WorldWideScience

Sample records for banded iron formations

  1. Chemostratigraphy of Neoproterozoic Banded Iron Formation (BIF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaucher, Claudio; Sial, Alcides N.; Frei, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Neoproterozoic banded iron formations (BIFs) are not restricted to the middle Cryogenian, c. 715 Ma glaciation, occurring in Tonian, Cryogenian, and Ediacaran successions. Many Neoproterozoic BIFs were deposited in glacially influenced settings, such as the Rapitan Group (Canada), Jacadigo Group (W...... study of BIFs include rare earth element distribution, especially Eu and Ce normalized concentrations, iron speciation, and Nd and Cr isotopes (δ53Cr). Whereas Rapitan type BIFs exhibit no Eu or Ce anomalies, the Algoma-type Neoproterozoic BIFs show both. Positive δ53Cr values characterize glacially...

  2. Geochemistry of some banded iron-formations of the archean supracrustals, Jharkhand–Orissa region, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H N Bhattacharya; Indranil Chakraborty; Kaushik K Ghosh

    2007-06-01

    Banded iron-formations (BIF) form an important part of the Archean supracrustal belts of the Jharkhand–Orissa region, India. Major, trace and REE chemistry of the banded iron-formation of the Gandhamardan, Deo Nala, Gorumahisani and Noamundi sections of the Jharkhand–Orissa region are utilized to explore the source of metals and to address the thermal regime of the basin floor and the redox conditions of the archean sea. Hydrothermal fluids of variable temperatures might have contributed the major part of the Fe and other trace elements to the studied banded iron-formations. Diagenetic fluids from the sea floor sediments and river water might have played a subdued role in supplying the Fe and other elements for the banded iron-formations.

  3. Raman Spectroscopic Characterisation of Australian Banded Iron Formation and Iron Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, M. A.; Ramanaidou, E. R.

    2012-04-01

    In Australia and world-wide over the past 5-10 years, declining reserves of premium, high-grade (>64% Fe), low-P bearing iron ore, have seen iron ore producers increase their utilisation of lower Fe-grade, higher P/Al/Si ore. In Australia, the channel iron deposits (CID), bedded iron deposits (BID) and, more recently, BIF-derived magnetite iron deposits (MID) have seen increased usage driven mainly by the increased demand from Chinese steel mills (Ramanaidou and Wells, 2011). Efficient exploitation and processing of these lower-grade iron ores requires a detailed understanding of their iron oxide and gangue mineralogy and geochemistry. The common Fe-bearing minerals (e.g., hematite, magnetite, goethite and kenomagnetite) in these deposits, as well as gangue minerals such as quartz and carbonates, are all strongly Raman active (e.g., de Faria et al., 1997). Their distinct Raman spectra enable them to be easily detected and mapped in situ in either unprepared material or samples prepared as polished blocks. In this paper, using representative examples of Australian CID ore, martite-goethite bedded iron deposit (BID) ore and banded iron formation (BIF) examined as polished blocks, we present a range of Raman spectra of the key iron ore minerals, and discuss how Raman spectroscopy can be applied to characterising iron ore mineralogy. Raman imaging micrographs, obtained using a StreamLine Plus Raman imaging system, clearly identified the main Fe-oxide and gangue components in the CID, BID and BIF samples when compared to optical micrographs. Raman analysis enabled the unequivocal identification of diamond in the CID ore as a contaminant from the polishing paste used to prepare the sample, and confirmed the presence of hematite in the BID ore in the form of martite, which can be morphologically similar to magnetite and, thus, difficult to otherwise distinguish. Image analysis of Raman mineral maps could be used to quantify mineral abundance based on the number of 'pixels

  4. Mineralogy and geochemistry of banded iron formation and iron ores from eastern India with implications on their genesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subrata Roy; A S Venkatesh

    2009-12-01

    The geological complexities of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Jilling–Langalata iron ore deposits, Singhbhum–North Orissa Craton, belonging to Iron Ore Group (IOG) eastern India have been studied in detail along with the geochemical evaluation of different iron ores. The geochemical and mineralogical characterization suggests that the massive, hard laminated, soft laminated ore and blue dust had a genetic lineage from BIFs aided with certain input from hydrothermal activity. The PAAS normalized REE pattern of Jilling BIF striking positive Eu anomaly, resembling those of modern hydrothermal solutions from mid-oceanic ridge (MOR). Major part of the iron could have been added to the bottom sea water by hydrothermal solutions derived from hydrothermally active anoxic marine environments. The ubiquitous presence of intercalated tuffaceous shales indicates the volcanic signature in BIF. Mineralogical studies reveal that magnetite was the principal iron oxide mineral, whose depositional history is preserved in BHJ, where it remains in the form of martite and the platy hematite is mainly the product of martite. The different types of iron ores are intricately related with the BHJ. Removal of silica from BIF and successive precipitation of iron by hydrothermal fluids of possible meteoric origin resulted in the formation of martite-goethite ore. The hard laminated ore has been formed in the second phase of supergene processes, where the deep burial upgrades the hydrous iron oxides to hematite. The massive ore is syngenetic in origin with BHJ. Soft laminated ores and biscuity ores were formed where further precipitation of iron was partial or absent.

  5. Magnetite: What it reveals about the origin of the banded iron formations. [Abstract only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, D. E.; Mancinelli, R. L.; White, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetite, Fe3O4 is produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, magnetite is a late magmatic mineral and forms as a consequence of the cooling of iron rich magma. Biotically, magnetite is produced by several organisms, including magnetotactic bacteria. Hematite, Fe2O3, is also produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, hematite rarely occurs as a primary mineral in igneous rocks, but is common as an alteration product, fumarole deposit, and in some metamorphosed Fe-rich rocks. Biotically, hematite is produced by several types of microorganisms. Biologically-produced magnetite and hematite are formed under the control of the host organism, and consequently, have characteristics not found in abiotically produced magnetite and hematite crystals. To determine if the magnetite and hematite in the Banded Iron Formation was biologically or abiotically produced, the characteristics of biologically-produced magnetite and hematite (concentrated from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum) and abiotically-produced magnetite and hematite obtained from Wards Scientific Supply Company, were compared with characteristics of magnetite and hematite concentrated from the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation (Ontario, Canada) using thermal and crystallographic analytical techniques. Whole rock analysis of the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) revealed the presence of quartz, hematite, siderite and dolomite as the major minerals, and magnetite, greenalite, pyrite, pyrrhotite and apatite as the minor minerals. Analysis of a crude magnetic fraction of the Gunflint showed the minerals quartz, hematite, siderite, dolomite, and magnetite. Analysis of the crude magnetic fraction from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum revealed organic compounds plus hematite and magnetite. The mineral identification and particle size distribution data obtained from the DTA along with XRD data indicate that the magnetite and hematite from the Gunflint

  6. Origin of iron oxide spherules in the banded iron formation of the Bababudan Group, Dharwar Craton, Southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orberger, Beate; Wagner, Christiane; Wirth, Richard; Quirico, Eric; Gallien, Jean Paul; Derré, Colette; Montagnac, Gilles; Noret, Aurélie; Jayananda, Mudlappa; Massault, Marc; Rouchon, Virgile

    2012-06-01

    The banded iron formation of the Bababudan Group (Western Dharwar Craton, India) is composed of millimetric to centimetric alternating quartz and grey to red Fe-oxide bands. Major phases are quartz and martite (hematized magnetite) with minor Fe-sulfides and Ca-Mg-Fe-carbonates. Micrometric Fe-oxide spherules fill cavities in discontinuous micrometric layers of Fe-oxides that occur in the massive quartz layers and at the interface of massive Fe-oxide and quartz layers. The spherules are composed of micrometric radial plates of hematite intergrown with nanometric magnetite. These spherules contain carbonaceous matter (CM) with nanometric Fe-particles and have low N contents (˜900 ppm; CM1). The spherule formation is attributed to a low temperature hydrothermal process (150-200 °C) at around 2.52 Ga, possibly favored by the presence of CM. These hydrothermal fluids dissolved diagenetic interstitial sulfides or carbonates creating cavities which, provided space for the spherule precipitation. Carbonaceous matter of semi-anthracite maturity is encapsulated in quartz grains adjacent to the Fe-oxide spherules (CM2) and it is thus concluded that CM1 and CM2 are most likely contemporaneous and of the same origin, either incorporated at the time of BIF formation or during the hydrothermal event at 2.52 Ga from the underlying phyllitised black shales. Carbonaceous matter (CM3) was also found around the Fe-oxide spherules and the martite grains. CM3 has much higher N contents (>5000 ppm), is of a lower maturity than CM1 and CM2, and is related to weathering, which is also indicated by the presence of goethite and kaolinite. The δ13C of all CMs varies from -19.4 to -24.7‰, similar to values measured in the underlying phyllitised black shales and likely reflect denitrifying microbial activity.

  7. Petrology and geochemistry of the ~2.9 Ga Itilliarsuk banded iron formation and associated supracrustal rocks, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Rasmus; Frei, Robert; Stendal, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    Here we present new field, petrographic and geochemical data from the ∼2.9 Ga Itilliarsuk banded iron formation (BIF) and associated lithologies within the Itilliarsuk supracrustal belt, south-eastern Nussuuaq, West Greenland. The supracrustals represent a volcanic–sedimentary sequence, which res...

  8. Biomarkers in Archaean banded iron formations : examples from Pilbara and Dhawar Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orberger, B.; Pinti, D. L.; Cloquet, C.; Hashizume, K.; Soyama, H.; Jayananda, M.; Wirth, R.; Gallien, J. P.; Massault, M.; Rouchon, V.

    The origin of Archeaen banded iron formations (BIF) and the role of biosphere in Fe precipitation is still highly debated. In order to elucidate these processes, detailed mineralogical and textural analyses combined with δ 15 N, δ 56 Fe and δ 13 C data were obtained on Fe-oxide bands from Marble Bar chert Unit (MB, 3.46 Ga, Pilbara craton, W. Australia) and a BIF from the Bababudan Group (BG, 2.7-2.9 Ga, Dhawar Craton, Southern India). Both samples are composed of alternating quartz and Feoxide bands with wavy micro-textures. CI-normalized REE patterns show that MB reflects hydrothermal fluid/basalt interactions, while BG precipitated from a hydrothermal fluid/seawater mixture. In MB, nano-cristalline hematite replaced magnetite, Mgcalcite and Fe-sulfides producing a matlike surface, preserving nanometric N-bearing amorphous carbon nodules. Measured C/N ratios (2.3 to 52) are typical of Precambrian organic matter. The δ 56 Fe of -0.40±0.02% suggests MOR-hydrothermal fluids as a Fe-source, while a δ 15 N of +7.4±0.4% is compatible with nitrification- denitrification processes and δ 13 C of -19.9±0.1% support an organic origin. BG is composed of intergrown magnetite and hematite. Disseminated grunerite and magnetite grew during low T metamorphism. Fe-oxide spherules compose vermicular- filaments that nucleated perpendicular to quartz surfaces. Fe-oxide spherule bunches are perfectly preserved in the silica bands forming micrometric mats, which contain heterogeneously distributed N (˜0.09at.%) and C (0.51 at.%, C/N=5.73). Bulk δ 13 C of -15.35%±0.10 points to an organic origin for C. The ?56 Fe in Fe and Si layers (0.75% to 2.16%) is compatible with a chemical precipitation for BIF. A negative correlation between ?56 Fe and the Th/U ratio suggests that Fe isotopic variations are related to fluid circulation and re-precipitation of Fe-oxides. High ?15 N, on one Feoxide layer, of +21.8±0.7%, corresponds to that observed for Archeaen BIFs and may be related

  9. ^(40)Ar/^(39)Ar constraints on the age and thermal history of the Urucum Neoproterozoic banded iron-formation, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Piacentini, Thiago; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Farley, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Urucum is one of the youngest banded iron-formations (BIFs) yet its exact age remains uncertain. ^(40)Ar/^(39)Ar geochronology on late-diagenetic to early metamorphic cryptomelane from the Urucum sequence reveals a minimum depositional age of 587 ± 7 Ma. Metamorphic braunite age spectra yield flat segments defining apparent ages of 547 ± 3 Ma to 513 ± 4 Ma, interpreted as recrystallization or cooling ages. Metamorphic muscovite grains from a meta-arkose interbedded with the BIF yield reproduc...

  10. Geology and geochemistry of the Macheng Algoma-type banded iron-formation, North China Craton: Constraints on mineralization events and genesis of high-grade iron ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huaying; Niu, Xianglong; Zhang, Lianchang; Pirajno, Franco; Luo, Huabao; Qin, Feng; Cui, Minli; Wang, Changle; Qi, Min

    2015-12-01

    The Macheng iron deposit is located in the eastern Hebei province of the North China Craton (NCC). It is hosted in Neoarchean metamorphic rocks of Baimiaozi formation in the Dantazi Group, consisting of biotite-leptynite, plagioclase-gneiss, plagioclase-amphibolite, migmatite, migmatitic granite and quartz schist. Geochemical analyses of the host biotite leptynite and plagioclase amphibolites show that their protoliths are both volcanics, inferred to be trachytic basalt and basaltic andesite, respectively. Based on the geochemical signature of the host rocks, together with geology of the iron deposit, it is inferred that the Macheng BIF is an Algoma-type iron exhalative formation, formed in an arc-related basin in the Neoarchean. Post-Archean Australian Shale (PAAS)-normalized rare earth elements (REEs) plus yttrium (Y) concentrations of different BIF ores with gneissic, striated and banded structure in the Macheng deposit, show similar patterns with depletions in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and middle rare earth elements (MREEs) relative to heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) and with apparently positive La, Y and Eu anomalies. Y/Ho ratios of the gneissic, striated and banded BIF ores vary from 37 to 56. These geochemical features of the BIF ores reveal their affinity with the sea water and the presence of a high-temperature hydrothermal component, indicating that both the seawater and high temperature hydrothermal fluids derived from alteration of oceanic basalts and komatiites may contribute to formation of the Macheng BIF. Geological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of the Macheng deposit recognized two kinds of high-grade iron ores. One is massive oxidized high-grade ore (Fe2O3T = 74.37-86.20 wt.%), mainly consisting of hematite with some magnetite, which shows geochemical characteristics of the gneissic, striated and banded BIF ores. The other type is magnetite high-grade ore, also massive and consisting of magnetite, with distinct characteristics

  11. Iron isotope and REE+Y composition of the Cauê banded iron formation and related iron ores of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Mônica; Lobato, Lydia M.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P.; Rosière, Carlos A.

    2016-04-01

    The Minas Supergroup banded iron formations (BIFs) of the Brazilian Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) mineral province experienced multiple deformational events synchronous with hypogene mineralization, which resulted in the metamorphism of BIFs to itabirites and their upgrade to high-grade iron ore. Here, we present rare earth element and yttrium (REE+Y) compositions together with iron isotope ratios of itabirites and their host iron orebodies from 10 iron deposits to constrain environmental conditions during BIF deposition and the effects of hypogene iron enrichment. The REE+Y characteristics of itabirites (positive Eu anomaly and LREE depletion) indicate hydrothermal iron contribution to the Minas basin. Iron isotope data and Ce anomalies suggest BIFs were precipitated by a combination of anoxic biological-mediated ferrous iron oxidation and abiotic oxidation in an environment with free oxygen (such as an oxygen oasis), perhaps related to increase in oxygen concentrations before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). The similarity of the REE+Y composition of the itabirites from the different QF deformational domains, as well as to other Superior-type BIFs, indicates that the metamorphism and synchronous hydrothermal mineralization did not significantly affect the geochemical signature of the original BIFs. However, iron isotope compositions of iron ore vary systematically between deformational domains of the QF, likely reflecting the specific mineralization features in each domain.

  12. Stratigraphic and tectonic settings of Proterozoic glaciogenic rocks and banded iron-formations: relevance to the snowball Earth debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Grant M.

    2002-11-01

    Among Palaeoproterozoic glacial deposits on four continents, the best preserved and documented are in the Huronian on the north shore of Lake Huron, Ontario, where three glaciogenic formations have been recognized. The youngest is the Gowganda Formation. The glacial deposits of the Gowganda Formation were deposited on a newly formed passive margin. To the west, on the south side of Lake Superior, the oldest Palaeoproterozoic succession (Chocolay Group) begins with glaciogenic diamictites that have been correlated with the Gowganda Formation. The >2.2 Ga passive margin succession (Chocolay Group=upper Huronian) is overlain, with profound unconformity, by a >1.88 Ga succession that includes the superior-type banded iron-formations (BIFs). The iron-formations are therefore not genetically associated with Palaeoproterozoic glaciation but were deposited ˜300 Ma later in a basin that formed as a result of closure of the "Huronian" ocean. In Western Australia, Palaeoproterozoic glaciogenic deposits of the Meteorite Bore Member appear to have formed part of a similar basin fill. The glaciogenic rocks are, however, separated from underlying BIF by a thick siliciclastic succession. In both North America and Western Australia, BIF-deposition took place in compressional (possibly foreland basin) settings but the iron-formations are of greatly different age, suggesting that the most significant control on their formation was not oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere but rather, emplacement of Fe-rich waters (uplifted as a result of ocean floor destruction?) in a siliciclastic-starved environment where oxidation (biogenic?) could take place. Some of the Australian BIFs appear to predate the appearance of red beds in North American Palaeoproterozoic successions and are therefore unlikely to be related to oxygenation of the atmosphere. Neoproterozoic glaciogenic deposits are widespread on the world's continents. Some are associated with iron-formations. Two theories have emerged

  13. Interpretation of high resolution aeromagnetic data for lineaments study and occurrence of Banded Iron Formation in Ogbomoso area, Southwestern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladunjoye, Michael Adeyinka; Olayinka, Abel Idowu; Alaba, Mustapha; Adabanija, Moruffdeen Adedapo

    2016-02-01

    The quest for solid mineral resource as an alternative for oil income in Nigeria presents opportunity to diversify the resource base of the country. To fill some information gap on the long abandoned Ajase and Gbede Banded Iron Formations (BIF) in Ogbomoso area, Southwestern Nigeria, high resolution aeromagnetic data of Ogbomoso - Sheet 222 was interpreted; to provide a better understanding of the mode of occurrence of the iron ore and associated structural features and geologic model. These were accomplished by subjecting reduced-to-pole (RTP) residual aeromagnetic intensity map to various data filtering and processing involving total horizontal derivative, vertical derivative, Upward Continuation (UC), Downward Continuation (DC), Euler Deconvolution at different Spectral Indices (SI), and Analytical signal using Geosoft Oasis Montaj 6.4.2 (HJ) data processing and analysis software. The resultants maps were overlain, compared and or plotted on RTP residual aeromagnetic intensity map and or geological map and interpreted in relation to the surface geological map. Positive magnetic anomalies observed on the RTP residual aeromagnetic intensity map ranged from 2.1 to 94.0 nT and associated with contrasting basement rocks, Ajase and Gbede BIF; while negative magnetic anomalies varied between -54.7 nT and -2.8 nT and are associated with intrusive bodies. Interpreted lineaments obtained from total horizontal derivative map were separated into two categories namely ductile and brittle based on their character vis-à-vis magnetic anomalies on RTP intensity map. Whilst the brittle lineaments were interpreted as fracture or faults; the ductile lineaments were interpreted as folds or representing the internal fabric of the rock units. In addition prominent magnetic faults mainly due to offset of similar magnetic domain/gradient were also interpreted. The iron ore mineralization is distributed within the eastern portion of the study area with Ajase BIF at relatively greater

  14. Generation of hydrothermal Fe-Si oxyhydroxide deposit on the Southwest Indian Ridge and its implication for the origin of ancient banded iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhilei; Li, Jun; Huang, Wei; Dong, Hailiang; Little, Crispin T. S.; Li, Jiwei

    2015-01-01

    hydrothermal Fe-Si oxyhydroxide deposits are now known to be analogues to ancient siliceous iron formations. In this study, samples of Fe-Si oxyhydroxide deposits were collected from hydrothermal field on the Southwest Indian Ridge. An investigation of mineralization in these deposits was carried out based on a series of mineralogical and morphological methods. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction analysis show that amorphous opal and poorly crystalline ferrihydrite are the major minerals. Furthermore, some typical filament structures detected by scanning electronic microscopy examinations, probably indicating the presence of Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), are pervasive with the main constituents being Fe, Si, P, and C. We thus believe that chemolithoautotrophic FeOB play a significant role in the formation of Fe oxyhydroxide which can effectively oxidize reduced Fe(II) sourced from hydrothermal fluids. Precipitation of amorphous silica, in contrast, is only a passive process with the Fe oxyhydroxide acting as a template. The distinct microlaminae structure alternating between the Fe-rich and Si-rich bands was observed in our samples for the first time in modern seafloor hydrothermal systems. We propose that its formation was due to the episodic temperature variation of the hydrothermal fluid which controls the biogenic Fe oxyhydroxide formation and passive precipitation of silica in this system. Our results might provide a clue for the formation mechanism of ancient banded iron formations.

  15. Early diagenetic quartz formation at a deep iron oxidation front in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific – A modern analogue for banded iron/chert formations?

    OpenAIRE

    Meister, Patrick; Chapligin, Bernhard; Picard, Aude; Meyer, Hanno; Fischer, Cornelius; Rettenwander, Daniel; Amthauer, Georg; Vogt, Christoph; Ivano W Aiello

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of early diagenetic quartz formation under low-temperature conditions are still poorly understood. In this study we investigated lithified cherts consisting of microcrystalline quartz recovered near the base of a 420 m thick Miocene–Holocene sequence of nannofossil and diatom ooze at a drill site in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (Ocean Drilling Program Site 1226). Precipitation seems still ongoing based on a sharp depletion in dissolved silica at the depth of the cherts. Also,...

  16. Development of Sintered Iron Driving Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Khanna

    1974-07-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation reports some detailed studies carried out on the development testing and proving of sintered Iron Driving Bands. Sintering studies on two different types of iron powders together with a few Fe-Cu compositions have been made and based on the results there of, parameters for development iron driving bands have been standardised. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that substitution of copper by sintered iron is highly practicable alternative.

  17. Petrological and geochemical features of the Jingtieshan banded iron formation (BIF): A unique type of BIF from the Northern Qilian Orogenic Belt, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Zuo-Heng; Duan, Shi-Gang; Zhao, Xin-Min

    2015-12-01

    The Jingtieshan banded iron formation (BIF) is located in the Northern Qilian Orogenic Belt (NQOB) in NW China. The BIFs are hosted in Mesoproterozoic Jingtieshan Group, a dominantly clastic-carbonate sedimentary formation, and was metamorphosed to lower greenschist facies. The Jingtieshan BIFs include oxide-, carbonate- and mixed carbonate-oxide facies, and consist of alternating iron-rich and silica-rich bands. The BIFs are composed essentially of specularite and jasper, with minor carbonate minerals and barite. The SiO2 + Fe2O3 content is markedly high in the oxide facies BIF, followed by FeO, CO2 and Ba, with the other elements usually lower than 1%, suggesting that the original chemical sediments were composed of Fe, Si, CO32- and Ba. The positive correlation between Al2O3, TiO2 and Zr in the BIFs indicates that these chemical sediments incorporate minor detrital components. Oxide facies BIF shows low HFSE, low ∑REE and low Y/Ho. The Post Archean Australian Shale-normalized REE patterns for Jingtieshan BIFs are characterized slight LREE depletion, strong positive Eu anomalies and lack of significant negative Ce anomalies. Siderite in the carbonate- and mixed carbonate-oxide facies BIF shows negative δ13C values varying from -8.4‰ to -3.0‰, and δ18O values show a range of -16.6‰ to -11.7‰. The geochemical signatures and carbon-oxygen isotopes suggest origin from high-temperature hydrothermal fluids with weak seawater signature for the sediments of Jingtieshan BIFs. The absence of negative Ce anomalies and the high Fe3+/∑Fe ratios of the oxide facies BIF do not support ocean anoxia. In contrast to the three main types (Algoma-, Superior- and Rapitan-type) of global BIFs, the Jingtieshan BIFs represent a unique type with features similar to those of sedimentary-exhalative mineralization.

  18. The Orosirian-Statherian banded iron formation-bearing sequences of the southern border of the Espinhaço Range, Southeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolim, Vassily Khoury; Rosière, Carlos A.; Santos, João Orestes Schneider; McNaughton, Neal J.

