic matter, negatively affected the 137Cs activity concentrations in wheat plants. PMID:15931978

  14. Impact of tannery effluents on the aquatic environment of the Buriganga River in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaduzzaman, Mohammad; Hasan, Imtiaj; Rajia, Sultana; Khan, Nazneen; Kabir, Kazi Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    This study presents an overview of the existence and effects of six heavy metals, chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), manganese (Mn), and aluminum (Al), in tannery effluents released to the Buriganga River in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The pollutants were found in three different sources, such as effluents from tanneries, contaminated river water and three species of fish-climbing perch (Anabas testudineus), spotted snakehead (Channa punctata), and Black tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) caught from the river. Tannery effluents, water, and fish samples were collected from three different factories, five sample stations, and three different harvesting points, respectively. Effluents from all three factories contained significant amounts of heavy metals, especially Cr (374.19 ppm in average), whereas lesser amounts were found in the tissues of the three fish species studied. The trends in tissue elemental concentrations of fish were Cr > Pb > Al > Hg > Mn > Cd. In most cases (Cr, Cd, Mn, and Al), heavy metal concentrations were found to be greater in climbing perch than in Black tilapia and spotted snakehead. Although the river water contained high concentrations of harmful heavy metals, the fish species under study had concentrations well below the permissible Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization levels for those metals and seemed to be safe for human consumption. PMID:25216801

  15. Between affiliation and autonomy: navigating pathways of women's empowerment and gender justice in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeer, Naila

    2011-01-01

    Inasmuch as women's subordinate status is a product of the patriarchal structures of constraint that prevail in specific contexts, pathways of women's empowerment are likely to be "path dependent." They will be shaped by women's struggles to act on the constraints that prevail in their societies, as much by what they seek to defend as by what they seek to change. The universal value that many feminists claim for individual autonomy may not therefore have the same purchase in all contexts. This article examines processes of empowerment as they play out in the lives of women associated with social mobilization organizations in the specific context of rural Bangladesh. It draws on their narratives to explore the collective strategies through which these organizations sought to empower the women and how they in turn drew on their newly established "communities of practice" to navigate their own pathways to wider social change. It concludes that while the value attached to social affiliations by the women in the study is clearly a product of the societies in which they have grown up, it may be no more context-specific than the apparently universal value attached to individual autonomy by many feminists. PMID:21898946

  16. Ebola Virus Disease – Global Scenario & Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Md Rezwanur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD), caused by one of the Ebola virus strains is an acute, serious illness which is often fatal when untreated. EVD, previously known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a rare and deadly disease. It first appeared in 1976 in two simultaneous outbreaks, one in Nzara, Sudan, and the other in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. The latter occurred in a village near the Ebola River, from which the disease takes its name.1,2 On March 23, 2014, the World Health Organization ...

  17. Corruption in cyclone preparedness and relief efforts in coastal Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmud, Tanvir; Prowse, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This article seeks to draw possible lessons for adaptation programmes in Bangladesh by examining whether cyclone preparedness and relief interventions are subject to corrupt practices. Based on a random sample survey of 278 households, three focus-group discussions and seven key-informant intervi......This article seeks to draw possible lessons for adaptation programmes in Bangladesh by examining whether cyclone preparedness and relief interventions are subject to corrupt practices. Based on a random sample survey of 278 households, three focus-group discussions and seven key......-informant interviews, the article investigates the nature and extent of corruption in pre- and post-disaster interventions in Khulna before and after Cyclone Aila in May 2009. Ninety nine percent of households reported losses from corrupt practices. Post-disaster interventions (such as food aid and public works...... schemes) suffered from greater levels, and worse types, of corruption than pre-disaster interventions (such as cyclone warning systems and disaster-preparedness training). Using an asset index created using principal component analysis, the article assesses how corruption affected wealth quartiles. Ultra...

  18. Women's experiences with medication for menstrual regulation in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Heather M; Biswas, Kamal; Griffin, Risa; Menzel, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Menstrual regulation has been legal in Bangladesh since 1974, but the use of medication for menstrual regulation is new. In this study, we sought to understand women's experiences using medication for menstrual regulation in Bangladesh. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with rural and urban women between December 2013 and February 2014. All interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, translated, computer recorded and coded for analysis. The majority of women in our study had had positive experiences with medication for menstrual regulation and successful outcomes, regardless of whether they obtained their medication from medicine sellers/pharmacies, doctors or clinics. Women were strongly influenced by health providers when deciding which method to use. There is a need to educate not only women of reproductive age, but also communities as a whole, about medication for menstrual regulation, with a particular emphasis on cost and branding the medication. Continued efforts to improve counselling by providers about the dose, medication and side-effects of medication for menstrual regulation, along with education of the community about medication as an option for menstrual regulation, will help to de-stigmatise the procedure and the women who seek it. PMID:26529099

  19. Prospects of biomass energy in Bangladesh: an alternative development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomass plays an important and complex role in the lives of the people of rural Bangladesh, where more than 80 per cent of the country's population live. The problems relating to biomass do not have to do merely with the question of supply of wood, or of food or of fuel; the problems are linked to competition in the variegations of land-use and to differing end-uses of by-products that may compete with or complement each other. The paper discusses the present pattern and amount of biomass consumption with a view to assessing the future prospect of biomass supply in meeting various needs. Regarding biomass energy supply, several important conclusions can be drawn: a) the energy consumption pattern in Bangladesh is characterized by heavy dependence on traditional fuel; b) the domestic sector uses 80 per cent of the total biomass fuel and c) in the industrial sector, about 76 per cent of the energy used consists of biomass fuel, mainly for processing agricultural products. Several observations are made pertaining to different sectors of biomass fuel demand. (author)

  20. Floristic composition and management of cropland agroforest in southwestern Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. Hasanuzzaman; Mahmood Hossain; Mustafa Saroar

