WorldWideScience

Sample records for banded iron formations

  1. Band Iron Formations and Satellite Magnetic Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, K. A.; Wasilewski, P.

    2005-05-01

    Band Iron Formations (BIF) are mainly Precambrian (2.5-1.8 Ga) sedimentary deposits and are composed of alternating layers of iron rich material and silica (chert). Precambrian BIF mark growth in the level of free oxygen in the atmosphere and the ocean which happened about 2.2 Ga. Distribution of main BIF includes Hamersley Range, Australia; Transvaal-Griquatown, South Africa; Minas Gerais, Brazil; Labrador Trough, Canada, and Kursk-Krivoi Rog (Russia). Together these five very large BIF deposits constitute about 90 percent of Earth's total estimated BIF (5.76*10 14 ). On each continent these ancient rocks usually metamorphosed and crystallized include what are variously described as hematite-quartzites, banded iron formations, banded jaspers or calico-rocks. West African, Hudson Bay and Western Australian Satellite Magnetic Anomalies coincide with distribution BIF deposits. The Kursk Satellite Magnetic Anomaly (KMA) (about 22 nT at the altitude=400km, centered at 51o N, 37o E) also was identified by ground and aeromagnetic observations and is recognized as one of the largest magnetic anomaly on the Earth. Magnetic modeling shows that immense Precambrian iron ore deposits (iron bands) of Voronezh uplift are the main source of KMA. Magnetic properties of 10000 BIF samples outcropped in the KMA area have been measured and analyzed (Krutikhovskaya et al., 1964) Rockmag BIF dataset is presented at: http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/MPDB/datasets.html. Mean NRM value is about 42 A/M, Qn about 1.4. Demagnetization tests suggest that hard and stable NRM component is caused by hematite occurring in BIF in different forms and grain sizes. Hematite deposits discovered on Mars in western equatorial area with layered topography of Aram Chaos and Sinus Meridiani could be of hydrothermal origin and may be formed similar to hematite precipitated in BIF on Earth.

  2. Chemostratigraphy of Neoproterozoic Banded Iron Formation (BIF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaucher, Claudio; Sial, Alcides N.; Frei, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Brazil), Chuos, and Numees Formations (Namibia) and Holowilena Ironstone (Australia). However, many occurrences are not related to glacial processes and can be assigned to the Algoma and Lake Superior types. Neoproterozoic Algoma-type BIF includes the Wadi Karim and Um Anab (Egypt), the correlative......Neoproterozoic banded iron formations (BIFs) are not restricted to the middle Cryogenian, c. 715 Ma glaciation, occurring in Tonian, Cryogenian, and Ediacaran successions. Many Neoproterozoic BIFs were deposited in glacially influenced settings, such as the Rapitan Group (Canada), Jacadigo Group (W...... Sawawin BIF (Saudi Arabia), and the Jucurutu Formation of the Seridó Belt (NE Brazil). Lake Superior type BIFs are represented by the Tonian Shilu Group (South China) and the late Ediacaran Arroyo del Soldado Group (Yerbal and Cerro Espuelitas formations, Uruguay). Useful chemostratigraphic tools...

  3. Nd isotopic variations in Precambrian banded iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Stein B.; Pimentel-Klose, Mario R.

    1988-01-01

    The isotopic composition of Nd is reported for eight banded iron formations (BIFs) ranging in age from 0.65 to 3.4 Ga. The data suggest a trend of increasingly positive epsilon(Nd) values with age which is interpreted to reflect isotopic variations in Precambrian seawater. The Urucum (0.65 Ga) and the Gunflint (1.9 Ga) BIFs yield negative epsilon(Nd) values between -6 and 0. The remaining BIFs, with ages of 1.84 to 3.4 Ga, have predominantly positive values between -1 and +4. The Nd isotopic signature of BIFs changes from a principally continental source to a dominantly depleted mantle source from the present into the Archean.

  4. Identification of biologically recycled continental materials in banded iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The controversy on the origin of banded iron formations (BIFs) has lasted for many decades. Studies prior to the 1970s suggested that Fe in BIFs was supplied from continental riverine inputs[1], but discovery of midocean ridge hydrothermal systems in the 1970s and identification of positive Eu anomaly in BIF samples led to an alternative model where hydrothermal vents provided Fe in BIFs[2]. Although the latter model has became widely accepted, it should be noted that interpretations of Fe sources for BIFs using the abundance and isotopic composition of rare earth elements (REEs) are based on an assumption that transport and deposition of REEs and Fe were coupled. We address the question of Fe sources and pathways for BIFs by combining stable Fe isotopes with radiogenic Nd isotopes as well as REE measurements to test proposals that Fe in BIFs was hydrothermally sourced. The samples investigated are from a type section of the Dales Gorge member of the 2.5 Ga Brockman Iron Formation, the world's most extensive Superior-type BIF that represents the climax of BIF deposition in the geologic record. Large variations were observed in both Fe and Nd isotope compositions of the BIF samples, and there is a positive correlation between the bulk rock ɛNd and δ56Fe values. In addition, there is a negative corelation between ɛNd and Sm/Nd ratios. In order to explain the observed correlations in those isotopic and elemental data, a two-component model, where mixing between a high ɛNd, low Sm/Nd hydrothermal endmember and a low ɛNd, low δ56Fe, but high Sm/Nd continental endmember occurred prior to deposition of the BIF, is required. The low-δ56Fe, high-Sm/Nd endmember is best explained by microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in the coastal sediments, which fractionated Fe isotopes and REEs and released these components back to water column that were ultimately precipitated in BIFs. The range and distribution of ɛNdvalues in the BIF samples suggest that the amount

  5. Geochemistry of some banded iron-formations of the archean supracrustals, Jharkhand–Orissa region, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H N Bhattacharya; Indranil Chakraborty; Kaushik K Ghosh

    2007-06-01

    Banded iron-formations (BIF) form an important part of the Archean supracrustal belts of the Jharkhand–Orissa region, India. Major, trace and REE chemistry of the banded iron-formation of the Gandhamardan, Deo Nala, Gorumahisani and Noamundi sections of the Jharkhand–Orissa region are utilized to explore the source of metals and to address the thermal regime of the basin floor and the redox conditions of the archean sea. Hydrothermal fluids of variable temperatures might have contributed the major part of the Fe and other trace elements to the studied banded iron-formations. Diagenetic fluids from the sea floor sediments and river water might have played a subdued role in supplying the Fe and other elements for the banded iron-formations.

  6. Raman Spectroscopic Characterisation of Australian Banded Iron Formation and Iron Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, M. A.; Ramanaidou, E. R.

    2012-04-01

    In Australia and world-wide over the past 5-10 years, declining reserves of premium, high-grade (>64% Fe), low-P bearing iron ore, have seen iron ore producers increase their utilisation of lower Fe-grade, higher P/Al/Si ore. In Australia, the channel iron deposits (CID), bedded iron deposits (BID) and, more recently, BIF-derived magnetite iron deposits (MID) have seen increased usage driven mainly by the increased demand from Chinese steel mills (Ramanaidou and Wells, 2011). Efficient exploitation and processing of these lower-grade iron ores requires a detailed understanding of their iron oxide and gangue mineralogy and geochemistry. The common Fe-bearing minerals (e.g., hematite, magnetite, goethite and kenomagnetite) in these deposits, as well as gangue minerals such as quartz and carbonates, are all strongly Raman active (e.g., de Faria et al., 1997). Their distinct Raman spectra enable them to be easily detected and mapped in situ in either unprepared material or samples prepared as polished blocks. In this paper, using representative examples of Australian CID ore, martite-goethite bedded iron deposit (BID) ore and banded iron formation (BIF) examined as polished blocks, we present a range of Raman spectra of the key iron ore minerals, and discuss how Raman spectroscopy can be applied to characterising iron ore mineralogy. Raman imaging micrographs, obtained using a StreamLine Plus Raman imaging system, clearly identified the main Fe-oxide and gangue components in the CID, BID and BIF samples when compared to optical micrographs. Raman analysis enabled the unequivocal identification of diamond in the CID ore as a contaminant from the polishing paste used to prepare the sample, and confirmed the presence of hematite in the BID ore in the form of martite, which can be morphologically similar to magnetite and, thus, difficult to otherwise distinguish. Image analysis of Raman mineral maps could be used to quantify mineral abundance based on the number of 'pixels

  7. Contrasting behavior of oxygen and iron isotopes in banded iron formation revealed by in situ analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, B.; Li, W.; Kita, N.; Valley, J. W.; Johnson, C.

    2012-12-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) record a period of dramatic secular change in Earth's geologic history, when abundant aqueous Fe(II) was removed from Archean and Proterozoic oceans by oxidation. BIFs are characterized by co-existing of quartz and iron minerals, including oxides and carbonates, and alternating iron-rich and iron-poor layers range from m to isotope ratios in minerals in BIFs provide valuable information about the origin of BIFs, as well as diagenetic and metamorphic effects that were superimposed on primary layering. We analyzed O and Fe isotope compositions of magnetite and hematite in BIFs from the 2.5 Ga Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, Hamersley Group, Western Australia. Oxygen isotope ratios were measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Fe isotope ratios were measured by femtosecond Laser ablation Multi-Collector ICP-MS (fs-LA-MC-ICP-MS), with spatial resolutions of 15 mm (O) and 30-50 mm (Fe), and external precisions (2s) of +0.7 ‰ for δ18O and +0.2 ‰ for δ56Fe, respectively. Analysis of δ18O in iron oxides by SIMS employed special tuning with a 3kV primary beam to minimize orientation effects (Huberty et al. 2010 ). For hematite, δ18O values range from -7.1 ‰ to -0.6 ‰, with the majority of data clustering around -4.5 ‰, and δ56Fe values range from -0.50 ‰ to +1.53‰. Magnetite has a δ18O range of -5.6 ‰ to +5.6 ‰ and a δ56Fe range of -0.76 ‰ to +1.33 ‰. Notably, magnetite shows significant O isotope heterogeneity at a mineral grain scale, and the highest δ18O values were commonly measured from Si-rich (1-3 wt% SiO2) magnetite overgrowths or magnetite grains that have a recrystallization texture. In contrast, lowest δ18O values were measured from magnetite that contains less than 1 wt% SiO2. Individual magnetite grains can have up to 6 ‰ variation in δ18O values between low-Si core and Si-rich overgrowth. Iron isotope compositions are homogeneous to ±0.1 ‰ in δ56Fe values

  8. Biologically recycled continental iron is a major component in banded iron formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiqiang; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M

    2015-07-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) record a time of extensive Fe deposition in the Precambrian oceans, but the sources and pathways for metals in BIFs remain controversial. Here, we present Fe- and Nd-isotope data that indicate two sources of Fe for the large BIF units deposited 2.5 billion y ago. High-εNd and -δ(56)Fe signatures in some BIF samples record a hydrothermal component, but correlated decreases in εNd- and δ(56)Fe values reflect contributions from a continental component. The continental Fe source is best explained by Fe mobilization on the continental margin by microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) and confirms for the first time, to our knowledge, a microbially driven Fe shuttle for the largest BIFs on Earth. Detailed sampling at various scales shows that the proportions of hydrothermal and continental Fe sources were invariant over periods of 10(0)-10(3) y, indicating that there was no seasonal control, although Fe sources varied on longer timescales of 10(5)-10(6) y, suggesting a control by marine basin circulation. These results show that Fe sources and pathways for BIFs reflect the interplay between abiologic (hydrothermal) and biologic processes, where the latter reflects DIR that operated on a basin-wide scale in the Archean.

  9. Trace-Element Analyses of Carbonate Minerals in the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Aurora; Papike, James J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the petrography, mineralogy and trace-element abundances of individual carbonate grains in the Early Proterozoic Gunflint BIF (Banded Iron Formation). Trace-element data may be used as environmental recorders of the fluid evolution from which the various carbonate phases precipitated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Mineralogy and geochemistry of banded iron formation and iron ores from eastern India with implications on their genesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subrata Roy; A S Venkatesh

    2009-12-01

    The geological complexities of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Jilling–Langalata iron ore deposits, Singhbhum–North Orissa Craton, belonging to Iron Ore Group (IOG) eastern India have been studied in detail along with the geochemical evaluation of different iron ores. The geochemical and mineralogical characterization suggests that the massive, hard laminated, soft laminated ore and blue dust had a genetic lineage from BIFs aided with certain input from hydrothermal activity. The PAAS normalized REE pattern of Jilling BIF striking positive Eu anomaly, resembling those of modern hydrothermal solutions from mid-oceanic ridge (MOR). Major part of the iron could have been added to the bottom sea water by hydrothermal solutions derived from hydrothermally active anoxic marine environments. The ubiquitous presence of intercalated tuffaceous shales indicates the volcanic signature in BIF. Mineralogical studies reveal that magnetite was the principal iron oxide mineral, whose depositional history is preserved in BHJ, where it remains in the form of martite and the platy hematite is mainly the product of martite. The different types of iron ores are intricately related with the BHJ. Removal of silica from BIF and successive precipitation of iron by hydrothermal fluids of possible meteoric origin resulted in the formation of martite-goethite ore. The hard laminated ore has been formed in the second phase of supergene processes, where the deep burial upgrades the hydrous iron oxides to hematite. The massive ore is syngenetic in origin with BHJ. Soft laminated ores and biscuity ores were formed where further precipitation of iron was partial or absent.

  11. Spectral characteristics of banded iron formations in Singhbhum craton, eastern India:Implications for hematite deposits on Mars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahima Singh; Jayant Singhal; K. Arun Prasad; V.J. Rajesh; Dwijesh Ray; Priyadarshi Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) are major rock units having hematite layers intermittent with silica rich layers and formed by sedimentary processes during late Archean to mid Proterozoic time. In terrestrial environment, hematite deposits are mainly found associated with banded iron formations. The BIFs in Lake Superior (Canada) and Carajas (Brazil) have been studied by planetary scientists to trace the evo-lution of hematite deposits on Mars. Hematite deposits are extensively identified in Meridiani region on Mars. Many hypotheses have been proposed to decipher the mechanism for the formation of these deposits. On the basis of geomorphological and mineralogical studies, aqueous environment of deposi-tion is found to be the most supportive mechanism for its secondary iron rich deposits. In the present study, we examined the spectral characteristics of banded iron formations of Joda and Daitari located in Singhbhum craton in eastern India to check its potentiality as an analog to the aqueous/marine envi-ronment on Mars. The prominent banding feature of banded iron formations is in the range of few millimeters to few centimeters in thickness. Fe rich bands are darker (gray) in color compared to the light reddish jaspilitic chert bands. Thin quartz veins (<4 mm) are occasionally observed in the hand-specimens of banded iron formations. Spectral investigations have been conducted in VIS/NIR region of electromagnetic spectrum in the laboratory conditions. Optimum absorption bands identified include 0.65, 0.86, 1.4 and 1.9 mm, in which 0.56 and 0.86 mm absorption bands are due to ferric iron and 1.4 and 1.9 mm bands are due to OH/H2O. To validate the mineralogical results obtained from VIS/NIR spectral radiometry, laser Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic techniques were utilized and the results were found to be similar. Goethite-hematite association in banded iron formation in Singhbhum craton suggests dehydration activity, which has altered the primary

  12. Preservation of Fe isotope heterogeneities during diagenesis and metamorphism of banded iron formation

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, C. D.; Friedhelm von Blanckenburg; R. Schönberg; Frost, B. R.; M. S. Swapp; [Egmont, John, 1st earl of] 

    2007-01-01

    We present the iron isotope composition of primary, diagenetic and metamorphic minerals in five samples from the contact metamorphosed Biwabik Iron Formation. These samples attained peak metamorphic temperatures of

  13. Early diagenetic quartz formation at a deep iron oxidation front in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific - A modern analogue for banded iron/chert formations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Patrick; Chapligin, Bernhard; Picard, Aude; Meyer, Hanno; Fischer, Cornelius; Rettenwander, Daniel; Amthauer, Georg; Vogt, Christoph; Aiello, Ivano W.

    2014-07-01

    concentration is locally decreased below opal-A and opal-CT saturation allowing for precipitation of the thermodynamically more stable phase: quartz. This mechanism of chert formation at the iron oxidation front in suboxic zones may explain why early-diagenetic microcrystalline chert only occurs sporadically in modern marine sediments. It may also serve as a modern analogue for the deposition of much more abundant banded iron/chert formations at the time of the great oxidation event around 2.4 Ga BP, which was probably the largest iron oxidation front in Earth's history.

  14. Using modern ferruginous habitats to interpret Precambrian banded iron formation deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeksoy, Elif; Halama, Maximilian; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Early Earth processes are typically identified through the study of mineralogical, elemental and isotopic features in the rock record, including Precambrian banded iron formations (BIF). However, post-depositional processes often obscure the primary geochemical signals, making the use of BIF as proxies for paleo-seawater and the paleo-biosphere potentially imprecise. Thus, alternative approaches are required to complement the information gained from the rock record in order to fully understand the distinctive biogeochemical processes on ancient Earth. Simulating these conditions in the laboratory is one approach, but this approach can never fully replicate the complexity of a natural environment. Therefore, finding modern environments with a unique set of geochemical and microbiological characteristics to use as analogues for BIF depositional environments can provide invaluable information. In this review, we provide an overview of the chemical, physical and biological parameters of modern, ferruginous lakes that have been used as analogue BIF environments.

  15. Deformation-induced silica redistribution in banded iron formation, Hamersley Province, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egglseder, Mathias S.; Cruden, Alexander R.; Tomkins, Andrew G.; Wilson, Christopher J. L.

    2016-12-01

    The formation of banded iron formations (BIF) remains controversial despite their potential to provide key information on Precambrian atmospheres and hydrospheres. It is widely agreed that BIF are chemical sedimentary rocks comprising alternating layers of iron oxides and chert formed from poorly known precursor phases. Many models address the chemical transformation of such precursor iron oxide phases into BIF during compaction and diagenesis. However, the formation of chert and the influence of physical forces in this process have received less attention. Microstructural analysis of BIF from the Hamersley Province (Western Australia) reveals that significant amounts of silica were redistributed by dissolution-precipitation creep during both diagenesis and regional-scale deformation. This physicochemical process led to silica remobilisation and volume loss by stress-induced dissolution of microcrystalline quartz in an aqueous fluid. The dissolved solid phase was transported by diffusion and fluid flow along grain boundaries or within available porosity and then reprecipitated in low-pressure zones, leading to local volume increase. These processes were further enhanced by rheological contrasts between different minerals, resulting in significant variations of chert band thickness. Microstructural observations combined with quantitative microfabric analysis reveal domains of crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in quartz grains within chert layers. The CPO fabrics record strain regimes (e.g., pure and simple shear, extension and shortening) that modified quartz aggregates by dissolution-precipitation creep, providing new insights into the metamorphic and deformation history of BIF. We document microstructures that indicate that non-coaxial deformation was active during diagenesis and subsequent deformation of the Hamersley Province BIF. Further, relatively undeformed chert layers may have been similarly affected by significant amounts of dissolution

  16. Do Secular Trends in the Nickel Content of Banded Iron Formation Record a Methanogen Famine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, S. V.; Pecoits, E.; Papineau, D.; Nisbet, E. G.; Barley, M. E.; Arndt, N. T.; Zahnle, K.; Kamber, B. S.; Konhauser, K. O.

    2008-12-01

    As ancient chemical sediments whose composition was dictated by contemporaneous seawater, Banded Iron Formations (BIF) may prove to be one of the most useful indicators of changing oceanic trace element concentrations over geological timescales. We report here new trace element analyses of over 20 BIF spanning roughly 3 billion years of ocean history. Our data indicate a progressive decline in nickel abundance in BIF with age; we suggest that after the most intense period of mantle plume magmatism and continental crustal growth in Earth's history ca. 2.7 billion years ago, a cooler upper mantle led to decreased eruption of Ni-rich ultramafic rocks (i.e., komatiites), and consequently a reduced flux of dissolved Ni to the oceans. These results, combined with experimentally-determined Ni partition coefficients between simulated Precambrian seawater and diverse iron oxides, indicate that dissolved Ni concentrations may have been as high as 400 nM throughout much of the Archean, but dropped significantly to ~120 nM by 2.5 Ga, and then slowly approached modern day values (~9 nM) by ~500 Ma. The observed decline in the availability of Ni, a key metal cofactor in the enzymes of methanogens, would have progressively stifled methanogenic activity in the oceans and severely disrupted the supply of biogenic methane sometime between 2.7 and 2.5 Ga. Did a nickel famine at the end of the Archean cause catastrophic collapse of atmospheric methane and thereby facilitate the rise of atmospheric oxygen at 2.4 billion years ago, the so-called 'Great Oxidation Event' (GOE)?

  17. Stable Ni Isotope Fractionation In Systems Relevant To Banded Iron-Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, H.; Spivak-Birndorf, L.; Newkirk, D.; Wasylenki, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    An important event in the evolution of life was the rise of atmospheric oxygen during the Proterozoic. Preceding the rise in O2 was a decline in atmospheric methane concentrations, likely due to decreased productivity of methanogenic Archaea. Based on Ni concentrations in banded iron formations (BIF), Konhauser et al. (2009) hypothesized that mantle cooling during the Archaean reduced the amount of Ni present in igneous rocks and in oceans, causing a Ni shortage for methanogens. Methanogens use Ni for cofactor F430, a catalyst during methanogenesis. To confirm Konhauser's hypothesis, a proxy for methanogen productivity in the rock record is necessary, in order to determine whether a decline in methanogen populations correlated with the observed decrease in maximum Ni contents in rocks from the Archaean. Ni isotope ratios recorded in BIF (oceanic sediments consisting of layered iron oxides and cherts) may provide evidence of a decline in methane production. Cameron et al. (2009) have shown that methanogens preferentially assimilate light Ni isotopes. Thus Ni isotopes in BIF have potential use as biomarkers for methanogenesis. Ferrihydrite was almost certainly the dominant Fe-oxide phase precipitating during BIF deposition. Ferrihydrite nanoparticles have large surface areas and are able to remove aqueous metals from solution through multiple sorption mechanisms. Thus we investigated experimentally the relationship between Ni isotopes in solution and Ni associated with ferrihydrite. We experimented with two different sorption mechanisms: adsorption of aqueous Ni onto surfaces of synthetic ferrihydrite and coprecipitation of aqueous Ni with ferrihydrite. Preliminary results indicate that light isotopes are preferentially associated with ferrihydrite in both adsorption and coprecipitation experiments, with an average fractionation of 0.3‰ in terms of δ60/58 Ni. Future experiments will investigate whether the observed isotope fractionations reflect kinetics or

  18. Conversion of sandy tailing from banded iron formation exploitation into glass-ceramic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Alves Rodrigues de Melo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramic materials made of 40.0 wt. (% of sandy tailing from banded iron formation exploitation and 60 wt. (% of slag from steelwork were analyzed. Vitrification was obtained by heating the batch samples up to 1400 °C for 1 hour and quenching the melt on a stainless steel plate. Devitrification was obtained by heat-treating the as-quenched glass samples in isothermal conditions at 750 and 1000 °C for 2 hours. FTIR spectroscopy analysis on the devitrified samples indicates a peak shift towards higher wave number with respect to the as-quenched glass because of the crystallization. XRD analysis revealed the presence of crystalline diopside CaMgSi2O6 as the major phase in the glass samples isothermally heat-treated at 1000 °C. Results also indicated that the devitrification at 1000 °C and an incipient devitrification at 750 °C resulted into harder glass-ceramic materials.

  19. The role of microaerophilic Fe-oxidizing micro-organisms in producing banded iron formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C S; Emerson, D; Luther, G W

    2016-09-01

    Despite the historical and economic significance of banded iron formations (BIFs), we have yet to resolve the formation mechanisms. On modern Earth, neutrophilic microaerophilic Fe-oxidizing micro-organisms (FeOM) produce copious amounts of Fe oxyhydroxides, leading us to wonder whether similar organisms played a role in producing BIFs. To evaluate this, we review the current knowledge of modern microaerophilic FeOM in the context of BIF paleoenvironmental studies. In modern environments wherever Fe(II) and O2 co-exist, microaerophilic FeOM proliferate. These organisms grow in a variety of environments, including the marine water column redoxcline, which is where BIF precursor minerals likely formed. FeOM can grow across a range of O2 concentrations, measured as low as 2 μm to date, although lower concentrations have not been tested. While some extant FeOM can tolerate high O2 concentrations, many FeOM appear to prefer and thrive at low O2 concentrations (~3-25 μm). These are similar to the estimated dissolved O2 concentrations in the few hundred million years prior to the 'Great Oxidation Event' (GOE). We compare biotic and abiotic Fe oxidation kinetics in the presence of varying levels of O2 and show that microaerophilic FeOM contribute substantially to Fe oxidation, at rates fast enough to account for BIF deposition. Based on this synthesis, we propose that microaerophilic FeOM were capable of playing a significant role in depositing the largest, most well-known BIFs associated with the GOE, as well as afterward when global O2 levels increased.

  20. SIMS analyses of silicon and oxygen isotope ratios for quartz from Archean and Paleoproterozoic banded iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Philipp R.; Huberty, Jason M.; Kita, Noriko T.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Kozdon, Reinhard; Valley, John W.

    2011-10-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) are chemical marine sediments dominantly composed of alternating iron-rich (oxide, carbonate, sulfide) and silicon-rich (chert, jasper) layers. Isotope ratios of iron, carbon, and sulfur in BIF iron-bearing minerals are biosignatures that reflect microbial cycling for these elements in BIFs. While much attention has focused on iron, banded iron formations are equally banded silica formations. Thus, silicon isotope ratios for quartz can provide insight on the sources and cycling of silicon in BIFs. BIFs are banded by definition, and microlaminae, or sub-mm banding, are characteristic of many BIFs. In situ microanalysis including secondary ion mass spectrometry is well-suited for analyzing such small features. In this study we used a CAMECA IMS-1280 ion microprobe to obtain highly accurate (±0.3‰) and spatially resolved (˜10 μm spot size) analyses of silicon and oxygen isotope ratios for quartz from several well known BIFs: Isua, southwest Greenland (˜3.8 Ga); Hamersley Group, Western Australia (˜2.5 Ga); Transvaal Group, South Africa (˜2.5 Ga); and Biwabik Iron Formation, Minnesota, USA (˜1.9 Ga). Values of δ 18O range from +7.9‰ to +27.5‰ and include the highest reported δ 18O values for BIF quartz. Values of δ 30Si have a range of ˜5‰ from -3.7‰ to +1.2‰ and extend to the lowest δ 30Si values for Precambrian cherts. Isua BIF samples are homogeneous in δ 18O to ±0.3‰ at mm- to cm-scale, but are heterogeneous in δ 30Si up to 3‰, similar to the range in δ 30Si found in BIFs that have not experienced high temperature metamorphism (up to 300 °C). Values of δ 30Si for quartz are homogeneous to ±0.3‰ in individual sub-mm laminae, but vary by up to 3‰ between multiple laminae over mm-to-cm of vertical banding. The scale of exchange for Si in quartz in BIFs is thus limited to the size of microlaminae, or less than ˜1 mm. We interpret differences in δ 30Si between microlaminae as preserved from primary

  1. Iron isotope and REE+Y composition of the Cauê banded iron formation and related iron ores of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Mônica; Lobato, Lydia M.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P.; Rosière, Carlos A.

    2017-02-01

    The Minas Supergroup banded iron formations (BIFs) of the Brazilian Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) mineral province experienced multiple deformational events synchronous with hypogene mineralization, which resulted in the metamorphism of BIFs to itabirites and their upgrade to high-grade iron ore. Here, we present rare earth element and yttrium (REE+Y) compositions together with iron isotope ratios of itabirites and their host iron orebodies from 10 iron deposits to constrain environmental conditions during BIF deposition and the effects of hypogene iron enrichment. The REE+Y characteristics of itabirites (positive Eu anomaly and LREE depletion) indicate hydrothermal iron contribution to the Minas basin. Iron isotope data and Ce anomalies suggest BIFs were precipitated by a combination of anoxic biological-mediated ferrous iron oxidation and abiotic oxidation in an environment with free oxygen (such as an oxygen oasis), perhaps related to increase in oxygen concentrations before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). The similarity of the REE+Y composition of the itabirites from the different QF deformational domains, as well as to other Superior-type BIFs, indicates that the metamorphism and synchronous hydrothermal mineralization did not significantly affect the geochemical signature of the original BIFs. However, iron isotope compositions of iron ore vary systematically between deformational domains of the QF, likely reflecting the specific mineralization features in each domain.

  2. Iron isotope and REE+Y composition of the Cauê banded iron formation and related iron ores of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Mônica; Lobato, Lydia M.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P.; Rosière, Carlos A.

    2016-04-01

    The Minas Supergroup banded iron formations (BIFs) of the Brazilian Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) mineral province experienced multiple deformational events synchronous with hypogene mineralization, which resulted in the metamorphism of BIFs to itabirites and their upgrade to high-grade iron ore. Here, we present rare earth element and yttrium (REE+Y) compositions together with iron isotope ratios of itabirites and their host iron orebodies from 10 iron deposits to constrain environmental conditions during BIF deposition and the effects of hypogene iron enrichment. The REE+Y characteristics of itabirites (positive Eu anomaly and LREE depletion) indicate hydrothermal iron contribution to the Minas basin. Iron isotope data and Ce anomalies suggest BIFs were precipitated by a combination of anoxic biological-mediated ferrous iron oxidation and abiotic oxidation in an environment with free oxygen (such as an oxygen oasis), perhaps related to increase in oxygen concentrations before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). The similarity of the REE+Y composition of the itabirites from the different QF deformational domains, as well as to other Superior-type BIFs, indicates that the metamorphism and synchronous hydrothermal mineralization did not significantly affect the geochemical signature of the original BIFs. However, iron isotope compositions of iron ore vary systematically between deformational domains of the QF, likely reflecting the specific mineralization features in each domain.

  3. Stratigraphic and tectonic settings of Proterozoic glaciogenic rocks and banded iron-formations: relevance to the snowball Earth debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Grant M.

    2002-11-01

    Among Palaeoproterozoic glacial deposits on four continents, the best preserved and documented are in the Huronian on the north shore of Lake Huron, Ontario, where three glaciogenic formations have been recognized. The youngest is the Gowganda Formation. The glacial deposits of the Gowganda Formation were deposited on a newly formed passive margin. To the west, on the south side of Lake Superior, the oldest Palaeoproterozoic succession (Chocolay Group) begins with glaciogenic diamictites that have been correlated with the Gowganda Formation. The >2.2 Ga passive margin succession (Chocolay Group=upper Huronian) is overlain, with profound unconformity, by a >1.88 Ga succession that includes the superior-type banded iron-formations (BIFs). The iron-formations are therefore not genetically associated with Palaeoproterozoic glaciation but were deposited ˜300 Ma later in a basin that formed as a result of closure of the "Huronian" ocean. In Western Australia, Palaeoproterozoic glaciogenic deposits of the Meteorite Bore Member appear to have formed part of a similar basin fill. The glaciogenic rocks are, however, separated from underlying BIF by a thick siliciclastic succession. In both North America and Western Australia, BIF-deposition took place in compressional (possibly foreland basin) settings but the iron-formations are of greatly different age, suggesting that the most significant control on their formation was not oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere but rather, emplacement of Fe-rich waters (uplifted as a result of ocean floor destruction?) in a siliciclastic-starved environment where oxidation (biogenic?) could take place. Some of the Australian BIFs appear to predate the appearance of red beds in North American Palaeoproterozoic successions and are therefore unlikely to be related to oxygenation of the atmosphere. Neoproterozoic glaciogenic deposits are widespread on the world's continents. Some are associated with iron-formations. Two theories have emerged

  4. Archaean asteroid impacts, banded iron formations and MIF-S anomalies: A discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikson, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    on impact spherule size distribution ( Melosh, H.J., Vickery, A.M. [1991] Nature, 350, 494-497) suggest projectiles several tens of kilometers in diameter (Byerly and Lowe, 1994; Shukloyukov, A., Kyte, F.T., Lugmair, G.W., Lowe, D.R., Byerly, G.R. [2000]. In: Koeberl, C., Gilmour, I. (Eds.), Impacts and the Early Earth, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 99-116; Kyte, F.T., Shukloyukov, A., Lugmair, G.W., Lowe, D.R., Byerly, G.R. [2003] Geology, 31, 283-286). Due to incomplete preservation these impacts represent a minimum rate of the Archaean impact flux. High UV radiation associated with low ozone levels in the Archaean atmosphere may have been further enhanced by large impacts, accentuating MIF-S anomalies. The appearance of iron-rich sediments above late and mid-Archaean impact ejecta units (Glikson, A.Y. [2006] Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 246, 149-160; Glikson, A.Y., Vickers, J. [2007] Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 254, 214-226) may be related either to microbial oxidation of ferrous iron or, alternatively, photochemical oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. Given post-2.45 Ga diluting of possible MIF-S anomalies by the oxygenating ocean sulfate reservoir (Pavlov, A.A., Kasting, J.F. [2002] Astrobiology, 2, 27-41), similar MIF-S anomalies may have been associated with Proterozoic and Phanerozoic impacts, although to date little evidence exists in this regard (Marouka, T., Koeberl, C., Newton, J., Gilmour, I., Bohor, B.F. [2002] Geological Society of America Special Paper 356, pp. 337-344; Koeberl, C., Thiemens, M. [2008] Multi-sulfur isotopes in cretaceous-tertiary boundary samples from the Western interior-search for photochemical effects 2008. Joint Meeting of the Geological Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies with the Gulf Coast Section of SEPM. (abstract)). Detailed sampling and isotopic analyses across the impact ejecta fallout units are

  5. Source heterogeneity for the major components of ~3.7 Ga banded iron formations (Isua Greenstone Belt, Western Greenland)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Robert; Polat, Ali

    2006-01-01

    We report trace element, samarium (Sm)-neodymium (Nd) and lead (Pb) isotopic data for individual micro-and mesobands of the Earth's oldest Banded Iron Formation (BIF) from the  3.7-3.8 Ga Isua Greenstone Belt (IGB, West Greenland) in an attempt to contribute to the characterization...... of the depositional environment and to the understanding of depositional mechanisms of these earliest chemical sediments. Rare earth element (REE)-yttrium (Y) patterns of the individual mesobands show features of modern seawater with diagnostic cerium (Ce/Ce ), presodymium (Pr/Pr ) and Y/holmium (Ho) anomalies. Very......-Nd isotopic relations on a layer-by-layer basis point to two REE sources controlling the back-arc basin depositional environment of the BIF, one being seafloor-vented hydrothermal fluids (eNd (3.7 Ga)   + 3.1), the other being ambient surface seawater which reached its composition by erosion of parts...

  6. The nature of Mesoarchaean seawater and continental weathering in 2.85 Ga banded iron formation, Slave craton, NW Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugaard, Rasmus; Ootes, Luke; Creaser, Robert A.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2016-12-01

    Banded iron formations (BIF) have been extensively used as proxies to infer the chemical composition of ancient bulk seawater. However, their proximity to ancient crust suggests that they might also be used to reveal the composition of emergent continental landmass at the time of their deposition. Here we use the combination of geochemistry and Sm-Nd isotopes on a layer-by-layer basis to interpret the relative contributions of hydrothermal, hydrogenous and terrestrial input to one of the oldest documented Superior-type BIF in the world. The ∼2.85 Ga Central Slave Cover Group BIF is deposited within a rift basin related to a continental margin and is found associated with basement gneisses, as well as shoreline and shallow-shelf type facies, such as fuchsitic quartzite and pebble-to-cobble conglomerate, that confirm a near-shore depositional setting for the BIF. The BIF ranges from a pure chemical oxide (magnetite)-silicate (grunerite + actinolite) sediment with low Al2O3 (segment exhibiting negative εNd(t) values averaging -1.1 and another with positive εNd(t) values averaging +2.5. This suggests input of dissolved REY into the upper seawater from weathering of isotopically different crustal components in the source region. Collectively, we speculate that the low REY in the upper seawater and the overall low Ni content implies a highly weathered crustal surface that was unable to contribute a significant dissolved load to the shelf environment.

  7. Interpretation of high resolution aeromagnetic data for lineaments study and occurrence of Banded Iron Formation in Ogbomoso area, Southwestern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladunjoye, Michael Adeyinka; Olayinka, Abel Idowu; Alaba, Mustapha; Adabanija, Moruffdeen Adedapo

    2016-02-01

    The quest for solid mineral resource as an alternative for oil income in Nigeria presents opportunity to diversify the resource base of the country. To fill some information gap on the long abandoned Ajase and Gbede Banded Iron Formations (BIF) in Ogbomoso area, Southwestern Nigeria, high resolution aeromagnetic data of Ogbomoso - Sheet 222 was interpreted; to provide a better understanding of the mode of occurrence of the iron ore and associated structural features and geologic model. These were accomplished by subjecting reduced-to-pole (RTP) residual aeromagnetic intensity map to various data filtering and processing involving total horizontal derivative, vertical derivative, Upward Continuation (UC), Downward Continuation (DC), Euler Deconvolution at different Spectral Indices (SI), and Analytical signal using Geosoft Oasis Montaj 6.4.2 (HJ) data processing and analysis software. The resultants maps were overlain, compared and or plotted on RTP residual aeromagnetic intensity map and or geological map and interpreted in relation to the surface geological map. Positive magnetic anomalies observed on the RTP residual aeromagnetic intensity map ranged from 2.1 to 94.0 nT and associated with contrasting basement rocks, Ajase and Gbede BIF; while negative magnetic anomalies varied between -54.7 nT and -2.8 nT and are associated with intrusive bodies. Interpreted lineaments obtained from total horizontal derivative map were separated into two categories namely ductile and brittle based on their character vis-à-vis magnetic anomalies on RTP intensity map. Whilst the brittle lineaments were interpreted as fracture or faults; the ductile lineaments were interpreted as folds or representing the internal fabric of the rock units. In addition prominent magnetic faults mainly due to offset of similar magnetic domain/gradient were also interpreted. The iron ore mineralization is distributed within the eastern portion of the study area with Ajase BIF at relatively greater

  8. Chemical fingerprint of iron oxides related to iron enrichment of banded iron formation from the Cauê Formation - Esperança Deposit, Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil: a laser ablation ICP-MS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilia Aparecida Ramos de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Chemical signatures of iron oxides from dolomitic itabirite and high-grade iron ore from the Esperança deposit, located in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, indicate that polycyclic processes involving changing of chemical and redox conditions are responsible for the iron enrichment on Cauê Formation from Minas Supergroup. Variations of Mn, Mg and Sr content in different generations of iron oxides from dolomitic itabirite, high-grade iron ore and syn-mineralization quartz-carbonate-hematite veins denote the close relationship between high-grade iron ore formation and carbonate alteration. This indicates that dolomitic itabirite is the main precursor of the iron ore in that deposit. Long-lasting percolation of hydrothermal fluids and shifts in the redox conditions have contributed to changes in the Y/Ho ratio, light/heavy rare earth elements ratio and Ce anomaly with successive iron oxide generations (martite-granular hematite, as well as lower abundance of trace elements including rare earth elements in the younger specularite generations.

  9. Crystallographic Fabrics, Grain Boundary Microstructure and Shape Preferred Orientation of Deformed Banded Iron Formations and their Significance for Deformation Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Carlos Fernando; Graça, Leonardo; Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Ferreira, Filippe

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of grain boundaries and shapes along with crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) are a key aspect of investigations of rock microstructures for their correlation with deformation mechanisms. Rapid developments have occurred in the studying rock microstructures due to recent improvements in analytical techniques such as Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). EBSD technique allows quick automated microtextural characteritzation. The deformed banded iron formations (BIFs) occurring in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) province in Brazil have been studied extensively with EBSD. All studies have focused mainly in CPOs. The general agreement is that dislocation creep was the dominant process of deformation, for the strong c-axis fabric of hematite crystals. This idea is substantiated by viscoplastic self-consistent models for deformation of hematite. However there are limitations to analyzing natural CPOs alone, or those generated by deformation models. The strong c-axis fabric could be taken as equally powerful an evidence for other known deformation mechanisms. Some grain boundary types in BIFs of the QF are irregular and comprise equant grains in granoblastic texture (Figure 1a). CPOs for this kind are strong and consistent with a predominance of dislocation creep. Others are very regular and long parallel to basal planes of hematites forming large elongated crystals (lepidoblastic texture, Figure 1b). Such crystals are called specularite, and their formation has been previously attributed to dislocation creep. This is erroneous because of the high strains which would be required. Their shape must be due to anisotropic grain growth. Other types lie between the above end-textures. Both types of grain shape microstructures have the same core deformation mechanism. Describing their genetic differences is crucial, since specularite owe its shape to anisotropic grain growth. It is not possible yet to confirm that dislocation creep was the

  10. Phosphogenesis in the 2460 and 2728 million-year-old banded iron formations as evidence for biological cycling of phosphate in the early biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Liang; Sun, Si; Chan, Lung S

    2012-01-01

    The banded iron formation deposited during the first 2 billion years of Earth's history holds the key to understanding the interplay between the geosphere and the early biosphere at large geological timescales. The earliest ore-scale phosphorite depositions formed almost at ∼2.0-2.2 billion years ago bear evidence for the earliest bloom of aerobic life. The cycling of nutrient phosphorus and how it constrained primary productivity in the anaerobic world of Archean-Palaeoproterozoic eons are still open questions. The controversy centers about whether the precipitation of ultrafine ferric oxyhydroxide due to the microbial Fe(II) oxidation in oceans earlier than 1.9 billion years substantially sequestrated phosphate, and whether this process significantly limited the primary productivity of the early biosphere. In this study, we report apatite radial flowers of a few micrometers in the 2728 million-year-old Abitibi banded iron formation and the 2460 million-year-old Kuruman banded iron formation and their similarities to those in the 535 million-year-old Lower Cambrian phosphorite. The lithology of the 535 Million-year-old phosphorite as a biosignature bears abundant biomarkers that reveal the possible similar biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in the Later Archean and Palaeoproterozoic oceans. These apatite radial flowers represent the primary precipitation of phosphate derived from the phytoplankton blooms in the euphotic zones of Neoarchean and Palaoeproterozoic oceans. The unbiased distributions of the apatite radial flowers within sub-millimeter bands do not support the idea of an Archean Crisis of Phosphate. This is the first report of the microbial mediated mineralization of phosphorus before the Great Oxidation Event when the whole biosphere was still dominated by anaerobic microorganisms.

  11. Ancient geochemical cycling in the Earth as inferred from Fe isotope studies of banded iron formations from the Transvaal Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Clark; Beard, Brian; Beukes, Nicolas; Klein, Cornelis; O'Leary, Julie

    2002-11-01

    Variations in the isotopic composition of Fe in Late Archean to Early Proterozoic Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) from the Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa, span nearly the entire range yet measured on Earth, from -2.5 to +1.0‰ in 56Fe/54Fe ratios relative to the bulk Earth. With a current state-of-the-art precision of +/-0.05‰ for the 56Fe/54Fe ratio, this range is 70 times analytical error, demonstrating that significant Fe isotope variations can be preserved in ancient rocks. Significant variation in Fe isotope compositions of rocks and minerals appears to be restricted to chemically precipitated sediments, and the range measured for BIFs stands in marked contrast to the isotopic homogeneity of igneous rocks, which have δ56Fe=0.00+/-0.05‰, as well as the majority of modern loess, aerosols, riverine loads, marine sediments, and Proterozoic shales. The Fe isotope compositions of hematite, magnetite, Fe carbonate, and pyrite measured in BIFs appears to reflect a combination of (1) mineral-specific equilibrium isotope fractionation, (2) variations in the isotope compositions of the fluids from which they were precipitated, and (3) the effects of metabolic processing of Fe by bacteria. For minerals that may have been in isotopic equilibrium during initial precipitation or early diagenesis, the relative order of δ56Fe values appears to decrease in the order magnetite > siderite > ankerite, similar to that estimated from spectroscopic data, although the measured isotopic differences are much smaller than those predicted at low temperature. In combination with on-going experimental determinations of equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation factors, the data for BIF minerals place additional constraints on the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation factors for the system Fe(III)-Fe(II)-hematite-magnetite-Fe carbonate. δ56Fe values for pyrite are the lowest yet measured for natural minerals, and stand in marked contrast to the high δ56Fe values that are predicted from

  12. Development of Sintered Iron Driving Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Khanna

    1974-07-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation reports some detailed studies carried out on the development testing and proving of sintered Iron Driving Bands. Sintering studies on two different types of iron powders together with a few Fe-Cu compositions have been made and based on the results there of, parameters for development iron driving bands have been standardised. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that substitution of copper by sintered iron is highly practicable alternative.

  13. Millimeter-scale variations of stable isotope abundances in carbonates from banded iron-formations in the Hamersley Group of Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, M. E.; Hayes, J. M.; Studley, S. A.; Walter, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several diamond drill cores from formations within the Hamersley Group of Western Australia have been studied for evidence of short-range variations in the isotopic compositions of the carbonates. For a set of 32 adjacent microbands analyzed in a specimen from the Marra Mamba Iron Formation, carbon isotope compositions of individual microbands ranged from -2.8 to -19.8 per mil compared to PDB and oxygen isotope compositions ranged from 10.2 to 20.8 per mil compared to SMOW. A pattern of alternating abundances was present, with the average isotopic contrasts between adjacent microbands being 3.0 per mil for carbon and 3.1 per mil for oxygen. Similar results were obtained for a suite of 34 microbands (in four groups) from the Bruno's Band unit of the Mount Sylvia Formation. Difficulties were experienced in preparing samples of single microbands from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, but overall isotopic compositions were in good agreement with values reported by previous authors. Chemical analyses showed that isotopically light carbon and oxygen were correlated with increased concentrations of iron. The preservation of these millimeter-scale variations in isotopic abundances is interpreted as inconsistent with a metamorphic origin for the isotopically light carbon in the BIF carbonates. A biological origin is favored for the correlated variations in 13C and Fe, and it is suggested that the 13C-depleted carbonates may derive either from fermentative metabolism or from anaerobic respiration. A model is presented in which these processes occur near the sediment-water interface and are coupled with an initial oxidative precipitation of the iron.

  14. Micro- and nanobands in late Archean and Palaeoproterozoic banded-iron formations as possible mineral records of annual and diurnal depositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Liang

    2014-04-01

    The microbands in Precambrian banded-iron formations (BIFs) have been conjectured to record annual or even diurnal depositions. However, these bands have rarely been observed in high resolution at their true (micro) scale. Here, I suggest that nanobands of fine-grained hematite represent possible diurnal depositions and that microbands of chert/jasper represent possible annual depositions in three sets of BIFs: 2460-Myr BIFs from the Kuruman Iron Formation, Transvaal Supergroup of South Africa; 2480-Myr BIFs from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, Western Australia; and 2728-Myr BIFs from the Hunter Mine Group, Abitibi Greenstone Belt, Canada. Observations made using scanning electron microscopy indicate that hematite and chert were syngenetic, and that there was a hiatus between their precipitation and the genesis of the remainder of the minerals containing structural Fe(II). Spindle-like grains of hematite, monocrystals of magnetite, and ferro-dolomite formed microbands of ∼30-70 μm in thickness, which appear cyclically in the matrix of the chert. Neither the band-bound magnetite and dolomite nor the linear formations of the hematite spindles represent annual depositions due to their diagenetic features. The thinnest microbands (∼3-∼12 μm) were observed in the chert and jasper, and indicate depositional rates of 6.6-22.2 m/Myr in the BIFs. These rates are consistent with the integrated deposition rates calculated by geochronologic methods for the BIFs, if annual deposition is assumed. The ∼26-nm nanobands observed only in hematite grains reflect an annual deposition of ∼18.6 μm, or ∼18.6 m/Myr, which is also consistent with the depositional rate calculated by geochronologic methods. It is tentatively suggested that these ∼26-nm nanobands were formed from the diurnal precipitation of Fe(III) resulting from the circadian metabolism of Fe(II)-oxidizing or oxygen-evolving photosynthetic microorganisms, which slowed down the rise

  15. Investigating variations in background response in measurements of downhole natural gamma in a banded iron formation in the Pilbara, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Richard J.; Silversides, Katherine L.

    2017-02-01

    Measurements of downhole natural gamma radiation (NGR) provide important information about the location of shale or clay bands within stratigraphical sequences (e.g. in Banded Iron Formations; BIF). An ability to link NGR with other kinds of measurements that are acquired at greater spatial and stratigraphic resolution, such as those acquired by hyperspectral sensing, would open up possibilities for improving the resolution of boundary models. To do this, measurements made by NGR and hyperspectral sensing must be highly correlated and any inconsistencies between these data must be understood. Observations made from the literature and from NGR measurements made in a BIF formation of the Hamersley Group, Pilbara, Western Australia, suggest that NGR measurements in some sections of ore or BIF are elevated compared with other sections; laboratory assays of drill chips do not however suggest the presence of shale or clay. These apparent inconsistencies were investigated using hyperspectral measurements and chemical assays of rock cores in the laboratory and NGR measurements made in the field. We show that the patterns of elevated NGR were a consistent feature of the stratigraphy for this region. Comparison of NGR and Al2O3 made by laboratory assay and from hyperspectral sensing show that elevated NGR measurements were caused by Uranium which was not associated with the presence of shale. Neither Thorium nor Potassium contributed to the elevated gamma signal in the ore. Thorium was strongly correlated with Al2O3 and was found to provide the best indicator of the presence of shale in the stratigraphy.

  16. Melting in the FeOsbnd SiO2 system to deep lower-mantle pressures: Implications for subducted Banded Iron Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Chie; Hirose, Kei; Nomura, Ryuichi; Ballmer, Maxim D.; Miyake, Akira; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-04-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs), consisting of layers of iron oxide and silica, are far denser than normal mantle material and should have been subducted and sunk into the deep lower mantle. We performed melting experiments on Fe2SiO4 from 26 to 131 GPa in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC). The textural and chemical characterization of a sample recovered from the DAC revealed that SiO2 is the liquidus phase for the whole pressure range examined in this study. The chemical compositions of partial melts are very rich in FeO, indicating that the eutectic melt compositions in the FeOsbnd SiO2 binary system are very close to the FeO end-member. The eutectic temperature is estimated to be 3540 ± 150 K at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), which is likely to be lower than the temperature at the top of the core at least in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic eons, suggesting that subducted BIFs underwent partial melting in a thermal boundary layer above the CMB. The FeO-rich melts formed by partial melting of the BIFs were exceedingly dense and therefore migrated downward. We infer that such partial melts have caused iron enrichment in the bottom part of the mantle, which may have contributed to the formation of ultralow velocity zones (ULVZs) observed today. On the other hand, solid residues left after the segregation of the FeO-rich partial melts have been almost pure SiO2, and therefore buoyant in the deep lower mantle to be entrained in mantle upwellings. They have likely been stretched and folded repeatedly by mantle flow, forming SiO2 streaks within the mantle "marble cake". Mantle packages enhanced by SiO2 streaks may be the origin of seismic scatterers in the mid-lower mantle.

  17. Archean deep-water depositional system: interbedded and banded iron formation and clastic turbidites in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentner, Danielle; Lowe, Donald

    2013-04-01

    The 3.23 billion year old sediments in the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa include some of the world's oldest known deep-water deposits. Unique to this locality are turbidites interbedded with banded iron formation (BIF) and banded ferruginous chert (BFC). This unusual association may provide clues for reconstructing Archean deep-water depositional settings. For our study we examined freshly drilled core in addition to measuring ~500 m of outcrop exposures along road cuts. The stacking pattern follows an overall BIF to BFC to amalgamated turbidite succession, although isolated turbidites do occur throughout the sequence. The turbidites are predominately massive, and capped with thin, normally graded tops that include mud rip-ups, chert plates, and ripples. The lack of internal stratification and the amalgamated character suggests emplacement by surging high-density turbidity currents. Large scours and channels are absent and bedding is tabular: the flows were collapsing with little turbulence reaching the bed. In contrast, field evidence indicates the BIF and BFC most likely precipitated directly out of the water column. Preliminary interpretations indicate the deposits may be related to a pro-deltaic setting. (1) Deltaic systems can generate long-lived, high volume turbidity currents. (2) The contacts between the BIF, BFC, and turbidite successions are gradual and inter-fingered, possibly representing lateral facies relationships similar to modern pro-delta environments. (3) Putative fan delta facies, including amalgamated sandstone and conglomerate, exist stratigraphically updip of the basinal sediments.

  18. Thyroid hormone-dependent formation of a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) in the neonatal brain is not exacerbated under conditions of low dietary iron (FeD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, S R; Bastian, T W; Wang, Y; Kosian, P; Anderson, G W; Gilbert, M E

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for brain development and insufficiencies can lead to structural abnormalities in specific brain regions. Administration of the goitrogen propylthiouracil (PTU) reduces TH production by inhibiting thyroperoxidase (TPO), an enzyme that oxidizes iodide for the synthesis of TH. TPO activity is iron (Fe)-dependent and dietary iron deficiency (FeD) also reduces circulating levels of TH. We have previously shown that modest degrees of TH insufficiency induced in pregnant rat dams alters the expression of TH-responsive genes in the cortex and hippocampus of the neonate, and results in the formation of a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) in the corpus callosum (Royland et al., 2008, Bastian et al., 2014, Gilbert et al., 2014). The present experiment investigated if FeD alone was sufficient to induce a SBH or if FeD would augment SBH formation at lower doses of PTU. One set of pregnant rats was administered 0, 1, 3, or 10ppm of PTU via drinking water starting on gestational day (GD) 6. FeD was induced in a 2nd set of dams beginning on GD2. A third set of dams received the FeD diet from GD2 paired with either 1ppm or 3ppm PTU beginning on GD6. All treatments continued until the time of sacrifice. On PN18, one female pup from each litter was sacrificed and the brain examined for SBH. We observed lower maternal, PN2 and PN18 pup serum T4 in response to PTU. FeD reduced serum T4 in pups on PN16, but did not affect serum T4 in dams or PN2 pups. Neither did FeD in combination with PTU alter T4 levels in dams on PN18 or pups on PN2 compared to PTU treatment alone. By PN16, however more severe T4 reductions were observed in pups when FeD was combined with PTU. SBH increased with increasing dosage of PTU, but counter to our hypothesis, no SBH was detected in the offspring of FeD dams. As such, T4 levels in dams and newborn pups rather than older neonates appear to be a better predictor SBH associated with TH insufficiency. These data indirectly

  19. Anoxygenic growth of cyanobacteria on Fe(II) and their associated biosignatures: Implications for biotic contributions to Precambrian Banded Iron Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenteau, M.; Jahnke, L. L.; Cady, S. L.; Pierson, B.

    2011-12-01

    Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) are widespread Precambrian sedimentary deposits that accumulated in deep ocean basins or shallow platformal areas with inputs of reduced iron (Fe(II)) and silica from deep ocean hydrothermal activity. There is debate as to whether abiotic or biotic mechanisms were responsible for the oxidation of aqueous Fe(II) and the subsequent accumulation of ferric iron (Fe(III)) mineral assemblages in BIFs. Biotic Fe(II) oxidation could have occurred indirectly as a result of the photosynthetic production of oxygen by cyanobacteria, or could have been directly mediated by anoxygenic phototrophs or chemolithotrophs. The anoxygenic use of Fe(II) as an electron donor for photosynthesis has also been hypothesized in cyanobacteria, representing another biotic mechanism by which Fe(II) could be oxidized in BIFs. This type of photoferrotrophic metabolism may also represent a key step in the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Members of our group have speculated that an intermediate reductant such as Fe(II) could have acted as a transitional electron donor before water. The widespread abundance of Fe(II) in Archean and Neoproterozoic ferruginous oceans would have made it particularly suitable as an electron donor for photosynthesis. We have been searching for modern descendants of such an ancestral "missing link" cyanobacterium in the phototrophic mats at Chocolate Pots, a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park with a constant outflow of anoxic Fe(II)-rich thermal water. Our physiological ecology study of the Synechococcus-Chloroflexi mat using C-14 bicarbonate uptake and autoradiography experiments revealed that the cyanobacteria grow anoxygenically using Fe(II) as an electron donor for photosynthesis in situ. An initial set of similar experiments substituting C-13 bicarbonate as the tracer was used to characterize labeling of the community lipid biomarker signature and confirm the C-14 results. Under light conditions with and without Fe(II), the C

  20. The reliability of ∼2.9 Ga old Witwatersrand banded iron formations (South Africa) as archives for Mesoarchean seawater: Evidence from REE and Nd isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehmann, Sebastian; Bau, Michael; Smith, Albertus J. B.; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Dantas, Elton L.; Bühn, Bernhard

    2015-11-01

    Pure marine chemical sediments, such as (Banded) Iron Formations, (B)IFs, are archives of geochemical proxies for the composition of Precambrian seawater and may provide information about the ancient hydrosphere-atmosphere system. We here present rare earths and yttrium (REY) and high precision Sm-Nd isotope data of ∼2.90 Ga old Superior-type BIFs from the Witwatersrand Supergroup, South Africa, and compare those with data for near-contemporaneous BIFs from the correlative Pongola Supergroup (Superior-type BIF) and from the Pietersburg Greenstone Belt (Algoma-type IF), respectively. All Witwatersrand samples studied display the typical general REY distribution of Archean seawater, but their REY anomalies are less pronounced and their immobile element concentrations are higher than those of other pure (B)IFs. These observations indicate the presence of significant amounts of detrital aluminosilicates in the Witwatersrand BIFs and question the reliability of the Contorted Bed and Water Tower BIFs (Parktown Formation, West Rand Group) as archives of Mesoarchean seawater. Significant post-depositional alteration of the REY budget and the Sm-Nd isotope system is not observed. The Nd isotopic compositions of the purest BIF samples, i.e. the most reliable archives for Witwatersrand seawater, show initial εNd values between -3.95 and -2.25. This range is more negative than what is observed in ambient shales, indicating a decoupling of suspended and dissolved loads in the "near-shore" Witwatersrand Basin seawater. However, εNd range overlaps with that of the correlative Pongola BIF (Alexander et al., 2008). The deeper-water Algoma-type Pietersburg BIF shows more positive (i.e. more mantle-like) εNd2.9Ga values, supporting the hypothesis that a significant amount of its REY inventory was derived from black smoker-style, high-temperature hydrothermal fluids that had altered seafloor basalts. In marked contrast, the dissolved REY budgets (including the Nd isotopic

  1. 微生物参与前寒武纪条带状铁建造沉积的研究进展%Microbial mineralization in Precambrian banded iron formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴文芳; 李一良; 潘永信

    2012-01-01

    地球演化早期太古代和早元古代大规模的条带状铁建造(BIF)是目前世界上最重要的铁矿资源.已有的稳定同位素组成、分子化石以及岩石磁学性质等证据支持早期微生物广泛参与了BIF的形成.本文评述了微生物参与BIF形成过程中铁搬运和沉淀及其同位素分馏、生物标志物和岩石磁学证据.深入地研究BIF成矿中的微生物矿化贡献,有助于解释BIF形成机制,反演前寒武纪大气-海洋环境演化,以及理解地球早期生命的过程.%Late Achaean to Palaeoproterozoic deposition of banded iron formations ( BIF) is the most important iron ore resource on Earth. As evident by stable isotopes compositions, fossil molecule, rock magnetic properties , microorganisms such as cyanobacteria, iron-oxidizing and iron-reducing bacteria are suggested to have participated in the deposition of BIF. In this review, we briefly introduced the global distribution of BIF and the environments of early Precambrian Earth; then we went through the recent studies on bacterial mineralization related to the deposition of banded iron, including oxygenic/anoxygenie photosynthesis and dissimilatory iron reduction. Finally,we proposed some challenges and prospectives. We suggest three approaches to understand the microbial mediated deposition of BIF; Searching for organic and inorganic signatures of bacterial mineralization, investigating the microbial participation in modern iron deposition in aquatic environments comparable to the microbial process of BIF, and laboratory microbial mineralization simulation, aiming at promoting the research on BIF formation mechanism.

  2. Thyroid Hormone-Dependent Formation of a Subcortical Band Heterotopia (SBH) in the Neonatal Brain is not Exacerbated Under Conditions of Low Dietary Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for brain development. Modest TH insufficiency in pregnant rats induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) results in formation of a structural abnormality, a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH), in brains of offspring. PTU reduces TH by inhibiting the s...