    2016-01-01

    The Serra da Serpentina and the Serra de São José groups are two distinct banded iron formation-bearing metasedimentary sequences along the eastern border of the southern Espinhaço Range that were deposited on the boundary between the Orosirian and Statherian periods. The Serra da Serpentina Group (SSG) has an Orosirian maximum depositional age (youngest detrital zircon grain age = 1990 ± 16 Ma) and consists of fine clastic metasediments at the base and chemical sediments, including banded iron formations (BIFs), on the top, corresponding to the Meloso and Serra do Sapo formations, respectively, and correlating with the pre-Espinhaço Costa Sena Group. The SSG represents sedimentary deposition on an epicontinental-epeiric, slow downwarping sag basin with little tectonic activity. The younger Serra de São José Group (SJG) is separated from the older SSG by an erosional unconformity and was deposited in a tectonically active continental rift-basin in the early stages of the opening of the Espinhaço Trough. The Serra do São José sediments stretch along the north-south axis of the rift and comprise a complete cycle of transgressive sedimentary deposits, which were subdivided, from base to top, into the Lapão, Itapanhoacanga, Jacém and Canjica formations. The Itapanhoacanga Formation has a maximum depositional age of 1666 ± 32 Ma (Statherian), which coincides with the maximum depositional age (i.e., 1683 ± 11 Ma) of the São João da Chapada Formation, one of the Espinhaço Supergroup's basal units. The Serra de São José Rift and the Espinhaço Rift likely represent the same system, with basal units that are facies variations of the same sequence. The supracrustal rocks have undergone two stages of deformation during the west-verging Brasiliano orogeny that affected the eastern margin of the São Francisco Craton and generated a regional-scale, foreland N-S trending fold-thrust belt, which partially involved the crystalline basement. Thrust faults have

  19. Melting in the FeOsbnd SiO2 system to deep lower-mantle pressures: Implications for subducted Banded Iron Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Chie; Hirose, Kei; Nomura, Ryuichi; Ballmer, Maxim D.; Miyake, Akira; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-04-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs), consisting of layers of iron oxide and silica, are far denser than normal mantle material and should have been subducted and sunk into the deep lower mantle. We performed melting experiments on Fe2SiO4 from 26 to 131 GPa in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC). The textural and chemical characterization of a sample recovered from the DAC revealed that SiO2 is the liquidus phase for the whole pressure range examined in this study. The chemical compositions of partial melts are very rich in FeO, indicating that the eutectic melt compositions in the FeOsbnd SiO2 binary system are very close to the FeO end-member. The eutectic temperature is estimated to be 3540 ± 150 K at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), which is likely to be lower than the temperature at the top of the core at least in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic eons, suggesting that subducted BIFs underwent partial melting in a thermal boundary layer above the CMB. The FeO-rich melts formed by partial melting of the BIFs were exceedingly dense and therefore migrated downward. We infer that such partial melts have caused iron enrichment in the bottom part of the mantle, which may have contributed to the formation of ultralow velocity zones (ULVZs) observed today. On the other hand, solid residues left after the segregation of the FeO-rich partial melts have been almost pure SiO2, and therefore buoyant in the deep lower mantle to be entrained in mantle upwellings. They have likely been stretched and folded repeatedly by mantle flow, forming SiO2 streaks within the mantle "marble cake". Mantle packages enhanced by SiO2 streaks may be the origin of seismic scatterers in the mid-lower mantle.

  20. Source heterogeneity for the major components of ~3.7 Ga banded iron formations (Isua Greenstone Belt, Western Greenland)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Robert; Polat, Ali

    2006-01-01

    protocrustal landmass (eNd(3.7 Ga)   + 1.6). The validity of two different and periodically interacting water masses (an essentially two-component mixing system) in the deposition of alternating iron- and silica-rich layers is also reflected by systematic trends in germanium (Ge)/silicon (Si) ratios. These...

  1. The reliability of ∼2.9 Ga old Witwatersrand banded iron formations (South Africa) as archives for Mesoarchean seawater: Evidence from REE and Nd isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehmann, Sebastian; Bau, Michael; Smith, Albertus J. B.; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Dantas, Elton L.; Bühn, Bernhard

    2015-11-01

    Pure marine chemical sediments, such as (Banded) Iron Formations, (B)IFs, are archives of geochemical proxies for the composition of Precambrian seawater and may provide information about the ancient hydrosphere-atmosphere system. We here present rare earths and yttrium (REY) and high precision Sm-Nd isotope data of ∼2.90 Ga old Superior-type BIFs from the Witwatersrand Supergroup, South Africa, and compare those with data for near-contemporaneous BIFs from the correlative Pongola Supergroup (Superior-type BIF) and from the Pietersburg Greenstone Belt (Algoma-type IF), respectively. All Witwatersrand samples studied display the typical general REY distribution of Archean seawater, but their REY anomalies are less pronounced and their immobile element concentrations are higher than those of other pure (B)IFs. These observations indicate the presence of significant amounts of detrital aluminosilicates in the Witwatersrand BIFs and question the reliability of the Contorted Bed and Water Tower BIFs (Parktown Formation, West Rand Group) as archives of Mesoarchean seawater. Significant post-depositional alteration of the REY budget and the Sm-Nd isotope system is not observed. The Nd isotopic compositions of the purest BIF samples, i.e. the most reliable archives for Witwatersrand seawater, show initial εNd values between -3.95 and -2.25. This range is more negative than what is observed in ambient shales, indicating a decoupling of suspended and dissolved loads in the "near-shore" Witwatersrand Basin seawater. However, εNd range overlaps with that of the correlative Pongola BIF (Alexander et al., 2008). The deeper-water Algoma-type Pietersburg BIF shows more positive (i.e. more mantle-like) εNd2.9Ga values, supporting the hypothesis that a significant amount of its REY inventory was derived from black smoker-style, high-temperature hydrothermal fluids that had altered seafloor basalts. In marked contrast, the dissolved REY budgets (including the Nd isotopic

  2. Geochemical characteristics of gold bearing boninites and banded iron formations from Shimoga greenstone belt, India: Implications for gold genesis and hydrothermal processes in diverse tectonic settings

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ganguly, S.; Manikyamba, C.; Saha, A.; Lingadevaru, M.; Santosh, M.; Rambabu, S.; Khelen, A.C.; Purushotham, D.; Linga, D.

    added to this mixture and thoroughly shaken for complete homogenization. Care was taken to avoid lumping of flux. The mixture was transferred to a preheated and cooled graphite crucible and kept for fusion in preheated muffle furnace at 1050± 25 °C... for one hour. Themelt obtained after fu- sion was swirled and poured into an iron mould to which a thin oil film D A B SD %RSD 88 0.002 1 3.13 0.345 71 236.975 230 0.029 0.012 11 14.094 12 0.016 0.114 03 28.517 25 0.023 0.079 12 3.187 3 0.013 0.408 86 13...

  3. The F'derik-Zouerate iron district: Mesoarchean and Paleoproterozoic iron formation of the Tiris Complex, Islamic Republic of Mauritania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Finn, Carol A.; Anderson, Eric D.; Bradley, Dwight C.; Joud, Mohamed; Taleb Mohamed, Ahmed; Horton, John D.; Johnson, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade hematitic iron ores (of HIF, containing 60-65 wt%Fe) have been mined in Mauritania since 1952 from Superior-type iron deposits of the F'derik-Zouerate district.  Depletion of the high-grade ores in recent years has resulted in new exploration projects focused on lower-grade magnetite ores occurring in Algoma-type banded iron formation (of BIF, containing ca. 35 wt% Fe).  Mauritania is the seventeenth largest iron producer in the world and currently has about 1.1 Gt of crude iron ore reserves. 

  4. Iron and Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Gentile

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, responsible for infection outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this bacterium is mainly due to its multidrug-resistance and ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces, which facilitate long-term persistence in the hospital setting. Given the crucial role of iron in A. baumannii nutrition and pathogenicity, iron metabolism has been considered as a possible target for chelation-based antibacterial chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of iron restriction on A. baumannii growth and biofilm formation using different iron chelators and culture conditions. We report substantial inter-strain variability and growth medium-dependence for biofilm formation by A. baumannii isolates from veterinary and clinical sources. Neither planktonic nor biofilm growth of A. baumannii was affected by exogenous chelators. Biofilm formation was either stimulated by iron or not responsive to iron in the majority of isolates tested, indicating that iron starvation is not sensed as an overall biofilm-inducing stimulus by A. baumannii. The impressive iron withholding capacity of this bacterium should be taken into account for future development of chelation-based antimicrobial and anti-biofilm therapies.

  5. Iron and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Banin, Ehud; Vasil, Michael L.; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2005-01-01

    Iron serves as a signal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development. We examined the influence of mutations in known and putative iron acquisition-signaling genes on biofilm morphology. In iron-sufficient medium, mutants that cannot obtain iron through the high-affinity pyoverdine iron acquisition system form thin biofilms similar to those formed by the parent under low iron conditions. If an iron source for a different iron acquisition system is provided to a pyoverdine mutant, normal biof...

  6. An iron shuttle for deepwater silica in Late Archean and early Paleoproterozoic iron formation

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Woodward W.; Andrew H. Knoll

    2009-01-01

    Iron formations are typically thinly bedded or laminated sedimentary rocks containing 15% or more of iron and a large proportion of silica (commonly > 40%). In the ca. 2590-2460 Ma Campbellrand-Kuruman Complex, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa, iron formation occurs as a sediment-starved deepwater facies distal to carbonates and shales. Iron minerals, primarily siderite, define the lamination. The silica primarily occurs as thin beds and nodules of diagenetic chert (now microcrystalline qua...

  7. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact. PMID:17997209

  8. Formation of iron sulphide in solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Noting that the iron sulfide in the Orgueil carbonaceous meteorite is an Fe-deficient monosulfide (pyrrhotite), it is suggested that such mineral chemistry is inconsistent with equilibrium condensation of the solar nebula and that the course of condensation may have been modified by kinetic effects. The effect of Ni on the reaction between Fe and S to produce FeS is examined, and possible reasons are considered for the fact that the cited meteorite differs in both crystal structure and Ni content from the predictions of equilibrium condensation. It is proposed that sulfide formation in the solar nebula may have been inhibited by sluggish diffusion, so that sulfur began to react with previously condensed troilite to form pyrrhotite. On this basis, observations of the Orgueil sulfides are shown to suggest that the course of solar-system condensation was modified by kinetic effects below about 700 K and that equilibrium may not have been achieved.

  9. Formation of Degenerate Band Gaps in Layered Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey P. Vinogradov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the review, peculiarities of spectra of one-dimensional photonic crystals made of anisotropic and/or magnetooptic materials are considered. The attention is focused on band gaps of a special type—the so called degenerate band gaps which are degenerate with respect to polarization. Mechanisms of formation and properties of these band gaps are analyzed. Peculiarities of spectra of photonic crystals that arise due to the linkage between band gaps are discussed. Particularly, it is shown that formation of a frozen mode is caused by linkage between Brillouin and degenerate band gaps. Also, existence of the optical Borrmann effect at the boundaries of degenerate band gaps and optical Tamm states at the frequencies of degenerate band gaps are analyzed.

  10. Increasing the band gap of iron pyrite by alloying with oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Matthew; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yanning; Wu, Ruqian

    2013-03-01

    Systematic density functional theory studies and model analyses have been used to show that the band gap of iron pyrite (FeS2) can be increased from ~ 1.0 to 1.2 -1.3 eV by replacing ~ 10% of the sulfur atoms with oxygen atoms (i.e., ~ 10% OS impurities). OS formation is exothermic, and the oxygen atoms tend to avoid O-O dimerization, which favors the structural stability of homogeneous FeS2-xOx alloys and frustrates phase separation into FeS2 and iron oxides. With an ideal band gap, absence of OSinduced gap states, high optical absorptivity, and low electron effective mass, FeS2-xOx alloys are promising for the development of pyrite-based heterojunction solar cells that feature large photovoltages and high device efficiencies. Acknowledgement: We thank the NSF SOLAR Program (Award CHE-1035218) and the UCI School of Physical Sciences Center for Solar Energy for support of this work. Calculations were performed on parallel computers at NERSC and at NSF supercomputer centers.

  11. Iron deficiency anemia's effect on bone formation in zebrafish mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Lin; Liu, Zhichun; Zhong, Yingbin; Huang, Jian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Han; Xu, Youjia

    2016-07-01

    Iron is one of the essential elements of life. Iron metabolism is related to bone metabolism. Previous studies have confirmed that iron overload is a risk factor for osteoporosis. But the correlation between iron deficiency and bone metabolism remains unclear. Ferroportin 1 is identified as a cellular iron exporter and required for normal iron cycling. In zebrafish, the mutant of ferroportin 1 gene (fpn1), weh(tp85c) exhibited the defective iron transport, leading to developing severe hypochromic anemia. We used weh(tp85c) as a model for investigating iron deficiency and bone metabolism. In this study, we examined the morphology of the developing cartilage and vertebrae of the Weh(tp85) compared to the wild type siblings by staining the larvae with alcian blue for cartilage and alizarin red for the bone. In addition, we evaluated the expression patterns of the marker genes of bone development and cell signaling in bone formation. Our results showed that weh(tp85c) mutant larvae exhibited the defects in bone formation, revealing by decreases in the number of calcified vertebrae along with decreased expression of osteoblast novel genes: alpl, runx2a and col1a1a and BMPs signaling genes in osteoblast differentiation: bmp2a and bmp2b. Our data suggest that iron deficiency anemia affects bone formation, potentially through the BMPs signaling pathway in zebrafish. PMID:27184405

  12. A biological switch at the ocean surface as a cause of laminations in a Precambrian iron formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, K.; Pinti, D. L.; Orberger, B.; Cloquet, C.; Jayananda, M.; Soyama, H.

    2016-07-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) exhibit alternating silica- and iron-rich laminae, potentially reflecting the dynamics of the paleo-environments in which they were formed, although the exact mechanism remains unclear. Here the formation of a 2.7-2.9 Ga BIF from Dharwar Craton, India, is deciphered by analyzing the inter-band variations of the redox-sensitive isotope biomarkers, 15N/14N and 56Fe/54Fe. Organic matter with δ15N values as high as + 12.0 ± 0.8 ‰ appears to be trapped in silica. Iron oxides exhibit systematically positive δ56Fe values, ranging between + 0.80 ± 0.05 ‰ and + 1.67 ± 0.02 ‰. Compared to the iron-rich bands, silica-rich bands, which show higher δ56Fe values, exhibit an order of magnitude higher concentrations of 15N-rich organic nitrogen, normalized by the abundances of its host silica. The presence of 15N-rich organic matter may imply the emergence of a modern-like biological nitrogen cycle that requires the formation of oxidized nitrogen compounds. The higher concentration of 15N-rich organic nitrogen for the silica-rich bands possibly suggests that the photosynthetic activity was higher during the formation periods of these bands. The heavier iron isotope compositions of the silica-rich bands cannot be explained alone by iron oxidation through probable pathways. The relative 56Fe-enrichment in silica-rich bands is explained here by the progressive dissolution of iron oxides to the ocean, through iron reduction by 15N-rich organic matter actively produced at the ocean surface. The formation of iron-rich bands possibly corresponds to periods of reduced biological productivity, when precipitated iron was not effectively dissolved to the ocean. The observed shift in the organic concentration between Fe- and Si-rich bands could be the switch that triggered the BIF laminations. This shift could conceivably represent periodic fluctuations in the oxygen generation, which possibly occurred over periods of millennia, at the dawn of the

  13. Iron and Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Gentile; Emanuela Frangipani; Carlo Bonchi; Fabrizia Minandri; Federica Runci; Paolo Visca

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, responsible for infection outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this bacterium is mainly due to its multidrug-resistance and ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces, which facilitate long-term persistence in the hospital setting. Given the crucial role of iron in A. baumannii nutrition and pathogenicity, iron metabolism has been considered as a possible target for chelation-based antibacterial chemotherapy. In this study, w...

  14. Band formation in coupled-resonator slow-wave structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Björn M; Woggon, Ulrike; Artemyev, Mikhail V

    2007-12-10

    Sequences of coupled-resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) have been examined as slow-wave structures. The formation of photonic bands in finite systems is studied in the frame of a coupled oscillator model. Several types of resonator size tuning in the system are evaluated in a systematical manner. We show that aperiodicities in sequences of coupled microspheres provide an additional degree of freedom for the design of photonic bands. PMID:19551030

  15. Limited Zn and Ni mobility during simulated iron formation diagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins, LJ; Swanner, ED; Lalonde, SV; Eickhoff, M.; Paranich, ML; Reinhard, CT; Peacock, CL; Kappler, A.; Konhauser, KO

    2015-01-01

    Iron formations (IF) are iron- and silica-rich chemical precipitates that were deposited during the Precambrian. Several recent studies have demonstrated how the trace metal abundances in IF can be used as proxies for the bioavailability of trace metals in ancient seawater; with the ultimate goal being to understand first-order controls on the composition of the ancient biosphere. However, the utility of IF as proxies depends on the immobilization of trace metals during diagenesis. Here, we a...

  16. Subsurface aeration of anaerobic groundwater : iron colloid formation and the nitrification process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthoorn, A.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Iron, anaerobic groundwater, groundwater purification, heterogeneous oxidation, iron colloid formation, electron microscopy, nitrification In anaerobic groundwater iron and ammonium can be found in relatively high concentrations. These substances need to be removed when groundwater is used

  17. Application of factor analysis to XPS valence band of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-Ray photoelectron spectra of nano-sized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were examined with the aim to discriminate the different degree of iron oxidation. Careful analysis of the valence band regions reveals the presence of both Fe3O4 and Fe2O3. The application of factor analysis enabled us to extract the relative molar concentrations of these oxides in the nanoparticles. This is of particular interest in improving the magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles whose superparamagnetic character can be optimized to obtain better contrast in images from nuclear magnetic resonance. As a result, the factor analysis allows tuning the nanoparticle synthesis conditions in order to obtain the optimal magnetic properties for imaging. Results obtained by the XPS valence band analysis were compared to the transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements.

  18. Iterative LCAO treatment with overlap and band occupation in the iron-group metals

    OpenAIRE

    Del Re, G.; Kolár, M.; Cyrot-Lackmann, F.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the LCAO scheme for the iron-group s- and d-bands is carried out with special emphasis on : (a) the choice of the AO basis and its adjustment to reproduce approaches like the renormalized-atom ansatz; (b) the dependence of the final results on overlap and the number of neighbours taken into account (s-band calculations require at least neighbours from up to the 12th shell, whereas for d-band 2nd neighbours are required at worst); (c) principle of Fermi-level equalization as a techn...

  19. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to...... present and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation...

  20. Red Supergiant Stars as Cosmic Abundance Probes: NLTE Effects in J-band Iron and Titanium Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Bergemann, Maria; Plez, Bertrand; Davies, Ben; Lind, Karin; Gazak, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Detailed non-LTE calculations for red supergiant stars are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of atomic iron and titanium lines in the J-band. With their enormous brightness at J-band red supergiant stars are ideal probes of cosmic abundances. Recent LTE studies have found that metallicities accurate to 0.15 dex can be determined from medium resolution spectroscopy of individual red supergiants in galaxies as distant as 10 Mpc. The non-LTE results obtained in this investigation support these findings. Non-LTE abundance corrections for iron are smaller than 0.05 dex for effective temperatures between 3400K to 4200K and 0.1 dex at 4400K. For titanium the non-LTE abundance corrections vary smoothly between -0.4 dex and +0.2 dex as a function of effective temperature. For both elements, the corrections also depend on stellar gravity and metallicity. The physical reasons behind the non-LTE corrections and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  1. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND IRON AND TITANIUM LINES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations for red supergiant (RSG) stars are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of atomic iron and titanium lines in the J band. With their enormous brightness at J band RSG stars are ideal probes of cosmic abundances. Recent LTE studies have found that metallicities accurate to 0.15 dex can be determined from medium-resolution spectroscopy of individual RSGs in galaxies as distant as 10 Mpc. The NLTE results obtained in this investigation support these findings. NLTE abundance corrections for iron are smaller than 0.05 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4200 K and 0.1 dex at 4400 K. For titanium the NLTE abundance corrections vary smoothly between –0.4 dex and +0.2 dex as a function of effective temperature. For both elements, the corrections also depend on stellar gravity and metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE corrections and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  2. Precise zircon U-Pb ages from the Marra Mamba iron formation and Wittenoom formation, Hamersley Group, Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mt Bruce Supergroup of the Pilbara Craton of Western Australia was laid down in the Hamersley Basin, unconformably over a basement of granite-greenstone terrane, and consists of the Fortescue. Hamersley and Turee Creek Groups. The base of the -230 m-thick Marra Mamba Iron Formation, the lowest formation of the Hamersley Group. marks the onset of the major banded iron-formation deposition that characterizes the group. Ion microprobe U-Pb isotope analyses of zircons from a tuff band (NS3) within a high-grade iron orebody in the uppermost (Mt Newman) member show two distinct, and non-overlapping, age populations. Fifteen grains from the younger group of 16 have a pooled age of 2597±5 Ma (95% confidence), interpreted as the age of syndepositional volcanism: individual grains of the older group of 8, with ages between ca 2950 Ma and ca 2820 Ma, are interpreted as xenocrysts derived from basement rocks transected by the rising magma. The conformably overlying Wittenoom Formation, ∼300-600 m thick, consists largely of dolomitic rocks. Zircons from a submarine fallout tuff within the uppermost (Bee Gorge) member also have two non-overlapping zircon age populations. Most of the 23 zircons analysed belong to an older population with near-concordant ages between ca 2750 and ca 2650 Ma., but 12 analysed spots from 7 grains have a pooled age of 2561 ±8 Ma. This is interpreted to be the age of volcanism coeval with deposition. The older zircons were probably derived from tuffs of Fortescue Group age, entrained with the Crystal-rich Tuff ejectamenta during its explosive, probably phreatoplinian, eruption. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Asia

  3. Petrography, Geochemistry and Proposed Genesis of Ordovician Oolitic Iron Formation Members of the Lashkarak Formation, Eastern Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoore Maghsoudloo Mahalli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Oolitic iron formations are sedimentary rocks with >5 vol.% oolites and >15 wt.% iron, corresponding to 21.4 wt.% Fe2O3 (Young, 1989; Petranek and Van Houten, 1997; Mucke and Farshad, 2005. In Iran, new iron oolite-bearing members have been identified in the Lashkarak Formation (lower-middle Ordovician in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh sections, eastern Alborz (Ghobadi Pour et al., 2011. At present, the mineralogy and geochemistry of these members are not known. Consequently, research reported here was conducted to reveal the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Ordovician oolitic iron formationmembers and to discuss their genesis and economic importance. Materials and Analyses Field geology and sampling was carried out to collect 25 samples from the ooliticiron formation members in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh section in eastern Alborz. Samples were prepared for polished-thin sections (n=10, XRD analysis (n=15. Whole-rock chemical analysis (n=15 by XRF for major elements and by ICP-ES for trace elements was performed by laboratories at the SarCheshmeh copper mine complex, Kerman, Iran. One sample was analyzed by SEM at the Wales Museum, UK. Results Microscopic studies show that the oolitic iron formation members are hosted by carbonate argillite rocks. They are mainly composed of oolites rather than pisoliths (small bodies somewhat larger and more irregular than oolites, whereas oolites have mainly ellipsoidal forms and locally spherical shapes. Most (6 oolites show banding with a central core. Simple oolites without a core are scarce. Mineralogically, oolites are mainly chamositic and hematitic in composition; goethite, pyrite and glauconite occur in traces and siderite is absent. Quartz, calcite and zircon are accessory minerals which are present in the groundmass. Geochemically, TFeO % of the oolitic iron formation horizons ranges from 8 to 48 % with an average of 21%. The CaO content ranges from 2 to 37% and

  4. Formation of iron sulfide nodules during anaerobic oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    van Dongen, B. E.; Organic Geochemistry Unit, Bristol Biogeochemistry Research Centre, School of Chemistry, Cantock’s Close, Bristol University, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom; Roberts, A. P.; National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.; Schouten, S.; Department of Marine Biogeochemistry, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, P.O. Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, The Netherlands; Jiang, W-T; Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan, PR China; Florindo, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Pancost, R. D.; Organic Geochemistry Unit, Bristol Biogeochemistry Research Centre, School of Chemistry, Cantock’s Close, Bristol University, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom

    2007-01-01

    The biomarker compositions of iron sulfide nodules (ISNs; upper Pliocene Valle Ricca section near Rome, Italy) that contain the ferrimagnetic mineral greigite (Fe3S4) were examined. In addition to the presence of specific terrestrial and marine biomarkers, consistent with formation in coastal marine sediments, these ISNs contain compounds thought to originate from sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). These compounds include a variety of low-molecular-weight and branched alkanols and seve...