    2014-01-01

    Cropland agroforest is an important production system in the southwest region of Bangladesh. This study focused on the floristic composition and management of existing cropland agroforests. A total of 313 cropland agroforests were surveyed and 83%respondents practiced pure agroforestry while the remaining 17% practiced agroforestry with fisheries. A total of 18 forest trees and 2 shrubs were recorded from 11 families and 59 species of agricultural crops were from 28 families. A higher proportion (79%) of cropland agroforests were occupied small land areas (0.12-0.80 ha). About 63% of respondents planted trees for fruit production and 47%for timber production, and 35%of respondents engaged in commercial production (35%). Swietenia macrophylla was the most prevalent species (relative prevalence 20.83) followed by Man-gifera indica (relative prevalence 15.57) and Cocos nucifera (relative prevalence 7.08). Shorter spacing was used for timber and fuel wood species and wider spacing for fruit trees. A wide range of rotation periods, from 5 to 25 years, was observed for both cases. The use of chemical fertilizer was highest followed by cow dung and compost in cropland agroforests. Overall management practices of cropland agroforest in southwest Bangladesh were determined by the end product and local demand.

  1. Arsenic incorporation into authigenic pyrite, Bengal Basin sediment, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowers, H.A.; Breit, G.N.; Foster, A.L.; Whitney, J.; Yount, J.; Uddin, Md. N.; Muneem, Ad. A.

    2007-01-01

    Sediment from two deep boreholes (???400 m) approximately 90 km apart in southern Bangladesh was analyzed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), total chemical analyses, chemical extractions, and electron probe microanalysis to establish the importance of authigenic pyrite as a sink for arsenic in the Bengal Basin. Authigenic framboidal and massive pyrite (median values 1500 and 3200 ppm As, respectively), is the principal arsenic residence in sediment from both boreholes. Although pyrite is dominant, ferric oxyhydroxides and secondary iron phases contain a large fraction of the sediment-bound arsenic between approximately 20 and 100 m, which is the depth range of wells containing the greatest amount of dissolved arsenic. The lack of pyrite in this interval is attributed to rapid sediment deposition and a low sulfur flux from riverine and atmospheric sources. The ability of deeper aquifers (>150 m) to produce ground water with low dissolved arsenic in southern Bangladesh reflects adequate sulfur supplies and sufficient time to redistribute the arsenic into pyrite during diagenesis.

  2. Practicing governance: pitfalls and potentials - a study of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Rubayet RAHAMAN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Governance is a manner of undertaking activities performed for a state’s people by the state’s government to ensure development. Hence, it has scope of having conflicts between state policy and government bodies resulting poor quality of governance: abuse of rule of law, bureaucratic discrimination, corruption, poverty, inequality, low level of human resource development, low level of per capita income, poor utilization of country resources, etc. The reason for conflicts is poor governance vis-à-vis the result from poor governance, i.e., as there has conflict, there exists poor governance and at the same time as there exists poor governance, there has conflict. On the other hand, interrelationships between state policy and government bodies assist ensuring good governance: participatory, consensus oriented, transparent and accountable, equitable and efficient, etc. Developing nations like Bangladesh require having good governance in their countries for promoting development indicators: ‘country resource’ mobilization, increasing GDP growth, increasing per capita income, enhancing quality of socioeconomic indices of people, etc. The major of findings from this paper is ‘good governance for sustainable development’. This paper addresses issues of historical performance of governance exercise, obstacles towards good governance, and reforming agendas come up in past studies. The authors conclude by explaining why and how good governance is essential in Bangladesh for sustainable development.

  3. ANALYZING AND ESTIMATING PORTFOLIO PERFORMANCE OF BANGLADESH STOCK MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Zobaer Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM is one of the most important developments in the finance literature. Simply, CAPM is a model that describes the relationship between risk and expected return. The theoretical validity of CAPM is well tested and accepted but the practical validity of CAPM is in questioned. This study is designed to analyze and estimate the portfolio performance of Bangladesh stock market in a CAPM framework. For this study, monthly stock returns from 80 companies for the period of January 2005 to December 2009 are chosen. In order to examine whether the CAPM is satisfied in the portfolio or not, the 80 stocks are arranged in descending order of beta and 10 portfolios are being made of eight stocks in each. The All Share Price Index (DSI is used as a proxy for the market portfolio and Bangladesh government 3-Month T-bill rate is used as the proxy for the risk-free asset. The results of this analysis show that the intercept terms are not significantly different from zero, linearity in the securities market line and insignificant unique risk for the 10 portfolios during the period. But, the results in term of slope contradict the CAPM hypothesis and indicate evidence against the CAPM in the portfolios. This analysis will obviously be used as a basis of reference for future investigates and the researchers and they will get proper instruction from this study.

  4. Spectrum of Acute Pharmaceutical and Chemical Poisoning in Northern Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendranath Sarkar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute poisoning is a major public health problem in Bangladesh. It is a common method for suicide. A clear picture regarding clinical presentation, most commonly used toxic agents, background factors and outcome of poisoned patients is necessary in every region. The aim of this study was to investigate frequency and outcome of acute pharmaceutical and chemical poisoning cases in Northern Bangladesh. Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive study on poisoned patients with 18 years of age and above who were admitted to Rangpur Medical College Hospital during 1st December 2011 to 30th November 2012. Results: During the study period, a total of 956 patients were investigated. Males slightly outnumbered females (51.6%. The majority of patients (92% were in the 18-40 year age-group. Regarding occupation, housewives were the most frequent (33.6% followed by farmers (31.7% and students (20.9%. Organophosphate compounds (OPC were the most commonly used toxic agents (73.5%. Most of poisoning cases occurred following suicidal attempts (88%. Familial disharmony was the main cause of suicidal attempts (92.3%. Univariate Analysis showed that age less than 40 years, being married, living in rural areas and educational attainment below secondary level were significantly associated with an increased risk of poisoning (P