  3. The formation of Palæoproterozoic banded iron formations and their associated Fe and Mn deposits, with reference to the Griqualand West deposits, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Dietrich D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper models the physico-chemical conditions of a Neoarchæan to Palæoproterozoic marine basin in which the sedimentary sequence of BIF, Fe and Mn ores of the Lake Superior-type formed. The model is based on Eh-pH diagram stability fields for Fe, silica and Mn solubilities (taken from the literature) and on field observations of the lithological sequences. BIF formation took place in epicontinental marine basins with free access to the ocean. The main Fe source for BIF formation was ocean enriched with about 6-10 ppm ferrous Fe of hydrothermal geochemical affinity. Land-derived Fe influxes into the BIF-forming basins certainly contributed, but the lack of clastic sedimentation precludes estimation of element budgets. The main silica source for formation of chert layers is sea water. If silica was precipitated by evaporation, the silica concentration of the BIF-forming sea must have been close to saturation (15-20 ppm). Biogenic silica concentration from a possible silica undersaturated sea may not be excluded. These inferred BIF-forming conditions fit the global occurrence of Lake Superior-type BIF in general, whereas special sedimentary environments were probably responsible for the formation of highly enriched laminated Fe ore at the Maremane Dome and in the Sishen-Kathu mining district in Griqualand West, and for the FeMn ores in the Kalahari field. Formation of laminated Fe ore in the Maremane Dome and in the Sishen-Kathu areas were restricted to local deeps within the BIF basins, caused by karst collapse in the underlying Campbellrand dolomites. In such deeps, increased pH values relative to the normal BIF-forming sea caused sufficiently increased silica solubility, resulting in the almost exclusive sedimentation of colloidal Fe precipitates. In the Kalahari field, the BIF sedimentation pile became silica-depleted when approaching the Mn layers. This was genetically controlled by the increased pH of sea water and increased silica solubility. Under

  4. Methodology for determination of trace elements in mineral phases of iron banded formation by LA-ICP-MS; Metodologia de determinacao de elementos-traco em fases minerais de formacoes ferriferas bandadas por LA-ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Denise V.M. de; Nalini Junior, Herminio A.; Sampaio, Geraldo M.S.; Abreu, Adriana T. de; Lana, Cristiano de C., E-mail: deniseversiane2@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: nalini@degeo.ufop.br, E-mail: geraldomssampaio@gmail.com, E-mail: adrianatropia@gmail.com, E-mail: cristianodeclana@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (DEGEO/UFOP), Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Geologia

    2015-07-01

    The study of the chemical composition of mineral phases of iron formation (FF), especially of trace elements, is an important tool in the understanding of the genesis of these rocks and the contribution of the phases in the composition of whole rock. Low mass fraction of such elements in the mineral phases present in this rock type requires a suitable analytical procedure. The laser ablation technique coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) has been widely used for determination of trace elements in geological samples. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop calibration curves for determination of trace elements (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) in mineral phases of banded iron formations by LA-ICP-MS. Several certified reference materials (CRM) were used for calibrate the equipment. The analytical conditions were checked by CRM NIST SRM 614. The results were satisfactory, since the curves showed good linearity coefficients, good accuracy and precision of results. (author)

  5. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  6. A compare geochemistry study for Algoma-and Superior-type banded iron formations%Algoma型和Superior型硅铁建造地球化学对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延河; 侯可军; 万德芳; 张增杰

    2012-01-01

    前寒武纪条带状硅铁建造(BIFs)是世界上最重要的铁矿资源类型和地球早期特有的化学沉积建造类型,广泛分布于太古代-古元古代(3.2~ 1.8Ga),记录了地球早期岩石圈、水圈、大气圈和生物圈的状态及演化.前人根据BIFs的岩石组合和构造地质环境将其划分为Algoma型和Superior型.本文对比研究了Algoma型和Superior型BIFs的硅、氧、铁和多硫同位素特征.不同时代和不同类型BIFs的硅氧同位素组成非常相似,强烈亏损30Si,δ30SiNBS-28为较大的负值.二者的铁同位素和硫同位素非质量分馏效应明显不同.Algoma型BIF的△33S多为负值,而Superior型BIF的△33S多为正值;Algoma型BIF富集重铁同位素,δ56FeIRMM-144多为高正值,而Superior型BIF相对富集轻铁同位素,δ56FeIRMM.144多为负值或小正值.研究提出无论是Algoma型,还是Superior型BIFs都是由地球早期的海底火山热液喷气作用形成的,二者属于同一成矿系统,相对而言,Algoma型BIF与火山活动关系更密切,距离同期火山活动中心更近,多形成于深水盆地,环境更加还原.%The Precambrian banded iron formations ( BIFs) are the most important type for iron resources in the world and extraordinary chemical marine sediments formation only occurred in the early Earth, which were concentrated during Archean to Early Proterozoic eras (3.2 ~ 1.8Ga) and recorded lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere status and evolvement then and there. The BIFs were classified into Algoma- and Superior-type on the basis of mineralogical composition and proposed tectonic setting. But contrastive studies about their geochemical characteristic, depositional environment and origin are little. So the silicon, oxygen, iron and multiple sulfur isotopic compositions of Algoma- and Superior-type BIFs were compared. The silicon isotopic compositions of BIFs of different types and ages are similar and strongly depleted in Si, the S Si

  7. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

    2000-08-08

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  8. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    2001-08-15

    The overall purpose of the project was to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addressed how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  9. Formation and occurrence of biogenic iron-rich minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Danielle; Langley, Sean

    2005-09-01

    unidentified iron-rich mineral phase forms inside Shewanella cells during the anaerobic reduction of ferrihydrite. Several studies have clearly shown that biogenic iron oxides form in present-day environments, but they might also be important components of ancient geological formations, such as banded-iron formations (BIF). BIF formation is still being debated, but there is now strong evidence that bacteria, more specifically, phototrophic iron oxidizers and possibly iron reducers might have been involved. Biogenic iron oxides represent a potential tool in the search for past and present life on Earth and other planetary systems. Despite the promising use of Fe-isotopes and magnetosomes, there is still no clear proof that they can form only as a result of biological activity. In fact, Fe isotope fractionation of abiotic iron oxides is often similar to that of biogenic oxides and the specific mineralogical characteristics of magnetite crystals present inside magnetotactic bacteria can be reproduced under abiotic conditions. In summary, the role of bacteria in iron cycling has been the focus of several studies in the last few decades, but clearly, more research is needed in order to fully assess the role of microorganisms in their formation.

  10. The F'derik-Zouerate iron district: Mesoarchean and Paleoproterozoic iron formation of the Tiris Complex, Islamic Republic of Mauritania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Finn, Carol A.; Anderson, Eric D.; Bradley, Dwight C.; Joud, Mohamed; Taleb Mohamed, Ahmed; Horton, John D.; Johnson, Craig A.; Bouabdellah, Mohammed; Slack, John F.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade hematitic iron ores (of HIF, containing 60-65 wt%Fe) have been mined in Mauritania since 1952 from Superior-type iron deposits of the F'derik-Zouerate district.  Depletion of the high-grade ores in recent years has resulted in new exploration projects focused on lower-grade magnetite ores occurring in Algoma-type banded iron formation (of BIF, containing ca. 35 wt% Fe).  Mauritania is the seventeenth largest iron producer in the world and currently has about 1.1 Gt of crude iron ore reserves. 

  11. Iron and Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Gentile

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, responsible for infection outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this bacterium is mainly due to its multidrug-resistance and ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces, which facilitate long-term persistence in the hospital setting. Given the crucial role of iron in A. baumannii nutrition and pathogenicity, iron metabolism has been considered as a possible target for chelation-based antibacterial chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of iron restriction on A. baumannii growth and biofilm formation using different iron chelators and culture conditions. We report substantial inter-strain variability and growth medium-dependence for biofilm formation by A. baumannii isolates from veterinary and clinical sources. Neither planktonic nor biofilm growth of A. baumannii was affected by exogenous chelators. Biofilm formation was either stimulated by iron or not responsive to iron in the majority of isolates tested, indicating that iron starvation is not sensed as an overall biofilm-inducing stimulus by A. baumannii. The impressive iron withholding capacity of this bacterium should be taken into account for future development of chelation-based antimicrobial and anti-biofilm therapies.

  12. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  13. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    1999-06-01

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals, and the impact of these processes on the solubility of metal contaminants, e.g., uranium, chromium and nickel. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  14. Iron isotope composition of some Archean and Proterozoic iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planavsky, Noah; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Bekker, Andrey; Hofmann, Axel; Little, Crispin T. S.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2012-03-01

    Fe isotopes can provide new insight into redox-dependent biogeochemical processes. Precambrian iron formations (IF) are deserving targets for Fe isotope studies because they are composed predominantly of authigenic Fe phases and record a period of unprecedented iron deposition in Earth's history. We present Fe isotope data for bulk samples from 24 Archean and Proterozoic IF and eight Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich deposits. These data reveal that many Archean and early Paleoproterozoic iron formations were a sink for isotopically heavy Fe, in contrast to later Proterozoic and Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich rocks. The positive δ56Fe values in IF are best explained by delivery of particulate ferric oxides formed in the water column to the sediment-water interface. Because IF are a net sink for isotopically heavy Fe, there must be a corresponding pool of isotopically light Fe in the sedimentary record. Earlier work suggested that Archean pyritic black shales were an important part of this light sink before 2.35 billion years ago (Ga). It is therefore likely that the persistently and anomalously low δ56Fe values in shales are linked with the deposition of isotopically heavy Fe in IF in the deeper parts of basins. IF deposition produced a residual isotopically light dissolved Fe pool that was captured by pyritic Fe in shales. Local dissimilatory Fe reduction in porewater and associated diagenetic reactions resulting in pyrite and carbonate precipitation may have further enhanced Fe isotope heterogeneity in marine sediments, and an 'iron shuttle' may have transported isotopically light Fe from shelf sediments to the basin. Nevertheless, water-column processing of hydrothermally delivered Fe likely had the strongest influence on the bulk iron isotope composition of Archean and Paleoproterozoic iron formations and other marine sediments.

  15. Formation of protein-coated iron minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Allison; Moore, Geoffrey R; Le Brun, Nick E

    2005-11-21

    The ability of iron to cycle between Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) forms has led to the evolution, in different forms, of several iron-containing protein cofactors that are essential for a wide variety of cellular processes, to the extent that virtually all cells require iron for survival and prosperity. The redox properties of iron, however, also mean that this metal is potentially highly toxic and this, coupled with the extreme insolubility of Fe(3+), presents the cell with the significant problem of how to maintain this essential metal in a safe and bioavailable form. This has been overcome through the evolution of proteins capable of reversibly storing iron in the form of a Fe(3+) mineral. For several decades the ferritins have been synonymous with the function of iron storage. Within this family are subfamilies of mammalian, plant and bacterial ferritins which are all composed of 24 subunits assembled to form an essentially spherical protein with a central cavity in which the mineral is laid down. In the past few years it has become clear that other proteins, belonging to the family of DNA-binding proteins from starved cells (the Dps family), which are oligomers of 12 subunits, and to the frataxin family, which may contain up to 48 subunits, are also able to lay down a Fe(3+) mineral core. Here we present an overview of the formation of protein-coated iron minerals, with particular emphasis on the structures of the protein coats and the mechanisms by which they promote core formation. We show on the one hand that significant mechanistic similarities exist between structurally dissimilar proteins, while on the other that relatively small structural differences between otherwise similar proteins result in quite dramatic mechanistic differences.

  16. Biogenicity of an Early Quaternary iron formation, Milos Island, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi Fru, E; Ivarsson, M; Kilias, S P; Frings, P J; Hemmingsson, C; Broman, C; Bengtson, S; Chatzitheodoridis, E

    2015-05-01

    A ~2.0-million-year-old shallow-submarine sedimentary deposit on Milos Island, Greece, harbours an unmetamorphosed fossiliferous iron formation (IF) comparable to Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs). This Milos IF holds the potential to provide clues to the origin of Precambrian BIFs, relative to biotic and abiotic processes. Here, we combine field stratigraphic observations, stable isotopes of C, S and Si, rock petrography and microfossil evidence from a ~5-m-thick outcrop to track potential biogeochemical processes that may have contributed to the formation of the BIF-type rocks and the abrupt transition to an overlying conglomerate-hosted IF (CIF). Bulk δ(13) C isotopic compositions lower than -25‰ provide evidence for biological contribution by the Calvin and reductive acetyl-CoA carbon fixation cycles to the origin of both the BIF-type and CIF strata. Low S levels of ~0.04 wt.% combined with δ(34) S estimates of up to ~18‰ point to a non-sulphidic depository. Positive δ(30) Si records of up to +0.53‰ in the finely laminated BIF-type rocks indicate chemical deposition on the seafloor during weak periods of arc magmatism. Negative δ(30) Si data are consistent with geological observations suggesting a sudden change to intense arc volcanism potentially terminated the deposition of the BIF-type layer. The typical Precambrian rhythmic rocks of alternating Fe- and Si-rich bands are associated with abundant and spatially distinct microbial fossil assemblages. Together with previously proposed anoxygenic photoferrotrophic iron cycling and low sedimentary N and C potentially connected to diagenetic denitrification, the Milos IF is a biogenic submarine volcano-sedimentary IF showing depositional conditions analogous to Archaean Algoma-type BIFs.

  17. Phase Formation Behavior in Ultrathin Iron Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jõgi, Indrek; Jacobsson, T Jesper; Fondell, Mattis; Wätjen, Timo; Carlsson, Jan-Otto; Boman, Mats; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2015-11-17

    Nanostructured iron oxides, and especially hematite, are interesting for a wide range of applications ranging from gas sensors to renewable solar hydrogen production. A promising method for deposition of low-dimensional films is atomic layer deposition (ALD). Although a potent technique, ALD of ultrathin films is critically sensitive to the substrate and temperature conditions where initial formation of islands and crystallites influences the properties of the films. In this work, deposition at the border of the ALD window forming a hybrid ALD/pulsed CVD (pCVD) deposition is utilized to obtain a deposition less sensitive to the substrate. A thorough analysis of iron oxide phases formation on two different substrates, Si(100) and SiO2, was performed. Films between 3 and 50 nm were deposited and analyzed with diffraction techniques, high-resolution Raman spectroscopy, and optical spectroscopy. Below 10 nm nominal film thickness, island formation and phase dependent particle crystallization impose constraints for deposition of phase pure iron oxides on non-lattice-matching substrates. Films between 10 and 20 nm thickness on SiO2 could effectively be recrystallized into hematite whereas for the corresponding films on Si(100), no recrystallization occurred. For films thicker than 20 nm, phase pure hematite can be formed directly with ALD/pCVD with very low influence of the substrate on either Si or SiO2. For more lattice matched substrates such as SnO2:F, Raman spectroscopy indicated formation of the hematite phase already for films with 3 nm nominal thickness and clearly for 6 nm films. Analysis of the optical properties corroborated the analysis and showed a quantum confined blue-shift of the absorption edge for the thinnest films.

  18. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact.

  19. Formation of Degenerate Band Gaps in Layered Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey P. Vinogradov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the review, peculiarities of spectra of one-dimensional photonic crystals made of anisotropic and/or magnetooptic materials are considered. The attention is focused on band gaps of a special type—the so called degenerate band gaps which are degenerate with respect to polarization. Mechanisms of formation and properties of these band gaps are analyzed. Peculiarities of spectra of photonic crystals that arise due to the linkage between band gaps are discussed. Particularly, it is shown that formation of a frozen mode is caused by linkage between Brillouin and degenerate band gaps. Also, existence of the optical Borrmann effect at the boundaries of degenerate band gaps and optical Tamm states at the frequencies of degenerate band gaps are analyzed.

  20. Subsurface Aluminum Nitride Formation in Iron-Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, June H.

    , which gradually decreased the internal precipitation zones with increasing aluminum content. In samples containing 8 wt.% aluminum, a thick continuous oxide scale formed and prevented nitrogen and oxygen penetration into the bulk of the sample, thus preventing the formation of any internal precipitates. The effect of modifying the heating rate in pure N2 atmospheres was examined. Samples were heated over the course of 1, 10, or 100 minutes. Faster heating rates increased the aluminum content in the oxide scale on all samples. Additionally, these rapid heating rate samples had either had lower internal precipitation depths or no internal precipitates. Experiments were conducted in N2--2.5% H2/H 2O mixtures with varying dew points to lower the oxygen potential of the reaction gas and prevent the formation of external iron oxide scales. In the 3 and 5 wt.% Al alloys, this produced an internal aluminum-rich oxide band which inhibited further internal precipitation. Samples treated in atmospheres to simulate the reheat furnace combustion atmosphere experienced dramatically increased external oxidation in addition to inward growth of the oxide scale and internal precipitation of oxides and nitrides within the metal. The most important scientific findings of this dissertation are the dramatic effect of heating rate on modifying the external scale of the alloys presented and the presence of continuous internal oxide bands in several samples throughout the study. Oxidation studies typically occur for longer times and in higher oxygen contents than the present results, so the influence of heating rate is either largely unnoticed or is overcome by oxide growth at long times. Oxide bands have been observed in literature, but few aluminum oxide bands have been seen before this study. vi.

  1. Formation of silica iron oxide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bawab, Abeer F.

    The microemulsion-gel method was developed as an alternative process in the production of room temperature glasses. This method is based on the formation of a microemulsion, to which is added a metal alkoxide that undergoes hydrolysis and condensation to form an oxide network, which is dried into glass. The goal of this work is to understand the sol-gel process upon addition of hydrate metal salts. The thermal transitions of the silica containing ferric nitrate hydrate were examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Using infrared (IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The glasses with a less than 30 mol % iron nitrate were amorphous, while those higher concentration were crystalline. Based on XRD the thermal transitions did not alter the crystallinity. The IR spectra indicated the existence of Si-O-Fe bonds. Thermal analysis indicated similar transitions as exhibited by pure iron nitrate with minor modifications due to interactions with the silica. The reaction between tetraethoxysilane and chloral hydrate in ethanol was followed by NMR of the sp{29}Si nucleus at two different pHs. The sp{29}Si NMR spectra were similar to those reported for the reactions in alcohol between tetraethoxysilane and water of low pH, and for the reactions in the presence of inorganic hydrate. At pH 4, monomene silicon species were detected where at pH 2 the reaction was sufficiently rapid that multi hydroxy monomers were not detected as expected from the catalysts. The reaction proceeded without adding water. The reaction between aluminum chloride and methoxydimethyloctylsilane was investigated at room temperature using NMR and IR spectroscopy in addition to a molecular weight determination from the freezing point reduction in benzene. The structure as deduced from the experimental results was found to be a dimer containing two silicon atoms and two aluminum atoms of which the latter were tetrahedrally coordinated.

  2. On the formation of iron(III) oxides via oxidation of iron(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongiovanni, R.; Pelizzetti, E. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Analitica; Borgarello, E. [Eniricerche SpA, Milan (Italy); Meisel, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Formation of iron oxides in aqueous salt solutions is reviewed. The discussion is focused on the oxidation of iron(II) and the following hydrolysis process that leads to the formation of a solid phase from homogeneous solutions. Results from our own studies on the kinetics of the oxidation reactions and the ensuing growth processes are presented.

  3. A biological switch at the ocean surface as a cause of laminations in a Precambrian iron formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, K.; Pinti, D. L.; Orberger, B.; Cloquet, C.; Jayananda, M.; Soyama, H.

    2016-07-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) exhibit alternating silica- and iron-rich laminae, potentially reflecting the dynamics of the paleo-environments in which they were formed, although the exact mechanism remains unclear. Here the formation of a 2.7-2.9 Ga BIF from Dharwar Craton, India, is deciphered by analyzing the inter-band variations of the redox-sensitive isotope biomarkers, 15N/14N and 56Fe/54Fe. Organic matter with δ15N values as high as + 12.0 ± 0.8 ‰ appears to be trapped in silica. Iron oxides exhibit systematically positive δ56Fe values, ranging between + 0.80 ± 0.05 ‰ and + 1.67 ± 0.02 ‰. Compared to the iron-rich bands, silica-rich bands, which show higher δ56Fe values, exhibit an order of magnitude higher concentrations of 15N-rich organic nitrogen, normalized by the abundances of its host silica. The presence of 15N-rich organic matter may imply the emergence of a modern-like biological nitrogen cycle that requires the formation of oxidized nitrogen compounds. The higher concentration of 15N-rich organic nitrogen for the silica-rich bands possibly suggests that the photosynthetic activity was higher during the formation periods of these bands. The heavier iron isotope compositions of the silica-rich bands cannot be explained alone by iron oxidation through probable pathways. The relative 56Fe-enrichment in silica-rich bands is explained here by the progressive dissolution of iron oxides to the ocean, through iron reduction by 15N-rich organic matter actively produced at the ocean surface. The formation of iron-rich bands possibly corresponds to periods of reduced biological productivity, when precipitated iron was not effectively dissolved to the ocean. The observed shift in the organic concentration between Fe- and Si-rich bands could be the switch that triggered the BIF laminations. This shift could conceivably represent periodic fluctuations in the oxygen generation, which possibly occurred over periods of millennia, at the dawn of the

  4. Large format voltage tunable dual-band QWIP FPAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Y.; Eker, S. U.; Kaldirim, M.; Besikci, C.

    2009-11-01

    Third generation thermal imagers with dual/multi-band operation capability are the prominent focus of the current research in the field of infrared detection. Dual band quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on various detection and fabrication approaches have been reported. One of these approaches is the three-contact design allowing simultaneous integration of the signals in both bands. However, this approach requires three In bumps on each pixel leading to a complicated fabrication process and lower fill factor. If the spectral response of a two-stack QWIP structure can effectively be shifted between two spectral bands with the applied bias, dual band sensors can be implemented with the conventional FPA fabrication process requiring only one In bump on each pixel making it possible to fabricate large format dual band FPAs at the cost and yield of single band detectors. While some disadvantages of this technique have been discussed in the literature, the detailed assessment of this approach has not been performed at the FPA level yet. We report the characteristics of a large format (640 × 512) voltage tunable dual-band QWIP FPA constructed through series connection of MWIR AlGaAs-InGaAs and LWIR AlGaAs-GaAs multi-quantum well stacks, and provide a detailed assessment of the potential of this approach at both pixel and FPA levels. The dual band FPA having MWIR and LWIR cut-off wavelengths of 5.1 and 8.9 μm provided noise equivalent temperature differences as low as 14 and 31 mK ( f/1.5) with switching voltages within the limits applicable by commercial read-out integrated circuits. The results demonstrate the promise of the approach for achieving large format low cost dual band FPAs.

  5. Ellagic acid inhibits iron-mediated free radical formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Luana T.; Moreira, Daniel C.; Andrade, Roberto; Ginani, Janini; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    Polyphenols are reported to have some health benefits, which are link to their antioxidant properties. In the case of ellagic acid (EA), there is evidence that it has free radical scavenger properties and that it is able to form complexes with metal ions. However, information on a possible link between the formation of iron-EA complexes and their interference in Haber-Weiss/Fenton reactions was not yet determined. Thus, the present study investigated the in vitro antioxidant mechanism of EA in a system containing ascorbate, Fe(III) and different iron ligands (EDTA, citrate and NTA). Iron-mediated oxidative degradation of 2-deoxyribose was poorly inhibited (by 12%) in the presence of EA (50 μM) and EDTA. When citrate or NTA - which form weak iron complexes - were used, the 2-deoxyribose protection increased to 89-97% and 45%, respectively. EA also presented equivalent inhibitory effects on iron-mediated oxygen uptake and ascorbyl radical formation. Spectral analyses of iron-EA complexes show that EA removes Fe(III) from EDTA within hours, and from citrate within 1 min. This difference in the rate of iron-EA complex formation may explain the antioxidant effects of EA. Furthermore, the EA antioxidant effectiveness was inversely proportional to the Fe(III) concentration, suggesting a competition with EDTA. In conclusion, the results indicate that EA may prevent in vitro free radical formation when it forms a complex with iron ions.

  6. Strong impact of impurity bands on domain formation in superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    The formation of electric field domains in doped semiconductor superlattices is described within a microscopic model. Due to the presence of impurity bands in low-doped samples the current-voltage characteristic is essentially different compared to medium-doped samples. (C) 1998 Published by Else...

  7. Magnetic Lifshitz transition and its consequences in multi-band iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptok, Andrzej; Kapcia, Konrad J.; Cichy, Agnieszka; Oleś, Andrzej M.; Piekarz, Przemysław

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we address Lifshitz transition induced by applied external magnetic field in a case of iron-based superconductors, in which a difference between the Fermi level and the edges of the bands is relatively small. We introduce and investigate a two-band model with intra-band pairing in the relevant parameters regime to address a generic behaviour of a system with hole-like and electron-like bands in external magnetic field. Our results show that two Lifshitz transitions can develop in analysed systems and the first one occurs in the superconducting phase and takes place at approximately constant magnetic field. The chosen sets of the model parameters can describe characteristic band structure of iron-based superconductors and thus the obtained results can explain the experimental observations in FeSe and Co-doped BaFe2As2 compounds. PMID:28165043

  8. Graphite formation in cast iron, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Fiske, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several types of cast irons are directionally solidified aboard the KC-135 aircraft. Also, control samples are run on Earth for comparison. Some of these samples are unusable because of various mechanical problems; the analysis and the interpretation of results on the samples that are run successfully is discussed.

  9. Functional renormalization group study of an 8-band model for the iron arsenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honerkamp, Carsten; Lichtenstein, Julian; Maier, Stefan A.; Platt, Christian; Thomale, Ronny; Andersen, Ole Krogh; Boeri, Lilia

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the superconducting pairing instabilities of eight-band models for 1111 iron arsenides. Using a functional renormalization group treatment, we determine how the critical energy scale for superconductivity depends on the electronic band structure. Most importantly, if we vary the parameters from values corresponding to LaFeAsO to SmFeAsO, the pairing scale is strongly enhanced, in accordance with the experimental observation. We analyze the reasons for this trend and compare the results of the eight-band approach to those found using five-band models.

  10. Functional renormalization group study of an eight-band model for the iron arsenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, J.; Maier, S. A.; Honerkamp, C.; Platt, C.; Thomale, R.; Andersen, O. K.; Boeri, L.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the superconducting pairing instabilities of eight-band models for the iron arsenides. Using a functional renormalization group treatment, we determine how the critical energy scale for superconductivity depends on the electronic band structure. Most importantly, if we vary the parameters from values corresponding to LaFeAsO to SmFeAsO, the pairing scale is strongly enhanced, in accordance with the experimental observation. We analyze the reasons for this trend and compare the results of the eight-band approach to those found using five-band models.

  11. Formation and characterization of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction of oolitic iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong-sheng; Han, Yue-xin; Li, Yan-feng; Li, Yan-jun

    2017-02-01

    To reveal the formation and characteristics of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction, oolitic iron ore was isothermally reduced in various reduction times at various reduction temperatures. The microstructure and size of the metallic iron phase were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and a Bgrimm process mineralogy analyzer. In the results, the reduced Fe separates from the ore and forms metallic iron protuberances, and then the subsequent reduced Fe diffuses to the protuberances and grows into metallic iron grains. Most of the metallic iron grains exist in the quasi-spherical shape and inlaid in the slag matrix. The cumulative frequency of metallic iron grain size is markedly influenced by both reduction time and temperature. With increasing reduction temperature and time, the grain size of metallic iron obviously increases. According to the classical grain growth equation, the growth kinetic parameters, i.e., time exponent, growth activation energy, and pre-exponential constant, are estimated to be 1.3759 ± 0.0374, 103.18 kJ·mol-1, and 922.05, respectively. Using these calculated parameters, a growth model is established to describe the growth behavior of metallic iron grains.

  12. Investigation of the chip formation of austempered grey iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, S.; Klocke, F.; Döbbeler, B.; Krick, E.

    2016-10-01

    By a heat treatment process the strength and thus the field of applications of Grey Cast Iron (GI) can be increased to a range which is comparable to Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI). The microstructure of the resulting material consists of austenite and acicular ferrite. This material is named Austempered Grey Iron (AGI). Until now the material has not yet made its way to widespread use, due to the unknown machinability. For an economical use the machinability of the material must be at least at the level of CGI. This work deals with the chip formation, as an evaluation criterion for the machinability and represents a first step towards a comprehensive assessment of machining of AGI materials. To investigate the chip formation chip roots of three different AGI grades, a GI and a CGI were produced in a turning process. The chip roots were prepared to analyse the deformation of the microstructure during the chip formation.

  13. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    2002-08-10

    Radionuclide and heavy metal contaminants at DOE sites pose immediate and long-term environmental problems. Under the NABIR program, bacteria are being considered for their role in the cycling of these contaminants because they influence many redox reactions in the subsurface. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) are particularly important to controlling the biogeochemistry of subsurface environments through enzymatic reduction of iron and manganese minerals. During reduction of FeIII, biogenic FeII phases form at the cell-mineral interface which may profoundly influence metal reduction.

  14. CORRELATION OF GALLSTONE FORMATION WITH SERUM IRON LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Bipin Bhadre

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Gallstones are one of the most common problem associated with the gallbladder, affecting millions of people throughout the world. Bile is excreted from liver and gallbladder into Duodenum for digestion. After digestion, if the gallbladder is not emptied out completely, the Bile Juice that remains in the gallbladder can become too concentrated with cholesterol leading to gallstone formation. Cholesterol and calcium bilirubinate are the two main substances involved in gallstone formation. Gallstones derived from bile consists of mixture of cholesterol, bilirubin with or without calcium. Based on their chemical composition, gallstones found in the gallbladder are classified as cholesterol, pigmented or mixed stones. Iron deficiency has been shown to alter the activity of several hepatic enzymes, leading to increased gallbladder bile cholesterol saturation and promotion of cholesterol crystal formation. AIMS & OBJECTIVE Attempt to establish a correlation with gallstones and decreased serum iron levels. MATERIAL & METHODS This study was a prospective cohort study which included 100 consecutive patients with imaging studies suggestive of Cholelithiasis. The Gallstone surgically removed was crushed with mortar and pestle and then analysed for cholesterol, calcium, phosphate and bilirubin (pigment. Serum samples were analysed for Cholesterol, iron and iron binding capacity. RESULTS 86% patients had increased cholesterol levels (p=0.04 and 93% had decreased serum Iron levels (p=0.96. The most common type of gallstone was found to be Cholesterol type of gallstone followed by Mixed and Pigment gallstones. CONCLUSION Serum cholesterol levels were found to be raised in majority of the patients and serum iron was found to be low in these majority of the patients indicating iron deficiency may play a role in gallstone formation.

  15. Time-dependent compaction band formation in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael J.; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip G.

    2015-07-01

    Compaction bands in sandstone are laterally extensive planar deformation features that are characterized by lower porosity and permeability than the surrounding host rock. As a result, this form of localization has important implications for both strain partitioning and fluid flow in the Earth's upper crust. To better understand the time dependency of compaction band growth, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (initial porosity = 0.24) under constant stress (creep) conditions in the compactant regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the compactant regime, manifest as compaction bands. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterized by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain rate to shear failure, compaction creep is characterized by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain rate. The global decrease in the rates of axial strain, acoustic emission energy, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated at intervals by higher rate excursions, interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence, background creep strain rate, is decreased. However, the inelastic strain associated with the growth of a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude (from 10-8 to 10-5 s-1). We find that despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate (from both creep and constant strain rate experiments), the characteristics (geometry and thickness) of the compaction bands remain essentially the same. Several lines of evidence, notably the similarity between the differential stress dependence of creep strain rate in the dilatant and compactant regimes, suggest that as for dilatant creep, subcritical stress corrosion cracking is the mechanism responsible for

  16. Formation of iron deposits during combustion of coals with varying iron-containing minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhnovich, A.N.; Gladkov, V.E. (Vsesoyuznyii Teplotekhnicheskii Institut (USSR). Ural' skii Filial)

    1989-08-01

    Describes an investigation into microstructure and chemical composition of particles in the heavy fraction of ash and iron deposits produced during combustion of coals containing pyrite and siderite. Results show that the structural state of iron deposits varies considerably with different types of coal and in different temperature zones in the boiler duct, and that their formation is the result of adherence of particles with different aggregate states and chemical composition. Interaction between iron deposits and silica results in the formation of firelight (FeSiO{sub 4}) with a melting point of 1200 C. Depending on the ratio, the interaction of a sulfide melt with a firelight melt results in the formation of immiscible liquids, the release of SiO{sub 2} and the formation of silicate and metallic liquid surfaces with unique properties of wettability, and the formation of eutectic compositions (no more than 65% FeS, 35% FeO, 3% SiO{sub 2}) which set at 910-1000 C depending on the FeO and FeS content. Addition of silica increased sticking properties of products of pyrite conversion. In the absence of pyrite, the formation of immiscible liquids with different melting points may result from the reduction of the products of the dissociation of siderite to metallic iron and the formation of a metallic melt with carbon with a melting point of at least 1140 C. 10 refs.

  17. Subsurface aeration of anaerobic groundwater : iron colloid formation and the nitrification process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthoorn, A.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Iron, anaerobic groundwater, groundwater purification, heterogeneous oxidation, iron colloid formation, electron microscopy, nitrification In anaerobic groundwater iron and ammonium can be found in relatively high concentrations. These substances need to be removed when groundwater is used

  18. Quasiparticle bands and structural phase transition of iron from Gutzwiller density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schickling, Tobias; Bünemann, Jörg; Gebhard, Florian; Boeri, Lilia

    2016-05-01

    We use the Gutzwiller density-functional theory to calculate ground-state properties and band structures of iron in its body-centered-cubic (bcc) and hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) phases. For a Hubbard interaction U =9 eV and Hund's-rule coupling J =0.54 eV , we reproduce the lattice parameter, magnetic moment, and bulk modulus of bcc iron. For these parameters, bcc is the ground-state lattice structure at ambient pressure up to a pressure of pc=41 GPa where a transition to the nonmagnetic hcp structure is predicted, in qualitative agreement with experiment (pcexp=10 ,...,15 GPa ) . The calculated band structure for bcc iron is in good agreement with ARPES measurements. The agreement improves when we perturbatively include the spin-orbit coupling.

  19. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  20. Study on numerical simulation of nodular graphite iron microstructure formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the mathematical and physical model was developed based on thermodynamics and solidification theory before the eutectoid transformation of nodular graphite iron occurred. The Local Element Substitute and Magnification Method was brought forward and 3-dimensional numerical simulation program based on the model and the new assistant algorithm was developed and used to calculate the samples. Results of calculation have good agreement with experimental data. To display the microstructure formation during solidification of nodular graphite iron, a 2-dimensional numerical simulation program combined with the result of the 3-dimensional numerical simulation of experimental samples was compiled.

  1. Formation of microstructures in the spheroidal graphite cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Daloz, D.; Bruneseaux, F.; Lesoult, G.

    2012-01-01

    Pipeline systems for hydraulic networks are obtained via centrifugal casting of spheroidal graphite cast iron. The very high cooling rate that is achieved in the skin of the product can sometimes lead to carbide instead of graphite in cast iron. An experimental device has been built in the laboratory that allows reproducing the extreme thermal conditions encountered during formation of skin of centrifugally cast pipes. Liquid metal droplets fall on a cold substrate. Rapid directional solidification occurs. The temperature evolution of the lower surface of the droplet is recorded during the very first moment of the solidification (t cast state and the heat-treated state. They are compared to the centrifugally cast ones. A model of directional solidification of cast iron under a very large temperature gradient has been built. It allows explaining the transition from stable to metastable micro structure that was observed in the products and reproduced in the laboratory samples.

  2. Petrography, Geochemistry and Proposed Genesis of Ordovician Oolitic Iron Formation Members of the Lashkarak Formation, Eastern Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoore Maghsoudloo Mahalli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Oolitic iron formations are sedimentary rocks with >5 vol.% oolites and >15 wt.% iron, corresponding to 21.4 wt.% Fe2O3 (Young, 1989; Petranek and Van Houten, 1997; Mucke and Farshad, 2005. In Iran, new iron oolite-bearing members have been identified in the Lashkarak Formation (lower-middle Ordovician in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh sections, eastern Alborz (Ghobadi Pour et al., 2011. At present, the mineralogy and geochemistry of these members are not known. Consequently, research reported here was conducted to reveal the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Ordovician oolitic iron formationmembers and to discuss their genesis and economic importance. Materials and Analyses Field geology and sampling was carried out to collect 25 samples from the ooliticiron formation members in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh section in eastern Alborz. Samples were prepared for polished-thin sections (n=10, XRD analysis (n=15. Whole-rock chemical analysis (n=15 by XRF for major elements and by ICP-ES for trace elements was performed by laboratories at the SarCheshmeh copper mine complex, Kerman, Iran. One sample was analyzed by SEM at the Wales Museum, UK. Results Microscopic studies show that the oolitic iron formation members are hosted by carbonate argillite rocks. They are mainly composed of oolites rather than pisoliths (small bodies somewhat larger and more irregular than oolites, whereas oolites have mainly ellipsoidal forms and locally spherical shapes. Most (6 oolites show banding with a central core. Simple oolites without a core are scarce. Mineralogically, oolites are mainly chamositic and hematitic in composition; goethite, pyrite and glauconite occur in traces and siderite is absent. Quartz, calcite and zircon are accessory minerals which are present in the groundmass. Geochemically, TFeO % of the oolitic iron formation horizons ranges from 8 to 48 % with an average of 21%. The CaO content ranges from 2 to 37% and

  3. Crystallographic Behavior of Iron Oxide Minerals in the Deformed Iron Formation of Quadrilátero Ferrífero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Lisboa, Filipe Augusto; Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Martins Graça, Leonardo; Ávila, Carlos Fernando; Ferreira Barbosa, Paola

    2016-04-01

    The Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) which is located in Brazil represents a mineral province of great importance for hosting Banded Iron Formation deposits (BIFs). The Alegria mine which belongs to Vale Company is located in the east part of Quadrilátero Ferrífero and it explores iron ore from a region of great structural complexity. A deformed BIF sample that presents a micro-fold on quartz and hematite bands was analyzed through Electron Backscatter Diffraction technique (EBSD) in order to relate the crystallographic orientations with the microstructures along the micro-fold envelop. For the sample orientation the Z-axis is taken parallel to the fold limb, Y-axis is perpendicular to the fold hinge and X-axis perpendicular to the YZ plane. In the limbs hematite grains are mostly stretched whereas at the hinge grains tend to be somewhat equant. On the other hand, quartz grain shapes are invariable along the fold, with a few exceptions in the hinge where grains are slightly elongated. Grains of hematite present a strong c-axis ({0001}) preferred orientation forming a subtle girdle somewhat parallel to the XY plane of the strain ellipsoid determined macroscopically (XY being the foliation plane), and a strong () crystallographic fabric approximately parallel to the Z-axis. Similarly, the poles to the prismatic planes ({m} or {10bar10}) also have a stronger crystallographic fabric parallel to the Z axis. It seems that there are two crossing planes for the orientation of and {m} with the two maxima at the intersection of the two planes. Typical hematite crystallographic fabrics are somewhat distinct, since {c} axis commonly forms a very strong fiber texture parallel to the pole of the foliation. Most studies regard such crystallographic texture as evidence for high activity of {c} slip. The {c} girdles observed here are common for mica grains under rigid body rotation in constriction strain, which mechanism is commonly observed in the hematite grains of the sample. The

  4. Standard free energy of formation of iron iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandkar, A.; Tare, V. B.; Wagner, J. B., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment is reported where silver iodide is used to determine the standard free energy of formation of iron iodide. By using silver iodide as a solid electrolyte, a galvanic cell, Ag/AgI/Fe-FeI2, is formulated. The standard free energy of formation of AgI is known, and hence it is possible to estimate the standard free energy of formation of FeI2 by measuring the open-circuit emf of the above cell as a function of temperature. The free standard energy of formation of FeI2 determined by this method is -38784 + 24.165T cal/mol. It is estimated that the maximum error associated with this method is plus or minus 2500 cal/mol.

  5. Structural mechanisms of formation of adiabatic shear bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Sokovikov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the experimental and theoretical study of plastic deformation instability and localization in materials subjected to dynamic loading and high-velocity perforation. We investigate the behavior of samples dynamically loaded during Hopkinson-Kolsky pressure bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions. Experiments were carried out using samples of a special shape and appropriate test rigging, which allowed us to realize a plane strain state. Also, the shear-compression specimens proposed in were investigated. The lateral surface of the samples was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. Use of a transmission electron microscope for studying the surface of samples showed that in the regions of strain localization there are parts taking the shape of bands and honeycomb structure in the deformed layer. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was investigated using a high-speed infra-red camera. A specially designed ballistic set-up for studying perforation was used to test samples in different impulse loading regimes followed by plastic flow instability and plug ejection. Changes in the velocity of the rear surface at different time of plug ejection were analyzed by Doppler interferometry techniques. The microstructure of tested samples was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The subsequent processing of 3D deformation relief data enabled estimation of the distribution of plastic strain gradients at different time of plug formation and ejection. It has been found that in strain localization areas the subgrains are elongated taking the shape of bands and undergo fragmentation leading to the formation of super-microcrystalline structure, in which the

  6. An iron detection system determines bacterial swarming initiation and biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Chuan-Sheng; Tsai, Yu-Huan; Chang, Chih-Jung; Tseng, Shun-Fu; Wu, Tsung-Ru; Lu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Ting-Shu; Lu, Jang-Jih; Horng, Jim-Tong; Martel, Jan; Ojcius, David M.; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Young, John D.; Andrews, S. C.; Robinson, A. K.; Rodriguez-Quinones, F.; Touati, D.; Yeom, J.; Imlay, J. A.; Park, W.; Marx, J. J.; Braun, V.; Hantke, K.; Cornelis, P.; Wei, Q.; Vinckx, T.; Troxell, B.; Hassan, H. M.; Verstraeten, N.; Lewis, K.; Hall-Stoodley, L.; Costerton, J. W.; Stoodley, P.; Kearns, D. B.; Losick, R.; Butler, M. T.; Wang, Q.; Harshey, R. M.; Lai, S.; Tremblay, J.; Deziel, E.; Overhage, J.; Bains, M.; Brazas, M. D.; Hancock, R. E.; Partridge, J. D.; Kim, W.; Surette, M. G.; Givskov, M.; Rather, P. N.; Houdt, R. Van; Michiels, C. W.; Mukherjee, S.; Inoue, T.; Frye, J. G.; McClelland, M.; McCarter, L.; Silverman, M.; Matilla, M. A.; Wu, Y.; Outten, F. W.; Singh, P. K.; Parsek, M. R.; Greenberg, E. P.; Welsh, M. J.; Banin, E.; Vasil, M. L.; Wosten, M. M.; Kox, L. F.; Chamnongpol, S.; Soncini, F. C.; Groisman, E. A.; Laub, M. T.; Goulian, M.; Krell, T.; Lai, H. C.; Lin, C. S.; Soo, P. C.; Tsai, Y. H.; Wei, J. R.; Wyckoff, E. E.; Mey, A. R.; Leimbach, A.; Fisher, C. F.; Payne, S. M.; Livak, K. J.; Schmittgen, T. D.; Clarke, M. B.; Hughes, D. T.; Zhu, C.; Boedeker, E. C.; Sperandio, V.; Stintzi, A.; Clarke-Pearson, M. F.; Brady, S. F.; Drake, E. J.; Gulick, A. M.; Qaisar, U.; Rowland, M. A.; Deeds, E. J.; Garcia, C. A.; Alcaraz, E. S.; Franco, M. A.; Rossi, B. N. Passerini de; Mehi, O.; Skaar, E. P.; Visaggio, D.; Nishino, K.; Dietz, P.; Gerlach, G.; Beier, D.; Bustin, S. A.; Schwyn, B.; Neilands, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Iron availability affects swarming and biofilm formation in various bacterial species. However, how bacteria sense iron and coordinate swarming and biofilm formation remains unclear. Using Serratia marcescens as a model organism, we identify here a stage-specific iron-regulatory machinery comprising

  7. Iron and copper catalysis of PCDD/F formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Junhong; Buekens, Alfons; Olie, Kees; Yang, Jie; Chen, Tong; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    The formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) was explored during de novo tests designed to compare the catalytic activity of copper (II) chloride (CuCl2) with that of iron (III) oxide (Fe2O3) and to test some synergistic effect between these two catalytic compounds. Both copper chloride (CuCl2) and iron oxide (Fe2O3) were earlier proposed as catalysts to explain the PCDD/F emissions from, e.g. municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI). In addition, haematite (Fe2O3) is the main iron ore and could be responsible for the typical iron ore sintering plant fingerprint. A total of nine model fly ash (MFA) samples were prepared by mixing and grinding of sodium chloride (NaCl), activated carbon and a powder matrix of silica (SiO2) with the selected metal compound(s). The conditions of these de novo tests were 1 h in duration, 350 °C in a flow of synthetic combustion gas (10 vol.% oxygen in nitrogen). The effect of Fe-Cu catalyst concentration on yield and distribution pattern of PCDD/F was systematically explored; three strongly differing ratios of [Fe]:[Cu] were considered (1:1, 10:1 and 100:1) to study the potential interactions of Fe2O3 and CuCl2 suggested earlier. The results show some slight rise of PCDD/F formed with raising iron concentration from 0 to 10.1 wt% (no Cu added; 0.1 wt% Cu), as well as strong surging of both amount and average chlorination level of PCDD/F when rising amounts of copper (0 to 1.1 wt%) are introduced. The resulting fingerprints are compared with those from sintering and from MSWI.

  8. Unveiling the broad band X-ray continuum and iron line complex in Mkr 841

    CERN Document Server

    Petrucci, P O; Matt, G; Longinotti, A L; Malzac, J; Mouchet, M; Boisson, C; Maraschi, L; Nandra, K; Ferrando, P

    2007-01-01

    Mkr 841 is a bright Seyfert 1 galaxy known to harbor a strong soft excess and a variable K$\\alpha$ iron line. It has been observed during 3 different periods by XMM for a total cumulated exposure time of $\\sim$108 ks. We present in this paper a broad band spectral analysis of the complete EPIC-pn data sets. We were able to test two different models for the soft excess, a relativistically blurred photoionized reflection (\\r model) and a relativistically smeared ionized absorption (\\a model). The continuum is modeled by a simple cut-off power law and we also add a neutral reflection. These observations reveal the extreme and puzzling spectral and temporal behaviors of the soft excess and iron line. The 0.5-3 keV soft X-ray flux decreases by a factor 3 between 2001 and 2005 and the line shape appears to be a mixture of broad and narrow components. We succeed in describing this complex broad-band 0.5-10 keV spectral variability using either \\r or \\a to fit the soft excess. Both models give statistically equivalen...

  9. The Role of Fermi Resonance in Formation of Valence Band of Water Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Burikov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Fermi resonance in formation of valence band of water Raman scattering was investigated. Simultaneous measurement of characteristics of bending and valence bands of water in D2O solutions, KBr, and KCl and using genetic algorithms in conjunction with variation methods allowed increasing accuracy of estimation of Fermi resonance coupling constant and of Fermi resonance contribution into formation of water Raman valence band.

  10. Solving the puzzle of interstitial loop formation in bcc Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haixuan; Stoller, Roger E; Osetsky, Yury N; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2013-06-28

    The interstitial loop is a unique signature of radiation damage in structural materials for nuclear and other advanced energy systems. Unlike other bcc metals, two types of interstitial loops, 1/2 and , are formed in bcc iron and its alloys. However, the mechanism by which interstitial dislocation loops are formed has remained undetermined since they were first observed more than fifty years ago. We describe our atomistic simulations that have provided the first direct observation of loop formation. The process was initially observed using our self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo method, and subsequently confirmed using molecular dynamics simulations. Formation of loops involves a distinctly atomistic interaction between two 1/2 loops, and does not follow the conventional assumption of dislocation theory, which is Burgers vector conservation between the reactants and the product. The process observed is different from all previously proposed mechanisms. Thus, our observations might provide a direct link between experiments and simulations and new insights into defect formation that may provide a basis to increase the radiation resistance of these strategic materials.

  11. A key role for green rust in the Precambrian oceans and the genesis of iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, I.; Alesker, M.; Schuster, E. M.; Popovitz-Biro, R.; Feldman, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Iron formations deposited in marine settings during the Precambrian represent large sinks of iron and silica, and have been used to reconstruct environmental conditions at the time of their formation. However, the observed mineralogy in iron formations, which consists of iron oxides, silicates, carbonates and sulfides, is generally thought to have arisen from diagenesis of one or more mineral precursors. Ferric iron hydroxides and ferrous carbonates and silicates have been identified as prime candidates. Here we investigate the potential role of green rust, a ferrous-ferric hydroxy salt, in the genesis of iron formations. Our laboratory experiments show that green rust readily forms in early seawater-analogue solutions, as predicted by thermodynamic calculations, and that it ages into minerals observed in iron formations. Dynamic models of the iron cycle further indicate that green rust would have precipitated near the iron redoxcline, and it is expected that when the green rust sank it transformed into stable phases within the water column and sediments. We suggest, therefore, that the precipitation and transformation of green rust was a key process in the iron cycle, and that the interaction of green rust with various elements should be included in any consideration of Precambrian biogeochemical cycles.

  12. Study of the Effect of Reduced Iron Temperature Rising on Total Carbon Formation in Iron Reactor Isobaric and Cooling Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayu Alamsari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We presented the mathematical model in the iron reactor. The model was limited to Isobaric Zone and Cooling Zone termed as IZ and CZ, respectively. The simulation was done by adapting the heat and mass transfer equations. The main purpose of this paper is to estimate the temperature increasing effect of reduced-iron on sponge-iron quality. The calculations are solved using Finite Element Method (FEM. The results showed that the temperature and concentration values from the simulation have high similarity to the reference data with Root-Mean-Square Error (RMSE about 0.7. The formation of total-carbon in the both zones decreased metallization degree until 1.72%. The increase in reduced-iron temperature higher than 1200 K produces total-carbon higher than 3%. Thus the increase in reduced-iron temperature more than 1200 K is not recommended because it can decrease metallization degree.

  13. Bacterial and iron oxide aggregates mediate secondary iron mineral formation: green rust versus magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, A; Mustin, C; Jorand, F

    2010-06-01

    In the presence of methanoate as electron donor, Shewanella putrefaciens, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe, is able to transform lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) to secondary Fe (II-III) minerals such as carbonated green rust (GR1) and magnetite. When bacterial cells were added to a gamma-FeOOH suspension, aggregates were produced consisting of both bacteria and gamma-FeOOH particles. Recently, we showed that the production of secondary minerals (GR1 vs. magnetite) was dependent on bacterial cell density and not only on iron reduction rates. Thus, gamma-FeOOH and S. putrefaciens aggregation pattern was suggested as the main mechanism driving mineralization. In this study, lepidocrocite bioreduction experiments, in the presence of anthraquinone disulfonate, were conducted by varying the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio in order to determine whether different types of aggregate are formed, which may facilitate precipitation of GR1 as opposed to magnetite. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the relative cell surface area and lepidocrocite concentration within the aggregates and captured images were characterized by statistical methods for spatial data (i.e. variograms). These results suggest that the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio influenced both the aggregate structure and the nature of the secondary iron mineral formed. Subsequently, a [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio above 1 x 10(7) cells mmol(-1) leads to densely packed aggregates and to the formation of GR1. Below this ratio, looser aggregates are formed and magnetite was systematically produced. The data presented in this study bring us closer to a more comprehensive understanding of the parameters governing the formation of minerals in dense bacterial suspensions and suggest that screening mineral-bacteria aggregate structure is critical to understanding (bio)mineralization pathways.

  14. Mechanisms of iron-silica aqueous interaction and the genesis of Precambrian iron formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemtob, S. M.; Catalano, J. G.; Moynier, F.; Pringle, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Iron formations (IFs), Fe- and Si-rich chemical sediments common in Precambrian successions, preserve key information about the compositional, biological, and oxidative evolution of the Precambrian ocean. Stable Si isotopes (δ30Si) of IF have been used to infer paleo-oceanic composition, and secular variations in δ30Si may reflect ancient biogeochemical cycles. The δ30Si of primary Fe-Si precipitates that formed IF depends not only on the δ30Si of aqueous silica but also on the precipitation mechanism. Multiple formation mechanisms for these primary precipitates are plausible. Aqueous Si may have adsorbed on newly precipitated iron oxyhydroxide surfaces; alternatively, Fe and Si may have coprecipitated as a single phase. Here we explore variations in the Si isotope fractionation factor (ɛ) with Fe-Si aqueous interaction mechanism (adsorption vs. coprecipitation). In adsorption experiments, sodium silicate solutions (pH 8.1, 125-2000 µM Si) were reacted with iron oxide particles (hematite, ferrihydrite, goethite, and magnetite) for 24 to 72 hours. Resultant solutions had δ30Si between 0 and +6‰. Calculated ɛ varied significantly with oxide mineralogy and morphology. For ferrihydrite, ɛ = -1.7‰; for hematite, ɛ = -2 to -5‰, depending on particle morphology. Apparent ɛ decreased upon surface site saturation, implying a smaller isotope effect for polymeric Si adsorption than monomeric adsorption. In coprecipitation experiments, solutions of Na-silicate and Fe(II) chloride (0.4-10 mM) were prepared anaerobically, then air-oxidized for 3 days to induce precipitation. At low Si concentrations, magnetite formed; near silica saturation, lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite formed. The Si isotope fractionation factor for coprecipitation was within the range of ɛ observed for adsorption (ɛ = -2.3 ± 1.0‰). These results indicate that the mechanism of Fe-Si interaction affects ɛ, presumably due to varying silicate coordination environments. These isotopic

  15. Formation mechanism and biological activity of novel thiolated human-like collagen iron complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Liu, Lingyun; Deng, Jianjun; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Hui, Junfeng; Fan, Daidi

    2016-03-01

    To develop an iron supplement that is effectively absorbed and utilized, thiolated human-like collagen was created to improve the iron binding capacity of human-like collagen. A thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex was prepared in a phosphate buffer, and one mole of thiolated human-like collagen-iron possessed approximately 28.83 moles of iron. The characteristics of thiolated human-like collagen-iron were investigated by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex retained the secondary structure of human-like collagen and had greater thermodynamic stability than human-like collagen, although interactions between iron ions and human-like collagen occurred during the formation of the complex. In addition, to evaluate the bioavailability of thiolated human-like collagen-iron, an in vitro Caco-2 cell model and an in vivo iron deficiency anemia mouse model were employed. The data demonstrated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex exhibited greater bioavailability and was more easily utilized than FeSO4, ferric ammonium citrate, or ferrous glycinate. These results indicated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex is a potential iron supplement in the biomedical field.

  16. White spot formation under orthodontic bands cemented with glass ionomer with or without Fluor Protector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, R P; Dermaut, L R

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an additional application of Fluor Protector before band cementation with glass ionomer cement reduces white spot formation compared with band cementation with glass ionomer cement. In the in vitro study, 80 premolars were divided in half, creating a control and a test group. All specimens were divided into four different groups to simulate different clinical situations and stored in a demineralizing solution to induce white spot formation. In the in vivo investigation, 18 orthodontic patients were incorporated in the study. One lower and one upper first molar band (randomly selected) were coated with Fluor Protector and then cemented with a glass ionomer cement (test group). The other two uncoated first molars were cemented with glass ionomer cement and served as the control group. The application of Fluor Protector in combination with Aquacem did not contribute to a reduction of white spot formation underneath molar bands compared with the use of Aquacem for banding.

  17. Secondary Mineral Formation Associated With Respiration of Nontronite, NAu-1 by Iron Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Secondary mineral formation associated with respiration of nontronite, NAu- I 5b. GRANT NUMBER by iron reducing bacteria 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...GEOCHEMICAL TRANSACTIONS VOLUME 6, NUMBER 4 DECEMBER 2005 Secondary mineral formation associated with respiration of nontronite, NAu-1 by iron reducing bacteria...systems. NAu-1 alteration or secondary mineral formation in our ex- These observations suggest that a portion of original perimental systems. NAu-1

  18. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (n{sub b}) and apparent association constant (K{sub app}) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at n{sub b} = 23.7 and log K{sub app} = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe{sup 2+} sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided.

  19. Changes in Gallbladder Motility and Gallstone Formation Following Laparoscopic Gastric Banding for Morbid Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal O Al-Jiffry

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Morbid obesity is associated with cholesterol gallstone formation, a risk compounded by rapid weight loss. Laparoscopic gastric banding allows for a measured rate of weight loss, but the subsequent risk for developing gallstones is unknown.

  20. Iron-regulated biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus Newman requires ica and the secreted protein Emp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Miranda; Cockayne, Alan; Morrissey, Julie A

    2008-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation is induced in iron-restricted growth conditions in vitro. In this study, we showed that Emp and Eap play important roles in low-iron-induced biofilm formation of S. aureus Newman. Eap and Emp are secreted proteins which are non-covalently attached to the S. aureus cell surface and have previously been implicated in a number of aspects of S. aureus pathogenesis. We showed here that the transcription of these important virulence factors is induced by growth in low-iron medium, reflective of the in vivo environment. Our results show that iron regulation of Eap and Emp is Fur independent. However, Fur is required for full induction of eap and emp expression in low-iron conditions. In this study, we demonstrated that in addition to Fur, low-iron-induced biofilm formation requires Sae, Agr, and SarA. In iron-restricted growth conditions, Sae and Agr are essential for Emp and Eap expression and hence for biofilm formation, whereas SarA appears to have a less-significant role. We also showed that expression of the ica operon is required for biofilm formation in iron-restricted growth conditions. We demonstrated that in fact, ica is required for the expression of the important multifunctional virulence determinants eap and emp.

  1. A high-resolution, four-band SAR testbed with real-time image formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B.; Sander, G.; Thompson, M.; Burns, B.; Fellerhoff, R.; Dubbert, D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the Twin-Otter SAR Testbed developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This SAR is a flexible, adaptable testbed capable of operation on four frequency bands: Ka, Ku, X, and VHF/UHF bands. The SAR features real-time image formation at fine resolution in spotlight and stripmap modes. High-quality images are formed in real time using the overlapped subaperture (OSA) image-formation and phase gradient autofocus (PGA) algorithms.

  2. Band gap formation and control in coupled periodic ferromagnetic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskaya, A. Yu.; Sadovnikov, A. V.; Grishin, S. V.; Romanenko, D. V.; Beginin, E. N.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the formation of additional bandgaps in the spectrum of spin waves in coupled magnonic crystals. We present the analytical model, which reveals the mechanism of bandgaps formation in coupled structures. In particular, the formation of one, two, or three bandgaps in the region of the first Bragg resonance is demonstrated and control of its characteristics by the variation of the complex coupling coefficient between magnonic crystals is shown. The spatially-resolved Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy and microwave measurements demonstrate the bandgap splitting in the spin-wave spectrum. The main advantage of proposed coupled structure, as compared to the conventional magnonic crystal, is the tunability of multiple bandgaps in the spin-wave spectrum, which enables potential applications in the frequency selective magnonic devices.

  3. Hf-W chronometry of core formation in planetesimals inferred from weakly irradiated iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijer, Thomas S.; Sprung, Peter; Kleine, Thorsten; Leya, Ingo; Burkhardt, Christoph; Wieler, Rainer

    2012-12-01

    The application of Hf-W chronometry to determine the timescales of core formation in the parent bodies of magmatic iron meteorites is severely hampered by 182W burnout during cosmic ray exposure of the parent meteoroids. Currently, no direct method exists to correct for the effects of 182W burnout, making the Hf-W ages for iron meteorites uncertain. Here we present noble gas and Hf-W isotope systematics of iron meteorite samples whose W isotopic compositions remained essentially unaffected by cosmic ray interactions. Most selected samples have concentrations of cosmogenic noble gases at or near the lowermost level observed in iron meteorites and, for iron meteorite standards, have very low noble gas and radionuclide based cosmic ray exposure ages (Mbosi), however, has elevated ɛ182W relative to the other investigated irons, indicating metal-silicate separation ˜2-3 Myr later than in the parent bodies of the three major iron meteorite groups studied here.

  4. Geochemical patterns and microbial contribution to iron plaque formation in the rice plant rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Markus; Murata, Chihiro; Unger, Julia; Kappler, Andreas; Schmidt, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Rice is the major food source for more than half of the world population and 80 percent of the worldwide rice cultivation is performed on water logged paddy soils. The establishment of reducing conditions in the soil and across the soil-water interface not only stimulates the microbial production and release of the greenhouse gas methane. These settings also create optimal conditions for microbial iron(III) reduction and therefore saturate the system with reduced ferrous iron. Through the reduction and dissolution of ferric minerals that are characterized by their high surface activity, sorbed nutrients and contaminants (e.g. arsenic) will be mobilized and are thus available for uptake by plants. Rice plants have evolved a strategy to release oxygen from their roots in order to prevent iron toxification in highly ferrous environments. The release of oxygen to the reduced paddy soil causes ferric iron plaque formation on the rice roots and finally increases the sorption capacity for toxic metals. To this date the geochemical and microbiological processes that control the formation of iron plaque are not deciphered. It has been hypothesized that iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria play a potential role in the iron(III) mineral formation along the roots. However, not much is known about the actual processes, mineral products, and geochemical gradients that establish within the rhizosphere. In the present study we have developed a growth set-up that allows the co-cultivation of rice plants and iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria, as well as the visual observation and in situ measurement of geochemical parameters. Oxygen and dissolved iron(II) gradients have been measured using microelectrodes and show geochemical hot spots that offer optimal growth conditions for microaerophilic iron(II) oxidizers. First mineral identification attempts of iron plaque have been performed using Mössbauer spectroscopy and microscopy. The obtained results on mineraology and crystallinity have been

  5. Formation of Iron Sulfide in Water-Body Sediment and Its Influence on Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Lei; SUMI Katsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Iron sulfide is an important reductive pollutant in aquatic sediment, so that increasing attentions have been paid to it in recent years. In this paper, the formation of iron sulfide in water-body sediment was introduced. Moreover, its adverse influences upon environment were summarized, including direct contribution to deficiency of dissolved oxygen in water, association with eutrophication in water-bodies and impact on geochemical sulfur cycle. Since conventional chemical analysis for iron sulfide has several disadvantages, new technique for rapid determination of iron sulfide on-line was prospected.

  6. An iron-binding protein, Dpr, from Streptococcus mutans prevents iron-dependent hydroxyl radical formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Poole, Leslie B; Hantgan, Roy R; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2002-06-01

    The dpr gene is an antioxidant gene which was isolated from the Streptococcus mutans chromosome by its ability to complement an alkyl hydroperoxide reductase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, and it was proven to play an indispensable role in oxygen tolerance in S. mutans. Here, we purified the 20-kDa dpr gene product, Dpr, from a crude extract of S. mutans as an iron-binding protein and found that Dpr formed a spherical oligomer about 9 nm in diameter. Molecular weight determinations of Dpr in solution by analytical ultracentrifugation and light-scattering analyses gave values of 223,000 to 292,000, consistent with a subunit composition of 11.5 to 15 subunits per molecule. The purified Dpr contained iron and zinc atoms and had an ability to incorporate up to 480 iron and 11.2 zinc atoms per molecule. Unlike E. coli Dps and two other members of the Dps family, Dpr was unable to bind DNA. One hundred nanomolar Dpr prevented by more than 90% the formation of hydroxyl radical generated by 10 microM iron(II) salt in vitro. The data shown in this study indicate that Dpr may act as a ferritin-like iron-binding protein in S. mutans and may allow this catalase- and heme-peroxidase-deficient bacterium to grow under air by limiting the iron-catalyzed Fenton reaction.

  7. Effects of cellular iron deficiency on the formation of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis. Iron deficiency and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckard Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young women diagnosed with breast cancer are known to have a higher mortality rate from the disease than older patients. Specific risk factors leading to this poorer outcome have not been identified. In the present study, we hypothesized that iron deficiency, a common ailment in young women, contributes to the poor outcome by promoting the hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF formation. This hypothesis was tested in an in vitro cell culture model system. Results Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1 shRNA to constitutively impair iron uptake. Cellular iron status was determined by a set of iron proteins and angiogenesis was evaluated by levels of VEGF in cells as well as by a mouse xenograft model. Significant decreases in ferritin with concomitant increases in VEGF were observed in TfR1 knockdown MDA-MB-231 cells when compared to the parental cells. TfR1 shRNA transfectants also evoked a stronger angiogenic response after the cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The molecular mechanism appears that cellular iron deficiency elevates VEGF formation by stabilizing HIF-1α. This mechanism is also true in human breast cancer MCF-7 and liver cancer HepG2 cells. Conclusions Cellular iron deficiency increased HIF-1α, VEGF, and angiogenesis, suggesting that systemic iron deficiency might play an important part in the tumor angiogenesis and recurrence in this young age group of breast cancer patients.