  5. Standard free energy of formation of iron iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandkar, A.; Tare, V. B.; Wagner, J. B., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment is reported where silver iodide is used to determine the standard free energy of formation of iron iodide. By using silver iodide as a solid electrolyte, a galvanic cell, Ag/AgI/Fe-FeI2, is formulated. The standard free energy of formation of AgI is known, and hence it is possible to estimate the standard free energy of formation of FeI2 by measuring the open-circuit emf of the above cell as a function of temperature. The free standard energy of formation of FeI2 determined by this method is -38784 + 24.165T cal/mol. It is estimated that the maximum error associated with this method is plus or minus 2500 cal/mol.

  6. The role of iron in Mycobacterium smegmatis biofilm formation: the exochelin siderophore is essential in limiting iron conditions for biofilm formation but not for planktonic growth

    OpenAIRE

    Ojha, Anil; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2007-01-01

    Many species of mycobacteria form structured biofilm communities at liquid–air interfaces and on solid surfaces. Full development of Mycobacterium smegmatis biofilms requires addition of supplemental iron above 1 μM ferrous sulphate, although addition of iron is not needed for planktonic growth. Microarray analysis of the M. smegmatis transcriptome shows that iron-responsive genes – especially those involved in siderophore synthesis and iron uptake – are strongly induced during biofilm format...

  7. Timing and setting of skarn and iron oxide formation at the Smältarmossen calcic iron skarn deposit, Bergslagen, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Nils F.; Allen, Rodney L.

    2013-03-01

    Abundant iron oxide deposits including banded iron formations, apatite iron oxide ores, and enigmatic marble/skarn-hosted magnetite deposits occur in the Palaeoproterozoic Bergslagen region, southern Sweden. During the last 100 years, the latter deposit class has been interpreted as contact metasomatic skarn deposits, metamorphosed iron formations, or metamorphosed carbonate replacement deposits. Their origin is still incompletely understood. At the Smältarmossen mine, magnetite was mined from a ca. 50-m-thick calcic skarn zone at the contact between rhyolite and stratigraphically overlying limestone. A syn-volcanic dacite porphyry which intruded the footwall has numerous apophyses that extend into the mineralized zone. Whole-rock lithogeochemical and mineral chemical analyses combined with textural analysis suggests that the skarns formed by veining and replacement of the dacite porphyry and rhyolite. These rocks were added substantial Ca and Fe, minor Mg, Mn, and LREE, as well as trace Co, Sn, U, As, and Sr. In contrast, massive magnetite formed by pervasive replacement of limestone. Tectonic fabrics in magnetite and skarn are consistent with ore formation before or early during Svecokarelian ductile deformation. Whereas a syngenetic-exhalative model has previously been suggested, our results are more compatible with magnetite formation at ca. 1.89 Ga in a contact metasomatic skarn setting associated with the dacite porphyry.

  8. Effect of Temperature on Morphology of Metallic Iron and Formation of Clusters of Iron Ore Pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alencar, Jean Philippe Santos Gherardi; de Resende, Valdirene Gonzaga; de Castro, Luiz Fernando Andrade

    2016-02-01

    The increase of the reduction temperature in direct reduction furnaces has been a recurring tool due to the benefits that it provides to the process. However, its increase cannot be performed without taking into account some considerations, since the sticking phenomenon is directly correlated with it and could lead to permeability problems and reactor performance. An analysis of the formation of pellets clusters at different temperatures was carried out with focus on morphological characterization of reduced materials to better understand the causes and effects of these actions. The results showed a correlation between the morphology of the metallic iron present in the samples and the clustering index. At low reduction temperatures, 1123 K (850 °C), the iron formed is eroded and deformed and the cluster hardly remains after tumbling. When forming iron with fibrous structure, 1223 K (950 °C), the clustering index increases because of anchor points which make the material to stick together. Finally, under the effect of high temperature and long time, it generates fresh precipitated iron, enhancing the resistance of the clusters so that they cannot be separated.

  9. Formation of microstructures in the spheroidal graphite cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipeline systems for hydraulic networks are obtained via centrifugal casting of spheroidal graphite cast iron. The very high cooling rate that is achieved in the skin of the product can sometimes lead to carbide instead of graphite in cast iron. An experimental device has been built in the laboratory that allows reproducing the extreme thermal conditions encountered during formation of skin of centrifugally cast pipes. Liquid metal droplets fall on a cold substrate. Rapid directional solidification occurs. The temperature evolution of the lower surface of the droplet is recorded during the very first moment of the solidification (t < 200 ms) thanks to a photodiode, which is located below the substrate. The microstructures that are obtained in laboratory are characterised in both the as-cast state and the heat-treated state. They are compared to the centrifugally cast ones. A model of directional solidification of cast iron under a very large temperature gradient has been built. It allows explaining the transition from stable to metastable micro structure that was observed in the products and reproduced in the laboratory samples.

  10. Iron-absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron-rich zones. [infrared spectral reflectance of Nevada iron deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Most major rock units and unaltered and altered areas in the study area can be discriminated on the basis of visible and near-infrared spectral reflectivity differences recorded from satellite altitude. These subtle spectral differences are detectable by digital ratioing of the MSS bands and subsequent stretching to increase the contrast to enhance spectral differences. Hydrothermally altered areas appear as anomalous color patches within the volcanic-rock areas. A map has been prepared which can be regarded as an excellent reconnaissance exploration map, for use in targeting areas for more detailed geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies. Mafic and felsic rock types are easily discriminated on the color stretched-ratio composite. The ratioing process minimizes albedo effects, leaving only the recorded characteristic spectral response. The spectra of unaltered rocks appear different from those of altered rocks, which are typically dominated by limonite and clay minerals. It seems clear that differences in spectral shape can provide a basis for discrimination of geologic material, although the relations between visible and near-infrared spectral reflectivity and mineralogical composition are not yet entirely understood.

  11. Unveiling the broad band X-ray continuum and iron line complex in Mkr 841

    CERN Document Server

    Petrucci, P O; Matt, G; Longinotti, A L; Malzac, J; Mouchet, M; Boisson, C; Maraschi, L; Nandra, K; Ferrando, P

    2007-01-01

    Mkr 841 is a bright Seyfert 1 galaxy known to harbor a strong soft excess and a variable K$\\alpha$ iron line. It has been observed during 3 different periods by XMM for a total cumulated exposure time of $\\sim$108 ks. We present in this paper a broad band spectral analysis of the complete EPIC-pn data sets. We were able to test two different models for the soft excess, a relativistically blurred photoionized reflection (\\r model) and a relativistically smeared ionized absorption (\\a model). The continuum is modeled by a simple cut-off power law and we also add a neutral reflection. These observations reveal the extreme and puzzling spectral and temporal behaviors of the soft excess and iron line. The 0.5-3 keV soft X-ray flux decreases by a factor 3 between 2001 and 2005 and the line shape appears to be a mixture of broad and narrow components. We succeed in describing this complex broad-band 0.5-10 keV spectral variability using either \\r or \\a to fit the soft excess. Both models give statistically equivalen...

  12. Subsurface aeration of anaerobic groundwater : iron colloid formation and the nitrification process

    OpenAIRE

    Wolthoorn, A.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Iron, anaerobic groundwater, groundwater purification, heterogeneous oxidation, iron colloid formation, electron microscopy, nitrification In anaerobic groundwater iron and ammonium can be found in relatively high concentrations. These substances need to be removed when groundwater is used for the production of drinking water. Subsurface aeration can be applied to remove iron before the groundwater reaches the purification plant. The primary goal of subsurface aeration is to oxidise...

  13. Mechanisms of iron-silica aqueous interaction and the genesis of Precambrian iron formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemtob, S. M.; Catalano, J. G.; Moynier, F.; Pringle, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Iron formations (IFs), Fe- and Si-rich chemical sediments common in Precambrian successions, preserve key information about the compositional, biological, and oxidative evolution of the Precambrian ocean. Stable Si isotopes (δ30Si) of IF have been used to infer paleo-oceanic composition, and secular variations in δ30Si may reflect ancient biogeochemical cycles. The δ30Si of primary Fe-Si precipitates that formed IF depends not only on the δ30Si of aqueous silica but also on the precipitation mechanism. Multiple formation mechanisms for these primary precipitates are plausible. Aqueous Si may have adsorbed on newly precipitated iron oxyhydroxide surfaces; alternatively, Fe and Si may have coprecipitated as a single phase. Here we explore variations in the Si isotope fractionation factor (ɛ) with Fe-Si aqueous interaction mechanism (adsorption vs. coprecipitation). In adsorption experiments, sodium silicate solutions (pH 8.1, 125-2000 µM Si) were reacted with iron oxide particles (hematite, ferrihydrite, goethite, and magnetite) for 24 to 72 hours. Resultant solutions had δ30Si between 0 and +6‰. Calculated ɛ varied significantly with oxide mineralogy and morphology. For ferrihydrite, ɛ = -1.7‰; for hematite, ɛ = -2 to -5‰, depending on particle morphology. Apparent ɛ decreased upon surface site saturation, implying a smaller isotope effect for polymeric Si adsorption than monomeric adsorption. In coprecipitation experiments, solutions of Na-silicate and Fe(II) chloride (0.4-10 mM) were prepared anaerobically, then air-oxidized for 3 days to induce precipitation. At low Si concentrations, magnetite formed; near silica saturation, lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite formed. The Si isotope fractionation factor for coprecipitation was within the range of ɛ observed for adsorption (ɛ = -2.3 ± 1.0‰). These results indicate that the mechanism of Fe-Si interaction affects ɛ, presumably due to varying silicate coordination environments. These isotopic

  14. Effect of slag composition on iron nuggets formation from carbon composite pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Eloy Anduze Nogueira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron-carbon nuggets can be obtained by high temperature reduction of iron ore by carbonaceous material when both are agglomerated together as a carbon composite pellet. During this process, the stable oxides contained in the materials will form a slag. This work investigates the effect of this slag composition on iron nugget formation. Pellets were prepared with iron ore and two different carbonaceous materials. Through the addition of Portland® cement, silica and alumina the slag composition was varied to adjust the expected liquidus temperature to 1573 and 2273 K. It has been shown that the formation of iron nuggets is favored for slags presenting low liquidus temperature. In order to further investigate this phenomenon, pellets containing iron powder and carbonaceous material, together with previously prepared slags, were also submitted to high temperature, and it has been shown that iron carburization depends on slag composition.

  15. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (n{sub b}) and apparent association constant (K{sub app}) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at n{sub b} = 23.7 and log K{sub app} = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe{sup 2+} sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided.

  16. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (nb) and apparent association constant (Kapp) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at nb = 23.7 and log Kapp = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe2+ sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided

  17. Anisotropic energy-gaps of iron-based superconductivity from intra-band quasiparticle interference in LiFeAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper pairing in the Fe-based superconductors is thought to occur due to the projection of the antiferromagnetic interactions between iron atoms onto the complex momentum-space electronic structure. A key consequence is that distinct anisotropic energy gaps Δi(k) with specific relative orientations should occur on the different electronic bands i. To determine this previously unresolved gap structure high-precision spectroscopy is required. Here we introduce the STM technique of intra-band Bogolyubov quasiparticle scattering interference (QPI) to iron-based superconductor studies, focusing on LiFeAs. We identify the QPI signatures of three hole-like dispersions and, by introducing a new QPI technique, determine the magnitude and relative orientations of corresponding anisotropic Δi(k). Intra-band Bogolyubov QPI therefore yields the spectroscopic information required to identify the mechanism of superconductivity in Fe-based superconductors.

  18. Geochemical patterns and microbial contribution to iron plaque formation in the rice plant rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Markus; Murata, Chihiro; Unger, Julia; Kappler, Andreas; Schmidt, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Rice is the major food source for more than half of the world population and 80 percent of the worldwide rice cultivation is performed on water logged paddy soils. The establishment of reducing conditions in the soil and across the soil-water interface not only stimulates the microbial production and release of the greenhouse gas methane. These settings also create optimal conditions for microbial iron(III) reduction and therefore saturate the system with reduced ferrous iron. Through the reduction and dissolution of ferric minerals that are characterized by their high surface activity, sorbed nutrients and contaminants (e.g. arsenic) will be mobilized and are thus available for uptake by plants. Rice plants have evolved a strategy to release oxygen from their roots in order to prevent iron toxification in highly ferrous environments. The release of oxygen to the reduced paddy soil causes ferric iron plaque formation on the rice roots and finally increases the sorption capacity for toxic metals. To this date the geochemical and microbiological processes that control the formation of iron plaque are not deciphered. It has been hypothesized that iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria play a potential role in the iron(III) mineral formation along the roots. However, not much is known about the actual processes, mineral products, and geochemical gradients that establish within the rhizosphere. In the present study we have developed a growth set-up that allows the co-cultivation of rice plants and iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria, as well as the visual observation and in situ measurement of geochemical parameters. Oxygen and dissolved iron(II) gradients have been measured using microelectrodes and show geochemical hot spots that offer optimal growth conditions for microaerophilic iron(II) oxidizers. First mineral identification attempts of iron plaque have been performed using Mössbauer spectroscopy and microscopy. The obtained results on mineraology and crystallinity have been

  19. Magnesium solubility in metallic iron during core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, J.; Siebert, J.; Nimmo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial core formation occurred by gravitational segregation of immiscible metal and silicate melts in an extensively molten proto-Earth. This stripped the bulk silicate Earth of most of its siderophile elements, which were concentrated in the core. The process occurs by virtue of partitioning through a redox reaction (e.g. [1]) whereby iron in the metal exchanges for a bonded siderophile element in the mantle. By performing metal-silicate equilibration experiments at extreme pressures and temperatures using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, we find that the major lithophile component of the silicate Earth, namely MgO, can also become soluble in the metal. At close to 5000 K, our experiments show that up to 1.2 % MgO can be incorporated in the metal. We show that Mg incorporation in the metal isn't a redox reaction as with siderophile element partitioning, but rather a direct solubility of the MgO component as temperatures approach the metal-silicate solvus; in that respect, our results are fully consistent with the recently calculated Fe-MgO solvus [2]. This confirms that significant amounts of magnesium could have been added to the early core, provided that a giant impact had generated the necessary temperature increase. The subsequent exsolution of MgO driven by core cooling would have provided a significant buoyancy source, likely sufficient to drive core convection and producing an ancient magnetic field [3]. [1] J. Wade and B. J. Wood, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 236, 78-95 (2005) [2] S. M. Wahl and B. Militzer, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 410, 25-33 (2015) [3] D. J. Stevenson, DI11C-03, Fall AGU 2012.

  20. Effects of texture on shear band formation in plane strain tension/compression and bending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuroda, M.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    In this study, effects of typical texture components observed in rolled aluminum alloy sheets on shear band formation in plane strain tension/compression and bending are systematically studied. The material response is described by a generalized Taylor-type polycrystal model, in which each grain is...... characterized in terms of an elastic-viscoplastic continuum slip constitutive relation. First, a simple model analysis in which the shear band is assumed to occur in a weaker thin slice of material is performed. From this simple model analysis, two important quantities regarding shear band formation are...

  1. Influence of Intermediate Principal Stress on Deformation Band Formation in Porous Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issen, K. A.; Ingraham, M. D.; Dewers, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, field observations of volumetric deformation bands (compaction bands and dilation bands) have prompted renewed laboratory and theoretical research efforts to understand conditions for deformation band formation. Historically, laboratory experiments have been conducted on cylindrical cores using axisymmetric stress states, where the intermediate principal stress is equal to either minimum or maximum compression. While experimentally convenient, it is not clear that these specialized stress states are common in field settings, where the intermediate principal stress likely falls between minimum and maximum compression. Additionally, theoretical predictions developed using a bifurcation approach to strain localization (Rudnicki and Rice, 1975) suggest that the deformation band type predicted to form (compaction, compactant shear, dilatant shear, dilation), and the orientation of the band relative to maximum compression, both depend on the magnitude of the intermediate principal stress relative to maximum and minimum compression. To examine the role of the intermediate principal stress in deformation band formation, a suite of true triaxial tests were conducted on Castlegate sandstone; this paper focuses on comparing theoretical predictions with experimental observations. Tests covered a wide range of mean stresses, from dilatant to compactant response. For a given mean stress, five stress states were tested, in which the intermediate principal stress was: A) equal to minimum compression, B) greater than the minimum but less than halfway to maximum compression, C) halfway between minimum and maximum compression, D) greater than halfway but less than maximum compression, and E) equal to maximum compression. Overall, reasonable agreement was found between predicted and observed band angles (defined as the angle between the band normal and maximum compression). Low mean stress tests produced the predicted high angles bands; at intermediate stresses

  2. Effects of cellular iron deficiency on the formation of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis. Iron deficiency and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckard Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young women diagnosed with breast cancer are known to have a higher mortality rate from the disease than older patients. Specific risk factors leading to this poorer outcome have not been identified. In the present study, we hypothesized that iron deficiency, a common ailment in young women, contributes to the poor outcome by promoting the hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF formation. This hypothesis was tested in an in vitro cell culture model system. Results Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1 shRNA to constitutively impair iron uptake. Cellular iron status was determined by a set of iron proteins and angiogenesis was evaluated by levels of VEGF in cells as well as by a mouse xenograft model. Significant decreases in ferritin with concomitant increases in VEGF were observed in TfR1 knockdown MDA-MB-231 cells when compared to the parental cells. TfR1 shRNA transfectants also evoked a stronger angiogenic response after the cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The molecular mechanism appears that cellular iron deficiency elevates VEGF formation by stabilizing HIF-1α. This mechanism is also true in human breast cancer MCF-7 and liver cancer HepG2 cells. Conclusions Cellular iron deficiency increased HIF-1α, VEGF, and angiogenesis, suggesting that systemic iron deficiency might play an important part in the tumor angiogenesis and recurrence in this young age group of breast cancer patients.

  3. Spin-wave band-pass filters based on yttrium iron garnet films for tunable microwave photonic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, A. B.; Drozdovskii, A. V.; Nikitin, A. A.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on development of tunable band-pass microwave filters for microwave photonic generators. The filters were fabricated with the use of epitaxial yttrium iron garnet films. Principle of operation of the filters was based on excitation, propagation, and reception of spin waves. In order to obtain narrow pass band, the filtering properties of excitation and reception antennas were exploited. The filters demonstrated insertion losses of 2-3 dB, bandwidth of 25-35 MHz, and tuning range of up to 1.5 GHz in the range 3-7 GHz.

  4. Complex Permittivity and Permeability Measurements and Numerical Simulation of carbonyl iron rubber in X-Band frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Luiz de Paula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing the importance of an adequate characterization of radar absorbing materials (RAM, and consequently their development, the present study aims to contribute for the establishment and validation of experimental determination and numerical simulation of complex permittivity and permeability of electromagnetic materials, using for this a carbonyl iron was seventy percent of the mass concentration. The present work branches out into two related topics. The first one is concerned with the implementation of a computational modeling to predict the behavior of electromagnetic materials in confined environment by using electromagnetic three-dimensional simulation. The second topic re-examines the Nicolson-Ross-Weir mathematical model to retrieve the constitutive parameters (complex permittivity and permeability of a homogeneous sample (carbonyl iron from scattering coefficient measurements. The measured and calculated results show a good convergence that guarantees the application of the used methodologies for the characterization of carbonyl iron rubber in x-band frequency.

  5. RESEARCH OF INFLUENCE OF THE IRON CONTENT ON FORMATION OF IRON-BEARING PHASES IN FOUNDRY ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Gorbachiova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available  The microstructure and microhardness of aluminum and silumin аК12 with iron content of 0 to 12 mas.% produced by sand casting and mol casting have been investigated. For the Al–Si–Fe and Al–Si–Fe–Mn systems the portions of the liquidus surfaces, which correspond to commercial silumin compositions, have been calculated using the updated thermodynamic model of the Al– Si–Fe system and COST–507 database. The area of primary crystallization of the iron-containing a and b phases is assessed for the commercial silumin. It has been proved that manganese promotes the formation of the iron-containing a-phase in the commercial silumin.

  6. Enthalpies of formation of liquid binary (copper + iron, cobalt, and nickel) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaenko, I.V. [National Univ. of Lesotho (South Africa). Dept. of Chemistry; Turchanin, M.A. [Donbass State Mechanical Engineering Academy, Kramatorsk (Ukraine). Dept. of Technology and Apparatuses of Cast Manufacture

    1997-12-01

    The enthalpies of formation of liquid binary (Cu + Fe, Co, Ni) alloys are studied by direct reaction calorimetry in the whole range of compositions at 1873, 1823, and 1753 K, respectively. The integral molar enthalpies of mixing are found to be positive in all three systems with the maximum values approaching 10.8 {+-} 0.7 kJ/mol{sup {minus}1} at x{sub Fe} = 0.43, 7.1 {+-} 0.9 kJ/mol{sup {minus}1} at x{sub Co} = 0.55, and 3.7 {+-} 0.5 kJ/mol{sup {minus}1} at x{sub Ni} = 0.53. Partial molar enthalpies at infinite dilution constitute 59.4 {+-} 3.3 kJ/mol{sup {minus}1} for iron, 44.3 {+-} 4.1 kJ/mol{sup {minus}1} for cobalt, and 14.9 {+-} 2.2 kJ/mol{sup {minus}1} for nickel in liquid copper. Similar values for copper in liquid iron, cobalt, and nickel are 36.6 {+-} 3.9, 45.3 {+-} 6.0, and 17.7 {+-} 4.4 kJ/mol{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The results are compared with the thermodynamic data available in literature and discussed in connection to the equilibrium-phase diagrams. In particular, decreasing from Cu-Fe to Cu-Ni liquid alloys positive values of the excess thermodynamic functions of mixing are fully in accord with the growing stability of phases in these systems. The excess entropies of mixing are estimated by combining the established enthalpies with carefully selected literature data for the excess Gibbs functions. Analysis of possible contributions to the enthalpies of mixing indicates that the experimentally established regularity in {Delta}H values along the 3d series is likely to arise from the difference in d-band width and d-electron binding energy of the alloy constituents.

  7. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  8. Wave propagation in single column woodpile phononic crystals: Formation of tunable band gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunho; Yang, Jinkyu

    2014-11-01

    We study the formation of frequency band gaps in single column woodpile phononic crystals composed of orthogonally stacked slender cylinders. We focus on investigating the effect of the cylinders' local vibrations on the dispersion of elastic waves along the stacking direction of the woodpile phononic crystals. We experimentally verify that their frequency band structures depend significantly on the bending resonant behavior of unit cells. We propose a simple theoretical model based on a discrete element method to associate the behavior of locally resonant cylindrical rods with the band gap formation mechanism in woodpile phononic crystals. The findings in this work imply that we can achieve versatile control of frequency band structures in phononic crystals by using woodpile architectures. The woodpile phononic crystals can form a new type of vibration filtering devices that offer an enhanced degree of freedom in manipulating stress wave propagation.

  9. Mechanisms and mechanics of porosity formation in ductile iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Perzyk

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage defects in ductile iron castings can be of two basic types: shrinkage cavities associated with the liquid contraction prior to the expansion period of the iron as well as the porosity, which may appear even if the liquid shrinkage is fully compensated. In the present paper two possible mechanisms of the porosity are presented and analyzed. The first one is the Karsay’s mechanism based on the secondary shrinkage concept. The second one is the mechanism acting during the expansion period of the iron, first suggested by Ohnaka and co-authors and essentially modified by the present authors. The mechanical interactions between casting and mould are determined for the both mechanisms. Their analysis leads to the conclusion, that porosity forms during expansion period of the melt. The direct cause is the negative pressure which appears in the central part of the casting due to the differences in expansion coefficients of the fast cooling surface layer and slow cooling inner region. Observations concerning feeding behavior of ductile iron castings, based on this mechanism, agree well with industrial practice. The secondary shrinkage is not only needless to induce the porosity, but the corresponding mechanism of its occurrence, proposed by Karsay, does not seem to be valid.