  5. Bangladesh: an Emerging Centre for Terrorism in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjan M. Gohel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This Research Note examines the political developments that have occurred in Bangladesh in 2013 and explores how these have fed into the rise of religious militancy. The ongoing conflicts not only intensify the instability and schisms within the country, but also illustrate that there is a rise in religious militancy that the country can ill afford at this juncture. Furthermore, it highlights how some members of the Bangladeshi diaspora in the United States and United Kingdom have been recruited by al-Qaeda and its affiliates to plot mass casualty attacks. Significantly, it is argued that all these threads are tied together because of the murky role of Jamaat-e-Islami Bangladesh (JEI, which is Bangladesh’s largest religious political party. A further deterioration of Bangladesh’s democracy and political stability could create additional space within which Islamist militants may be increasingly free to operate not just for domestic terrorist activity but for preparing internationals plots as well.

  6. Experience in the management of radioactive wastes in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangladesh has been firmly committed to the peaceful applications of ionizing radiations in agriculture, medicine, industry and research in order to achieve socio-economic development in diverse sectors in the short term as well as long term perspective since its emergence in 1971. Consequently, the use of radioactive materials and radiation sources may always produce radioactive wastes warranting safe, planned and proper management so as to protect man and the related environment (at present and in the future) from the undue risks of ionizing radiation. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission BAEC), is, in principle, responsible for developing and implementing a national strategy and necessary infra-structure for the collection, handling, treatment, conditioning, transportation, storage and disposal of radioactive wastes including their regulatory control, duly considering the local conditions and socio-economic pattern of the country. A considerable progress has already been made in this regard. The Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Act (NSRC Act, 1993) was promulgated in 1993 and necessary regulations (sub-ordinate legislation) are under preparation in the light of the act, government policy and the up-to-date internationally accepted waste management and disposal recommendations and the standards. Special emphasis has been attached to the Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of the Radiation Sources. (author). 1 fig., 2 tabs

  7. Factors Influencing Fecal Contamination in Pond of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappett, P. S.; Escamilla, V.; Layton, A.; McKay, L. D.; Emch, M.; Mailloux, B. J.; Williams, D. E.; Huq, M. R.; Alam, M.; Farhana, L.; Ferguson, A. S.; Sayler, G. S.; Ahmed, K.; Serre, M. L.; Akita, Y.; Yunus, M.; van Geen, A.

    2010-12-01

    Occurrence of diarrheal disease in villages in rural Bangladesh remains relatively common, even though many households have switched to tubewell water for drinking and cooking. One factor contributing to this may be exposure to fecal contamination in ponds, which are often used for bathing and fishing. The objective of this study is to determine the dominant sources of fecal pollution in typical ponds and to explore the relationship between local population, latrine density, latrine quality and concentrations of fecal bacteria and pathogens in pond water. Forty-three ponds were sampled and analyzed for E. coli using culture-based methods and for E. coli, Bacteroides and adenovirus using quantitative PCR. Population and sanitation infrastructure were surveyed and compared to levels of pond fecal contamination. Molecular fecal source tracking using Bacteroides, determined that humans were the dominant source of fecal contamination in 79% of the ponds. Ponds directly receiving latrine effluent had the highest concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria. Concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria correlated with population surveyed within a distance of 30-70 m (pcattle. Since the majority of fecal pollution is from humans, use of pond water could help explain the persistence of diarrheal disease in rural Bangladesh.

  8. Exploring the communication barriers in private commercial banks of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana, Nahneen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, lots of private commercial banks are contributing for economic growth. The performance of the banks depends on a well-structured communication system. So by maintaining an effective communication system, the banks can gain competitive advantage. Thus the study aims to investigate the communication barriers that should be removed for effective communication in the private commercial banks of Bangladesh. A structured questionnaire survey based on 5-point Likert-scale was conducted on 165 full-time employees of private commercial banks. The sample includes 15 private commercial banks. The Principal Component Analysis reveals three types of communication barriers; personal barriers, job barriers, and organizational barriers. Among these barriers, personal barriers are the most significant barriers according to the respondents of the study. Personal barriers include lack of English knowledge, local tone, opposite sex and hot temper. The second most important barriers are job barriers that include technical words, personal life and job monotony. The third most important barriers are organizational barriers which include defective technology and internal politics.

  9. Impact of Liquidity on Islamic Banks' Profitability: Evidence from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limon Moinur Rasul

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the impact of liquidity on Islamic banks’ profitability during an 11 years period of 2001 to 2011. To explore and interpret the results the study has taken samples from five Islamic banks that have been in operation in Bangladesh on or before 2001 to till date. In order to construct the liquidity model it used four liquidity variables namely cash & due from banks to total assets (CDTA, cash & due from banks to total deposits (CDDEP, investment to total assets (INVSTA and investment to total deposits (INVSDEP. According to adjusted R squares profitability variables return on assets (ROA, return on equity (ROE and return on deposits (ROD are respectively 17.1%, 4.5% and 24.6% dependent on independent variables. The statistical results suggest that CDTA is found insignificant with all profitability variables, whereas CDDEP is individually significant with all profitability variables except ROE. On the other hand INVSTA and INVSDEP are recognized significant with all three profitability variables. However, when ROE stands for an insignificant relationship with the overall liquidity model, ROA and ROD are identified significantly correlated with the similar model at 1% significant level. Unsurprisingly the findings do strengthen the specification that the impact of liquidity reflects adequate imposition on profitability that the Islamic banks in Bangladesh must abide by.