  8. An autocatalytic radical chain pathway in formation of an iron(IV)-oxo complex by oxidation of an iron(II) complex with dioxygen and isopropanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuma; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-03-28

    Evidence of an autocatalytic radical chain pathway has been reported in formation of a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex by oxidation of an iron(II) complex with dioxygen and isopropanol in acetonitrile at 298 K. The radical chain reaction is initiated by hydrogen abstraction from isopropanol by the iron(IV)-oxo complex.

  9. Formation of Hubbard-like bands as a fingerprint of strong electron-electron interactions in FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew D.; Backes, Steffen; Haghighirad, Amir A.; Hoesch, Moritz; Kim, Timur K.; Coldea, Amalia I.; Valentí, Roser

    2017-02-01

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to explore the electronic structure of single crystals of FeSe over a wide range of binding energies and study the effects of strong electron-electron correlations. We provide evidence for the existence of "Hubbard-like bands" at high binding energies consisting of incoherent many-body excitations originating from Fe 3 d states in addition to the renormalized quasiparticle bands near the Fermi level. Many high-energy features of the observed ARPES data can be accounted for when incorporating the effects of strong local Coulomb interactions in calculations of the spectral function via dynamical mean-field theory, including the formation of a Hubbard-like band. This shows that over the energy scale of several eV, local correlations arising from the on-site Coulomb repulsion and Hund's coupling are essential for a proper understanding of the electronic structure of FeSe and other related iron-based superconductors.

  10. RESEARCH OF INFLUENCE OF THE IRON CONTENT ON FORMATION OF IRON-BEARING PHASES IN FOUNDRY ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Gorbachiova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  The microstructure and microhardness of aluminum and silumin аК12 with iron content of 0 to 12 mas.% produced by sand casting and mol casting have been investigated. For the Al–Si–Fe and Al–Si–Fe–Mn systems the portions of the liquidus surfaces, which correspond to commercial silumin compositions, have been calculated using the updated thermodynamic model of the Al– Si–Fe system and COST–507 database. The area of primary crystallization of the iron-containing a and b phases is assessed for the commercial silumin. It has been proved that manganese promotes the formation of the iron-containing a-phase in the commercial silumin.

  11. Carbon nanomaterial Formation on Fresh-Reduced Iron by Converted Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebesnyi, A.; Kotov, V.; Sviatenko, A.; Filonenko, D.; Khovavko, A.; Bondarenko, B.

    2017-02-01

    The mechanism of carbon nanomaterial formation at moderate temperatures while processing fresh-reduced iron by products of air conversion of natural gas is considered. It is shown that under given conditions, the size and the shape of the resulting carbon are dependent on the temperature and the size of microscopic iron grains formed during reduction. These iron grains are the catalyzer of the reaction of carbon monoxide disproportionation. It is concluded that the formation of a nucleus of the new carbon phase occurs at the contact boundaries of neighboring grains of newly reduced iron with the subsequent formation in these places of ring-shaped carbon cuffs. Nanotubes are forming as a result of further carbon crystallization, and separation of iron particles from the main mass is occurring, i.e., there is a fragmentation of the substance of the catalyst. According to the results of laboratory studies, the optimum temperature of carbon nanotube formation in the environment of converted gas is 600-650 °C. The evidence of the hypothesis that the mechanism of the reaction of carbon monoxide disproportionation flows through the intermediate stage of iron oxides formation is given.

  12. Modeling gas formation and mineral precipitation in a granular iron column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Amos, Richard T; Blowes, David W

    2012-06-19

    In granular iron permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), hydrogen gas formation, entrapment and release of gas bubbles, and secondary mineral precipitation have been known to affect the permeability and reactivity. The multicomponent reactive transport model MIN3P was enhanced to couple gas formation and release, secondary mineral precipitation, and the effects of these processes on hydraulic properties and iron reactivity. The enhanced model was applied to a granular iron column, which was studied for the treatment of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of dissolved CaCO(3). The simulation reasonably reproduced trends in gas formation, secondary mineral precipitation, permeability changes, and reactivity changes observed over time. The simulation showed that the accumulation of secondary minerals reduced the reactivity of the granular iron over time, which in turn decreased the rate of mineral accumulation, and also resulted in a gradual decrease in gas formation over time. This study provides a quantitative assessment of the evolving nature of geochemistry and permeability, resulting from coupled processes of gas formation and mineral precipitation, which leads to a better understanding of the processes controlling the granular iron reactivity, and represents an improved method for incorporating these factors into the design of granular iron PRBs.

  13. Size-independent shear band formation in amorphous nanowires made from simulated casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfeng

    2010-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that surfaces strongly influence the strain localization behavior of amorphous nanowires in tension. A sample preparation routine that simulates casting was employed to facilitate the relaxation of the sample surface. Samples as short as 15 nm (7.5 nm in diameter) form dominant shear bands during deformation. The elastic energy release during plastic deformation is sufficient to provide the excess potential energy required for the shear band nucleation at rather small sample sizes. The results show that shear band formation is almost size-independent and is bounded only by its own length scale.

  14. Does TGF Beta Suppressing Effect of Simvastatin Lead to Protection Against Surgical Adhesion Band Formation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Shahabuddin Hoseini

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Intra-abdominal adhesions are the most common cause of small bowel obstruction. Infertility in women and chronic abdominal-pelvic pain are the other problems of adhesiogenesis which impose a great economic burden on the population health. On the other hand, increased levels of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β are shown to play a role in formation of adhesion bands and can impair peritoneal fibrinolysis. Moreover, simvastatin, an immunomodulator agent, can down-regulate TGF-β. Although it is shown in previous studies that simvastatin antagonizes the interaction between TGF-β and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, no human study exists on the effect of simvastatin on surgical adhesion band formation. We hypothesize that simvastatin, through its effect on reducing the level of TGF-β, may be useful in preventing adhesion band formation after surgical procedures. Surely, this hypothesis should be assessed in several experimental and clinical trials.

  15. Device Physics Analysis of Parasitic Conduction Band Barrier Formation in SiGe HBTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roenker, K. P.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a physics-based model describing the current-induced formation of a parasitic barrier in the conduction band at the base collector heterojunction in npn SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). Due to the valence band discontinuity DELTA E(sub v), hole injection into the collector at the onset of base pushout is impeded, which gives rise to formation of a barrier to electron transport which degrades the device's high frequency performance. In this paper, we present results from an analytical model for the height of the barrier calculated from the device's structure as a function of the collector junction bias and collector current density.

  16. Mechanisms and mechanics of porosity formation in ductile iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Perzyk

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage defects in ductile iron castings can be of two basic types: shrinkage cavities associated with the liquid contraction prior to the expansion period of the iron as well as the porosity, which may appear even if the liquid shrinkage is fully compensated. In the present paper two possible mechanisms of the porosity are presented and analyzed. The first one is the Karsay’s mechanism based on the secondary shrinkage concept. The second one is the mechanism acting during the expansion period of the iron, first suggested by Ohnaka and co-authors and essentially modified by the present authors. The mechanical interactions between casting and mould are determined for the both mechanisms. Their analysis leads to the conclusion, that porosity forms during expansion period of the melt. The direct cause is the negative pressure which appears in the central part of the casting due to the differences in expansion coefficients of the fast cooling surface layer and slow cooling inner region. Observations concerning feeding behavior of ductile iron castings, based on this mechanism, agree well with industrial practice. The secondary shrinkage is not only needless to induce the porosity, but the corresponding mechanism of its occurrence, proposed by Karsay, does not seem to be valid.

  17. Biological carbon precursor to diagenetic siderite with spherical structures in iron formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Inga; Konhauser, Kurt O; Papineau, Dominic; Bekker, Andrey; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    During deposition of Precambrian iron formation, the combined sedimentation of ferrihydrite and phytoplankton biomass should have facilitated Fe(III) reduction during diagenesis. However, the only evidence for this reaction in iron formations is the iron and carbon isotope values preserved in the authigenic ferrous iron-containing minerals. Here we show experimentally that spheroidal siderite, which is preserved in many iron formation and could have been precursor to rhombohedral or massive siderite, forms by reacting ferrihydrite with glucose (a proxy for microbial biomass) at pressure and temperature conditions typical of diagenesis (170 °C and 1.2 kbar). Depending on the abundance of siderite, we found that it is also possible to draw conclusions about the Fe(III):C ratio of the initial ferrihydrite-biomass sediment. Our results suggest that spherical to rhombohedral siderite structures in deep-water, Fe-oxide iron formation can be used as a biosignature for photoferrotrophy, whereas massive siderite reflects high cyanobacterial biomass loading in highly productive shallow-waters.

  18. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  19. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of iron stored in the body become low, iron deficiency anemia sets in. Red blood cells become smaller and ... from the lungs throughout the body. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include tiredness and lack of energy, GI upset, ...

  20. Formation of non-magmatic iron-meteorite group IIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Instrumental neutron-activation (INAA) data for metal in 22 nonmagmatic IIE meteorites show narrow ranges in Ir and other refractory siderophiles; the Ir range is a factor of 2.6, a factor of ∼2 smaller than in nonmagmatic IAB-MG, and orders of magnitude smaller than in the large magmatic groups. Siderophile data show no evidence of fractional crystallization. IIE irons can be split into two sets, a larger main-set and a set of 6 Cu- (or FeS) rich irons. Elemental concentrations in metal from veins in H5 chondrite Portales Valley fall within the IIE range with the exceptions of Co (high) and Ga (low). H-group-chondrite and Au-normalized IIE abundances for siderophiles show that IIE irons are ∼30% higher than H in refractory siderophiles Re, Ir and W and are about 30% lower than H chondrites in the volatiles Ga and Sb, inconsistent with proposals that IIE irons formed from H chondrites. The IIE fractionations contrast with those in L chondrites which are about 15% lower than H in the three refractory elements and 40% higher than H in volatiles indicating that IIE irons did not form from H chondrites but from a more reduced and siderophile-rich kind of ordinary chondrite ("HH" chondrites). Most O-isotope data support a close relationship between IIE irons and H or HH chondrites; lower Δ17O in primitive (chondritic) silicates support an HH classification. Literature isotopic data for Ru and Mo also show that IIE metal formed from an ordinary chondrite parent; it appears that the silicates and metal were formed by melting of a single asteroid. There is no evidence for radiogenic (26Al) heating; this, the rapid cooling recorded in the sizes of parental gamma crystal in the metal and the absence of fractional crystallization strongly support the hypothesis that IIE melting was the result of impacts. To summarize, the weight of the evidence favors the conclusion that IIE meteorites were formed by one or more impacts on an HH asteroid. The target probably had a

  1. Early diagenetic quartz formation at a deep iron oxidation front in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Patrick; Chapligin, Bernhard; Picard, Aude; Meyer, Hanno; Fischer, Cornelius; Rettenwander, Daniel; Amthauer, Georg; Vogt, Christoph; Aiello, Ivano

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of early diagenetic quartz formation under low-temperature conditions are still poorly understood. We studied lithified cherts consisting of microcrystalline quartz recovered from ODP Site 1226 in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific. The cherts occur near the base of a 420-m-thick Miocene-Holocene sequence within unlithified nannofossil and diatom ooze. Palaeo-temperatures reconstructed from δ18O values in the cherts are near to present porewater temperatures and a sharp depletion in dissolved silica occurs around 385 mbsf indicating that silica precipitation is still ongoing. Also a deep iron oxidation front occurs at the same depth, which is caused by upward diffusing nitrate from an oxic seawater aquifer in the underlying basaltic crust. Sequential iron extraction and analysis of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) revealed that iron in the cherts predominantly occurs as illite and amorphous iron oxide, whereas iron in the nannofossil and diatom ooze occurs mainly as smectites. Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed that the illite iron in the cherts is largely oxidized. A possible mechanisms that may be operative is quartz precipitation initiated by adsorption of silica to freshly precipitated iron oxides. The decrease in porewater silica concentration below opal-A and opal-CT saturation then allows for the precipitation of the thermodynamically more stable phase: quartz. We suggest that the formation of early-diagenetic chert at iron oxidation fronts is an important process in suboxic zones of silica-rich sediments. The largest iron oxidation front ever occurred during the great oxidation event ca. 2.5 Ga ago, when large amounts of iron and chert beds were deposited.

  2. The salmochelin receptor IroN itself, but not salmochelin-mediated iron uptake promotes biofilm formation in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistro, Giuseppe; Hoffmann, Christiane; Schubert, Sören

    2015-01-01

    The key to success of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) to colonize niches outside the intestinal tract and to establish infection is the coordinated action of numerous virulence and fitness factors. Intense research revealed not only an arsenal of unique virulence determinants with specific action, but also the multi-functionality of single elements. Especially iron uptake systems of ExPEC proved to be of prime importance. Apart from iron acquisition they optimize certain virulence properties. Here we analyzed the contribution of the salmochelin siderophore system to the ability of ExPEC to form biofilms. In the same iron limited environment, ExPEC displayed a distinct transcriptional profile of siderophore systems. During biofilm formation the iroN gene coding for the specific receptors of the siderophore salmochelin was highly upregulated. Almost no induction was observed during planctonic growth. Disruption of iroN resulted in a reduction of almost 50% in biofilm production. Efficient biofilm formation was not affected in a salmochelin synthesis mutant. Thus, the contribution of IroN is independent from the ability to produce salmochelin. Enhanced expression of IroN did not increase significantly the capacity to form biofilms in ExPEC. Interestingly, the additional expression of IroN or even the acquisition of the entire salmochelin system was not able to improve biofilm formation in a poor biofilm producer like a laboratory E. coli K12 strain. However, complementation with only IroN in an ExPEC iroA deletion mutant was able to restore biofilm formation. The contribution of IroN to biofilm formation appears to require a certain background found in ExPEC, but not in E. coli K12. This study identified the contribution of IroN to biofilm formation and highlights the multi-functional role of iron uptake systems in ExPEC.

  3. Mechanisms for axial band formation in a rotating drum of granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newey, Michael K.

    We study granular particles, like sand or glass beads, that are mixed in a partially filled, horizontal, cylindrical drum. When the drum is rotated, it is observed that there is a flowing layer of grains on the free surface of the granular medium. In addition, if the particles have different sizes, spatial segregation of the particles by size is observed. This segregation occurs in two phases. During the first phase, called radial segregation, the smaller particles form a radial core. In the second, called axial segregation, particles segregate into alternating bands along the axis of the drum. We perform a detailed study of the characteristics of the flow to determine the physical mechanisms driving axial segregation. We characterize the top surface of the flowing layer by tracking particles using a high speed camera. We then extract average quantities such as velocity and diffusion. The average velocities show surprising behavior: Particles in small particle bands have a higher downhill flow velocity than particles in large particle bands. We also observe that there is a pattern of sideways velocity as a function of position down the flow. Particles flow into small particle bands in the middle of the flow but flow out of small particle bands at the bottom. We present the framework for a new model based on our experimentally observed results. We explain the axial band formation in terms of the observed surface flow patterns. We show how two physical processes could contribute to the band formation: (A) Accelerating granular material does not necessarily collide while decelerating granular material requires collisions. (B) Different size particles flow at different velocities. Our framework connects differences in flow velocities on the surface of the drum with the radial segregation in the bulk of the drum. We compare these results to current models, including models by Savage, Zik, Aranson, and Elperin. We test the general model assumption that the particles

  4. Iron(III) species formed during iron(II) oxidation and iron-core formation in bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, C. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dep. of Physics; Treffry, A. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dep. of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology; Mackey, J.; Williams, J.M. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dep. of Physics; Andrews, S.C.; Guest, J.R.; Harrison, P.M. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dep. of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation and storage of Fe(III) in the bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli (EcBFR). Using Moessbauer spectroscopy to examine the initial oxidation of iron by EcBFR it is confirmed that this ferritin exhibits ferroxidase activity and is shown that dimeric and monomeric iron species are produced as intermediates. The characteristics of ferroxidase activity in EcBFR is compare d with those of human H-chain ferritin (HuHF) and discuss the different Moessbauer parameters of their dimeric iron with reference to the structures of their di-metal sites. In addition, it is presented preliminary findings suggesting that after an initial {sup b}urst{sup ,} the rate of oxidation is greatly reduced, possibly due to blockage of the ferroxidase centre by bound iron. A new component, not found in HuHF and probably representing a small cluster of Fe(III) atoms, is reported.

  5. Silicon Burning: Formation of the Iron Peak Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hix, Wm. Raphael; Thielemann, Friederich-Karl

    1993-12-01

    As the most tightly bound nuclei, the 'Iron Peak' nuclei are the culmination of nuclear energy generation in astrophysical environments. Our re-examination of silicon burning, the mechanism by which the nuclei of the iron peak are produced, has revealed a number of potential improvements in the treatment of this ultimate stage of astrophysical nuclear energy generation. Previous work on Nuclear Statistical Equilibrium (NSE), the end state of silicon burning, has neglected the effect that Coulomb screening of capture reactions and their reverse reactions has on the equilibrium distribution, or assumed that these effects cancel, leaving an abundance distribution identical to that predicted in the absence of such screening. We find that the proper treatment of the screening of nuclear reactions in Nuclear Statistical Equilibrium (NSE), can produce significant differences in the relative abundances of the nuclei produced. This is particularly true at high density. Further, results gleaned from simulation work done with a large nuclear network (300 nuclei and 3000 reactions) and from independent calculations of NSE abundance distributions, offer new insights into the quasi-equilibrium mechanism and the approach to NSE. We will discuss methods which use this quasi-equilibrium mechanism to preserve the most important features of the large nuclear network calculations at a significant improvement in computational speed. Such improved methods are ideally suited for hydro- dynamic calculations which involve the production of iron peak nuclei, where the larger network calculation proves unmanageable.

  6. A Model for Ferrite/Pearlite Band Formation and Prevention in Steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivera-Diaz-Del-Castillo, P.E.J.; Sietsma, J.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2004-01-01

    A model for predicting the conditions under which ferrite/pearlite band formation occurs, and therefore the conditions in which it can be avoided in steels, has been developed. The model requires as input the alloy composition and microchemical segregation wavelength, and provides in turn the homoge

  7. MODELING OF 'BANDING' MICROSTRUCTURE FORMATION IN CENTRIFUGALLY SOLIDIFIED Ti-6Al-4V ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Numerical investigations of the 'banding' microstructure formation during solidifica-tion of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in the centrifugal casting are conducted using a multi-scale model, which combines the finite difference method (FDM) at the macroscale with a cellular automaton (CA) model at the microscale. The macro model is used to simu-late the fluid flow and heat transfer throughout the casting. The micro model is used to predict the nucleation and growth of microstructures. With the proposed model,numerical simulations are performed to study the influences of the nucleation density,mould rotation speed, and casting size upon the 'banding' microstructure formation. It is noted that changing the nucleation density has a minor effect on the microstructure formation. The rotation speed promotes the formation of 'banding' microstructure,which is more noticeable for larger size castings. The major mechanism responsi-ble for this 'banding' phenomenon is the spatial variation in cooling rates created by centrifugal force.

  8. Geology of East Egypt greenstone field in Neoproterozoic isoand arc: Reconstruction of Iron formation sedimentary environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, S.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Geology of East Egypt greenstone-granit belt which is northern part of Nubia shield was identified neoproterozoic island arc amalgamated sections. There are several iron formation within these greenstone belt. Age data shows this iron formation may be overlaped during 700 Ma Snowball period, how ever, there is no detail report of well preserved ice related evidences. We now started detail field work for identified tectonic reconstruction, original stratigraphy around Iron formation and sedimentary environment during the iron formation sedimentation area. East Egyptian shield was divided three geology, Proterozoic greenstone complex, 700-600 Granitic domes and cover sequence (Hammamet Group). We focus three area to identified sedimentary environment of iron sedimentation. Along the north-south trend of Wadi EL Dabban area are, we named Wadi branch as West site is RW-0 ~ 12, East site is RE-0 ~ 12 from north to south. Northern area is structurally moderate, southern portion is north dipping. Southern portion was intruded by granite and several place contain granitic dikes. Northeast to eastern area are identified younger sedimentary sequence (Hammamat Group) which is unconformablly overlay on the other iron formation bearing greenstone belt. Structurally these area is divided four units. Wadi was divided by right-lateral strike-ship fault. The displacement are more than 3 km. Also north dipping faults are identified.East-West trend fault are divided two units. It is divided NE, SE, NW and NS units.SW unit is most well preserved thick sequence of the Iron formation. SW unit is well preserved iron formation sequence within thick volcaniclastics. This unit mostly north dipping around 40-60 degree. Structural repetition in not well understand. Reconstract stratigraphy in this unit is at least 4000m in thickness. 5 member is identified in this sequence. Several thin iron formations are observed with in pillow lava and volcaniclastic sequence. These very thick

  9. Biofuel-Promoted Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxin/furan Formation in an Iron-Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Norbert V; Rey, Maria Dolores; Zennegg, Markus; Haag, Regula; Wichser, Adrian; Schmid, Peter; Seiler, Cornelia; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Mohn, Joachim; Bürki, Samuel; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-08-04

    Iron-catalyzed diesel particle filters (DPFs) are widely used for particle abatement. Active catalyst particles, so-called fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs), are formed in situ, in the engine, when combusting precursors, which were premixed with the fuel. The obtained iron oxide particles catalyze soot oxidation in filters. Iron-catalyzed DPFs are considered as safe with respect to their potential to form polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs). We reported that a bimetallic potassium/iron FBC supported an intense PCDD/F formation in a DPF. Here, we discuss the impact of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biofuel on PCDD/F emissions. The iron-catalyzed DPF indeed supported a PCDD/F formation with biofuel but remained inactive with petroleum-derived diesel fuel. PCDD/F emissions (I-TEQ) increased 23-fold when comparing biofuel and diesel data. Emissions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the most toxic congener [toxicity equivalence factor (TEF) = 1.0], increased 90-fold, and those of 2,3,7,8-TCDF (TEF = 0.1) increased 170-fold. Congener patterns also changed, indicating a preferential formation of tetra- and penta-chlorodibenzofurans. Thus, an inactive iron-catalyzed DPF becomes active, supporting a PCDD/F formation, when operated with biofuel containing impurities of potassium. Alkali metals are inherent constituents of biofuels. According to the current European Union (EU) legislation, levels of 5 μg/g are accepted. We conclude that risks for a secondary PCDD/F formation in iron-catalyzed DPFs increase when combusting potassium-containing biofuels.

  10. Near infrared iron absorption bands: Applications to geologic mapping and mineral exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    A spectroscopic analysis of the difference in reflectance of iron-rich and iron-poor minerals was made. Attempts were made to use these minima contrast in geological mapping and metallic mineral exploration of large areas from near infrared and visible satellite images. Data cover pertinent laboratory spectroscopic investigations, applications of spectral differences to the discrimination of two important metamorphic rock types, and mineral exploration by aircraft in Beartooth Mountains, Montana.

  11. Shelf-to-basin iron shuttling enhances vivianite formation in deep Baltic Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Daniel C.; Gustafsson, Bo G.; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal hypoxia is a growing and persistent problem largely attributable to enhanced terrestrial nutrient (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus) loading. Recent studies suggest phosphorus removal through burial of iron (II) phosphates, putatively vivianite, plays an important role in nutrient cycling in the Baltic Sea - the world's largest anthropogenic dead zone - yet the dynamics of iron (II) phosphate formation are poorly constrained. To address this, a reactive-transport model was used to reconstruct the diagenetic and depositional history of sediments in the Fårö basin, a deep anoxic and sulphidic region of the Baltic Sea where iron (II) phosphates have been observed. Simulations demonstrate that transport of iron from shelf sediments to deep basins enhances vivianite formation while sulphide concentrations are low, but that pyrite forms preferentially over vivianite when sulphate reduction intensifies due to elevated organic loading. Episodic reoxygenation events, associated with major inflows of oxic waters, encourage the retention of iron oxyhydroxides and iron-bound phosphorus in sediments, increasing vivianite precipitation as a result. Results suggest that artificial reoxygenation of the Baltic Sea bottom waters could sequester up to 3% of the annual external phosphorus loads as iron (II) phosphates, but this is negligible when compared to potential internal phosphorus loads due to dissolution of iron oxyhydroxides when low oxygen conditions prevail. Thus, enhancing vivianite formation through artificial reoxygenation of deep waters is not a viable engineering solution to eutrophication in the Baltic Sea. Finally, simulations suggest that regions with limited sulphate reduction and hypoxic intervals, such as eutrophic estuaries, could act as important phosphorus sinks by sequestering vivianite. This could potentially alleviate eutrophication in shelf and slope environments.

  12. Cooper pairing in the insulating valence band in iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lun-Hui; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Zhang, Fu-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Conventional Cooper pairing arises from attractive interaction of electrons in the metallic bands. A recent experiment on Co-doped LiFeAs shows superconductivity in the insulating valence band, which is evolved from a metallic hole band upon doping. Here we examine this phenomenon by studying superconductivity in a three-orbital Hamiltonian relevant to the doped LiFeAs. We show explicitly that Cooper pairing of the insulating hole band requires a finite pairing interaction strength. For strong coupling, the superconductivity in the hole band is robust against the sink of the hole band below the Fermi level. Our theory predicts a substantial upward shift of the chemical potential in the superconducting transition for Co-doped LiFeAs.

  13. Electronic coupling in iron oxide-modified TiO2 leads to a reduced band gap and charge separation for visible light active photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Michael

    2011-10-28

    In recent experiments Tada et al. have shown that TiO(2) surfaces modified with iron oxide display visible light photocatalytic activity. This paper presents first principles simulations of iron oxide clusters adsorbed at the rutile TiO(2) (110) surface to elucidate the origin of the visible light photocatalytic activity of iron oxide modified TiO(2). Small iron oxide clusters adsorb at rutile (110) surface and their presence shifts the valence band so that the band gap of the composite is narrowed towards the visible, thus confirming the origin of the visible light activity of this composite material. The presence of iron oxide at the TiO(2) surface leads to charge separation, which is the origin of enhanced photocatalytic efficiency, consistent with experimental photoluminesence and photocurrent data. Surface modification of a metal oxide is thus an interesting route in the development of visible light photocatalytic materials.

  14. Experimental method for the evaluation of the susceptibility of materials to shear band formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tham R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize materials with respect to their susceptibility to shear band formation at high strain rates, a modified Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus and hat-shaped steel specimens with a shear zone having a width significantly larger than the typical width of adiabatic bands are used. The sample is directly impacted by the striker. The force acting on the sample is measured with a PVDF-gauge between the sample and the output bar. The displacement is recorded with an electro-optical extensometer. The energy absorbed by the shearing process up to failure can be used as a reference for the susceptibility of materials to shear band formation. The method is demonstrated comparing the shear behavior of two high-strength steels with similar metallic structure and strength. Differences were found in the transition region between quasi-static and fully adiabatic shearing conditions where the energy up to rupture differs by 40 %. For fully adiabatic shear band formation, the deformation process of both materials equals. At extreme rates, shear processes are mainly governed by the thermodynamic properties of the materials. On the other hand, strength and structural properties play a role for low and intermediate rates where global and localized shear mechanisms occur in parallel.

  15. SCUSS u-band Emission as a Star-formation-rate Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhimin; Zhou, Xu; Wu, Hong; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Fan, Zhou; Jiang, Zhao-Ji; Jing, Yi-Peng; Li, Cheng; Lesser, Michael; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Ma, Jun; Nie, Jun-Dan; Shen, Shi-Yin; Wang, Jia-Li; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Tian-Meng; Zou, Hu

    2017-01-01

    We present and analyze the possibility of using optical u-band luminosities to estimate star-formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies based on the data from the South Galactic Cap u band Sky Survey (SCUSS), which provides a deep u-band photometric survey covering about 5000 deg2 of the South Galactic Cap. Based on two samples of normal star-forming galaxies selected by the BPT diagram, we explore the correlations between u-band, Hα, and IR luminosities by combing SCUSS data with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The attenuation-corrected u-band luminosities are tightly correlated with the Balmer decrement-corrected Hα luminosities with an rms scatter of ∼0.17 dex. The IR-corrected u luminosities are derived based on the correlations between the attenuation of u-band luminosities and WISE 12 (or 22) μm luminosities, and then calibrated with the Balmer-corrected Hα luminosities. The systematic residuals of these calibrations are tested against the physical properties over the ranges covered by our sample objects. We find that the best-fitting nonlinear relations are better than the linear ones and recommended to be applied in the measurement of SFRs. The systematic deviations mainly come from the pollution of old stellar population and the effect of dust extinction; therefore, a more detailed analysis is needed in future work.

  16. The Phenomenology of Iron Pnictides Superconductors Explained in the Framework of -Wave Three-Band Eliashberg Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Ummarino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The s-wave three-band Eliashberg theory can simultaneously reproduce the experimental critical temperatures and the gap values of the superconducting materials LaFeAsO0.9F0.1, Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 as exponent of the more important families of iron pnictides. In this model the dominant role is played by interband interactions and the order parameter undergoes a sign reversal between hole and electron bands (±-wave symmetry. The values of all the gaps (with the exact experimental critical temperature can be obtained by using high values of the electron-boson coupling constants and small typical boson energies (in agreement with experiments.

  17. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovjan, Andreana C; Kretlow, Ariane; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Barrea, Raul; Vogt, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M

    2011-03-01

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late-stage human Alzheimer's disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher than age-matched controls at an early stage, corresponding to the commencement of plaque formation. The elevated iron was not associated with the amyloid plaques. Interestingly, none of the metal ions were elevated in the amyloid plaques until the latest time point (56 weeks), where only the Zn content was significantly elevated by 38%. Since neuropathological changes in human Alzheimer's disease are presumed to occur years before the first cognitive symptoms appear, quantification of brain iron content could be a powerful marker for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. The formation of radiation-induced segregation at twin bands in ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Kwon, Junhyun; Hwang, Seong Sik [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Chansun, E-mail: c.shin@mju.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Myongji University, 116 Myongji-ro, Cheoin-gu, Youngin, Gyeonggi-do 449-728 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at twins was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steel. Significant RIS was found to occur at twin boundaries. TEM analysis indicates that interfacial dislocations at partially coherent twin boundaries are potential sites for strong RIS phenomenon. The RIS causes the formation of thin bands having a higher Ni and lower Cr concentration in twin bands with a width less than 15 nm. In wider twin bands, strong RIS occurs only at the outer twin boundaries, but not inside the band. The possible mechanism for the formation of the RIS thin band is discussed.

  19. Comparative genomics of iron-transporting systems in Bacillus cereus strains and impact of iron sources on growth and biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik; Siezen, Roland; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an important element for bacterial viability, however it is not readily available in most environments. We studied the ability of 20 undomesticated food isolates of Bacillus cereus and two reference strains for capacity to use different (complex) iron sources for growth and biofilm format

  20. A study on the formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) from elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sina, H.; Corneliusson, J.; Turba, K.; Iyengar, S.

    2015-07-05

    Highlights: • Fe–40 at.% Al discs with coarse iron powder showed precombustion and combustion peaks. • Loose powder mixtures and discs with fine iron powder showed only combustion peaks. • Slower heating rate and fine aluminum particles promote precombustion. • The major product formed during both the reactions was Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}. • Heating the samples to 1000 °C yielded a stable FeAl phase as the final product. - Abstract: The formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) during the heating of Fe–40 at.% Al powder mixture has been studied using a differential scanning calorimeter. The effect of particle size of the reactants, compaction of the powder mixtures as well as the heating rate on combustion behavior has been investigated. On heating compacted discs containing relatively coarser iron powder, DSC data show two consecutive exothermic peaks corresponding to precombustion and combustion reactions. The product formed during both these reactions is Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and there is a volume expansion in the sample. The precombustion reaction could be improved by a slower heating rate as well as a better surface coverage of iron particles using relatively finer aluminum powder. The combustion reaction was observed to be weaker after a strong precombustion stage. Heating the samples to 1000 °C resulted in the formation of a single and stable FeAl phase through the diffusional reaction between Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and residual iron. DSC results for compacted discs containing relatively finer iron powder and for the non-compacted samples showed a single combustion exotherm during heating, with Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} as the product and traces of FeAl. X-ray diffraction and EDS data confirmed the formation of FeAl as the final product after heating these samples to 1000 °C.

  1. What do we really know about the role of microorganisms in iron sulfide mineral formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude; Gartman, Amy; Girguis, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Iron sulfide mineralization in low-temperature systems is a result of biotic and abiotic processes, though the delineation between these two modes of formation is not always straightforward. Here we review the role of microorganisms in the precipitation of extracellular iron sulfide minerals. We summarize the evidence that links sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and sulfide minerals in nature and we present a critical overview of laboratory-based studies of the nucleation and growth of iron sulfide minerals in microbial cultures. We discuss whether biologically derived minerals are distinguishable from abiotic minerals, possessing attributes that are uniquely diagnostic of biomineralization. These inquiries have revealed the need for additional thorough, mechanistic and high-resolution studies to understand microbially mediated formation of a variety of sulfide minerals across a range of natural environments.

  2. What do we really know about the role of microorganisms in iron sulfide mineral formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude A.; Gartman, Amy; Girguis, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Iron sulfide mineralization in low-temperature systems is a result of biotic and abiotic processes, though the delineation between these two modes of formation is not always straightforward. Here we review the role of microorganisms in the precipitation of extracellular iron sulfide minerals. We summarize the evidence that links sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and sulfide minerals in nature and we present a critical overview of laboratory-based studies of the nucleation and growth of iron sulfide minerals in microbial cultures. We discuss whether biologically derived minerals are distinguishable from abiotic minerals, possessing attributes that are uniquely diagnostic of biomineralization. These inquiries have revealed the need for additional thorough, mechanistic and high-resolution studies to understand microbially mediated formation of a variety of sulfide minerals across a range of natural environments.

  3. Pathways of ferrous iron mineral formation upon sulfidation of lepidocrocite surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellige, K.; Pollok, K.; Larese-Casanova, P.; Behrends, T.; Peiffer, S.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between S(-II) and ferric oxides exerts a major control for the sulphur and iron cycle and in particular for the carbon and electron flow in many aquatic systems. It is regarded to be a key reaction leading ultimately to pyrite formation, the pathways still remaining unresolved. We h

  4. FORMATION OF WEAR-RESISTANT CHROMIUM CAST IRON CASTING INTO THE CHILL MOLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of thermal processes of formation of castings from wearproof chromic cast irons for replaceable details of centrifugal mills and crushers is carried out. Influence of protective and dividing coverings on intensity of heating of the chill mold is investigated.

  5. Fragmentation and shear band formation by slow compression of brittle porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pál, Gergő; Jánosi, Zoltán; Kun, Ferenc; Main, Ian G.

    2016-11-01

    Localized fragmentation is an important phenomenon associated with the formation of shear bands and faults in granular media. It can be studied by empirical observation, by laboratory experiment, or by numerical simulation. Here we investigate the spatial structure and statistics of fragmentation using discrete element simulations of the strain-controlled uniaxial compression of cylindrical samples of different finite size. As the system approaches failure, damage localizes in a narrow shear band or synthetic fault "gouge" containing a large number of poorly sorted noncohesive fragments on a broad bandwidth of scales, with properties similar to those of natural and experimental faults. We determine the position and orientation of the central fault plane, the width of the shear band, and the spatial and mass distribution of fragments. The relative width of the shear band decreases as a power law of the system size, and the probability distribution of the angle of the central fault plane converges to around 30 degrees, representing an internal coefficient of friction of 0.7 or so. The mass of fragments is power law distributed, with an exponent that does not depend on scale, and is near that inferred for experimental and natural fault gouges. The fragments are in general angular, with a clear self-affine geometry. The consistency of this model with experimental and field results confirms the critical roles of preexisting heterogeneity, elastic interactions, and finite system size to grain size ratio on the development of shear bands and faults in porous media.

  6. Disturbances in the positioning, proliferation, and apoptosis of neural progenitors contribute to subcortical band heterotopia formation

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Cortical malformations are commonly associated with intractable epilepsy and other developmental disorders. Our studies utilize the tish rat, a spontaneously occurring genetic model of subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) associated with epilepsy, to evaluate the developmental events underlying SBH formation in the neocortex. Our results demonstrate that Pax6+ and Tbr2+ progenitors are mislocalized in tish+/− and tish−/− neocortex throughout neurogenesis. In addition, mislocalized tish−/− proge...

  7. Reduced Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in the presence of chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Si-Feng; Jia, Jing-Fu; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Chen, De-Sheng; Guo, Yong-Yuan; Zhang, Xian-Long

    Staphylococcus aureus can adhere to most foreign materials and form biofilm on the surface of medical devices. Biofilm infections are difficult to resolve. The goal of this in vitro study was to explore the use of chitosan-coated nanoparticles to prevent biofilm formation. For this purpose, S. aureus was seeded in 96-well plates to incubate with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in order to study the efficiency of biofilm formation inhibition. The biofilm bacteria count was determined using the spread plate method; biomass formation was measured using the crystal violet staining method. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the biofilm formation. The results showed decreased viable bacteria numbers and biomass formation when incubated with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at all test concentrations. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed increased dead bacteria and thinner biofilm when incubated with nanoparticles at a concentration of 500 µg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles inhibited biofilm formation in polystyrene plates. Future studies should be performed to study these nanoparticles for anti-infective use.

  8. STRUCTURE FORMATION OF ALLOYS ON IRON BASIS AFTER LASER ALLOYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Diachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to investigations on influence of laser treatment regimes of gas-thermal and adhesive coatings from self-fluxing powders on iron basis and after melting with modifying plaster on their roughness and phase composition. One of mathematical planning methods that is a complete factor experiment method has been used for investigation of parameters’ influence on micro-geometry of coatings. The executed investigations have made it possible to observe a general regularity which does not depend on a type of alloying plaster: while increasing speed of laser beam relatively to treated part, beam diameter value of Ra parameter is becoming less. Decrease in height of surface irregularities in case of increasing laser beam speed is related with intensification of evaporation processes. An increase in beam diameter diminishes Ra parameter of the surface. This is due to the fact that decrease in power density occurs at high rate of beam defocusing. Overlapping coefficient does not exert a pronounced effect on Ra parameter of fused coatings. While increasing the speed of laser beam relatively to the part structure is transferred from dendrite into supersaturated one with carbide and boride precipitations. It has been established that technological parameters of laser treatment and particularly speed of laser beam influence on coating composition. While increasing the speed up to v5 = 5 × 10–3 m/s amount of chromium has become larger by 1.5-fold that resulted in increase of micro-hardness of the coating from 9.5–10.1 GPa up to 11.04–15.50 GPa.

  9. The Effect of Bands and Ridges on Chaos Formation on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett Hedgepeth, Joshua; Schmidt, Britney E.

    2016-10-01

    Europa presents a dynamic and varied surface, but the most enticing component is arguably its chaos structures. With it, the surface and subsurface can interact, but in order to fully understand if this is occurring we have to properly parameterize the surface structural integrity. We consider the Schmidt et al. (2011) method of classifying icebergs by feature type to study what features remained intact in the chaos matrix. In this work we expand on this idea. We hypothesize that ridges and bands exhibit higher structural strengths than plains. Subsequently, less of the stronger band or ridge material is destroyed during chaos formation than plains material, leaving behind large blocks of ice (i.e. icebergs) comprised mainly of ridges and bands, with matrix formed predominantly from plains materials. We begin by mapping the surface at and near Murias chaos including surrounding chaos regions. Maps are used to infer what paleo-topographic features existed before each chaos formed. We perform a multivariate regression to correlate the amount of icebergs present to the amount of surface that was covered by either bands, plains, or ridges. We find ridges play the biggest role in the production of icebergs with a weighted value of 40%. Bands may play a smaller role (13%), but plains show little to no correlation (5%). Further mapping will better reveal if this trend holds true in other regions. This statistical analysis supports our hypothesis, and further work will better quantify what is occurring. We will address the energy expended in the chaos regions via movement and rotation of icebergs during the formation event and through ice-melt.

  10. Synergistic Activities of an Efflux Pump Inhibitor and Iron Chelators against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth and Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Liang; Molin, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The efflux pump inhibitor phenyl-arginine-beta-naphthylamide (PA beta N) was paired with iron chelators 2,2'-dipyridyl, acetohydroxamic acid, and EDTA to assess synergistic activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth and biofilm formation. All of the tested iron chelators synergistically...... inhibited P. aeruginosa growth and biofilm formation with PA beta N. PA beta N-EDTA showed the most promising activity against P. aeruginosa growth and biofilm formation....

  11. Formation and Destabilization of the Particle Band on the Fluid-Fluid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungchul; Xu, Feng; Lee, Sungyon

    2017-02-01

    An inclusion of particles in a Newtonian liquid can fundamentally change the interfacial dynamics and even cause interfacial instabilities. For instance, viscous fingering can arise even in the absence of the destabilizing viscosity ratio between invading and defending phases, when particles are added to the viscous invading fluid inside a Hele-Shaw cell. In the same flow configuration, the formation and breakup of a dense particle band are observed on the interface, only when the particle diameter d becomes comparable to the channel gap thickness h . We experimentally characterize the evolution of the fluid-fluid interface in this new physical regime and propose a simple model for the particle band that successfully captures the fingering onset as a function of the particle concentration and h /d .

  12. Surface composition of pull-apart bands in Argadnel Regio, Europa: Evidence of localized cryovolcanic resurfacing during basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockter, Louise M.; Shirley, James H.; Dalton, James B.; Kamp, L.

    2017-03-01

    We combine Galileo Solid State Imager (SSI) and Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data to investigate the composition of pull-apart bands in Europa's Argadnel Regio. Using spectral linear mixture modeling employing cryogenic laboratory reference spectra, we find that bands of intermediate age ("grey" bands) are compositionally distinct from bands that are stratigraphically younger ("dark" bands). The grey bands have higher abundances of larger ice grains and lower abundances of hydrated salts than the dark bands; both of these tendencies are statistically significant at the 1% level. The grey and dark bands have similar abundances of hexahydrite, a material which is relatively stable under irradiation; however, the derived abundances of frozen magnesium sulfate brine and of mirabilite, which are more susceptible to fragmentation by radiation, are significantly higher in the dark bands than in the grey bands. These results are consistent with a physical model in which the differences in composition and in ice grain sizes are linked to space weathering and radiolytic processing levels; the grey bands have presumably undergone higher levels of processing, due to being exposed on Europa's surface for a longer period of time. One prominent wedge-shaped band exhibits an anomalous albedo variation across its northern portion, appearing dark in its top third, and grey in its southernmost two-thirds. We find that the dark part of the band has a modeled composition that is in-family with other dark bands, while the grey portion has a modeled composition that is indistinguishable from other grey bands in the study area. Because these variations cannot easily be attributed to the band's formation mechanism (bands open sequentially along a central axis), we surmise that the northern part has been resurfaced, probably in response to the formation of a large topographic basin that cuts through the band. Faulting accompanying basin formation may provide conduits allowing

  13. Authigenic iron oxide formation in the estuarine mixing zone of the Yangtze River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, D. J.; Neuser, R. D.; Sun, X. G.; Yang, Z. S.; Guo, Z. G.; Zhai, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Estuaries are elementary geochemical fronts where river water and seawater mix. Within this mixing zone, iron and other non-conservative elements can undergo complex reactions to form new solid phases. In order to understand authigenic iron oxide formation in the Yangtze River Estuary, two onsite water-mixing sets of experiments were conducted, one by mixing variable amounts of unfiltered Yangtze River water with filtered East China Sea water of different salinity (set 1), the other by mixing variable amounts of filtered Yangtze River water with filtered East China Sea water of different salinity (set 2). In set 2, the minerals newly formed in the course of mixing were investigated by means of a scanning electron microscope fitted with an energy-dispersive X-ray analytical system. It was found that ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite were formed in these mixing experiments, coexisting in nearly equal amounts. These iron oxides appear as aggregated particles with a large grain-size range of several microns to more than 100 μm. The electrolytic properties of seawater played an important role in the formation of these authigenic iron oxides. Kaolinite and organic aggregates were also found in the experimentally mixed pre-filtered waters. Amounts of newly formed suspended matter (set 2) were one to three orders of magnitude lower than those of total suspended matter (TSM) (set 1). This implies that newly formed minerals represent only a very small proportion of TSM in the estuarine mixing zone of the Yangtze River.

  14. Microstructures and formation mechanism of hypoeutectic white cast iron by isothermal electromagnetic rheocast process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wanning

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was made on the evolution of microstructures of hypoeutectic white cast iron slurry containing 2.5wt.%C and 1.8wt.%Si produced by rheocasting in which the solidifying alloy was vigorously agitated by electromagnetic stirrer during isothermal cooling processes. The results indicated that under the proper agitating temperatures and speeds applied, the dendrite structures in white cast iron slurry were gradually evolved into spherical structures during a certain agitating time. It also revealed that the bent dendrites were formed by either convection force or by the growth of the dendrites themselves in the bending direction; then, as they were in solidifying, they were gradually being alternated into separated particles and into more spherical structures at the end of the isothermal cooling process. Especially, the dendrites were granulated as the bending process proceeding, which suggested that they were caused by unwanted elements such as sulfur and phosphor usually contained in engineering cast iron. Convective flow of the melt caused corrosion on the dendritic segments where they were weaker in strength and lower in melting temperature because of higher concentration of sulfur or phosphor. And the granulation process for such dendrites formed in the melt became possible under the condition. Certainly, dendrite fragments are another factors considerable to function for spherical particles formation. A new mechanism, regarding to the rheocast structure formation of white cast iron, was suggested based on the structural evolution observed in the study.

  15. Linkage of iron elution and dissolved oxygen consumption with removal of organic pollutants by nanoscale zero-valent iron: Effects of pH on iron dissolution and formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Nanae; Suzuki, Moe; Kurosu, Shunji; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    The iron elution and dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption in organic pollutant removal by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was examined in the range of solution pH from 3.0 to 9.0. Their behaviors were linked with the removal of organic pollutant through the dissolution of iron and the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer affected strongly by solution pH and DO. As an example of organic pollutants, azo-dye Orange II was chosen in this study. The chemical composition analyses before and after reaction confirmed the corrosion of nZVI into ions, the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer on nZVI surface and the adsorption of the pollutant and its intermediates. The complete decolorization of Orange II with nZVI was accomplished very quickly. On the other hand, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal was considerably slow and the maximum TOC removal was around 40% obtained at pH 9.0. The reductive cleavage of azo-bond by emitted electrons more readily took place as compared with the cleavage of aromatic rings of Orange II leading to the degradation to smaller molecules and subsequently the mineralization. A reaction kinetic model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood/Eley-Rideal approach was developed to elucidate mechanisms for organic pollutant removal controlled by the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer, the progress of which could be characterized by considering the dynamic concentration changes in Fe(2+) and DO. The dynamic profiles of Orange II removal linked with Fe(2+) and DO could be reasonably simulated in the range of pH from 3.0 to 9.0.

  16. Engineering Diffusivity, Band gap and Operating Voltage in Lithium Iron Phosphate through transition metal doping

    OpenAIRE

    Jena, Ajit; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Density functional calculations are carried out to understand and tailor the electrochemical profile diffusivity, band gap and open circuit voltage of transition metal doped olivine phosphate LiFe_{1-x}M_{x}PO_{4} (M = V, Cr, Mn, Co and Ni). Diffusion and hence the ionic conductivity is studied by calculating the activation barrier, V_{act}, experienced by the diffusing Li^{+} ion. We show that the effect of dopants on diffusion is both site dependent and short ranged and thereby it paves way...

  17. High Magnetic Field-Induced Formation of Banded Microstructures in Lamellar Eutectic Alloys During Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Gagnoud, Annie; Ren, Zhongming; Moreau, Rene

    2016-08-01

    The influences of high magnetic field (up to 12 T) on the morphology of Pb-Sn and Al-Al2Cu lamellar eutectics during directional solidification were investigated. The experimental results indicate that, along with a decrease in eutectic spacing, the banded structure forms at lower growth speeds under high magnetic field and the band spacing decreases as the magnetic field increases. Moreover, the application of a magnetic field enriches the Cu solute in the liquid ahead of the liquid/solid interface during directional solidification of an Al-Al2Cu eutectic alloy. The effects of high magnetic field on the eutectic points of non-ferromagnetic alloys and the stress acting on the eutectic lamellae during directional solidification have been studied. Both thermodynamic evaluation and DTA measurements reveal that the high magnetic field has a negligible effect on the eutectic points of non-ferromagnetic alloys. However, the high magnetic field caused an increase of the nucleation temperature and undercooling. The numerical results indicate that a considerable stress is produced on the eutectic lamellae during directional solidification under high magnetic field. The formation of a banded structure in a lamellar eutectic during directional solidification under high magnetic field may be attributed to both the buildup of the solute in the liquid ahead of the liquid/solid interface and the stress acting on the eutectic lamellae.

  18. IRON-TOLERANT CYANOBACTERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASTROBIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Igor I.; Allen, Carlton C.; Mummey, Daniel L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; McKay, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to the new group of extremophiles - iron tolerant cyanobacteria. The authors have analyzed earlier published articles about the ecology of iron tolerant cyanobacteria and their diversity. It was concluded that contemporary iron depositing hot springs might be considered as relative analogs of Precambrian environment. The authors have concluded that the diversity of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria is understudied. The authors also analyzed published data about the physiological peculiarities of iron tolerant cyanobacteria. They made the conclusion that iron tolerant cyanobacteria may oxidize reduced iron through the photosystem of cyanobacteria. The involvement of both Reaction Centers 1 and 2 is also discussed. The conclusion that iron tolerant protocyanobacteria could be involved in banded iron formations generation is also proposed. The possible mechanism of the transition from an oxygenic photosynthesis to an oxygenic one is also discussed. In the final part of the review the authors consider the possible implications of iron tolerant cyanobacteria for astrobiology.

  19. Microstructural characterization and formation mechanism of abnormal segregation band of hot rolled ferrite/pearlite steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Rui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Engineering Research Center of Large Size Alloy Structural Steel Bars of Shandong Province, Jinan 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Li, Shengli, E-mail: lishengli@sdu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Engineering Research Center of Large Size Alloy Structural Steel Bars of Shandong Province, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhu, Xinde [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Ao, Qing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Engineering Research Center of Large Size Alloy Structural Steel Bars of Shandong Province, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2015-10-15

    In order to further reveal the microstructural characterization and formation mechanism of abnormal segregation band of hot rolled ferrite/pearlite steel, the microstructure of this type steel was intensively studied with Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM), etc. The results show that severe C–Mn segregation exists in the abnormal segregation band region at the center of hot rolled ferrite/pearlite steel, which results from the Mn segregation during solidification process of the continuous casting slab. The C–Mn segregation causes relative displacement of pearlite transformation curve and bainite transformation curve of C curve in the corresponding region, leading to bay-like shaped C curve. The bay-like shaped C curve creates conditions for the transformation from supercooling austenite to bainite at relatively lower cooling rate in this region. The Fe–Mn–C Atomic Segregation Zone (FASZ) caused by C–Mn segregation can powerfully retard the atomic motion, and increase the lattice reconstruction resistance of austenite transformation. These two factors provide thermodynamic and kinetic conditions for the bainite transformation, and result in the emergence of granular bainitic abnormal segregation band at the center of steel plate, which leads to lower plasticity and toughness of this region, and induces the layered fracture. - Highlights: • Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM) is applied in the fracture analysis. • The abnormal segregation band region appears obvious C–Mn segregation. • The C–Mn segregation leads to bay-like shaped C curve. • The C–Mn segregation leads to Fe–Mn–C Atomic Segregation Zone.

  20. Variation in stable carbon isotopes in organic matter from the Gunflint Iron Formation. [Precambrian rock analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghoorn, E. S.; Knoll, A. H.; Dembicki, H., Jr.; Meinschein, W. G.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented for an isotopic analysis of the kerogen separated from 15 samples of the Gunflint Iron Formation, Ontario, and the conformably overlying Rove Formation. Reasons for which the Gunflint Iron Formation is suitable for such a study of a single Precambrian formation are identified. The general geology of the formation is outlined along with sample selection, description, and preparation. Major conclusions are that the basal Gunflint algal chert and shale facies are depleted in C-13 relative to the chert-carbonate and taconite facies, that differences in the delta C-13 values between Gunflint facies correlate with marked differences in their biological source materials as evidenced by their respective microbiotas, that the anthraxolites are anomalously depleted in C-13 relative to the kerogen of their encompassing cherts and shales, and that the effects of igneous intrusion and concomitant thermal alteration are shown by a marked loss of C-12 at the contact. The demonstration that not all kerogens are isotopically alike stresses the importance of facies data to the interpretation of C-13/C-12 ratios of ancient organic matter.

  1. Comparative analysis of biofilm formation by Bacillus cereus reference strains and undomesticated food isolates and the effect of free iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik; Muller, Lisette; Tempelaars, Marcel; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja

    2015-05-04

    Biofilm formation of Bacillus cereus reference strains ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987 and 21 undomesticated food isolates was studied on polystyrene and stainless steel as contact surfaces. For all strains, the biofilm forming capacity was significantly enhanced when in contact with stainless steel (SS) as a surface as compared to polystyrene (PS). For a selection of strains, the total CFU and spore counts in biofilms were determined and showed a good correlation between CFU counts and total biomass of these biofilms. Sporulation was favoured in the biofilm over the planktonic state. To substantiate whether iron availability could affect B. cereus biofilm formation, the free iron availability was varied in BHI by either the addition of FeCl3 or by depletion of iron with the scavenger 2,2-Bipyridine. Addition of iron resulted in increased air-liquid interface biofilm on polystyrene but not on SS for strain ATCC 10987, while the presence of Bipyridine reduced biofilm formation for both materials. Biofilm formation was restored when excess FeCl3 was added in combination with the scavenger. Further validation of the iron effect for all 23 strains in microtiter plate showed that fourteen strains (including ATCC10987) formed a biofilm on PS. For eight of these strains biofilm formation was enhanced in the presence of added iron and for eleven strains it was reduced when free iron was scavenged. Our results show that stainless steel as a contact material provides more favourable conditions for B. cereus biofilm formation and maturation compared to polystyrene. This effect could possibly be linked to iron availability as we show that free iron availability affects B. cereus biofilm formation.

  2. Influence of aluminium on the formation of pinholes in cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Elbel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study concerns the formation of pinholes in castings by reaction between cast iron with compacted graphite and green sand mould.Methodology: Experiments were done on bar castings moulded in green bentonite mixtures without carbonaceous matters. Moulding sand moisture and aluminium content in the melt were purposely changed. Metal was melted in a 100 kg furnace by remelting the uniform charge of return material. Metal was inoculated all at once in a ladle and modified in a reaction chamber in a mould or as sandwich method in a pouring ladle.Findings: The formation of pinholes was not caused by high moisture of the mould but this defect was sensible to aluminium content in metal. In castings with high aluminium content > 0.2 % the pinholes occurred in high numbers, and namely under low and also high moistures (> 4 %. In previous melts with aluminium contents < 0.02 % defects occurred in small range.Practical implications: Thus the conclusions known from literature about the influence of Al on pinholes occurrence in cast irons were confirmed. Oxygen activity in metal during its flowing and cooling in the mould was also measured but this quantity was not changed too in dependence on pinholes content. Morphological analyses near the defect have indicated that it is a physical type of pinholes caused by hydrogen.Originality: A number of works were aimed at explanation of causes of pinholes formation in lamellar graphite iron castings and spheroidal graphite ones. But this defect is formed in castings from compacted graphite cast iron too and the research was aimed just to this material. The contribution is in such a way an exceptional one.

  3. First-Principles Momentum-Dependent Local Ansatz Wavefunction and Momentum Distribution Function Bands of Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehashi, Yoshiro; Chandra, Sumal

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a first-principles local ansatz wavefunction approach with momentum-dependent variational parameters on the basis of the tight-binding LDA+U Hamiltonian. The theory goes beyond the first-principles Gutzwiller approach and quantitatively describes correlated electron systems. Using the theory, we find that the momentum distribution function (MDF) bands of paramagnetic bcc Fe along high-symmetry lines show a large deviation from the Fermi-Dirac function for the d electrons with eg symmetry and yield the momentum-dependent mass enhancement factors. The calculated average mass enhancement m*/m = 1.65 is consistent with low-temperature specific heat data as well as recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data.

  4. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leskovjan, Andreana C.; Kretlow, Ariane; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Barrea, Raul; Vogt, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late stage human Alzheimer’s disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher th...

  5. Studies on alkaline band formation in Chara corallina: ameliorating effect of Ca2+ on inhibition induced by osmotic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimmen, Teruo; Yonemura, Satoko; Negoro, Mio; Lucas, William J

    2003-09-01

    Although the decrease in cell turgor by application of sorbitol to the external medium did not inhibit the alkaline band formation in Chara corallina, recovery of normal turgor severely inhibited it. Alkaline-loading analysis suggested that the inhibition of alkaline band formation was caused by inhibition of HCO(3)(-) influx but not that of OH(-) efflux. In the presence of 10 mM CaCl(2), the capacity of alkaline band formation was maintained during osmotic treatment. Cells could not form alkaline bands, when plasmolysis was induced by application of sorbitol at a higher concentration. Addition of 10 mM CaCl(2) could ameliorate the inhibition caused by plasmolyis.

  6. Multi-band reflectance spectroscopy of carbonaceous lithium iron phosphate battery electrodes versus state of charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, R.; Iyer, K.; Chabot, V.; Nieva, P.; Yu, A.; Khajepour, A.; Wang, J.

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to expand the body of knowledge about the optical properties of battery cathode materials. Although some studies have been conducted on the optical properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4), to the authors' knowledge, this is the first study of its kind on electrodes extracted from commercially available LiFePO4 batteries. The use of Vis/NIR and FTIR spectroscopy provides for a methodology to study the optical properties of LiFePO4 and may allow for the characterization of other properties such as particle size and the proportions of LiFePO4 versus FePO4 material. Knowledge of these properties is important for the development of a mechanism to measure the state-of charge (SOC) in lithium ion batteries. These properties are also important in a host of other applications including battery modeling and materials characterization. Cylindrical LiFePO4 batteries (from A123 Systems Inc.) were acquired from the commercial market and charged to 10 different states between 30% and 80% of their nominal capacity using a constant-current, constant-voltage (CCCV) cycling method. Visual inspection of the extracted electrodes shows that the LiFePO4/C-cathodes display subtle changes in color (shades of grey) with respect to SOC. Vis/NIR measurements support the visual observation of uniform intensity variations versus SOC. FTIR measurements show an absorbance signature that varies with SOC and is distinct from results found in the literature for similar LiFePO4-based material systems, supporting the uniqueness of the absorbance fingerprint.

  7. Shifting redox states of the iron center partitions CDO between crosslink formation or cysteine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeri, Catherine W; Ellis, Holly R

    2014-09-15

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of L-cysteine to L-cysteine sulfinic acid. The mammalian CDO enzymes contain a thioether crosslink between Cys93 and Tyr157, and purified recombinant CDO exists as a mixture of the crosslinked and non crosslinked isoforms. The current study presents a method of expressing homogenously non crosslinked CDO using a cell permeative metal chelator in order to provide a comprehensive investigation of the non crosslinked and crosslinked isoforms. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of purified non crosslinked CDO revealed that the iron was in the EPR silent Fe(II) form. Activity of non crosslinked CDO monitoring dioxygen utilization showed a distinct lag phase, which correlated with crosslink formation. Generation of homogenously crosslinked CDO resulted in an ∼5-fold higher kcat/Km value compared to the enzyme with a heterogenous mixture of crosslinked and non crosslinked CDO isoforms. EPR analysis of homogenously crosslinked CDO revealed that this isoform exists in the Fe(III) form. These studies present a new perspective on the redox properties of the active site iron and demonstrate that a redox switch commits CDO towards either formation of the Cys93-Tyr157 crosslink or oxidation of the cysteine substrate.

  8. The formation of IIE iron meteorites investigated by the chondrule-bearing Mont Dieu meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosbroek, N.; Debaille, V.; Pittarello, L.; Goderis, S.; Humayun, M.; Hecht, L.; Jourdan, F.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Vanhaecke, F.; Claeys, Ph.

    2015-07-01

    A 435 kg piece of the Mont Dieu iron meteorite (MD) contains cm-sized silicate inclusions. Based on the concentration of Ni, Ga, Ge, and Ir (8.59 ± 0.32 wt%, 25.4 ± 0.9 ppm, 61 ± 2 ppm, 7.1 ± 0.4 ppm, respectively) in the metal host, this piece can be classified as a IIE nonmagmatic iron. The silicate inclusions possess a chondritic mineralogy and relict chondrules occur throughout the inclusions. Major element analysis, oxygen isotopic analysis (Δ17O = 0.71 ± 0.02‰), and mean Fa and Fs molar contents (Fa15.7 ± 0.4 and Fs14.4 ± 0.5) indicate that MD originated as an H chondrite. Because of strong similarities with Netschaëvo IIE, MD can be classified in the most primitive subgroup of the IIE sequence. 40Ar/39Ar ages of 4536 ± 59 Ma and 4494 ± 95 Ma obtained on pyroxene and plagioclase inclusions show that MD belongs to the old (~4.5 Ga) group of IIE iron meteorites and that it has not been perturbed by any subsequent heating event following its formation. The primitive character of MD sheds light on the nature of its formation process, its thermal history, and the evolution of its parent body.

  9. Inlfuence of boron on ferrite formation in copper-added spheroidal graphite cast iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zou; Hideo Nakae

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the original work of the authors published recently, describing the inlfuence of B on the matrix of the Cu-added spheroidal graphite cast iron. The effect of Cu has been corrected as a ferrite formation promoter in the matrix of the grey cast iron by the usage of high-purity material. Also, this paper focuses on the ferrite formation and the observation of the Cu distribution in the B-added and B-free Cu-containing spheroidal graphite cast iron. The Cu iflm on the spheroidal graphite can be successfuly observed in the B-free sample using a special etching method. However, in the B-added sample, no Cu iflm could be found, while the secondary graphite was formed on the surface of the spheroidal graphite. The interaction between B and Cu is stressed as a peculiar phenomenon by the employment of a contrast experiment of B and Mn. The heat treatment could make Cu precipitate more signiifcantly in the eutectic cels and in the matrix in the form of large Cu particles because of the limited solubility of Cu.

  10. Iron-tolerant Cyanobacteria as a Tool to Study Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Iron Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Cooksey, K. E.; McKay, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    We are investigating biological mechanisms of terrestrial iron deposition as analogs for Martian hematite recently confirmed by. Possible terrestrial analogs include iron oxide hydrothermal deposits, rock varnish, iron-rich laterites, ferricrete soils, moki balls, and banded iron formations (BIFs). With the discovery of recent volcanic activity in the summit craters of five Martian volcanoes, renewed interest in the iron dynamics of terrestrial hydrothermal environments and associated microorganisms is warranted. In this study we describe a new genus and species of CB exhibiting elevated dissolved iron tolerance and the ability to precipitate hematite on the surface of their exopolymeric sheathes.