  10. Formation of shear band in a granular material during triaxial compression test

    OpenAIRE

    Grochowicz M.; Ã…Âukaszuk J.; Horabik J.

    2000-01-01

    Formation of shear band during triaxial compression test of a sample of granular material was investigated experimentally. A new method of displacement field fixation in the sample of granular material was proposed. The method allows to analyse of displacement distribution inside a sample of any course granular material. Thickness of the fully developed shear band obtained in the triaxial compression test of a mustard seed was found approximately 15 times bigger than the mean seed diameter.

  11. Effects of cellular iron deficiency on the formation of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis. Iron deficiency and angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Eckard Jonathan; Dai Jisen; Wu Jing; Jian Jinlong; Yang Qing; Chen Haobin; Costa Max; Frenkel Krystyna; Huang Xi

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Young women diagnosed with breast cancer are known to have a higher mortality rate from the disease than older patients. Specific risk factors leading to this poorer outcome have not been identified. In the present study, we hypothesized that iron deficiency, a common ailment in young women, contributes to the poor outcome by promoting the hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) formation. This hypothesis was tested in an in vitro ...

  12. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukes, N. J.; Klein, C.; Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    sparites are most depleted in 13C. Carbonates in oxide-rich iron-formations are more depleted in 13C than those in siderite-rich iron-formation whereas the kerogens in oxide banded iron-formations (BIF) are more enriched. This implies that the siderite-rich iron-formations were not derived from oxide-rich iron-formation through reduction of ferric iron by organic matter. Organic matter oxidation by ferric iron did, however, decrease the abundance of kerogen in oxide-rich iron-formation and led to the formation of isotopically very light sparry carbonates. Siderite and calcmicrosparite both represent recrystallized primary micritic precipitates but differ in their 13C composition, with the siderites depleted in 13C by 4.6 per mil on average relative to calcmicrosparite. This means that the siderites were precipitated from water with dissolved inorganic carbon depleted in 13C by about 9 per mil relative to that from which the limestones precipitated. This implies an ocean system stratified with regard to total carbonate, with the deeper water, from which siderite-rich iron-formation formed, depleted in 13C. Iron-formations were deposited in areas of very low organic matter supply. Depletion of 13C may, therefore, derive not from degradation of organic matter but from hydrothermal activity, a conclusion which is supported by 18O composition of the carbonate minerals and trace element and rare earth element (REE) compositions of the iron-formations.

  13. Early diagenetic quartz formation at a deep iron oxidation front in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Patrick; Chapligin, Bernhard; Picard, Aude; Meyer, Hanno; Fischer, Cornelius; Rettenwander, Daniel; Amthauer, Georg; Vogt, Christoph; Aiello, Ivano

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of early diagenetic quartz formation under low-temperature conditions are still poorly understood. We studied lithified cherts consisting of microcrystalline quartz recovered from ODP Site 1226 in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific. The cherts occur near the base of a 420-m-thick Miocene-Holocene sequence within unlithified nannofossil and diatom ooze. Palaeo-temperatures reconstructed from δ18O values in the cherts are near to present porewater temperatures and a sharp depletion in dissolved silica occurs around 385 mbsf indicating that silica precipitation is still ongoing. Also a deep iron oxidation front occurs at the same depth, which is caused by upward diffusing nitrate from an oxic seawater aquifer in the underlying basaltic crust. Sequential iron extraction and analysis of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) revealed that iron in the cherts predominantly occurs as illite and amorphous iron oxide, whereas iron in the nannofossil and diatom ooze occurs mainly as smectites. Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed that the illite iron in the cherts is largely oxidized. A possible mechanisms that may be operative is quartz precipitation initiated by adsorption of silica to freshly precipitated iron oxides. The decrease in porewater silica concentration below opal-A and opal-CT saturation then allows for the precipitation of the thermodynamically more stable phase: quartz. We suggest that the formation of early-diagenetic chert at iron oxidation fronts is an important process in suboxic zones of silica-rich sediments. The largest iron oxidation front ever occurred during the great oxidation event ca. 2.5 Ga ago, when large amounts of iron and chert beds were deposited.

  14. The salmochelin receptor IroN itself, but not salmochelin-mediated iron uptake promotes biofilm formation in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistro, Giuseppe; Hoffmann, Christiane; Schubert, Sören

    2015-01-01

    The key to success of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) to colonize niches outside the intestinal tract and to establish infection is the coordinated action of numerous virulence and fitness factors. Intense research revealed not only an arsenal of unique virulence determinants with specific action, but also the multi-functionality of single elements. Especially iron uptake systems of ExPEC proved to be of prime importance. Apart from iron acquisition they optimize certain virulence properties. Here we analyzed the contribution of the salmochelin siderophore system to the ability of ExPEC to form biofilms. In the same iron limited environment, ExPEC displayed a distinct transcriptional profile of siderophore systems. During biofilm formation the iroN gene coding for the specific receptors of the siderophore salmochelin was highly upregulated. Almost no induction was observed during planctonic growth. Disruption of iroN resulted in a reduction of almost 50% in biofilm production. Efficient biofilm formation was not affected in a salmochelin synthesis mutant. Thus, the contribution of IroN is independent from the ability to produce salmochelin. Enhanced expression of IroN did not increase significantly the capacity to form biofilms in ExPEC. Interestingly, the additional expression of IroN or even the acquisition of the entire salmochelin system was not able to improve biofilm formation in a poor biofilm producer like a laboratory E. coli K12 strain. However, complementation with only IroN in an ExPEC iroA deletion mutant was able to restore biofilm formation. The contribution of IroN to biofilm formation appears to require a certain background found in ExPEC, but not in E. coli K12. This study identified the contribution of IroN to biofilm formation and highlights the multi-functional role of iron uptake systems in ExPEC. PMID:25921426

  15. Geology of East Egypt greenstone field in Neoproterozoic isoand arc: Reconstruction of Iron formation sedimentary environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, S.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Geology of East Egypt greenstone-granit belt which is northern part of Nubia shield was identified neoproterozoic island arc amalgamated sections. There are several iron formation within these greenstone belt. Age data shows this iron formation may be overlaped during 700 Ma Snowball period, how ever, there is no detail report of well preserved ice related evidences. We now started detail field work for identified tectonic reconstruction, original stratigraphy around Iron formation and sedimentary environment during the iron formation sedimentation area. East Egyptian shield was divided three geology, Proterozoic greenstone complex, 700-600 Granitic domes and cover sequence (Hammamet Group). We focus three area to identified sedimentary environment of iron sedimentation. Along the north-south trend of Wadi EL Dabban area are, we named Wadi branch as West site is RW-0 ~ 12, East site is RE-0 ~ 12 from north to south. Northern area is structurally moderate, southern portion is north dipping. Southern portion was intruded by granite and several place contain granitic dikes. Northeast to eastern area are identified younger sedimentary sequence (Hammamat Group) which is unconformablly overlay on the other iron formation bearing greenstone belt. Structurally these area is divided four units. Wadi was divided by right-lateral strike-ship fault. The displacement are more than 3 km. Also north dipping faults are identified.East-West trend fault are divided two units. It is divided NE, SE, NW and NS units.SW unit is most well preserved thick sequence of the Iron formation. SW unit is well preserved iron formation sequence within thick volcaniclastics. This unit mostly north dipping around 40-60 degree. Structural repetition in not well understand. Reconstract stratigraphy in this unit is at least 4000m in thickness. 5 member is identified in this sequence. Several thin iron formations are observed with in pillow lava and volcaniclastic sequence. These very thick

  16. Biofuel-Promoted Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxin/furan Formation in an Iron-Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Norbert V; Rey, Maria Dolores; Zennegg, Markus; Haag, Regula; Wichser, Adrian; Schmid, Peter; Seiler, Cornelia; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Mohn, Joachim; Bürki, Samuel; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Iron-catalyzed diesel particle filters (DPFs) are widely used for particle abatement. Active catalyst particles, so-called fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs), are formed in situ, in the engine, when combusting precursors, which were premixed with the fuel. The obtained iron oxide particles catalyze soot oxidation in filters. Iron-catalyzed DPFs are considered as safe with respect to their potential to form polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs). We reported that a bimetallic potassium/iron FBC supported an intense PCDD/F formation in a DPF. Here, we discuss the impact of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biofuel on PCDD/F emissions. The iron-catalyzed DPF indeed supported a PCDD/F formation with biofuel but remained inactive with petroleum-derived diesel fuel. PCDD/F emissions (I-TEQ) increased 23-fold when comparing biofuel and diesel data. Emissions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the most toxic congener [toxicity equivalence factor (TEF) = 1.0], increased 90-fold, and those of 2,3,7,8-TCDF (TEF = 0.1) increased 170-fold. Congener patterns also changed, indicating a preferential formation of tetra- and penta-chlorodibenzofurans. Thus, an inactive iron-catalyzed DPF becomes active, supporting a PCDD/F formation, when operated with biofuel containing impurities of potassium. Alkali metals are inherent constituents of biofuels. According to the current European Union (EU) legislation, levels of 5 μg/g are accepted. We conclude that risks for a secondary PCDD/F formation in iron-catalyzed DPFs increase when combusting potassium-containing biofuels. PMID:26176879

  17. Deposition of 1.88-billion-year-old iron formations as a consequence of rapid crustal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Birger; Fletcher, Ian R; Bekker, Andrey; Muhling, Janet R; Gregory, Courtney J; Thorne, Alan M

    2012-04-26

    Iron formations are chemical sedimentary rocks comprising layers of iron-rich and silica-rich minerals whose deposition requires anoxic and iron-rich (ferruginous) sea water. Their demise after the rise in atmospheric oxygen by 2.32 billion years (Gyr) ago has been attributed to the removal of dissolved iron through progressive oxidation or sulphidation of the deep ocean. Therefore, a sudden return of voluminous iron formations nearly 500 million years later poses an apparent conundrum. Most late Palaeoproterozoic iron formations are about 1.88 Gyr old and occur in the Superior region of North America. Major iron formations are also preserved in Australia, but these were apparently deposited after the transition to a sulphidic ocean at 1.84 Gyr ago that should have terminated iron formation deposition, implying that they reflect local marine conditions. Here we date zircons in tuff layers to show that iron formations in the Frere Formation of Western Australia are about 1.88 Gyr old, indicating that the deposition of iron formations from two disparate cratons was coeval and probably reflects global ocean chemistry. The sudden reappearance of major iron formations at 1.88 Gyr ago--contemporaneous with peaks in global mafic-ultramafic magmatism, juvenile continental and oceanic crust formation, mantle depletion and volcanogenic massive sulphide formation--suggests deposition of iron formations as a consequence of major mantle activity and rapid crustal growth. Our findings support the idea that enhanced submarine volcanism and hydrothermal activity linked to a peak in mantle melting released large volumes of ferrous iron and other reductants that overwhelmed the sulphate and oxygen reservoirs of the ocean, decoupling atmospheric and seawater redox states, and causing the return of widespread ferruginous conditions. Iron formations formed on clastic-starved coastal shelves where dissolved iron upwelled and mixed with oxygenated surface water. The

  18. Schottky barrier formation and band bending revealed by first- principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Hellman, Anders; Fang, Yurui; Gao, Shiwu; Käll, Mikael

    2015-06-01

    The formation of a Schottky barrier at the metal-semiconductor interface is widely utilised in semiconductor devices. With the emerging of novel Schottky barrier based nanoelectronics, a further microscopic understanding of this interface is in high demand. Here we provide an atomistic insight into potential barrier formation and band bending by ab initio simulations and model analysis of a prototype Schottky diode, i.e., niobium doped rutile titania in contact with gold (Au/Nb:TiO2). The local Schottky barrier height is found to vary between 0 and 1.26 eV depending on the position of the dopant. The band bending is caused by a dopant induced dipole field between the interface and the dopant site, whereas the pristine Au/TiO2 interface does not show any band bending. These findings open the possibility for atomic scale optimisation of the Schottky barrier and light harvesting in metal-semiconductor nanostructures.

  19. Granular axial band formation in rotating tumblers: a discrete element method study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The onset mechanism for band formation of a granular mixture in long rotating tumblers is still largely unresolved. We study this issue for axial segregation of binary mixtures having different size particles, using discrete element method simulations. Endwalls initiate axial segregation via an axial flow due to friction. The non-uniform distribution of axial velocity in the flow together with simultaneous radial segregation via percolation results in the axial flow rate of the two types of particles differing in the upstream and downstream portions of the flowing layer. Thus, small particles are driven further from the endwalls, while large particles accumulate at the endwalls. Once this occurs, a cascading mechanism begins so that other bands form due to the gradient in particle concentration near the endwalls. A small axial flow between segregated bands of small and large particles persists even after the bands are fully developed.

  20. MODELING OF 'BANDING' MICROSTRUCTURE FORMATION IN CENTRIFUGALLY SOLIDIFIED Ti-6Al-4V ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Numerical investigations of the 'banding' microstructure formation during solidifica-tion of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in the centrifugal casting are conducted using a multi-scale model, which combines the finite difference method (FDM) at the macroscale with a cellular automaton (CA) model at the microscale. The macro model is used to simu-late the fluid flow and heat transfer throughout the casting. The micro model is used to predict the nucleation and growth of microstructures. With the proposed model,numerical simulations are performed to study the influences of the nucleation density,mould rotation speed, and casting size upon the 'banding' microstructure formation. It is noted that changing the nucleation density has a minor effect on the microstructure formation. The rotation speed promotes the formation of 'banding' microstructure,which is more noticeable for larger size castings. The major mechanism responsi-ble for this 'banding' phenomenon is the spatial variation in cooling rates created by centrifugal force.

  1. Shelf-to-basin iron shuttling enhances vivianite formation in deep Baltic Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Daniel C.; Gustafsson, Bo G.; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal hypoxia is a growing and persistent problem largely attributable to enhanced terrestrial nutrient (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus) loading. Recent studies suggest phosphorus removal through burial of iron (II) phosphates, putatively vivianite, plays an important role in nutrient cycling in the Baltic Sea - the world's largest anthropogenic dead zone - yet the dynamics of iron (II) phosphate formation are poorly constrained. To address this, a reactive-transport model was used to reconstruct the diagenetic and depositional history of sediments in the Fårö basin, a deep anoxic and sulphidic region of the Baltic Sea where iron (II) phosphates have been observed. Simulations demonstrate that transport of iron from shelf sediments to deep basins enhances vivianite formation while sulphide concentrations are low, but that pyrite forms preferentially over vivianite when sulphate reduction intensifies due to elevated organic loading. Episodic reoxygenation events, associated with major inflows of oxic waters, encourage the retention of iron oxyhydroxides and iron-bound phosphorus in sediments, increasing vivianite precipitation as a result. Results suggest that artificial reoxygenation of the Baltic Sea bottom waters could sequester up to 3% of the annual external phosphorus loads as iron (II) phosphates, but this is negligible when compared to potential internal phosphorus loads due to dissolution of iron oxyhydroxides when low oxygen conditions prevail. Thus, enhancing vivianite formation through artificial reoxygenation of deep waters is not a viable engineering solution to eutrophication in the Baltic Sea. Finally, simulations suggest that regions with limited sulphate reduction and hypoxic intervals, such as eutrophic estuaries, could act as important phosphorus sinks by sequestering vivianite. This could potentially alleviate eutrophication in shelf and slope environments.

  2. Fermi surface shrinking, band shifts and interband coupling in iron-based pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelluti, E., E-mail: emmanuele.cappelluti@romal.infn.i [SMC Research Center, CNR-INFM, Rome (Italy); Department of Physics, University ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy); Ortenzi, L.; Benfatto, L.; Pietronero, L. [Department of Physics, University ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    Band shifts are systematically observed in pnictides using de Hass-van Alphen and ARPES techniques. Most interesting, such shifts result to be band-sensitive, so that hole-like bands are shifted downwards while electron-like ones are shifted upwards. In this contribution we present a comprehensive explanation for the origin of such band shifts. Using a four band Eliashberg analysis, we show that they are a natural consequence of the multiband character of these systems and of the strong particle-hole asymmetry of the bands. We also show that the relative sign of such shifts provides a direct experimental evidence of a dominant interband scattering. A quantitative analysis in LaFePO yields a spin-mediated interband coupling of the order V {approx} 0.46 eV which corresponds to a mass enhancement Z{approx}1.5.

  3. The Phenomenology of Iron Pnictides Superconductors Explained in the Framework of -Wave Three-Band Eliashberg Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Ummarino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The s-wave three-band Eliashberg theory can simultaneously reproduce the experimental critical temperatures and the gap values of the superconducting materials LaFeAsO0.9F0.1, Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 as exponent of the more important families of iron pnictides. In this model the dominant role is played by interband interactions and the order parameter undergoes a sign reversal between hole and electron bands (±-wave symmetry. The values of all the gaps (with the exact experimental critical temperature can be obtained by using high values of the electron-boson coupling constants and small typical boson energies (in agreement with experiments.

  4. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seafood, and foods that contain vitamin C , like citrus fruits, strawberries, sweet peppers, tomatoes, and broccoli. What ... diets. What are some effects of iron on health? Scientists are studying iron to understand how it ...

  5. Experimental method for the evaluation of the susceptibility of materials to shear band formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tham R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize materials with respect to their susceptibility to shear band formation at high strain rates, a modified Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus and hat-shaped steel specimens with a shear zone having a width significantly larger than the typical width of adiabatic bands are used. The sample is directly impacted by the striker. The force acting on the sample is measured with a PVDF-gauge between the sample and the output bar. The displacement is recorded with an electro-optical extensometer. The energy absorbed by the shearing process up to failure can be used as a reference for the susceptibility of materials to shear band formation. The method is demonstrated comparing the shear behavior of two high-strength steels with similar metallic structure and strength. Differences were found in the transition region between quasi-static and fully adiabatic shearing conditions where the energy up to rupture differs by 40 %. For fully adiabatic shear band formation, the deformation process of both materials equals. At extreme rates, shear processes are mainly governed by the thermodynamic properties of the materials. On the other hand, strength and structural properties play a role for low and intermediate rates where global and localized shear mechanisms occur in parallel.

  6. Experimental method for the evaluation of the susceptibility of materials to shear band formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, R.

    2012-08-01

    In order to characterize materials with respect to their susceptibility to shear band formation at high strain rates, a modified Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus and hat-shaped steel specimens with a shear zone having a width significantly larger than the typical width of adiabatic bands are used. The sample is directly impacted by the striker. The force acting on the sample is measured with a PVDF-gauge between the sample and the output bar. The displacement is recorded with an electro-optical extensometer. The energy absorbed by the shearing process up to failure can be used as a reference for the susceptibility of materials to shear band formation. The method is demonstrated comparing the shear behavior of two high-strength steels with similar metallic structure and strength. Differences were found in the transition region between quasi-static and fully adiabatic shearing conditions where the energy up to rupture differs by 40 %. For fully adiabatic shear band formation, the deformation process of both materials equals. At extreme rates, shear processes are mainly governed by the thermodynamic properties of the materials. On the other hand, strength and structural properties play a role for low and intermediate rates where global and localized shear mechanisms occur in parallel.

  7. A study on the formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) from elemental powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Fe–40 at.% Al discs with coarse iron powder showed precombustion and combustion peaks. • Loose powder mixtures and discs with fine iron powder showed only combustion peaks. • Slower heating rate and fine aluminum particles promote precombustion. • The major product formed during both the reactions was Fe2Al5. • Heating the samples to 1000 °C yielded a stable FeAl phase as the final product. - Abstract: The formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) during the heating of Fe–40 at.% Al powder mixture has been studied using a differential scanning calorimeter. The effect of particle size of the reactants, compaction of the powder mixtures as well as the heating rate on combustion behavior has been investigated. On heating compacted discs containing relatively coarser iron powder, DSC data show two consecutive exothermic peaks corresponding to precombustion and combustion reactions. The product formed during both these reactions is Fe2Al5 and there is a volume expansion in the sample. The precombustion reaction could be improved by a slower heating rate as well as a better surface coverage of iron particles using relatively finer aluminum powder. The combustion reaction was observed to be weaker after a strong precombustion stage. Heating the samples to 1000 °C resulted in the formation of a single and stable FeAl phase through the diffusional reaction between Fe2Al5 and residual iron. DSC results for compacted discs containing relatively finer iron powder and for the non-compacted samples showed a single combustion exotherm during heating, with Fe2Al5 as the product and traces of FeAl. X-ray diffraction and EDS data confirmed the formation of FeAl as the final product after heating these samples to 1000 °C

  8. Experimental method for the evaluation of the susceptibility of materials to shear band formation

    OpenAIRE

    Tham R.

    2012-01-01

    In order to characterize materials with respect to their susceptibility to shear band formation at high strain rates, a modified Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus and hat-shaped steel specimens with a shear zone having a width significantly larger than the typical width of adiabatic bands are used. The sample is directly impacted by the striker. The force acting on the sample is measured with a PVDF-gauge between the sample and the output bar. The displacement is recorded with an electro-optic...

  9. What do we really know about the role of microorganisms in iron sulfide mineral formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude; Gartman, Amy; Girguis, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Iron sulfide mineralization in low-temperature systems is a result of biotic and abiotic processes, though the delineation between these two modes of formation is not always straightforward. Here we review the role of microorganisms in the precipitation of extracellular iron sulfide minerals. We summarize the evidence that links sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and sulfide minerals in nature and we present a critical overview of laboratory-based studies of the nucleation and growth of iron sulfide minerals in microbial cultures. We discuss whether biologically derived minerals are distinguishable from abiotic minerals, possessing attributes that are uniquely diagnostic of biomineralization. These inquiries have revealed the need for additional thorough, mechanistic and high-resolution studies to understand microbially mediated formation of a variety of sulfide minerals across a range of natural environments.

  10. The formation of radiation-induced segregation at twin bands in ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at twins was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steel. Significant RIS was found to occur at twin boundaries. TEM analysis indicates that interfacial dislocations at partially coherent twin boundaries are potential sites for strong RIS phenomenon. The RIS causes the formation of thin bands having a higher Ni and lower Cr concentration in twin bands with a width less than 15 nm. In wider twin bands, strong RIS occurs only at the outer twin boundaries, but not inside the band. The possible mechanism for the formation of the RIS thin band is discussed

  11. Observation of a Hidden Hole-Like Band Approaching the Fermi Level in K-Doped Iron Selenide Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Masanori; Terashima, Kensei; Hamada, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Fukura, Tetsushi; Takeda, Aya; Tanaka, Masashi; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Takano, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Usui, Hidetomo; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Wakita, Takanori; Muraoka, Yuji; Yokoya, Takayoshi

    2016-07-01

    One of the ultimate goals of the study of iron-based superconductors is to identify the common feature that produces the high critical temperature (Tc). In the early days, based on a weak-coupling viewpoint, the nesting between hole- and electron-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) leading to the so-called s± state was considered to be one such key feature. However, this theory has faced a serious challenge ever since the discovery of alkali-metal-doped FeSe (AFS) superconductors, in which only electron-like FSs with a nodeless superconducting gap are observed. Several theories have been proposed, but a consistent understanding is yet to be achieved. Here we show experimentally that a hole-like band exists in KxFe2-ySe2, which presumably forms a hole-like Fermi surface. The present study suggests that AFS can be categorized in the same group as iron arsenides with both hole- and electron-like FSs present. This result provides a foundation for a comprehensive understanding of the superconductivity in iron-based superconductors.

  12. FORMATION OF WEAR-RESISTANT CHROMIUM CAST IRON CASTING INTO THE CHILL MOLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of thermal processes of formation of castings from wearproof chromic cast irons for replaceable details of centrifugal mills and crushers is carried out. Influence of protective and dividing coverings on intensity of heating of the chill mold is investigated.

  13. FORMATION OF WEAR-RESISTANT CHROMIUM CAST IRON CASTING INTO THE CHILL MOLD

    OpenAIRE

    E. I. Marukovich; V. M. Ilyushenko; P. Yu. Duvalov

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of thermal processes of formation of castings from wearproof chromic cast irons for replaceable details of centrifugal mills and crushers is carried out. Influence of protective and dividing coverings on intensity of heating of the chill mold is investigated.