  10. Identification of the influencing factors on groundwater drought in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touhidul Mustafa, Syed Md.; Huysmans, Marijke

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater drought is a specific type of drought that concerns groundwater bodies. It may have a significant adverse effect on the socio-economic, agricultural, and environmental conditions. Investigating the effect of response different climatic and manmade factors on groundwater drought provides essential information for sustainable planning and management of water resources. The aim of this study is to identify the influencing factors on groundwater drought in a drought prone region in Bangladesh to understand the forcing mechanisms. The Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) and Reconnaissance Drought Index (RDI) have been used to quantify the aggregated deficit between precipitation and the evaporative demand of the atmosphere. The influence of land use patterns on the groundwater drought has been identified by calculating spatially distributed groundwater recharge as a function of land use. The result shows that drought intensity is more severe during the dry season (November to April) compared to the rainy season (May to October). The evapotranspiration and rainfall deficit has a significant effect on meteorological drought which has a direct relation with groundwater drought. Urbanization results in a decrease of groundwater recharge which increases groundwater drought severity. Overexploitation of groundwater for irrigation and recurrent meteorological droughts are the main causes of groundwater drought in the study area. Efficient irrigation management is essential to reduce the growing pressure on groundwater resources and ensure sustainable water management. More detailed studies on climate change and land use change effects on groundwater drought are recommended. Keywords: Groundwater drought, SPI & RDI, Spatially distributed groundwater recharge, Irrigation, Bangladesh

  11. Modeling for Growth and Forecasting of Pulse Production in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niaz Md. FarhatRahman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to estimate growth pattern and examine the best ARIMA model to efficiently forecasting pigeon pea, chickpea and field pea pulse production in Bangladesh. It appeared that the time series data for pigeon pea, chickpea and field pea were 1st order homogenous stationary. Two types of models namely Box-Jenkins type Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA and deterministic type growth models, are examined to identify the best forecasting models for pigeon pea, chickpea and field pea pulse production in Bangladesh. The study revealed that the best models were ARIMA (1, 1 and 1, ARIMA (0, 1 and 0 and ARIMA (1, 1 and 3 for pigeon pea, chickpea and field pea pulse production, respectively. Among the deterministic type growth models, the cubic model is best for pigeon pea, chickpea and field pea pulse production. The analysis indicated that short-term forecasts were more efficient for ARIMA models compared to the deterministic models. The production uncertainty of pulse could be minimized if production were forecasted well and necessary steps were taken against losses. The findings of this study would be more useful for policy makers, researchers as well as producers in order to forecast future national pulse production more accurately in the short run.

  12. Bangladesh : Attaining the Millennium Development Goals in Bangladesh, How Likely and What Will it Take to Reduce Poverty, Child Mortality and Malnutrition, Gender Disparities, and to Increase School Enrollment and Completion?

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    This report focuses on the attainment of five major human development-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in Bangladesh - consumption poverty, infant and under-five mortality, child malnutrition, schooling enrollment and completion, gender disparities in schooling. The report stipulates that of these MDGs, Bangladesh has already attained (or nearly attained) the goal relating to elimination of gender disparity in schooling opportunities. Bangladesh is the only country in South Asia (o...

  13. Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Bovine Brucellosis Seropositivity and Abortion in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Md. Atiqul

    2011-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and to identify the herd level risk factors associated with bovine brucellosis seropositivity and abortion in the Mymensingh and Sherpur districts of Bangladesh.

  14. Design Strategies and Preliminary Prototype for a Low-Cost Arsenic Removal System for Rural Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Qazi, Shefah; Agogino, Alice M.

    2009-09-14

    Researchers have invented a material called ARUBA -- Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash -- that effectively and affordably removes arsenic from Bangladesh groundwater. Through analysis of studies across a range of disciplines, observations, and informal interviews conducted over three trips to Bangladesh, we have applied mechanical engineering design methodology to develop eight key design strategies, which were used in the development of a low-cost, community-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to removearsenic from drinking water. We have constructed, tested, and analysed a scale version of the system. Experiments have shown that the system is capable of reducing high levels of arsenic (nearly 600 ppb) to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb, while remaining affordable to people living on less than US$2/day. The system could be sustainably implemented as a public-private partnership in rural Bangladesh.

  15. How to finance investment in Bangladesh: Finding long-run factors in a bounds test method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biru Paksha Paula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Investment in Bangladesh has been at almost one-fourth of the country’s output since the early 2000s. Consequently, Bangladesh’s growth has also remained stagnant at around 6 percent since then. The question of how to increase investment in Bangladesh has been of crucial discussion of late. This study examines the long run determinants of investment in Bangladesh by applying the bounds test over 1976-2010. There should not be any policy dilemma about the effect of lending rates, which must be reduced to boost investment and domestic credit should be expanded. Further liberalization in trade and finance is recommended since economic openness and financial deepening show a positive impact on capital formation. The policy prescriptions for Bangladesh are not different from those for other nations that embarked on liberalization to augment investment for accelerating growth.

  16. Undiscovered natural gas resources Total Petroleum System unit boundaries for Bangladesh (tps8bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage includes arcs, polygons, and polygon labels that describe the Total Petroleum System boundaries of the natural gas resources of Bangladesh. This...

  17. Undiscovered gas resources assessment unit boundaries for Bangladesh (au8bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage includes arcs, polygons, and polygon labels that describe the undiscovered natural gas resources assessment unit boundaries of the Bangladesh. This...

  18. Satellite altimetry and GRACE gravimetry for studies of annual water storage variations in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Berry, P.; Freeman, J.;

    2008-01-01

    Four different data sources have been compared with respect to observations of the annual water storage variations in the region of Bangladesh. Data from satellite altimeters and river gauges estimates the variation in surface water storage in the major rivers of Bangladesh. The GRACE satellites...... measure the integrated mass change and hence the terrestrial soil moisture variations, which can also be estimated by a hydrological model (GLDAS). These types of observations enable the derivation of the integrated water storage in the entire region of Bangladesh. For all data types, the annual signal...... has been estimated from a common dataset spanning the period 2003 and 2004. All four different data observe that water storage in Bangladesh is largely dominated by an annual signal with a phase peaking in early September. The annual variations in river level peaks roughly two weeks earlier than...