  11. Iron-chelating agent, deferasirox, inhibits neutrophil activation and extracellular trap formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Mari; Saigo, Katsuyasu; Yamamoto, Shiori; Shirai, Kohei; Iwamoto, Shuta; Uematsu, Tomoko; Takahashi, Takayuki; Imoto, Shion; Hashimoto, Makoto; Minami, Yosuke; Wada, Atsushi; Takenokuchi, Mariko; Kawano, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    Iron-chelating agents, which are frequently prescribed to transfusion-dependent patients, have various useful biological effects in addition to chelation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by neutrophils can cause pulmonary endothelial cell damage, which can lead to acute lung injury (ALI). We previously reported that deferasirox (DFS), an iron-chelating agent, inhibits phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced ROS production in neutrophils, in vitro. Here, we investigate whether DFS inhibits vacuolization in neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. Human neutrophils were incubated with DFS and stimulated with PMA or fMLP. Human neutrophils were separated from heparinized peripheral blood using density gradient centrifugation, and subsequently incubated with DFS. After 10 minutes, neutrophils were stimulated by PMA or fMLP. Vacuole formation was observed by electron microscopy. For observing NET formations using microscopes, immunohistological analyses using citrullinated histone H3 and myeloperoxidase antibodies, and SYTOX Green (an impermeable DNA detection dye) staining, were conducted. NET formation was measured as the quantity of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), using the AccuBlue Broad Range dsDNA Quantitation Kit. DFS (50 μmol/L) inhibited vacuole formation in the cytoplasm and NET formation. Additionally, 5-100 μmol/L concentration of DFS inhibited the release of dsDNA in a dose-independent manner. We demonstrate that DFS inhibits not only ROS production but also vacuolization and NET formation in neutrophils. These results suggest the possibility of protective effects of DFS against NET-related adverse effects, including ALI and thrombosis.

  12. Effects of Iron Chelators on the Formation and Development of Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazik, Hasan; Penner, John C; Ferreira, Jose A; Haagensen, Janus A J; Cohen, Kevin; Spormann, Alfred M; Martinez, Marife; Chen, Vicky; Hsu, Joe L; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2015-10-01

    Iron acquisition is crucial for the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus. A. fumigatus biofilm formation occurs in vitro and in vivo and is associated with physiological changes. In this study, we assessed the effects of Fe chelators on biofilm formation and development. Deferiprone (DFP), deferasirox (DFS), and deferoxamine (DFM) were tested for MIC against a reference isolate via a broth macrodilution method. The metabolic effects (assessed by XTT [2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide inner salt]) on biofilm formation by conidia were studied upon exposure to DFP, DFM, DFP plus FeCl3, or FeCl3 alone. A preformed biofilm was exposed to DFP with or without FeCl3. The DFP and DFS MIC50 against planktonic A. fumigatus was 1,250 μM, and XTT gave the same result. DFM showed no planktonic inhibition at concentrations of ≤2,500 μM. By XTT testing, DFM concentrations of biofilms forming in A. fumigatus or preformed biofilms (P biofilm formation (P Biofilm formation with 625 μM DFP plus any concentration of FeCl3 was lower than that in the controls (P biofilms, DFP in the range of ≥625 to 1,250 μM was inhibitory compared to the controls (P biofilm formation (P biofilm increased with 2,500 μM FeCl3 only (P biofilms of A. fumigatus clinical isolates to DFP were noted. In conclusion, iron stimulates biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. Chelators can inhibit or enhance biofilms. Chelation may be a potential therapy for A. fumigatus, but we show here that chelators must be chosen carefully. Individual isolate susceptibility assessments may be needed.

  13. Integrated Chemical Systems: The Simultaneous Formation of Hybrid Nanocomposites of Iron Oxide and Organo Silsesquioxanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L; Clapsaddle, B; Jr., J S; Schaefer, D; Shea, K

    2004-10-15

    A sol-gel approach for the synthesis of hybrid nanocomposites of iron oxide and bridged polysilsesquioxanes has been established. The procedures allow for the simultaneous formation of iron oxide and polysilsesquioxane networks in monolithic xerogels and aerogels. These hybrid nanocomposites are synthesized from FeCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O and functionalized silsesquioxane monomers in a one-pot reaction using epoxides as a gelation agent. The porosity and microstructure of the materials has been determined by nitrogen porosimetry, electron microscopy and ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The hybrid nanocomposites exhibit a uniform dispersion of both components with no evidence for phase separation at length scales > 5 nm. At this limit of resolution it is not possible to distinguish between two independent interpenetrating networks integrated at molecular length scales or a random copolymer or mixtures of both.

  14. The Study of Kinetics of Diffusion and Phase Formation in the Layered Iron-Beryllium System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuterbekov, K. A.; Nurkenov, S. A.; Kislitsin, S. B.; Kuketayev, T. A.; Nurakhmetov, T. N.

    2017-02-01

    The methods of Mössbauer spectroscopy with X-ray phase analysis and Rutherford backscattering of protons were used to study the kinetics of diffusion and phase transformations in the layered iron-beryllium system. For the first time, the authors suggested and implemented a method for retardation of diffusion and phase formation processes in the layered iron-beryllium system using the barrier layer. It was established that the barrier layer limits the zone of beryllium dissolution in the area of implanted layer. The impact of the barrier layer on kinetics of thermally induced processes of diffusion and phase transformations in the layered Fe-Be system was determined using the example of Fe (10 μm): O+ - Be (0.7 μm) - 57Fe (0.1 μm). The authors suggested and implemented a method for recovery of the distribution function of the admixture atom concentration in the solid matrix-admixture solution on the basis of the X-ray diffraction data. The kinetics of mutual diffusion was determined for Fe and Be atoms in the α-Fe(Be) solution for both sides of the layered systems with a barrier layer and without it using the suggested method for recovery of the distribution function of the Be atom concentration. It was established that for the system without a barrier layer, the share of iron atoms ends at tann 5 h on the coating side and at tann 7.5 h on the iron side, while for the barrier layer case - at tann 20 h on the coating side and at tann 40 h on the iron side.

  15. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  16. Atomistic explanation of shear-induced amorphous band formation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-29

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (0111)/ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C.

  17. Prevention of Porosity Formation and Other Effects of Gaseous Elements in Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albany Research Center

    2005-04-01

    Iron foundries have observed porosity primarily as interdendritic porosity in large freezing range alloys such as Ni-Hard I and hypoeutectic high Cr alloys or pinholes and fissure defects in gray and ductile irons. For most iron foundries, porosity problems occur sporadically, but even occasional outbreaks can be costly since even a very small amount of porosity can significantly reduce the mechanical properties of the castings. As a result when porosity is detected, the castings are scrapped and remelted, or when the porosity is undetected, defective parts are shipped to the consumer. Neither case is desirable. This project was designed to examine various factors contributing to the porosity formation in iron castings. Factors such as solubility of gases in liquid and solid iron alloys, surface tension of liquid iron alloys, and permeability of dendritic structures were investigated in terms of their effect on the porosity formation. A method was developed to predict how much nitrogen the molten alloy picks up from air after a given amount of holding time for a given melting practice. It was shown that small batches of iron melts in an induction furnace can end up with very high concentration of nitrogen (near solubility limit). Surface tension of liquid iron alloys was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of minor additions of S, Ti, and Al on the surface tension of liquid iron alloys was investigated. Up to 18% change in surface tension was detected by minor element additions. This translates to the same amount of change in gas pressure required in a bubble of a given size to keep the bubble stable. A new method was developed to measure the permeability of dendritic structures in situ. The innovative aspect of these experiments, with respect to previous interdendritic permeability measurements, was the fact that the dendritic structure was allowed to form in situ and was not cooled and re-heated for permeability tests. A permeability model was developed

  18. Thermal conductivity of the iron-based superconductor FeSe: Nodeless gap with strong two-band character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois-Hope, Patrick; Badoux, Sven; Doiron-Leyraud, Nicolas; Taillefer, Louis; Chi, Shun; Liang, Ruixing; Hardy, Walter; Bonn, Doug

    The thermal conductivity κ of the iron-based superconductor FeSe was measured at temperatures down to 50 mK in magnetic fields up to 17 T. In zero magnetic field, the residual linear term in the T = 0 limit, κ0 / T , is vanishingly small. Application of a magnetic field H causes no increase in κ0 / T initially. Those two facts show that there are no zero-energy quasiparticles that carry heat and therefore no nodes in the superconducting gap of FeSe. The full field dependence of κ0 / T has the classic shape of a two-band superconductor, such as MgB2. It rises initially with a characteristic field H* ~=Hc 2 / 25 , and then more slowly up to Hc 2 = 14 T. We interpret this in terms of a small gap ΔA ~=Δ0 / 5 on some part of the Fermi surface, with a large gap ΔB =Δ0 in the region that controls Hc 2.

  19. Thermal Conductivity of the Iron-Based Superconductor FeSe: Nodeless Gap with a Strong Two-Band Character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois-Hope, P; Chi, S; Bonn, D A; Liang, R; Hardy, W N; Wolf, T; Meingast, C; Doiron-Leyraud, N; Taillefer, Louis

    2016-08-26

    The thermal conductivity κ of the iron-based superconductor FeSe was measured at temperatures down to 75 mK in magnetic fields up to 17 T. In a zero magnetic field, the electronic residual linear term in the T=0  K limit, κ_{0}/T, is vanishingly small. The application of a magnetic field B causes an exponential increase in κ_{0}/T initially. Those two observations show that there are no zero-energy quasiparticles that carry heat and therefore no nodes in the superconducting gap of FeSe. The full field dependence of κ_{0}/T has the classic two-step shape of a two-band superconductor: a first rise at very low field, with a characteristic field B^{⋆}≪B_{c2}, and then a second rise up to the upper critical field B_{c2}. This shows that the superconducting gap is very small (but finite) on one of the pockets in the Fermi surface of FeSe. We estimate that the minimum value of the gap, Δ_{min}, is an order of magnitude smaller than the maximum value, Δ_{max}.

  20. Magneto-structural transformations via a solid-state nudged elastic band method: Application to iron under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkevich, N A; Johnson, D D

    2015-08-14

    We extend the solid-state nudged elastic band method to handle a non-conserved order parameter, in particular, magnetization, that couples to volume and leads to many observed effects in magnetic systems. We apply this formalism to the well-studied magneto-volume collapse during the pressure-induced transformation in iron-from ferromagnetic body-centered cubic (bcc) austenite to hexagonal close-packed (hcp) martensite. We find a bcc-hcp equilibrium coexistence pressure of 8.4 GPa, with the transition-state enthalpy of 156 meV/Fe at this pressure. A discontinuity in magnetization and coherent stress occurs at the transition state, which has a form of a cusp on the potential-energy surface (yet all the atomic and cell degrees of freedom are continuous); the calculated pressure jump of 25 GPa is related to the observed 25 GPa spread in measured coexistence pressures arising from martensitic and coherency stresses in samples. Our results agree with experiments, but necessarily differ from those arising from drag and restricted parametrization methods having improperly constrained or uncontrolled degrees of freedom.

  1. Yielding of glass under shear: A directed percolation transition precedes shear-band formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastav, Gaurav Prakash; Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Horbach, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    Under external mechanical loading, glassy materials, ranging from soft matter systems to metallic alloys, often respond via formation of inhomogeneous flow patterns, during yielding. These inhomogeneities can be precursors to catastrophic failure, implying that a better understanding of their underlying mechanisms could lead to the design of smarter materials. Here, extensive molecular dynamics simulations are used to reveal the emergence of heterogeneous dynamics in a binary Lennard-Jones glass, subjected to a constant strain rate. At a critical strain, this system exhibits for all considered strain rates a transition towards the formation of a percolating cluster of mobile regions. We give evidence that this transition belongs to the universality class of directed percolation. Only at low shear rates, the percolating cluster subsequently evolves into a transient (but long-lived) shear band with a diffusive growth of its width. Finally, the steady state with a homogeneous flow pattern is reached. In the steady state, percolation transitions also do occur constantly, albeit over smaller strain intervals, to maintain the stationary plastic flow in the system.

  2. Disturbances in the positioning, proliferation and apoptosis of neural progenitors contribute to subcortical band heterotopia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, M P; Covio, M; Lee, K S

    2011-03-10

    Cortical malformations are commonly associated with intractable epilepsy and other developmental disorders. Our studies utilize the tish rat, a spontaneously occurring genetic model of subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) associated with epilepsy, to evaluate the developmental events underlying SBH formation in the neocortex. Our results demonstrate that Pax6(+) and Tbr2(+) progenitors are mislocalized in tish(+/-) and tish(-/-)- neocortex throughout neurogenesis. In addition, mislocalized tish(-/-) progenitors possess a longer cell cycle than wild type or normally-positioned tish(-/-) progenitors, owing to a lengthened G(2)+M+G(1) time. This mislocalization is not associated with adherens junction breakdown or loss of radial glial polarity in the ventricular zone (VZ), as assessed by immunohistochemistry against phalloidin (to identify F-actin), aPKC-λ and Par3. However, vimentin immunohistochemistry indicates that the radial glial scaffold is disrupted in the region of the tish(-/-) heterotopia. Moreover, lineage tracing experiments using in utero electroporation in tish(-/-) neocortex demonstrate that mislocalized progenitors do not retain contact with the ventricular surface and that ventricular/subventricular zone (SVZ) progenitors produce neurons that migrate into both the heterotopia and cortical plate (CP). Taken together, these findings define a series of developmental errors contributing to SBH formation that differs fundamentally from a primary error in neuronal migration.

  3. Effects of iron and manganese on the formation of HAAs upon chlorinating Chlorella vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Fei, E-mail: gefei@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Egongtang Road, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Wu, Xiuzhen; Wang, Na; Zhu, Runliang; Wang, Tong; Xu, Yin [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Egongtang Road, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The major objective of the present study was to investigate the role of iron and manganese on the formation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) when algae are chlorinated at different pHs. The results showed that both iron and manganese can reduce the yields of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) on chlorinating green alga Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) at a pH range of 6.0-9.0, and the decline of DCAA and TCAA was shown to be more significant at the low pH range. At pH 6.0, DCAA and TCAA yields decreased by 44.5% and 57.3%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L{sup -1} iron, and decreased 39.5% and 49.4%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L{sup -1} manganese. The main reason for decreasing the yields of HAAs as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) is that Fe(OH){sub 3(am)} or MnO{sub 2(am)} coat the algal cells{sub ,} which then improves their agglomeration of algal cells which is also revealed by the laser particle size analysis (LPSA).

  4. Investigations of void formation in neutron irradiated iron and F82H steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, Bachu Narain

    2002-01-01

    In the present work pure iron and low activation steel F82H have been neutron irradiated at temperatures in the interval 50 deg.C - 350 deg.C to a dose of 0.23 dpa (displacements per atom). The formation of defects has been investigated by the use ofpositron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS......). In addition iron has been irradiated to different doses in the range 0.01 - 0.4 dpa at 50oC and 100oC and the dose dependence of the electrical conductivity determined. The results demonstrated that theformation of voids takes place during neutron irradiation of pure iron in the whole temperature range....... For irradiation temperatures of 50 deg.C and 100 deg.C also a high density of micro-voids was observed. Voids and micro-voids were also detected in lowactivation F82H steel for a low irradiation temperature (50 deg.C), while for irradiation close to the temperature of annealing stage V (250 deg.C), no voids...

  5. The Role of Short-Range Order and Hyperuniformity in the Formation of Band Gaps in Disordered Photonic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Froufe-Pérez, Luis S; Damasceno, Pablo F; Muller, Nicolas; Haberko, Jakub; Glotzer, Sharon C; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We study photonic band gap formation in two-dimensional high refractive index disordered ma- terials where the dielectric structure is derived from packing disks in real and reciprocal space. Numerical calculations of the photonic density of states demonstrate the presence of a band gap for all polarizations in both cases. We find that the band gap width is controlled by the increase in positional correlation inducing short-range order and hyperuniformity concurrently. Our findings suggest that the optimization of short-range order, in particular the tailoring of Bragg scattering at the isotropic Brillouin zone, are of key importance for designing disordered PBG materials.

  6. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  7. Differences between Rice Cultivars in Iron Plaque Formation on Roots and Plant Lead Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinmei Ma

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to understand some mechanisms on the variations between rice cultivars in lead (Pb tolerance. Pot soil experiments were conducted with two rice cultivars under different soil Pb levels and the relationships between Pb phytotoxicity, uptake and iron plaque formation on roots were investigated. The results showed that the rice cultivar with indica consanguinity (Shanyou 63 were more sensitive to soil Pb stress than the cultivar with japonica consanguinity (Wuyunjing 7, particularly for the roots. Pb concentrations and distribution ratios in root tissues were higher for Shan you 63 than for Wuyunjing 7, but those in the plaques showed a reverse order. Fe distribution ratios in plaques were also larger for Wuyunjing 7 than for Shanyou 63, but the ratios in root tissues showed a reverse order. The results indicate that iron plaque formation on rice roots can provide a barrier to soil Pb stress in Pb-contaminated soils. The plaque will increase the sequestration of Pb on root surface, providing a means of external exclusion of soil Pb. But the function of the plaque is limited, only effective in relatively lower or moderate levels of soil Pb contamination.

  8. Effect of iron and phosphate on bacterial cyanide formation determined by methemoglobin in two-dimensional gradient microcultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf von Rohr, Matthias; Furrer, Gerhard; Brandl, Helmut

    2009-10-01

    Cyanide formation by microorganisms is typically observed during early stationary growth phase and is facilitated by the presence of iron(III) and inorganic phosphate. Extracellular free cyanide in aqueous solutions might readily react with methemoglobin added and can be determined by UV/VIS spectroscopy. As alternative to existing methods, this provided the basis for an analytical method which has not been used previously for the determination of cyanide in bacterial cultivations. We successfully applied the technique to study the combined effect of both iron(III) and phosphate on the cyanide formation by Pseudomonas fluorescens, which we used as model organism known for its ability to form HCN. Information on the combined effect of iron and phosphate was obtained by using commercially available 24-well microtiter plates as two-dimensional gradient systems. After its reaction with methemoglobin, cyanide was measured reproducibly at the wavelength of 427 nm. We found a combined effect of both iron and phosphate. In the absence of inorganic phosphate, cyanide formation was stimulated considerably by increasing concentrations of iron(III), although the effect on the bacterial growth of P. fluorescens was almost insignificant. This suggests that iron is more important than inorganic phosphate for the cyanogenesis by P. fluorescens.

  9. Band offset formation at semiconductor heterojunctions through density-based minimization of interface energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Raymond T.; Kronik, Leeor

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the magnitude of band offset (BO) at any semiconductor heterojunction is directly derivable from the distribution of charge at that interface and that the latter is decided by a minimization of total energy. However, the fact that BO formation is governed by energy minimization has not been explicitly used in theoretical BO models, likely because the equilibrium charge densities at heterojunction interfaces appear difficult to predict, except via explicit calculation. In this paper, electron densities at a large number of (100), (110), and (111) oriented heterojunctions between lattice-matched, isovalent semiconductors with the zinc blende (ZB) structure have been calculated by first-principles methods and analyzed in detail for possible common characteristics among energy-minimized densities. Remarkably, the heterojunction electron density was found to largely depend only on the immediate, local atomic arrangement. In fact, it is so much so that a juxtaposition of local electron-densities generated in oligo-cells (LEGOs) accurately reproduced the charge densities that minimize the energy for the heterojunctions. Furthermore, the charge distribution for each bulk semiconductor was found to display a striking separability of its electrostatic effect into two neutral parts, associated with the cation and the anion, which are approximately transferrable among semiconductors. These discoveries form the basis of a neutral polyhedra theory (NPT) that approximately predicts the equilibrium charge density and BO of relaxed heterojunctions from the energy minimization requirement. Well-known experimentally observed characteristics of heterojunctions, such as the insensitivity of BO to heterojunction orientation and the identity of interface bonds, the transitivity rule, etc., are all in good agreement with the NPT. Therefore, energy minimization, which essentially decides the electronic properties of all other solid and molecular systems, also governs

  10. Galaxy formation at z > 3 revealed by narrow-band selected [OIII] emission line galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Tomoko L; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Hayashi, Masao; Koyama, Yusei; Tanaka, Ichi; Minowa, Yosuke; Shimakawa, Rhythm; Yamamoto, Moegi

    2015-01-01

    We present the physical properties of [OIII] emission line galaxies at z>3 as the tracers of active galaxies at 1Gyr before the peak epoch at z~2. We have performed deep narrow-band imaging surveys in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field with MOIRCS on the Subaru Telescope and have constructed coherent samples of 34 [OIII] emitters at z=3.2 and 3.6, as well as 107 H$\\alpha$ emitters at z=2.2 and 2.5. We investigate their basic physical quantities, such as stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and sizes using the publicly available multi-wavelength data and high resolution images by the Hubble Space Telescope. The stellar masses and SFRs show a clear correlation known as the "main sequence" of star-forming galaxies. It is found that the location of the main sequence of the [OIII] emitters at z=3.2 and 3.6 is almost identical to that of the H$\\alpha$ emitters at z=2.2 and 2.5. Also, we investigate their mass-size relation and find that the relation does not change between the two epochs. When we assum...

  11. An in-depth spectroscopic examination of molecular bands from 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. I. Formation of the G-band in metal-poor dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, A. J.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Spite, M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Recent developments in the three-dimensional (3D) spectral synthesis code Linfor3D have meant that for the first time, large spectral wavelength regions, such as molecular bands, can be synthesised with it in a short amount of time. Aims: A detailed spectral analysis of the synthetic G-band for several dwarf turn-off-type 3D atmospheres (5850 ≲ Teff [ K ] ≲ 6550, 4.0 ≤ log g ≤ 4.5, - 3.0 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤-1.0) was conducted, under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We also examine carbon and oxygen molecule formation at various metallicity regimes and discuss the impact it has on the G-band. Methods: Using a qualitative approach, we describe the different behaviours between the 3D atmospheres and the traditional one-dimensional (1D) atmospheres and how the different physics involved inevitably leads to abundance corrections, which differ over varying metallicities. Spectra computed in 1D were fit to every 3D spectrum to determine the 3D abundance correction. Results: Early analysis revealed that the CH molecules that make up the G-band exhibited an oxygen abundance dependency; a higher oxygen abundance leads to weaker CH features. Nitrogen abundances showed zero impact to CH formation. The 3D corrections are also stronger at lower metallicity. Analysis of the 3D corrections to the G-band allows us to assign estimations of the 3D abundance correction to most dwarf stars presented in the literature. Conclusions: The 3D corrections suggest that A(C) in carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars with high A(C) would remain unchanged, but would decrease in CEMP stars with lower A(C). It was found that the C/O ratio is an important parameter to the G-band in 3D. Additional testing confirmed that the C/O ratio is an equally important parameter for OH transitions under 3D. This presents a clear interrelation between the carbon and oxygen abundances in 3D atmospheres through their molecular species, which is not seen in 1D.

  12. Formation of spanwise vorticy in oblique turbulent bands of transitional plane Couette flow, part 1: Numerical experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Rolland, Joran

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the formation of spanwise vorticity in the velocity streaks of the oblique laminar- turbulent bands of plane Couette flow (PCF) by mean of Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). The spanwise vorticity is created by a roll-up type development of the streamwise-wall normal shear layer of the velocity streaks. It is advected by the large scale flow along the bands. We propose a criterion on spanwise vorticity which detects these events in order to perform systematic measurements. Beside of the streamwise and spanwise correlation lengths of the rolls, their advection velocity is measured and shown to match the large scale flow along the band near the turbulent region. Eventually, we discuss the possible relation between ejection of vorticity away from the bands near the laminar region and the size of said laminar region.

  13. Differences in root aeration, iron plaque formation and waterlogging tolerance in six mangroves along a continues tidal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hao; Wang, You-Shao; Fei, Jiao; Jiang, Zhao-Yu; Ye, Zhi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    Mangrove is a special coastal forest along tropical and subtropical intertidal shores. However, how mangroves adapt to tidal flooding and the mechanisms involved in mangrove zonation are still poorly understood. In this study, a pot trial with different tide treatments was conducted to investigate the differences in root anatomy, porosity, radial oxygen loss, iron plaque formation and waterlogging tolerance among six mangroves along a continuous tidal gradient. The index of waterlogging tolerance illustrated that Sonneratia apetala possessed the highest index, followed by Aeguceras corniculatum/Kandelia, Rhizophora stylosa, Heritiera littorlis and Thespesia populnea. Waterlogging tolerances of the mangroves were found to be positively correlated with their root porosity, radial oxygen loss and iron plaque formation. Waterlogging-sensitive species such as landward semi-mangroves exhibited small root porosity and ROL, while waterlogging-tolerant species such as seaward pioneer and rhizophoraceous mangroves exhibited extensive porosity, ROL and iron plaque formation. Nevertheless, grater root porosity and iron plaque formation were detected in permanent waterlogged plants when compared to drained plants. In conclusion, The present study proposes a structural adaptive strategy to tidal flooding in mangroves, such that the mangroves with higher root porosity, ROL and iron plaque appeared to exhibit higher waterlogging tolerance and adaptability in anaerobic foreshores.

  14. Effects of low energy ion bombardment on the formation of cubic iron mononitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, Pilar [Departamento de Física Aplicada M-12, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Figuera, Juan de la [Instituto de Química-Física “Rocasolano”, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, José M. [Departamento de Física Aplicada M-12, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Marco, José F. [Instituto de Química-Física “Rocasolano”, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-31

    The formation of cubic nitrides with stoichiometry close to FeN obtained by ion assisted sputter deposition has been studied as a function of deposition parameters. In particular, we have explored the influence of the energy deposited by the assistant beam per deposited Fe atom to understand changes in composition, phase formation and nanocrystallinity of the films. An optimum N{sub 2}{sup +} ion energy and a J{sub N}/J{sub Fe} ratio (J{sub N} and J{sub Fe} represent the current density of N{sub 2}{sup +} ions and Fe atoms respectively) have been determined in order to obtain only iron mononitride phases. X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed a phase evolution from ε-Fe{sub x(x≈2)}N to γ″ and γ‴-FeN as the N{sub 2}{sup +} ion energy and the J{sub N}/J{sub Fe} flux ratio increase. Pure nanocrystalline iron mononitride, with nitrogen content close to 50%, is obtained when J{sub N}/J{sub Fe} ratio reaches 5.9 and the N{sub 2}{sup +} ion energy is 63.4 eV. Further increments of N{sub 2}{sup +} energies and J{sub N}/J{sub Fe} values reverse this behavior and a phase evolution from γ″ and γ‴-FeN to ε-Fe{sub x(x≈2)}N is found. This behavior is attributed to energy damage and resputtering phenomena. It has also been found that γ‴-FeN phase coexists with γ″-FeN phase when the deposition is performed at room temperature. - Highlights: • We have grown iron nitride FeN{sub x(0.6} {sub ≤x≤1)} thin films by dual ion beam sputtering. • Effects of N{sub 2}{sup +} ion assistance in the formation of Fe mononitride phases are studied. • Nanocrystalline Fe mononitride with a composition FeN{sub x≈1} is obtained. • A phase evolution ε → γ‴ + γ″ → ε is observed as E{sub Fe} increases. • γ‴-FeN phase coexists with γ″-FeN at room temperature deposition conditions.

  15. Oxygen isotope variations in granulite-grade iron formations: constraints on oxygen diffusion and retrograde isotopic exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Z.D.; O'Neil, J.R.; Essene, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    The oxygen isotope ratios of various minerals were measured in a granulite-grade iron formation in the Wind River Range, Wyoming. Estimates of temperature and pressure for the terrane using well calibrated geothermometers and geobarometers are 730??50?? C and 5.5??0.5 kbar. The mineral constraints on fluid compositions in the iron formation during retrogression require either very CO2-rich fluids or no fluid at all. In the iron formation, isotopic temperature estimates from quartz-magnetite fractionations are controlled by the proximity to the enclosing granitic gneiss, and range from 500?? C (??qz - mt=10.0???) within 2-3 meters of the orthogneiss contact to 600?? C (??qz - mt=8.0???) farther from the contact. Temperature estimates from other isotopic thermometers are in good agreement with those derived from the quartz-magnetite fractionations. During prograde metamorphism, the isotopic composition of the iron formation was lowered by the infiltration of an external fluid. Equilibrium was achieved over tens of meters. Closed-system retrograde exchange is consistent with the nearly constant whole-rock ??18Owr value of 8.0??0.6???. The greater ??qz-mt values in the iron formation near the orthogneiss contact are most likely due to a lower oxygen blocking temperature related to greater exchange-ability of deformed minerals at the contact. Cooling rates required to preserve the quartz-magnetite fractionations in the central portion of the iron formation are unreasonably high (???800?? C/Ma). In order to preserve the 600?? C isotopic temperature, the diffusion coefficient D (for ??-quartz) should be two orders of magnitude lower than the experimentally determined value of 2.5??10-16 cm2/s at 833 K. There are no values for the activation energy (Q) and pre-exponential diffusion coefficient (D0), consistent with the experimentally determined values, that will result in reasonable cooling rates for the Wind River iron formation. The discrepancy between the diffusion

  16. Aluminium substitution in iron(II III)-layered double hydroxides: Formation and cationic order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Christian; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Aissa, Rabha; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Brunelli, Michela; François, Michel

    2008-09-01

    The formation and the modifications of the structural properties of an aluminium-substituted iron(II-III)-layered double hydroxide (LDH) of formula Fe4IIFe(2-6y)IIIAl6yIII (OH) 12 SO 4, 8H 2O are followed by pH titration curves, Mössbauer spectroscopy and high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Rietveld refinements allow to build a structural model for hydroxysulphate green rust, GR(SO 42-), i.e. y=0, in which a bilayer of sulphate anions points to the Fe 3+ species. A cationic order is proposed to occur in both GR(SO 42-) and aluminium-substituted hydroxysulphate green rust when yhydroxides. Adsorption of more soluble Al III species onto the initially formed ferric oxyhydroxide may be responsible for this slowdown of crystal growth. Therefore, the insertion of low aluminium amount ( y˜0.01) could be an interesting way for increasing the surface reactivity of iron(II-III) LDH that maintains constant the quantity of the reactive Fe II species of the material.

  17. An in-depth spectroscopic examination of molecular bands from 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres I. Formation of the G-band in metal-poor dwarf stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, A J; Bonifacio, P; Ludwig, H -G; Steffen, M; Spite, M

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in the three-dimensional (3D) spectral synthesis code Linfor3D have meant that, for the first time, large spectral wavelength regions, such as molecular bands, can be synthesised with it in a short amount of time. A detailed spectral analysis of the synthetic G-band for several dwarf turn-off-type 3D atmospheres (5850 <= T_eff [K] <= 6550, 4.0 <= log g <= 4.5, -3.0 <= [Fe/H] <= -1.0) was conducted, under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We also examine carbon and oxygen molecule formation at various metallicity regimes and discuss the impact it has on the G-band. Using a qualitative approach, we describe the different behaviours between the 3D atmospheres and the traditional one-dimensional (1D) atmospheres and how the different physics involved inevitably leads to abundance corrections, which differ over varying metallicities. Spectra computed in 1D were fit to every 3D spectrum to determine the 3D abundance correction. Early analysis revealed that the ...

  18. Formation of coatings from a liquid phase on the surface of iron-base alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tatarek

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The study discloses the present state of the art regarding the technology and investigations of the phenomena that take place during the formation and growth of aluminum and zinc coatings hot-dip formed on iron products. In its cognitive aspect, the study offers an in-depth analysis of the partial processes that proceed in metal bath at the solid body – liquid metal interface. It is expected that the present study will help in a more detailed description of the respective phenomena and in full explanation of the mechanism of the coating growth, taking as an example the growth of aluminum coatings. The obtained results can serve as a background for some general conclusions regarding the thickness evolution process in other hot-dip coatings.

  19. Kinetic study of austenite formation during continuous heating of unalloyed ductile iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Octavio Vzquez-Gmez; Jos Antonio Barrera-Godnez; Hctor Javier Vergara-Hernndez

    2015-01-01

    The austenite formation kinetics in unalloyed cast ductile iron was studied on the basis of dilatometry measurements, and Avrami’s equation was used to estimate the material’s kinetic parameters. A continuous heating transformation diagram was constructed us-ing heating rates in the range of 0.06 to 0.83°C⋅s−1. As the heating rate was augmented, the critical temperatures, c1A and Aα, as well as the intercritical range, which was evaluated as the difference between the critical temperatures, α c1Δ T =A −A , increased. At a low heating rate, the kinetics of austenite formation was slow as a consequence of the iron’s silicon content. The effect of heating rate on k and n, the kinetic parameters of Avrami’s equation, was also determined. Parameter n, which is associated with nucleation sites and growth geometry, de-creased with an increase in heating rate. In addition, parameter k increased with the increase of heating rate, suggesting that the nucleation and growth rates are carbon-and silicon-diffusion controlled during austenite formation under continuous heating.

  20. Iron and Stony-iron Meteorites: Evidence for the Formation, Crystallization, and Early Impact Histories of Differentiated Planetesimals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... dated materials. The main heat source responsible for the melting and differentiation of asteroids was 26Al (Chapter 6, This Volume). Unlike the parent bodies of chondrites, the differentiated bodies accreted while 26Al was sufficiently abundant to cause melting. In this review, we summarize properties...

  1. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F. [Calisolar GmbH, Magnusstrasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Möller, C. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany); TU Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Str. 32, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Lauer, K. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany)

    2013-11-11

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  2. Tunable band gap of iron-doped lanthanum-modified bismuth titanate synthesized by using the thermal decomposition of a secondary phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun Young; Bark, Chung Wung

    2015-05-01

    The photoelectric properties of complex oxides have prompted interest in materials with a tunable band gap because of the absorption. The substitution of iron atoms in La-modified bismuth titanate (BLT) can lead to dramatic improvements in the band gap; however, the substitution of iron atoms while maintaining the original bismuth layer structure without forming a BiFeO3 secondary phase is quite challenging. Therefore, a series of Fe-doped BLT (Fe-BLT) samples were synthesized using a solid reaction at various calcination temperatures (300 ˜ 900°C) to remove the secondary phase. The structural and the optical properties were analyzed by using X-ray diffraction and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. This paper reports a new route by using high-temperature calcination, to synthesize the Aurivillius phase with a reduced optical band gap due to the thermal decomposition of BiFeO3 during high-temperature calcination. This simple route to reduce the second phase can be adapted to other complex oxides for use in emerging oxide optoelectronic devices.

  3. Nanocrystalline Phase Formation inside Shear Bands of Pd-Cu-Si Metallic Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Shao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pd77.5Cu6Si16.5 metallic glass was prepared by fluxing treatment and water quenching method. To avoid possible artifacts, shear bands were created by indentation after TEM sample preparation. Bright field image, diffraction pattern, and the dark field image of TEM that covered the shear band region were presented. A few nanocrystalline phases were noticed inside the shear bands, which favored the plastic deformation ability and supported the explanation of mechanical deformation-induced crystallization.

  4. Iron is an essential cause of fishy aftertaste formation in wine and seafood pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Yumiko; Okubo, Toshiyuki; Takata, Ryoji; Konno, Tomonori

    2009-09-23

    Fishy aftertaste is sometimes perceived in wine with fish and seafood pairing. However, what component of wine clashes with seafood or what compound contributes to the unpleasant fishy aftertaste in the mouth remains an open problem. First, intensities of unpleasant fishy aftertaste of wine and dried scallop pairings were rated by sensory analysis. Second, components of the wines were analyzed. Strong positive correlations were found between the intensity of fishy aftertaste and the concentration of both total iron and ferrous ion. Moreover, the intensity of fishy aftertaste was increased by the addition of ferrous ion in model wine and suppressed by the chelation of ferrous ion in red wine. Third, potent volatile compounds of fishy aftertaste, such as hexanal, heptanal, 1-octen-3-one, (E,Z)-2,4-heptadienal, nonanal, and decanal, were determined by gas chromatography-olfactometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in dried scallop soaked in red wine. The formations of these compounds depended on the dose of ferrous ion in the model wine. These results suggest that ferrous ion is a key compound of the formation of fishy aftertaste in wine and seafood pairing within the concentration range commonly found in wine.

  5. Acute band keratopathy formation after penetrating keratoplasty:A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wee-Min Teh; Mohtar Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old male was referred from another eye hospital for right eye corneal perforation secondary to infective keratitis. A penetrating keratoplasty was performed for tectonic purposes. Forty eight hours after penetrating keratoplasty, he developed a band keratopathy located at the interpalpebral area of the corneal button. Despite stopping topical and systemic ciprofloxacin which could have contributed to this, the band keratopathy became more severe. Surgical debridement of the band keratopathy was done and there was no recurrence after that. This case of acute band keratopathy is an uncommon condition that develops within days to weeks of a particular insult to the eye. Various offending medications have been implicated, and treatment options include chelation therapy, surgical debridement and penetrating keratoplasty. Recurrence is common despite treatment and the cessation of possible offending medications. As such, it is prudent to be aware of and recognise the early symptoms and signs of this potentially sight-threatening condition.

  6. Large Format Narrow Band High Throughput Optical Filters for 0.5-2.75 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the most efficient ways to create narrow band filter is the use of reflective Bragg gratings or which allow increasing of efficiency and decreasing of weight...

  7. Analysis of Polaron Band Formation with the One-Dimensional Holstein Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Ming; QIN Gan; WAN Shao-Long

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present an analytic result of the polaronic band structure by using the one-dimensional Holstein model on an infinite lattice. The single-phonon effect is used to investigate the ground state properties, such as the polaronic band structure, ground state energy, phonon distribution and effective mass, which agree with the numerical and analytic results obtained recently in the region from the weak coupling to the intermediate coupling.

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans requires the ESCRT protein Vps23 for iron acquisition from heme, for capsule formation, and for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Cadieux, Brigitte; Chan, Vivienne; Liu, Victor; Kronstad, James

    2013-01-01

    Iron availability is a key regulator of virulence factor elaboration in Cryptococcus neoformans, the causative agent of fungal meningoencephalitis in HIV/AIDS patients. In addition, iron is an essential nutrient for pathogen proliferation in mammalian hosts but little is known about the mechanisms of iron sensing and uptake in fungal pathogens that attack humans. In this study, we mutagenized C. neoformans by Agrobacterium-mediated T-DNA insertion and screened for mutants with reduced growth on heme as the sole iron source. Among 34 mutants, we identified a subset with insertions in the gene for the ESCRT-I (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) protein Vps23 that resulted in a growth defect on heme, presumably due to a defect in uptake via endocytosis or misregulation of iron acquisition from heme. Remarkably, vps23 mutants were also defective in the elaboration of the cell-associated capsular polysaccharide that is a major virulence factor, while overexpression of Vps23 resulted in cells with a slightly enlarged capsule. These phenotypes were mirrored by a virulence defect in the vps23 mutant in a mouse model of cryptococcosis and by hypervirulence of the overexpression strain. Overall, these results reveal an important role for trafficking via ESCRT functions in both heme uptake and capsule formation, and they further reinforce the connection between iron and virulence factor deployment in C. neoformans.

  9. Formation of spanwise vorticity in oblique turbulent bands of transitional plane Couette flow, part 2: modelling and stability analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rolland, Joran

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a modelling of the formation of spanwise vorticity in the turbulent streaks of the oblique bands and spots of transitional plane Couette flow. A functional model is designed to mimic the coherent flow in the streaks. The control parameters of the model are extracted from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) statistical data. A Reynolds stress is proposed to study the effect on the instability of this additional force maintaining the baseflow. Local (quasi-parallel) temporal stability analysis is performed on that model to investigate the linear development of the spanwise vorticity. Results show that average profiles, even if they have an inflection, are stable: the shear layers inside the velocity streaks are responsible for the vorticity formation. Emphasis is put on the convective or absolute nature of the instability, depending on the location in the band. This shows that a transition from a convective to an absolute instability occurs in the zone in between fully turbulent and laminar...

  10. Recent developments in the formation and structure of tin-iron oxides by laser pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, R.; Morjan, I.; Dumitrache, F.; Birjega, R.; Fleaca, C.; Soare, I.; Gavrila, L.; Luculescu, C.; Prodan, G.; Kuncser, V.; Filoti, G.

    2011-04-01

    Complex oxides demonstrate specific electric and magnetic properties which make them suitable for a wide variety of applications, including dilute magnetic semiconductors for spin electronics. A tin-iron oxide Sn 1- xFe xO 2 nanoparticulate material has been successfully synthesized by using the laser pyrolysis of tetramethyl tin-iron pentacarbonyl-air mixtures. Fe doping of SnO 2 nanoparticles has been varied systematically in the 3-10 at% range. As determined by EDAX, the Fe/Sn ratio (in at%) in powders varied between 0.14 and 0.64. XRD studies of Sn 1- xFe xO 2 nanoscale powders, revealed only structurally modified SnO 2 due to the incorporation of Fe into the lattice mainly by substitutional changes. The substitution of Fe 3+ in the Sn 4+ positions (Fe 3+ has smaller ionic radius as compared to the ionic radius of 0.69 Å for Sn 4+) with the formation of a mixed oxide Sn 1- xFe xO 2 is suggested. A lattice contraction consistent with the determined Fe/Sn atomic ratios was observed. The nanoparticle size decreases with the Fe doping (about 7 nm for the highest Fe content). Temperature dependent 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy data point to the additional presence of defected Fe 3+-based oxide nanoclusters with blocking temperatures below 60 K. A new Fe phase presenting magnetic order at substantially higher temperatures was evidenced and assigned to a new type of magnetism relating to the dispersed Fe ions into the SnO 2 matrix.

  11. Recent developments in the formation and structure of tin-iron oxides by laser pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrescu, R., E-mail: ralexandrescu2001@yahoo.co.uk [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, POB MG-36, Bucharest 077125, Magurele (Romania); Morjan, I.; Dumitrache, F.; Birjega, R.; Fleaca, C.; Soare, I.; Gavrila, L.; Luculescu, C. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, POB MG-36, Bucharest 077125, Magurele (Romania); Prodan, G. [Ovidius University of Constanta, Bd. Mamaia 124, Constanta (Romania); Kuncser, V.; Filoti, G. [National Institute of Materials Physics, POB MG-7, Bucharest 077125, Magurele (Romania)

    2011-04-01

    Complex oxides demonstrate specific electric and magnetic properties which make them suitable for a wide variety of applications, including dilute magnetic semiconductors for spin electronics. A tin-iron oxide Sn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2} nanoparticulate material has been successfully synthesized by using the laser pyrolysis of tetramethyl tin-iron pentacarbonyl-air mixtures. Fe doping of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles has been varied systematically in the 3-10 at% range. As determined by EDAX, the Fe/Sn ratio (in at%) in powders varied between 0.14 and 0.64. XRD studies of Sn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2} nanoscale powders, revealed only structurally modified SnO{sub 2} due to the incorporation of Fe into the lattice mainly by substitutional changes. The substitution of Fe{sup 3+} in the Sn{sup 4+} positions (Fe{sup 3+} has smaller ionic radius as compared to the ionic radius of 0.69 A for Sn{sup 4+}) with the formation of a mixed oxide Sn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2} is suggested. A lattice contraction consistent with the determined Fe/Sn atomic ratios was observed. The nanoparticle size decreases with the Fe doping (about 7 nm for the highest Fe content). Temperature dependent {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy data point to the additional presence of defected Fe{sup 3+}-based oxide nanoclusters with blocking temperatures below 60 K. A new Fe phase presenting magnetic order at substantially higher temperatures was evidenced and assigned to a new type of magnetism relating to the dispersed Fe ions into the SnO{sub 2} matrix.

  12. Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

    2011-07-01

    Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

  13. Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

    2011-04-01

    Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2  μm  h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger (∼100  nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

  14. Axial-Compressive Behavior, Including Kink-Band Formation and Propagation, of Single p-Phenylene Terephthalamide (PPTA) Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    unit cell Laminate Laminae Interface Stacked lamina Figure 3: Microstructural hierarchy consisting of eight distinct length scales encountered...fabrication of the reinforcing substructures (e.g., during textile manufactur- ing of ballistic fabric), the PPTA fiber-reinforced polymer- matrix...phenomena and processes (e.g., formation and propagation of kink bands) to the (continuum) lamina/ laminate length scales. It should be noted that while the

  15. Influence of iron and copper oxides on polychlorinated diphenyl ether formation in heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenxia; Shen, Lianfeng; Zhang, Fawen; Liu, Wenbin; Zheng, Minghui; Yang, Xitian

    2013-08-01

    Polychlorinated diphenyl ether (PCDE) has attracted great attention recently as an important type of environmental pollutant. The influence of iron and copper oxides on formation of PCDEs was investigated using laboratory-scale flow reactors under air and under nitrogen at 350 °C, a temperature corresponding to the post-combustion zone of a municipal solid waste incinerator. The results show that the 2,2',3,4,4',5,5',6-otachlorodiphenyl ether (OCDE) formed from the condensation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene (Cl4Bz) is the predominant congener formed on the SiO2/Fe2O3 surface with and without oxygen. This indicated that HCl elimination between PCP and 1,2,4,5-Cl4Bz molecules formed 2,2',3,4,4',5,5',6-OCDE in the presence of Fe2O3. On the other hand, decachlorodiphenyl ether, nonachlorodiphenyl ether, and OCDE were the dominant products on the SiO2/CuO surface without oxygen, although the 2,2',3,4,4',5,5',6-OCDE was the dominant product on the SiO2/CuO surface with oxygen. Therefore, the presence of Fe2O3 and CuO influences the formation and homologue distribution of PCDEs, which shifted towards the lower chlorinated species. Fe2O3 can promote both the condensation and dechlorination reaction without oxygen. On the contrary, with oxygen, Fe2O3 suppresses the condensation of chlorobenzene and chlorophenol to form PCDEs and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). CuO can increase the formation of lower chlorinated PCDEs and PCDDs without oxygen. In conclusion, the different fly ash components have a major influence on PCDE emissions.

  16. The formation of magnetic carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles using precipitation from an aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makovec, Darko [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gyergyek, Sašo, E-mail: saso.gyergyek@ijs.si [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Primc, Darinka [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Plantan, Ivan [Lek Pharmaceuticals d.d., Mengeš (Slovenia)

    2015-03-01

    The formation of spinel iron-oxide nanoparticles during the co-precipitation of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ions from an aqueous solution in the presence of carboxymethyldextrane (CMD) was studied. To follow the formation of the nanoparticles, a mixture of the Fe ions, CMD and ammonia was heated to different temperatures, while the samples were taken, quenched in liquid nitrogen, freeze-dried and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and magnetometry. The CMD plays a role in the reactions of the Fe ions' precipitation by partially immobilizing the Fe{sup 3+} ions into a complex. At room temperature, the amorphous material is precipitated. Then, above approximately 30 °C, the spinel nanoparticles form inside the amorphous matrix, and at approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles. The CMD bonded to the nanoparticles' surfaces hinders the mass transport and thus prevents their growth. - Highlights: • The carboxymethyl-dextrane coated iron-oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • The carboxymethyl-dextrane significantly modifies formation of the spinel nanoparticles. • The spinel nanoparticles are formed inside the amorphous matrix. • At approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles.

  17. Lepidophloios acerosus Lindley and Hutton 1831 in the Carboniferous Cucuiova Formation, “Iron Gates” Natural Park (Banat, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popa Mihai Emilian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Carboniferous Cucuiova Formation of the Sirinia Basin, Danubian Units, in Almăj Mountains, South Carpathians, yields a highly diverse yet rare compressive flora representing significant heritage values of the “Iron Gates” Natural Park. This flora includes pteridophytes (lycopsids, sphenopsids, filicopsids and gymnosperms (pteridosperms and conifers, some of these representatives being important coal generators during the Late Carboniferous times. The facies features, distribution and paleofloral features of the Cucuiova Formation are discussed in the framework of the Sirinia Basin. The lycopsid Lepidophloios acerosus Lindley and Hutton 1831 is reported for the first time in Romania from the Cucuiova Formation in Dragosela Valley, in the central part of the “Iron Gates” Natural Park.

  18. Silicon isotope fractionation during microbial reduction of Fe(III)-Si gels under Archean seawater conditions and implications for iron formation genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Thiruchelvi R.; Zheng, Xin-Yuan; Roden, Eric E.; Beard, Brian L.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2016-10-01

    Microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) is a deeply rooted metabolism in the Bacteria and Archaea. In the Archean and Proterozoic, the most likely electron acceptor for DIR in marine environments was Fe(III)-Si gels. It has been recently suggested that the Fe and Si cycles were coupled through sorption of aqueous Si to iron oxides/hydroxides, and through release of Si during DIR. Evidence for the close association of the Fe and Si cycles comes from banded iron formations (BIFs), which consist of alternating bands of Fe-bearing minerals and quartz (chert). Although there has been extensive study of the stable Fe isotope fractionations produced by DIR of Fe(III)-Si gels, as well as studies of stable Fe isotope fractionations in analogous abiologic systems, no studies to date have investigated stable Si isotope fractionations produced by DIR. In this study, the stable Si isotope fractionations produced by microbial reduction of Fe(III)-Si gels were investigated in simulated artificial Archean seawater (AAS), using the marine iron-reducing bacterium Desulfuromonas acetoxidans. Microbial reduction produced very large 30Si/28Si isotope fractionations between the solid and aqueous phase at ˜23 °C, where Δ30Sisolid-aqueous isotope fractionations of -3.35 ± 0.16‰ and -3.46 ± 0.09‰ were produced in two replicate experiments at 32% Fe(III) reduction (solid-phase Fe(II)/FeTotal = 0.32). This isotopic fractionation was substantially greater than that observed in two abiologic controls that had solid-phase Fe(II)/FeTotal = 0.02-0.03, which produced Δ30Sisolid-aqueous isotope fractionations of -2.83 ± 0.24‰ and -2.65 ± 0.28‰. In a companion study, the equilibrium Δ30Sisolid-aqueous isotope fractionation was determined to be -2.3‰ for solid-phase Fe(II)/FeTotal = 0. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of Fe(II) in Fe-Si gels in producing large changes in Si isotope fractionations. These results suggest that DIR should produce highly

  19. An Iron-Binding Protein, Dpr, from Streptococcus mutans Prevents Iron-Dependent Hydroxyl Radical Formation In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Poole, Leslie B.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2002-01-01

    The dpr gene is an antioxidant gene which was isolated from the Streptococcus mutans chromosome by its ability to complement an alkyl hydroperoxide reductase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, and it was proven to play an indispensable role in oxygen tolerance in S. mutans. Here, we purified the 20-kDa dpr gene product, Dpr, from a crude extract of S. mutans as an iron-binding protein and found that Dpr formed a spherical oligomer about 9 nm in diameter. Molecular weight determinations of ...

  20. Influence of thermomechanical processing on shear bands formation and magnetic properties of a 3% Si non-oriented electrical steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Ferreira de Dafe, Sara, E-mail: saradafe@gmail.com [Physics Department, Federal University of Ouro Preto, Campus Universitario, Ouro Preto, MG 35400000 (Brazil); Costa Paolinelli, Sebastiao da [Research Department, ArcelorMittal Inox Brasil, Praca Primeiro de Maio, 9 Timoteo, MG 35180018 (Brazil); Barros Cota, Andre [Physics Department, Federal University of Ouro Preto, Campus Universitario, Ouro Preto, MG 35400000 (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    The effect of thermomechanical processing on the formation of shear bands and on the magnetic properties of a 3.0 wt% silicon non-oriented steel was investigated by hot rolling samples with different thicknesses at different temperatures, in order to obtain a variation in hot band grain size and cold strain. All the samples were processed in a single-stage cold rolling and finally annealed at 1020 deg. C. It was found that the increase of the hot band grain size decreases the {gamma} fiber volume fraction and increases the {eta} fiber volume fraction after the final annealing. The increase of the cold strain strongly contributed to this result. A good combination of intense generation of shear bands, and proper crystallographic texture, due to higher nucleation of grains with favorable orientations to magnetization in these bands, can be obtained for the samples hot rolled at 1000 and 1120 deg. C and submitted to cold strain of 64.3% and 72.2% respectively. However the best combination of B{sub 50}, W{sub 15/60} and {mu}{sub r} can be obtained by hot rolling the samples at 1000 deg. C to the thickness of 1.4 mm, corresponding to 64.3% of cold strain. - Highlights: > Effect of processing on the magnetic properties of a non-oriented electrical steel. > Shear band generation during cold rolling is essential to reach a favorable texture. > Great magnetic properties obtained by hot rolling at 1000 deg. C and 64.3% cold strain.

  1. Formation of parallel joint sets and shear band/fracture networks in physical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorand, C.; Chemenda, A. I.; Petit, J.-P.

    2012-12-01

    Both oedometric and plane-strain tests were performed with parallelepipedic samples made of synthetic granular, cohesive, frictional and dilatant rock analogue material GRAM2. For the first time parallel sets of fractures that have all the characteristics of natural joints were reproduced in the laboratory. The fractures are regularly spaced, normal to σ3, and have plumose morphology very similar to that of natural joints. These fractures can form at tensile stress σ3 much smaller in magnitude than the tensile strength of material and even at slightly compressive σ3. When mean stress σ exceeds a certain value, the fractures become oblique to σ1 (the obliquity increases with σ), forming networks of conjugate shear bands/fractures. These results of plane-strain experiments are in good agreement with those of better controlled conventional axisymmetric tests on a similar material in Chemenda et al. (2011b) and are closer to real geological situations. Both types of experiments are complementary. Their results lead to the conclusion that at least certain categories of natural fractures (including joints, and conjugate shear fractures/bands) were initiated as deformation localization bands. The band orientation is defined by the constitutive properties/parameters (notably the dilatancy factor) that are sensitive to σ.

  2. Signatures of recent asteroid disruptions in the formation and evolution of solar system dust bands

    CERN Document Server

    Kehoe, A J Espy; Colwell, J E; Dermott, S F

    2015-01-01

    We have performed detailed dynamical modeling of the structure of a faint dust band observed in coadded IRAS data at an ecliptic latitude of 17$^{\\circ}$ that convincingly demonstrates that it is the result of a relatively recent (significantly less than 1 Ma) disruption of an asteroid and is still in the process of forming. We show here that young dust bands retain information on the size distribution and cross-sectional area of dust released in the original asteroid disruption, before it is lost to orbital and collisional decay. We find that the Emilkowalski cluster is the source of this partial band and that the dust released in the disruption would correspond to a regolith layer $\\sim$3 m deep on the $\\sim$10 km diameter source body's surface. The dust in this band is described by a cumulative size-distribution inverse power-law index with a lower bound of 2.1 (implying domination of cross-sectional area by small particles) for dust particles with diameters ranging from a few $\\mu$m up to a few cm. The co...

  3. Differentiation of Asteroid 4 Vesta: Core Formation by Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft while orbiting asteroid 4 Vesta, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possible with about 25 percent of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15 percent by mass (or 8 percent by volume) of the asteroid, with a composition of 73.7 percent by weight Fe, 16.0 percent by weight S, and 10.3 percent by weight Ni. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. The combination of the melting phase relationships for the silicate and metal phases, together with the moderately siderophile element concentrations together require that complete melting of the metal phase occurred (temperature is greater than1350 degrees Centigrade), along with substantial (greater than 40 percent) melting of the silicate material. Thus, core formation on Vesta occurs as iron rain sinking through a silicate magma ocean.

  4. Mechanism of unintentionally produced persistent organic pollutant formation in iron ore sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yifei; Liu, Lina; Fu, Xin; Zhu, Tianle; Buekens, Alfons; Yang, Xiaoyi; Wang, Qiang

    2016-04-05

    Effects of temperature, carbon content and copper additive on formation of chlorobenzenes (CBzs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in iron ore sintering were investigated. By heating simulated fly ash (SFA) at a temperature range of 250-500°C, the yield of both CBzs and PCBs presented two peaks of 637ng/g-fly ash at 350°C and 1.5×10(5)ng/g-fly ash at 450°C for CBzs, and 74ng/g-fly ash at 300°C and 53ng/g-fly ash at 500°C. Additionally, in the thermal treatment of real fly ash (RFA), yield of PCBs displayed two peak values at 350°C and 500°C, however, yield of CBzs showed only one peak at 400°C. In the thermal treatment of SFA with a carbon content range of 0-20wt% at 300°C, both CBzs and PCBs obtained the maximum productions of 883ng/g-fly ash for CBzs and 127ng/g-fly ash for PCBs at a 5wt% carbon content. Copper additives also affected chlorinated aromatic formation. The catalytic activity of different copper additives followed the orders: CuCl2∙2H2O>Cu2O>Cu>CuSO4>CuO for CBzs, and CuCl2∙2H2O>Cu2O>CuO>Cu>CuSO4 for PCBs.

  5. Iron limitation enhances acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) production and biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarresi, Farzan; Azizi, Omid; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Mosadegh, Ellahe; Mansouri, Shahla

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important source of infections in intensive care units (ICUs) of our hospitals in Kerman, Iran and the most frequently isolated strains produce biofilm. There is a little information about role of iron (Fe) levels on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) production and biofilm formation in this microorganism. In the present study, we investigated the influence of iron-III limitation on AHL, siderophore, catechol and virulence factors in the biofilm forming clinical strains of A. baumannii. A total of 65 non-duplicated multidrug resistance (MDR) strains of A. baumannii were isolated from patients in ICUs of 2 hospitals in Kerman, Iran. Antibiotic susceptibility, siderophore and other iron chelators, hemolysis, cell twitching motility, capsule, gelatinase and DNase were studied. Presence of quorum sensing, LuxI and LuxR genes was detected by multiplex-PCR. AHL activity quantified by colorimetric method and the functional groups were determined by Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FT-IR). Biofilm formation was detected by microtiter plate technique. All of the isolates were resistant to third generation of cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, whereas, 78% and 81% were resistant to amikacin and carbapenems, respectively. The siderophore activity was highest at 20 μM Fe(3+) (70%); however, it decreased to 45% as concentration of Fe(3+) increased to 80 μM. Furthermore, screening of the isolates for LuxI and LuxR genes showed that presence of both genes required in the isolates with high AHL activity. FT-IR analysis indicated C=O bond of the lactone ring and primary amides. Significantly, a higher amount of AHL (70%) was detected in the presence of low concentration of iron-III (20 μM); as iron concentration increased to 80 μM, the AHL activity was reduced to 40% (P ≤ 0.05). All the isolates exhibited twitching motility and had a capsule. No any gelatinase or DNase activity was detected. Quantification of the

  6. Gene cloning, purification, and characterization of two cyanobacterial NifS homologs driving iron-sulfur cluster formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S; Mihara, H; Kurihara, T; Yoshimura, T; Esaki, N

    2000-11-01

    Iron-sulfur proteins are essential in the photosynthetic system and many other biological processes. We have isolated and characterized enzymes driving the formation of iron-sulfur clusters from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Two genes (slr0387 and sll0704), showing similarity to nifS of Azotobacter vinelandii, were cloned, and their gene products (SsCsdl and SsCsd2) were purified. They catalyzed the desulfuration of L-cysteine. Reconstitution of a [2Fe-2S] cluster of cyanobacterial ferredoxin proceeded much faster in the presence of L-cysteine and either of these enzymes than when using sodium sulfide. These results suggest that SsCsdl and SsCsd2 facilitate the iron-sulfur cluster assembly by producing inorganic sulfur from L-cysteine. Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 has no gene coding for a protein with similarity to the N-terminal domain of NifU of A. vinelandii, which is believed to cooperate with NifS to assemble iron-sulfur clusters. Thus, the cluster formation in the cyanobacterium probably proceeds through a mechanism that is different from that in A. vinelandii.

  7. Inhibition of iron-catalysed hydroxyl radical formation by inositol polyphosphates: a possible physiological function for myo-inositol hexakisphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, P T; Poyner, D R; Jackson, T R; Letcher, A J; Lander, D A; Irvine, R F

    1993-09-15

    1. The ability of myo-inositol polyphosphates to inhibit iron-catalysed hydroxyl radical formation was studied in a hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system [Graf, Empson and Eaton (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 11647-11650]. Fe3+ present in the assay reagents supported some radical formation, and a standard assay, with 5 microM Fe3+ added, was used to investigate the specificity of compounds which could inhibit radical generation. 2. InsP6 (phytic acid) was able to inhibit radical formation in this assay completely. In this respect it was similar to the effects of the high affinity Fe3+ chelator Desferral, and dissimilar to the effects of EDTA which, even at high concentrations, still allowed detectable radical formation to take place. 3. The six isomers of InsP5 were purified from an alkaline hydrolysate of InsP6 (four of them as two enantiomeric mixtures), and they were compared with InsP6 in this assay. Ins(1,2,3,4,6)P5 and D/L-Ins(1,2,3,4,5)P5 were similar to InsP6 in that they caused a complete inhibition of iron-catalysed radical formation at > 30 microM. Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5 and D/L-Ins(1,2,4,5,6)P5, however, were markedly less potent than InsP6, and did not inhibit radical formation completely; even when Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5 was added up to 600 microM, significant radical formation was still detected. Thus InsP5s lacking 2 or 1/3 phosphates are in this respect qualitatively different from InsP6 and the other InsP5s. 4. scyllo-Inositol hexakisphosphate was also tested, and although it caused a greater inhibition than Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5, it too still allowed detectable free radical formation even at 600 microM. 5. We conclude that the 1,2,3 (equatorial-axial-equatorial) phosphate grouping in InsP6 has a conformation that uniquely provides a specific interaction with iron to inhibit totally its ability to catalyse hydroxyl radical formation; we suggest that a physiological function of InsP6 might be to act as a 'safe' binding site for iron during its transport through the

  8. Texture formation in iron particles using mechanical milling with graphite as a milling aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Motozuka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystallographically anisotropic platelet iron particles were successfully prepared using a conventional ball mill with addition of graphite (Gp particles. The morphological and structural changes resulting from the milling were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The spherical iron particles were plastically deformed into platelet shapes during the milling. Simultaneously, it is suggested that the size of the Gp particles decreased and adhered as nanoparticles on the surface of the iron particles. The adhered Gp particles affected the plastic deformation behavior of the iron particles: the {001} planes of α-iron were oriented parallel to the particle face, and no preferred in-plane orientation was observed. This study not only details the preparation of soft magnetic metal particles that crystallographically oriented to enhance their magnetic properties but also provides new insight into the activities of the well-established and extensively studied mechanical milling method.