  14. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries. PMID:25320452

  15. STRUCTURE FORMATION OF ALLOYS ON IRON BASIS AFTER LASER ALLOYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Diachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to investigations on influence of laser treatment regimes of gas-thermal and adhesive coatings from self-fluxing powders on iron basis and after melting with modifying plaster on their roughness and phase composition. One of mathematical planning methods that is a complete factor experiment method has been used for investigation of parameters’ influence on micro-geometry of coatings. The executed investigations have made it possible to observe a general regularity which does not depend on a type of alloying plaster: while increasing speed of laser beam relatively to treated part, beam diameter value of Ra parameter is becoming less. Decrease in height of surface irregularities in case of increasing laser beam speed is related with intensification of evaporation processes. An increase in beam diameter diminishes Ra parameter of the surface. This is due to the fact that decrease in power density occurs at high rate of beam defocusing. Overlapping coefficient does not exert a pronounced effect on Ra parameter of fused coatings. While increasing the speed of laser beam relatively to the part structure is transferred from dendrite into supersaturated one with carbide and boride precipitations. It has been established that technological parameters of laser treatment and particularly speed of laser beam influence on coating composition. While increasing the speed up to v5 = 5 × 10–3 m/s amount of chromium has become larger by 1.5-fold that resulted in increase of micro-hardness of the coating from 9.5–10.1 GPa up to 11.04–15.50 GPa.

  16. Effects of iron on intermetallic compound formation in scandium modified Al–Si–Mg Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patakham, Ussadawut [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 114 Thailand Science Park, Klong Nueng, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Limmaneevichitr, Chaowalit, E-mail: chaowalit.lim@mail.kmutt.ac.th [Production Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utid Rd., Bangmod, Tungkhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Iron reduces the modification effects of scandium in Al–Si–Mg alloys. • Morphologies of Sc-rich intermetallic phases vary with Fe and Sc contents and the cooling rates. • Sc neutralizes effects of Fe by changing Fe-rich intermetallic phases from platelets to more cubic. - Abstract: In general, iron has a strong tendency to dissolve in molten aluminum. Iron has very low solid solubility in aluminum–silicon casting alloys, so it will form intermetallic compounds that cause detrimental effects on mechanical properties. In this work, the effects of iron on intermetallic compound formations in scandium modified Al–Si–Mg alloys were studied. There were two levels of iron addition (0.2 and 0.4 wt.%) and two levels of scandium addition (0.2 and 0.4 wt.%). We found that the effects of scandium modification decreased with increasing iron addition. The morphologies of the complex intermetallic compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. It was found that scandium changes the morphology of Fe-rich intermetallic compounds from β-phase (plate-like) to α-phase, which reduces the harmful effects of β-phase.

  17. An experimental study on spontaneous adiabatic shear band formation in electro-magnetically collapsing cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovinger, Z.; Rittel, D.; Rosenberg, Z.

    2015-06-01

    The formation of shear bands in collapsing thick-walled cylinders (TWC) occurs in a spontaneous manner. The advantage of studying spontaneous, as opposed to forced, shear localization, is that it highlights the inherent susceptibility of the material to adiabatic shear banding without prescribed geometrical constraints. In the case of spontaneous shear localization, the role of microstructure (grain size and grain boundaries) on localization, is still unresolved. Using an electro-magnetic set-up, for the collapse of thick-walled cylinders, we examined the shear band formation and evolution in seven metallic alloys, with a wide range of strength and failure properties. To assess microstructural effects, we conducted systematic tests on copper and Ti6Al4V with different grain sizes. Our results match quite well with previously reported data on much larger specimens, showing the absence of a size effect, on adiabatic shearing. However, the measured shear band spacings, in this study, do not match the predictions of, existing analytical models, indicating that the physics of the problem needs to be better modeled.

  18. Sedimentary and tectonic history of the Holowilena Ironstone, a Neoproterozoic iron formation in South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechte, Maxwell Alexander; Wallace, Malcolm William

    2015-11-01

    The Holowilena Ironstone is a Neoproterozoic iron formation in South Australia associated with glacial deposits of the Sturtian glaciation. Through a comprehensive field study coupled with optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and X-ray diffraction, a detailed description of the stratigraphy, sedimentology, mineralogy, and structure of the Holowilena Ironstone was obtained. The Holowilena Ironstone comprises ferruginous shales, siltstones, diamictites, and is largely made up of hematite and jasper, early diagenetic replacement minerals of precursor iron oxyhydroxides, and silica. These chemical precipitates are variably influenced by turbidites and debris flows contributing clastic detritus to the depositional system. Structural and stratigraphic evidence suggests deposition within a synsedimentary half-graben. A model for the Holowilena Ironstone is proposed, in which dense oxic fluids expelled during sea ice formation in the Cryogenian pool in the depression of the half-graben, allowing for long-lived mixing with the ferruginous seawater and the deposition of iron oxides. This combination of glacial dynamics, tectonism, and ocean chemistry may explain the return of iron formations in the Neoproterozoic.

  19. PCDD/F formation in an iron/potassium-catalyzed diesel particle filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Norbert V; Zennegg, Markus; Haag, Regula; Wichser, Adrian; Schmid, Peter; Seiler, Cornelia; Ulrich, Andrea; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Emmenegger, Lukas; Bonsack, Peter; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Kasper, Markus; Mayer, Andreas

    2013-06-18

    Catalytic diesel particle filters (DPFs) have evolved to a powerful environmental technology. Several metal-based, fuel soluble catalysts, so-called fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs), were developed to catalyze soot combustion and support filter regeneration. Mainly iron- and cerium-based FBCs have been commercialized for passenger cars and heavy-duty vehicle applications. We investigated a new iron/potassium-based FBC used in combination with an uncoated silicon carbide filter and report effects on emissions of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs). The PCDD/F formation potential was assessed under best and worst case conditions, as required for filter approval under the VERT protocol. TEQ-weighted PCDD/F emissions remained low when using the Fe/K catalyst (37/7.5 μg/g) with the filter and commercial, low-sulfur fuel. The addition of chlorine (10 μg/g) immediately led to an intense PCDD/F formation in the Fe/K-DPF. TEQ-based emissions increased 51-fold from engine-out levels of 95 to 4800 pg I-TEQ/L after the DPF. Emissions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the most toxic congener (TEF = 1.0), increased 320-fold, those of 2,3,7,8-TCDF (TEF = 0.1) even 540-fold. Remarkable pattern changes were noticed, indicating a preferential formation of tetrachlorinated dibenzofurans. It has been shown that potassium acts as a structural promoter inducing the formation of magnetite (Fe3O4) rather than hematite (Fe2O3). This may alter the catalytic properties of iron. But the chemical nature of this new catalyst is yet unknown, and we are far from an established mechanism for this new pathway to PCDD/Fs. In conclusion, the iron/potassium-catalyzed DPF has a high PCDD/F formation potential, similar to the ones of copper-catalyzed filters, the latter are prohibited by Swiss legislation. PMID:23713673

  20. Preparation of Ni-B Coating on Carbonyl Iron and Its Microwave Absorption Properties in the X Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Zhou, Wan-Cheng; Qing, Yu-Chang

    2014-09-01

    Ni-B coated carbonyl iron particles (CI@Ni-B) are prepared by the electroless plating technique. The structure, morphology, and antioxidant properties of the CI@Ni-B particles are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the CI particles have been coated with intact spherical-shell Ni-B coating, indicating the core-shell structure of CI@Ni-B particles, and the Ni-B coating can prevent the further oxidation of the CI particles. Compared with the raw CI particles/paraffin coatings with the same coating thickness of 2.0 mm and particles content of 70%, the CI@Ni-B particles/paraffin coatings possess higher microwave absorption (the RL exceeding -10 dB is obtained in the whole X band (8.2-12.4 GHz) with minimal RL of -35.0 dB at 9.2 GHz).

  1. Clear band formation simulated by dislocation dynamics: Role of helical turns and pile-ups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogaret, Thomas [SIMAP-GPM2, INP Grenoble, CNRS/UJF, BP46, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); SRMA, CEA DEN/DMN Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Rodney, David [SIMAP-GPM2, INP Grenoble, CNRS/UJF, BP46, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)], E-mail: dvd.rodney@gmail.com; Fivel, Marc [SIMAP-GPM2, INP Grenoble, CNRS/UJF, BP46, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Robertson, Christian [SRMA, CEA DEN/DMN Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-10-15

    We present dislocation dynamics simulations of the glide of dislocations in random populations of Frank loops. Specific local rules of interaction are developed to reproduce elementary interaction mechanisms obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. We show that absorption of Frank loops as helical turns on screw dislocations is at the heart of the process of clear band formation because (1) it transforms the loops into jogs on dislocations, (2) when the dislocations unpin, the jogs are transported along the dislocation lines, leading to a progressive clearing of the band and (3) the dislocations are re-emitted in a glide plane different from the initial one, allowing for a broadening of the band. We also show that isolated dislocations cannot form a clear band of finite thickness because the clearing process would be limited to one plane tilted with respect to the {l_brace}111{r_brace} primary plane. Rather, a pile-up of dislocations is needed, leading to collective effects between dislocations that are analyzed in details.

  2. Microstructures and formation mechanism of hypoeutectic white cast iron by isothermal electromagnetic rheocast process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wanning

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was made on the evolution of microstructures of hypoeutectic white cast iron slurry containing 2.5wt.%C and 1.8wt.%Si produced by rheocasting in which the solidifying alloy was vigorously agitated by electromagnetic stirrer during isothermal cooling processes. The results indicated that under the proper agitating temperatures and speeds applied, the dendrite structures in white cast iron slurry were gradually evolved into spherical structures during a certain agitating time. It also revealed that the bent dendrites were formed by either convection force or by the growth of the dendrites themselves in the bending direction; then, as they were in solidifying, they were gradually being alternated into separated particles and into more spherical structures at the end of the isothermal cooling process. Especially, the dendrites were granulated as the bending process proceeding, which suggested that they were caused by unwanted elements such as sulfur and phosphor usually contained in engineering cast iron. Convective flow of the melt caused corrosion on the dendritic segments where they were weaker in strength and lower in melting temperature because of higher concentration of sulfur or phosphor. And the granulation process for such dendrites formed in the melt became possible under the condition. Certainly, dendrite fragments are another factors considerable to function for spherical particles formation. A new mechanism, regarding to the rheocast structure formation of white cast iron, was suggested based on the structural evolution observed in the study.

  3. Formation of oriented nitrides by N+ ion implantation in iron single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron single crystals were implanted with nitrogen at room temperature, with a fluence of 5×1017 cm−2 and 50 keV energy, to produce iron nitride phases and characterize the influence of the crystal orientation. The stability and evolution of the nitride phases and diffusion of implanted nitrogen were studied as a function of successive annealing treatments at 250 °C in vacuum. The composition, structure and magnetic properties were characterized using RBS/channeling, X-Ray Diffraction, Magnetic Force Microscopy, Magneto-optical Kerr Effect and Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy. In the as-implanted state the formation of Fe2N phase was clearly identified in all single crystals. This phase is not stable at 250 °C and annealing at this temperature promotes the formation of ε-Fe3N, or γ′-Fe4N, depending on the orientation of the substrate. - Highlights: • Oriented magnetic iron nitrides were obtained by nitrogen implantation into iron single crystals. • The stable magnetic nitride phase at 250 °C depends on the orientation of the host single crystal, being γ'-Fe4N or ε-Fe3N. • The easy magnetization axis was found to lay in the (100) plane for cubic γ'-Fe4N and out of (100) plane for hexagonal ε-Fe3N

  4. Pressure-induced magneto-structural transition in iron via a modified solid-state nudged elastic band method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-03-01

    Materials under pressure may exhibit critical electronic and structural transitions that affect equation of states, as known for superconductors and the magneto-structural transformations of iron with both geophysical and planetary implications. While experiments often use constant-pressure (diamond-anvil cell, DAC) measurements, many theoretical results address a constant-volume transitions, which avoid issues with magnetic collapse but cannot be directly compared to experiment. We establish a modified solid-state nudge elastic band (MSS-NEB) method to handle magnetic systems that may exhibit moment (and volume) collapse during transformation. We apply it to the pressure-induced transformation in iron between the low-pressure body-centered cubic (bcc) and the high-pressure hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phases, find the bcc-hcp equilibrium coexistence pressure and a transitional pathway, and compare to shock and DAC experiments. We use methods developed with support by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-03ER46026 and DE-AC02-07CH11358). Ames Laboratory is operated for the DOE by Iowa State University under contract DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  5. Geochemistry and source of iron-formation from Guanhaes group, Guanhaes district, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Guanhaes district is underlain by metavolcano-sedimentary rocks of the Guanhaes Group, emplaced over an older Archean basement and intruded by granitic bodies. The Guanhaes Group is composed of pelitic, mafic and ultramafic schists at the base; silicate and carbonate facies iron-formation, calcarious schists, calcsilicates rocks and quartzites at the median portion and para-gneisses (meta-graywacks) at the top. Geochemistry of iron-formation suggest a hydrothermal affinity comparable to the hydrothermal sediments flanking East Pacific Rise. Paragenetic studies indicates that the rocks were submited to two metamorphic processes: one of regional character (high-amphibolite facies) and one of themal character (pyroxene-hornfels facies). Chemical analysis, as X-ray and optic spectrography, atomic absorption and plasma spectrography are presented. (author)

  6. Atomistic Explanation of Shear-Induced Amorphous Band Formation in Boron Carbide

    OpenAIRE

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Cheng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Boron carbide (B_4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (011 ¯  1 ¯ )/⟨1 ¯ 101⟩ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon ...

  7. Synergistic Activities of an Efflux Pump Inhibitor and Iron Chelators against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth and Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Liang; Molin, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The efflux pump inhibitor phenyl-arginine-beta-naphthylamide (PA beta N) was paired with iron chelators 2,2'-dipyridyl, acetohydroxamic acid, and EDTA to assess synergistic activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth and biofilm formation. All of the tested iron chelators synergistically...

  8. EPR demonstration of iron-nitrosyl complex formation by cytotoxic activated macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated macrophage cytotoxicity is characterized by loss of intracellular iron and inhibition of certain enzymes that have catalytically active nonheme-iron coordinated to sulfur. This phenomenon involves the oxidation of one of the terminal guanidino nitrogen atoms of L-arginine, which results in the production of citrulline and inorganic nitrogen oxides (NO2-, NO3-, and NO). We report here the results of an electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic study performed on cytotoxic activated macrophage (CAM) effector cells, which develop the same pattern of metabolic inhibition as their targets. Examination of activated macrophages from mice infected with Mycobacterium bovis (strain bacillus Calmette-Guerin) that were cultured in medium with lipopolysaccharide and L-arginine showed the presence of an axial signal at g = 2.039, which is similar to previously described iron-nitrosyl complexes formed from the destruction of iron-sulfur centers by nitric oxide (NO). Inhibition of the L-arginine-dependent pathway by addition of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (methyl group on a terminal guanidino nitrogen) inhibits the production of nitrite, nitrate, citrulline, and the g = 2.039 signal. Comparison of the hyperfine structure of the signal from cells treated with L-arginine with terminal guanidino nitrogen atoms of natural abundance N14 atoms or labeled with N15 atoms showed that the nitrosyl group in this paramagnetic species arises from one of these two atoms. These results show that loss of iron-containing enzyme function in CAM is a result of the formation of iron-nitrosyl complexes induced by the synthesis of nitric oxide from the oxidation of a terminal guanidino nitrogen atom of L-arginine

  9. Dislocation dynamics. II. Applications to the formation of persistent slip bands, planar arrays, and dislocation cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic organization of dislocations into spatially heterogeneous substructures is demonstrated by applying the principles of dislocation dynamics that were outlined in the preceding paper. Here it is shown that the formation of persistent slip bands is a consequence of the competition between dipole formation and annihilation of dislocations of opposite Burgers vectors in the absence of temperature-enhanced climb recovery under cyclic stress conditions. Planar arrays, which are also uniaxial structures, are shown to arise from enhanced dislocation multiplication and the formation of stable dipole configurations along a slip plane at lower temperatures where climb is unimportant. Biaxial dislocation systems experience additional degrees of freedom compared with uniaxial systems because of available motion along additional slip systems. It is demonstrated that for a system of orthogonal slip directions at high temperatures in which climb and glide motion are competitive, dislocation cellular structures form as a result of immobile dipole and junction formation and by the internal elastic strain energy minimization caused by long-range self-shielding. It is shown that the internal elastic strain energy is reduced by the self-organization process. However, the short-range nonlinear processes (i.e., dipole and junction formation) are shown not to allow absolute elastic energy minimization

  10. IRON-TOLERANT CYANOBACTERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASTROBIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Igor I.; Allen, Carlton C.; Mummey, Daniel L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; McKay, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to the new group of extremophiles - iron tolerant cyanobacteria. The authors have analyzed earlier published articles about the ecology of iron tolerant cyanobacteria and their diversity. It was concluded that contemporary iron depositing hot springs might be considered as relative analogs of Precambrian environment. The authors have concluded that the diversity of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria is understudied. The authors also analyzed published data about the physiological peculiarities of iron tolerant cyanobacteria. They made the conclusion that iron tolerant cyanobacteria may oxidize reduced iron through the photosystem of cyanobacteria. The involvement of both Reaction Centers 1 and 2 is also discussed. The conclusion that iron tolerant protocyanobacteria could be involved in banded iron formations generation is also proposed. The possible mechanism of the transition from an oxygenic photosynthesis to an oxygenic one is also discussed. In the final part of the review the authors consider the possible implications of iron tolerant cyanobacteria for astrobiology.

  11. Synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy of weak torsional bands: A case study of cis-methyl formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudorie, M.; Ilyushin, V.; Vander Auwera, J.; Pirali, O.; Roy, P.; Huet, T. R.

    2012-08-01

    The far infrared spectrum of cis-methyl formate has been recorded on the AILES beamline of the synchrotron SOLEIL using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer coupled to a long path cell. The very weak fundamental band associated with the methyl-top torsion mode (ν18) was observed. The frequency analysis was performed using the "rho axis method", and the microwave and millimeter-wave data from the literature. A precise determination of the band origins ({ν }_{18}^A = 132.4303 cm-1 and {ν }_{18}^E = 131.8445 cm-1) and of the barrier height [V3 = 370.7398 (58) cm-1] have been obtained. The intensity of the ν18 fundamental band was determined to be 3.4 × 10-21 cm-1/(molecule cm-2) at 297 K, equally shared among A-A and E-E transitions, thus leading to a dipole moment component μc(3) equal to 0.0483 D. The results were compared with the ab initio calcula-tions of Senent et al. [Astrophys. J. 627, 567 (2005)], 10.1086/430201.

  12. High Magnetic Field-Induced Formation of Banded Microstructures in Lamellar Eutectic Alloys During Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Gagnoud, Annie; Ren, Zhongming; Moreau, Rene

    2016-06-01

    The influences of high magnetic field (up to 12 T) on the morphology of Pb-Sn and Al-Al2Cu lamellar eutectics during directional solidification were investigated. The experimental results indicate that, along with a decrease in eutectic spacing, the banded structure forms at lower growth speeds under high magnetic field and the band spacing decreases as the magnetic field increases. Moreover, the application of a magnetic field enriches the Cu solute in the liquid ahead of the liquid/solid interface during directional solidification of an Al-Al2Cu eutectic alloy. The effects of high magnetic field on the eutectic points of non-ferromagnetic alloys and the stress acting on the eutectic lamellae during directional solidification have been studied. Both thermodynamic evaluation and DTA measurements reveal that the high magnetic field has a negligible effect on the eutectic points of non-ferromagnetic alloys. However, the high magnetic field caused an increase of the nucleation temperature and undercooling. The numerical results indicate that a considerable stress is produced on the eutectic lamellae during directional solidification under high magnetic field. The formation of a banded structure in a lamellar eutectic during directional solidification under high magnetic field may be attributed to both the buildup of the solute in the liquid ahead of the liquid/solid interface and the stress acting on the eutectic lamellae.

  13. Effect of band filling in the paramagnetic tetragonal phase of iron chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The normal state of layered Fe-chalcogenide superconductors shows a range of anomalous, non-Fermi liquid responses. Unconventional metallic resistivity, characteristic pseudogap and saturating features and proximity to insulating states mark these systems as correlated metals. Motivated thereby, we use a combination of first-principles and many-particle calculations to show that multiband electronic correlations generate a low-energy pseudogap in the normal state of Fe(Te,Se) end-members, which, depending on the band filling, promotes incoherent metallic or orbital-selective insulating states. Upon comparison, good qualitative agreement with experimental (photoemission and electrical resistivity) data of FeTe1−xSe x systems is found. Based on observed charge transport we propose that the parent bulk compounds are best described as partially filled multiband systems. (paper)

  14. Microstructural characterization and formation mechanism of abnormal segregation band of hot rolled ferrite/pearlite steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Rui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Engineering Research Center of Large Size Alloy Structural Steel Bars of Shandong Province, Jinan 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Li, Shengli, E-mail: lishengli@sdu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Engineering Research Center of Large Size Alloy Structural Steel Bars of Shandong Province, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhu, Xinde [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Ao, Qing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Engineering Research Center of Large Size Alloy Structural Steel Bars of Shandong Province, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2015-10-15

    In order to further reveal the microstructural characterization and formation mechanism of abnormal segregation band of hot rolled ferrite/pearlite steel, the microstructure of this type steel was intensively studied with Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM), etc. The results show that severe C–Mn segregation exists in the abnormal segregation band region at the center of hot rolled ferrite/pearlite steel, which results from the Mn segregation during solidification process of the continuous casting slab. The C–Mn segregation causes relative displacement of pearlite transformation curve and bainite transformation curve of C curve in the corresponding region, leading to bay-like shaped C curve. The bay-like shaped C curve creates conditions for the transformation from supercooling austenite to bainite at relatively lower cooling rate in this region. The Fe–Mn–C Atomic Segregation Zone (FASZ) caused by C–Mn segregation can powerfully retard the atomic motion, and increase the lattice reconstruction resistance of austenite transformation. These two factors provide thermodynamic and kinetic conditions for the bainite transformation, and result in the emergence of granular bainitic abnormal segregation band at the center of steel plate, which leads to lower plasticity and toughness of this region, and induces the layered fracture. - Highlights: • Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM) is applied in the fracture analysis. • The abnormal segregation band region appears obvious C–Mn segregation. • The C–Mn segregation leads to bay-like shaped C curve. • The C–Mn segregation leads to Fe–Mn–C Atomic Segregation Zone.

  15. Microstructural characterization and formation mechanism of abnormal segregation band of hot rolled ferrite/pearlite steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to further reveal the microstructural characterization and formation mechanism of abnormal segregation band of hot rolled ferrite/pearlite steel, the microstructure of this type steel was intensively studied with Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM), etc. The results show that severe C–Mn segregation exists in the abnormal segregation band region at the center of hot rolled ferrite/pearlite steel, which results from the Mn segregation during solidification process of the continuous casting slab. The C–Mn segregation causes relative displacement of pearlite transformation curve and bainite transformation curve of C curve in the corresponding region, leading to bay-like shaped C curve. The bay-like shaped C curve creates conditions for the transformation from supercooling austenite to bainite at relatively lower cooling rate in this region. The Fe–Mn–C Atomic Segregation Zone (FASZ) caused by C–Mn segregation can powerfully retard the atomic motion, and increase the lattice reconstruction resistance of austenite transformation. These two factors provide thermodynamic and kinetic conditions for the bainite transformation, and result in the emergence of granular bainitic abnormal segregation band at the center of steel plate, which leads to lower plasticity and toughness of this region, and induces the layered fracture. - Highlights: • Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM) is applied in the fracture analysis. • The abnormal segregation band region appears obvious C–Mn segregation. • The C–Mn segregation leads to bay-like shaped C curve. • The C–Mn segregation leads to Fe–Mn–C Atomic Segregation Zone

  16. The formation of IIE iron meteorites investigated by the chondrule-bearing Mont Dieu meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosbroek, N.; Debaille, V.; Pittarello, L.; Goderis, S.; Humayun, M.; Hecht, L.; Jourdan, F.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Vanhaecke, F.; Claeys, Ph.