  19. Studies on environmental pollution in Bangladesh using reactor based neutron activation analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental and health related problems have become a major global concern in the recent years. Bangladesh is now facing a serious problem about arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr), which contaminate our environment. Arsenic exposure is a potential health risk to local populations in most of the parts of Bangladesh. The total element concentration has been traditionally used to assess environmental impact and health risk of the element. We have a 3MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor at Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Our interest is to study environmental pollution due to As and Cr through distribution in environment over Bangladesh. Particularly, this work was undertaken for determining As content in water, soil and herbal plants, and Cr-content in soil of tannery industrial areas as a part of our systematic studies

  20. APPLICATION OF RESPONSIVE REGULATION IN THE FOOD SAFETY REGULATIONS OF BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Noman M. A. Ali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh, a developing country of the South Asian region, has been suffering from rampant food adulteration for the last few decades. Recent studies revealed that numerous deaths along with countless physical illnesses are occurring as the consequences of this ongoing food adulteration. Several attempts have been made through to change the food safety regulations (FSR of Bangladesh to combat this alarming issue. Unfortunately, the situation has hardly been changed. Rather it is getting worse day by day. However, Bangladesh has never changed the regulatory enforcement philosophy of its FSR to tackle this severe food safety concern. The current study is an endeavour to apply the responsive regulation theory (RRT in the enforcement framework of the FSR of Bangladesh as an attempt to make it more effective and updated.

  1. Representation and Dissemination of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Bangladesh through Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Chowdhury, MD Saiful Alam

    2016-01-01

    of strategically representing and diffusing ICH through social media, this research explores the current roles of social media in the transmission of ICH in the virtual world. The research question is: How are Baul song and Jamdani weaving as intangible cultural heritage of Bangladesh represented and disseminated......Bangladesh is one of the next eleven countries and home to more than 160 million people. The country is experiencing an exponential growth of social media users due to the increase in affordability of smartphones, literacy rate, education level, and adoption of Internet services and applications....... Bangladesh, with its digital agenda, has a favorable environment for the transformation and development of digital media and culture. There exists unexplored, assumably underutilized, and potential roles of Internet-mediated communication about the two nominated ICH of Bangladesh. Towards the goal...

  2. Analysis of Recent Situation of Pesticide Poisoning in Bangladesh: Is There a Proper Estimate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourab Dewan

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Pesticide poisoning is responsible for great number of admissions and deaths in Bangladesh. Creating a register of commercially available pesticides in each region for rapid identification of nature of the pesticide is recommended.

  3. Decomposing the relationship between human capital and GDP:an empirical analysis of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Nazneen Ahmad; Joseph J. French

    2011-01-01

    This paper dissects the relationship between human capital stock and real GDP per capita in Bangladesh using VEC and VAR techniques. Results show that GDP granger causes aggregate human capital stock. This paper constructs a measure of Bangladesh's human capital stock for the period of 1973-2004 using the perpetual inventory method. Innovations in secondary and higher secondary education are found to have the greatest short to medium-term impact on the country's real GDP. Consistently this re...

  4. Approaches to Increase Arsenic Awareness in Bangladesh: An Evaluation of an Arsenic Education Program

    OpenAIRE

    George, Christine Marie; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Khan, Khalid; ISLAM, Tariqul; Singha, Ashit; Moon-Howard, Joyce; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a household-level arsenic education and well water arsenic testing intervention to increase arsenic awareness in Bangladesh. The authors randomly selected 1,000 study respondents located in 20 villages in Singair, Bangladesh. The main outcome was the change in knowledge of arsenic from baseline to follow-up 4 to 6 months after the household received the intervention. This was assessed through a pre- and postintervention quiz concerning kn...

  5. Impact of Trade Liberalisation on Employment in Bangladesh: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hoque, Serajul

    2005-01-01

    We use a 86-industry CGE model of Bangladesh to simulate the employment effects of removing all tariffs in Bangladesh. We find that this would expand GDP and generate employment. The industries that experience the greatest positive effects on their output and employment are the export-oriented industries. There are also positive effects on the suppliers to these industries. Lightly-protected industries that rely heavily on imported intermediate inputs exhibit robust expansion as they benefit ...

  6. Integration of Digital Technology in the Film Industry of Bangladesh: Readiness and Response Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Ahsan, Muhammad Shajjad

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand how the integration of digital technology (DT) in the Bangladesh Film industry has been responded to by its production, distribution and exhibition related organisations. Since no research on digital integration has been considered in a developing country context, and specifically within the area of concentrating on the industry rather than the films themselves, this research therefore addresses the gaps within the knowledge field. The Bangladesh F...

  7. Educational influences on student academic attainment: a multi-level analysis in the context of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Jahan, Monira

    2012-01-01

    Bangladesh has made significant progress in terms of improving student access and gender disparity at primary and secondary levels of education. Currently, the major concern is the quality of education. In the national interest, the government of Bangladesh has undertaken a number of intervention programmes to increase the quality of primary and secondary education. Recently, researchers and practitioners are more engaged in investigating the quality of education, particularly at primary and ...

  8. Predicting water consumption habits for seven arsenic-safe water options in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Inauen, Jennifer; Tobias, Robert; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Background: In Bangladesh, 20 million people are at the risk of developing arsenicosis because of excessive arsenic intake. Despite increased awareness, many of the implemented arsenic-safe water options are not being sufficiently used by the population. This study investigated the role of social-cognitive factors in explaining the habitual use of arsenic-safe water options.Methods: Eight hundred seventy-two randomly selected households in six arsenic-affected districts of rural Bangladesh, w...