  9. Texture formation in iron particles using mechanical milling with graphite as a milling aid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motozuka, S.; Hayashi, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Gifu National College of Technology, 2236-2 Kamimakuwa, Motosu, Gifu 501-0495 (Japan); Tagaya, M. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Morinaga, M. [Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute, 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Crystallographically anisotropic platelet iron particles were successfully prepared using a conventional ball mill with addition of graphite (Gp) particles. The morphological and structural changes resulting from the milling were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The spherical iron particles were plastically deformed into platelet shapes during the milling. Simultaneously, it is suggested that the size of the Gp particles decreased and adhered as nanoparticles on the surface of the iron particles. The adhered Gp particles affected the plastic deformation behavior of the iron particles: the (001) planes of α-iron were oriented parallel to the particle face, and no preferred in-plane orientation was observed. This study not only details the preparation of soft magnetic metal particles that crystallographically oriented to enhance their magnetic properties but also provides new insight into the activities of the well-established and extensively studied mechanical milling method.

  10. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-08-01

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are ˜0.1-2 μs over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  11. The chloroplast NifS-like protein of Arabidopsis thaliana is required for iron-sulfur cluster formation in ferredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hong; Garifullina, Gulnara F; Abdel-Ghany, Salah E; Zhang, Lihong; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; Pilon, Marinus

    2005-02-01

    Plastids are known to be able to synthesize their own iron-sulfur clusters, but the biochemical machinery responsible for this process is not known. In this study it is investigated whether CpNifS, the chloroplastic NifS-like cysteine desulfurase of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. is responsible for the release of sulfur from cysteine for the biogenesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters in chloroplasts. Using an in vitro reconstitution assay it was found that purified CpNifS was sufficient for Fe-S cluster formation in ferredoxin in the presence of cysteine and a ferrous iron salt. Antibody-depletion experiments using stromal extract showed that CpNifS is also essential for the Fe-S cluster formation activity of chloroplast stroma. The activity of CpNifS in the stroma was 50- to 80-fold higher than that of purified CpNifS on a per-protein basis, indicating that other stromal factors cooperate in Fe-S cluster formation. When stromal extract was separated on a gel-filtration column, most of the CpNifS eluted as a dimer of 86 kDa, but a minor fraction of the stromal CpNifS eluted at a molecular weight of approx. 600 kDa, suggesting the presence of a multi-protein complex. The possible nature of the interacting proteins is discussed.

  12. Red mud (RM)-Induced enhancement of iron plaque formation reduces arsenic and metal accumulation in two wetland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J X; Guo, Q J; Yang, J; Zhou, X Y; Ren, H Y; Zhang, H Z; Xu, R X; Wang, X D; Peters, M; Zhu, G X; Wei, R F; Tian, L Y; Han, X K

    2016-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in arsenic (As) and heavy metals accumulation in paddy soils in China. Phytoremediation has been suggested as an effective and low-cost method to clean up contaminated soils. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of red mud (RM) supply on iron plaque formation and As and heavy metal accumulation in two wetland plant species (Cyperus alternifolius Rottb., Echinodorus amazonicus Rataj), using As and heavy metals polluted paddy soil combined with three rates of RM application (0, 2%, 5%). The results showed that RM supply significantly decreased As and heavy metals accumulation in shoots of the two plants due to the decrease of As and heavy metal availability and the enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere. Both wetland plants supplied with RM tended to have more Fe plaque, higher As and heavy metals on roots and in their rhizospheres, and were more tolerant of As and heavy metal toxicity. The results suggest that RM-induced enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere of wetland plants may be significant for remediation of soils contaminated with As and heavy metals.

  13. Situs inversus abdominus and malrotation in an adult with Ladd's band formation leading to intestinal ischaemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ismail H Mallick; Rizwan Iqbal; Justin B Davies

    2006-01-01

    Situs inversus abdominus with rotational anomaly of the intestines is an extremely rare condition. Although intestinal mairotation has been recognized as a cause of obstruction in infants and children and may be complicated by intestinal ischaemia, it is very rare in adults. When it occurs in the adult patient, it may present acutely as bowel obstruction or intestinal ischaemia or chronically as vague intermittent abdominal pain. Herein, we present an acute presentation of a case of situs inversus abdominus and intestinal malrotation with Ladd's band leading to infarction of the intestine in a 32 year old woman.

  14. Preservation of carbohydrates through sulfurization in a Jurassic euxinic shelf sea: Examination of the Blackstone Band TOC-cycle in the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, B.E. van; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    A complete total organic carbon (TOC) cycle in the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF) comprising the extremely TOC-rich (34%) Blackstone Band was studied to investigate the controlling factors on TOC accumulation. Compared with the under- and overlying strata, TOC in the Blackstone Band

  15. Formation Sequences of Iron Minerals in the Acidic Alteration Products and Variation of Hydrothermal Fluid Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Iron minerals have important role in environmental issues not only on the Earth but also other terrestrial planets. Iron mineral species related to alteration products of primary minerals with surface or subsurface fluids are characterized by temperature, acidity and redox conditions of the fluids. We can see various iron- bearing alteration products in alteration products around fumaroles in geothermal/volcanic areas. In this study, zonal structures of iron minerals in alteration products of the geothermal area are observed to elucidate temporal and spatial variation of hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of the pyroxene-amphibole andesite of Garan-dake volcano, Oita, Japan occurs by the acidic hydrothermal fluid to form cristobalite leaching out elements other than Si. Hand specimens with unaltered or weakly altered core and cristobalite crust show various sequences of layers. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Intermediately altered layers are characterized by occurrence including alunite, pyrite, kaolinite, goethite and hematite. A specimen with reddish brown core surrounded by cristobalite-rich white crust has brown colored layers at the boundary of core and the crust. Reddish core is characterized by occurrence of crystalline hematite by XRD. Another hand specimen has light gray core, which represents reduced conditions, and white cristobalite crust with light brown and reddish brown layers of ferric iron minerals between the core and the crust. On the other hand, hornblende crystals, typical ferrous iron-bearing mineral of the host rock, are well preserved in some samples with strongly decolorized cristobalite-rich groundmass. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of iron-rich basaltic material shows iron mineral species depend on acidity and temperature of the fluid. Oxidation states of the iron-bearing mineral species are strongly influenced by the acidity and redox conditions. Variations of alteration

  16. An Iron-Rain Model for Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is differentiated into a crust, mantle, and core, as demonstrated by studies of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites and by data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Most models for the differentiation and thermal evolution of Vesta assume that the metal phase completely melts within 20 degrees of the eutectic temperature, well before the onset of silicate melting. In such a model, core formation initially happens by Darcy flow, but this is an inefficient process for liquid metal and solid silicate. However, the likely chemical composition of Vesta, similar to H chondrites with perhaps some CM or CV chondrite, has 13-16 weight percent S. For such compositions, metal-sulfide melting will not be complete until a temperature of at least 1350 degrees Centigrade. The silicate solidus for Vesta's composition is between 1100 and 1150 degrees Centigrade, and thus metal and silicate melting must have substantially overlapped in time on Vesta. In this chemically and physically more likely view of Vesta's evolution, metal sulfide drops will sink by Stokes flow through the partially molten silicate magma ocean in a process that can be envisioned as "iron rain". Measurements of eucrites show that moderately siderophile elements such as Ni, Mo, and W reached chemical equilibrium between the metal and silicate phases, which is an important test for any Vesta differentiation model. The equilibration time is a function of the initial metal grain size, which we take to be 25-45 microns based on recent measurements of H6 chondrites. For these sizes and reasonable silicate magma viscosities, equilibration occurs after a fall distance of just a few meters through the magma ocean. Although metal drops may grow in size by merger with other drops, which increases their settling velocities and decreases the total core formation time, the short equilibration distance ensures that the moderately siderophile elements will reach chemical equilibrium between metal and silicate before

  17. Photonic band-gap formation by optical-phase-mask lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Timothy Y M; Toader, Ovidiu; John, Sajeev

    2006-04-01

    We demonstrate an approach for fabricating photonic crystals with large three-dimensional photonic band gaps (PBG's) using single-exposure, single-beam, optical interference lithography based on diffraction of light through an optical phase mask. The optical phase mask (OPM) consists of two orthogonally oriented binary gratings joined by a thin, solid layer of homogeneous material. Illuminating the phase mask with a normally incident beam produces a five-beam diffraction pattern which can be used to expose a suitable photoresist and produce a photonic crystal template. Optical-phase-mask Lithography (OPML) is a major simplification from the previously considered multibeam holographic lithography of photonic crystals. The diffracted five-beam intensity pattern exhibits isointensity surfaces corresponding to a diamondlike (face-centered-cubic) structure, with high intensity contrast. When the isointensity surfaces in the interference patterns define a silicon-air boundary in the resulting photonic crystal, with dielectric contrast 11.9 to 1, the optimized PBG is approximately 24% of the gap center frequency. The ideal index contrast for the OPM is in the range of 1.7-2.3. Below this range, the intensity contrast of the diffraction pattern becomes too weak. Above this range, the diffraction pattern may become too sensitive to structural imperfections of the OPM. When combined with recently demonstrated polymer-to-silicon replication methods, OPML provides a highly efficient approach, of unprecedented simplicity, for the mass production of large-scale three-dimensional photonic band-gap materials.

  18. Influence of gangue existing states in iron ores on the formation and flow of liquid phase during sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-liang Zhang; Sheng-li Wu; Shao-guo Chen; Bo Su; Zhi-gang Que; Chao-gang Hou

    2014-01-01

    Gangue existing states largely affect the high-temperature characteristics of iron ores. Using a micro-sintering method and scan-ning electron microscopy, the effects of gangue content, gangue type, and gangue size on the assimilation characteristics and fluidity of liquid phase of five different iron ores were analyzed in this study. Next, the mechanism based on the reaction between gangues and sintering mate-rials was unraveled. The results show that, as the SiO2 levels increase in the iron ores, the lowest assimilation temperature (LAT) decreases, whereas the index of fluidity of liquid phase (IFL) increases. Below 1.5wt%, Al2O3 benefits the assimilation reaction, but higher concentra-tions proved detrimental. Larger quartz particles increase the SiO2 levels at the local reaction interface between the iron ore and CaO, thereby reducing the LAT. Quartz-gibbsite is more conductive to assimilation than kaolin. Quartz-gibbsite and kaolin gangues encourage the forma-tion of liquid-phase low-Al2O3-SFCA with high IFL and high-Al2O3-SFCA with low IFL, respectively.

  19. Influence of gangue existing states in iron ores on the formation and flow of liquid phase during sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-liang; Wu, Sheng-li; Chen, Shao-guo; Su, Bo; Que, Zhi-gang; Hou, Chao-gang

    2014-10-01

    Gangue existing states largely affect the high-temperature characteristics of iron ores. Using a micro-sintering method and scanning electron microscopy, the effects of gangue content, gangue type, and gangue size on the assimilation characteristics and fluidity of liquid phase of five different iron ores were analyzed in this study. Next, the mechanism based on the reaction between gangues and sintering materials was unraveled. The results show that, as the SiO2 levels increase in the iron ores, the lowest assimilation temperature (LAT) decreases, whereas the index of fluidity of liquid phase (IFL) increases. Below 1.5wt%, Al2O3 benefits the assimilation reaction, but higher concentrations proved detrimental. Larger quartz particles increase the SiO2 levels at the local reaction interface between the iron ore and CaO, thereby reducing the LAT. Quartz-gibbsite is more conductive to assimilation than kaolin. Quartz-gibbsite and kaolin gangues encourage the formation of liquid-phase low-Al2O3-SFCA with high IFL and high-Al2O3-SFCA with low IFL, respectively.

  20. Axial-Compressive Behavior, Including Kink-Band Formation and Propagation, of Single p-Phenylene Terephthalamide (PPTA Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grujicic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical response of p-phenylene terephthalamide (PPTA single fibers when subjected to uniaxial compression is investigated computationally using coarse-grained molecular statics/dynamics methods. In order to construct the coarse-grained PPTA model (specifically, in order to define the nature of the coarse-grained particles/beads and to parameterize various components of the bead/bead force-field functions, the results of an all-atom molecular-level computational investigation are used. In addition, the microstructure/topology of the fiber core, consisting of a number of coaxial crystalline fibrils, is taken into account. Also, following our prior work, various PPTA crystallographic/topological defects are introduced into the model (at concentrations consistent with the prototypical PPTA synthesis/processing conditions. The analysis carried out clearly revealed (a formation of the kink bands during axial compression; (b the role of defects in promoting the formation of kink bands; (c the stimulating effects of some defects on the fiber-fibrillation process; and (d the detrimental effect of the prior compression, associated with fiber fibrillation, on the residual longitudinal-tensile strength of the PPTA fibers.

  1. Role of humic substances in the formation of nanosized particles of iron corrosion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, D. A.; Anuchina, M. M.

    2017-02-01

    The corrosion of metallic iron in aqueous solutions of humic substances (HS) with limited access to air is studied. The HS are found to exhibit multiple functions. Acid-base, redox, and surfactant properties, along with the ability to form complexes with iron in solution, are displayed in the corrosion process. Partial reduction of the HS during the corrosion reaction and their adsorption onto the main corrosion product (Fe3O4 nanoparticles) are observed.

  2. Tailoring the spin waves band structure of 1D magnonic crystals consisting of L-shaped iron/permalloy nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Silvani, R.; Tacchi, S.; Madami, M.; Carlotti, G.; Yang, Z.; Adeyeye, A. O.; Kostylev, M.

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated both experimentally and numerically the magnonic band structure of arrays of closely spaced Fe/permalloy nanowires (NWs) with an L-shape cross-section using the Brillouin light scattering technique and GPU-based micromagnetic simulations. NWs consist of a 340 nm wide and 10 nm thick permalloy layer covered by a 170 nm wide Fe overlayer. The thickness of the latter was varied in the range from 0 to 10 nm in order to analyze its influence on the magnonic band structure. We found that both the frequency and the spatial profile of the most intense and dispersive mode, can be efficiently tuned by the presence of the thin Fe NW overlayer. In particular, by increasing the Fe thickness, one observes a substantial frequency increase, while the spatial profile of the mode narrows and moves to the permalloy NW portion not covered by Fe. In addition, the presence of the Fe overlayer causes a significant increase of the number of detected modes and a change of their intensity in the Brillouin spectra as a function of the Bloch wave number. These results show that it is possible to engineer the band structure of magnonic crystals consisting of bi-layered, L-shaped, NWs by a careful control of the overlayer thickness.

  3. Maghemite nanoparticles and ferrous sulfate for the stimulation of iron plaque formation and arsenic immobilization in Phragmites australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Tania; Martínez-Fernández, Domingo; de la Fuente, Carlos; Clemente, Rafael; Komárek, Michael; Bernal, M Pilar

    2016-12-01

    Wetland plants are considered as suitable biofilters for the removal of metal(loid)s and other contaminants from waters and wastewaters, due to their ability to accumulate and retain the contaminants in their roots. The iron plaque (IP) on the root surface influences the metal(loid)s retention processes. The stimulation of the IP development on roots of Phragmites australis by the external supply of a novel synthetic nanomaterial (nanomaghemite, nFe2O3) and FeSO4 (alone or in combination) was studied. An hydroponic experiment was carried out to evaluate the iron plaque formation after external iron addition, as well as their influence on arsenic immobilization capacity. Microscopic and spectroscopic techniques were utilized to assess the distribution of Fe and As in the roots. The addition of Fe stimulated the generation of the IP, especially when FeSO4 was involved. The nanoparticles alone were not efficient with regard to IP formation or As adsorption, even though they adhered to the root surface and did not enter into epithelial root cells. The combination of FeSO4 and nFe2O3 was the most effective treatment for improving the As removal capacity, and it seems to be an effective way to enhance the rhizofiltration potential of P. australis in As contaminated (waste)waters.

  4. Ferrous iron formation following the co-aggregation of ferric iron and the Alzheimer's disease peptide β-amyloid (1-42).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, J; Céspedes, E; Shelford, L R; Exley, C; Collingwood, J F; Dobson, J; van der Laan, G; Jenkins, C A; Arenholz, E; Telling, N D

    2014-06-06

    For decades, a link between increased levels of iron and areas of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology has been recognized, including AD lesions comprised of the peptide β-amyloid (Aβ). Despite many observations of this association, the relationship between Aβ and iron is poorly understood. Using X-ray microspectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy and spectrophotometric iron(II) quantification techniques, we examine the interaction between Aβ(1-42) and synthetic iron(III), reminiscent of ferric iron stores in the brain. We report Aβ to be capable of accumulating iron(III) within amyloid aggregates, with this process resulting in Aβ-mediated reduction of iron(III) to a redox-active iron(II) phase. Additionally, we show that the presence of aluminium increases the reductive capacity of Aβ, enabling the redox cycling of the iron. These results demonstrate the ability of Aβ to accumulate iron, offering an explanation for previously observed local increases in iron concentration associated with AD lesions. Furthermore, the ability of iron to form redox-active iron phases from ferric precursors provides an origin both for the redox-active iron previously witnessed in AD tissue, and the increased levels of oxidative stress characteristic of AD. These interactions between Aβ and iron deliver valuable insights into the process of AD progression, which may ultimately provide targets for disease therapies.

  5. Ferrous iron formation following the co-aggregation of ferric iron and the Alzheimer's disease peptide β-amyloid (1–42)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, J.; Céspedes, E.; Shelford, L. R.; Exley, C.; Collingwood, J. F.; Dobson, J.; van der Laan, G.; Jenkins, C. A.; Arenholz, E.; Telling, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, a link between increased levels of iron and areas of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology has been recognized, including AD lesions comprised of the peptide β-amyloid (Aβ). Despite many observations of this association, the relationship between Aβ and iron is poorly understood. Using X-ray microspectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy and spectrophotometric iron(II) quantification techniques, we examine the interaction between Aβ(1–42) and synthetic iron(III), reminiscent of ferric iron stores in the brain. We report Aβ to be capable of accumulating iron(III) within amyloid aggregates, with this process resulting in Aβ-mediated reduction of iron(III) to a redox-active iron(II) phase. Additionally, we show that the presence of aluminium increases the reductive capacity of Aβ, enabling the redox cycling of the iron. These results demonstrate the ability of Aβ to accumulate iron, offering an explanation for previously observed local increases in iron concentration associated with AD lesions. Furthermore, the ability of iron to form redox-active iron phases from ferric precursors provides an origin both for the redox-active iron previously witnessed in AD tissue, and the increased levels of oxidative stress characteristic of AD. These interactions between Aβ and iron deliver valuable insights into the process of AD progression, which may ultimately provide targets for disease therapies. PMID:24671940

  6. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-05-22

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe1-xS, 0<_ x<_ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  7. Nonlinear sub-cyclotron resonance as a formation mechanism for gaps in banded chorus

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Xiangrong; Dong, Chuanfei; Gary, S Peter

    2015-01-01

    An interesting characteristic of magnetospheric chorus is the presence of a frequency gap at $\\omega \\simeq 0.5\\Omega_e$, where $\\Omega_e$ is the electron cyclotron angular frequency. Recent chorus observations sometimes show additional gaps near $0.3\\Omega_e$ and $0.6\\Omega_e$. Here we present a novel nonlinear mechanism for the formation of these gaps using Hamiltonian theory and test-particle simulations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless plasma. We find that an oblique whistler wave with frequency at a fraction of the electron cyclotron frequency can resonate with electrons, leading to effective energy exchange between the wave and particles.

  8. Bayesian inference of galaxy formation from the K-band luminosity function of galaxies: tensions between theory and observation

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Yu; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, Martin D

    2011-01-01

    We conduct Bayesian model inferences from the observed K-band luminosity function of galaxies in the local Universe, using the semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation introduced in Lu et al (2011). The prior distributions for the 14 free parameters include a large range of possible models. We find that some of the free parameters, e.g. the characteristic scales for quenching star formation in both high-mass and low-mass halos, are already tightly constrained by the single data set. The posterior distribution includes the model parameters adopted in other SAMs. By marginalising over the posterior distribution, we make predictions that include the full inferential uncertainties for the colour-magnitude relation, the Tully-Fisher relation, the conditional stellar mass function of galaxies in halos of different masses, the HI mass function, the redshift evolution of the stellar mass function of galaxies, and the global star formation history. Using posterior predictive checking with the available observatio...

  9. Temperature dependence of enthalpies and entropies of formation and migration of mono-vacancy in BCC iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Haohua; Woo, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Entropies and enthalpies of vacancy formation and diffusion in BCC iron are calculated for each temperature directly from free-energies using phase-space trajectories obtained from spin-lattice dynamics simulations. Magnon contributions are found to be particularly substantial in the temperature regime near the α-β (ferro/para-magnetic) transition. Strong temperature dependence and singular behavior can be seen in this temperature regime, reflecting magnon softening effects. Temperature dependence of the lattice component in this regime is also much more significant compared to previous estimations based on Arrhenius-type fitting. Similar effects on activation processes involving other irradiation-produced defects in magnetic materials are expected.

  10. Formation of the Mont Dieu IIE Non Magmatic Iron Meteorite, and Origin of its Silicate Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosbroek, N.; Goderis, S.; Debaille, V.; Valley, J. W.; Claeys, Ph.

    2012-03-01

    Mont Dieu is an IIE nonmagmatic iron meteorite showing primitive features such as preserved chondrules and glass. SEM and geochemical analyses demonstrate that it most likely originated from an H-chondrite parent body impacted by a Fe-Ni projectile.

  11. The formation of filamentous carbon on iron and nickel catalysts : II. Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kock, A.J.H.M.; Bokx, P.K. de; Boellaard, E.; Klop, W.; Geus, John W.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of filamentous carbon growth on iron and nickel catalysts has been studied using a combination of magnetic techniques and temperature-programmed hydrogenation. CO and CH4 were used as carburizing agents. It is concluded that high carbide contents are a prerequisite for the nucleation o

  12. Silicon Burning, Quasi-Equilibrium and the formation of the Iron Peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hix, William Raphael; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    1994-12-01

    As the most tightly bound nuclei, the 'Iron Peak' nuclei result from Nuclear Statistical Equilibrium (NSE) and are the culmination of nuclear energy generation in astrophysical environments. Our re-examination of silicon burning, the mechanism by which the nuclei of the iron peak are produced, has revealed a number of potential improvements in the treatment of this ultimate stage of astrophysical nuclear energy generation. We will discuss results gleaned from simulation work done with a large nuclear network (300 nuclei and 3000 reactions) and from independent calculations of equilirium abundance distributions, which offer new insights into the quasi-equilibrium mechanism and the approach to NSE. We find that the degree to which the matter has been neutronized is of great importance, not only to the final products, but also to the rate of energy generation and the membership of the quasi-equilibrium groups. Furthermore, we find that, as a result of quasi-equilibrium, incomplete silicon burning results in neutron richness among the isotopes of the iron group much larger than the global neutronization would indicate. We will discuss methods which use this quasi-equilibrium mechanism to preserve the most important features of the large nuclear network calculations at a significant improvement in computational speed. Such improved methods are ideally suited for hydrodynamic calculations which involve the production of iron peak nuclei, where the larger network calculation proves unmanageable.

  13. Mechanism and optimization of titanium carbide-reinforced iron composite formation through carbothermal reduction of hematite and anatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasniyati, Md Razi; Zuhailawati, Hussain, E-mail: zuhaila@eng.usm.my; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul

    2014-02-25

    Highlights: • Reduction mechanism of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} mixture in formation Fe–TiC composite was discovered. • Factorial design is used to define interaction between calcination temperature and FeCl{sub 3} content. • Increasing FeCl{sub 3} content and calcination temperature increased the formation of Fe and TiC phases. • Microhardness and density of the sintered composite improved noticeably. -- Abstract: This study investigated an optimization of titanium carbide-reinforced iron composite fabricated using a combination of powder metallurgy and carbothermal reduction of hematite-anatase mixture using 2{sup k} factorial design. The composite formation mechanism is described as well. Powders of hematite, anatase and graphite with mole ratio of 1:1:6 were mixed for 1 h together with 0 wt%, 1 wt% and 5 wt% FeCl{sub 3}. The mixture was pressed at 5 MPa, calcined for 1 h at 1000 °C, 1100 °C or 1200 °C and sintered at 1200 °C. X-ray diffraction of the calcined powder showed that with increasing temperature TiO{sub 2} was reduced to TiC through formation of various suboxides (Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5} and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Scanning electron microscope observation of the sintered composite indicated that addition of FeCl{sub 3} enhanced the formation of TiC in iron matrix. Consequently, microhardness and density of the sintered composite improved noticeably. Based on microhardness, green density and sintered density measurements, design of experiment analysis suggested that an increase in both FeCl{sub 3} content and calcination temperature increased the percentage of hematite and anatase reduction.

  14. Responses to Iron-Deficiency in Arabidopsis-Thaliana - The Turbo Iron Reductase does not depend on the Formation of Root Hairs and Transfer Cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moog, P.R.; Van der Kooij, T.A.W.; Bruggemann, W.; Schiefelbein, J.W.; Kuiper, P.J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Columbia wild type and a root hair-less mutant RM57 were grown on iron-containing and iron-deficient nutrient solutions. In both genotypes, ferric chelate reductase (FCR) of intact roots was induced upon iron deficiency and followed a Michaelis-Menten kinetic with a

  15. Solid-stabilized emulsion formation using stearoyl lactylate coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengsarkar, Pranav S.; Roberts, Christopher B.

    2014-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can exhibit highly tunable physicochemical properties that are extremely important in applications such as catalysis, biomedicine and environmental remediation. The small size of iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to stabilize oil-in-water Pickering emulsions due to their high energy of adsorption at the interface of oil droplets in water. The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of the primary particle characteristics and stabilizing agent chemistry on the stability of oil-in-water Pickering emulsions. Iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method using stoichiometric amounts of Fe2+ and Fe3+ salts. Sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL), a Food and Drug Administration approved food additive, was used to functionalize the iron oxide nanoparticles. SSL is useful in the generation of fat-in-water emulsions due to its high hydrophilic-lipophilic balance and its bilayer-forming capacity. Generation of a monolayer or a bilayer coating on the nanoparticles was controlled through systematic changes in reagent concentrations. The coated particles were then characterized using various analytical techniques to determine their size, their crystal structure and surface functionalization. The capacity of these bilayer coated nanoparticles to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions under various salt concentrations and pH values was also systematically determined using various characterization techniques. This study successfully demonstrated the ability to synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles (20-40 nm) coated with SSL in order to generate stable Pickering emulsions that were pH-responsive and resistant to significant destabilization in a saline environment, thereby lending themselves to applications in advanced oil spill recovery and remediation.

  16. Controlled hydrodynamic conditions on the formation of iron oxide nanostructures synthesized by electrochemical anodization: Effect of the electrode rotation speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Granados, Bianca; Sánchez-Tovar, Rita; Fernández-Domene, Ramón M.; García-Antón, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanostructures are of particular interest because they can be used as photocatalysts in water splitting due to their advantageous properties. Electrochemical anodization is one of the best techniques to synthesize nanostructures directly on the metal substrate (direct back contact). In the present study, a novel methodology consisting of the anodization of iron under hydrodynamic conditions is carried out in order to obtain mainly hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanostructures to be used as photocatalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. Different rotation speeds were studied with the aim of evaluating the obtained nanostructures and determining the most attractive operational conditions. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, photoelectrochemical water splitting, stability against photocorrosion tests, Mott-Schottky analysis, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and band gap measurements. The results showed that the highest photocurrent densities for photoelectrochemical water splitting were achieved for the nanostructure synthesized at 1000 rpm which corresponds to a nanotubular structure reaching ∼0.130 mA cm-2 at 0.54 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). This is in agreement with the EIS measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis which showed the lowest resistances and the corresponding donor density values, respectively, for the nanostructure anodized at 1000 rpm.

  17. Magneto-structural transformations via a solid-state nudged elastic band method: Application to iron under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarkevich, N. A., E-mail: zarkev@ameslab.gov, E-mail: ddj@ameslab.gov [The Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011-3020 (United States); Johnson, D. D., E-mail: zarkev@ameslab.gov, E-mail: ddj@ameslab.gov [The Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011-3020 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-2300 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    We extend the solid-state nudged elastic band method to handle a non-conserved order parameter, in particular, magnetization, that couples to volume and leads to many observed effects in magnetic systems. We apply this formalism to the well-studied magneto-volume collapse during the pressure-induced transformation in iron—from ferromagnetic body-centered cubic (bcc) austenite to hexagonal close-packed (hcp) martensite. We find a bcc-hcp equilibrium coexistence pressure of 8.4 GPa, with the transition-state enthalpy of 156 meV/Fe at this pressure. A discontinuity in magnetization and coherent stress occurs at the transition state, which has a form of a cusp on the potential-energy surface (yet all the atomic and cell degrees of freedom are continuous); the calculated pressure jump of 25 GPa is related to the observed 25 GPa spread in measured coexistence pressures arising from martensitic and coherency stresses in samples. Our results agree with experiments, but necessarily differ from those arising from drag and restricted parametrization methods having improperly constrained or uncontrolled degrees of freedom.

  18. Bayesian inferences of galaxy formation from the K-band luminosity and HI mass functions of galaxies: constraining star formation and feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Yu; Lu, Zhankui; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, Martin D

    2013-01-01

    We infer mechanisms of galaxy formation for a broad family of semi-analytic models (SAMs) constrained by the K-band luminosity function and HI mass function of local galaxies using tools of Bayesian analysis. Even with a broad search in parameter space the whole model family fails to match to constraining data. In the best fitting models, the star formation and feedback parameters in low-mass haloes are tightly constrained by the two data sets, and the analysis reveals several generic failures of models that similarly apply to other existing SAMs. First, based on the assumption that baryon accretion follows the dark matter accretion, large mass-loading factors are required for haloes with circular velocities lower than 200 km/s, and most of the wind mass must be expelled from the haloes. Second, assuming that the feedback is powered by Type-II supernovae with a Chabrier IMF, the outflow requires more than 25% of the available SN kinetic energy. Finally, the posterior predictive distributions for the star form...

  19. Quantum statistics in the spin-lattice dynamics simulation of formation and migration of mono-vacancy in BCC iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Haohua; Woo, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Contributions from the vibrational thermodynamics of phonons and magnons in the dynamic simulations of thermally activated atomic processes in crystalline materials were considered within the framework of classical statistics in conventional studies. The neglect of quantum effects produces the wrong lattice and spin dynamics and erroneous activation characteristics, sometimes leading to the incorrect results. In this paper, we consider the formation and migration of mono-vacancy in BCC iron over a large temperature range from 10 K to 1400 K, across the ferro/paramagnetic phase boundary. Entropies and enthalpies of migration and formation are calculated using quantum heat baths based on a Bose-Einstein statistical description of thermal excitations in terms of phonons and magnons. Corrections due to the use of classical heat baths are evaluated and discussed.

  20. Vacancy enhanced formation and phase transition of Cu-rich precipitates in α - iron under neutron irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Lv

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we employed both molecular statics and molecular dynamics simulation methods to investigate the role of vacancies in the formation and phase transition of Cu-rich precipitates in α-iron. The results indicated that vacancies promoted the diffusion of Cu atoms to form Cu-rich precipitates. After Cu-rich precipitates formed, they further trapped vacancies. The supersaturated vacancy concentration in the Cu-rich precipitate induced a shear strain, which triggered the phase transition from bcc to fcc structure by transforming the initial bcc (110 plane into fcc (111 plane. In addition, the formation of the fcc-twin structure and the stacking fault structure in the Cu-rich precipitates was observed in dynamics simulations.

  1. Vacancy enhanced formation and phase transition of Cu-rich precipitates in α - iron under neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, G. C.; Zhang, H.; He, X. F.; Yang, W.; Su, Y. J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we employed both molecular statics and molecular dynamics simulation methods to investigate the role of vacancies in the formation and phase transition of Cu-rich precipitates in α-iron. The results indicated that vacancies promoted the diffusion of Cu atoms to form Cu-rich precipitates. After Cu-rich precipitates formed, they further trapped vacancies. The supersaturated vacancy concentration in the Cu-rich precipitate induced a shear strain, which triggered the phase transition from bcc to fcc structure by transforming the initial bcc (110) plane into fcc (111) plane. In addition, the formation of the fcc-twin structure and the stacking fault structure in the Cu-rich precipitates was observed in dynamics simulations.

  2. Siderophile element systematics of IAB complex iron meteorites: New insights into the formation of an enigmatic group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsham, Emily A.; Bermingham, Katherine R.; Walker, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    Siderophile trace element abundances and the 187Re-187Os isotopic systematics of the metal phases of 58 IAB complex iron meteorites were determined in order to investigate formation processes and how meteorites within chemical subgroups may be related. Close adherence of 187Re-187Os isotopic data of most IAB iron meteorites to a primordial isochron indicates that the siderophile elements of most members of the complex remained closed to elemental disturbance soon after formation. Minor, presumably late-stage open-system behavior, however, is observed in some members of the sLM, sLH, sHL, and sHH subgroups. The new siderophile element abundance data are consistent with the findings of prior studies suggesting that the IAB subgroups cannot be related to one another by any known crystallization process. Equilibrium crystallization, coupled with crystal segregation, solid-liquid mixing, and subsequent fractional crystallization can account for the siderophile element variations among meteorites within the IAB main group (MG). The data for the sLM subgroup are consistent with equilibrium crystallization, combined with crystal segregation and mixing. By contrast, the limited fractionation of siderophile elements within the sLL subgroup is consistent with metal extraction from a chondritic source with little subsequent processing. The limited data for the other subgroups were insufficient to draw robust conclusions about crystallization processes involved in their formation. Collectively, multiple formational processes are represented in the IAB complex, and modeling results suggest that fractional crystallization within the MG may have been a more significant process than has been previously recognized.

  3. Dual-beam irradiation of {alpha}-iron: Heterogeneous bubble formation on dislocation loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brimbal, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.brimbal@cea.fr [Laboratoire d' Analyse Microstructurale des Materiaux (LA2M), CEA/Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMA/LA2M, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Decamps, Brigitte, E-mail: Brigitte.decamps@csnsm.in2p3.fr [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masses (CSNSM/IN2P3/CNRS), Orsay University, Bat. 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Barbu, Alain, E-mail: Alain.barbu@cea.fr [Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique (SRMP), CEA/Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMP, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Meslin, Estelle, E-mail: Estelle.Meslin@cea.fr [Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique (SRMP), CEA/Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMP, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Henry, Jean, E-mail: Jean.henry@cea.fr [Laboratoire d' Analyse Microstructurale des Materiaux (LA2M), CEA/Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMA/LA2M, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We have irradiated {alpha}-iron in situ with Fe{sup +} and He{sup +} ions at 500 deg. C. > Dislocation loops and helium bubbles are present at 1 dpa/540 appm He. > The helium bubbles are located heterogeneously on the dislocation loops. - Abstract: In order to understand the evolution of materials under irradiation conditions similar to those in future fusion reactors, we have irradiated high purity iron in situ in a transmission electron microscope with 1 MeV Fe{sup +} ions while simultaneously implanting 15 keV He{sup +} ions, at 500 deg. C. Once {approx}1 dpa/500 appm He were reached, helium bubbles and large dislocation loops were observed. The study reveals that helium bubbles nucleated heterogeneously: a majority of them were observed inside the large dislocation loops.

  4. Formation of Hearth Sediment during Vanadium Titano-magnetite Smelting in Blast Furnace No.7 of Chengde Iron and Steel Company

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-jie LIU; Qing L; Shu-jun CHEN; Zhen-feng ZHANG; Shu-hui ZHANG; Yan-qin SUN

    2015-01-01

    The large quantity of sediment produced in the hearth during vanadium titano-magnetite smelting in a blast furnace (BF) affects the stability of the blast furnace operation. Testing and analysis of the sediment in the hearth of Chengde Iron and Steel Companyʹs BF No.7 revealed that it was mainly concentrated in the location below the tuyere and above the iron notch. Notably, some of the bonding material (sediment) consisted of greater than 50% pig iron, and the pig iron distributed in the slag was granu-lar. It is proposed that a large quantity of TiC and Ti(C,N) are deposited on the surface of the pig iron. These high melting point materials mix with iron drops, preventing the slag from lfowing freely, thus leading to the formation of bonding materials. In ad-dition, the viscosity and melting temperature of the slag in the tuyere areas lfuctuate greatly, and thus the properties of the slag are unstable. Moreover, the slag contains large quantities of carbon, which results in the reduction of TiO2. The resultant precipitation of Ti is followed by the formation of TiC in the slag, which also leads to an increase in the viscosity of the slag and dififculty in achieving separation of the slag-iron. In fact, all of these factors interact with each other, and as a result, sediment is formed when the operating conditions in the hearth lfuctuate.

  5. High-temperature miscibility of iron and rock during terrestrial planet formation

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    The accretion of a terrestrial body and differentiation of its silicate/oxide mantle from iron core provide abundant energy for heating its interior to temperatures much higher than the present day Earth. The consequences of differentiation on the structure and composition of planets are typically addressed considering only the interaction of molten iron with an immiscible `rocky' phase. We demonstrate that mixing in a representative system of liquid or solid MgO and liquid iron to a single homogeneous liquid occurs at sufficiently low temperature to be present in the aftermath of a giant impact. Applying the thermodynamic integration technique to density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations, we determine the solvus closure temperature for the Fe-MgO system for pressures up to 400 GPa. Solvus closure occurs at $\\sim$4000 K at low pressure, and has a weak positive pressure dependence, such that its gradient with respect to depth is less steep than an adiabatic temperature profile. This predicts a n...

  6. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  7. Dioxygen activation by a non-heme iron(II) complex: formation of an iron(IV)-oxo complex via C-H activation by a putative iron(III)-superoxo species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Min; Hong, Seungwoo; Morimoto, Yuma; Shin, Woonsup; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2010-08-11

    Iron(III)-superoxo intermediates are believed to play key roles in oxygenation reactions by non-heme iron enzymes. We now report that a non-heme iron(II) complex activates O(2) and generates its corresponding iron(IV)-oxo complex in the presence of substrates with weak C-H bonds (e.g., olefins and alkylaromatic compounds). We propose that a putative iron(III)-superoxo intermediate initiates the O(2)-activation chemistry by abstracting a H atom from the substrate, with subsequent generation of a high-valent iron(IV)-oxo intermediate from the resulting iron(III)-hydroperoxo species.

  8. Methane formation by oxidation of ascorbic acid using iron minerals and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Frederik; Jugold, Alke; Keppler, Frank

    2010-06-01

    The possibility of methane formation in an oxidative environment has been intensely debated, especially since the discovery of methane generation by living plants. However, recent studies with animal tissue suggested that under specific conditions aerobic methane formation is also possible. Here, we investigated the generation of methane in an abiotic model system using bioavailable substances. We show formation of methane in a highly oxidative media, using ascorbic acid, ferrihydrite and hydrogen peroxide as reagents. Methane production was shown to be related to reagent ratio, reaction volume and pH. A 2:1 ratio of hydrogen peroxide to ascorbic acid, catalytic amounts of ferrihydrite and acidic conditions (pH 3) enhanced formation of methane. We further show that gaseous oxygen has a strong influence with higher levels found to inhibit methane formation. This study is a first step towards providing an insight for the reaction mechanism of methane formation that would be applicable to aerobic environments.

  9. Do radial oxygen loss and external aeration affect iron plaque formation and arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan; Ye, Zhihong; Li, Hui; Wu, Shengchun; Deng, Dan; Zhu, Yongguan; Wong, Minghung

    2012-05-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of radial oxygen loss (ROL) and external aeration on iron (Fe) plaque formation, and arsenic (As) accumulation and speciation in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The data showed that there were significant correlations between ROL and Fe concentrations in Fe plaque produced on different genotypes of rice. There were also significant differences in the amounts of Fe plaque formed between different genotypes in different positions of roots and under different aeration conditions (aerated, normal, and stagnant treatments). In aerated treatments, rice tended to have a higher Fe plaque formation than in a stagnant solution, with the greatest formation at the root tip decreasing with increasing distances away, in accordance with a trend of spatial ROL. Genotypes with higher rates of ROL induced higher degrees of Fe plaque formation. Plaques sequestered As on rice roots, with arsenate almost double that with arsenite, leading to decreased As accumulation in both roots and shoots. The major As species detected in roots and shoots was arsenite, ranging from 34 to 78% of the total As in the different treatments and genotypes. These results contribute to our understanding of genotypic differences in As uptake by rice and the mechanisms causing rice genotypes with higher ROL to show lower overall As accumulation.

  10. The cytoskeletal binding domain of band 3 is required for multiprotein complex formation and retention during erythropoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchwell, Timothy J; Hawley, Bethan R; Bell, Amanda J; Ribeiro, M. Leticia; Toye, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Band 3 is the most abundant protein in the erythrocyte membrane and forms the core of a major multiprotein complex. The absence of band 3 in human erythrocytes has only been reported once, in the homozygous band 3 Coimbra patient. We used in vitro culture of erythroblasts derived from this patient, and separately short hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of band 3, to investigate the development of a band 3-deficient erythrocyte membrane and to specifically assess the stability and retention of band 3 dependent proteins in the absence of this core protein during terminal erythroid differentiation. Further, using lentiviral transduction of N-terminally green fluorescent protein-tagged band 3, we demonstrated the ability to restore expression of band 3 to normal levels and to rescue secondary deficiencies of key proteins including glycophorin A, protein 4.2, CD47 and Rh proteins arising from the absence of band 3 in this patient. By transducing band 3-deficient erythroblasts from this patient with band 3 mutants with absent or impaired ability to associate with the cytoskeleton we also demonstrated the importance of cytoskeletal connectivity for retention both of band 3 and of its associated dependent proteins within the reticulocyte membrane during the process of erythroblast enucleation. PMID:25344524

  11. Oxygen controlled product formation in CCl{sub 4} dechlorination using zero-valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helland, B.R.; Alvarez, P.J.J.; Schnoor, J.L. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) was abiotically dechlorinated using zero-valent iron powder (Fe{sup o}) to yield chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}) and methylene chloride (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}), which did not undergo further dechlorination. Dechlorination was rapid and approximated first-order kinetics in the range of concentrations tested (CCl{sub 4}: 1.5 to 5.5 {mu}M; Fe{sup o}: 1 to 10 g per 265 mL distilled deionized water). Initial dechlorination rate coefficients for anoxic batch reactors (0.290 {plus_minus} 0.009 hr{sup -1} for 1 g Fe{sup o}; 1.723 {plus_minus} 0.078 hr{sup -1} for 10 g Fe{sup o}) increased with iron surface area (initially 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2 m{sup 2}/g). Dechlorination also occurred under oxic conditions, although rates were significantly slower (e.g., 0.085 {plus_minus} 0.041 hr{sup -1} for 1 g Fe{sup o} and 7.4 mg/L initial dissolved oxygen). Rate coefficients increased with time, probably due to an increase in reactive surface area from pitting and dissolution of the iron surface. A rapid pH increase was synchronous to dissolved oxygen consumption, and the pH remained constant after oxygen depletion. This was attributed to the proton and oxygen consuming aerobic corrosion of the Fe{sup o} surface. Recalcitrant CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} was decreased in the presence of dissolved oxygen, which reacted with dechlorinated intermediates to yield less environmentally onerous products such as formic acid and carbon monoxide.

  12. Diatoms in acid mine drainage and their role in the formation of iron-rich stromatolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Dannelly, H.K. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Adverse conditions in the acid mine drainage (AMD) system at the Green Valley mine, Indiana, limit diatom diversity to one species, Nitzschia tubicola. It is present in three distinct microbial consortia: Euglena mutabilis-dominated biofilm, diatom-dominated biofilm, and diatom-exclusive biofilm. E. mutabilis dominates the most extensive biofilm, with lesser numbers of N. tubicola, other eukaryotes, and bacteria. Diatom-dominated biofilm occurs as isolated patches containing N. tubicola with minor fungal hyphae, filamentous algae, E. mutabilis, and bacteria. Diatom-exclusive biofilm is rare, composed entirely of N. tubicola. Diatom distribution is influenced by seasonal and intraseasonal changes in water temperature and chemistry. Diatoms are absent in winter due to cool water temperatures. In summer, isolated patchy communities are present due to warmer water temperatures. In 2001, the diatom community expanded its distribution following a major rainfall that temporarily diluted the effluent, creating hospitable conditions for diatom growth. After several weeks when effluent returned to preexisting conditions, the diatom biofilm retreated to isolated patches, and E. mutabilis biofilm flourished. Iron-rich stromatolites underlie the biofilms and consist of distinct laminae, recording spatial and temporal oscillations in physicochemical conditions and microbial activity. The stromatolites are composed of thin, wavy laminae with partially decayed E. mutabilis biofilm, representing microbial activity and iron precipitation under normal AMD conditions. Alternating with the wavy layers are thicker, porous, spongelike laminae composed of iron precipitated on and incorporated into radiating colonies of diatoms. These layers indicate episodic changes in water chemistry, allowing diatoms to temporarily dominate the system.

  13. The Effect of Chelating Copolymer Additive on the Yttrium Iron Garnet Nanoparticle Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang; Cheng-chien

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) is a well-known ferromagnetic garnet material and has widely used in electronic devices[1].A new acrylic chelating polymer was developed to act as the additive of the preparation of YIG precursor in our previous study[2].The sintering temperature of YIG nanocrystal obtained by this YIG precursor (ACP) was magnificently descended from 1 000 to 600 ℃.In this study,we were further to study the effect of amount of chelating polymer and the compositions of chelating polyme...

  14. Petrology and geochemistry of the ~2.9 Ga Itilliarsuk banded iron formation and associated supracrustal rocks, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Rasmus; Frei, Robert; Stendal, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    or outer shelf environment, with frequent fluctuations of epiclastic and volcanogenic sediments derived from adjacent bimodal sources. The TDM model ages and the use of Th–Sc–Zr and La–Th–Sc tectonic discrimination plots indicate that the metasediments were sourced from a juvenile ocean island arc setting....

  15. Geochemistry of tourmalines associated with iron formation and quartz veins of the Morro da Pedra Preta Formation, Serra do Itaberaba Group (São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garda Gianna M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourmalines of intermediate schorl-dravite composition occur in iron formation (including metachert and tourmalinites, metasediments, calc-silicate and metabasic/intermediate rocks of the Morro da Pedra Preta Formation, a volcanic-sedimentary sequence of the Serra do Itaberaba Group (northeast of São Paulo City, southeastern Brazil. The Morro da Pedra Preta Formation is crosscut by quartz veins that contain both intermediate schorl-dravite and an alkali-deficient, Cr-(V-bearing tourmaline, in which the occupancy of the X-site is ϑ0.51Ca0.33Na0.15, characterizing it as intermediate to foitite and magnesiofoitite end-members. Mg# values for this tourmaline are higher than those for intermediate schorl-dravite. Raman spectroscopy also confirms the presence of two groups of tourmalines. Stable isotope data indicate sediment waters as fluid sources, rather than fluids from magmatic/post-magmatic sources. Delta18O compositions for tourmalines, host metachert, and quartz veins are similar, showing that fluid equilibration occurred during crystallization of both quartz and tourmaline. Syngenetic, intermediate schorl-dravite tourmalines were formed under submarine, sedimentary-exhalative conditions; amphibolite-grade metamorphism did not strongly affect their compositions. Younger tourmalines of compositions intermediate to foitite and magnesiofoitite reflect the composition of the host rocks of quartz veins, due to fluid percolation along faults and fractures that caused leaching of Cr (and V and the crystallization of these alkali-deficient, Cr-(V-bearing tourmalines.

  16. Effect of Hot Deformation on Formation and Growth of Thermal Fatigue Crack in Chromium Wear Resistant Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Li-min; LIU Jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    The formation and growth of thermal fatigue crack in chromium wear resistant cast iron was investigated, and the effect of hot deformation on the crack was analyzed by means of optical microscope and scanning electron microscope and high frequency induction thermal fatigue tester. The results show that eutectic carbide is the main location and passage for initiation and extension of thermal fatigue cracks, hot deformation can improve the eutectic carbide′s morphology and distribution, inhibit the generation and propagation of thermal fatigue cracks. In the experiment, the propagation rate of thermal fatigue crack reduces with the quantity of hot deformation increasing, which was analyzed in the point view of the activation energy of crack propagation.

  17. Insight into Bio-metal Interface Formation in vacuo: Interplay of S-layer Protein with Copper and Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Anna A.; Grachova, Elena V.; Neudachina, Vera S.; Yashina, Lada V.; Blüher, Anja; Molodtsov, Serguei L.; Mertig, Michael; Ehrlich, Hermann; Adamchuk, Vera K.; Laubschat, Clemens; Vyalikh, Denis V.

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms of interaction between inorganic matter and biomolecules, as well as properties of resulting hybrids, are receiving growing interest due to the rapidly developing field of bionanotechnology. The majority of potential applications for metal-biohybrid structures require stability of these systems under vacuum conditions, where their chemistry is elusive, and may differ dramatically from the interaction between biomolecules and metal ions in vivo. Here we report for the first time a photoemission and X-ray absorption study of the formation of a hybrid metal-protein system, tracing step-by-step the chemical interactions between the protein and metals (Cu and Fe) in vacuo. Our experiments reveal stabilization of the enol form of peptide bonds as the result of protein-metal interactions for both metals. The resulting complex with copper appears to be rather stable. In contrast, the system with iron decomposes to form inorganic species like oxide, carbide, nitride, and cyanide.

  18. Numerical investigation of the effects of iron oxidation reactions on the fume formation mechanism in arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanibondi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Fume formation during arc welding has been modelled using a stochastic approach taking into account iron oxidation reactions. The model includes the nucleation and condensation of Fe and FeO vapours, the reaction of gaseous O2 and O on the nanoparticle surface, the coagulation of the nanoparticles including a sintering time as a function of temperature and composition, assuming chemical equilibrium for species in the gaseous phase. Results suggest that fumes generated in gas metal arc welding with oxidizing shielding mixtures are composed of aggregates of primary particles that are nucleated from gas-phase FeO and further oxidized to Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 in the liquid and solid phase, respectively. The composition of the fumes at the end of the formation process depends on the relative initial concentration of Fe and O2 species in the gas mixture and on the diameter of the primary particles that compose the aggregates: as the oxidation reactions are driven by deposition of oxygen on nanoparticle surface, the oxidation of larger particles is slower than that of smaller particles because of their lower surface to volume ratio. Solid-state diffusion is limiting the oxidation process at temperatures lower than 1500 K, inducing the formation of not fully oxidized particles composed of Fe3O4.

  19. Characteristic of skin formation using zircon- and graphite-coated mold in thin wall ductile iron fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaneswara, Donanta; Suharno, Bambang; Nugroho, Janu Ageng; Ariobimo, Rianti Dewi S.; Sofyan, Nofrijon

    2017-03-01

    One of the problems in thin wall ductile iron (TWDI) fabrication is skin formation during the casting. The presence of this skin will decrease strength and strain of the TWDI. One of the ways to control this skin formation is to change the cooling rate during the process through a mold coating. In testing the effectiveness of skin prevention, the following variables were used for the mold coating i.e. (i) graphite: (ii) zirconium; and (iii) double layer of graphite-zirconium. After the process, the plates were characterized by non-etching, etching, tensile test, and SEM observation. The results showed that the average skin formation using graphite: 65 µm; zirconium: 13.04 µm; and double layer of graphite-zirconium: 33.25 µm. It seems that zirconium has the most effect on the skin prevention due to sulfur binding and magnesium locked, which then prevented rapid cooling resulting in less skin formation. The results also showed the number of nodules obtained in specimen with graphite: 703 nodules/mm2 with average diameter of 12.57 µm, zirconium: 798 nodules/mm2 with average diameter of 12.15 µm, and double layer of graphite-zirconium: 697 nodules/mm2 with average diameter of 11.9 µm and nodularity percentage of 82.58%, 84.53%, and 84.22%, respectively. Tensile test showed that the strength of the specimen with graphite is 301.1 MPa, with zirconium is 388.8 MPa, and with double layer of graphite-zirconium is 304 MPa. In overall, zirconium give the best performance on the skin formation prevention in TWDI fabrication.

  20. Corrosive inorganic contamination on wafer surfaces after nickel-iron electroplating formation mechanisms and prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritzer, P. [Freudenberg Nonwovens KG, Technical Nonwovens Div., Weinheim (Germany); Diel, W.; Barber, P.H. [IBM Speichersysteme Deutschland GmbH, Mainz (Germany); Romankiw, L.T. [IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States)

    2001-11-01

    Electroplating of Nickel-Iron alloys is widely used in the production of magnetic heads for storage systems. Usually, the plating process is performed in acidic, salt-containing solutions. After the plating step, a complete removal of the plating salts is necessary to receive a clean surface. In disadvantageous cases, a precipitation of sticky particles is observed that cannot be removed from the plated surface without damaging the surface. Some of these substances (esp. nickel sulfates) might lead to severe local corrosion and thus might act as ''time-bomb'' in the later product. Non-corrosive precipitations (i.e. nickel hydroxides) strongly hinder or even prevent the following production steps. In the present paper, the mechanisms of the origin of the different kinds of precipitation are described and the principle actions for their prevention are given. An outlook is given for other possible technical applications. (orig.)

  1. SPHERICAL MICROSTRUCTURE FORMATION OF THE SEMI-SOLID HIGH CHROMIUM CAST IRON Cr20Mo2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.M. Mao; A.M. Zhao; X.Y. Zhong

    2004-01-01

    The nondendritic semi-solid slurry preparation of high chromium cast iron Cr20Mo2 has been studied in this paper. The experiments show that the proeutectic austenitic particles are more spherical under a larger stirring power condition, even if the stirring time is shorter, while the proeutectic austenitic particles are not very much spherical under a smaller stirring power condition and some proeutectic austenitic dendrites also exist, even if the stirring time is very long. The experiments also show that when stirred for 5 6 minutes under the test condition, the semi-solid slurry with 40vol. %-50vol. % solid fraction and spherical proeutectic austenite in the size of 50-80μm can be obtained.

  2. Microscopic insight into the bilateral formation of carbon spirals from a symmetric iron core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Stangl, Andreas; Cox, David C; Silva, S Ravi P; Rümmeli, Mark H; Pichler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Mirrored carbon-spirals have been produced from pressured ferrocene via the bilateral extrusion of the spiral pairs from an iron core. A parametric plot of the surface geometry displays the fractal growth of the conical helix made with the logarithmic spiral. Electron microscopy studies show the core is a crystalline cementite which grows and transforms its shape from spherical to biconical as it extrudes two spiralling carbon arms. In a cross section along the arms we observe graphitic flakes arranged in a herringbone structure, normal to which defects propagate. Local-wave-pattern analysis reveals nanoscale defect patterns of two-fold symmetry around the core. The data suggest that the bilateral growth originates from a globular cementite crystal with molten surfaces and the nano-defects shape emerging hexagonal carbon into a fractal structure. Understanding and knowledge obtained provide a basis for the controlled production of advanced carbon materials with designed geometries.

  3. Improving the Estimation of Star-formation Rates and Stellar Population Ages of High-redshift Galaxies from Broad-band Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seong-Kook; Somerville, Rachel S; Wiklind, Tommy; Giavalisco, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    We explore methods to improve the estimates of star-formation rates and mean stellar population ages from broad-band photometry of high redshift star-forming galaxies. We use synthetic spectral templates with a variety of simple parametric star-formation histories to fit broad-band spectral-energy distributions. These parametric models are used to infer ages, star-formation rates and stellar masses for a mock data set drawn from a hierarchical semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution. Traditional parametric models generally assume an exponentially declining rate of star-formation after an initial instantaneous rise. Our results show that star-formation histories with a much more gradual rise in the star-formation rate are likely to be better templates, and are likely to give better overall estimates of the age distribution and star-formation rate distribution of Lyman-break galaxies. For B- and V-dropouts, we find the best simple parametric model to be one where the star-formation rate increases linearly with ...

  4. On Iron Enrichment, Star Formation, and Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The nature of star formation and Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in galaxies in the field and in rich galaxy clusters are contrasted by juxtaposing the buildup of heavy metals in the universe inferred from observed star formation and supernovae rate histories with data on the evolution of Fe abundances in the intracluster medium (ICM). Models for the chemical evolution of Fe in these environments are constructed, subject to observational constraints, for this purpose. While models with a mean delay for SNIa of 3 Gyr and standard initial mass function (IMF) are fully consistent with observations in the field, cluster Fe enrichment immediately tracked a rapid, top-heavy phase of star formation - although transport of Fe into the ICM may have been more prolonged and star formation likely continued beyond redshift 1. The means of this prompt enrichment consisted of SNII yielding greater than or equal to 0.1 solar mass per explosion (if the SNIa rate normalization is scaled down from its value in the field according to the relative number of candidate progenitor stars in the 3 - 8 solar mass range) and/or SNIa with short delay times originating during the rapid star formation epoch. Star formation is greater than 3 times more efficient in rich clusters than in the field, mitigating the overcooling problem in numerical cluster simulations. Both the fraction of baryons cycled through stars, and the fraction of the total present-day stellar mass in the form of stellar remnants, are substantially greater in clusters than in the field.

  5. Probing the mystery of Liesegang band formation: revealing the origin of self-organized dual-frequency micro and nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Rita; Walliser, Roché M; Lagzi, István; Boudoire, Florent; Düggelin, Marcel; Braun, Artur; Housecroft, Catherine E; Constable, Edwin C

    2016-10-12

    Periodic precipitation processes in gels can result in impressive micro- and nanostructured patterns known as periodic precipitation (or Liesegang bands). Under certain conditions, the silver nitrate-chromium(vi) system exhibits the coexistence of two kinds of Liesegang bands with different frequencies. We now present that the two kinds of bands form independently on different time scales and the pH-dependent chromate(vi)-dichromate(vi) equilibrium controls the formation of the precipitates. We determined the spatial distribution and constitution of the particles in the bands using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and scanning transmission X-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) measurements. This provided the necessary empirical input data to formulate a model for the pattern formation; a model that quantitatively reproduces the experimental observations. Understanding the pattern-forming process at the molecular level enables us to tailor the size and the shape of the bands, which, in turn, can lead to new functional architectures for a range of applications.

  6. Atmospheric outgassing and native-iron formation during carbonaceous sediment-basalt melt interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet-Fisher, John F.; Day, James M. D.; Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Ryabov, Victor V.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2017-02-01

    Organic carbon-rich sediment assimilation by basaltic magmas leads to enhanced emission of greenhouse gases during continental flood basalt eruptions. A collateral effect of these interactions is the generation of low oxygen fugacities (fO2) (below the iron-wüstite [IW] buffer curve) during magmatic crystallization, resulting in the precipitation of native-iron. The occurrence of native-iron bearing terrestrial basaltic rocks are rare, having been identified at three locations: Siberia, West Greenland, and Central Germany. We report the first combined study of Re-Os isotopes, highly siderophile element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re), and trace-element abundances for these three occurrences, in addition to host sediments at West Greenland. To quantify the amount of crustal assimilation experienced by the magmas, we present combined crystallization and assimilation models, together with fractional crystallization models, to assess how relative abundances of the HSE have been modified during crystallization. The radiogenic osmium isotopic compositions (γOsinitial +15 to +193) of mafic igneous samples are consistent with assimilation of old high Re/Os crustal contaminants with radiogenic 187Os/188Os, whereas the HSE inter-element fractionations (Pd/Os 2 to >10,000) suggest that some Siberian samples underwent an early stage of sulfide removal. Metalliferous samples from the Siberian intrusions of Khungtukun and Dzhaltul (associated with the Siberian flood basalts) yield internal 187Re-187Os ages of 266 ± 83Ma and 249 ± 50Ma, respectively, reflecting late-Permian emplacement ages. These results imply that crustal assimilation took place prior to crystallization of native-Fe. In contrast, metalliferous samples from Disko Island and Bühl (associated with the West Greenland flood basalts, and the Central European Volcanic Province, respectively) have trends in 187Re/188Os-187Os/188Os space corresponding to apparent ages older than their reported crystallization ages

  7. DIRECT IMAGING OF THE WATER SNOW LINE AT THE TIME OF PLANET FORMATION USING TWO ALMA CONTINUUM BANDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banzatti, A.; Pontoppidan, K. M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pinilla, P. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ricci, L.; Birnstiel, T. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ciesla, F., E-mail: banzatti@stsci.edu [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Molecular snow lines in protoplanetary disks have been studied theoretically for decades because of their importance in shaping planetary architectures and compositions. The water snow line lies in the planet formation region at ≲10 AU, and so far its location has been estimated only indirectly from spatially unresolved spectroscopy. This work presents a proof-of-concept method to directly image the water snow line in protoplanetary disks through its physical and chemical imprint on the local dust properties. We adopt a physical disk model that includes dust coagulation, fragmentation, drift, and a change in fragmentation velocities of a factor of 10 between dry silicates and icy grains as found by laboratory work. We find that the presence of a water snow line leads to a sharp discontinuity in the radial profile of the dust emission spectral index α{sub mm} due to replenishment of small grains through fragmentation. We use the ALMA simulator to demonstrate that this effect can be observed in protoplanetary disks using spatially resolved ALMA images in two continuum bands. We explore the model dependence on the disk viscosity and find that the spectral index reveals the water snow line for a wide range of conditions, with opposite trends when the emission is optically thin rather than thick. If the disk viscosity is low (α{sub visc} < 10{sup −3}), the snow line produces a ringlike structure with a minimum at α{sub mm} ∼ 2 in the optically thick regime, possibly similar to what has been measured with ALMA in the innermost region of the HL Tau disk.

  8. Direct Imaging of the Water Snow Line at the Time of Planet Formation using Two ALMA Continuum Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzatti, A.; Pinilla, P.; Ricci, L.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Birnstiel, T.; Ciesla, F.

    2015-12-01

    Molecular snow lines in protoplanetary disks have been studied theoretically for decades because of their importance in shaping planetary architectures and compositions. The water snow line lies in the planet formation region at ≲10 AU, and so far its location has been estimated only indirectly from spatially unresolved spectroscopy. This work presents a proof-of-concept method to directly image the water snow line in protoplanetary disks through its physical and chemical imprint on the local dust properties. We adopt a physical disk model that includes dust coagulation, fragmentation, drift, and a change in fragmentation velocities of a factor of 10 between dry silicates and icy grains as found by laboratory work. We find that the presence of a water snow line leads to a sharp discontinuity in the radial profile of the dust emission spectral index αmm due to replenishment of small grains through fragmentation. We use the ALMA simulator to demonstrate that this effect can be observed in protoplanetary disks using spatially resolved ALMA images in two continuum bands. We explore the model dependence on the disk viscosity and find that the spectral index reveals the water snow line for a wide range of conditions, with opposite trends when the emission is optically thin rather than thick. If the disk viscosity is low (αvisc < 10-3), the snow line produces a ringlike structure with a minimum at αmm ˜ 2 in the optically thick regime, possibly similar to what has been measured with ALMA in the innermost region of the HL Tau disk.