    2015-07-01

    A 435 kg piece of the Mont Dieu iron meteorite (MD) contains cm-sized silicate inclusions. Based on the concentration of Ni, Ga, Ge, and Ir (8.59 ± 0.32 wt%, 25.4 ± 0.9 ppm, 61 ± 2 ppm, 7.1 ± 0.4 ppm, respectively) in the metal host, this piece can be classified as a IIE nonmagmatic iron. The silicate inclusions possess a chondritic mineralogy and relict chondrules occur throughout the inclusions. Major element analysis, oxygen isotopic analysis (Δ17O = 0.71 ± 0.02‰), and mean Fa and Fs molar contents (Fa15.7 ± 0.4 and Fs14.4 ± 0.5) indicate that MD originated as an H chondrite. Because of strong similarities with Netschaëvo IIE, MD can be classified in the most primitive subgroup of the IIE sequence. 40Ar/39Ar ages of 4536 ± 59 Ma and 4494 ± 95 Ma obtained on pyroxene and plagioclase inclusions show that MD belongs to the old (~4.5 Ga) group of IIE iron meteorites and that it has not been perturbed by any subsequent heating event following its formation. The primitive character of MD sheds light on the nature of its formation process, its thermal history, and the evolution of its parent body.

  17. Formation of high-valent iron-oxo species in superoxide reductase: characterization by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnot, Florence; Tremey, Emilie; von Stetten, David; Rat, Stéphanie; Duval, Simon; Carpentier, Philippe; Clemancey, Martin; Desbois, Alain; Nivière, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    Superoxide reductase (SOR), a non-heme mononuclear iron protein that is involved in superoxide detoxification in microorganisms, can be used as an unprecedented model to study the mechanisms of O2 activation and of the formation of high-valent iron-oxo species in metalloenzymes. By using resonance Raman spectroscopy, it was shown that the mutation of two residues in the second coordination sphere of the SOR iron active site, K48 and I118, led to the formation of a high-valent iron-oxo species when the mutant proteins were reacted with H2O2. These data demonstrate that these residues in the second coordination sphere tightly control the evolution and the cleavage of the O-O bond of the ferric iron hydroperoxide intermediate that is formed in the SOR active site. PMID:24777646

  18. Effects of Iron Chelators on the Formation and Development of Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazik, Hasan; Penner, John C; Ferreira, Jose A; Haagensen, Janus A J; Cohen, Kevin; Spormann, Alfred M; Martinez, Marife; Chen, Vicky; Hsu, Joe L; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2015-10-01

    Iron acquisition is crucial for the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus. A. fumigatus biofilm formation occurs in vitro and in vivo and is associated with physiological changes. In this study, we assessed the effects of Fe chelators on biofilm formation and development. Deferiprone (DFP), deferasirox (DFS), and deferoxamine (DFM) were tested for MIC against a reference isolate via a broth macrodilution method. The metabolic effects (assessed by XTT [2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide inner salt]) on biofilm formation by conidia were studied upon exposure to DFP, DFM, DFP plus FeCl3, or FeCl3 alone. A preformed biofilm was exposed to DFP with or without FeCl3. The DFP and DFS MIC50 against planktonic A. fumigatus was 1,250 μM, and XTT gave the same result. DFM showed no planktonic inhibition at concentrations of ≤2,500 μM. By XTT testing, DFM concentrations of biofilms forming in A. fumigatus or preformed biofilms (P biofilm formation (P Biofilm formation with 625 μM DFP plus any concentration of FeCl3 was lower than that in the controls (P biofilms, DFP in the range of ≥625 to 1,250 μM was inhibitory compared to the controls (P biofilm formation (P biofilm increased with 2,500 μM FeCl3 only (P biofilms of A. fumigatus clinical isolates to DFP were noted. In conclusion, iron stimulates biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. Chelators can inhibit or enhance biofilms. Chelation may be a potential therapy for A. fumigatus, but we show here that chelators must be chosen carefully. Individual isolate susceptibility assessments may be needed. PMID:26239975

  19. Iron-tolerant Cyanobacteria as a Tool to Study Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Iron Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Cooksey, K. E.; McKay, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    We are investigating biological mechanisms of terrestrial iron deposition as analogs for Martian hematite recently confirmed by. Possible terrestrial analogs include iron oxide hydrothermal deposits, rock varnish, iron-rich laterites, ferricrete soils, moki balls, and banded iron formations (BIFs). With the discovery of recent volcanic activity in the summit craters of five Martian volcanoes, renewed interest in the iron dynamics of terrestrial hydrothermal environments and associated microorganisms is warranted. In this study we describe a new genus and species of CB exhibiting elevated dissolved iron tolerance and the ability to precipitate hematite on the surface of their exopolymeric sheathes.

  20. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  1. Formation and mitigation of PCDD/Fs in iron ore sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Tze Chean; Lu, Liming

    2011-10-01

    The sintering of iron ore is presently a significant industrial source of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) worldwide owing to the fundamental requirement of the operation of a high temperature process to pre-treat fines and to recycle plant by-products arising from the integrated iron and steelworks. The process is a noteworthy contributor of PCDD/F indirectly due to decreasing PCDD/F releases from municipal solid waste incineration. Commonly PCDD/F formation from the process is associated with the addition of oily mill scales although raw material containing a combination of C, Cl and specific metal catalyst has been shown to drastically increase PCDD/F formation in the process. The degenerate graphitic structure of carbon present in coke fuel and soot formed and the chemistry of catalytic metals and Cl are important factors. A review on PCDD/F emission in this process has been carried out, including examination of its formation mechanism, congener distribution, contributing factors and mitigation strategies, with emphasis on the use of inhibiting compound to achieve suppression. A detailed analysis of the de novo and precursor theories of formation and the contributing factor is given since the subject of PCDD/F formation is still controversial. The de novo formation pathway identified in sinter plants and controlled studies performed in the laboratory as well as at pilot-scale are discussed; where appropriate, a comparison is drawn between sintering and other thermal processes emitting PCDD/Fs. Summary of the latest developments in PCDD/F downstream abatement strategies presently employed in full scale industrial plants is provided. Potential inhibiting compounds are discussed in terms of their mode of action and merits under sintering conditions. PMID:21880347

  2. Kinetic study of austenite formation during continuous heating of unalloyed ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Gómez, Octavio; Barrera-Godínez, José Antonio; Vergara-Hernández, Héctor Javier

    2015-01-01

    The austenite formation kinetics in unalloyed cast ductile iron was studied on the basis of dilatometry measurements, and Avrami's equation was used to estimate the material's kinetic parameters. A continuous heating transformation diagram was constructed using heating rates in the range of 0.06 to 0.83°C·s-1. As the heating rate was augmented, the critical temperatures, A c1 and A α, as well as the intercritical range, which was evaluated as the difference between the critical temperatures, Δ T = A α - A c1, increased. At a low heating rate, the kinetics of austenite formation was slow as a consequence of the iron's silicon content. The effect of heating rate on k and n, the kinetic parameters of Avrami's equation, was also determined. Parameter n, which is associated with nucleation sites and growth geometry, decreased with an increase in heating rate. In addition, parameter k increased with the increase of heating rate, suggesting that the nucleation and growth rates are carbon- and silicon-diffusion controlled during austenite formation under continuous heating.

  3. The effect of hydrogen and helium on microvoid formation in iron and nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation experiments on iron and nickel were carried out to study the effect of hydrogen and helium ions on microvoid formation. The total dose was 1.0x1017 hydrogen ions/cm2 (0.2 dpa) and 9.6x1015 helium ions/cm2 (0.3 dpa). The irradiation temperature was 423 and 573 K. To investigate microvoid formation and the total amount of residual defects, positron annihilation lifetime and coincidence Doppler broadening measurements were made. The results for positron lifetime indicated that vacancy clusters grew more easily in nickel than in iron and helium atoms were more effective for microvoid formation than hydrogen atoms. The temperature dependence of microvoid growth was greater after irradiation with hydrogen ions than helium ions between 423 and 573 K in both metals. Annealing experiments for nickel irradiated with hydrogen and helium ions at 423 k were carried out at up to 573 K and the stability of helium-vacancy complexes was clarified

  4. Mechanism of formation of wiggly compaction bands in porous sandstone: 1. Observations and conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun; Pollard, David D.; Deng, Shang; Aydin, Atilla

    2015-12-01

    Field observations are combined with microscopic analyses to investigate the mechanism of formation of wiggly compaction bands (CBs) in the porous Jurassic aeolian Aztec Sandstone exposed at Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada. Among the three types of CBs (T1, T2, and T3), we focused on the wiggly CBs (T3), which show a chevron (T31) or wavy (T32) pattern with typical corner angles of approximately 90° or 130°, respectively. Where corner angles of wiggly CBs increase to 180°, they become straight CBs (T33). Image analyses of thin sections using an optical microscope show host rock porosity increases downslope in this dune, and the predominant type of wiggly CBs also varies from chevron to straight CBs. Specifically, band type varies continuously from chevron to wavy to straight where the porosity and grain sorting of the host rock increase systematically. Based on the crack and anticrack models, we infer that the change from chevron to straight CBs is due to increasing failure angle of the sandstone and this may correlate with increasing grain sorting. Wavy CBs with intermediate failure angle and host rock porosity are an intermediate stage between chevron and straight CBs. Previous sedimentological studies also have suggested that grain size and sorting degree increase downslope on the downwind side of sand dunes due to a sieving process of the wind-blown grains. Therefore, the transition of wiggly CB types in this regard correlates with increasing sorting and perhaps with increasing porosity downslope.

  5. Atomistic explanation of shear-induced amorphous band formation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-29

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (0111)/ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C. PMID:25215991

  6. Atomistic Explanation of Shear-Induced Amorphous Band Formation in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (011¯ 1¯)/⟨1¯101⟩ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C.

  7. Vacancy type defect formation in irradiated α-iron investigated by positron beam Doppler broadening technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacancy type defects formations have been investigated in virgin and irradiated a-iron samples using slow positron beam Doppler broadening technique. Mono-vacancies and vacancy clusters are observed in 1.5 MeV 4He ions irradiated Fe samples at varying fluences from 1×1013 to 1×1017 cm−2. In the 1.2 MeV Yttrium ions implantation at low fluence 1×1014 cm−2 vacancy clusters with higher concentration and larger size are formed. In this sample, vacancy defects are detected deeper than predicted by SRIM calculation due to channelling.

  8. Effects of iron and manganese on the formation of HAAs upon chlorinating Chlorella vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Fei, E-mail: gefei@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Egongtang Road, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Wu, Xiuzhen; Wang, Na; Zhu, Runliang; Wang, Tong; Xu, Yin [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Egongtang Road, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The major objective of the present study was to investigate the role of iron and manganese on the formation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) when algae are chlorinated at different pHs. The results showed that both iron and manganese can reduce the yields of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) on chlorinating green alga Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) at a pH range of 6.0-9.0, and the decline of DCAA and TCAA was shown to be more significant at the low pH range. At pH 6.0, DCAA and TCAA yields decreased by 44.5% and 57.3%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L{sup -1} iron, and decreased 39.5% and 49.4%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L{sup -1} manganese. The main reason for decreasing the yields of HAAs as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) is that Fe(OH){sub 3(am)} or MnO{sub 2(am)} coat the algal cells{sub ,} which then improves their agglomeration of algal cells which is also revealed by the laser particle size analysis (LPSA).

  9. The role of polyaniline in the formation of iron-containing nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzon, Lorena M. A., E-mail: aranzazl@tcd.ie; Ackland, Karl; Mosivand, Saba; Venkatesan, M.; Coey, J. M. D. [Trinity College Dublin, Physics Department (Ireland)

    2013-04-15

    Polyaniline (PANI)-coated iron-based nanocomposites with a range of magnetisation and coercivity values were produced by in situ polymerisation of aniline and chemical reduction of Fe{sup 3+} by BH{sub 4}{sup -}. We have varied the ratio of aniline to iron, keeping the amount of BH{sub 4}{sup -} added constant, and vice versa. Room-temperature magnetisation loops, X-ray diffraction patterns, Moessbauer spectra and transmission electron microscopy images show that PANI plays two distinct roles: on the one hand, it coats the iron particle surface, preventing oxidation of the Fe cores and, on the other, it enhances the formation of an Fe{sub 100-x}B{sub x} alloy. The incorporation of boron in the alloy is facilitated by the polymer entrapment of small Fe nuclei. The mean particle size determined for composites obtained with low PANI content is (50 {+-} 20) nm, while for PANI-rich composites (30 {+-} 10) nm particles are formed.

  10. Characterisation of iron inclusion during the formation of calcium sulfoaluminate phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The iron distribution among the sulfoaluminate clinker phases and its ability to enter the calcium sulfoaluminate lattice in solid solution can have a significant influence on manufacturing process and reactivity of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Moessbauer spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis system (EDAX) and infrared spectroscopy were used to identify the mineralogical conditions of iron inclusion during the formation of calcium sulfoaluminate (C4A3S) phase from different mixtures in the CaO-Al2O3-Fe2O3-SO3 system. The mixtures, heated in a laboratory electric oven, contained stoichiometric amounts of reagent grade CaCO3, Al2O3, Fe2O3 and CaSO4.2H2O for the synthesis of Ca4Al(6-2x)Fe2xSO16, where x, comprised between 0 and 3, is the mole number of Al2O3 substituted by Fe2O3. With x increasing from 0 to 1.5, both the iron content of C4A3S phase and the amounts of side components such as C2F and CS increased. For x values included in the range of 1.5-3.0, at temperatures higher than 1200 oC, melting phenomena were observed and, instead of the C4A3S solid solution, ferritic phases and anhydrite were formed.

  11. Effect of sintering properties on the formation of Yttrium iron garnet by powder preparation method for microwave ferrite resonator antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triyttrium Pentairon (III) Oxide (Y3Fe5O12) or familiar called as Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) is successfully prepared using a conventional mixed-oxide method of 5:3 Fe to Y ratios. YIG prepared from conventional mixed-oxide usually produced some associated phase which surely will affect electrical properties. In this study, various temperature used in the sintering process to induce associated phases (YIP) to be fully reacting to form single phase of YIG and the effect on resonance frequency is studied for resonator applications. The mixtures of oxide powders are calcined at 1100 degree Celsius and sintered at various temperatures of (1350, 1380, 1400, 1420, 1450 degree Celsius, respectively). Cubic phase is detected from the formation of YIG. Some other phases such as YIP and hematite also present as secondary phase. However, it is seen that, based on the Rietveld refinement method, the total amount of secondary phase simulated are inversely proportional with sintering temperature. The powder was pressed into cylindrical pellet and tested as a microwave resonator in antenna application. It was found that, on the actual antenna circuit the operating frequencies measured are in the range of 10-12 GHz for all samples which suitable for X-band. At the end, overall radiation pattern for all samples exhibit an omni directional behavior. (Author)

  12. The Role of Short-Range Order and Hyperuniformity in the Formation of Band Gaps in Disordered Photonic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Froufe-Pérez, Luis S; Damasceno, Pablo F; Muller, Nicolas; Haberko, Jakub; Glotzer, Sharon C; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We study photonic band gap formation in two-dimensional high refractive index disordered ma- terials where the dielectric structure is derived from packing disks in real and reciprocal space. Numerical calculations of the photonic density of states demonstrate the presence of a band gap for all polarizations in both cases. We find that the band gap width is controlled by the increase in positional correlation inducing short-range order and hyperuniformity concurrently. Our findings suggest that the optimization of short-range order, in particular the tailoring of Bragg scattering at the isotropic Brillouin zone, are of key importance for designing disordered PBG materials.

  13. The effect of initial iron concentration and pH on the radiolytic formation of γ-FeOOH nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles under gamma irradiation is a process in the infancy of its understanding. Herein we present work to describe how initial iron concentration and pH impact the growth of radiolytically formed nanoparticles. These results can be used to better understand the activity transport processes occurring within a reactor environment which may pose both environmental and safety concerns. Preliminary results suggest that the final particle size is proportional to the initial dissolved iron concentration, while experiments probing the effect of solution pH are ongoing. (author)

  14. The effect of iridium(III) ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krehula, Stjepko, E-mail: krehul@irb.hr [Division of Materials Chemistry, Ruder Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Music, Svetozar [Division of Materials Chemistry, Ruder Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-03-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the influence of Ir{sup 3+} ions on the precipitation of iron oxides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} doping in {alpha}-FeOOH caused significant changes in the microstructural properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} doping in {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} caused an increase in the Morin transition temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} ions caused a phase transformation {alpha}-(Fe,Ir)OOH {yields} {alpha}-(Fe,Ir){sub 2}O{sub 3} {yields} Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} + Ir{sup 0}. - Abstract: The effect of the presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline precipitation system was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Monodispersed lath-like {alpha}-FeOOH (goethite) particles precipitated by hydrothermal treatment in a highly alkaline medium with the addition of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) were used as reference material. The presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions in the precipitation system strongly influenced the phase composition, magnetic, structural and morphological properties of obtained samples. The formation of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite) along with {alpha}-FeOOH in the first stage of hydrothermal treatment and the transformation of {alpha}-FeOOH and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite) by a longer hydrothermal treatment was caused by the presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions. Ir{sup 3+} for Fe{sup 3+} substitution in the structure of {alpha}-FeOOH brought about changes in unit-cell dimensions, crystallinity, particle size and shape, hyperfine magnetic field and infrared bands positions. Ir{sup 3+} for Fe{sup 3+} substitution in the structure of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} led to an increase in the temperature of the Morin transition; Moessbauer spectroscopy showed the presence of

  15. The effect of iridium(III) ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Study of the influence of Ir3+ ions on the precipitation of iron oxides. ► Ir3+ doping in α-FeOOH caused significant changes in the microstructural properties. ► Ir3+ doping in α-Fe2O3 caused an increase in the Morin transition temperature. ► Ir3+ ions caused a phase transformation α-(Fe,Ir)OOH → α-(Fe,Ir)2O3 → Fe3O4 + Ir0. - Abstract: The effect of the presence of Ir3+ ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline precipitation system was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), 57Fe Mössbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Monodispersed lath-like α-FeOOH (goethite) particles precipitated by hydrothermal treatment in a highly alkaline medium with the addition of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) were used as reference material. The presence of Ir3+ ions in the precipitation system strongly influenced the phase composition, magnetic, structural and morphological properties of obtained samples. The formation of α-Fe2O3 (hematite) along with α-FeOOH in the first stage of hydrothermal treatment and the transformation of α-FeOOH and α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 (magnetite) by a longer hydrothermal treatment was caused by the presence of Ir3+ ions. Ir3+ for Fe3+ substitution in the structure of α-FeOOH brought about changes in unit-cell dimensions, crystallinity, particle size and shape, hyperfine magnetic field and infrared bands positions. Ir3+ for Fe3+ substitution in the structure of α-Fe2O3 led to an increase in the temperature of the Morin transition; Mössbauer spectroscopy showed the presence of α-Fe2O3 in the antiferromagnetically ordered state at 293 K.

  16. Microstructure evolution associated with adiabatic shear bands and shear band failure in ballistic plug formation in Ti-6Al-4V targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructures and microstructure evolution associated with adiabatic shear band (ASB) formation in ballistic plugging in thick (2.5 cm) Ti-6Al-4V targets impacted by cylindrical, 4340 steel projectiles (2.0 cm in height) at impact velocities ranging from 633 m/s to 1027 m/s (just above the ballistic limit) were investigated by optical and transmission electron microscopy. ASB width increased from 10 μm to 21 μm as the velocity increased. ASB evolution was accompanied by the evolution of dark deformation bands composed of α' martensite platelets which increased in density with increasing impact velocity. The corresponding Vickers microindentation hardness also increased from HV 619 to HV 632 in contrast to the surrounding matrix microindentation hardness of HV 555. These deformation bands were not necessarily precursors to ASB formation. The ASB average Vickers microindentation hardness was essentially constant at HV 645, a 16% increase over the matrix. This constant microindentation hardness was characterized by a consistent DRX grain structure which varied from equiaxed, defect-free grains (∼2 μm diameter) to heavily dislocated, equiaxed grains. Cracks nucleating and propagating within the ABSs were observed to increase from 8% to 87% of the ASB length with increasing impact velocity.

  17. Warm dust and aromatic bands as quantitative probes of star-formation activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Roussel, H.; Sauvage, M.; Charmandaris, V.

    2004-05-01

    We combine samples of spiral galaxies and starburst systems observed with ISOCAM on board ISO to investigate the reliability of mid-infrared dust emission as a quantitative tracer of star formation activity. The total sample covers very diverse galactic environments and probes a much wider dynamic range in star formation rate density than previous similar studies. We find that both the monochromatic 15 μm continuum and the 5-8.5 μm emission constitute excellent indicators of the star formation rate as quantified by the Lyman continuum luminosity LLyc, within specified validity limits which are different for the two tracers. Normalized to projected surface area, the 15 μm continuum luminosity Σ15 μm,ct is directly proportional to ΣLyc over several orders of magnitude. Two regimes are distinguished from the relative offsets in the observed relationship: the proportionality factor increases by a factor of ≈5 between quiescent disks in spiral galaxies, and moderate to extreme star-forming environments in circumnuclear regions of spirals and in starburst systems. The transition occurs near ΣLyc ˜ 102 L⊙ pc-2 and is interpreted as due to very small dust grains starting to dominate the emission at 15 μm over aromatic species above this threshold. The 5-8.5 μm luminosity per unit projected area is also directly proportional to the Lyman continuum luminosity, with a single conversion factor from the most quiescent objects included in the sample up to ΣLyc ˜ 104 L⊙ pc-2, where the relationship then flattens. The turnover is attributed to depletion of aromatic band carriers in the harsher conditions prevailing in extreme starburst environments. The observed relationships provide empirical calibrations useful for estimating star formation rates from mid-infrared observations, much less affected by extinction than optical and near-infrared tracers in deeply embedded H II regions and obscured starbursts, as well as for theoretical predictions from evolutionary

  18. Effect of iron-oxide formations on the heat transfer in a NPP once-through steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glebov, V.P.; Taratuta, V.A.; Trubachev, V.M.; Ehskin, N.B.

    1983-04-01

    Results of investigations into changes in the heat transfer characteristic of the heating surfaces of a once-through steam generating element due to fouling caused by iron oxide deposition are presented. Graphs of distribution of amount, thickness and porosity of iron oxide formations over the length of an experimental section are given, as well as graphs of the temperatures distribution in tube metal with and without formations. Heat transfer coefficients for clean and fouled heating surfaces, duration of a period between washings are determined. The results obtained are recommended for calculation and operation of a once-through steam generator.

  19. Effect of iron-oxide formations on the heat transfer in a NPP once-through steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of investigations into changes in the heat transfer characteristic of the heating surfaces of a once-through steam generating element due to fouling caused by iron oxide deposition are presented. Graphs of distribution of amount, thickness and porosity of iron oxide formations over the length of an experimental section are given, as well as graphs of the temperatures distribution in tube metal with and without formations. Heat transfer coefficients for clean and fouled heating surfaces, duration of a period between washings are determined. The results obtaned are recommended for calculation and operation of a once-through steam generator

  20. Rapid Formation of Distributed Plasma Discharges using X-Band Microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xun; Booske, John; Scharer, John

    2015-11-01

    Observations of rapidly formed (polycarbonate windows is used to observe microwave breakdown in Ar and Ne gas mixtures from 10 to 760 torr. The chamber is illuminated by the output of 25 kW, 0.8 μs pulse-width, 9.382 GHz magnetron through an X-band waveguide pressed against the polycarbonate window. Measured incident and reflected microwave power is used to detect the discharge and absorption and transmission characteristics as the pressure is varied. Measurements show 70% reflected power once plasma is formed and a small amount of Argon in Neon shortens the breakdown time. An E-plane tapered waveguide is designed to enhance the electric field at the breakdown surface so that breakdown condition is improved. Additionally, an ICCD provides fast (<50 ns) time-scale optical images of the plasma, revealing the plasma formation and decay processes. Optical emission spectroscopy branching ratio measurements provide plasma breakdown characteristics including electron temperatures and the electron energy distribution functions for different Ne/Ar gas mixture plasmas formed at 10-200 torr. Experiments show that inclusion of both red and blue argon lines significantly enhances the effective electron temperature and the distribution function solutions, compared with using only red lines.