  9. The Determinants of Worker Remittance in Terms of Foreign Factors: The Case of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rana Rezwanul Hasan; Hashmi Rubayyat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the determinants of worker remittance of Bangladesh. Instead of traditional approach of estimating the remittance determinants, here we propose to use foreign macroeconomic indicators as a proxy determinant to avoid endogeneity. We also used panel estimation technique in our study to incorporate country specific heterogeneity of remittance inflow of Bangladesh. According our study any changes in the number of labor force, consumer price index, export, i...

  10. Comparative Analysis of Learning Styles of Students of USA and Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Quamrul H. Mazumder

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare and evaluate the different learning styles of students in Bangladesh and the United States. The objective was to identify the similarities and differences among individual student learning styles using the Fielder-Silverman model and an index of learning styles, which was compiled using student response data from two universities in Bangladesh and one American university. Statistical analysis was performed to identify the factors affecting learning style, such...

  11. Qualitative insights into promotion of pharmaceutical products in Bangladesh: how ethical are the practices?

    OpenAIRE

    Mohiuddin, Mahrukh; Rashid, Sabina Faiz; Shuvro, Mofijul Islam; Nahar, Nahitun; Ahmed, Syed Masud

    2015-01-01

    Background The pharmaceutical market in Bangladesh is highly concentrated (top ten control around 70 % of the market). Due to high competition aggressive marketing strategies are adopted for greater market share, which sometimes cross limit. There is lack of data on this aspect in Bangladesh. This exploratory study aimed to fill this gap by investigating current promotional practices of the pharmaceutical companies including the role of their medical representatives (MR). Methods This qualita...

  12. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Lina, Taslima T.; Khajanchi, Bijay K.; Azmi, Ishrat J.; Mohammad Aminul Islam; Belal Mahmood; Mahmuda Akter; Atanu Banik; Rumana Alim; Armando Navarro; Gabriel Perez; Alejandro Cravioto; Talukder, Kaisar A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resistance to cephalosporins in Enterobacteriaceae is mainly due to the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Little is known about ESBL-producing bacteria in Bangladesh. Therefore, the study presents results of phenotypic and molecular characterization of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from hospitals in Bangladesh. METHODS: A total of 339 E. coli isolated from patients with urinary tract and wound infections attending three different medical hospitals in urban a...

  13. DEMAND PROJECTIONS FOR POULTRY FEEDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR WHEAT AND MAIZE PRODUCTION IN BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, K M Nabiul

    2000-01-01

    Wheat and maize are important components of poultry feeds. The demand for wheat and maize, therefore, is expected to increase with the currently experienced sharp growth of poultry farms in Bangladesh. This analysis carries out projections of demand for poultry feeds and its implications for wheat and maize production in Bangladesh over the next 20 years. Under the scenario of rural consumption data from FMRSP and urban consumption data from HES source, and fixed income elasticity of demand, ...

  14. A GIS based Site Suitability Analysis for Shrimp Cultivation in the Coastal Region of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Syeed, Kazi

    2007-01-01

    Bangladesh geographically comprised one of the largest delta landscapes of the world. Almost 6.7% of country’stotal area (147570 sqkm.) is covered byrivers and inland water bodies. These water bodies being rich in fishproduction meet the majority of the demand of protein. Bangladesh produces world's fourth largest quantity of fishand it is collected from the inland water bodies. Though shrimps were easily available in the inland water bodies forhundreds of years but shrimp culture as an expor...

  15. Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Mainstream Primary Education of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Asim, Das

    2011-01-01

    Over the years Bangladesh has shown a remarkable progress in primary education. Inclusion of students with disabilities in mainstream primary education is also increasing year by year. But in the context of quality teachinglearning for all, Bangladesh is still a far away from effective inclusive education. Inclusive education requires some additional arrangement within the mainstream system that is really a challenge. The present paper reports on the prevailing situation of education of stude...

  16. Injecting Drug Users and Their Health Seeking Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikh Mohammed Shariful Islam; Tuhin Biswas; Faiz Ahmed Bhuiyan; Md. Serajul Islam; Mohammad Mizanur Rahman; Hurun Nessa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim. Injecting drug users (IDUs) are amongst the most vulnerable people to acquisition of HIV/AIDS. This study aims to collect information on IDUs and their health seeking behavior in Bangladesh. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 120 IDUs attending a drug rehabilitation center in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data were collected on sociodemographics, drug use, health seeking behavior, knowledge of injecting drugs, and sexual behavior. Results. The mean ± SD...

  17. Progress and challenges to control malaria in a remote area of Chittagong hill tracts, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Haque Rashidul; Ahmed Syed; Hossain Shahed; Sunahara Toshihiko; Hashizume Masahiro; Haque Ubydul; Yamamoto Taro; Glass Gregory E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Malaria is endemic in 13 eastern districts where the overall infection prevalence is 3.97%. In 2006, Bangladesh received US$ 36.9 million from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) to support the national malaria control programme of Bangladesh. Objectives The objective of this study was to i) clarify factors associated with treatment seeking behaviours of malaria ii) distribution of LLIN, and iii) re-treatment of ITN in remote area of a CHT distr...

  18. Designing an Health Insurance Scheme for Government Employees in Bangladesh: A Concept Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid, Syed Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Introducing compulsory health insurance for government employees bears immense importance for stepping towards universal healthcare coverage in Bangladesh. Lack of scientific study on designing such scheme, in the Bangladesh context, motivates this paper. The study aims at designing a comprehensive insurance package simultaneously covering health, life and accident related disability risks of the public employees, where the health component would extend to all dependent family members. ...

  19. Reaching the Unreachable: Barriers of the Poorest to Accessing NGO Healthcare Services in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Nizam U.; Alam, Mohammed M.; Sultana, Fadia; Sayeed, Shahana N.; Pressman, Aliza M.; Powers, Mary Beth

    2006-01-01

    The NGO Service Delivery Program (NSDP), a USAID-funded programme, is the largest NGO programme in Bangladesh. Its strategic flagship activity is the essential services package through which healthcare services are administered by NGOs in Bangladesh. The overall goal of the NSDP is to increase access to essential healthcare services by communities, especially the poor. Recognizing that the poorest in the community often have no access to essential healthcare services due to various barriers, ...