  9. ABOUT MECHANISM OF STRUCTURE FORMATION OF PARTICULAR SOLID CARBONIC PHASE IN NANOCOMPOSITE ON THE BASIS OF IRON AND NANO-DISPERSE CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Kuis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of structure formation in super-solid carbon phase in nanocomposite on the basis of iron and nano-disperse carbon, which can be used at development of technology and composition of creation of new materials using inexpensive nano-carbon materials is offered.

  10. Theoretical studies on N-O or N-N bond formation from aryl azide catalyzed by iron(II) bromide complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Qi; Zhou, Lixin

    2012-03-02

    DFT calculations have been carried out to study the reaction mechanism on N-O or N-N bond formation from aryl azide catalyzed by iron(II) bromide complex. A favorable reaction pathway is proposed to account for the construction of the core structure of 2H-indazoles or 2,1-benzisoxazoles.

  11. Auxin Resistant1 and PIN-FORMED2 Protect Lateral Root Formation in Arabidopsis under Iron Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangjie; Song, Haiyan; Li, Baohai; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Shi, Weiming

    2015-12-01

    A stunted root system is a significant symptom of iron (Fe) toxicity, yet little is known about the effects of excess Fe on lateral root (LR) development. In this work, we show that excess Fe has different effects on LR development in different portions of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root system and that inhibitory effects on the LR initiation are only seen in roots newly formed during excess Fe exposure. We show that root tip contact with Fe is both necessary and sufficient for LR inhibition and that the auxin, but not abscisic acid, pathway is engaged centrally in the initial stages of excess Fe exposure. Furthermore, Fe stress significantly reduced PIN-FORMED2 (PIN2)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in root tips, and pin2-1 mutants exhibited significantly fewer LR initiation events under excess Fe than the wild type. Exogenous application of both Fe and glutathione together increased PIN2-GFP expression and the number of LR initiation events compared with Fe treatment alone. The ethylene inhibitor aminoethoxyvinyl-glycine intensified Fe-dependent inhibition of LR formation in the wild type, and this inhibition was significantly reduced in the ethylene overproduction mutant ethylene overproducer1-1. We show that Auxin Resistant1 (AUX1) is a critical component in the mediation of endogenous ethylene effects on LR formation under excess Fe stress. Our findings demonstrate the relationship between excess Fe-dependent PIN2 expression and LR formation and the potential role of AUX1 in ethylene-mediated LR tolerance and suggest that AUX1 and PIN2 protect LR formation in Arabidopsis during the early stages of Fe stress.

  12. On Iron Enrichment, Star Formation, and Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Loewenstein, M

    2006-01-01

    The nature of star formation and Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in galaxies in the field and in rich galaxy clusters are contrasted by juxtaposing the build-up of heavy metals in the universe inferred from observed star formation and supernovae rate histories with data on the evolution of Fe abundances in the intracluster medium (ICM). Models for the chemical evolution of Fe in these environments are constructed, subject to observational constraints, for this purpose. While models with a mean delay for SNIa of 3 Gyr and standard initial mass function (IMF) are consistent with observations in the field, cluster Fe enrichment immediately tracks a rapid, top-heavy phase of star formation -- although transport of Fe into the ICM may be more prolonged and star formation likely continues to redshifts 3 times more efficient in rich clusters than in the field, mitigating the overcooling problem in numerical cluster simulations. Both the fraction of baryons cycled through stars, and the fraction of the total present-day st...

  13. Formation and transformation of a short range ordered iron carbonate precursor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Frandsen, Cathrine; Bovet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Fe(II)-carbonates, such as siderite, form in environments where O2 is scarce, e.g., during marine sediment diagenesis, corrosion and possibly CO2 sequestration, but little is known about their formation pathways. We show that early precipitates from carbonate solutions containing 0.1M Fe(II) with...

  14. Formation of VC- composites surface layers on spheroidized graphite cast iron by laser surface cladding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam R.I. Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spheroidal graphite cast iron was laser cladded with VC powder of 44-53 μm particle size using YAG Fiber laser at 500, 1000, and 1500 W processing power and fixed travelling speed of 4 mm/s. The powder was preplaced on the surface of the specimens with 0.5 mm thickness. To prevent the oxidation, argon gas was used as a shielding gas. After the treatment, three zones were resulted: build-up (cladding, fusion, and heat affected zones. The build-up zone was a composite structure consisted of VC particles/dendrites dispersed in a matrix of martensite, carbides and ledeburite structure. At 500 W, most of the VC particles were appeared as their original large size. When the laser power was increased to 1000 W or more, the VC particles were melted and then re-solidified in the form of fine dendrites. The surface hardness of the cladded area was remarkably improved. As the distance from the free surface increases, the hardness decreases. The average hardness value at the surface treated by 500 W was about 710 HV (3 times of the hardness of substrate, while it reached to about 1340 HV and 1520 HV at powers of 1000 W and 1500 W, respectively. The wear resistance of the laser treated samples was improved at all investigated laser processing powers, especially at 1000W and 1500 W.

  15. Dielectric barrier formation and tunneling magnetoresistance effect in strontium iron molybdate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dem'yanov, S. E.; Kalanda, N. A.; Kovalev, L. V.; Avdeev, M. V.; Zheludkevich, M. L.; Garamus, V. M.; Willumeit, R.

    2013-06-01

    A comparative X-ray diffraction study of the initial single-phase metal-oxide compound-strontium iron molybdate Sr2FeMoO6 - δ (SFMO)-and that subjected to additional isothermal annealing shows that this heat treatment leads to the appearance of a SrMoO4 (SMO) phase. Small-angle neutron scattering measurements indicate that the SMO phase forms a dielectric shell surrounding SFMO grains, which has a characteristic thickness of 2-4 nm and extends above 120 nm. The character of the temperature dependence of the electric resistance corresponds to the metal-type conduction in single-phase SFMO and changes to a semiconductor type in the material with SMO dielectric shells, which is evidence of a tunneling mechanism of charge transfer. This conclusion is confirmed by an increase in the absolute value of the negative magnetoresistance of SFMO due to the appearance of a tunneling magnetoresistance component of the same sign.

  16. Formation and Release Behavior of Iron Corrosion Products under the Influence of Bacterial Communities in a Simulated Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the effects of biofilm on the iron corrosion, iron release and associated corrosion by-products is critical for maintaining the water quality and the integrity of drinking water distribution system (DWDS). In this work, iron corrosion experiments under sterilized a...

  17. Evidence of redox-active iron formation following aggregation of ferrihydrite and the Alzheimer's disease peptide β-amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, James; Céspedes, Eva; Shelford, Leigh R; Exley, Chris; Collingwood, Joanna F; Dobson, Jon; van der Laan, Gerrit; Jenkins, Catherine A; Arenholz, Elke; Telling, Neil D

    2014-03-17

    Recent work has demonstrated increased levels of redox-active iron biominerals in Alzheimer's disease (AD) tissue. However, the origin, nature, and role of iron in AD pathology remains unclear. Using X-ray absorption, X-ray microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy techniques, we examined interactions between the AD peptide β-amyloid (Aβ) and ferrihydrite, which is the ferric form taken when iron is stored in humans. We report that Aβ is capable of reducing ferrihydrite to a pure iron(II) mineral where antiferromagnetically ordered Fe(2+) cations occupy two nonequivalent crystal symmetry sites. Examination of these iron(II) phases following air exposure revealed a material consistent with the iron(II)-rich mineral magnetite. These results demonstrate the capability of Aβ to induce the redox-active biominerals reported in AD tissue from natural iron precursors. Such interactions between Aβ and ferrihydrite shed light upon the processes of AD pathogenesis, while providing potential targets for future therapies.

  18. Reactions of OH Radicals with Tris (1,10-Phenanthroline) Iron (II) Studied by Pulse Radiolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siekierska Floryan, E.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1976-01-01

    The reaction of OH radicals with aqueous tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) leads to the formation of an adduct, which exhibits a broad absorption band at rmpH = 6, λmax = 460 nm, and epsilon (Porson)460 = 6700 (molar, decadic, 1 mol−1 cm−1). The rate of formation of the adduct is first order in c...

  19. Formation mechanism of the low-frequency locally resonant band gap in the two-dimensional ternary phononic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Gang; Liu Yao-Zong; Wen Ji-Hong; Yu Dian-Long

    2006-01-01

    The low-frequency band gap and the corresponding vibration modes in two-dimensional ternary locally resonant phononic crystals are restudied successfully with the lumped-mass method. Compared with the work of C. Goffaux and J. Sanchez-Dehesa (Phys. Rev. B 67 14 4301(2003)), it is shown that there exists an error of about 50% in their calculated results of the band structure, and one band is missing in their results. Moreover, the in-plane modes shown in their paper are improper, which results in the wrong conclusion on the mechanism of the ternary locally resonant phononic crystals. Based on the lumped-mass method and better description of the vibration modes according to the band gaps, the locally resonant mechanism in forming the subfrequency gaps is thoroughly analysed. The rule used to judge whether a resonant mode in the phononic crystals can result in a corresponding subfrequency gap is also verified in this ternary case.

  20. Observation of the anisotropic Dirac cone in the band dispersion of 112-structured iron-based superconductor Ca0.9La0.1FeAs2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. T.; Xing, X. Z.; Li, M. Y.; Zhou, W.; Sun, Y.; Fan, C. C.; Yang, H. F.; Liu, J. S.; Yao, Q.; Li, W.; Shi, Z. X.; Shen, D. W.; Wang, Z.

    2016-07-01

    CaFeAs2 is a parent compound of recently discovered 112-type iron-based superconductors. It is predicted to be a staggered intercalation compound that naturally integrates both quantum spin Hall insulating and superconducting layers and an ideal system for the realization of Majorana modes. We performed a systematical angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation study of the slightly electron-doped CaFeAs2. We found that the zigzag As chain of 112-type iron-based superconductors play a considerable role in the low-energy electronic structure, resulting in the characteristic Dirac-cone like band dispersion as the prediction. Our experimental results further confirm that these Dirac cones only exist around the X but not Y points in the Brillouin zone, breaking the S4 symmetry at iron sites. Our findings present the compelling support to the theoretical prediction that the 112-type iron-based superconductors might host the topological nontrivial edge states. The slightly electron doped CaFeAs2 would provide us a unique opportunity to realize and explore Majorana fermion physics.

  1. Effects of copper, iron and fluoride co-crystallized with sugar on caries development and acid formation in deslivated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalen, P L; Pearson, S K; Bowen, W H

    1996-11-01

    The purpose was to explore the effects of combinations of copper, iron and fluoride (Cu, Fe and F) incorporated in sucrose by co-crystallization on caries development in the deslivated rat model and to examine acid formation by bacteria in the rat mouth. Ninety-six Sprague-Dawley rats were infected with Streptococcus sobrinus 6715 and desalivated when aged 26 days. Eight groups were placed in a König-Höfer programmed feeder and received 17 meals daily at hourly intervals, and essential nutrition (NCP No. 2) by gavage twice daily for 21 days. The groups received (1) plain sucrose, (2) F (8 parts/10(6)) co-crystallized with sucrose, (3) Fe (88 parts/10(6)) sucrose, (4) Cu (75 parts/10(6)) sucrose, (5) Cu + F sucrose, (6) Cu + L Fe sucrose, (7) F + Fe sucrose, and (8) Cu + Fe + F sucrose. At death the jaws were removed and sonicated in 0.9% saline solution for microbial assessment. In addition, organic acid assays were performed for each animal. Keyes smooth-surface and sulcal caries scores were lowest in the Cu + Fe + F sucrose group, but not statistically significantly different from those of the other Cu groups. The numbers of Strep. sobrinus found in the groups that received Cu, Cu + Fe, Cu + F, F + Fe and Cu + Fe + F sugar were lower than in the control group. Lactic acid was found in lower concentrations in Fe, Cu, Cu + F, Cu + Fe and F + Fe groups than in the other groups. It appears that combinations of Cu; Fe and F co-crystallized with sugar may have an additive effect in reducing the cariogenic potential of sugar by affecting lactic acid formation and reducing bacterial colonization.

  2. Effects of Ceramic Fibre Insulation Thickness on Skin Formation and Nodule Characteristics of Thin Wall Ductile Iron Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaneswara, D.; Suharno, B.; Nugraha, N. D.; Ariobimo, R. D. S.; Sofyan, N.

    2017-02-01

    Skin formation has become one of the problems in the thin wall ductile iron casting because it will reduce the mechanical properties of the materials. One of the solutions to reduce this skin formation is by using heat insulator to control the cooling rate. One of the insulators used for this purpose is ceramic fibre. In this research, the thickness of the ceramic fibre heat insulator used in the mould was varied, i.e. 50 mm on one side and 37.5 mm on the other side (A), no heat insulator (B), and 37.5 mm on both sides (C). After the casting process, the results were characterized in terms of metallography by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and tensile test for mechanical properties. The results showed that the skin thickness formed in A is 34.21 μm, 23.38 μm in B, and 27.78 μm in C. The nodule count in A is 541.98 nodule/mm2 (84.7%) with an average diameter of 15.14 μm, 590 nodule/mm2 (86.7%) with an average diameter of 13.18 μm in B, and 549.73 nodule/mm2 (87.2%) with an average diameter of 13.95 μm in C. The average ultimate tensile strength for A was 399 MPa, B was 314 MPa, and C was 415 MPa. Microstructural examination under SEM showed that the materials have a ductile fracture with matrix full of ferrite.

  3. Structural and magnetic phase formation in nanophase brass–iron electron compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mishra; C Bansal

    2005-11-01

    Starting with Cu0.65Zn0.35 with an e/a ratio of 1.35 we studied the phase formation in nanophase (Cu0.65Zn0.35)1−Fe alloys in the concentration range 0.1 ≤ ≤ 0.7 to see the effect of altering the electron concentration. The evolution of bcc phase from the fcc phase as a function of Fe concentration was investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The grain size, lattice parameters, and average hyperfine magnetic field distributions were estimated for the nanophase alloys. The fcc phase was observed to persist up to 40 atomic per cent Fe substitutions, a mixed (fcc + bcc) phase region up to 70 atomic per cent Fe and bcc phase beyond 70 atomic per cent Fe. The magnetic state of the alloys changed from nonmagnetic for ≤ 0.3 to magnetically ordered state at room temperature for ≥ 0.33, which lies in the fcc phase region. The fcc phase alloys of Fe with non-magnetic metals have very low magnetic transition temperatures. However, in this system the room temperature state is unusually magnetic.

  4. Soil Formation of "Atlantic Rankers" from NW Spain - A High Resolution Aluminium and Iron Fractionation Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. KAAL; M. COSTA-CASAIS; C. FERRO-V(A)ZQUEZ; X. PONTEVEDRA-POMBAL; A. MARTINEZ-CORTIZAS

    2008-01-01

    Atlantic rankers belong to the group of "cryptopodzolic rankers", which are ubiquitous in the mountainous cool/tempe-rate humid regions of Western Europe. The rankers of Galicia (NW Spain) formed by thousands of years of colluviation.The preponderance of Al-stabilised organic matter (OM) masks the horizonation and polycyclic character (I.e., stratifi-cation) of these soils. Cryptopodzolic rankers are generally thought to be the outcome of podzolisation. This soil type is part of the recent discussion on how to classify soils developed from nonvolcanic parent material having andic properties.To better understand the formation processes of these soils, the Al and Fe fractionation of four typical Atlantic rankers were studied by selective dissolution in acid NH4-oxalate, Na-pyrophosphatc and the chlorides of K, La and Cu.A high-resolution sampling approach allowed us to investigate the soils in greater detail than simply sampling by horizon.The rankers studied display a distribution of Fe- and Al-OM complexes that is typical of cryptopodzolic soils. However,these organomineral associations were probably immobile due to the high Al saturation. We argue that the soils owe their characteristic chemical status to external factors rather than to translocation of organomineral associations: variations in Al-OM concentrations could be linked to changes in weathering/leaching intensity and colluviation rates caused by anthropogenic disturbances or changes in regional climate regime.

  5. Melt-preferred orientation, anisotropic permeability, and melt-band formation in a deforming, partially molten aggregate

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor-West, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Shear deformation of partially molten rock in laboratory experiments causes the emergence of melt-enriched sheets (bands in cross-section) that are aligned at about 15-20 degrees to the shear plane. Deformation and deviatoric stress also cause the coherent alignment of pores at the grain scale. This leads to a melt-preferred orientation which may give rise to an anisotropic permeability. Here we develop a simple, general model of anisotropic permeability in partially molten rocks. We use linearised analysis and nonlinear numerical solutions to investigate its behaviour under simple shear deformation. In particular, we consider implications of the model for the emergence and angle of melt-rich bands. Anisotropic permeability affects the angle of bands and, in a certain parameter regime, it can give rise to low angles consistent with experiments. However, the conditions required for this regime have a narrow range and are unlikely to be met by experiments. Although anisotropic permeability may shape the behavio...

  6. Formation and dilatation of shear bands in a Cu-Zr metallic glass: A free volume perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chunguang; Peng, Hailong; Chen, Yu; Ferry, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We report the tensile deformation behaviour of metallic glass Cu50Zr50 as a function of quenching rate using molecular dynamics simulations. The atomic-scale shearing is found to be independent of atomic free volume, and the macroscopic correlation between the yield strength and density (or average free volume) is a coincidence, whereby samples with large free volume also have a low density of shear-resistant local five-fold symmetry. In the relatively slowly quenched (≤1010 K/s) samples, shear bands have a dilatation about 0.5%, which compares well with recent experimental results. In contrast, although more active local shearing occurs in the rapidly quenched samples, shear banding is not observed. This is because the strain energy disperses into local atomic shearing at the macroscopically elastic stage and, hence, is not sufficient for shear band activation, resulting in homogeneous deformation and appreciable plasticity.

  7. Possible wave formation and martensitic transformation of iron particles in copper single crystals during argon ion bombardment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thölén, Anders Ragnar; Li, Chang-Hai; Easterling, K.E.

    1983-01-01

    Thin single crystal copper specimens (thickness ~250 nm) containing coherent iron particles (diameter 40–50 nm) have been bombarded with argon ions (5, 80, and 330 keV). During this process some of the iron particles transform to martensite. The transformation was observed near the exposed surface...

  8. Technologies for Use in the Formation of a Differentiated Structure in Iron Billets Used in Glass Molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leushin, I. O.; Chistyakov, D. G.

    2016-09-01

    Causes for the failure of pig iron press molds that are parts of a glass mold are described. Criteria for differentiating the structure of pig iron are established. Ways of obtaining a differentiated structure of a casting product are outlined. A heat treatment regime for the billets is determined.

  9. Broad-band X-ray emission and the reality of the broad iron line from the neutron star-white dwarf X-ray binary 4U 1820-30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Aditya S.; Dewangan, G. C.; Pahari, M.; Misra, R.; Kembhavi, A. K.; Raychaudhuri, B.

    2016-09-01

    Broad relativistic iron lines from neutron star X-ray binaries are important probes of the inner accretion disc. The X-ray reflection features can be weakened due to strong magnetic fields or very low iron abundances such as is possible in X-ray binaries with low mass, first generation stars as companions. Here, we investigate the reality of the broad iron line detected earlier from the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1820-30 with a degenerate helium dwarf companion. We perform a comprehensive, systematic broad-band spectral study of the atoll source using Suzaku and simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift observations. We have used different continuum models involving accretion disc emission, thermal blackbody and thermal Comptonization of either disc or blackbody photons. The Suzaku data show positive and negative residuals in the region of Fe K band. These features are well described by two absorption edges at 7.67 ± 0.14 keV and 6.93 ± 0.07 keV or partial covering photoionized absorption or by blurred reflection. Though, the simultaneous Swift and NuSTAR data do not clearly reveal the emission or absorption features, the data are consistent with the presence of either absorption or emission features. Thus, the absorption based models provide an alternative to the broad iron line or reflection model. The absorption features may arise in winds from the inner accretion disc. The broad-band spectra appear to disfavour continuum models in which the blackbody emission from the neutron-star surface provides the seed photons for thermal Comptonization. Our results suggest emission from a thin accretion disc (kTdisc ˜ 1 keV), Comptonization of disc photons in a boundary layer most likely covering a large fraction of the neutron-star surface and innermost parts of the accretion disc, and blackbody emission (kTbb ˜ 2 keV) from the polar regions.

  10. The crystal structure of TrxA(CACA): Insights into the formation of a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster in an Escherichia coli thioredoxin mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collet, Jean-Francois; Peisach, Daniel; Bardwell, James C.A.; Xu, Zhaohui [Michigan

    2010-07-13

    Escherichia coli thioredoxin is a small monomeric protein that reduces disulfide bonds in cytoplasmic proteins. Two cysteine residues present in a conserved CGPC motif are essential for this activity. Recently, we identified mutations of this motif that changed thioredoxin into a homodimer bridged by a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster. When exported to the periplasm, these thioredoxin mutants could restore disulfide bond formation in strains lacking the entire periplasmic oxidative pathway. Essential for the assembly of the iron-sulfur was an additional cysteine that replaced the proline at position three of the CGPC motif. We solved the crystalline structure at 2.3 {angstrom} for one of these variants, TrxA(CACA). The mutant protein crystallized as a dimer in which the iron-sulfur cluster is replaced by two intermolecular disulfide bonds. The catalytic site, which forms the dimer interface, crystallized in two different conformations. In one of them, the replacement of the CGPC motif by CACA has a dramatic effect on the structure and causes the unraveling of an extended {alpha}-helix. In both conformations, the second cysteine residue of the CACA motif is surface-exposed, which contrasts with wildtype thioredoxin where the second cysteine of the CXXC motif is buried. This exposure of a pair of vicinal cysteine residues apparently allows thioredoxin to acquire an iron-sulfur cofactor at its active site, and thus a new activity and mechanism of action.

  11. Magnetic iron oxide/clay composites: effect of the layer silicate support on the microstructure and phase formation of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, Tamas [Department of Colloid Chemistry, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Bakandritsos, Aristides [Institute of Materials Science, National Center for Scientific Research (NCSR) ' Demokritos' , Agia Paraskevi, 15310, Athens (Greece); Tzitzios, Vassilios [Institute of Materials Science, National Center for Scientific Research (NCSR) ' Demokritos' , Agia Paraskevi, 15310, Athens (Greece); Papp, Szilvia [Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Koroesi, Laszlo [Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Galbacs, Gabor [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Szeged, Dom ter 7, H-6720 (Hungary); Musabekov, Kuanyshbek [Department of Chemistry, Kazakh National State University named Al-Faraby, Karasay Batyr 95, Almaty, 480012, The Republic of (Kazakhstan); Bolatova, Didara [Department of Chemistry, Kazakh National State University named Al-Faraby, Karasay Batyr 95, Almaty, 480012, The Republic of (Kazakhstan); Petridis, Dimitris [Institute of Materials Science, National Center for Scientific Research (NCSR) ' Demokritos' , Agia Paraskevi, 15310, Athens (Greece); Dekany, Imre [Department of Colloid Chemistry, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2007-07-18

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized on two different clay supports: natural montmorillonite and synthetic laponite. The nanocomposites obtained, characterized by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption, small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), vibrating sample magnetometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy, were found to exhibit highly different physicochemical properties despite their similar iron content. The observed size effect of the layered silicate support, resulting in the high abundance of very small particles (diameter of 1-5 nm) on laponite, was explained in terms of the difference between the surface charge densities and the lamellar dimensions of the clay substrates. Moreover, it was revealed that the nature of the layered support greatly affected the nanostructure (fractal dimensions, surface area, porosity) of the formed hybrid solids as well as the phase formation of iron oxide crystals. The high surface area laponite composites, due to the dominance of very small iron oxide particles, exhibited more pronounced superparamagnetic behaviour as compared to the montmorillonite samples prepared under identical conditions. The observed higher saturation magnetization of the laponite composites, attributed to their lower content in the antiferromagnetic hematite and to the onset of superferromagnetism in the aggregated particles, shows their excellent utility for adsorption/magnetic separation.

  12. Rate of Iron Transfer Through the Horse Spleen Ferritin Shell Determined by the Rate of Formation of Prussian Blue and Fe-desferrioxamine Within the Ferritin Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Watt, Richard K.; Galvez, Natividad; Dominquez-Vera, Jose M.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (2+ and 3+) is believed to transfer through the three-fold channels in the ferritin shell during iron deposition and release in animal ferritins. However, the rate of iron transit in and out through these channels has not been reported. The recent synthesis of [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-), Prussian Blue (PB) and desferrioxamine (DES) all trapped within the horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) interior makes these measurements feasible. We report the rate of Fe(2+) penetrating into the ferritin interior by adding external Fe(2+) to [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) encapsulated in the HoSF interior and measuring the rate of formation of the resulting encapsulated PB. The rate at which Fe(2+) reacts with [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) in the HoSF interior is much slower than the formation of free PB in solution and is proceeded by a lag period. We assume this lag period and the difference in rate represent the transfer of Fe(2+) through the HoSF protein shell. The calculated diffusion coefficient, D approx. 5.8 x 10(exp -20) square meters per second corresponds to the measured lag time of 10-20 s before PB forms within the HoSF interior. The activation energy for Fe(2+) transfer from the outside solution through the protein shell was determined to be 52.9 kJ/mol by conducting the reactions at 10 to approximately 40 C. The reaction of Fe(3+) with encapsulated [Fe(CN)6](4-) also readily forms PB in the HoSF interior, but the rate is faster than the corresponding Fe(2+) reaction. The rate for Fe(3+) transfer through the ferritin shell was confirmed by measuring the rate of the formation of Fe-DES inside HoSF and an activation energy of 58.4 kJ/mol was determined. An attempt was made to determine the rate of iron (2+ and 3+) transit out from the ferritin interior by adding excess bipyridine or DES to PB trapped within the HoSF interior. However, the reactions are slow and occur at almost identical rates for free and HoSF-encapsulated PB, indicating that the transfer of iron from the interior through the

  13. The problem of iron partition between Earth and Moon during simultaneous formation as a double planet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    A planetary model is described which requires fractional vapor/liquid condensation, planet accumulation during condensation, a late start for accumulation of the Moon, and volatile accretion to the surfaces of each planet only near the end of the accumulation process. In the model, initial accumulation of small objects is helped if the agglomerating particles are somewhat sticky. Assuming that growth proceeds through this range, agglomeration continues. If the reservoir of vapor is being preferentially depleted in iron by fractional condensation, an iron-rich planetary core forms. As the temperature decreases, condensing material becomes progressively richer in silicates and poorer in iron, forming the silicate-rich mantle of an already differentiated Earth. A second center of agglomeration successfully forms near the growing Earth after most of the iron in the reservoir has been used up. The bulk composition of the Moon then is similar to the outer mantle of the accumulating Earth.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of poly(divinylbenzene)-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as precursor for the formation of air-stable carbon-coated iron crystalline nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslavsky, Yonit; Margel, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    Maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticles of 15 +/- 3 nm diameter were prepared by nucleation of gelatin/iron oxide followed by growth of gamma-Fe2O3 films onto these nuclei. The gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were coated with polydivinylbenzene (PDVB) by emulsion polymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) in an aqueous continuous phase containing the gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, dispersed in water, were separated from homo-PDVB nanoparticles using the high gradient magnetic field (HGMF) technique. The influence of DVB concentration on the amount of PDVB coating, on the size and size distribution of the coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and on their magnetic properties, has been investigated. Air-stable carbon-coated iron (alpha-Fe/C) crystalline nanoparticles of 41 +/- 12 nm diameter have been prepared by annealing the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles at 1050 degrees C in an inert atmosphere. These nanoparticles exhibit high saturation magnetization value (83 emu g(-1)) and excellent resistance to oxidation. Characterization of the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 and of the alpha-Fe/C nanoparticles has been accomplished by TEM, HRTEM, DLS, FTIR, XRD, thermal analysis, zeta-potential, and magnetic measurements.

  15. Effect of vanadium on growth, chlorophyll formation and iron metabolism in unicellular green algae. [Chlorella pyrenoidosa; Chlorella vulgaris mutants Scenedesmus obliquus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisch, H.U.; Bielig, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    In presence of vanadium, growth of Scenedesmus obliquus and Chlorella pyrenoidosa was increased five to sixfold as determined by dry weight, when cultured under autotrophic conditions for 7 days. The stimulation by vanadium decreased with increasing stability towards hydrolysis of the iron(III)-compounds added. Pentavalent vanadium (20 ..mu..g V/l as NH/sub 4/ VO/sub 3/) was able to overcome completely a limited iron-deficiency in the algae following growth in presence of 1.8 x 10/sup -5/ m ferric chloride. Vanadium did not alter the iron uptake into the algal cells. 90% of offered /sup 48/V was taken up by Scenedesmus obliquus during 5 days of growth, and 21% thereof were found in the chloroplast fraction. In presence of vanadium, the chlorophyll formation was stimulated in Scenedesmus obliquus. This stimulation by vanadium was found to be light-dependent but occurred to a certain extent in the dark also. The main porphyrin of the yellow mutant 211-11h/20 of Chlorella vulgaris was identified as protoporphyrin-IX. The formation of this compound was stimulated by vanadium in the biosynthesis of chlorophylls is discussed. 18 references, 2 figures, 6 tables.

  16. Hydroxyapatite formation on titania-based materials in a solution mimicking body fluid: Effects of manganese and iron addition in anatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Euisup; Kim, Ill Yong; Cho, Sung Baek; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2015-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite formation on the surfaces of implanted materials plays an important role in osteoconduction of bone substitutes in bone tissues. Titania hydrogels are known to instigate hydroxyapatite formation in a solution mimicking human blood plasma. To date, the relationship between the surface characteristics of titania and hydroxyapatite formation on its surface remains unclear. In this study, titania powders with varying surface characteristics were prepared by addition of manganese or iron to examine hydroxyapatite formation in a type of simulated body fluid (Kokubo solution). Hydroxyapatite formation was monitored by observation of deposited particles with scale-like morphology on the prepared titania powders. The effect of the titania surface characteristics, i.e., crystal structure, zeta potential, hydroxy group content, and specific surface area, on hydroxyapatite formation was examined. Hydroxyapatite formation was observed on the surface of titania powders that were primarily anatase, and featured a negative zeta potential and low specific surface areas irrespective of the hydroxy group content. High specific surface areas inhibited the formation of hydroxyapatite because calcium and phosphate ions were mostly consumed by adsorption on the titania surface. Thus, these surface characteristics of titania determine its osteoconductivity following exposure to body fluid.

  17. Partial Melt Systems in Plate-Driven Corner Flow: Evaluating the Formation of Porosity Bands as a Mechanism for Magma Focusing at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, D.; Butler, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The imposition of an external shear on a system of partial melt will result in compaction of the solid matrix and concentration of the interstitial liquid melt leading to the formation of regions of contrasting high and low porosity. In experiments, direct and torsional shear geometries have demonstrated that these regions of varying porosity form in bands orientated at low angles relative to the shear plane. A variety of numerical models have been employed to recreate these experimental results. Simple shear, pure shear and torsional shear geometries have been used in both linear and nonlinear numerical settings to model the formation of the porosity bands. In this contribution the numerical models utilize a shear geometry derived from the velocity field of the plate-driven corner flow of a mid-ocean ridge. Motivation for using the velocity field of a mid-ocean ridge comes from evidence that suggests the existence of lateral melt channeling from either side of the ridge axis. Imposing the shear from a mid-ocean ridge corner flow allows for the evaluation of the resulting porosity bands in terms of suitability for channeling melt laterally toward the ridge axis. This is done using both slow and fast spreading ridge geometries. The degree of similarity between previous numerical and experimental results has been found to be greatly influenced by the imposed viscosity law of the solid matrix phase. In order to keep this in mind, the numerical models in this contribution use three different matrix viscosity laws: strain-rate independent, strain-rate dependent and anisotropic. Of these rheologies, strain-rate independence results in the poorest orientation for channeling melt directly to the ridge axis. The strain-rate dependent and anisotropic viscosities present more favorable direct-channeling orientations for the fastest growing porosity bands, but in both cases the background flow will rotate bands to less ideal orientations over time. However, these less

  18. Aerogravity and remote sensing observations of an iron deposit in Gara Djebilet, southwestern Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersi, Mohand; Saibi, Hakim; Chabou, Moulley Charaf

    2016-04-01

    The Gara Djebilet iron ore region is one of the most important regions in Africa. Located in the southwestern part of Algeria at the border with Mauritania, the Gara Djebilet region is characterized by steep terrain, which makes this area not easily accessible. Due to these conditions, remote sensing techniques and geophysics are the best ways to map this iron ore. The Gara Djebilet formations are characterized by high iron content that is especially rich in hematite, chamosite and goethite. The high iron content causes an absorption band at 0.88 μm, which is referred to as band 5 in the Operational Land Imager (OLI) Landsat 8 images. In this study, we integrated geological data, aerogravity data, and remote sensing data for the purpose of mapping the distribution of the Gara Djebilet iron deposit. Several remote sensing treatments were applied to the Landsat 8 OLI image, such as color composites, band ratioing, principal component analysis and a mathematical index, which helped locate the surface distribution of the iron ore. The results from gravity gradient interpretation techniques, 2-D forward modeling and 3-D inversion of aerogravity data provided information about the 2-D and 3-D distribution of the iron deposit. The combination of remote sensing and gravity results help us evaluate the ore potential of Gara Djebilet. The estimated tonnage of the iron ore at Gara Djebilet is approximately 2.37 billion tonnes with 57% Fe.

  19. Multiband Gutzwiller theory of the band magnetism of LaO iron arsenide; Multiband Gutzwiller-Theorie des Bandmagnetismus von LaO-Eisen-Arsenid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schickling, Tobias

    2012-02-23

    In this work we apply the Gutzwiller theory for various models for LaOFeAs. It was discovered in 2008 that doped LaOFeAs is superconducting below a temperature of T{sub c} = 28 K. Soon after that discovery, more iron based materials were found which have an atomic structure that is similar to the one of LaOFeAs and which are also superconducting. These materials form the class of iron-based superconductors. Many properties of this material class are in astonishing agreement with the properties of the cuprates. Therefore, studying this new material may promote our understanding of high-T{sub c} superconductivity. Despite great efforts, however, Density Functional Theory calculations cannot reproduce the small magnetic moment in the ground state of undoped LaOFeAs. Such calculations overestimate the magnetic moment by a factor 2-3. Within our Gutzwiller approach, we take additional local Coulomb correlations into account. We show that it is necessary to work with the iron 3d-orbitals and the arsenic 4p-orbitals to obtain a realistic description of LaOFeAs. For a broad parameter regime of the electronic interactions, we find a magnetic moment that is in the region of the experimentally observed values. We claim that the magnetic phase in LaOFeAs can be described as a spin-density wave of Landau-Gutzwiller quasi-particles.

  20. Magnetic bead-based enzyme-chromogenic substrate system for ultrasensitive colorimetric immunoassay accompanying cascade reaction for enzymatic formation of squaric acid-iron(III) chelate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wenqiang; Tang, Dianping; Zhuang, Junyang; Chen, Guonan; Yang, Huanghao

    2014-05-20

    This work reports on a simple and feasible colorimetric immunoassay with signal amplification for sensitive determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA, used as a model) at an ultralow concentration by using a new enzyme-chromogenic substrate system. We discovered that glucose oxidase (GOx), the enzyme broadly used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), has the ability to stimulate in situ formation of squaric acid (SQA)-iron(III) chelate. GOx-catalyzed oxidization of glucose leads to the formation of gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The latter can catalytically oxidize iron(II) to iron(III), which can rapidly (immunoassay protocol with GOx-labeled anti-PSA detection antibody can be designed for the detection of target PSA on capture antibody-functionalized magnetic immunosensing probe, monitored by recording the color or absorbance (λ = 468 nm) of the generated SQA-iron(III) chelate. The absorbance intensity shows to be dependent on the concentration of target PSA. A linear dependence between the absorbance and target PSA concentration is obtained under optimal conditions in the range from 1.0 pg mL(-1) to 30 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit (LOD) of 0.5 pg mL(-1) (0.5 ppt) estimated at the 3Sblank level. The sensitivity displays to be 3-5 orders of magnitude better than those of most commercialized human PSA ELISA kits. In addition, the developed colorimetric immunoassay was validated by assaying 12 human serum samples, receiving in good accordance with those obtained by the commercialized PSA ELISA kit. Importantly, the SQA-based immunosensing system can be further extended for the detection of other low-abundance proteins or biomarkers by controlling the target antibody.

  1. Experimental demonstration of a novel bio-sensing platform via plasmonic band gap formation in gold nano-patch arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Grande, Marco; Stomeo, Tiziana; Morea, Giuseppe; Marani, Roberto; Marrocco, Valeria; Petruzzelli, Vincenzo; D'Orazio, Antonella; Cingolani, Roberto; De Vittorio, Massimo; de Ceglia, Domenico; Scalora, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of implementing a novel bio-sensing platform based on the observation of the shift of the leaky surface plasmon mode that occurs at the edge of the plasmonic band gap of metal gratings when an analyte is deposited on top of the metallic structure. We provide experimental proof of the sensing capabilities of a two-dimensional array of gold nano-patches by observing color variations in the diffracted field when the air overlayer is replaced with a small quantity of Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA). Effects of rounded corners and surface imperfections are also discussed. Finally, we also report proof of changes in color intensities as a function of the air/filling ratio of the structure and discuss their relation with the diffracted spectra.

  2. Effect of ultrasonic treatment on formation of iron-containing intermetallic compounds in Al-Si alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-bo Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron is generally regarded as an unavoidable impurity in Al-Si casting alloys. The acicular Al3Fe and β-Al5FeSi (or Al9Si2Fe2 are common iron-containing intermetallic compounds (IMCs in conventional structure which have a detrimental impact on the mechanical properties. In this paper, ultrasonic field (USF was applied to modify acicular iron phases in Al-12%Si-2%Fe and Al-2%Fe alloys. The results show that the USF applied to Al-Fe alloys caused the morphological transformation of both primary and eutectic Al3Fe from acicular to blocky and granular without changes in their composition. In the case of Al-Si-Fe alloys, ultrasonic treatment led to both morphological and compositional conversion of the ternary iron IMCs. When the USF was applied, the acicular β-Al9Si2Fe2 was substituted by star-like α-Al12Si2Fe3. The modification rate of both binary and ternary iron IMCs relates to the USF treatment duration. The undercooling induced by the ultrasonic vibration contributes to the nucleation of intermetallics and can explain the transformation effect.

  3. Iron Chelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Menu Donate Treatments Therapies Iron Chelation Iron chelation therapy is the main treatment ... have iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you ...

  4. NO2-induced synthesis of nitrato-iron(III) porphyrin with diverse coordination mode and the formation of isoporphyrin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jagannath Bhuyan; Sabyasachi Sarkar

    2013-07-01

    Two nitrato-iron(III) porphyrinates [Fe(4-Me-TPP)(NO3)] 1 and [Fe(4-OMe-TPP)(NO3)] 2 are reported. Interestingly, [Fe(4-Me-TPP)(NO3)] 1 has nitrate ion coordinated as monodentate (by single oxygen atom), while [Fe(4-OMe-TPP)(NO3)] 2 has nitrate coordination through bidentate mode. Compound 1 was found serendipitously in the reaction of [Fe(4-Me-TPP)Cl] with nitrous acid, which was performed for the synthesis of nitro-iron(III) porphyrin, [Fe(4-Me-TPP)NO2]. The compound 2 was synthesized by passing NO2 gas through a solution of [Fe(4-OMe-TPP)]2O. Upon passing NO2 gas through a solution of a -oxo-dimer, [Fe(4-Me-TPP)]2O also produces 1. It is interesting that in more electron-rich porphyrin 2, binding of the nitrate in a symmetrical bidentate way while in less electron-rich porphyrin 1, binding of the anion is unidentate by a terminal oxygen atom. However, it is expected that the energy difference between the monodentate and bidentate coordination mode is very small and the interchange between these coordination is possible. Upon passing NO2 gas through a solution of -oxo-dimeric iron(III) porphyrin, the nitrato-iron(III) porphyrin forms first, that later gets oxidized to -cation radical to yield hydroxy-isoporphyrin in the presence of trace amount of water. These nitrato-iron(III) porphyrinates in moist air slowly converted back to their respective -oxo-dimeric iron(III) porphyrins.

  5. Polyaspartic acid facilitates oxolation within iron(iii) oxide pre-nucleation clusters and drives the formation of organic-inorganic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheck, J.; Drechsler, M.; Ma, X.; Stöckl, M. T.; Konsek, J.; Schwaderer, J. B.; Stadler, S. M.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Gebauer, D.

    2016-12-01

    The interplay between polymers and inorganic minerals during the formation of solids is crucial for biomineralization and bio-inspired materials, and advanced material properties can be achieved with organic-inorganic composites. By studying the reaction mechanisms, basic questions on organic-inorganic interactions and their role during material formation can be answered, enabling more target-oriented strategies in future synthetic approaches. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the hydrolysis of iron(iii) in the presence of polyaspartic acid. For the basic investigation of the formation mechanism, a titration assay was used, complemented by microscopic techniques. The polymer is shown to promote precipitation in partly hydrolyzed reaction solutions at the very early stages of the reaction by facilitating iron(iii) hydrolysis. In unhydrolyzed solutions, no significant interactions between the polymer and the inorganic solutes can be observed. We demonstrate that the hydrolysis promotion by the polymer can be understood by facilitating oxolation in olation iron(iii) pre-nucleation clusters. We propose that the adsorption of olation pre-nucleation clusters on the polymer chains and the resulting loss in dynamics and increased proximity of the reactants is the key to this effect. The resulting composite material obtained from the hydrolysis in the presence of the polymer was investigated with additional analytical techniques, namely, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, light microscopy, atomic force microscopy, zeta potential measurements, dynamic light scattering, and thermogravimetric analyses. It consists of elastic, polydisperse nanospheres, ca. 50-200 nm in diameter, and aggregates thereof, exhibiting a high polymer and water content.

  6. Iron and manganese shuttles control the formation of authigenic phosphorus minerals in the euxinic basins of the Baltic Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jilbert, T.; Slomp, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    Microanalysis of epoxy resin-embedded sediments is used to demonstrate the presence of authigenic iron (Fe) (II) phosphates and manganese (Mn)-calcium (Ca)-carbonate-phosphates in the deep euxinic basins of the Baltic Sea. These minerals constitute major burial phases of phosphorus (P) in this area,

  7. Formation of colloidal dispersions from supersaturated iron(III) nitrate solutions. III. Development of goethite at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, P.L. de; Woude, J.H.A. van der; Pieters, J.

    1984-01-01

    The development of colloidal goethite from partially neutralized iron(III) nitrate solutions has been investigated by high resolution electronmicroscopy and ultracentrifuge analysis. Monocrystalline rod-like particles characterized by (001) faces and very flat (010) and (120) faces are observed to f

  8. Role of a silicate phase in the reduction of iron and chromium and their oxidation with carbide formation during the manufacture of carbon ferrochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchin, V. E.; Roshchin, A. V.; Akhmetov, K. T.; Salikhov, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    The reactions of reduction of chromium and iron from chromospinelide and the reactions of carbide formation from the reduced metals are separated in space in experiments performed on ore grains with an artificially applied silicate shell. It is found that the silicate layer that isolates spinelide fro direct contact with carbon takes part in the reactions of both reduction and carbide formation. Free carbon extracts oxygen anions from the layer at the contact surface with the formation of CO, and the forming anion vacancies transfer "excess" electrons to the iron and chromium cations in the spinelide lattice and reduce them. Free and carbide-fixed carbon extracts iron and chromium cations from the silicate layer, and carbides form on the surface. The cation vacancies and electron holes (high-charge cations) that form in the silicate phase under these conditions are involved in the oxidation of the metal reduced in spinelide and cause its dissolution in the silicate phase and the precipitation of lower carbides on the surface of the silicate phase. The structure that is characterized of carbon ferrochrome forms on the surface of the silicate phase. Carbide formation is slower than reduction because of higher energy consumed for the formation of high-charge cations and the transfer of cations from the spinelide volume to the outer surface of the silicate phase. In the absence of a silicate layer, a carbide shell blocks the contact of carbon with oxides, which leads to the stop of reduction and, then, carbide formation. In the presence of a silicate (slag) shell around a spinelide grain, the following two concentration galvanic cells operate in parallel: an oxygen (reduction) cell and a metal (oxidation) cell. The parallel operation of the two galvanic cells with a common electrolyte (silicate phase) results in a decrease in the electric potentials between spinelide inside the silicate phase and carbon and carbides on its surface, and each of the processes is

  9. The Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate between Redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 for Narrow-band Emitters in the Subaru Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Ly, C; Kashikawa, N; Shimasaku, K; Doi, M; Nagao, T; Iye, M; Kodama, T; Morokuma, T; Motohara, K; Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matt A.; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Doi, Mamoru; Nagao, Tohru; Iye, Masanori; Kodama, Tadayuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro

    2006-01-01

    Abridged: Subaru Deep Field line-emitting galaxies in four narrow-band filters at low and intermediate redshifts are presented. Broad-band colors, follow-up optical spectroscopy, and multiple NB filters are used to distinguish Ha, [O II], and [O III] emitters between redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 to construct their luminosity functions (LFs). These LFs are derived down to faint magnitudes, which allows for a more accurate determination of the faint end slope. With a large (N~200-900) sample for each redshift interval, a Schechter profile is fitted to each LF. Prior to dust extinction corrections, the [O III] and [O II] LFs reported in this paper agree reasonably well with those of Hippelein et al. The z=0.08 Ha LF, which reaches two orders of magnitude fainter than Gallego et al., is steeper by 25%. This indicates that there are more low luminosity star-forming galaxies for z1, the star-formation rate densities are more or less constant. The latter is consistent with previous UV and [O II] measurements. Below z&...

  10. Effect of some naturally occurring iron ion chelators on the formation of radicals in the reaction mixtures of rat liver microsomes with ADP, Fe3+ and NADPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Katsuyuki; Fukushima, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Masayuki; Iwahashi, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism by polyphenols of protective effects against oxidative damage or by quinolinic acid of its neurotoxic and inflammatory actions, effects of polyphenols or quinolinic acid on the radical formation were examined. The ESR measurements showed that some polyphenols such as caffeic acid, catechol, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, L-dopa, chlorogenic acid and L-noradrenaline inhibited the formation of radicals in the reaction mixture of rat liver microsomes with ADP, Fe3+ and NADPH. The ESR measurements showed that α-picolinic acid, 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid and quinolinic acid (2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) enhanced the formation of radicals in the reaction mixture of rat liver microsomes with Fe3+ and NADPH. Caffeic acid and α-picolinic acid had no effects on the formation of radicals in the presence of EDTA, suggesting that the chelation of iron ion seems to be related to the inhibitory and enhanced effects. The polyphenols may exert protective effects against oxidative damage of erythrocyte membrane, ethanol-induced fatty livers, cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory and cancer through the mechanism. On the other hand, quinolinic acid may exert its neurotoxic and inflammatory effects because of the enhanced effect on the radical formation. PMID:22128221

  11. Effect of some naturally occurring iron ion chelators on the formation of radicals in the reaction mixtures of rat liver microsomes with ADP, Fe and NADPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Katsuyuki; Fukushima, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Masayuki; Iwahashi, Hideo

    2011-11-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism by polyphenols of protective effects against oxidative damage or by quinolinic acid of its neurotoxic and inflammatory actions, effects of polyphenols or quinolinic acid on the radical formation were examined. The ESR measurements showed that some polyphenols such as caffeic acid, catechol, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, L-dopa, chlorogenic acid and L-noradrenaline inhibited the formation of radicals in the reaction mixture of rat liver microsomes with ADP, Fe(3+) and NADPH. The ESR measurements showed that α-picolinic acid, 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid and quinolinic acid (2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) enhanced the formation of radicals in the reaction mixture of rat liver microsomes with Fe(3+) and NADPH. Caffeic acid and α-picolinic acid had no effects on the formation of radicals in the presence of EDTA, suggesting that the chelation of iron ion seems to be related to the inhibitory and enhanced effects. The polyphenols may exert protective effects against oxidative damage of erythrocyte membrane, ethanol-induced fatty livers, cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory and cancer through the mechanism. On the other hand, quinolinic acid may exert its neurotoxic and inflammatory effects because of the enhanced effect on the radical formation.

  12. Direct imaging of the water snow line at the time of planet formation using two ALMA continuum bands

    CERN Document Server

    Banzatti, Andrea; Ricci, Luca; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Birnstiel, Til; Ciesla, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Molecular snow lines in protoplanetary disks have been studied theoretically for decades because of their importance in shaping planetary architectures and compositions. The water snow line lies in the planet formation region at < 10 AU, and so far its location has been estimated only indirectly from spatially-unresolved spectroscopy. This work presents a proof-of-concept method to directly image the water snow line in protoplanetary disks through its physical and chemical imprint in the local dust properties. We adopt a physical disk model that includes dust coagulation, fragmentation, drift, and a change in fragmentation velocities of a factor 10 between dry silicates and icy grains as found by laboratory work. We find that the presence of a water snow line leads to a sharp discontinuity in the radial profile of the dust emission spectral index {\\alpha}_mm, due to replenishment of small grains through fragmentation. We use the ALMA simulator to demonstrate that this effect can be observed in protoplaneta...

  13. Galaxy Number Counts in the Subaru Deep Field Multi-band Analysis in a Hierarchical Galaxy Formation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nagashima, M; Totani, T; Gouda, N

    2002-01-01

    Number counts of galaxies are re-analyzed using a semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation based on the hierarchical clustering scenario. Faint galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) and the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) are compared with our model galaxies. We have determined the astrophysical parameters in the SAM that reproduce observations of nearby galaxies, and used them to predict the number counts and redshifts of faint galaxies for three cosmological models, the standard cold dark matter (CDM) universe, a flat lambda-CDM, and an open CDM. The novelty of our SAM analysis is the inclusion of selection effects arising from the cosmological dimming of surface brightness of high-z galaxies, and from the absorption of visible light by internal dust and intergalactic HI clouds. As was found in our previous work, in which the UV/optical HDF galaxies were compared with our model galaxies, we find that our SAM reproduces counts of near-IR SDF galaxies in low-density models, and that the standard CDM universe i...

  14. Low Power Band to Band Tunnel Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    the E-field and tunneling at the source- pocket junction you form a parasitic NPN + transistor and the injection mechanism of carriers into the...hypothesis that the 1000 ° C, 5s anneal split lead to a very wide pocket and the accidental formation of a NPN + transistor , while the 1000 ° C, 1s anneal...Low Power Band to Band Tunnel Transistors Anupama Bowonder Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley

  15. Grafting of diazonium salts on oxides surface: formation of aryl-O bonds on iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brymora, Katarzyna [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France); Fouineau, Jonathan; Eddarir, Asma; Chau, François [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS CNRS UMR 7086 (France); Yaacoub, Nader; Grenèche, Jean-Marc [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France); Pinson, Jean; Ammar, Souad [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS CNRS UMR 7086 (France); Calvayrac, Florent, E-mail: florent.calvayrac@univ-lemans.fr [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Combining ab initio modeling and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, we characterized the nature of the chemical linkage of aminoalkyl arenediazonium salt on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. We established that it is built through a metal–oxygen–carbon bonding and not a metal–carbon one, as usually suggested and commonly observed in previously studied metal- or carbon-based surfaces.

  16. Enzyme-mediated quenching of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS promotes biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by increasing iron availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Tettmann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2-alkyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H-quinolone 2,4-dioxygenase HodC was previously described to cleave the Pseudomonas quinolone signal, PQS, which is exclusively used in the complex quorum sensing (QS system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen employing QS to regulate virulence and biofilm development. Degradation of PQS by exogenous addition of HodC to planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa attenuated production of virulence factors, and reduced virulence in planta. However, proteolytic cleavage reduced the efficacy of HodC. Here, we identified the secreted protease LasB of P. aeruginosa to be responsible for HodC degradation. In static biofilms of the P. aeruginosa PA14 lasB::Tn mutant, the catalytic activity of HodC led to an increase in viable biomass in newly formed but also in established biofilms, and reduced the expression of genes involved in iron metabolism and siderophore production, such as pvdS, pvdL, pvdA and pvdQ. This is likely due to an increase in the levels of bioavailable iron by degradation of PQS, which is able to sequester iron from the surrounding environment. Thus, HodC, despite its ability to quench the production of virulence factors, is contraindicated for combating P. aeruginosa biofilms.

  17. Audio-magnetotelluric investigation of allochthonous iron formations in the Archaean Reguibat shield (Mauritania): structural and mining implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, G.; Fourno, J. P.

    1992-11-01

    The M'Haoudat range, considered as an allochthonous unit amid the strongly metamorphosed Archaean basement (Tiris Group), belongs to the Lower Proterozoic Ijil Group, weakly metamorphosed, constituted mainly by iron quartzites including red jaspers and high grade iron ore. Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) soundings (frequency range 1-7500 HZ) were performed together with the systematic survey of the range (SNIM mining company). The non-linear least squares method was used to perform a smoothness-constrained data model. The obvious AMT resistivity contrasts between the M'Haoudat Unit (150-3500 ohm. m) and the Archaean basement (20 000 ohm. m) allow to state precisely that the two thrust surfaces, on both sides of the range, join together at a depth which increases from North-West to South-East, as the ore bodies. Inside the steeply dipping M'Haoudat Unit, the main beds of iron quartzites (1500-3500 ohm. m), schists (1000-1500 ohm. m) and hematite ores (150-300 ohm. m) were distinguished when their thickness exceeded 30 to 50 m. The existence of an hydrostatic level (1-50 ohm. m) and the steeply dipping architecture, very likely responsible for the lack of resistivity contrast on the upper part of some profiles, complicate the interpretation at high frequencies the thin layers being poorly defined.

  18. Ground-based Pa$\\alpha$ Narrow-band Imaging of Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies I: Star Formation Rates and Surface Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Tateuchi, Ken; Motohara, Kentaro; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kato, Natsuko Mitani; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Todo, Soya; Toshikawa, Koji; Sako, Shigeyuki; Uchimoto, Yuka K; Ohsawa, Ryou; Asano, Kentaro; Ita, Yoshifusa; Kamizuka, Takafumi; Komugi, Shinya; Koshida, Shintaro; Manabe, Sho; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Nakashima, Asami; Okada, Kazushi; Takagi, Toshinobu; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Uchiyama, Mizuho; Aoki, Tsutomu; Doi, Mamoru; Handa, Toshihiro; Kawara, Kimiaki; Kohno, Kotaro; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyata, Takashi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Soyano, Takeo; Tamura, Yoichi; Tanaka, Masuo; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Yoshii, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are enshrouded by a large amount of dust, produced by their active star formation, and it is difficult to measure their activity in the optical wavelength. We have carried out Pa$\\alpha$ narrow-band imaging observations of 38 nearby star-forming galaxies including 33 LIRGs listed in $IRAS$ RBGS catalog with the Atacama Near InfraRed camera (ANIR) on the University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory (TAO) 1.0 m telescope (miniTAO). Star formation rates (SFRs) estimated from the Pa$\\alpha$ fluxes, corrected for dust extinction using the Balmer Decrement Method (typically $A_V$ $\\sim$ 4.3 mag), show a good correlation with those from the bolometric infrared luminosity of $IRAS$ data within a scatter of 0.27 dex. This suggests that the correction of dust extinction for Pa$\\alpha$ flux is sufficient in our sample. We measure the physical sizes and the surface density of infrared luminosities ($\\Sigma_{L(\\mathrm{IR})}$) and $SFR$ ($\\Sigma_{SFR}$) of star-forming region for individual ga...

  19. Ferrite grade iron oxides from ore rejects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K S Rane; V M S Verenkar; P Y Sawant

    2001-06-01

    Iron oxyhydroxides and hydroxides were synthesized from chemically beneficiated high SiO2/Al2O3 low-grade iron ore (57.49% Fe2O3) rejects and heated to get iron oxides of 96–99.73% purity. The infrared band positions, isothermal weight loss and thermogravimetric and chemical analysis established the chemical formulas of iron-oxyhydroxides as -FeOOH.0.3H2O; -FeOOH.0.2H2O and amorphous FeOOH. The thermal products of all these were -Fe2O3 excepting that of -FeOOH.0.3H2O which gave mainly -Fe2O3 and some admixture of -Fe2O3. The hydrazinated iron hydroxides and oxyhydroxides, on the other hand, decomposed autocatalytically to mainly -Fe2O3. Hydrazine method modifies the thermal decomposition path of the hydroxides. The saturation magnetization, s, values were found to be in the range 60–71 emu g–1 which are close to the reported values for -Fe2O3. Mechanism of the -Fe2O3 formation by hydrazine method is discussed.

  20. Controversial Pb-Pb and Sm-Nd isotope results in the early Archean Isua (West Greenland) oxide iron formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Robert; Rosing, Minik; Stecher, Ole

    1999-01-01

    as crystal overgrowths in the magnetite-rich bands. The timing of the hydrothermal event during which apatite was deposited within the BIF remains uncertain, but a TCHUR model age of 1.85 Ga from the apatite-dominated HCl leachate may point to a close genetic relationship with local Proterozoic metamorphism...

  1. Ocean productivity before about 1.9 Gyr ago limited by phosphorus adsorption onto iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum, Christian J; Canfield, Donald E

    2002-05-09

    After the evolution of oxygen-producing cyanobacteria at some time before 2.7 billion years ago, oxygen production on Earth is thought to have depended on the availability of nutrients in the oceans, such as phosphorus (in the form of orthophosphate). In the modern oceans, a significant removal pathway for phosphorus occurs by way of its adsorption onto iron oxide deposits. Such deposits were thought to be more abundant in the past when, under low sulphate conditions, the formation of large amounts of iron oxides resulted in the deposition of banded iron formations. Under these circumstances, phosphorus removal by iron oxide adsorption could have been enhanced. Here we analyse the phosphorus and iron content of banded iron formations to show that ocean orthophosphate concentrations from 3.2 to 1.9 billion years ago (during the Archaean and early Proterozoic eras) were probably only approximately 10-25% of present-day concentrations. We suggest therefore that low phosphorus availability should have significantly reduced rates of photosynthesis and carbon burial, thereby reducing the long-term oxygen production on the early Earth--as previously speculated--and contributing to the low concentrations of atmospheric oxygen during the late Archaean and early Proterozoic.

  2. Structural characterization, antibacterial and catalytic effect of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesised using the leaf extract of Cynometra ramiflora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groiss, Silvia; Selvaraj, Raja; Varadavenkatesan, Thivaharan; Vinayagam, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    In the present investigation, the leaf extract of Cynometra ramiflora was used to synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles. Within minutes of adding iron sulphate to the leaf extract, iron oxide nanoparticles were formed and thus, the method is very simple and fast. UV-VIS spectra showed the strong absorption band in the visible region. SEM images showed discrete spherical shaped particles and EDS spectra confirmed the iron and oxygen presence. The XRD results depicted the crystalline structure of iron oxide nanoparticles. FT-IR spectra portrayed the existence of functional groups of phytochemicals which are probably involved in the formation and stabilization of nanoparticles. The iron oxide nanoparticles exhibited effective inhibition against E. coli and S. epidermidis which may find its applications in the antibacterial drug development. Furthermore, the catalytic activity of the nanoparticles as Fenton-like catalyst was successfully investigated for the degradation of Rhodamine-B dye. This outcome could play a prominent role in the wastewater treatment.

  3. Rituals of commensality and the politics of state formation in the "princely" societies of early Iron Age Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Dietler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction My task in this essay is to address the question «what can an examination of rituals of commensality add to our understanding of political structure and process in the so-called "princely" societies of Early Iron Age Europe ? ». The short answer is, I believe, a great deal. This is both because rituals are potentially recoverable as distinct events in the archaeological record and because, as will be shown, they are a fundamental instrument and theater of political relations. The...

  4. Influence of iron complexes on formation of photosynthetic apparatus and outcome of genetic changes at the gamma irradiated seeds of wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Shamilov

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Influence of various doses of γ-irradiation on biosynthesis of chlorophyll and carotinoids, and also on a progress of mitotic divisions of meristematic cells of root hairs at sprouting wheat seeds at the presence of pyrocatechol, iron pyrocatecholat, thiocarbamide, iron thiocarbamide, rutine, iron rutinate, juglon and iron juglonate was studied. There was revealed that iron pyrocatecholate, iron rutinate, juglon and iron juglonate possess appreciable radioprotective properties which stimulate adaptive biosynthesis of chlorophyll and carotinoids, and also considerably reduce a number of chromosomal aberrations under irradiation.

  5. Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mucolytic drug ambroxol through ion-pair formation with iron and thiocyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levent, Abdulkadir; Sentürk, Zühre

    2010-09-01

    Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods have been developed for the determination of mucolytic drug Ambroxol. These procedures depend upon the reaction of iron(III) metal ion with the drug in the presence of thiocyanate ion to form stable ion-pair complex which extractable chloroform. The red-coloured complex was determined either colorimetrically at 510 nm or by indirect atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) via the determination of the iron content in the formed complex. The optimum experimental conditions for pH, concentrations of Fe(3+) and SCN(-), shaking time, phase ratio, and the number of extractions were determined. Under the proposed conditions, linearity was obeyed in the concentration ranges 4.1x10(-6) - 5.7x10(-5) M (1.7-23.6 µg mL(-1)) using both methods, with detection limits of 4.6x10(-7) M (0.19 µg mL(-1)) for colorimetry and 1.1x10(-6) M (0.46 µg mL(-1)) for AAS. The proposed methods were applied for the determination of Ambroxol in tablet dosage forms. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the high-performance liquid chromatographic method with diode-array detection.

  6. Formation of heme-iron complexes with nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) after ultraviolet radiation as a protective mechanism in rat skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiou, Stelios; Fotiou, Despina; Deliconstantinos, George

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet C (UVC)-irradiated microvessels isolated from rat skin release free nitrogen radicals, i.e. nitric oxide (NO), peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and nitrosocompounds formed from L-arginine. During UVC radiation of microvessels, heme (Fe3+) is released from hemoglobin and reacts with NO to form nitrosyl-heme (Fe2+-NO). The hydroxyl radical (OH*) produced is attached to heme-iron (Fe3+) to form hematin. ONOO- then binds to Fe(OH) and the complex Fe[(OH)ONOO-]2- is formed. Thus, in cases of increased oxidative stress, the free heme can act as an endogenous scavenger of OH* and ONOO-. Furthermore, Fe-NO and Fe[(OH)ONOO-]2- can act as NO donor and as antioxidant in redox cyclic iron-centered heme reactions, respectively. The scavenging-antioxidant properties of heme complexes, which allow it to protect the cells from the cytotoxic effects of the oxygen and/or nitrogen free radicals, were verified by estimating the changes in membrane fluidity of microvessels after UVC radiation. The present study indicates that UVC radiation of the skin acts as a potent stimulator for the formation of Fe-NO and Fe[(OH)ONOO-]2- in microvasculature with cytoprotective effects.