  1. Investigations of void formation in neutron irradiated iron and F82H steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, Bachu Narain

    2002-01-01

    In the present work pure iron and low activation steel F82H have been neutron irradiated at temperatures in the interval 50 deg.C - 350 deg.C to a dose of 0.23 dpa (displacements per atom). The formation of defects has been investigated by the use ofpositron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). In...... irradiation temperatures of 50 deg.C and 100 deg.C also a high density of micro-voids was observed. Voids and micro-voids were also detected in lowactivation F82H steel for a low irradiation temperature (50 deg.C), while for irradiation close to the temperature of annealing stage V (250 deg.C), no voids or...... below stage V by migration andcoalescence of the micro-voids and voids. The dose dependence of the electrical conductivity of iron showed a lower conductivity for the specimens irradiated at 50 deg.C than at 100 deg.C. This has been associated with the segregation of carbon at about70 deg.C where carbon...

  2. LuxS mediates iron-dependent biofilm formation, competence, and fratricide in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappetti, Claudia; Potter, Adam J; Paton, Adrienne W; Oggioni, Marco R; Paton, James C

    2011-11-01

    During infection, Streptococcus pneumoniae exists mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. The capacity to form biofilms is believed to be important for nasopharyngeal colonization as well as disease pathogenesis, but relatively little is known about the regulation of this process. Here, we investigated the effect of exogenous iron [Fe(III)] as well as the role of luxS (encoding S-ribosylhomocysteine lyase) on biofilm formation by S. pneumoniae D39. Fe(III) strongly enhanced biofilm formation at concentrations of ≥50 μM, while Fe(III) chelation with deferoxamine was inhibitory. Importantly, Fe(III) also upregulated the expression of luxS in wild-type D39. A luxS-deficient mutant (D39luxS) failed to form a biofilm, even with Fe(III) supplementation, whereas a derivative overexpressing luxS (D39luxS+) exhibited enhanced biofilm formation capacity and could form a biofilm without added Fe(III). D39luxS exhibited reduced expression of the major Fe(III) transporter PiuA, and the cellular [Fe(III)] was significantly lower than that in D39; in contrast, D39luxS+ had a significantly higher cellular [Fe(III)] than the wild type. The release of extracellular DNA, which is an important component of the biofilm matrix, also was directly related to luxS expression. Similarly, genetic competence, as measured by transformation frequency as well as the expression of competence genes comD, comX, comW, cglA, and dltA and the murein hydrolase cbpD, which is associated with fratricide-dependent DNA release, all were directly related to luxS expression levels and were further upregulated by Fe(III). Moreover, mutagenesis of cbpD blocked biofilm formation. We propose that competence, fratricide, and biofilm formation are closely linked in pneumococci, and that luxS is a central regulator of these processes. We also propose that the stimulatory effects of Fe(III) on all of these parameters are due to the upregulation of luxS expression, and that

  3. LuxS Mediates Iron-Dependent Biofilm Formation, Competence, and Fratricide in Streptococcus pneumoniae ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappetti, Claudia; Potter, Adam J.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Oggioni, Marco R.; Paton, James C.

    2011-01-01

    During infection, Streptococcus pneumoniae exists mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. The capacity to form biofilms is believed to be important for nasopharyngeal colonization as well as disease pathogenesis, but relatively little is known about the regulation of this process. Here, we investigated the effect of exogenous iron [Fe(III)] as well as the role of luxS (encoding S-ribosylhomocysteine lyase) on biofilm formation by S. pneumoniae D39. Fe(III) strongly enhanced biofilm formation at concentrations of ≥50 μM, while Fe(III) chelation with deferoxamine was inhibitory. Importantly, Fe(III) also upregulated the expression of luxS in wild-type D39. A luxS-deficient mutant (D39luxS) failed to form a biofilm, even with Fe(III) supplementation, whereas a derivative overexpressing luxS (D39luxS+) exhibited enhanced biofilm formation capacity and could form a biofilm without added Fe(III). D39luxS exhibited reduced expression of the major Fe(III) transporter PiuA, and the cellular [Fe(III)] was significantly lower than that in D39; in contrast, D39luxS+ had a significantly higher cellular [Fe(III)] than the wild type. The release of extracellular DNA, which is an important component of the biofilm matrix, also was directly related to luxS expression. Similarly, genetic competence, as measured by transformation frequency as well as the expression of competence genes comD, comX, comW, cglA, and dltA and the murein hydrolase cbpD, which is associated with fratricide-dependent DNA release, all were directly related to luxS expression levels and were further upregulated by Fe(III). Moreover, mutagenesis of cbpD blocked biofilm formation. We propose that competence, fratricide, and biofilm formation are closely linked in pneumococci, and that luxS is a central regulator of these processes. We also propose that the stimulatory effects of Fe(III) on all of these parameters are due to the upregulation of luxS expression, and that

  4. Nitric oxide formation in an iron oxide pellet rotary kiln furnace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R A

    1998-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model was developed to simulate the effects of heat and mass transfer on the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in a rotary kiln furnace for iron oxide pellet induration. The modeled kiln has a length-to-diameter ratio of approximately seven. The principal mechanism of heat transfer is radiation from the flame, which was described by the net radiation method. The well known Zeldovich mechanism was used to predict thermal NOx generation. Temperature fluctuations in the vicinity of the flame were estimated with a clipped Gaussian probability density function. The thermal energy and mass balance model equations were solved numerically. The model is capable of predicting temperature profiles and NOx production rates in agreement with observed plant performance. The model was used to explore the effects of process changes on the total NOx formation in the kiln. It was concluded that the gas temperature as well as the partial pressure of oxygen in the process gases controls the rate of NOx formation. Lowering the temperature of the kiln gases by increasing the secondary air flow rates requires simultaneously decreasing the pellet production rate in order to maintain the pellet temperatures needed for blast furnace conditions. PMID:15655997

  5. Formation of environmentally persistent free radical (EPFR) in iron(III) cation-exchanged smectite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Ugwumsinachi G; Roy, Amitava; dela Cruz, Albert Leo N; Dellinger, Barry; Cook, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have been found at a number of Superfund sites, with EPFRs being formed via a proposed redox process at ambient environmental conditions. The possibility of such a redox process taking place at ambient environmental conditions is studied utilizing a surrogate soil system of phenol and iron(III)-exchanged calcium montmorillonite clay, Fe(III)CaM. Sorption of phenol by the Fe(III)CaM is demonstrated by Fourier-transformed infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, as evidenced by the peaks between 1345 cm(-1) and 1595 cm(-1), and at lower frequencies between 694 cm(-1) and 806 cm(-1), as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, as shown by an increase in interlayer spacing within Fe(III)CaM. The formation and characterization of the EPFRs is determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, showing phenoxyl-type radical with a g-factor of 2.0034 and ΔHP-P of 6.1 G at an average concentration of 7.5 × 10(17) spins per g. EPFRs lifetime data are indicative of oxygen and water molecules being responsible for EPFR decay. The change in the oxidation state of the iron redox center is studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, showing that 23% of the Fe(III) is reduced to Fe(II). X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results confirm the XANES results. These findings, when combined with the EPFR concentration data, demonstrate that the stoichiometry of the EPFR formation under the conditions of this study is 1.5 × 10(-2) spins per Fe(II) atom. PMID:26647158

  6. Development of an X-ray Telescope with a Large Effective Area for the Iron K Line Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hironori; Tachibana, Sasagu; Yoshikawa, Shun; Tamura, Keisuke; Mori, Hideyuki; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Tawara, Yuzuru; Kunieda, Hideyo; Yamashita, Kojun

    2015-08-01

    X-ray micro-calorimeters such as the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on board ASTRO-H will enable precise spectroscopy of iron K lines even for spatially extended objects. To exploit the full power of the high-energy resolution, X-ray telescopes with a large effective area around 6 keV are essentially important. Conventional Wolter-I X-ray telescopes aimed at X-rays below 10 keV have used the principle of total reflection to collect the X-rays. Enlarging the diameter of this type of telescopes is not effective to obtain the large effective area, since the incident angle of X-rays for the outer part of the telescope exceeds the critical angle, and the X-ray reflectivity of the outer part is significantly low. For example, the critical angle of Ir for an X-ray of 6 keV is 0.748 deg. Thus if we assume a focal length of 6 m for a Wolter-I optics using mirrors covered with Ir as a reflector, the mirrors the radial position of which are larger than 34 cm cannot reflect X-rays above 6 keV effectively. If multi-layer mirrors are applied to the outer part of the telescope, however, the X-ray reflectivity can be enhanced significantly by the principle of Bragg reflection. Our objective is to develop a Wolter-I X-ray telescope with an aperture of 110 cm and a focal length of 6 m, and make all mirrors in the telescope can reflect X-rays around 6 keV effectively by utilizing the multi-layer mirrors. The size of the telescope is determined by a boundary condition that can be launched by the epsilon rocket of ISAS/JAXA. The multi-layer is designed to enhance the reflectivity at 6.4 keV, 6.7 keV, or 6.9 keV. Our simulation suggests that the effective area averaged in the 5.7-7.7 keV band could be 2000 cm2, whichis comparable to the effective area of Athena launched in 2028 by ESA. Furthermore, we showed that the Ir/C multi-layers produced by our DC magnetron sputtering machine has a surface roughness of less than 4 angstrom. This value is smaller than the average surface roughness

  7. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F. [Calisolar GmbH, Magnusstrasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Möller, C. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany); TU Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Str. 32, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Lauer, K. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany)

    2013-11-11

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  8. An in-depth spectroscopic examination of molecular bands from 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres I. Formation of the G-band in metal-poor dwarf stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, A J; Bonifacio, P; Ludwig, H -G; Steffen, M; Spite, M

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in the three-dimensional (3D) spectral synthesis code Linfor3D have meant that, for the first time, large spectral wavelength regions, such as molecular bands, can be synthesised with it in a short amount of time. A detailed spectral analysis of the synthetic G-band for several dwarf turn-off-type 3D atmospheres (5850 <= T_eff [K] <= 6550, 4.0 <= log g <= 4.5, -3.0 <= [Fe/H] <= -1.0) was conducted, under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We also examine carbon and oxygen molecule formation at various metallicity regimes and discuss the impact it has on the G-band. Using a qualitative approach, we describe the different behaviours between the 3D atmospheres and the traditional one-dimensional (1D) atmospheres and how the different physics involved inevitably leads to abundance corrections, which differ over varying metallicities. Spectra computed in 1D were fit to every 3D spectrum to determine the 3D abundance correction. Early analysis revealed that the ...

  9. Iron is an essential cause of fishy aftertaste formation in wine and seafood pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Yumiko; Okubo, Toshiyuki; Takata, Ryoji; Konno, Tomonori

    2009-09-23

    Fishy aftertaste is sometimes perceived in wine with fish and seafood pairing. However, what component of wine clashes with seafood or what compound contributes to the unpleasant fishy aftertaste in the mouth remains an open problem. First, intensities of unpleasant fishy aftertaste of wine and dried scallop pairings were rated by sensory analysis. Second, components of the wines were analyzed. Strong positive correlations were found between the intensity of fishy aftertaste and the concentration of both total iron and ferrous ion. Moreover, the intensity of fishy aftertaste was increased by the addition of ferrous ion in model wine and suppressed by the chelation of ferrous ion in red wine. Third, potent volatile compounds of fishy aftertaste, such as hexanal, heptanal, 1-octen-3-one, (E,Z)-2,4-heptadienal, nonanal, and decanal, were determined by gas chromatography-olfactometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in dried scallop soaked in red wine. The formations of these compounds depended on the dose of ferrous ion in the model wine. These results suggest that ferrous ion is a key compound of the formation of fishy aftertaste in wine and seafood pairing within the concentration range commonly found in wine. PMID:19708656

  10. PECULIARITIES OF PROCESSES OF CARBIDE FORMATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF Cr, Mn AND Ni IN WHITE CAST IRONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During crystallization of castings from white cast iron, carbides Me3С, Me7С3, Me23С6 were formed depending on chromium and carbon content. Impeded chromium diffusion caused formation of thermodynamically unstable and non-uniform phases (carbides. During heat treatment process stable equilibrium phases were formed as a result of rearrangement of the carbides’ crystal lattice, replacement of iron, manganese, nickel and silicon atoms by chromium atoms. The allocated atoms concentrated, forming inclusions of austenite inside the carbides. Holding during 9 hours at 720 °С and annealing decreased the non-uniformity of chromium distribution in the metallic base of cast iron containing 11,5 % Cr, and increased it in the cast iron containing 21,5 % Cr. Holding during 4.5 hours at 1050 °С and normalization decreased the non-uniformity of chromium distribution in the metallic base of cast iron containing 21,5 % Cr, and increased it in cast iron containing 11,5 % Cr.

  11. Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

    2011-07-01

    Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

  12. Mineralization features and iron formation of Huimin- and Jiangfeng-style ore deposits in Lancangjiang iron ore belt%澜沧江铁矿带惠民式-疆峰式铁矿床特征与含铁建造

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许东; 任治机; 余海军; 尹光侯; 段建中

    2011-01-01

    A study of the Huimin- and Jiangfeng-style iron deposits has revealed that the marine volcanogene sedimentary type Huimin and Jiangfeng ore deposits are controlled by metamorphosed intermediate-basic volcanic formation. The former (Huimin-style) consists of both banded iron formation (BIF) and granular iron formation (GIF) whereas the latter (Jiangfeng-style), consists only of banded iron formations (BIF). The possess of the formation of Proterozoic bended siliceous iron formation possesses the features of "a large-scale supply of aqueous iron from the oceanic hydrothermal system; the existence of large continental shelves to serve as deposition repositories and a stratified ocean capable of connecting the two", thus satisfying the three essential factors for forming large-size volcanogene-exhalative-sedimentary type iron deposits. The Lancangjiang iron ore belt is composed of Huimin- and Jiangfeng-style ore deposits hosted by strata of Proterozoic Huimin Group and Damenglong Group, and the evolutional characteristics of syngenetic exhalative sedimentary-hypogene alteration-supergene leaching and enrichment are obvious. The Huimin-style iron ore deposits of Huimin Formation in the Lancang Group belong to the volcano-sedimentary Superior Lake type, in association with manganese, whereas the Jiangfeng-style iron ore deposits of Damenglong Group may be regarded as the volcano-exhalative Algoma type characterized by the existence of minor sulfur. On the whole, for the mineralization from volcano-exhalativesedimentation to metamorphism and transformation we can find the relevant parts from the ore deposit metallo-genic model, and hence the model offers a great potential in search for bended iron formation in this region.%通过对惠民式和疆峰式铁矿的研究,认为它们都是受变质中基性火山岩建造控制的海相火山-沉积型铁矿床,前者兼有条带状含铁建造(BIF)和粒状含铁建造(GIF)的特征,而后者则为条带状含铁建造.它

  13. Large Format Narrow Band High Throughput Optical Filters for 0.5-2.75 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the most efficient ways to create narrow band filter is the use of reflective Bragg gratings or which allow increasing of efficiency and decreasing of weight...

  14. The formation of magnetic carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles using precipitation from an aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of spinel iron-oxide nanoparticles during the co-precipitation of Fe3+/Fe2+ ions from an aqueous solution in the presence of carboxymethyldextrane (CMD) was studied. To follow the formation of the nanoparticles, a mixture of the Fe ions, CMD and ammonia was heated to different temperatures, while the samples were taken, quenched in liquid nitrogen, freeze-dried and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and magnetometry. The CMD plays a role in the reactions of the Fe ions' precipitation by partially immobilizing the Fe3+ ions into a complex. At room temperature, the amorphous material is precipitated. Then, above approximately 30 °C, the spinel nanoparticles form inside the amorphous matrix, and at approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles. The CMD bonded to the nanoparticles' surfaces hinders the mass transport and thus prevents their growth. - Highlights: • The carboxymethyl-dextrane coated iron-oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • The carboxymethyl-dextrane significantly modifies formation of the spinel nanoparticles. • The spinel nanoparticles are formed inside the amorphous matrix. • At approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles

  15. The formation of magnetic carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles using precipitation from an aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makovec, Darko [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gyergyek, Sašo, E-mail: saso.gyergyek@ijs.si [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Primc, Darinka [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Plantan, Ivan [Lek Pharmaceuticals d.d., Mengeš (Slovenia)

    2015-03-01

    The formation of spinel iron-oxide nanoparticles during the co-precipitation of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ions from an aqueous solution in the presence of carboxymethyldextrane (CMD) was studied. To follow the formation of the nanoparticles, a mixture of the Fe ions, CMD and ammonia was heated to different temperatures, while the samples were taken, quenched in liquid nitrogen, freeze-dried and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and magnetometry. The CMD plays a role in the reactions of the Fe ions' precipitation by partially immobilizing the Fe{sup 3+} ions into a complex. At room temperature, the amorphous material is precipitated. Then, above approximately 30 °C, the spinel nanoparticles form inside the amorphous matrix, and at approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles. The CMD bonded to the nanoparticles' surfaces hinders the mass transport and thus prevents their growth. - Highlights: • The carboxymethyl-dextrane coated iron-oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • The carboxymethyl-dextrane significantly modifies formation of the spinel nanoparticles. • The spinel nanoparticles are formed inside the amorphous matrix. • At approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles.

  16. Enhanced formation of silver nanoparticles in Ag+-NOM-iron(II, III) systems and antibacterial activity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegboyega, Nathaniel F; Sharma, Virender K; Siskova, Karolina M; Vecerova, Renata; Kolar, Milan; Zbořil, Radek; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2014-03-18

    This work reports the role of iron redox pair (Fe(3+)/Fe(2+)) in the formation of naturally occurring silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the aquatic environment. The results showed that Fe(3+) or Fe(2+) ions in the mixtures of Ag(+) and natural organic matter enhanced the formation of AgNPs. The formation of AgNPs depended on pH and types of organic matter. Increase in pH enhanced the formation of AgNPs, and humic acids as ligands showed higher formation of AgNPs compared to fulvic acids. The observed results were described by considering the potentials of redox pairs of silver and iron species and the possible species involved in reducing silver ions to AgNPs. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy measurements of AgNPs revealed mostly bimodal size distribution with decrease in size of AgNPs due to iron species in the reaction mixture. Minimum inhibitory concentration of AgNPs needed to inhibit the growth of various bacterial species suggested the role of surfaces of tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Stability study of AgNPs, formed in Ag(+)-humic acid/fulvic acids-Fe(3+) mixtures over a period of several months showed high stability of the particles with significant increase in surface plasmon resonance peak. The environmental implications of the results in terms of fate, transport, and ecotoxicity of organic-coated AgNPs are briefly presented. PMID:24524189

  17. Transport through a triple quantum dot system: Formation of resonance band and its application as a spin filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zelong [Institute of Condensed-Matter Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Heilongjiang Institute of Technology, Harbin 150050 (China); Lü, Tianquan, E-mail: ltq@hit.edu.cn [Institute of Condensed-Matter Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2012-07-23

    A three-quantum-dot spin filter based on nonequilibrium Green's function technique is proposed with external magnetic flux, Rashba spin orbit interaction, and intradot coulomb interaction taken into consideration. Numerical results indicate a spin filter can be made efficient by adjusting external magnetic flux and Rashba spin orbit interaction. Moreover, the formation of a resonance band is discussed through calculation. It is observed that the possibility of transition from one peak to other three peaks in the conductance spectrum increases with increasing interdot coupling strength. -- Highlights: ► Investigation of the conductance through a triple quantum dot system. ► Proposal of an efficient spin-filter device. ► Discussion on the formation of the resonance band. ► Study on spin polarization with intradot Coulomb interaction taken into consideration.

  18. Threshold for formation of atom-photon bound states in a coherent photonic band-gap reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hanzhuang

    2016-05-01

    We study the threshold for the formation of atom-photon bound (APB) states from a two-level atom embedded in a coherent photonic band-gap (PBG) reservoir. It is shown that the embedded position of the atom plays an important role in the threshold. By varying the atomic embedded position, a part of formation range of APB states can be moved from inside to outside the band gap. The direct link between the steady-state entanglement and APB states is also investigated. We show that the values of entanglement between reservoir modes reflect the amount of bounded energy caused by APB states. The feasible experimental systems for verifying the above phenomena are discussed. Our results provide a clear clue on how to form and control APB states in PBG materials.

  19. Formation of spanwise vorticity in oblique turbulent bands of transitional plane Couette flow, part 2: modelling and stability analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rolland, Joran

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a modelling of the formation of spanwise vorticity in the turbulent streaks of the oblique bands and spots of transitional plane Couette flow. A functional model is designed to mimic the coherent flow in the streaks. The control parameters of the model are extracted from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) statistical data. A Reynolds stress is proposed to study the effect on the instability of this additional force maintaining the baseflow. Local (quasi-parallel) temporal stability analysis is performed on that model to investigate the linear development of the spanwise vorticity. Results show that average profiles, even if they have an inflection, are stable: the shear layers inside the velocity streaks are responsible for the vorticity formation. Emphasis is put on the convective or absolute nature of the instability, depending on the location in the band. This shows that a transition from a convective to an absolute instability occurs in the zone in between fully turbulent and laminar...

  20. Iron oxidation on the surface of adventitious roots and its relation to aerenchyma formation in rice genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquel Jonas Holzschuh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of the water layer in an irrigated rice crop leads to consumption of free oxygen in the soil which enters in a chemical reduction process mediated by anaerobic microorganisms, changing the crop environment. To maintain optimal growth in an environment without O2, rice plants develop pore spaces (aerenchyma that allow O2 transport from air to the roots. Carrying capacity is determined by the rice genome and it may vary among cultivars. Plants that have higher capacity for formation of aerenchyma should theoretically carry more O2 to the roots. However, part of the O2 that reaches the roots is lost due to permeability of the roots and the O2 gradient created between the soil and roots. The O2 that is lost to the outside medium can react with chemically reduced elements present in the soil; one of them is iron, which reacts with oxygen and forms an iron plaque on the outer root surface. Therefore, evaluation of the iron plaque and of the formation of pore spaces on the root can serve as a parameter to differentiate rice cultivars in regard to the volume of O2 transported via aerenchyma. An experiment was thus carried out in a greenhouse with the aim of comparing aerenchyma and iron plaque formation in 13 rice cultivars grown in flooded soils to their formation under growing conditions similar to a normal field, without free oxygen. The results indicated significant differences in the volume of pore spaces in the roots among cultivars and along the root segment in each cultivar, indicating that under flooded conditions the genetic potential of the plant is crucial in induction of cell death and formation of aerenchyma in response to lack of O2. In addition, the amount of Fe accumulated on the root surface was different among genotypes and along the roots. Thus, we concluded that the rice genotypes exhibit different responses for aerenchyma formation, oxygen release by the roots and iron plaque formation, and that there is a direct

  1. Formation and coupling of band gaps in a locally resonant elastic system comprising a string with attached resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A uniform string with periodically attached spring-mass resonators represents a simple locally resonant continuous elastic system whose band gap mechanisms are basic to more general and complicated problems. In this Letter, analytical models with explicit formulations are provided to understand the band gap mechanisms of such a system. Some interesting phenomena are demonstrated and discussed, such as asymmetric/symmetric attenuation behavior within a resonance gap, and the realization of a super-wide gap due to exact coupling between Bragg and resonance gaps. In addition, some approximate formulas for the evaluation of low frequency resonance gaps are derived using an approach different from existing investigations. - Research highlights: → We examine band gaps in a special one-dimensional locally resonant system. → Bragg and resonance gaps co-exist. → Explicit formulas for locating band edges are derived. → Exact physical models are used to clarify the band gap formation mechanisms. → Coupling between Bragg and resonance gaps leads to a super-wide gap.