  20. ASSESSMENT OF INFLUENCING FACTORS ON PRESCRIPTION PRACTICES OF PHYSICIANS IN BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Mir Monir Hossain; Sumaiya Kawsar; Tasmuna Tamrin Tanmy; Abu Yousuf

    2013-01-01

    In Bangladesh same drug molecules are sold under different brand names by different pharmaceutical companies. To persuade the physicians to prescribe their brands pharmaceuticals engage in marketing techniques like giving samples, gifts, sponsoring travel etc. Many countries are striving to reduce the impact of incentives on prescription behavior. This study explores the influence of factors on the prescription practices of doctors in Bangladesh. Data collection was done by a self administere...

  1. Utilisation of Formal Health Care and Out-of-Pocket Payments in Rural Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Ahsan, Syed M; Syed Abdul Hamid; Shubhasish Barua

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the utilisation of formal health care and out-ofpocket (OOP) payments in rural areas of Bangladesh. The broader focus of the investigation is to gauge how far Bangladesh has to traverse to achieve universal health coverage (UHC). We used the data from the baseline survey (conducted in diversifi ed geographical locations on about 4,000 households) of a longitudinal research project (entitled Microinsurance, Poverty and Vulnerability) of the Institute of Micro...

  2. Access to Microfinance: Does it Matter for Profit Efficiency Among Small Scale Rice Farmers in Bangladesh?

    OpenAIRE

    Sumelius, John; Islam, K. M. Zahidul; Sipilainen, Timo

    2011-01-01

    This paper measures profit efficiency and examines the effect of access to microfinance on the performance of rice firms in Bangladesh. An extended Cobb-Douglas stochastic frontier profit function was used to assess profit efficiency and profit loss of rice farmers in Bangladesh in a survey data of 360 farms throughout the 2008-2009 growing seasons. Model diagnostics reveal that serious selection bias exists that justifies the uses of sample selection model in stochastic frontier models. Afte...

  3. CHANGES OF LEARNERS’ SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONTEXT AFTER COMPLETING A PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FROM BANGLADESH OPEN UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    A.K.M. Iftekhar Khalid

    2009-01-01

    Creating same opportunity in term of social and economic context for the learners of distance education as the students from conventional education is a challenging task since professional education through distance method is a new genre in Bangladesh. This genre of professional education starts successfully with the establishment of the Bangladesh Open University (BOU) in 1992. The university creates immense opportunities to study anytime and anywhere. This paper explains what social and eco...

  4. The Framework for Implementing ECommerce: The Role of Bank and Telecom in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Laisuzzaman, Ijaj Md.; Imran, Nahid; Nahid, Abdullah Al; Ziaul, Md.; Alim, Md. Abdul

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an effective framework for adapting electronic commerce or e-commerce services in developing countries like Bangladesh. The internet has opened up a new horizon for commerce, namely electronic commerce (e-commerce). It entails the use of the internet in the marketing, identification, payment and delivery of goods and services. At present internet facilities are available in Bangladesh. Slowly, but steadily these facilities are holding a strong position in every aspe...

  5. Exploring non-traditional sources of development finance: The case of remittance in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hasanuzzaman. Zaman; Mashfique Ibne Akbar

    2013-01-01

    The article attempts to explain the underlying rationale for consideration of remittances as a potential source of Innovative Development Finance (IDF). Remittance is considered as IDF in the face of declining flow of external resources, mainly foreign aid, in Bangladesh. The sources of remittance are depicted in relation to the type of workers remitting earnings back to Bangladesh and also the different destination countries. The concluding remarks of the article are preceded with a new idea...

  6. The International Science Programme in Bangladesh : A case of self-interest, interdependence or social empowerment?

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to analyze different forms of North-South development assistance with regard to its widespread critique and to examine whether the field of international research capacity building holds alternative development cooperation strategies that have the potential to reconcile some of the criticisms. The focus is on the International Science Programme (ISP) and the empirical research carried out in Bangladesh and Sweden on the ISP-Bangladesh collaboration in the form of sem...

  7. USA Trade and Development Act 2000: A Response from Bangladesh Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Debapriya Bhattacharya; Mustafizur Rahman

    2000-01-01

    The present paper attempts to understand the various ramifications of the US TDA2000, the United States Congress initiated, particularly with respect to Bangladesh. The paper lays out the backdrop of the issue, various provisions of the US TDA2000, reviews the implications of the Act for Bangladesh and puts forward a number of measures which might provide a basis for Bangladesh’s response strategy to the US TDA2000.

  8. Impact on arsenic exposure of a growing proportion of untested wells in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    George Christine; Graziano Joseph H; Mey Jacob L; van Geen Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In many areas of Bangladesh, it has been more than six years since a national campaign to test tubewells for arsenic (As) was conducted. Many households therefore draw their water for drinking and cooking from untested wells. Methods A household drinking water survey of 6646 households was conducted in Singair upazilla of Bangladesh. A subset of 795 untested wells used by 1000 randomly selected households was tested in the field by trained village workers with the Hach EZ ...

  9. Targeting Low-arsenic Groundwater with Mobile-phone Technology in Araihazar, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    van Geen, A.; Trevisani, M.; Immel, J.; Jakariya, Md.; Osman, N.; Cheng, Z; Gelman, A; Ahmed, K M

    2006-01-01

    The Bangladesh Arsenic Mitigation and Water Supply Program (BAMWSP) has compiled field-kit measurements of the arsenic content of groundwater for nearly five million wells. By comparing the spatial distribution of arsenic inferred from these field-kit measurements with geo-referenced laboratory data in a portion of Araihazar upazila, it is shown here that the BAMWSP data could be used for targeting safe aquifers for the installation of community wells in many villages of Bangladesh. Recent ex...