  7. Study of the sulfur mechanism on the formation of coke deposition on iron surfaces; Etude des mecanismes d'action du soufre sur le cokage catalytique du fer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, F.

    2001-12-01

    The formation of coke deposition which occurs in a range of temperature 500 deg C-650 deg C is a major problem in many chemical and petrochemical processes where hydrocarbons or other strongly carburizing atmospheres are involved. To reduce the rate of coke deposition, sulfur can be added in the gas phase. The topic of this work is to study the sulfur mechanism on the formation of coke deposition on iron surfaces. Firstly, we study the mechanism of graphitic filament formation on reduced and oxidised iron surfaces. A new mechanism of catalytic particle formation is proposed when the surface is initially oxidised. This mechanism is based on thermodynamic, kinetic and structural considerations. The results show that oxide/carbide transitions are involved in the transformation of the oxide layer in catalytic particles. Although the different iron oxides are precursors for the formation of catalytic particles, wustite (FeO) has a better reactivity than magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Sulfur acts on different steps of the coke formation, preventing phase transformations (carburation, graphitization) which occur during the formation of catalytic particles. Sulfur activity required to prevent these transformations changes with the temperature, the chemical state of iron (reduced or oxidised) and the carbon activity in the gas phase. Sulfur/ethylene co-adsorption studies were performed on mono-crystal of iron (110). The results show that sulfur can prevent adsorption and decomposition of this hydrocarbon on metallic surface (Fe) and on magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Then, sulfur prevents the reaction leading to the carburation and graphitization of the surface. (author)

  8. Homogeneous formation of epsilon carbides within the austenite during the isothermal transformation of a ductile iron at 410 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, I.; Aranzabal, J.; Castro, F.; Urcola, J. J.

    1995-05-01

    The transformation of a ductile iron at 410 °C for different times, after austenitization for 30 minutes at 900 °C, is analyzed in detail. Upper bainite and a high volume fraction of austenite are formed for intermediate annealing times. A certain amount of martensite is observed after quenching not only for short transformation times but also for intermediate times. The formation of the martensite on cooling after intermediate transformation times is due to the decrease in carbon concentration of the retained austenite because of the homogeneous precipitation of epsilon carbides within. This homogeneous precipitation of epsilon carbide inside austenite is unambiguously observed. The epsilon carbide, pre-precipitated in austenite, which transforms to martensite on cooling, continues growing in the martensite after transformation. For long times of austempering at 410 °C, some complex large carbides or silicocarbides are formed, probably from the epsilon carbide, which result in the total decomposition of austenite.

  9. GROUND-BASED Paα NARROW-BAND IMAGING OF LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. I. STAR FORMATION RATES AND SURFACE DENSITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateuchi, Ken; Konishi, Masahiro; Motohara, Kentaro; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kato, Natsuko Mitani; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Todo, Soya; Toshikawa, Koji; Sako, Shigeyuki; Uchimoto, Yuka K.; Ohsawa, Ryou; Asano, Kentaro; Kamizuka, Takafumi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Okada, Kazushi [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Ita, Yoshifusa [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Komugi, Shinya [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 2665-1, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan); Koshida, Shintaro [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Manabe, Sho [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Nakashima, Asami, E-mail: tateuchi@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); and others

    2015-03-15

    Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are enshrouded by a large amount of dust produced by their active star formation, and it is difficult to measure their activity in optical wavelengths. We have carried out Paα narrow-band imaging observations of 38 nearby star forming galaxies including 33 LIRGs listed in the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample catalog with the Atacama Near InfraRed camera on the University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory (TAO) 1.0 m telescope (miniTAO). Star formation rates (SFRs) estimated from the Paα fluxes, corrected for dust extinction using the Balmer decrement method (typically A{sub V} ∼ 4.3 mag), show a good correlation with those from the bolometric infrared luminosity of the IRAS data within a scatter of 0.27 dex. This suggests that the correction of dust extinction for the Paα flux is sufficient in our sample. We measure the physical sizes and surface densities of infrared luminosities (Σ{sub L(IR)}) and the SFR (Σ{sub SFR}) of star forming regions for individual galaxies, and we find that most of the galaxies follow a sequence of local ultra-luminous or luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) on the L(IR)-Σ{sub L(IR)} and SFR-Σ{sub SFR} plane. We confirm that a transition of the sequence from normal galaxies to U/LIRGs is seen at L(IR) = 8 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉}. Also, we find that there is a large scatter in physical size, different from normal galaxies or ULIRGs. Considering the fact that most U/LIRGs are merging or interacting galaxies, this scatter may be caused by strong external factors or differences in their merging stages.

  10. Cobalt and iron segregation and nitride formation from nitrogen plasma treatment of CoFeB surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, E. C.; Michalak, D. J.; Veyan, J. F.; Chabal, Y. J.

    2017-02-01

    Cobalt-iron-boron (CoFeB) thin films are the industry standard for ferromagnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junction devices and are closely related to the relevant surfaces of CoFe-based catalysts. Identifying and understanding the composition of their surfaces under relevant processing conditions is therefore critical. Here we report fundamental studies on the interaction of nitrogen plasma with CoFeB surfaces using infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and low energy ion scattering. We find that, upon exposure to nitrogen plasma, clean CoFeB surfaces spontaneously reorganize to form an overlayer comprised of Fe2N3 and BN, with the Co atoms moved well below the surface through a chemically driven process. Subsequent annealing to 400 °C removes nitrogen, resulting in a Fe-rich termination of the surface region.

  11. K band SINFONI spectra of two $z \\sim 5$ SMGs: upper limits to the un-obscured star formation from [O II] optical emission line searches

    CERN Document Server

    Couto, Guilherme S; López, Javier Piqueras; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Arribas, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    We present deep SINFONI K band integral field spectra of two submillimeter (SMG) galaxy systems: BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0234, at $z=4.69$ and $4.55$ respectively. Spectra extracted for each object in the two systems do not show any signature of the [O II]$\\lambda\\lambda$3726,29\\AA$\\,$ emission-lines, placing upper flux limits of $3.9$ and $2.5 \\times 10^{-18}\\,$${\\rm erg\\,s^{-1}\\,\\,cm^{-2} \\,}$ for BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0234, respectively. Using the relation between the star formation rate (SFR) and the luminosity of the [O II] doublet from Kennicutt (1998), we estimate unobscured SFR upper limits of $\\sim$ $10-15\\,\\rm M_\\odot\\,yr^{-1} \\,$ and $\\sim$ $30-40\\,\\rm M_\\odot\\,yr^{-1} \\,$ for the objects of the two systems, respectively. For the SMGs, these values are at least two orders of magnitude lower than those derived from SED and IR luminosities. The differences on the SFR values would correspond to internal extinction of, at least, $3.4 - 4.9$ and $2.1 - 3.6$ mag in the visual for BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0...

  12. A new model for the formation of a spaced crenulation (shear band) cleavage in the Dalradian rocks of the Tay Nappe, SW Highlands, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoff Tanner, P. W.

    2016-03-01

    The main conclusion of this study is that non-coaxial strain acting parallel to a flat-lying D1 spaced cleavage was responsible for the formation of the D2 spaced crenulation (shear band) cleavage in Dalradian rocks of Neoproterozoic-Lower Ordovician age in the SW Highlands, Scotland. The cm-dm-scale D2 microlithons are asymmetric; have a geometrically distinctive nose and tail; and show a thickened central portion resulting from back-rotation of the constituent D1 microlithons. The current terminology used to describe crenulation cleavages is reviewed and updated. Aided by exceptional 3D exposures, it is shown how embryonic D2 flexural-slip folds developed into a spaced cleavage comprising fold-pair domains wrapped by anastomosing cleavage seams. The bulk strain was partitioned into low-strain domains separated by zones of high non-coaxial strain. This new model provides a template for determining the sense of shear in both low-strain situations and in ductile, higher strain zones where other indicators, such as shear folds, give ambiguous results. Analogous structures include tectonic lozenges in shear zones, and flexural-slip duplexes. Disputes over the sense and direction of shear during emplacement of the Tay Nappe, and the apparently intractable conflict between minor fold asymmetry and shear sense, appear to be resolved.

  13. Research progress of Precambrian iron formations abroad and some problems deserving further discussion%国外前寒武纪铁建造的研究进展与有待深入探讨的问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王长乐; 张连昌; 刘利; 代堰锫

    2012-01-01

    Iron formation (IF), formed during the early Precambrian period, is an iron-rich (TFe> 15%) and siliceous chemical sedimentary rock. It consists chiefly of iron oxides (magnetite and hematite) and quartz. According to its petrographic features, IF can be classified into two types: Banded Iron Formation (BIF) and Granular Iron Formation (GIF); BIF can also be further divided into Algoma type related to volcanic rocks and Superior type related to fine clastic-carbonate rocks on the basis of sedimentary environment. IF began its production at 3.8 Ga, mainly occurred from 2.8 Ga to 1.8 Ga, continuously disappeared after 1.8 Ga, and reappeared in small amounts at about 0.8 Ga because of the Snowball Event. Algoma type BIF was dominantly pro-duced in Meso-Neoarchean, whereas Superior-type BIF was much more common in Paleoproterozoic. The former, mainly formed before cratonization, was closely related to marine volcanic activity and continental accretion while the latter, mainly formed after cratonization, was related to stable craton basins and increasing atmospheric oxygen content. Algoma-type iron deposits are often characterized by smaller-size in terms of single ore body, lower grade and multilayer development, whereas the Superior-type ones have features of larger-size single ore bodies, higher grade and fairly stable layers. Due to extensive production and unrepeatable nature of IF, the research on IF has not only economic value but also important scientific significance. The research trend of IF seems to further focus on such problems as the relationship between IF and early tectonic (mantle plumes and early plate tectonics) evolution, the composition and evolution of hydrosphere and atmosphere, the activity of early organisms in the earth, the genesis of IF and the regularity of its temporal and spatial distribution.%形成于早前寒武纪的铁建造,是一种富铁[ω(TFe)>15%]的硅质化学沉积岩,其主要矿物组成是铁氧化物(磁铁矿和赤

  14. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  15. Fe{sup 2+} oxidation rate drastically affect the formation and phase of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral occurred in acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Shan; Zhou Lixiang, E-mail: lxzhou@njau.edu.cn

    2012-05-01

    During the processes of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral formation, Fe{sup 2+} ion was oxidized by the following three methods: (1) biooxidation treatment by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans); (2) rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (rapid oxidation treatment); (3) slow abiotic oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (slow oxidation treatment). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, element composition, precipitate weight and total Fe removal efficiency were analyzed. The XRD patterns and element composition of precipitates synthesized through the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments well coincide with those of potassium jarosite, while precipitates formed at the initial stage of incubation in the rapid oxidation treatment showed a similar XRD pattern to schwertmannite. With the ongoing incubation, XRD patterns and element composition of the precipitates that occurred in the rapid oxidation treatment were gradually close to those in the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments. Due to the inhibition of A. ferrooxidans itself and its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in aggregation of precipitates, the amount of precipitates and soluble Fe removal efficiency were lower in the biooxidation treatment than in the slow oxidation treatment. Therefore, it is concluded that Fe{sup 2+} oxidation rate can greatly affect the mineral phase of precipitates, and slow oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} is helpful in improving jarosite formation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slow oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} is helpful in jarosite formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The already-formed schwertmannite can be gradually transformed to jarosite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitates formation can be inhibited probably by EPS from A. ferrooxidans.

  16. Comparative analysis of biofilm formation by Bacillus cereus reference strains and undomesticated food isolates and the effect of free iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, H.; Muller, L.K.; Tempelaars, M.H.; Abee, T.; Nierop Groot, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation of Bacillus cereus reference strains ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987 and 21 undomesticated food isolates was studied on polystyrene and stainless steel as contact surfaces. For all strains, the biofilm forming capacity was significantly enhanced when in contact with stainless steel (SS)

  17. Eukaryotic stromatolite builders in acid mine drainage: Implications for Precambrian iron formations and oxygenation of the atmosphere?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Dannelly, H.K.; Connors, K.A. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Geography, Geology & Anthropology

    2002-07-01

    Biological activity of Euglena mutabilis, an acidophilic, photosynthetic protozoan, contributes to the formation of Fe-rich stromatolites in acid mine drainage systems. E. mutabilis is the dominant microbe in bright green benthic mats (biofilm), coating drainage channels at abandoned coal mine sites in Indiana. It builds biolaminates through phototactic and aerotactic behavior, similar to prokaryotes, by moving through precipitates that periodically cover the mats. E. mutabilis also contributes to formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by (1) intracellularly storing Fe compounds released after death, contributing to the solid material of stromatolites and acting as nucleation sites for precipitation of authigenic Fe minerals, and (2) generating 02 via photosynthesis that further facilitates precipitation of reduced Fe, any excess 02 not consumed by Fe precipitation being released to the atmosphere. Recognition of E. mutabilis-dominated biofilm in acidic systems raises a provocative hypothesis relating processes involved in formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by E. mutabilis to those responsible for development of Precambrian stromatolitic Fe formations and oxygenation of the early atmosphere.

  18. Silica and Pyroxene in IVA Irons; Possible Formation of the IVA Magma by Impact Melting and Reduction of L-LL-Chondrite Materials Followed by Crystallization and Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John T.; Matsunami, Yoshiyuki; Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    Group IVA is a large magmatic group of iron meteorites. The mean DELTA O-17 (= delta O-17 - 0.52(raised dot) delta O-18) of the silicates is approx. plus or minus 1.2%o, similar to the highest values in L chondrites and the lowest values in LL chondrites; delta O-18 values are also in the L/LL range. This strongly suggests that IVA irons formed by melting L-LL parental material, but the mean Ni content of IVA irons (83 mg/g) is much lower than that of a presumed L-LL parent (approx. 170 mg/g) and the low-Ca pyroxene present in two IVA meteorites is Fs13, much lower than the Fs20-29 values in L and LL chondrites. Thus, formation from L-LL precursors requires extensive addition of metallic Fe, probably produced by reduction of FeS and FeO. Group IVA also has S/Ni, Ga/Ni, and Ge/Ni ratios that are much lower than those in L-LL chondrites or any chondrite group that preserves nebular compositions, implying loss of these volatile elements during asteroidal processing. We suggest that these reduction and loss processes occurred near the surface of the asteroid during impact heating, and resulted partly from reduction by C, and partly from the thermal dissociation of FeS and FeO with loss of O and S. The hot (approx. 1770 K) low-viscosity melt quickly moved through channels in the porous asteroid to form a core. Two members of the IVA group, Sao Joao Nepomuceno (hereafter, SJN) and Steinbach, contain moderate amounts of orthopyroxene and silica, and minor amounts of low-Ca clinopyroxene. Even though SJN formed after approx. 26% crystallization and Steinbach formed after approx. 77% Crystallization of the IVA core, both could have originated within several tens of meters of the core-mantle interface if 99% of the crystallization occurred from the center outwards. Two other members of the group (Gibeon and Bishop Canyon) contain tabular tridymite, which we infer to have initially formed as veins deposited from a cooling SiO-rich vapor. The silicates were clearly introduced

  19. Bonding Character and Formation Energy of Point Defects of He and Vacancy on (001) Surface of bcc Iron by First Principle Calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun CAI; Daogang LU

    2013-01-01

    The structure and energy of He impurities and vacancy on (001) surface of bcc iron are investigated by an ab initio method.Three cases for stabilities of a He atom at the surface are found: some of He atoms at surface atomic layers (SAL) relax into vacuum gap; some of surface He atoms at octahedral interstitial site relax into more stable tetrahedral interstitial site; some of surface He atoms still stay at tetrahedral interstitial site.The un-stability of the He atom at the surface system can be explained by deformation mechanism of charge densities and electronic densities of states.It is found that formation energy of the point defects from the topmost SAL to bulk-like atomic layer increase gradually,for example,the formation energies of a monovacancy at the first five topmost SALs are equal to 0.33,1.56,2.04,2.02 and 2.11 eV,respectively.The magnetic moments of Fe atoms in the surface atomic layers are also calculated.

  20. Energetics of formation process of a <001> prismatic dislocation loop via the collision between two 1/2<111> loops in {alpha}-iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, K; Mori, H [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, 7-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: arakawak@uhvem.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-05-01

    It has been proposed by Marian et al. [1] that a [001] interstitial-type dislocation loop can be formed in body-centered cubic iron via the collision between a 1/2[111] loop and 1/ 2[111] loop, which undergo one-dimensional glide diffusion, and the subsequent shear reaction. However, the formation of [001] loops through this reaction has not been reproduced by other works even though the two 1/2<111> loops collided with each other. In the present paper, the origin of the difficulty in this reaction is discussed within the framework of isotropic elasticity theory. The sign of the driving force for the reaction is heavily dependent on the reaction path. The two 1/2<111> loops colliding to form a [110] junction can transform to a single [001] loop when a shear loop generated within the 1/2[111] loop propagates in sync with the other shear loop within the 1/ 2[111] loop. However, unsynchronized motion of the two shear loops significantly suppresses the propagation of the shear loops, which might be caused by the thermal fluctuation at finite temperatures. This will be one of the origins of the difficulty in the formation of [001] loops through the collision between the two 1/2<111> loops.

  1. Geochemical characteristics of gold bearing boninites and banded iron formations from Shimoga greenstone belt, India: Implications for gold genesis and hydrothermal processes in diverse tectonic settings

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ganguly, S.; Manikyamba, C.; Saha, A.; Lingadevaru, M.; Santosh, M.; Rambabu, S.; Khelen, A.C.; Purushotham, D.; Linga, D.

    in an intraoceanic arc setting. The Gd/Yb and Dy/Yb ratios suggest parent magma origin through partial melting of a spinel lherzolite mantle source. Geochemical signatures of the boninites suggest high temperature, shallow level melting of refractory mantle wedge...

  2. Oxygen-independent alkane formation by non-heme iron-dependent cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase: investigation of kinetics and requirement for an external electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, Bekir E; Das, Debasis; Han, Jaehong; Jones, Patrik R; Marsh, E Neil G

    2011-12-13

    Cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (cAD) is, structurally, a member of the di-iron carboxylate family of oxygenases. We previously reported that cAD from Prochlorococcus marinus catalyzes the unusual hydrolysis of aldehydes to produce alkanes and formate in a reaction that requires an external reducing system but does not require oxygen [Das et al. (2011) Angew. Chem. 50, 7148-7152]. Here we demonstrate that cADs from divergent cyanobacterial classes, including the enzyme from N. puntiformes that was reported to be oxygen dependent, catalyze aldehyde decarbonylation at a much faster rate under anaerobic conditions and that the oxygen in formate derives from water. The very low activity (<1 turnover/h) of cAD appears to result from inhibition by the ferredoxin reducing system used in the assay and the low solubility of the substrate. Replacing ferredoxin with the electron mediator phenazine methosulfate allowed the enzyme to function with various chemical reductants, with NADH giving the highest activity. NADH is not consumed during turnover, in accord with the proposed catalytic role for the reducing system in the reaction. With octadecanal, a burst phase of product formation, k(prod) = 3.4 ± 0.5 min(-1), is observed, indicating that chemistry is not rate-determining under the conditions of the assay. With the more soluble substrate, heptanal, k(cat) = 0.17 ± 0.01 min(-1) and no burst phase is observed, suggesting that a chemical step is limiting in the reaction of this substrate.

  3. Superconductivity versus bound-state formation in a two-band superconductor with small Fermi energy: Applications to Fe pnictides/chalcogenides and doped SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubukov, Andrey V.; Eremin, Ilya; Efremov, Dmitri V.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the interplay between superconductivity and the formation of bound pairs of fermions (BCS-BEC crossover) in a 2D model of interacting fermions with small Fermi energy EF and weak attractive interaction, which extends to energies well above EF. The 2D case is special because a two-particle bound state forms at arbitrary weak interaction, and already at weak coupling, one has to distinguish between the bound-state formation and superconductivity. We briefly review the situation in the one-band model and then consider two different two-band models: one with one hole band and one electron band and another with two hole or two electron bands. In each case, we obtain the bound-state energy 2 E0 for two fermions in a vacuum and solve the set of coupled equations for the pairing gaps and the chemical potentials to obtain the onset temperature of the pairing Tins and the quasiparticle dispersion at T =0 . We then compute the superfluid stiffness ρs(T =0 ) and obtain the actual Tc. For definiteness, we set EF in one band to be near zero and consider different ratios of E0 and EF in the other band. We show that at EF≫E0 , the behavior of both two-band models is BCS-like in the sense that Tc≈Tins≪EF and Δ ˜Tc . At EF≪E0 , the two models behave differently: in the model with two hole/two electron bands, Tins˜E0/lnE/0EF , Δ ˜(E0EF) 1 /2 , and Tc˜EF , like in the one-band model. In between Tins and Tc, the system displays a preformed pair behavior. In the model with one hole and one electron bands, Tc remains of order Tins, and both remain finite at EF=0 and of the order of E0. The preformed pair behavior still does exist in this model because Tc is numerically smaller than Tins. For both models, we reexpress Tins in terms of the fully renormalized two-particle scattering amplitude by extending to the two-band case (the method pioneered by Gorkov and Melik-Barkhudarov back in 1961). We apply our results for the model with a hole and an electron band to

  4. Oxygen isotope exchange kinetics of mineral pairs in closed and open systems: Applications to problems of hydrothermal alteration of igneous rocks and Precambrian iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, R.T.; Criss, R.E.; Taylor, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    heat-balance constraints, we can utilize the 18O 16O data on natural mineral assemblages to calculate the kinetic rate constants (k's) and the effective diffusion constants (D's) for mineral-H2O exchange: these calculated values (kqtz ??? 10-14, kfeld ??? 10-13-10-12) agree with experimental determinations of such constants. In nature, once the driving force or energy source for the external infiltrating fluid phase is removed, the disequilibrium mineral-pair arrays will either: (1) remain "frozen" in their existing state, if the temperatures are low enough, or (2) re-equilibrate along specific closed-system exchange vectors determined solely by the temperature path and the mineral modal proportions. Thus, modal mineralogical information is a particularly important parameter in both the open- and closed-system scenarios, and should in general always be reported in stable-isotopic studies of mineral assemblages. These concepts are applied to an analysis of 18O 16O systematics of gabbros (Plagioclase-clinopyroxene and plagioclase-amphibole pairs), granitic plutons (quartz-feldspar pairs), and Precambrian siliceous iron formations (quartz-magnetite pairs). In all these examples, striking regularities are observed on ??-?? and ??-?? plots, but we point out that ??-?? plots have many advantages over their equivalent ??-?? diagrams, as the latter are more susceptible to misinterpretation. Using the equations developed in this study, these regularities can be interpreted to give semiquantitative information on the exchange histories of these rocks subsequent to their formation. In particular, we present a new interpretation indicating that Precambrian cherty iron formations have in general undergone a complex fluid exchange history in which the iron oxide (magnetite precursor?) has exchanged much faster with low-temperature (< 400??C) fluids than has the relatively inert quartz. ?? 1989.

  5. Low temperature aging mechanism identification and lithium deposition in a large format lithium iron phosphate battery for different charge profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Minggao; Chu, Zhengyu; Lu, Languang; Li, Jianqiu; Han, Xuebing; Feng, Xuning; Liu, Guangming

    2015-07-01

    Charging procedures at low temperatures severely shorten the cycle life of lithium ion batteries due to lithium deposition on the negative electrode. In this paper, cycle life tests are conducted to reveal the influence of the charging current rate and the cut-off voltage limit on the aging mechanisms of a large format LiFePO4 battery at a low temperature (-10 °C). The capacity degradation rates accelerate rapidly after the charging current reaches 0.25 C or the cut-off voltage reaches 3.55 V. Therefore the scheduled current and voltage during low-temperature charging should be reconsidered to avoid capacity degradation. Lithium deposition contributes to low-temperature aging mechanisms, as something needle-like which might be deposited lithium is observed on the surface of the negative electrode after disassembling the aged battery cell. To confirm our explanation, incremental capacity analysis (ICA) is performed to identify the characteristics of the lithium deposition induced battery aging mechanisms. Furthermore, the aging mechanism is quantified using a mechanistic model, whose parameters are estimated with the particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO). The loss of reversible lithium originating from secondary SEI formation and dead lithium is confirmed as the cause of the aging.

  6. Phase separation in iron chalcogenide superconductor Rb0.8+xFe1.6+ySe2 as seen by Raman light scattering and band structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkevich, Yu.; Gnezdilov, V.; Lemmens, P.; Shevtsova, T.; Gusev, A.; Lamonova, K.; Wulferding, D.; Gnatchenko, S.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.

    2016-06-01

    We report Raman light scattering in the phase separated superconducting single crystal Rb0.77Fe1.61Se2 with Tc = 32 K over a wide temperature region 3-500 K. The observed phonon lines from the majority vacancy ordered Rb2Fe4Se5 (245) antiferromagnetic phase with TN = 525 K demonstrate modest anomalies in the frequency, intensity and halfwidth at the superconductive phase transition. We identify phonon lines from the minority compressed RbδFe2Se2 (122) conductive phase. The superconducting gap with d x 2 - y 2 symmetry has been detected in our spectra. In the range 0-600 cm-1 we observe a weak but highly polarized B1g-type background which becomes well-structured upon cooling. A possible magnetic or multiorbital origin of this background is discussed. We argue that the phase separation in M0.8+xFe1.6+ySe2 is of pure magnetic origin. It occurs below the Néel temperature when the magnetic moment of iron reaches a critical value. We state that there is a spacer between the majority 245 and minority 122 phases. Using ab initio spin-polarized band structure calculations we demonstrate that the compressed vacancy ordered Rb2Fe4Se5 phase can be conductive and therefore may serve as a protective interface spacer between the purely metallic RbδFe2Se2 phase and the insulating Rb2Fe4Se5 phase providing percolative Josephson-junction like superconductivity all throughout of Rb0.8+xFe1.6+ySe2. Our lattice dynamics calculations show significant differences in the phonon spectra of the conductive and insulating Rb2Fe4Se5 phases.

  7. Competing instabilities, orbital ordering, and splitting of band degeneracies from a parquet renormalization group analysis of a four-pocket model for iron-based superconductors: Application to FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Rui-Qi; Classen, Laura; Khodas, Maxim; Chubukov, Andrey V.

    2017-02-01

    We report the results of a parquet renormalization group (RG) study of competing instabilities in the full 2D four-pocket, three-orbital low-energy model for iron-based superconductors. We derive and analyze the RG flow of the couplings, which describes all symmetry-allowed interactions between low-energy fermions. Despite that the number of the couplings is large, we argue that there are only two stable fixed trajectories of the RG flow and one weakly unstable fixed trajectory with a single unstable direction. Each fixed trajectory has a finite basin of attraction in the space of initial system parameters. On the stable trajectories, either interactions involving only dx z and dy z or only dx y orbital components on electron pockets dominate, while on the weakly unstable trajectory interactions involving dx z (dy z) and dx y orbital states on electron pockets remain comparable. The behavior along the two stable fixed trajectories has been analyzed earlier [Chubukov, Khodas, and Fernandes, Phys. Rev. X 6, 041045 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.041045]. Here we focus on the system behavior along the weakly unstable trajectory and apply the results to FeSe. We find, based on the analysis of susceptibilities along this trajectory, that the leading instability upon lowering the temperature is towards a three-component d -wave orbital nematic order. Two components are the differences between fermionic densities on dx z and dy z orbitals on hole pockets and on electron pockets, and the third one is the difference between the densities of dx y orbitals on the two electron pockets. We argue that this order is consistent with the splitting of band degeneracies, observed in recent photoemission data on FeSe by Fedorov et al. [Sci. Rep. 6, 36834 (2016), 10.1038/srep36834].

  8. Assessing the utility of trace and rare earth elements as biosignatures in microbial iron oxyhydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eHeim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial iron oxyhydroxides are common deposits in natural waters, recent sediments and mine drainage systems and often contain significant accumulations of trace and rare earth elements (TREE. TREE patterns are widely used to characterize minerals and rocks, and to elucidate their evolution and origin. Whether and which characteristic TREE signatures distinguish between a biological and an abiological origin of iron minerals is still not well understood. Long-term flow reactor studies were performed in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory to investigate the development of microbial mats dominated by iron-oxidizing bacteria, namely Mariprofundus sp. and Gallionella sp. The experiments investigated the accumulation and fractionation of TREE under controlled conditions and enabled us to assess potential biosignatures evolving within the microbial iron oxyhydroxides. Concentrations of Be, Y, Zn, Zr, Hf, W, Th, Pb, and U in the microbial mats were 1e3- to 1e5-fold higher than in the feeder fluids whereas the rare earth elements and Y (REE+Y contents were 1e4 and 1e6 fold enriched. Except for a hydrothermally induced Eu anomaly, the normalized REE+Y patterns of the microbial iron oxyhydroxides were very similar to published REE+Y distributions of Archaean Banded Iron Formations. The microbial iron oxyhydroxides from the flow reactors were compared to iron oxyhydroxides that were artificially precipitated from the same feeder fluid. These abiotic and inorganic iron oxyhydroxides show the same REE+Y distribution patterns. Our results indicate that the REE+Y mirror quite exactly the water chemistry, but they do not allow to distinguish microbially mediated from inorganic iron precipitates. All TREE studied showed an overall similar fractionation behavior in biogenic, abiotic and inorganic iron oxyhydroxides. Exceptions are Ni and Tl, which were only accumulated in the microbial iron oxyhydroxides and may point to a potential usage of these elements as

  9. Jarosite versus Soluble Iron-Sulfate Formation and Their Role in Acid Mine Drainage Formation at the Pan de Azúcar Mine Tailings (Zn-Pb-Ag, NW Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesica Murray

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Secondary jarosite and water-soluble iron-sulfate minerals control the composition of acid mine waters formed by the oxidation of sulfide in tailings impoundments at the (Zn-Pb-Ag Pan de Azúcar mine located in the Pozuelos Lagoon Basin (semi-arid climate in Northwest (NW Argentina. In the primary zone of the tailings (9.5 wt % pyrite-marcasite precipitation of anglesite (PbSO4, wupatkite ((Co,Mg,NiAl2(SO44 and gypsum retain Pb, Co and Ca, while mainly Fe2+, Zn2+, Al3+, Mg2+, As3+/5+ and Cd2+ migrate downwards, forming a sulfate and metal-rich plume. In the oxidation zone, jarosite (MFe3(TO42(OH6 is the main secondary Fe3+ phase; its most suitable composition is M = K+, Na+, and Pb2+and TO4 = SO42−; AsO42−. During the dry season, iron-sulfate salts precipitate by capillary transport on the tailings and at the foot of DC2 (tailings impoundment DC2 tailings dam where an acid, Fe2+ rich plume outcrops. The most abundant compounds in the acid mine drainage (AMD are SO42−, Fe2+, Fe3+, Zn2+, Al3+, Mg2+, Cu2+, As3+/5+, Cd2+. These show peak concentrations at the beginning of the wet season, when the soluble salts and jarosite dissolve. The formation of soluble sulfate salts during the dry season and dilution during the wet season conform an annual cycle of rapid metals and acidity transference from the tailings to the downstream environment.

  10. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    OpenAIRE

    Susanna Burckhardt; Peter Geisser

    2011-01-01

    Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3−4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under...

  11. Formation of Fe(0-Nanoparticles via Reduction of Fe(II Compounds by Amino Acids and Their Subsequent Oxidation to Iron Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Klačanová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron nanoparticles were prepared by the reduction of central Fe(II ion in the coordination compounds with amino acid ligands. The anion of the amino acid used as a ligand acted as the reducing agent. Conditions for the reduction were very mild; the temperature did not exceed 52°C, and the optimum pH was between 9.5 and 9.7. The metal iron precipitated as a mirror on the flask or as a colloid in water. Identification of the product was carried out by measuring UV/VIS spectra of the iron nanoparticles in water. The iron nanoparticles were oxidized by oxygen yielding a mixture of iron oxides. Oxidation of Fe(0 to Fe(II took several seconds under air. The size and properties of iron oxide nanoparticles were studied by UV/VIS, TEM investigation, RTG diffractometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetometry, thermogravimetry, and GC/MS.

  12. Effects of proton acceptors on formation of a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex via proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Yusuke; Morimoto, Yuma; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-03-18

    Rates of formation of a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex, [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+) (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine), via electron-transfer oxidation of [Fe(III)(OH)(N4Py)](2+) in acetonitrile (MeCN) containing H2O (0.56 M) were accelerated as much as 390-fold by addition of proton acceptors such as CF3COO(-), TsO(-) (p-MeC6H4SO3(-)), NsO(-) (o-NO2C6H4SO3(-)), DNsO(-) (2,4-(NO2)2C6H3SO3(-)), and TfO(-) (CF3SO3(-)). The acceleration effect of proton acceptors increases with increasing basicity of the proton acceptors. The one-electron oxidation potential of [Fe(III)(OH)(N4Py)](2+) was shifted from 1.24 to 0.96 V vs SCE in the presence of TsO(-) (10 mM). The electron-transfer oxidation of Fe(III)-OH complex was coupled with the deprotonation process by proton acceptors in which deuterium kinetic isotope effects were observed when H2O was replaced by D2O.

  13. Biogenic Iron-Rich Filaments in the Quartz Veins in the Uppermost Ediacaran Qigebulake Formation, Aksu Area, Northwestern Tarim Basin, China: Implications for Iron Oxidizers in Subseafloor Hydrothermal Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiqiang; Chen, Daizhao; Tang, Dongjie; Dong, Shaofeng; Guo, Chuan; Guo, Zenghui; Zhang, Yanqiu

    2015-07-01

    Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide-encrusted filamentous microstructures produced by microorganisms have been widely reported in various modern and ancient extreme environments; however, the iron-dependent microorganisms preserved in hydrothermal quartz veins have not been explored in detail because of limited materials available. In this study, abundant well-preserved filamentous microstructures were observed in the hydrothermal quartz veins of the uppermost dolostones of the terminal-Ediacaran Qigebulake Formation in the Aksu area, northwestern Tarim Basin, China. These filamentous microstructures were permineralized by goethite and hematite as revealed by Raman spectroscopy and completely entombed in chalcedony and quartz cements. Microscopically, they are characterized by biogenic filamentous morphologies (commonly 20-200 μm in length and 1-5 μm in diameter) and structures (curved, tubular sheath-like, segmented, and mat-like filaments), similar to the Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) living in modern and ancient hydrothermal vent fields. A previous study revealed that quartz-barite vein swarms were subseafloor channels of low-temperature, silica-rich, diffusive hydrothermal vents in the earliest Cambrian, which contributed silica to the deposition of the overlying bedded chert of the Yurtus Formation. In this context, this study suggests that the putative filamentous FeOB preserved in the quartz veins might have thrived in the low-temperature, silica- and Fe(II)-rich hydrothermal vent channels in subseafloor mixing zones and were rapidly fossilized by subsequent higher-temperature, silica-rich hydrothermal fluids in response to waning and waxing fluctuations of diffuse hydrothermal venting. In view of the occurrence in a relatively stable passive continental margin shelf environment in Tarim Block, the silica-rich submarine hydrothermal vent system may represent a new and important geological niche favorable for FeOB colonization, which is different from their traditional

  14. Formation Reason and Countermeasures of Non-Metal Inclusions of Cast Irons%铸铁非金属夹杂物的形成原因与应对措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文和; 王峰; 赵鲁生

    2011-01-01

    The composition and source of slag of cast irons melted in cupola and medium frequency furnace was introduced. The measures to reduce non-metal inclusions in cast irons were proposed as follows: ( 1 )improving metallurgical quality of the cast irons; (2 )improving the morphology and distribution of the nonmetal inclusions. The formation reason of the secondary slag was described. It's considered that, by adopting proper measures and iron melt treating technique, the secondary oxidation of the iron melt and its harmful effect can be reduced.%介绍了冲天炉和中频炉熔炼铸铁的炉渣成分及来源,提出减少铸铁内部非金属夹杂物的措施:(1)提高铸铁的冶金质量;(2)改善铸铁中非金属夹杂物的形态及分布.描述了铁液二次渣的形成原因,认为采取适宜的措施及铁液处理技术,可以减轻铁液二次氧化及其不利影响.

  15. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Burckhardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3−4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II (ferrous salts or iron(III (ferric complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia.

  16. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of iron preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisser, Peter; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2011-01-04

    Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3-4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC) are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III)-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II) (ferrous) salts or iron(III) (ferric) complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia.

  17. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  18. Mineral resource assessment of the Iron River 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Michigan and Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William F.

    1983-01-01

    The Iron River 1? x 2? quadrangle contains identified resources of copper and iron. Copper-rich shale beds in the north part of the quadrangle contain 12.2 billion pounds (5.5 billion kilograms) of copper in well-studied deposits including 9.2 billion pounds (4.2 billion kilograms) that are economically minable by 1980 standards. At least several billion pounds of copper probably exist in other parts of the same shale beds, but not enough data are available to measure the amount. A small amount, about 250 million pounds (113 million kilograms), of native copper is known to remain in one abandoned mine, and additional but unknown amounts remain in other abandoned mines. About 13.25 billion tons (12.02 billion metric tons) of banded iron-formation averaging roughly 30 percent iron are known within 500 feet (152.4 meters) of the surface in the Gogebic, Marquette, and Iron River-Crystal Falls districts. A small percentage of that might someday be minable as taconite, but none is now believed to be economic. Some higher grade iron concentrations exist in the same iron-formations. Such material was the basis of former mining of iron in the region, but a poor market for such ore and depletion of many deposits have led to the decline of iron mining in the quadrangle. Iron mines of the quadrangle were not being worked in 1980. Many parts of the quadrangle contain belts of favorable host rocks for mineral deposits. Although deposits are not known in these belts, undiscovered deposits of copper, zinc, lead, silver, uranium, phosphate, nickel, chromium, platinum, gold, and diamonds could exist.

  19. Examination of Sarikaya(Yozgat-Turkey) iron mineralization with rare earth element(REE) method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nursel; OKSUZ; Sukru; KOC

    2010-01-01

    Iron mineralizations in the study area are found in amphibolites in the localities of Buyukoren,Uzunkuyu-Atkayasi,and Karabacak and they display a predominantly banded texture.Their paragenesis is dominated by magnetite and hematite.In this study,iron mineralizations in Sarikaya were examined in terms of rare earth element(REE) contents and attempts were made to determine some physicochemical conditions that had an impact upon their formation.For this purpose,42 ore samples and 17 enriched magnetite samples...

  20. Iron and Stony-iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, H.; McCoy, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    constraints on the processes operating in the solar nebula. Although most of them probably formed through similar mechanisms, their characteristics are diverse in terms of chemistry, mineralogy, and structure. Significant differences in bulk chemistry between iron meteorites from different cores as well as variations in chemistry between meteorites from the same core provide evidence of the complex chemical evolution of these evolved meteorites. Intergroup variations for volatile siderophile elements (e.g., gallium and germanium) extend more than three orders of magnitude, hinting that iron meteorite parent bodies formed under diverse conditions. These differences reflect both the nebular source material and geological processing in the parent bodies.Can we be sure that the iron meteorites are indeed fragments of cores? Since no differentiated asteroid has yet been visited by a spacecraft, we rely on circumstantial evidence. Some M-type asteroids have spectral characteristics expected from exposed metallic cores (Tholen, 1989), while others exhibit basaltic surfaces, a hallmark of global differentiation. Although olivine-rich mantles should dominate the volume of differentiated asteroids, there is an enigmatic lack of olivine-rich asteroids (and meteorites) that could represent mantle material ( Burbine et al., 1996). Until we visit an asteroid with parts of a core-mantle boundary exposed, our best evidence supporting a core origin is detailed studies of iron meteorites.Iron-nickel alloys are expected in the cores of differentiated asteroids, but what other evidence supports the notion that iron meteorites sample the metallic cores of differentiated asteroids? What suggests that these asteroids were sufficiently heated to trigger core formation, and that iron meteorites sample cores rather than isolated pods of once molten metal? First and foremost, trace-element compositional trends in most groups of iron meteorites are consistent with fractional crystallization of a

  1. Iron and oxygen isotope fractionation during iron UV photo-oxidation: Implications for early Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Nicole X.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Greenwood, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) contain appreciable amounts of ferric iron (Fe3+). The mechanism by which ferrous iron (Fe2+) was oxidized into Fe3+ in an atmosphere that was globally anoxic is highly debated. Of the three scenarios that have been proposed to explain BIF formation, photo-oxidation by UV photons is the only one that does not involve life (the other two are oxidation by O2 produced by photosynthesis, and anoxygenic photosynthesis whereby Fe2+ is directly used as electron donor in place of water). We experimentally investigated iron and oxygen isotope fractionation imparted by iron photo-oxidation at a pH of 7.3. The iron isotope fractionation between precipitated Fe3+-bearing lepidocrocite and dissolved Fe2+ follows a Rayleigh distillation with an instantaneous 56Fe/54Fe fractionation factor of + 1.2 ‰. Such enrichment in the heavy isotopes of iron is consistent with the values measured in BIFs. We also investigated the nature of the mass-fractionation law that governs iron isotope fractionation in the photo-oxidation experiments (i.e., the slope of the δ56Fe-δ57Fe relationship). The experimental run products follow a mass-dependent law corresponding to the high-T equilibrium limit. The fact that a ∼3.8 Gyr old BIF sample (IF-G) from Isua (Greenland) falls on the same fractionation line confirms that iron photo-oxidation in the surface layers of the oceans was a viable pathway to BIF formation in the Archean, when the atmosphere was largely transparent to UV photons. Our experiments allow us to estimate the quantum yield of the photo-oxidation process (∼0.07 iron atom oxidized per photon absorbed). This yield is used to model iron oxidation on early Mars. As the photo-oxidation proceeds, the aqueous medium becomes more acidic, which slows down the reaction by changing the speciation of iron to species that are less efficient at absorbing UV-photons. Iron photo-oxidation in centimeter to meter-deep water ponds would take months to years to

  2. High temperature corrosion studies. A. Iron: based superalloy in SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ atmospheres. B. Gas: solid reaction with formation of volatile species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T.K.

    1980-03-01

    The thermogravimetric method was used to study high temperature corrosion under SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ atmosphere applied to Armco 18SR alloys with different heat treatment histories, Armco T310 and pure chromium between 750 and 1100/sup 0/C. The weight gain follows the parabolic rate law. The volatilization of the protective Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ layer via formation of CrO/sub 3/ was taken into account above 900/sup 0/C for long time runs. The parabolic rate and the volatilization rate, derived from fitting the experimental data to the modified Tedmon's non-linear model, were correlated using the Arrhenius equation. Armco 18SR-C has the best corrosion resistance of the Armco 18SR alloys. Armco T310 is not protective at high temperatures. The available rate data on the oxidation of chromium oxide, chlorination of chromium, oxidation-chlorination of chromium oxide, chlorination of nickel and chlorination of iron were found to be predictable. The calculation of high temperature volatilization rate was performed using the available fluid correlation equations and the Lennard-Jones parameters derived from the molecule with similar structure and from the low temperature viscosity measurement. The lower predicted volatilization rate is due to the use of the Chapman-Enskog equation with the Lennard-Jones parameters mostly derived from the low temperature viscosity measurement. This was substantiated by comparing the reliable high temperature diffusion rate in the literature with the above mentioned calculational method. The experimental volatilization rates of this study are compared with the other related studies and the mass transfer predictions.

  3. Translating formative research findings into a behaviour change strategy to promote antenatal calcium and iron and folic acid supplementation in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephanie L; Seim, Gretchen L; Wawire, Salome; Chapleau, Gina M; Young, Sera L; Dickin, Katherine L

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization now recommends integrating calcium supplements into antenatal micronutrient supplementation programmes to prevent pre-eclampsia, a leading cause of maternal mortality. As countries consider integrating calcium supplementation into antenatal care (ANC), it is important to identify context-specific barriers and facilitators to delivery and adherence. Such insights can be gained from women's and health workers' experiences with iron and folic acid (IFA) supplements. We conducted in-depth interviews with 22 pregnant and post-partum women and 20 community-based and facility-based health workers in Kenya to inform a calcium and IFA supplementation programme. Interviews assessed awareness of anaemia, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia; ANC attendance; and barriers and facilitators to IFA supplement delivery and adherence. We analyzed interviews inductively using the constant comparative method. Women and health workers identified poor diet quality in pregnancy as a major health concern. Neither women nor health workers identified pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, anaemia or related symptoms as serious health threats. Women and community-based health workers were unfamiliar with pre-eclampsia and eclampsia and considered anaemia symptoms normal. Most women had not received IFA supplements, and those who had received insufficient amounts and little information about supplement benefits. We then developed a multi-level (health facility, community, household and individual) behaviour change strategy to promote antenatal calcium and IFA supplementation. Formative research is an essential first step in guiding implementation of antenatal calcium supplementation programmes to reduce pre-eclampsia. Because evidence on how to implement successful calcium supplementation programmes is limited, experiences with antenatal IFA supplementation can be used to guide programme development.

  4. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the Noamundi-Koira basin iron ore deposits (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Azimuddin; Alvi, Shabbar Habib; Ilbeyli, Nurdane

    2015-04-01

    India is one of the richest sources of iron ore deposits in the world; and one of them is located in the Noamundi-Koira basin, Singhbhum-Orissa craton. The geological comparative studies of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Noamundi-Koira iron ore deposits, belonging to the iron ore group in eastern India, focus on the study of mineralogy and major elemental compositions along with the geological evaluation of different iron ores. The basement of the Singhbhum-Orissa craton is metasedimentary rocks which can be traced in a broadly elliptical pattern of granitoids, surrounded by metasediments and metavolcanics of Greenstone Belt association. The Singhbhum granitoid is intrusive into these old rocks and to younger, mid Archaean metasediments, including iron formations, schists and metaquartzites and siliciclastics of the Precambrian Iron Ore Group (Saha et al., 1994; Sharma, 1994). The iron ore of Noamundi-Koira can be divided into seven categories (Van Schalkwyk and Beukes 1986). They are massive, hard laminated, soft laminated, martite-goethite, powdery blue dust and lateritic ore. Although it is more or less accepted that the parent rock of iron ore is banded hematite jasper (BHJ), the presence of disseminated martite in BHJ suggests that the magnetite of protore was converted to martite. In the study area, possible genesis of high-grade hematite ore could have occurred in two steps. In the first stage, shallow, meteoric fluids affect primary, unaltered BIF by simultaneously oxidizing magnetite to martite and replacing quartz with hydrous iron oxides. In the second stage of supergene processes, deep burial upgrades the hydrous iron oxides to microplaty hematite. Removal of silica from BIF and successive precipitation of iron resulted in the formation of martite- goethite ore. Soft laminated ores were formed where precipitation of iron was partial or absent. The leached out space remains with time and the interstitial space is generally filled

  5. Band Together!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    After nearly a decade as band director at St. James High School in St. James, Missouri, Derek Limback knows that the key to building a successful program is putting the program itself above everything else. Limback strives to augment not only his students' musical prowess, but also their leadership skills. Key to his philosophy is instilling a…

  6. Fluctuations in late Neoproterozoic atmospheric oxidation — Cr isotope chemostratigraphy and iron speciation of the late Ediacaran lower Arroyo del Soldado Group (Uruguay)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Stolper, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two major steps, near the beginning and near the end of the Proterozoic Eon (2500 to 542 Ma ago), but the details of this history are unclear. Chromium isotopes in iron-rich chemical sediments offer a potential to highlight fine-scale fluctuations...... in the oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere and to add a further dimension in the use of redox-sensitive tracers to solve the question regarding fluctuations of atmospheric oxygen levels and their consequences for Earth's climate. We observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (d53Cr up to + 5.......0‰) in iron-rich cherts and banded iron formation horizons within the Arroyo del Soldado Group (Ediacaran; Uruguay) that can be explained by rapid, effective oxidation of Fe(II)-rich surface waters. These fluctuations are correlated with variations in ratios of highly reactive iron (FeHR) to total iron (Fetot...

  7. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  8. Structure and properties of ultrathin iron films on Ru(10 overline10) : The formation of metastable surface phases of γ-Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kevin; Prince, Robert H.; Lambert, Richard M.

    1988-07-01

    The chemisorption and desorption of Fe at the (10 overline10) surface of Ru has been investigated by LEED, Auger spectroscopy, Δφ and thermal desorption measurements over a substrate temperature range of 300-900 K. The growth mode of the iron deposit was found to be strongly dependent on the temperature. At 300 K up to seven iron monolayers could be grown, these adopting the configuration of the fcc (111) plane of bulk γ-iron. The layers were metastable and heating of such films or deposition at elevated temperatures resulted in nucleation and growth of crystallites. Only a single Fe desorption peak ( Ed≈ 250 kJ mol-1) was observed over the whole coverage regime; this is assigned to the evaporation of iron atoms in contact with the ruthenium substrate, either pre-existing in the first monolayer or supplied from the Fe crystallites.

  9. Formation of austenite and martensite in the surface layer of pure iron due to ion-nitriding hardening. Ion chikka ni yoru juntetsu hyomen kokasonai no austenite oyobi martensite no keisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumaru, N. (Fukui National College of Technology, Fukui (Japan))

    1990-08-20

    To investigate the ion-nitriding behavior including the phase transformation on the surface of iron, the mechanism of formation and growth of the nitrided case was studied by ion-nitriding pure iron with well-known properties. Pure iron for industrial use was nitrided in the mixed gas (80vol% N {sub 2}+20vol% H {sub 2}) inder a pressure of 665 Pa at temperatures of 803K, 923K, and 1013K with treatment time 2.1-14.7ks and then quenched in water. Consequently, a surface hardened layer and a diffusion layer with specific characteristics were formed in each occasion with different temperature and quenching method. Under the eutectoid transformation temperature of 863K, the nitrided case consisting of a compound layer and a diffusion layer is formed. In nitriding above the eutectoid transformation temperature, the following formation can be considered: a {gamma} phase, which has a denser nitrogen concentration than that estimated from the intersection of the nitriding temperature and the A {sub 3}-line, is formed above the upper part of the diffusion layer and grows as the nitriding time passes; during the quenching process, this {gamma} phase is transformed either to single {gamma} phase structure or to martensite structure, corresponding to different M {sub s} temperature accompanied with different nitrogen concentration. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Iron-oxygen interaction in silicon: A combined XBIC/XRF-EBIC-DLTS study of precipitation and complex building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trushin, M., E-mail: trushmax@tu-cottbus.d [IHP/BTU Jointlab, Konrad-Wachsmann Allee 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Vyvenko, O. [V.A.Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya 1, 108594 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Seifert, W. [IHP/BTU Jointlab, Konrad-Wachsmann Allee 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); IHP microelectronics, Im Technologiepark 25, D-15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Jia, G. [IHP/BTU Jointlab, Konrad-Wachsmann Allee 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Kittler, M. [IHP/BTU Jointlab, Konrad-Wachsmann Allee 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); IHP microelectronics, Im Technologiepark 25, D-15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Iron-oxygen interaction in the Czochralski-grown silicon (CZ-Si) giving rise to their final precipitated state was investigated by means of a combination of electrical and element-sensitive techniques. The samples studied were intentionally contaminated with iron at 1150 deg. C and then they were annealed at temperatures of 850 and 950 deg. C to stimulate precipitate formation. Fe-related defect levels in silicon band gap and spatial distributions of iron-related precipitates were monitored after each annealing step. It was found that FeB-pairs being the dominant defects in as-contaminated sample transformed completely to the stable FeO-related complexes that served as precursors for further iron-oxygen co-precipitation.

  11. Iron-oxygen interaction in silicon: A combined XBIC/XRF-EBIC-DLTS study of precipitation and complex building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushin, M.; Vyvenko, O.; Seifert, W.; Jia, G.; Kittler, M.

    2009-12-01

    Iron-oxygen interaction in the Czochralski-grown silicon (CZ-Si) giving rise to their final precipitated state was investigated by means of a combination of electrical and element-sensitive techniques. The samples studied were intentionally contaminated with iron at 1150 °C and then they were annealed at temperatures of 850 and 950 °C to stimulate precipitate formation. Fe-related defect levels in silicon band gap and spatial distributions of iron-related precipitates were monitored after each annealing step. It was found that FeB-pairs being the dominant defects in as-contaminated sample transformed completely to the stable FeO-related complexes that served as precursors for further iron-oxygen co-precipitation.

  12. Alginate-Iron Speciation and Its Effect on In Vitro Cellular Iron Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Horniblow

    Full Text Available Alginates are a class of biopolymers with known iron binding properties which are routinely used in the fabrication of iron-oxide nanoparticles. In addition, alginates have been implicated in influencing human iron absorption. However, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles employs non-physiological pH conditions and whether nanoparticle formation in vivo is responsible for influencing cellular iron metabolism is unclear. Thus the aims of this study were to determine how alginate and iron interact at gastric-comparable pH conditions and how this influences iron metabolism. Employing a range of spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions alginate-iron complexation was confirmed and, in conjunction with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticles were observed. The results infer a nucleation-type model of iron binding whereby alginate is templating the condensation of iron-hydroxide complexes to form iron oxide centred nanoparticles. The interaction of alginate and iron at a cellular level was found to decrease cellular iron acquisition by 37% (p < 0.05 and in combination with confocal microscopy the alginate inhibits cellular iron transport through extracellular iron chelation with the resulting complexes not internalised. These results infer alginate as being useful in the chelation of excess iron, especially in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer where excess unabsorbed luminal iron is thought to be a driver of disease.

  13. 氧化铁改性石英砂的复合挂膜与氨氮去除试验研究%EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON COMPOUND FORMATION AND REMOVAL AMMONIA NITROGEN USING IRON OXIDE COATED SANDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冬梅; 刘贝; 庞治星; 刘培涛; 刘雄威; 李绍秀

    2012-01-01

    采用自制的氧化铁改性石英砂滤料(简称“改性砂”),对生物改性砂联合处理微污染物氨氮的复合挂膜启动性能以及滤料表面形态进行了试验研究,并与生物普通砂联用效果进行对比.结果表明,生物普通砂和生物改性砂在挂膜初期的生物量分别为15.46、13.79 nmol/g(n(P)/m(滤料)),稳定运行期分别为18.75、20.09 nmol/g;挂膜初期,生物普通砂与生物改性砂对质量浓度为1~2 mg/L氨氮的去除效果分别达到92%和95%;挂膜稳定期,前者对氨氮的去除效果约60%,后者稳定在80%左右;在不同氨氮质量浓度(0.5~4 mg/L)下,生物普通砂对氨氮去除率从60%上升至80%,生物改性砂的去除率从70%增至95%;过滤前后2种滤料表面形态均发生变化,生物改性砂表面孔隙更小,结构更加复杂多孔,表面粗糙程度进一步增加,对氨氮去除率高.%A homemade iron oxide cCoated sands filters with biological was used to remove ammonia nitrogen from contaminated source water, the process of compound formation start-up and the surface morphology of the two filters was carried out, and contrasted with the effect of biological-raw sands. The results were shown as follows: The biomass of the biological- raw sand filter, and biological-iron oxide coated sand filter were 15.46 and 13.79 nmol/g in the initial of formation, 18.75 and 20.09 nmol/g in the stable of formation. Removal of ammonia nitrogen with concentration among 1.0-2.0 mg/L using biological-raw sands and biological-iron oxide coated sands were 92% to 95% in the initial of formation, In the stable of formation, removal ammonia nitrogen using biological-raw sands stable about 60%, and removal ammonia nitrogen using biological-iron oxide coated sands stable about 80%. In different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen among 0.5~4.0 mg/L, removal efficiency of biological-raw sands from 60% rose to 80%, biological- iron oxide coated sands from 70% rose to

  14. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  15. Band alignments in Fe/graphene/Si(001) junctions studied by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Breton, J.-C.; Tricot, S.; Delhaye, G.; Lépine, B.; Turban, P.; Schieffer, P.

    2016-08-01

    The control of tunnel contact resistance is of primary importance for semiconductor-based spintronic devices. This control is hardly achieved with conventional oxide-based tunnel barriers due to deposition-induced interface states. Manipulation of single 2D atomic crystals (such as graphene sheets) weakly interacting with their substrate might represent an alternative and efficient way to design new heterostructures for a variety of different purposes including spin injection into semiconductors. In the present paper, we study by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy the band alignments and interface chemistry of iron-graphene-hydrogenated passivated silicon (001) surfaces for a low and a high n-doping concentration. We find that the hydrogen passivation of the Si(001) surface remains efficient even with a graphene sheet on the Si(001) surface. For both doping concentrations, the semiconductor is close to flat-band conditions which indicates that the Fermi level is unpinned on the semiconductor side of the Graphene/Si(001):H interface. When iron is deposited on the graphene/Si(001):H structures, the Schottky barrier height remains mainly unaffected by the metallic overlayer with a very low barrier height for electrons, a sought-after property in semiconductor based spintronic devices. Finally, we demonstrate that the graphene layer intercalated between the metal and semiconductor also serves as a protection against iron-silicide formation even at elevated temperatures preventing from the formation of a Si-based magnetic dead layer.

  16. Effect of different sulphur precursors on morphology and band-gap on the formation of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) particles with microwave irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, Bharati; Vijaylakshmi, S.; Sharma, Pratibha

    2016-05-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a promising semiconductor material for ecological cost effective thin film Photovoltaic (PV) devices. As it contains earth abundant and non-toxic elements, it has the advantages over commercially available CIGS and CdTe thin film PV devices. In the present work, the pure phase Cu2ZnSnS4 particles were successfully synthesised with microwave irradiation. The morphology and phase study was carried out for the samples prepared with two different sulphur precursors viz. thiourea and thioacetamide (TAA). CZTS particles with thiourea as sulphur precursor are more crystalline than CZTS particles with TAA. The band gap of 1.654eV and 1.713eV were calculated for the samples prepared with thiourea and TAA respectively.

  17. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in ad...

  18. Formation of carbon nanotubes on iron/cobalt oxides supported on zeolite-Y : Effect of zeolite textural properties and particle morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triantafyllidis, K. S.; Karakoulia, S. A.; Gournis, D.; Delimitis, A.; Nalbandian, L.; Maccallini, E.; Rudolf, P.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the textural properties and morphology of zeolite Y, used as support of iron (Fe) or cobalt (Co) oxides, on the quantity and quality of the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) synthesized by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) of acetylene was studied. The parent zeolite Y was

  19. Heterojunction nanowires having high activity and stability for the reduction of oxygen: Formation by self-assembly of iron phthalocyanine with single walled carbon nanotubes (FePc/SWNTs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jia

    2014-04-01

    A self-assembly approach to preparing iron phthalocyanine/single-walled carbon nanotube (FePc/SWNT) heterojunction nanowires as a new oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst has been developed by virtue of water-adjusted dispersing in 1-cyclohexyl-pyrrolidone (CHP) of the two components. The FePc/SWNT nanowires have a higher Fermi level compared to pure FePc (d-band center, DFT. =. -0.69. eV versus -0.87. eV, respectively). Consequently, an efficient channel for transferring electron to the FePc surface is readily created, facilitating the interaction between FePc and oxygen, so enhancing the ORR kinetics. This heterojunction-determined activity in ORR illustrates a new stratagem to preparing non-noble ORR electrocatalysts of significant importance in constructing real-world fuel cells. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  20. New insights on microcrack propagation in bcc iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodin, V.A. [PRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Karlsruher Inst. fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Vladimirov, P.V.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruher Inst. fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations of micro-crack propagation in alpha-iron evidence high sensitivity of lattice transformation modes at the tips of propagating cracks to the crack plane orientation and expansion direction. The crack initiation on {l_brace}001{r_brace} planes is preceded with the emission of compact slip bands from the pre-crack tips, in agreement with the earlier quasi-two-dimensional simulations. Moreover, the compact slip bands emanating from the crack tips remain an essential feature of the crack propagation on {l_brace}001{r_brace} planes. On the contrary, crack propagation on {l_brace}110{r_brace} plane is accompanied with the formation of subgrains at the crack tip and the emission of dislocations. (orig.)

  1. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  2. A Coherent Study of Emission Lines from Broad-Band Photometry: Specific Star-Formation Rates and [OIII]/H{\\beta} Ratio at 3 < z < 6

    CERN Document Server

    Faisst, A L; Hsieh, B C; Laigle, C; Salvato, M; Tasca, L; Cassata, P; Davidzon, I; Ilbert, O; Fevre, O Le; Masters, D; McCracken, H J; Steinhardt, C; Silverman, J D; De Barros, S; Hasinger, G; Scoville, N Z

    2016-01-01

    We measure the H{\\alpha} and [OIII] emission line properties as well as specific star-formation rates (sSFR) of spectroscopically confirmed 33 cannot be fully explained in a picture of cold accretion driven growth. We find a progressively increasing [OIII]{\\lambda}5007/H{\\beta} ratio out to z~6, consistent with the ratios in local galaxies selected by increasing H{\\alpha} EW (i.e., sSFR). This demonstrates the potential of using "local high-z analogs" to investigate the spectroscopic properties and relations of galaxies in the re-ionization epoch.

  3. Geological characteristics and genesis of iron ores of Zhaoanzhuang Formation in Wuyang iron ore field of Henan%河南省舞阳铁矿田赵案庄组铁矿地质特征及成因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立新; 李怀乾; 贾兴杰; 王伟中; 王夏

    2014-01-01

    赵案庄矿区是舞阳矿田三大矿区之一,20世纪50~70年代该矿区在500m 以浅共提交资源储量1.3亿吨。通过近期的普查工作探获资源储量5000t。笔者根据以往的地质资料、结合本次的普查结果,对矿体基本地质特征进行了总结、对成因特点进行了分析、为下步的详查工作提供参考。%Zhaoanzhuang iron mining area is one of the three primary mining areas of Wuyang iron ore field. From 1950s to 1970s this mining area has proven reserves of 130 million tons above depth of 500m.A recent reconnaissance survey has verified reserves of 5000 tons.Based on historical geological data and findings of the recent reconnaissance survey,the author analyzes basic geological characteristics of ore-bodies and its genesis and provides references for the following detailed survey works.