  10. The present status of infectious diseases of laboratory animals in Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdul; Awal

    2005-01-01

    The commonlaboratory animals in Bangladesh are rabbit,guinea pig,rat&mice.Commoninfectious diseases of rabbitare pasteurellosis,infectious myxomatosis,pneumonia,tyzzer’s disease,nasal catarrh,Conjunctivitis(weepy eye)&abscess formation.Amongthem,laterthree diseases are most commonin most of the animal housesin Bangladesh.Ente-rotoxaemia,primarilya diarrhoeal disease of rabbit caused by Clostridiumspiroformoccurs during4-8weeks of age show-ing clinical signslikelassitude,rough hair coat,perianal regioncovere...

  11. E-Business and on line banking in Bangladesh: an Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Mahboob Ali

    2010-01-01

    E-business has created tremendous opportunity all over the globe. On line banking can act as a complementary factor of e-business. Bangladesh Bank has recently argued to introduce automated clearing house system. This pushed upward transition from the manual banking system to the on line banking system. The study has been undertaken to observe present status of the e-business and as its complementary factor on line banking system in Bangladesh. The article analyzes the data that were collecte...

  12. Causes of adult female deaths in Bangladesh: findings from two National Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Nahar, Quamrun; Arifeen, Shams El; Jamil, Kanta; Streatfield, Peter Kim

    2015-01-01

    Background Assessment of causes of death and changes in pattern of causes of death over time are needed for programmatic purposes. Limited national level data exist on the adult female causes of death in Bangladesh. Method Using data from two nationally representation surveys, the 2001 and 2010 Bangladesh Maternal Mortality Surveys (BMMS), the paper examines the causes of adult female death, aged 15–49 years, and changes in the patterns of these deaths. In both surveys, all household deaths t...

  13. Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2010-01-01

    ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses l...

  14. Interpersonal communication and contraception: Insights and evidences from Bangladesh demographic and health survey, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj Kumar Raut

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the role of exposure to mass media and interpersonal communication in predicting the current use of contraception in Bangladesh. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out using the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS), 2011 data to explore the association between communication and the current use of contraception. After adjusting the related socioeconomic and demographic factors, the mass media did not seem to have any role in predicting contraceptive...

  15. Institutional Repositories and Open Access Initiatives in Bangladesh: A New Paradigm of Scholarly Communication

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, open access (OA) in its diverse forms constitutes the most interesting and promising model for the research output of an academic or research institution. The purpose of the present study is to discuss the situation of OA in the developing world, with a focus on Bangladesh. The study also addresses why OA is important for developing countries and which initiatives have been taken in Bangladesh. Finally, we discuss some challenging issues of OA and suggestions on how to overcome thes...

  16. Bangladesh Beyond 2005 : The Era of Textile and Apparel Quota Phase-Out

    OpenAIRE

    Reznideen, Ahamed-Abbas-Mohamed; Atcha, Mohammed-Emran

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Title: Bangladesh Beyond 2005: The Era of Textile and Apparel Quota Phase-Out Authors: A. A. M. Reznideen & Mohammed Emran Atcha Supervisor: Anders Hederstierna Department: Business Administration, Blekinge Institute of Technology Course: Master’s thesis in business administration, 10 credits. Background and Problem Discussion: Removal of quotas on Textile and Apparel trade since 1st January 2005 is a part of the globalization process. Small countries like Bangladesh had their RM...

  17. Feasibility of adopting aquaculture without detriment to existing farming practices: a case of Bangladesh farming systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, M.; Rab, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Integrating agriculture aquaculture that would draw inputs from on farm sources is viewed as a viable option to improve the productivity, income and resource use efficiency of existing farms in Bangladesh. To assess the existing resource availability, use pattern and efficiency before introducing new aquaculture technology within the existing farm systems, a survey of 330 pond operating farm households was conducted in six selected unions from two thanas (subdistricts) of Bangladesh.

  18. Agriculture and adaptation in Bangladesh: Current and projected impacts of climate change:

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Timothy S.; Mainuddin, Khandaker; Chiang, Catherine; Rahman, Aminur; Haque, Anwarul; Islam, Nazria; Quasem, Saad; Sun, Yun

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this research was to examine the likely impacts of climate change on agriculture in Bangladesh, and develop recommendations to policymakers to help farmers adapt to the changes. In this study, we use climate data from four general circulation models (GCMs) to evaluate the impact of climate change on agriculture in Bangladesh by 2050. We use the DSSAT (Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer) crop modeling software to evaluate crop yields, first for the 1950 to 2000 per...

  19. Mitochondrial DNA mutations—candidate biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rowshan Ara Begum; Abu Din Ahmed Shahinuzzaman; Atiqur Rahman; Gazi Nurun Nahar Sultana; Chowdhury Faiz Hossain

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem that affects more than 24% of women in Bangladesh. Further- more, among low-income countries including Bangladesh, individuals have a high risk for developing breast cancer. This study aimed to identify candidate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladeshi women to be used as a preventive approach. We screened the blood samples from 24 breast cancer patients and 20 healthy controls to detect polymorphisms in the D-loo...

  20. Child Rights: An Enabling or Disabling Right? The Nexus between Child Labor and Poverty in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Ruwanpura, Kanchana N; Leanne Roncolato

    2006-01-01

    The research reported in this article demonstrates the centrality of poverty and the structures of political economy to the prevalence of child labor in Bangladesh. This article examines the context of child laborers in Bangladesh and challenges the uncritical application of the social and cultural rights discourse to conditions where poverty and economic injustice are endemic. The authors argue the current preoccupation in development circles with cultural rights tends to disregard the fact ...