  4. Moessbauer study of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes of some nitrogen-, oxygen- and sulphur donor ligands, reduction of iron(III) by the mercaptide group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawhney, G.L.; Baijal, J.S. (Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics); Chandra, S. (Zakir Hussain College, Ajmeri Gate, Delhi (India). Dept. of Chemistry); Pandeya, K.B. (Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-01-01

    Complex formation reactions of iron(II) and iron(III) with semicarbazones and thiosemicarbazones of pyruvic acid and phenyl pyruvic acid have been studied by magnetic measurements and Moessbauer spectroscopy. With iron(II), all the ligands form hexa-coordinated octahedral complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H/sub 2/). With iron(III) semicarbazones, complexes of the composition (Fe(ligand-H)/sub 2/)(OH) are formed. Thiosemicarbazones first reduce iron(III) to iron(II) and then form iron(II) complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H)/sub 2/.

  5. 铁矿石烧结行业二英类形成机制与排放水平%Formation mechanism and emission profiles of PCDD/Fs in iron ore sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王梦京; 吴素愫; 高新华; 侯梅芳; 唐琛; 刘文彬

    2014-01-01

    Iron ore sintering is one of the important emission sources for PCDD/Fs. This paper summarized formation mechanisms of PCDD/Fs in sintering process and the emission profile of PCDD/Fs in typical sintering stack gas. Key influencing factors of PCDD/Fs formation, including temperature, time, oxygen concentration and other conditions in raw material composition were analyzed. Reduction technologies of PCDD/Fs emission were also suggested in this paper. Finally, it provided analysis and outlook on the current emission of PCDD/Fs from iron ore sintering industry in China and several developed countries. It is aimed to provide reference for the management and reduction of emission of PCDD/Fs in the iron ore sintering industry in China.%铁矿石烧结是我国重要的二英类( PCDD/Fs)排放源之一。本文总结了烧结过程PCDD/Fs的生成机制,以及典型烧结烟气的PCDD/Fs排放特征。针对影响PCDD/Fs生成的关键因素进行了分析,探讨了原料组成中关键元素的影响,以及温度、时间和氧气含量等条件的影响,进而对PCDD/Fs的减排技术等方面进行了讨论。最后本文还对部分发达国家和我国的铁矿石烧结行业PCDD/Fs排放现状进行了分析和展望。可为我国铁矿石烧结行业PCDD/Fs的管理和减排提供参考。

  6. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  7. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a~new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the type of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid-like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 °C to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  8. The urinary antibiotic 5-nitro-8-hydroxyquinoline (Nitroxoline) reduces the formation and induces the dispersal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by chelation of iron and zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobke, A; Klinger, M; Hermann, B; Sachse, S; Nietzsche, S; Makarewicz, O; Keller, P M; Pfister, W; Straube, E

    2012-11-01

    Since cations have been reported as essential regulators of biofilm, we investigated the potential of the broad-spectrum antimicrobial and cation-chelator nitroxoline as an antibiofilm agent. Biofilm mass synthesis was reduced by up to 80% at sub-MIC nitroxoline concentrations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and structures formed were reticulate rather than compact. In preformed biofilms, viable cell counts were reduced by 4 logs at therapeutic concentrations. Complexation of iron and zinc was demonstrated to underlie nitroxoline's potent antibiofilm activity.

  9. Iron Deficiency in Heart Failure: A Practical Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole Ebner; Stephan von Haehling

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an element necessary for cells due to its capacity of transporting oxygen and electrons. One of the important co-morbidities in heart failure is iron deficiency. Iron has relevant biological functions, for example, the formation of haemoglobin, myoglobin and numerous enzymatic groups. The prevalence of iron deficiency increases with the severity of heart failure. For a long time, the influence of iron deficiency was underestimated especially in terms of worsening of cardiovascular dis...

  10. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to iron and contribution to normal formation of haemoglobin and red blood cells pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Specialised Nutrition Europe (formerly IDACE), submitted pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of France, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific...... physiological effect for infants and young children. A claim on iron and contribution to normal formation of haemoglobin and red blood cells in the general population has already been assessed by the Panel with a favourable outcome. The Panel considers that the role of iron in normal formation of haemoglobin...... and red blood cells applies to all ages, including infants and young children (from birth to three years). The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between dietary intake of iron and contribution to normal formation of haemoglobin and red blood cells....

  11. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  12. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergic to iron dextran injection; any other iron injections such as ferric carboxymaltose (Injectafer), ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit);any other ...

  13. Micromilling enhances iron bioaccessibility from wholegrain wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, G O; Li, X; Parodi, A; Edwards, C H; Ellis, P R; Sharp, P A

    2014-11-19

    Cereals constitute important sources of iron in human diet; however, much of the iron in wheat is lost during processing for the production of white flour. This study employed novel food processing techniques to increase the bioaccessibility of naturally occurring iron in wheat. Iron was localized in wheat by Perl's Prussian blue staining. Soluble iron from digested wheat flour was measured by a ferrozine spectrophotometric assay. Iron bioaccessibility was determined using an in vitro simulated peptic-pancreatic digestion, followed by measurement of ferritin (a surrogate marker for iron absorption) in Caco-2 cells. Light microscopy revealed that iron in wheat was encapsulated in cells of the aleurone layer and remained intact after in vivo digestion and passage through the gastrointestinal tract. The solubility of iron in wholegrain wheat and in purified wheat aleurone increased significantly after enzymatic digestion with Driselase, and following mechanical disruption using micromilling. Furthermore, following in vitro simulated peptic-pancreatic digestion, iron bioaccessibility, measured as ferritin formation in Caco-2 cells, from micromilled aleurone flour was significantly higher (52%) than from whole aleurone flour. Taken together our data show that disruption of aleurone cell walls could increase iron bioaccessibility. Micromilled aleurone could provide an alternative strategy for iron fortification of cereal products.

  14. New Kronig-Penney Equation Emphasizing the Band Edge Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmulowicz, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Kronig-Penney problem is a textbook example for discussing band dispersions and band gap formation in periodic layered media. For example, in photonic crystals, the behaviour of bands next to the band edges is important for further discussions of such effects as inhibited light emission, slow light and negative index of refraction. However,…

  15. Gastric digestion of pea ferritin and modulation of its iron bioavailability by ascorbic and phytic acids in caco-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satyanarayana Bejjani; Raghu Pullakhandam; Ravinder Punjal; K Madhavan Nair

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To understand the digestive stability and mechanism of release and intestinal uptake of pea ferritin iron in caco-2 cell line model.METHODS: Pea seed ferritin was purified using salt fractionation followed by gel filtration chromatography.The bioavailability of ferritin iron was assessed using coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model in the presence or absence of ascorbic acid and phytic acid.Caco-2 cell ferritin formation was used as a surrogate marker of iron uptake. Structural changes of pea ferritin under simulated gastric pH were characterized using electrophoresis, gel filtration and circular dichroism spectroscopy.RESULTS: The caco-2 cell ferritin formation was significantly increased (P < 0.001) with FeSO4 (19.3±9.8 ng/mg protein) and pea ferritin (13.9 ± 6.19 ng/mg protein) compared to the blank digest (3.7 ± 1.8 ng/mg protein). Ascorbic acid enhanced while phytic acid decreased the pea ferritin iron bioavailability. However,either in the presence or absence of ascorbic acid, the ferritin content of caco-2 cells was significantly less with pea ferritin than with FeSO4. At gastric pH, no band corresponding to ferritin was observed in the presence of pepsin either on native PAGE or SDS-PAGE. Gel filtration chromatography and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed a pH dependent loss of quaternary and secondary structure.CONCLUSION: Under gastric conditions, the iron core of pea ferritin is released into the digestive medium due to acid induced structural alterations and dissociation of protein. The released iron interacts with dietary factors leading to modulation of pea ferritin iron bioavailability,resembling the typical characteristics of non-heme iron.

  16. Direct Iron Coating onto Nd-Fe-B Powder by Thermal Decomposition of Iron Pentacarbonyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamuro, S; Okano, M; Tanaka, T [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Sumiyama, K [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nozawa, N; Nishiuchi, T; Hirosawa, S [Magnetic Materials Research Laboratory, NEOMAX Company, Hitachi Metals, Ltd., Osaka 618-0013 (Japan); Ohkubo, T, E-mail: yamamuro@eng.ehime-u.ac.jp [Magnetic Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    Iron-coated Nd-Fe-B composite powder was prepared by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl in an inert organic solvent in the presence of alkylamine. Though this method is based on a modified solution-phase process to synthesize highly size-controlled iron nanoparticles, it is in turn featured by a suppressed formation of iron nanoparticles to achieve an efficient iron coating solely onto the surfaces of rare-earth magnet powder. The Nd-Fe-B magnetic powder was successfully coated by iron shells whose thicknesses were of the order of submicrometer to micrometer, being tuneable by the amount of initially loaded iron pentacarbonyl in a reaction flask. The amount of the coated iron reached to more than 10 wt.% of the initial Nd-Fe-B magnetic powder, which is practically sufficient to fabricate Nd-Fe-B/{alpha}-Fe nanocomposite permanent magnets.

  17. HYBASE : HYperspectral BAnd SElection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Seijen, H.H. van

    2009-01-01

    Band selection is essential in the design of multispectral sensor systems. This paper describes the TNO hyperspectral band selection tool HYBASE. It calculates the optimum band positions given the number of bands and the width of the spectral bands. HYBASE is used to assess the minimum number of spe

  18. Study of clustering point defects under irradiation in dilute iron alloys; Etude de la formation sous irradiation des amas de defauts ponctuels dans les alliages ferritiques faiblement allies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duong-Hardouin Duparc, T.H.A

    1998-12-31

    In low copper steels for nuclear reactor pressure vessel, point defect clustering plays an important role in hardening. These clusters are very small and invisible by transmission electron microscopy. In order to study the hardening component which results from the clustering of freely migrating point defects, we irradiated in a high voltage electron microscope Fe, the FeCu{sub 0.13%}, FeP{sub 0.015%} and FeN{sub 33ppm} alloys and the complex FeMn{sub 1.5%}Ni{sub 0.8%}Cu{sub 0.13%}P{sub 0.01%} alloy the composition of which is close to the matrix of pressure vessel steel. We studied the nucleation of dislocation loops and their growth velocity. The observations and the analyses have shown that in the complex model alloy, the interstitial dislocation loops are smaller and their density is more important than for the others alloys. The diffusion coefficients of interstitials and vacancies are obtained with the help of a simplified model. The densities of dislocation loops and their growth velocities obtained experimentally are reproduced by means of a cluster dynamics model we have developed. This is achieved self-consistently by using as a first trial the approximated coefficients obtained with the simplified model. The results of calculations have shown that the binding energy of di-interstitials must be very important in the binary iron alloys and only 0.95 eV in iron. Copper, nitrogen and phosphorus stabilize di-interstitials in iron. Finally the distribution of interstitial loops at 290 deg C and at 2.10{sup -9} dpa/s is calculated with the diffusion coefficient of point defects adjusted in FeCu. A distribution of small loops appears which gives an increase of hardening estimated to 10 Hv instead of 33 Hv experimentally observed. This low value can be improved by assuming in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations that a little fraction of di-interstitials is created at 2.5 MeV. (author) 111 refs.

  19. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron ...

  20. NUMERICAL EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SOFT-MELTING PROPERTIES ON THE KINETIC OF (CAFE2 O4 -CA2 FE2 O5 FORMATION IN THE IRON ORE SINTERING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Adilson de Castro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model able to predict the influence of soft-melting properties of the blend of raw materials used in the iron ore sintering process in the kinetic formation of calcium ferrite and di-calcium ferrite constituents. The model is based on the simultaneous solution of transport equations of Momentum, energy and chemical species in multiphase multicomponent systems coupled with the chemical reactions kinetics and phase transformations that occur within the sinter bed. The numerical solution is obtained using the finite volume method and the model is validated using monitoring data from an industrial scale sintering plant. After validation, the model was used to predict processing conditions using raw materials with different soft-melting properties. Results indicate that the temperatures of starting soft-melting, shrinkage and melting range are the main parameters to be controlled in order to attain liquid phases formation responsible to confer good mechanical and reducibility properties for the sinter product. In this study was found that raw materials with high soft-melting temperature and wilder temperature of mushy zone could decrease up to 30% the calcium ferrites formation and hence deteriorates the metallurgical properties of the sinter.

  1. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  2. Recent advances in iron metabolism and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara; Strati, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    Iron is essential for life, because it is indispensable for several biological reactions such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis and cell proliferation, but is toxic if present in excess since it causes cellular damage through free radical formation. Either cellular or systemic iron regulation can be disrupted in disorders of iron metabolism. In the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has dramatically changed. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged and the role of iron has started to be recognized as a cofactor of other disorders. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory-iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited for a more effective treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders.

  3. Missing Fe: hydrogenated iron nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Bilalbegovic, G; Mohacek-Grosev, V

    2016-01-01

    Although it was found that the FeH lines exist in the spectra of some stars, none of the spectral features in the ISM have been assigned to this molecule. We suggest that iron atoms interact with hydrogen and produce Fe-H nanoparticles which sometimes contain many H atoms. We calculate infrared spectra of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles using density functional theory methods and find broad, overlapping bands. Desorption of H2 could induce spinning of these small Fe-H dust grains. Some of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles posses magnetic and electric moments and should interact with electromagnetic fields in the ISM. Fe_nH_m nanoparticles could contribute to the polarization of the ISM and the anomalous microwave emission. We discuss the conditions required to form FeH and Fe_nH_m in the ISM.

  4. Missing Fe: hydrogenated iron nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilalbegović, G.; Maksimović, A.; Mohaček-Grošev, V.

    2017-03-01

    Although it was found that the FeH lines exist in the spectra of some stars, none of the spectral features in the interstellar medium (ISM) have been assigned to this molecule. We suggest that iron atoms interact with hydrogen and produce Fe-H nanoparticles which sometimes contain many H atoms. We calculate infrared spectra of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles using density functional theory methods and find broad, overlapping bands. Desorption of H2 could induce spinning of these small Fe-H dust grains. Some of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles possess magnetic and electric moments and should interact with electromagnetic fields in the ISM. FenHm nanoparticles could contribute to the polarization of the ISM and the anomalous microwave emission. We discuss the conditions required to form FeH and FenHm in the ISM.

  5. Spin excitations in hole-overdoped iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigane, K.; Kihou, K.; Fujita, K.; Kajimoto, R.; Ikeuchi, K.; Ji, S.; Akimitsu, J.; Lee, C. H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the overall features of magnetic excitation is essential for clarifying the mechanism of Cooper pair formation in iron-based superconductors. In particular, clarifying the relationship between magnetism and superconductivity is a central challenge because magnetism may play a key role in their exotic superconductivity. BaFe2As2 is one of ideal systems for such investigation because its superconductivity can be induced in several ways, allowing a comparative examination. Here we report a study on the spin fluctuations of the hole-overdoped iron-based superconductors Ba1-xKxFe2As2 (x = 0.5 and 1.0; Tc = 36 K and 3.4 K, respectively) over the entire Brillouin zone using inelastic neutron scattering. We find that their spin spectra consist of spin wave and chimney-like dispersions. The chimney-like dispersion can be attributed to the itinerant character of magnetism. The band width of the spin wave-like dispersion is almost constant from the non-doped to optimum-doped region, which is followed by a large reduction in the overdoped region. This suggests that the superconductivity is suppressed by the reduction of magnetic exchange couplings, indicating a strong relationship between magnetism and superconductivity in iron-based superconductors. PMID:27615691

  6. Spin excitations in hole-overdoped iron-based superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigane, K; Kihou, K; Fujita, K; Kajimoto, R; Ikeuchi, K; Ji, S; Akimitsu, J; Lee, C H

    2016-09-12

    Understanding the overall features of magnetic excitation is essential for clarifying the mechanism of Cooper pair formation in iron-based superconductors. In particular, clarifying the relationship between magnetism and superconductivity is a central challenge because magnetism may play a key role in their exotic superconductivity. BaFe2As2 is one of ideal systems for such investigation because its superconductivity can be induced in several ways, allowing a comparative examination. Here we report a study on the spin fluctuations of the hole-overdoped iron-based superconductors Ba1-xKxFe2As2 (x = 0.5 and 1.0; Tc = 36 K and 3.4 K, respectively) over the entire Brillouin zone using inelastic neutron scattering. We find that their spin spectra consist of spin wave and chimney-like dispersions. The chimney-like dispersion can be attributed to the itinerant character of magnetism. The band width of the spin wave-like dispersion is almost constant from the non-doped to optimum-doped region, which is followed by a large reduction in the overdoped region. This suggests that the superconductivity is suppressed by the reduction of magnetic exchange couplings, indicating a strong relationship between magnetism and superconductivity in iron-based superconductors.

  7. Defect Studies in bcc and fcc Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Ghorai, A.; Arjun Das

    2012-01-01

    Variation of vacancy formation energy (EF1v) with rc of Ashcroft's empty core model potential (AECMP) model for different exchange and correlation functions (ECFs) show almost independent nature but slight variation with ECF for both bcc α iron and fcc γ iron.

  8. The evaluation of iron deficiency and anemia in male blood donors with other related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefinejad Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Background: Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide and blood donation may cause iron depletion. Limited studies with large sample size have been done on male donors. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among male donors in the Kurdistan Organization of Blood Transfusion in Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was 1184 blood donors selected by systematic random sampling. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron banding capacity (TIBC and transferin saturation were measured in donors. Iron depletion, lack of iron stores, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and anemia were evaluated among them. Data was analyzed with SPSS software and X΂, one-way ANOVA, and LSD test. Results: Iron deficiency, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, iron depletion and lack of iron resources were seen in 2.3, 4.08, 2.14, 22.76 and 4.66 percent respectively. There was a significant relationship of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia with instances of donation and interval from last donation (P < 0.05. A significant relationship was seen between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among blood donors with more than ten times blood donation (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study showed regular male donors require especial attention. Therefore, serum ferritin is recommended as a more adequate index to use for iron deficiency screening and planning purposes for iron supplementation among them.

  9. Role of citrate and phosphate anions in the mechanism of iron(III) sequestration by ferric binding protein: kinetic studies of the formation of the holoprotein of wild-type FbpA and its engineered mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Katherine D; Gabricević, Mario; Anderson, Damon S; Adhikari, Pratima; Mietzner, Timothy A; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2010-07-27

    Ferric binding protein A (FbpA) plays a central role in the iron acquisition processes of pathogenic Neisseria gonorrheae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. FbpA functions as an iron shuttle within the periplasmic space of these Gram-negative human pathogens. Iron is picked up by FbpA at the periplasmic aspect of the outer membrane with concomitant acquisition of a synergistic anion. Here we report the kinetics and mechanisms involved with loading of iron(III) into iron-free FbpA using iron(III) citrate as an iron source in the presence of excess citrate or phosphate (physiologically available anions) at pH 6.5. In the presence of excess phosphate, iron(III) citrate loads into apo-FbpA in three kinetically distinguishable steps, while in the presence of excess citrate, only two steps are discernible. A stable intermediate containing iron(III) citrate-bound FbpA is observed in each case. The observation of an additional kinetic step and moderate increase in apparent rate constants suggests an active role for phosphate in the iron insertion process. To further elucidate a mechanism for iron loading, we report on the sequestration kinetics of iron(III) citrate in the presence of phosphate with binding site mutant apo-FbpAs, H9E, E57D, E57Q, Q58A, Y195F, and Y196H. Tyrosine mutations drastically alter the kinetics and hamper iron sequestration ability. H9E, E57D, and E57Q have near native iron sequestration behavior; however, iron binding rates are altered, enabling assignment of sequential side chain interactions. Additionally, this investigation elaborates on the function of FbpA as a carrier for iron chelates as well as "naked" or free iron as originally proposed.

  10. Chunky graphite formation in small section ductile iron castings; Formacion de grafito chunky en piezas de pequeno espesor fabricadas utilizando fundicion de hierro con grafito esferoidal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asenjo, I.; Larranaga, P.; Sertucha, J.

    2011-07-01

    Chunky graphite is a degenerated graphite form which can be found in the thermal centre of ductile iron heavy section castings. Previous studies made on cubic blocks (300 and 180 mm in side) manufactured using alloys with fully ferritic matrix structures show that low cooling rates, excessive post-inoculation and high silicon and/or cerium contents in the melts are the most important factors that promote this kind of defect. The enhancement of these critical factors led to obtain chunky graphite in sections lower than 50 mm. Different experimental conditions have been used in order to establish the main parameters that affect this graphite malformation. The use of cutting-edge techniques in the analysis of chemical compositions has revealed that no significant differences can be found when comparing chunky areas and well-formed spheroidal graphite areas. On the other hand, it has not been possible to establish any correlation between the oxygen contents and the scale of the defect. However, it is noteworthy that the oxygen content is related to the use of magnesium or cerium as nodulized agent. (Author) 23 refs.

  11. Synthesis of core-shell iron nanoparticles from decomposition of Fe-Sn nanocomposite and studies on their microwave absorption properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Vatsana; Patra, Manoj K.; Shukla, Anuj; Saini, Lokesh; Songara, Sandhya; Jani, Rajkumar; Vadera, Sampat R.; Kumar, Narendra, E-mail: nkjainjd@yahoo.com [Defence Laboratory (India)

    2012-12-15

    Core-shell iron nanoparticles have been synthesized by pyrolysis of nanocomposite of oxides of iron-tin (Fe-Sn). The core-shell nanoparticles of phase pure iron in carbonaceous shell are formed only at very low concentration of tin (0.0011 mol) in the nanocomposite sample. From different studies viz. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, it has been established that core-shell nanostructures have been formed with Fe as core and amorphous carbon as the shell. The heating of nanocomposite at different temperatures up to 900 Degree-Sign C revealed very interesting dynamics of formation of core-shell structure wherein above 650 Degree-Sign C the iron carbide phase decomposes and carbon atoms move out to form an amorphous shell around iron nanoparticles. This process of formation of core-shell structures is quite different from conventional way wherein synthesis of core material precedes formation of shell in two different steps. The microwave absorption properties of core-shell nanoparticles have been studied by making their composites in nitrile butadiene rubber. Reflection loss simulation studies show high values in the X and Ku bands of microwave region. The frequency of maximum return loss can be tuned through variation of composition and thickness of composite layer.

  12. Iron isotope fractionation during microbial dissimilatory iron oxide reduction in simulated Archaean seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percak-Dennett, E M; Beard, B L; Xu, H; Konishi, H; Johnson, C M; Roden, E E

    2011-05-01

    The largest Fe isotope excursion yet measured in marine sedimentary rocks occurs in shales, carbonates, and banded iron formations of Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic age. The results of field and laboratory studies suggest a potential role for microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in producing this excursion. However, most experimental studies of Fe isotope fractionation during DIR have been conducted in simple geochemical systems, using pure Fe(III) oxide substrates that are not direct analogues to phases likely to have been present in Precambrian marine environments. In this study, Fe isotope fractionation was investigated during microbial reduction of an amorphous Fe(III) oxide-silica coprecipitate in anoxic, high-silica, low-sulphate artificial Archaean seawater at 30 °C to determine if such conditions alter the extent of reduction or isotopic fractionations relative to those observed in simple systems. The Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate was highly reducible (c. 80% reduction) in the presence of excess acetate. The coprecipitate did not undergo phase conversion (e.g. to green rust, magnetite or siderite) during reduction. Iron isotope fractionations suggest that rapid and near-complete isotope exchange took place among all Fe(II) and Fe(III) components, in contrast to previous work on goethite and hematite, where exchange was limited to the outer few atom layers of the substrate. Large quantities of low-δ(56)Fe Fe(II) (aqueous and solid phase) were produced during reduction of the Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate. These findings shed new light on DIR as a mechanism for producing Fe isotope variations observed in Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic marine sedimentary rocks.

  13. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including th...

  14. Iron ore pollution in Mandovi and Zuari estuarine sediments and its fate after mining ban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessarkar, Pratima M; Suja, S; Sudheesh, V; Srivastava, Shubh; Rao, V Purnachandra

    2015-09-01

    Iron ore was mined from the banded iron formations of Goa, India, and transported through the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries for six decades until the ban on mining from September 2012. Here we focus on the environmental magnetic properties of sediments from the catchment area, upstream and downstream of these estuaries, and adjacent shelf during peak mining time. Magnetic susceptibility (χ lf) and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) values of sediments were highest in upstream (catchment area and estuaries), decreased gradually towards downstream (catchment area and estuaries), and were lowest on the adjacent shelf. The χ lf values of the Mandovi estuary were two to fourfold higher than those in the Zuari. The sediments of these two estuaries after the mining ban showed enrichment of older magnetite and sharp decrease in the SIRM values. Although the input of ore material has been reduced after mining ban, more flushing of estuarine sediments is required for healthier environment.

  15. Orbital magnetic moment and extrinsic spin Hall effect for iron impurities in gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shick, Alexander B.; Kolorenč, Jindřich; Janiš, Václav; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.

    2011-09-01

    We report electronic structure calculations of an iron impurity in a gold host. The spin, orbital, and dipole magnetic moments were investigated using the local density approximation (LDA) + U correlated band theory. We show that the around-mean-field LDA + U reproduces the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experimental data well and does not lead to the formation of a large orbital moment on the Fe atom. Furthermore, exact diagonalization of the multiorbital Anderson impurity model with the full Coulomb interaction matrix and the spin-orbit coupling is performed in order to estimate the spin Hall angle. The obtained value γS≈0.025 suggests that there is no giant extrinsic spin Hall effect due to scattering on iron impurities in gold.

  16. Electrochemical and spectroscopie behaviour of iron in the molten NaCl-K2SO4 mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Niels; Petruchina, Irina; Volkov, S.V.

    1996-01-01

    mainly of FeS and FeO. Iron in the dissolved state is most probably in the form of [Fe(II)(SO4)3CL3](7-), a mixed-ligand complex of quasi-octahedral type.In the case of electrochemical dissolution iron oxidizes stepwise, first to Fe(II) and then to Fe(III). This process is reversible, and the Fe......(III) is reduced via Fe(II) and then to the metal. The electrode process as a whole may be represented as follows:Fe(+2e) (-2e)Fe(II)(+e) (-e)Fe(III)Formation of insoluble particles (probably Fe3O4) in the melt is observed. Iron is in the melt as a mixed octahedral bivalent iron sulfate-chloride complex. We did...... not detect Fe(III) by electronic absorption spectra, possibly due to the superimposition of the charge transfer bands edge on low-intensity Fe(III) bands of the 5d electronic configuration. The solubility of Fe2O3 in the NaCl-K2SO4 melt is low and was determined to 2 x 10(-3) wt%....

  17. Transdermal iron replenishment therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modepalli, Naresh; Shivakumar, H N; Kanni, K L Paranjothy; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the major nutritional deficiency disorders. Iron deficiency anemia occurs due to decreased absorption of iron from diet, chronic blood loss and other associated diseases. The importance of iron and deleterious effects of iron deficiency anemia are discussed briefly in this review followed by the transdermal approaches to deliver iron. Transdermal delivery of iron would be able to overcome the side effects associated with conventional oral and parenteral iron therapy and improves the patient compliance. During preliminary investigations, ferric pyrophosphate and iron dextran were selected as iron sources for transdermal delivery. Different biophysical techniques were explored to assess their efficiency in delivering iron across the skin, and in vivo studies were carried out using anemic rat model. Transdermal iron delivery is a promising approach that could make a huge positive impact on patients suffering with iron deficiency.

  18. Iron and iron derived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Gutzwiller theory of band magnetism in LaOFeAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schickling, Tobias; Gebhard, Florian [Fachbereich Physik, Philipps Universitaet, D-35037 Marburg (Germany); Buenemann, Joerg [Institut fuer Physik, BTU Cottbus, D-03013 Cottbus (Germany); Boeri, Lilia; Andersen, Ole K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Weber, Werner [Fakultaet Physik, TU Dortmund, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    For the iron pnictide LaOFeAs we investigate multi-band Hubbard models which are assumed to capture the relevant physics. In our calculations, we employ the Gutzwiller variational theory which is a genuine many particle approach. We will present results both on the paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of our model systems. These results show that a five band-model is not adequate to capture the relevant physics in LaOFeAs. However, our results for the eight band-model which includes the arsenic 4p bands reproduce the experimental data, especially the small magnetic moment, for a broad parameter regime.

  20. Al2O3 Scale Development on Iron Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Thaidigsmann, Katja; Ager, Joel; Hou, Peggy Y.

    2005-11-10

    The structure and phase of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale that forms on an Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy (Fe-28Al-5Cr) (at %) was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). Oxidation was performed at 900 C and 1000 C for up to 190 min. TEM revealed that single-layer scales were formed after short oxidation times. Electron diffraction was used to show that the scales are composed of nanoscale crystallites of the {theta}, {gamma}, and {alpha} phases of alumina. Band-like structure was observed extending along three 120{sup o}-separated directions within the surface plane. Textured {theta} and {gamma} grains were the main components of the bands, while mixed {alpha} and transient phases were found between the bands. Extended oxidation produced a double-layered scale structure, with a continuous {alpha} layer at the scale/alloy interface, and a {gamma}/{theta} layer at the gas surface. The mechanism for the formation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales on iron aluminide alloys is discussed and compared to that for nickel aluminide alloys.

  1. A new model of the formation of Pennsylvanian iron carbonate concretions hosting exceptional soft-bodied fossils in Mazon Creek, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotroneo, S; Schiffbauer, J D; McCoy, V E; Wortmann, U G; Darroch, S A F; Peng, Y; Laflamme, M

    2016-11-01

    Preservation of Pennsylvanian-aged (307 Ma) soft-bodied fossils from Mazon Creek, Illinois, USA, is attributed to the formation of siderite concretions, which encapsulate the remains of terrestrial, freshwater, and marine flora and fauna. The narrow range of positive δ(34) S values from pyrite in individual concretions suggests microenvironmentally limited ambient sulfate, which may have been rapidly exhausted by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Tissue of the decaying carcass was rapidly encased by early diagenetic pyrite and siderite produced within the sulfate reduction and methanogenic zones of the sediment, with continuation of the latter resulting in concretion cementation. Cross-sectional isotopic analyses (δ(13) C and δ(18) O) and mineralogical characterization of the concretions point to initiation of preservation in high porosity proto-concretions during the early phases of microbially induced decay. The proto-concretion was cemented prior to compaction of the sediments by siderite as a result of methanogenic production of (13) C-rich bicarbonate-which varies both between Essex and Braidwood concretions and between fossiliferous and unfossiliferous concretions. This work provides the first detailed geochemical study of the Mazon Creek siderite concretions and identifies the range of conditions allowing for exceptional soft-tissue fossil formation as seen at Mazon Creek.

  2. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized inside highly ordered mesoporous silica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Bhaumik; S Samanta; N K Mal

    2005-11-01

    Nanosized iron oxide, a moderately large band-gap semiconductor and an essential component of optoelectrical and magnetic devices, has been prepared successfully inside the restricted internal pores of mesoporous silica material through in-situ reduction during impregnation. The samples were characterized by powder XRD, TEM, SEM/EDS, N2 adsorption, FT-IR and UV–visible spectroscopies. Characterization data indicated well-dispersed isolated nanoclusters of (Fe2O3),` within the internal surface of 2D-hexagonal mesoporous silica structure. No occluded Fe/Fe2O3 crystallites were observed at the external surface of the mesoporous silica nanocomposites. Inorganic mesoporous host, such as hydrophilic silica in the pore walls, directs a physical constraint necessary to prevent the creation of large Fe2O3 agglomerates and enables the formation of nanosized Fe2O3 particles inside the mesopore.

  3. Iron overload in very low birth weight infants: Serum Ferritin and adverse outcomes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barrett, M

    2011-11-01

    Adequate iron isessential for growth and haematpoiesis. Oral iron supplementation is the standard of care in VLBW infants. Post mortem evidence has confirmed significant iron overload. Excessive free iron has been associated with free radical formation and brain injury in term infants.

  4. Sulfide-iron interactions in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Lens, P.N.L.; Vollertsen, J.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between iron and sulfide in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer were investigated with particular emphasis on redox cycling of iron and iron sulfide formation. The concentration ranges of iron and total sulfide in the experiments were 0.4-5.4 mg Fe L-1 and 0-5.1 mg S L-1, respectiv

  5. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  6. Oxygen fugacity determined from iron oxidation state in natural (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase: new insights for lower mantle diamond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, M.; McCammon, C.; Bulanova, G.; Kaminsky, F. V.; Tappert, R.

    2009-12-01

    The most common mineral found in diamonds originating in the lower mantle is (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase (more than 50 percent of occurrences). Since it is well known that the Fe3+ concentration in (Mg,Fe)O is sensitive to oxygen fugacity, even at high pressures, the determination of Fe3+ over Fe total in such inclusions provides a direct method for investigating lower mantle redox conditions during diamond formation. Therefore, the goal of this study is to measure Fe3+ using a new method, namely the flank method (EMPA) in (Mg,Fe)O lower mantle diamond inclusions from a wide range of sites worldwide in order to explore the variation of oxygen fugacity with chemical, physical and geographic parameters. Eighteen (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase inclusions from ultra deep diamonds selected worldwide (four from Juina area, Brazil, two from Machado River, Brazil, and twelve from Ororoo, Australia) were analyzed by the flank method. Inclusions were all less than 50 microns in size. Our results follow the theoretical trend described by the synthetic samples, confirming high phase homogeneity for most of the samples. Flank method measurements show a large range of redox conditions for (Mg,Fe)O inclusions, with a Fe3+ over Fe total ratio varying between 1 and 15 percent, similar to results for a suite of much larger diameter inclusions that were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy. Inclusions recovered from the same host diamond show a strong redox gradient, which leads to the conclusion of varying oxygen fugacity conditions involved in the formation of the inclusions. These observations combined with the geographical correlation observed among all inclusions measured in the present work and from previous studies in literature leads to the suggestion of other mechanisms than subducted slabs being involved in diamond formation. In order to provide insights on the mechanisms controlling the redox conditions at lower mantle depths and how a heterogeneous oxygen fugacity may affect the

  7. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...

  8. Labile iron potentiates ascorbate-dependent reduction and mobilization of ferritin iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badu-Boateng, Charles; Pardalaki, Sofia; Wolf, Claude; Lajnef, Sonia; Peyrot, Fabienne; Naftalin, Richard J

    2017-03-21

    Ascorbate mobilizes iron from equine spleen ferritin by two separate processes. Ascorbate alone mobilizes ferritin iron with an apparent Km (ascorbate) ≈1.5mM. Labile iron >2μM, complexed with citrate (10mM), synergises ascorbate-dependent iron mobilization by decreasing the apparent Km (ascorbate) to ≈270μM and raising maximal mobilization rate by ≈5-fold. Catalase reduces the apparent Km(ascorbate) for both ascorbate and ascorbate+iron dependent mobilization by ≈80%. Iron mobilization by ascorbate alone has a higher activation energy (Ea=45.0±5.5kJ/mole) than when mediated by ascorbate with labile iron (10μM) (Ea=13.7±2.2kJ/mole); also mobilization by iron-ascorbate has a three-fold higher pH sensitivity (pH range 6.0-8.0) than with ascorbate alone. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits ascorbate's iron mobilizing action. EPR and autochemiluminescence studies show that ascorbate and labile iron within ferritin enhances radical formation, whereas ascorbate alone produces negligible radicals. These findings suggest that iron catalysed single electron transfer reactions from ascorbate, involving ascorbate or superoxide and possibly ferroxidase tyrosine radicals, accelerate iron mobilization from the ferroxidase centre more than EPR silent, bi-dentate two-electron transfers. These differing modes of electron transference from ascorbate mirror the known mono and bidentate oxidation reactions of dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide with di-ferrous iron at the ferroxidase centre. This study implies that labile iron, at physiological pH, complexed with citrate, synergises iron mobilization from ferritin by ascorbate (50-4000μM). This autocatalytic process can exacerbate oxidative stress in ferritin-containing inflamed tissue.

  9. Abrasive wear behaviour of as cast and austempered ductile irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baydogan, M.; Koekden, M.U.; Cimenoglu, H. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science Engineering Istanbul (Turkey)

    2000-07-01

    In this study, abrasive wear behaviour of as cast and austempered GGG 50 and GGG 80 quality ductile irons was investigated. In the as cast condition, GGG 50 and GGG 80 quality ductile irons were having ferritic and pearlitic matrix structures, respectively. Austempering at 250 C after austenitisation at 900 C for 100 minutes produced bainitic matrix structure in both of the investigated ductile irons. Abrasive wear tests performed by rubbing the as cast and austempered specimens on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} abrasive bands, revealed that austempering treatment improves abrasion resistance about 10-70% depending on the abrasive particle size and composition of the base iron. In the as cast condition, pearlitic GGG 80 grade ductile iron, has higher wear resistance than ferritic GGG 50 grade ductile iron. In the austempered condition GGG 50 and GGG 80 grade ductile irons which have bainitic matrix structure, exhibit almost similar wear resistance. (orig.)

  10. Influence of copper in spheres of iron and aluminum oxide; Influencia do cobre nas propriedades texturais e estruturais de esferas de oxido de ferro e aluminio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, A.F. de; Gomes, E.C.C.; Valentini, A.; Longhinotti, E., E-mail: adfrsou@hotmail.co [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica; Sales, F.A.M. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2010-07-01

    The various applications of mesoporous materials in adsorption and catalysis have driven research for new synthetic routes to improve the structural and morphological characteristics of the compounds currently available. Spherical mesoporous materials of aluminum oxide and / or iron were synthesized in proportions of 10.30 and 50%, and then impregnated with copper oxide by wet impregnation method. Supporters of spherical iron oxide and aluminum before and after impregnation with copper were characterized by XRD, SEM, chemical analysis, BET and TPR. The analysis results of XRD showed the formation of crystalline phases AB{sub 2}O{sub 4} type, the results of TPR showed a shift of the band of iron reduction with the incorporation of copper and the samples indicated a decrease in porosity, possibly due to the closure of pores with the addition of copper. (author)

  11. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extra iron in their diets. People following a vegetarian diet might also need additional iron. What's Iron ... as Whole Milk? About Anemia Minerals What's a Vegetarian? Word! Anemia Anemia Food Labels Vitamins and Minerals ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  13. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  15. Key parameters for low-grade fine-grained iron ore valorization: lower environmental impact through reduced waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christiane; Orberger, Beate; Tudryn, Alina; Baptiste, Benoît; Wirth, Richard; Morgan, Rachel; Miska, Serge

    2016-04-01

    In low-grade banded iron formations (BIFs), a large part of the iron is related to micro- and nano- metric iron-bearing inclusions within quartz and/or carbonates, mainly dolomite (~ 20 to 50 μm). Low-grade fine grained iron ore present two types of environmental risks: a) they are often stocked as tailings. For example, the recent disaster (5th of November 2015) in the Minas Gerais district, Brazil, was caused by the collapse of the Fundão tailings dam at an open cast mine; b) during beneficiation significant amounts of dust are generated also leading to metal loss. A laminated BIF studied from a drill core at Àguas Claras Mine, Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil, contains 26.71 wt. % total iron, 0.2 wt. % SiO2, 0.32 wt.% MnO, 15.46 wt. % MgO, 22.32 wt.% CaO, 0.09 wt. % P2O5, risk factors.

  16. Iron Supplements and Magnesium Peroxide: An Example of a Hazardous Combination in Self-Medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrolijk, Misha F; Opperhuizen, Antoon; Jansen, Eugène H J M; Bast, Aalt; Haenen, Guido R M M

    2016-10-01

    The use of self-medication, which includes dietary supplements and over-the-counter drugs, is still on the rise, while safety issues are not well addressed yet. This especially holds for combinations. For example, iron supplements and magnesium peroxide both produce adverse effects via the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This prompted us to investigate the effect of the combination of three different iron supplements with magnesium peroxide on ROS formation. Hydroxyl radical formation by the three iron supplements either combined with magnesium peroxide or alone was determined by performing a deoxyribose assay. Free iron content of iron supplements was determined using ferrozine assay. To determine hydrogen peroxide formation by magnesium peroxide, a ferrous thiocyanate assay was performed. Finally, electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was performed to confirm the formation of hydroxyl radicals. Our results show that magnesium peroxide induces the formation of hydrogen peroxide. All three iron supplements induced the formation of the extremely reactive hydroxyl radical, although the amount of radicals formed by the different supplements differed. It was shown that combining iron supplements with magnesium peroxide increases radical formation. The formation of hydroxyl radicals after the combination was confirmed with ESR. All three iron supplements contained labile iron and induced the formation of hydroxyl radicals. Additionally, magnesium peroxide in water yields hydrogen peroxide, which is converted into hydroxyl radicals by iron. Hence, iron supplements and magnesium peroxide is a hazardous combination and exemplifies that more attention should be given to combinations of products used in self-medication.

  17. In-situ formation of barium ferrite in iron-doped 'tetragonal tungsten bronze': Elaboration of room temperature multiferroic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castel, E. [ICMCB-CNRS, 87 Avenue du Docteur Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac cedex (France); Josse, M. [ICMCB-CNRS, 87 Avenue du Docteur Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac cedex (France)], E-mail: josse@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr; Roulland, F.; Michau, D.; Raison, L.; Maglione, M. [ICMCB-CNRS, 87 Avenue du Docteur Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac cedex (France)

    2009-06-15

    Recent studies of ceramics of formula Ba{sub 2}LnFeNb{sub 4}O{sub 15} (Ln=rare earth) with the 'tetragonal tungsten bronze' (TTB) structure have correlated their room temperature multiferroics properties to the occurrence of barium ferrite parasitic phases. This work presents the elaboration of Ba{sub 2}LaFeNb{sub 4}O{sub 15} and Ba{sub 2}EuFeNb{sub 4}O{sub 15} composite samples with an excess of hematite in the TTB nominal composition. The influence of crystal-chemistry on the phase content and properties of Ba{sub 2}LnFeNb{sub 4}O{sub 15} TTB composites is discussed. A particular focus on the mechanisms related to the in-situ formation of barium ferrite is given. We show that we can control the spurious ferrite phase in TTB multiferroic composites and thus modulate their magnetic response.

  18. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.;

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory...

  19. The biogeochemical iron cycle and astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christian; Köhler, Inga; Muller, Francois L. L.; Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Kupenko, Ilya; Rüffer, Rudolf; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemistry investigates chemical cycles which influence or are influenced by biological activity. Astrobiology studies the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe. The biogeochemical Fe cycle has controlled major nutrient cycles such as the C cycle throughout geological time. Iron sulfide minerals may have provided energy and surfaces for the first pioneer organisms on Earth. Banded iron formations document the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. To assess the potential habitability of planets other than Earth one looks for water, an energy source and a C source. On Mars, for example, Fe minerals have provided evidence for the past presence of liquid water on its surface and would provide a viable energy source. Here we present Mössbauer spectroscopy investigations of Fe and C cycle interactions in both ancient and modern environments. Experiments to simulate the diagenesis of banded iron formations indicate that the formation of ferrous minerals depends on the amount of biomass buried with ferric precursors rather than on the atmospheric composition at the time of deposition. Mössbauer spectra further reveal the mutual stabilisation of Fe-organic matter complexes against mineral transformation and decay of organic matter into CO2. This corresponds to observations of a `rusty carbon sink' in modern sediments. The stabilisation of Fe-organic matter complexes may also aid transport of particulate Fe in the water column while having an adverse effect on the bioavailability of Fe. In the modern oxic ocean, Fe is insoluble and particulate Fe represents an important source. Collecting that particulate Fe yields small sample sizes that would pose a challenge for conventional Mössbauer experiments. We demonstrate that the unique properties of the beam used in synchrotron-based Mössbauer applications can be utilized for studying such samples effectively. Reactive Fe species often occur in amorphous or nanoparticulate form in the environment and

  20. Oxygen fugacities determined from iron oxidation state in natural (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase: new insights into lower mantle diamond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Micaela; McCammon, Catherine; Bulanova, Galina; Kaminsky, Felix; Tappert, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Mineral inclusions in diamonds reflect the chemical composition and mineral assemblages of the two principal rock types occurring in the deep lithosphere, peridotite and eclogite. However, in the past two decades, the discovery of rare diamonds containing inclusions such as former Mg,Si-perovskite and (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase led to the possibility that diamonds can form also at greater depths. (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase is the most commonly found inclusion in lower mantle diamonds (more than 50% of the occurrences). Since the Fe3+ concentration in (Mg,Fe)O is sensitive to oxygen fugacity also at high pressures (Frost et al., 2004), the determination of Fe3+/Σ Fe in such inclusions provides a direct method for investigating lower mantle redox conditions during diamond formation. In the present study we explore whether variations in mantle oxygen fugacity exist as a function of chemical, physical and geographic parameters, by studying (Mg,Fe)O inclusions in lower mantle diamonds from a wide range of localities. Eighteen (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase inclusions from lower mantle diamonds selected worldwide were measured by the flank method using the calibration previously established for synthetic ferropericlase (Longo et al., in preparation). The Fe3+/Σ Fe measured in (Mg,Fe)O inclusions of the present work (Juina, Brazil, Machado River, Brazil and Orroroo, Australia) were compared to data already available for other inclusions of larger size previously measured by Mössbauer spectroscopy (McCammon et al. 1997, 2004). Oxygen fugacity was estimated for each specimen relative to two reference buffers such as the Fe-(Mg,Fe)O buffer (reducing conditions) and the Re-ReO2 buffer (oxidizing conditions). Our results show a dependence on geographical location, and in particular, inclusions from the African province (Kankan Guinea) seem to record more reducing mantle conditions than the inclusions measured from the other provinces, which cover a larger range of fO2 conditions. It is

  1. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  2. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  3. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  4. Liver iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ross M Graham; Anita CG Chua; Carly E Herbison; John K Olynyk; Debbie Trinder

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in iron metabolism. It is the major storage site for iron and also expresses a complex range of molecules which are involved in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis. An increasing number of genes associated with hepatic iron transport or regulation have been identified. These include transferrin receptors (TFR1 and 2), a ferrireductase (STEAP3), the transporters divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) as well as the haemochromatosis protein, HFE and haemojuvelin (HJV),which are signalling molecules. Many of these genes also participate in iron regulatory pathways which focus on the hepatic peptide hepcidin. However, we are still only beginning to understand the complex interactions between liver iron transport and iron homeostasis. This review outlines our current knowledge of molecules of iron metabolism and their roles in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis.

  5. Magnetic characterization of iron oxides formed after thermal treatment of nontronite and the formation of three polymorphs of Fe2O3: α-Fe2O3, γ-Fe2O3, ɛ-Fe2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berquo, T. S.; Moskowitz, B. M.

    2011-12-01

    Nontronite is an Fe-rich smectite clay that occurs widely in terrestrial soils, sediments and weathering formations and may also be present in the Martian regolith. The thermal decomposition of nontronite is known to form various magnetic iron oxides but their compositions, magnetic properties, and formation pathways remain poorly understood. The magnetic alteration products of nontronite have been proposed as a source for the magnetic phases in the surface layers and dust on Mars as well as in some archeological fired-bricks and ceramic pottery. One alteration product of nontronite is ɛ-Fe2O3 which is ferrimagnetic with a Curie temperature of ~ 500 K and extremely large coercivity (HC ~ 1-2 T) at 300 K. In this work nontronite samples from eight source localities were heated to 1000°C in air for one hour. The magnetic properties of the alteration products were investigated with low-temperature (LT) magnetization and AC susceptibility curves, hysteresis loops, Mossbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The thermal treatment was effective in converting the nontronite to a combination of different polymorphs of ferric oxide depending on source locality and included: hematite (α-Fe2O3), ɛ-Fe2O3, and a cubic spinel phase that suggest the presence of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). Mossbauer spectra at 300 K identified hematite and ɛ-Fe2O3 as the main phases in 7 samples with amounts ranging from 26-100% for hematite 0-69% for ɛ-Fe2O3. One sample showed a paramagnetic Fe3+ doublet and a broad sextet characteristic of magnetic relaxation effects. Upon cooling to 4.2 K, the Mossbauer spectrum was consistent with maghemite. In all samples except one, the magnetic hyperfine fields for the hematite phase are slightly reduced as compared with its stoichiometric form indicating some iron substitution with ions such as Al. This is consistent with the observation that all but one sample lacked the characteristic Morin transition for pure hematite on LT-remanence warming curves

  6. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course......We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...

  7. Shear bands in magnesium alloy AZ31

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨平; 毛卫民; 任学平; 唐全波

    2004-01-01

    During deformation of magnesium at low temperatures, cracks always develop at shear bands. The origin of the shear bands is the {101-1} twinning in basal-oriented grains and the mobility of this type of twin boundary is rather low. The most frequent deformation mechanisms in magnesium at low temperature are basal slip and {1012} twinning, all leading to the basal texture and therefore the formation of shear bands with subsequent fracture. The investigation on the influences of initial textures and grain sizes reveals that a strong prismatic initial texture of parallels to TD and fine grains of less than 5 μm can restrict the formation and expansion of shear bands effectively and therefore improve the mechanical properties and formability of magnesium.

  8. Significant Reduction in NiO Band Gap Upon Formation of LixNi1-xO alloys: Applications To Solar Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alidoust, Nima; Toroker, Maytal Caspary; Keith, John A.; Carter, Emily A.

    2013-11-21

    Long-term sustainable solar energy conversion relies on identifying economical and versatile semiconductor materials with appropriate band structures for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications (e.g., band gaps of ~1.5–2.0 eV). Nickel oxide (NiO) is an inexpensive yet highly promising candidate. Its charge-transfer character may lead to longer carrier lifetimes needed for higher efficiencies, and its conduction band edge is suitable for driving hydrogen evolution via water-splitting. However, NiO’s large band gap (~4 eV) severely limits its use in practical applications. Our first-principles quantum mechanics calculations show band gaps dramatically decrease to ~2.0 eV when NiO is alloyed with Li2O. In this paper, we show that LixNi1-xO alloys (with x=0.125 and 0.25) are p-type semiconductors, contain states with no impurity levels in the gap and maintain NiO’s desirable charge-transfer character. Lastly, we show that the alloys have potential for photoelectrochemical applications, with band edges well-placed for photocatalytic hydrogen production and CO2 reduction, as well as in tandem dye-sensitized solar cells as a photocathode.

  9. Iron Homeostasis in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Gozzelino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is required for the survival of most organisms, including bacteria, plants, and humans. Its homeostasis in mammals must be fine-tuned to avoid iron deficiency with a reduced oxygen transport and diminished activity of Fe-dependent enzymes, and also iron excess that may catalyze the formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, oxidative stress, and programmed cell death. The advance in understanding the main players and mechanisms involved in iron regulation significantly improved since the discovery of genes responsible for hemochromatosis, the IRE/IRPs machinery, and the hepcidin-ferroportin axis. This review provides an update on the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular and systemic Fe homeostasis and their roles in pathophysiologic conditions that involve alterations of iron metabolism, and provides novel therapeutic strategies to prevent the deleterious effect of its deficiency/overload.

  10. Room-temperature synthesis of iron-doped anatase TiO₂ for lithium-ion batteries and photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriamiadamanana, Christian; Laberty-Robert, Christel; Sougrati, Moulay T; Casale, Sandra; Davoisne, Carine; Patra, Snehangshu; Sauvage, Frédéric

    2014-10-06

    Iron-doped nanocrystalline particles of anatase TiO2 (denoted x% Fe-TiO2, with x the nominal [Fe] atom % in solution) have been successfully synthesized at room temperature by a controlled two-step process. Hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide is first achieved to precipitate Ti(OH)4 species. A fine control of the pH allows one to maintain (i) soluble iron species and (ii) a sluggish solubility of Ti(OH)4 to promote a dissolution and condensation of titanium clusters incorporating iron, leading to the precipitation of iron-doped anatase TiO2. The pH does then influence both the nature and crystallinity of the final phase. After 2 months of aging at pH = 2, well-dispersed nanocrystalline iron-doped TiO2 particles have been achieved, leading to 5-6 nm particle size and offering a high surface area of ca. 280 m(2)/g. This dissolution/recrystallization process allows the incorporation of a dopant concentration of up to 7.7 atom %; the successful incorporation of iron in the structure is demonstrated by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. This entails optical-band-gap narrowing from 3.05 to 2.30 eV. The pros and cons effects of doping on the electrochemical properties of TiO2 versus lithium are herein discussed. We reveal that doping improves the power rate capability of the electrode but, in turn, deserves the electrolyte stability, leading to early formation of SEI. Finally, we highlight a beneficial effect of low iron introduction into the anatase lattice for photocatalytic applications under standard AM1.5G visible-light illumination.

  11. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  12. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  13. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  14. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  15. Iron stress in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary

    2002-07-30

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches

  16. Iron stress in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Erin L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches.

  17. Iron deficiency in heart failure: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Nicole; von Haehling, Stephan

    2013-09-23

    Iron is an element necessary for cells due to its capacity of transporting oxygen and electrons. One of the important co-morbidities in heart failure is iron deficiency. Iron has relevant biological functions, for example, the formation of haemoglobin, myoglobin and numerous enzymatic groups. The prevalence of iron deficiency increases with the severity of heart failure. For a long time, the influence of iron deficiency was underestimated especially in terms of worsening of cardiovascular diseases and of developing anaemia. In recent years, studies with intravenous iron agents in patients with iron deficiency and cardiovascular diseases indicated new insights in the improvement of therapy. Experimental studies support the understanding of iron metabolism. Many physicians remain doubtful of the use of intravenous iron due to reports of side effects. The aim of this review is to describe iron metabolism in humans, to highlight the influence of iron deficiency on the course and symptoms of heart failure, discuss diagnostic tools of iron deficiency and provide guidance on the use of intravenous iron.

  18. Iron Deficiency in Heart Failure: A Practical Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Ebner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an element necessary for cells due to its capacity of transporting oxygen and electrons. One of the important co-morbidities in heart failure is iron deficiency. Iron has relevant biological functions, for example, the formation of haemoglobin, myoglobin and numerous enzymatic groups. The prevalence of iron deficiency increases with the severity of heart failure. For a long time, the influence of iron deficiency was underestimated especially in terms of worsening of cardiovascular diseases and of developing anaemia. In recent years, studies with intravenous iron agents in patients with iron deficiency and cardiovascular diseases indicated new insights in the improvement of therapy. Experimental studies support the understanding of iron metabolism. Many physicians remain doubtful of the use of intravenous iron due to reports of side effects. The aim of this review is to describe iron metabolism in humans, to highlight the influence of iron deficiency on the course and symptoms of heart failure, discuss diagnostic tools of iron deficiency and provide guidance on the use of intravenous iron.

  19. Urinary iron excretion test in iron deficiency anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura,Ikuro

    1980-02-01

    Full Text Available A urinary iron excretion test was carried out in 22 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The iron excretion index was significantly higher in patients with intractable iron deficiency anemia compared with normal subjects and anemic patients who were responsive to iron therapy. The findings suggest that iron excretion may be a factor that modulates the response of patients to iron therapy.

  20. La fracturation et les bandes de déformation dans la région d’El Kohol (Atlas saharien central, Algérie: analyse fractale, lois d’échelles et modèle de réseaux de fractures discrètes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zazoun, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is focused on the study of natural fractures and deformation bands in El Kohol structure, located in the Djebel Amour in the Central Saharan Atlas, Algeria. The field observations and measurements were performed through two localities on the forelimb and two others on the backlimb of the structure. The outcrop study has shown the existence of five fracture sets and three deformation bands sets. The spacing and length distribution models of the different fractures sets obey to a power law. The mechanical layer thickness analysis for the whole formations shows the existence of twelve mechanical units with a stratabound control. The deformation bands show an increasing in their numbers, and a decreasing in their spacing when they approach the major faults. The fractal analysis of faults and fractures, as well as the deformation bands show a fractal character of 2D dimension. A good correlation coefficients is obtained from the comparison between the density and the intensity parameters (Pxy calculated from the discrete fracture network (DFN modelling, and those from the outcrops. The model developed is discussed related to deformation events recognized in the area.[fr] Ce travail porte sur l’étude de la fracturation naturelle et les bandes de déformation dans la structure plicative d’El Kohol, du le Djebel Amour, dans l’Atlas saharien central. Les observations et les mesures ont été effectuées à travers deux stations sur le flanc court ou avant de la structure, et deux stations sur le flanc long ou arrière. L’étude a montré l’existence de cinq familles de fractures et de trois familles de bandes de déformation. Les modèles de distribution des espacements et des longueurs des différentes familles de fractures obéit à une loi de type puissance. L’analyse mécanostratigraphique montre une subdivision des formations étudiées en douze unités mécaniques. Les bandes de déformation montrent une

  1. Oxygen toxicity in Streptococcus mutans: manganese, iron and superoxide dismutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.E.; Strachan, R.C.; Aranha, H.; Evans, S.L.; Salin, M.L.; Welch, B.; Arceneaux, J.E.L.; Byers, B.R.

    1984-07-01

    When cultured anaerobically in a chemically defined medium that was treated with Chelex-100 to lower its trace metal content, Streptococcus mutans OMZ176 had no apparent requirement for manganese or iron. Manganese or iron was necessary for aerobic cultivation in deep static cultures. During continuous aerobic cultivation in a stirred chemostat, iron did not support the growth rate achieved with manganese. Since the dissolved oxygen level in the chemostat cultures was higher than the final level in the static cultures, manganese may be required for growth at elevated levels. In medium supplemented with manganese, cells grown anaerobically contained a low level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity; aerobic cultivation increased SOD activity at least threefold. In iron-supplemented medium, cells grown anaerobically also had low SOD activity; aerobic incubation resulted in little increase in SOD activity. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the cell extracts revealed a major band and a minor band of SOD activity in the cells grown with manganese; however, cells grown with iron contained a single band of SOD activity with an R/sub f/ value similar to that of the major band found in cells grown with manganese. None of the SOD activity bands were abolished by the inclusion of 2 mM hydrogen peroxide in the SOD activity strain. S. mutans may not produce a separate iron-containing SOD but may insert either iron or manganese into an apo-SOD protein. Alternatively, iron may function in another activity (not SOD) that augments the defense against oxygen toxicity at low SOD levels. 28 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  2. Gutzwiller theory of band magnetism in LaOFeAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schickling, Tobias; Gebhard, Florian; Bünemann, Jörg; Boeri, Lilia; Andersen, Ole K; Weber, Werner

    2012-01-20

    We use the Gutzwiller variational theory to calculate the ground-state phase diagram and quasiparticle bands of LaOFeAs. The Fe3d-As4p Wannier-orbital basis obtained from density-functional theory defines the band part of our eight-band Hubbard model. The full atomic interaction between the electrons in the iron orbitals is parametrized by the Hubbard interaction U and an average Hund's-rule interaction J. We reproduce the experimentally observed small ordered magnetic moment over a large region of (U,J) parameter space. The magnetically ordered phase is a stripe spin-density wave of quasiparticles.

  3. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES. III. NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND MAGNESIUM LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergemann, Maria [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Gazak, Zach [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Davies, Ben [University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Plez, Bertrand, E-mail: bergemann@mpia-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: zgazak@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: bertrand.plez@univ-montp2.fr [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Université Montpellier 2, CNRS, F-34095 Montpellier (France)

    2015-05-10

    Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) calculations for Mg i in red supergiant stellar atmospheres are presented to investigate the importance of NLTE for the formation of Mg i lines in the NIR J-band. Recent work using medium resolution spectroscopy of atomic lines in the J-band of individual red supergiant stars has demonstrated this technique is a very promising tool for investigating the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star forming galaxies. As in previous work, where NLTE effects were studied for iron, titanium, and silicon, substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger Mg i absorption lines. For the quantitative spectral analysis the NLTE effects lead to magnesium abundances significantly smaller than in local thermodynamic equilibrium with the NLTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between −0.4 dex and −0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 and 4400 K. We discuss the physical reasons of the NLTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies using individual red supergiants in the young massive galactic double cluster h and χ Persei.

  4. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric C-b

  5. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  6. Progressive Band Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kevin; Chang, Chein-I

    2009-01-01

    Progressive band selection (PBS) reduces spectral redundancy without significant loss of information, thereby reducing hyperspectral image data volume and processing time. Used onboard a spacecraft, it can also reduce image downlink time. PBS prioritizes an image's spectral bands according to priority scores that measure their significance to a specific application. Then it uses one of three methods to select an appropriate number of the most useful bands. Key challenges for PBS include selecting an appropriate criterion to generate band priority scores, and determining how many bands should be retained in the reduced image. The image's Virtual Dimensionality (VD), once computed, is a reasonable estimate of the latter. We describe the major design details of PBS and test PBS in a land classification experiment.

  7. Magnetic separation of algae genetically modified for increased intracellular iron uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Amy [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Moore, Lee R. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lane, Christopher D.; Kumar, Anil; Stroff, Clayton; White, Nicolas [Phycal Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Xue, Wei; Chalmers, Jeffrey J. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Zborowski, Maciej, E-mail: zborowm@ccf.org [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Algae were investigated in the past as a potential source of biofuel and other useful chemical derivatives. Magnetic separation of algae by iron oxide nanoparticle binding to cells has been proposed by others for dewatering of cellular mass prior to lipid extraction. We have investigated feasibility of magnetic separation based on the presence of natural iron stores in the cell, such as the ferritin in Auxenochlorella protothecoides (A. protothecoides) strains. The A. protothecoides cell constructs were tested for inserted genes and for increased intracellular iron concentration by inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption (ICP–AA). They were grown in Sueoka’s modified high salt media with added vitamin B1 and increasing concentration of soluble iron compound (FeCl{sub 3} EDTA, from 1× to 8× compared to baseline). The cell magnetic separation conditions were tested using a thin rectangular flow channel pressed against interpolar gaps of a permanent magnet forming a separation system of a well-defined fluid flow and magnetic fringing field geometry (up to 2.2 T and 1000 T/m) dubbed “magnetic deposition microscopy”, or MDM. The presence of magnetic cells in suspension was detected by formation of characteristic deposition bands at the edges of the magnet interpolar gaps, amenable to optical scanning and microscopic examination. The results demonstrated increasing cellular Fe uptake with increasing Fe concentration in the culture media in wild type strain and in selected genetically-modified constructs, leading to magnetic separation without magnetic particle binding. The throughput in this study is not sufficient for an economical scale harvest. - Highlights: • Auxenochlorella protothecoides algae were genetically modified for biofuel production. • Algal iron metabolism was sufficient for their label-less magnetic separation. • High magnetic field and low flow required make the separation scale-up uneconomical.

  8. The mutual co-regulation of extracellular polymeric substances and iron ions in biocorrosion of cast iron pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Juntao; Guan, Yuntao

    2014-10-01

    New insights into the biocorrosion process may be gained through understanding of the interaction between extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and iron. Herein, the effect of iron ions on the formati