  2. Formation of biomineral iron oxides compounds in a Fe hyperaccumulator plant: Imperata cylindrica (L.) P. Beauv.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente, V; Rufo, L; Juárez, B H; Menéndez, N; García-Hernández, M; Salas-Colera, E; Espinosa, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed work of composition and location of naturally formed iron biominerals in plant cells tissues grown in iron rich environments as Imperata cylindrica. This perennial grass grows on the Tinto River banks (Iberian Pyritic Belt) in an extreme acidic ecosystem (pH∼2.3) with high concentration of dissolved iron, sulphate and heavy metals. Iron biominerals were found at the cellular level in tissues of root, stem and leaf both in collected and laboratory-cultivated plants. Iron accumulated in this plant as a mix of iron compounds (mainly as jarosite, ferrihydrite, hematite and spinel phases) was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), magnetometry (SQUID), electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX; TEM-EDX; HRSTEM). A low fraction of phosphorous was detected in this iron hyperaccumulator plant. Root and rhizomes tissues present a high proportion of ferromagnetic iron oxide compounds. Iron oxides-rich zones are localized in electron dense intra and inter-cellular aggregates that appear as dark deposits covering the inner membrane and organelles of the cell. This study aims to contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms of accumulation, transport, distribution of iron in Imperata cylindrica. PMID:26592710

  3. All-Optical RZ to NRZ Format Conversion Using Single SOA Assisted by Optical Band-Pass Filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel all-optical format conversion from the return-to-zero (RZ) to the non-return-to-zero (NRZ) based on single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and optical band-pass filter (OBF). We demonstrate the proof of the principle experiment at 10Gbps by using the test SOA and OBF converter. The format conversion can be achieved with output extinction ratio of 11.51 dB. The BER is 5.5 × 10−9 when the power of NRZ is −10 dBm. The proposed scheme is robust and potential for applications in optical networks. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  4. Self-heating of dried industrial tannery wastewater sludge induced by pyrophoric iron sulfides formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, R; Biasin, A; Canu, P; Della Zassa, M; Refosco, D; Simionato, F; Zerlottin, M

    2016-03-15

    Similarly to many powders of solids, dried sludge originated from tannery wastewater may result in a self-heating process, under given circumstances. In most cases, it causes a moderate heating (reaching 70-90°C), but larger, off-design residence times in the drier, in a suboxic atmosphere, extremely reactive solids can be produced. Tannery waste contains several chemicals that mostly end up in the wastewater treatment sludge. Unexpected and uncontrolled self heating could lead to a combustion and even to environmental problems. Elaborating on previous studies, with the addition of several analytical determinations, before and after the self-heating, we attempted to formulate a mechanism for the onset of heating. We demonstrated that the system Fe/S/O has been involved in the process. We proved that the formation of small quantities of pyrophoric iron sulfides is the key. They are converted to sulfated by reaction with water and oxygen with exothermic processes. The pyrite/pyrrhotite production depends on the sludge drying process. The oxidation of sulfides to oxides and sulfates through exothermic steps, reasonably catalyzed by metals in the sludge, occurs preferentially in a moist environment. The mechanism has been proved by reproducing in the laboratory prolonged heating under anoxic/suboxic atmosphere. PMID:26651067

  5. A new mechanism of loop formation and transformation in bcc iron without dislocation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Gao, N.; Jung, P.; Sauvage, T.

    2013-10-01

    Structure and kinetics of dislocation loops in α-Fe is an active field in material science, due to their implications on fundamental understanding as well as application of structural materials in irradiation environments. Recent computer simulations provoke new conceptions, which call for experimental verification. The present investigation reports transmission electron microscopy of small interstitial dislocation loops (2.5-10 nm diameters) in bcc iron, irradiated with 25 MeV α-particles at 573 K up to 0.13 dpa. The observed and ½ loops have habit planes of (1 0 0), and (1 1 0), (1 1 1) and (2 1 1), respectively. Furthermore it is observed that loops also contain ½{2 1 1} and {1 0 0} components which are considered as intermediate stages of transformation of ½ loops to . Based on these observations, a new mechanism of loop formation and transformation by self-interstitial atoms aggregation is proposed, with concurrent molecular dynamic simulations supporting the kinetic feasibility of the proposed process.

  6. Performance assessments for the disposal of low-level wastes into an iron-ore formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes producing negligible heat production are planned to be disposed of into a deep iron ore formation in Lower Saxony. For this repository at the Konrad site a performance assessment has been carried out as part of the licensing procedure. As a first part of the exercise the flow of groundwater has been modelled and scenarios for nuclide migration have been established. The assumptions for the groundwater modelling and the results from the calculations are explained and the resulting scenarios are described. In the second part the release of radionuclides from the near field has been investigated. The release from near field is influenced by the degradation of the waste forms, the retention of radionuclides by sorption and precipitation and the groundwater flow through the repository system. Finally in part three of the exercise the migration of radionuclides through the geosphere is considered. The simplified model used for migration calculations has been extracted from the groundwater modelling. For migration modelling, sorption and dispersion phenomena, and dilution by fresh water are taken into account. The results obtained from the groundwater modelling, the release calculations, and the migration modelling are presented. The relevance of the considered phenomena are discussed

  7. The Effect of Sulfur Concentration in Liquid Iron on Mineral Layer Formation During Coke Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Michael W.; Monaghan, Brian J.; Nightingale, Sharon A.; Mathieson, John G.; Nightingale, Robert J.

    2011-08-01

    The effects of sulfur concentration in liquid iron on mineral layer development between coke and iron as coke dissolves in a 2 mass pct carbon-iron liquid have been investigated at 1773 K (1500 °C). The initial sulfur in iron concentrations used ranged from 0.006 to 0.049 mass pct. Key findings include that the two-stage dissolution behavior exhibited in the carbon transfer from coke to iron, as reported in a previous study by the authors, at low initial sulfur in iron contents, was also apparent at the higher values used in this study. This two-stage behavior was attributed to a change in the mineral layer density as a result of changes in mineral morphology at the interface. In addition to confirming the two-stage behavior of the carbon-transfer kinetics at the higher sulfur concentration in iron levels, after a period of time, a solid calcium sulfide layer formed on the mineral layer. The sulfide layer formed after approximately 40 minutes, and the proportion of sulfide in the mineral layer increased with increased experimental time and initial sulfur concentration in iron. It was usually found at the iron side of the mineral layer and was associated with calcium-enriched calcium aluminates. Thermodynamic analysis of this layer confirmed that the sulfide is stabilized as the mineral layer is enriched by calcium.

  8. Influence of thermomechanical processing on shear bands formation and magnetic properties of a 3% Si non-oriented electrical steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of thermomechanical processing on the formation of shear bands and on the magnetic properties of a 3.0 wt% silicon non-oriented steel was investigated by hot rolling samples with different thicknesses at different temperatures, in order to obtain a variation in hot band grain size and cold strain. All the samples were processed in a single-stage cold rolling and finally annealed at 1020 deg. C. It was found that the increase of the hot band grain size decreases the γ fiber volume fraction and increases the η fiber volume fraction after the final annealing. The increase of the cold strain strongly contributed to this result. A good combination of intense generation of shear bands, and proper crystallographic texture, due to higher nucleation of grains with favorable orientations to magnetization in these bands, can be obtained for the samples hot rolled at 1000 and 1120 deg. C and submitted to cold strain of 64.3% and 72.2% respectively. However the best combination of B50, W15/60 and μr can be obtained by hot rolling the samples at 1000 deg. C to the thickness of 1.4 mm, corresponding to 64.3% of cold strain. - Highlights: → Effect of processing on the magnetic properties of a non-oriented electrical steel. → Shear band generation during cold rolling is essential to reach a favorable texture. → Great magnetic properties obtained by hot rolling at 1000 deg. C and 64.3% cold strain.

  9. Analysis of band-gap formation in squashed arm-chair CNT

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrer, H; Anantram, M P; Elstner, M; Frauenheim, T

    2005-01-01

    The electronic properties of squashed arm-chair carbon nanotubes are modeled using constraint free density functional tight binding molecular dynamics simulations. Independent from CNT diameter, squashing path can be divided into {\\it three} regimes. In the first regime, the nanotube deforms with negligible force. In the second one, there is significantly more resistance to squashing with the force being $\\sim 40-100$ nN/per CNT unit cell. In the last regime, the CNT looses its hexagonal structure resulting in force drop-off followed by substantial force enhancement upon squashing. We compute the change in band-gap as a function of squashing and our main results are: (i) A band-gap initially opens due to interaction between atoms at the top and bottom sides of CNT. The $\\pi-$orbital approximation is successful in modeling the band-gap opening at this stage. (ii) In the second regime of squashing, large $\\pi-\\sigma$ interaction at the edges becomes important, which can lead to band-gap oscillation. (iii) Contr...

  10. Signatures of recent asteroid disruptions in the formation and evolution of solar system dust bands

    CERN Document Server

    Kehoe, A J Espy; Colwell, J E; Dermott, S F

    2015-01-01

    We have performed detailed dynamical modeling of the structure of a faint dust band observed in coadded IRAS data at an ecliptic latitude of 17$^{\\circ}$ that convincingly demonstrates that it is the result of a relatively recent (significantly less than 1 Ma) disruption of an asteroid and is still in the process of forming. We show here that young dust bands retain information on the size distribution and cross-sectional area of dust released in the original asteroid disruption, before it is lost to orbital and collisional decay. We find that the Emilkowalski cluster is the source of this partial band and that the dust released in the disruption would correspond to a regolith layer $\\sim$3 m deep on the $\\sim$10 km diameter source body's surface. The dust in this band is described by a cumulative size-distribution inverse power-law index with a lower bound of 2.1 (implying domination of cross-sectional area by small particles) for dust particles with diameters ranging from a few $\\mu$m up to a few cm. The co...

  11. Texture formation in iron particles using mechanical milling with graphite as a milling aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystallographically anisotropic platelet iron particles were successfully prepared using a conventional ball mill with addition of graphite (Gp) particles. The morphological and structural changes resulting from the milling were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The spherical iron particles were plastically deformed into platelet shapes during the milling. Simultaneously, it is suggested that the size of the Gp particles decreased and adhered as nanoparticles on the surface of the iron particles. The adhered Gp particles affected the plastic deformation behavior of the iron particles: the (001) planes of α-iron were oriented parallel to the particle face, and no preferred in-plane orientation was observed. This study not only details the preparation of soft magnetic metal particles that crystallographically oriented to enhance their magnetic properties but also provides new insight into the activities of the well-established and extensively studied mechanical milling method

  12. Thermodynamic and mass balance constraints on iron-bearing phyllosilicate formation and alteration pathways on early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2013-10-01

    Widespread occurrences of phyllosilicates, predominantly nontronite and Mg saponite, in the Noachian-aged crust of Mars place constraints on water availability and surface conditions. However, the Noachian atmosphere likely lacked oxidants capable of forming nontronite from the basaltic crust and its origins are thus uncertain. In this study, scenarios for the formation of iron-bearing phyllosilicates from the weathering and hydrothermal alteration of Martian basalt were investigated using geochemical modeling to establish plausible pathways of nontronite generation and the effect of redox conditions on associated secondary phases. Hydrothermal alteration produced FeII and Mg saponite, serpentine, and zeolites at 100°C and chlorite, prehnite, and talc at 250°C, consistent with phases observed in crater deposits on Mars. Anoxic weathering produced primarily FeII and Mg saponite. High water-rock ratios produced Al-clays and amorphous silica and high pCO2 conditions inhibited smectite formation because of carbonate precipitation. Oxic weathering produced primarily nontronite and Mg saponite. Later oxidation of anoxic weathering products also formed nontronite-Mg saponite assemblages; oxidation products of hydrothermal assemblages included nontronite, Mg saponite, and either Al smectites or residual zeolites or prehnite. These calculations demonstrate that there are multiple plausible routes to form Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars and that an oxidizing atmosphere need not have existed in the Noachian. Decoupling iron oxidation from initial clay formation raises the possibilities that Mars transitioned to conditions favoring widespread iron oxidation after phyllosilicate formation ceased and that residual, unoxidized ferrous iron phyllosilicates still exist today in the Martian subsurface.

  13. Red mud (RM)-Induced enhancement of iron plaque formation reduces arsenic and metal accumulation in two wetland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J X; Guo, Q J; Yang, J; Zhou, X Y; Ren, H Y; Zhang, H Z; Xu, R X; Wang, X D; Peters, M; Zhu, G X; Wei, R F; Tian, L Y; Han, X K

    2016-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in arsenic (As) and heavy metals accumulation in paddy soils in China. Phytoremediation has been suggested as an effective and low-cost method to clean up contaminated soils. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of red mud (RM) supply on iron plaque formation and As and heavy metal accumulation in two wetland plant species (Cyperus alternifolius Rottb., Echinodorus amazonicus Rataj), using As and heavy metals polluted paddy soil combined with three rates of RM application (0, 2%, 5%). The results showed that RM supply significantly decreased As and heavy metals accumulation in shoots of the two plants due to the decrease of As and heavy metal availability and the enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere. Both wetland plants supplied with RM tended to have more Fe plaque, higher As and heavy metals on roots and in their rhizospheres, and were more tolerant of As and heavy metal toxicity. The results suggest that RM-induced enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere of wetland plants may be significant for remediation of soils contaminated with As and heavy metals. PMID:26505322

  14. Optical evidence of 4f-band formation in CeN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report ab initio calculations of the ground state and optical properties of CeN, which show that the 4f electrons in CeN are itinerant and that the intra-atomic 4f-Coulomb interaction is largely screened. A coherent 4f band of width ∼2 eV is formed, from which an accurate description of the optical spectrum is obtained. The lattice parameter, linear specific heat coefficient, and magnetic susceptibility are also well reproduced. While CeN was previously classified to be a mixed valence compound, our results show that the more appropriate picture is that of a 4f-band material. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  15. Probing the shear-band formation in granular media with sound waves

    OpenAIRE

    KHIDAS, Yacine; Jia, X.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the mechanical responses of dense granular materials, using a direct shear box combined with simultaneous acoustic measurements. Measured shear wave speeds evidence the structural change of the material under shear, from the jammed state to the flowing state. There is a clear acoustic signature when the shear band is formed. Subjected to cyclic shear, both shear stress and wave speed show the strong hysteretic dependence on the shear strain, likely associated with the geometry ...

  16. Formation, propagation, reflection, and collision of microwave envelope solitons in yttrium iron garnet films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovshikov, N. G.; Kalinikos, B. A.; Patton, C. E.; Wright, E. S.; Nash, J. M.

    1996-12-01

    The end edge reflection and collision of backward volume wave bright microwave magnetic envelope solitons in long and narrow yttrium iron garnet single-crystal films has been studied experimentally. The experiments were done on 5.1-μm-thick, 1-mm-wide films. The bright solitons were excited by single or double 8-36-ns-wide microwave pulses with a nominal carrier frequency of 5.8 GHz. The experiments utilized a movable transducer structure to make measurements for a range of transducer separations from 2 to 15 mm and for pulses before and after reflection. The soliton character was established from single-pulse decay versus time and distance measurements. Three decay regions were observed, a slow decay region before soliton formation, a fast decay region characteristic of solitons, and a second slow decay for linear pulses. The soliton region included both incident and reflected pulses. The exponential decay rate for the soliton regime was greater than for the linear. The soliton pulses retained the same shape and speed after edge reflection. An observed drop in pulse amplitude after passing under the pickup transducer provided a way to measure the actual power and amplitude of the soliton signal. The measured amplitudes and widths were in fair agreement with predictions for a simple sech-type order one soliton pulse. For properly timed double-pulse experiments in which a reflected lead pulse collides with the follow-on pulse before detection, the effects of soliton collisions could be examined. In the single soliton power regime, the pulses were found to retain their shape and speed after collision. At higher powers, shapes were not retained. In addition, a wake effect was observed in which the lead pulse causes a change in the detected signal for the follow-on pulse, even without collision.

  17. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are ∼0.1-2 μs over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  18. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-08-01

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are ˜0.1-2 μs over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  19. Formation and transformation of a short range ordered iron carbonate precursor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Frandsen, Cathrine; Bovet, Nicolas;

    2015-01-01

    structural order. Moreover, PDF peak positions differ from those for known iron carbonates and hydroxides. Mössbauer spectra also deviate from those expected for known iron carbonates and suggest a less crystalline structure. These data show that a previously unidentified iron carbonate precursor phase...... formed. Its coherent scattering domains determined from PDF analysis are slightly larger than for amorphous calcium carbonate, suggesting that the precursor could be nanocrystalline. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of Fe-carbonate polynuclear complexes yield PDF peak positions that agree...

  20. An Iron-Rain Model for Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is differentiated into a crust, mantle, and core, as demonstrated by studies of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites and by data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Most models for the differentiation and thermal evolution of Vesta assume that the metal phase completely melts within 20 degrees of the eutectic temperature, well before the onset of silicate melting. In such a model, core formation initially happens by Darcy flow, but this is an inefficient process for liquid metal and solid silicate. However, the likely chemical composition of Vesta, similar to H chondrites with perhaps some CM or CV chondrite, has 13-16 weight percent S. For such compositions, metal-sulfide melting will not be complete until a temperature of at least 1350 degrees Centigrade. The silicate solidus for Vesta's composition is between 1100 and 1150 degrees Centigrade, and thus metal and silicate melting must have substantially overlapped in time on Vesta. In this chemically and physically more likely view of Vesta's evolution, metal sulfide drops will sink by Stokes flow through the partially molten silicate magma ocean in a process that can be envisioned as "iron rain". Measurements of eucrites show that moderately siderophile elements such as Ni, Mo, and W reached chemical equilibrium between the metal and silicate phases, which is an important test for any Vesta differentiation model. The equilibration time is a function of the initial metal grain size, which we take to be 25-45 microns based on recent measurements of H6 chondrites. For these sizes and reasonable silicate magma viscosities, equilibration occurs after a fall distance of just a few meters through the magma ocean. Although metal drops may grow in size by merger with other drops, which increases their settling velocities and decreases the total core formation time, the short equilibration distance ensures that the moderately siderophile elements will reach chemical equilibrium between metal and silicate before

  1. Observation of a Hidden Hole-Like Band Approaching the Fermi Level in K-Doped Iron Selenide Superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Sunagawa, Masanori; Terashima, Kensei; Hamada, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Fukura, Tetsushi; Takeda, Aya; Tanaka, Masashi; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Takano, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Usui, Hidetomo

    2016-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals of the study of iron-based superconductors is to identify the common feature that produces the high critical temperature (Tc). In the early days, based on a weak-coupling viewpoint, the nesting between hole- and electron-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) leading to the so-called $s\\pm$ state was considered to be one such key feature. However, this theory has faced a serious challenge ever since the discovery of alkali-metal-doped FeSe (AFS) superconductors, in which only ele...

  2. Influence of gangue existing states in iron ores on the formation and flow of liquid phase during sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-liang; Wu, Sheng-li; Chen, Shao-guo; Su, Bo; Que, Zhi-gang; Hou, Chao-gang

    2014-10-01

    Gangue existing states largely affect the high-temperature characteristics of iron ores. Using a micro-sintering method and scanning electron microscopy, the effects of gangue content, gangue type, and gangue size on the assimilation characteristics and fluidity of liquid phase of five different iron ores were analyzed in this study. Next, the mechanism based on the reaction between gangues and sintering materials was unraveled. The results show that, as the SiO2 levels increase in the iron ores, the lowest assimilation temperature (LAT) decreases, whereas the index of fluidity of liquid phase (IFL) increases. Below 1.5wt%, Al2O3 benefits the assimilation reaction, but higher concentrations proved detrimental. Larger quartz particles increase the SiO2 levels at the local reaction interface between the iron ore and CaO, thereby reducing the LAT. Quartz-gibbsite is more conductive to assimilation than kaolin. Quartz-gibbsite and kaolin gangues encourage the formation of liquid-phase low-Al2O3-SFCA with high IFL and high-Al2O3-SFCA with low IFL, respectively.

  3. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Distel, Luitpold V.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Universitaetsstrasse 27, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Neuhuber, Winfried [Department of Anatomy, Chair of Anatomy I, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Krankenhausstr. 9, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Kryschi, Carola, E-mail: kryschi@chemie.uni-erlangen.de [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasmall citrate-coated SPIONs with {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPIONs uptaken by MCF-7 cells increase the ROS production for about 240%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SPION induced ROS production is due to released iron ions and catalytically active surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Released iron ions and SPION surfaces initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray irradiation of internalized SPIONs leads to an increase of catalytically active surfaces. -- Abstract: Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  4. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Ultrasmall citrate-coated SPIONs with γFe2O3 and Fe3O4 structure were prepared. ► SPIONs uptaken by MCF-7 cells increase the ROS production for about 240%. ► The SPION induced ROS production is due to released iron ions and catalytically active surfaces. ► Released iron ions and SPION surfaces initiate the Fenton and Haber–Weiss reaction. ► X-ray irradiation of internalized SPIONs leads to an increase of catalytically active surfaces. -- Abstract: Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber–Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  5. Siderophore Biosynthesis but Not Reductive Iron Assimilation Is Essential for the Dimorphic Fungus Nomuraea rileyi Conidiation, Dimorphism Transition, Resistance to Oxidative Stress, Pigmented Microsclerotium Formation, and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Zhongkang; Liu, Xuee; Song, Zhangyong; Li, Ren; Shao, Changwen; Yin, Youping

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an indispensable factor for the dimorphic insect pathogenic Nomuraea rileyi to form persistent microsclerotia which can replace conidia or blastospores for commercial mass production. There are two high affinity iron acquisition pathways in N. rileyi, siderophore-assisted iron mobilization and reductive iron assimilation systems. Transcription of the two iron uptake pathways related genes is induced under iron-limiting conditions. Stage-specific iron uptake-related genes expression during microsclerotia development shows siderophore-mediated iron acquisition genes are rigorously upregulated specifically during the formation and mature period while reductive iron assimilation related genes just display a higher expression at the late maturation period. Abrogation of reductive iron assimilation, by the deletion of the high affinity iron permease (NrFtrA), has no visible effect on microsclerotia biogenesis in N. rileyi. In sharp contrast, N. rileyi L-ornithine-N(5)-monooxygenase (NrSidA), required for synthesis of all siderophores, is absolutely necessary for the development of pigmented microsclerotia. In agreement with the lower intracellular iron contents of microsclerotia in ΔNrSidA strains, not only the pigments, but both the number and the biomass are also noticeably reduced. Certain concentration of ROS is required for promoting microsclerotia biogenesis. Combined with expression pattern analysis of related genes and quantitative of intracellular iron or extracellular siderophore in WT and mutants, these data demonstrate the lack of adequate intracellular iron caused by the loss of the siderophore results in the deficiency of ROS detoxication. Furthermore, ΔNrSidA strains show significantly increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Besides, NrSidA, but not NrFtrA, play a crucial role in vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, and dimorphic switching. Remarkably, the slower growth of the ΔNrSidA strains in vivo due to a

  6. Siderophore Biosynthesis but Not Reductive Iron Assimilation Is Essential for the Dimorphic Fungus Nomuraea rileyi Conidiation, Dimorphism Transition, Resistance to Oxidative Stress, Pigmented Microsclerotium Formation, and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Zhongkang; Liu, Xuee; Song, Zhangyong; Li, Ren; Shao, Changwen; Yin, Youping

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an indispensable factor for the dimorphic insect pathogenic Nomuraea rileyi to form persistent microsclerotia which can replace conidia or blastospores for commercial mass production. There are two high affinity iron acquisition pathways in N. rileyi, siderophore-assisted iron mobilization and reductive iron assimilation systems. Transcription of the two iron uptake pathways related genes is induced under iron-limiting conditions. Stage-specific iron uptake-related genes expression during microsclerotia development shows siderophore-mediated iron acquisition genes are rigorously upregulated specifically during the formation and mature period while reductive iron assimilation related genes just display a higher expression at the late maturation period. Abrogation of reductive iron assimilation, by the deletion of the high affinity iron permease (NrFtrA), has no visible effect on microsclerotia biogenesis in N. rileyi. In sharp contrast, N. rileyi L-ornithine-N5-monooxygenase (NrSidA), required for synthesis of all siderophores, is absolutely necessary for the development of pigmented microsclerotia. In agreement with the lower intracellular iron contents of microsclerotia in ΔNrSidA strains, not only the pigments, but both the number and the biomass are also noticeably reduced. Certain concentration of ROS is required for promoting microsclerotia biogenesis. Combined with expression pattern analysis of related genes and quantitative of intracellular iron or extracellular siderophore in WT and mutants, these data demonstrate the lack of adequate intracellular iron caused by the loss of the siderophore results in the deficiency of ROS detoxication. Furthermore, ΔNrSidA strains show significantly increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Besides, NrSidA, but not NrFtrA, play a crucial role in vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, and dimorphic switching. Remarkably, the slower growth of the ΔNrSidA strains in vivo due to a reduced

  7. Axial-Compressive Behavior, Including Kink-Band Formation and Propagation, of Single p-Phenylene Terephthalamide (PPTA Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grujicic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical response of p-phenylene terephthalamide (PPTA single fibers when subjected to uniaxial compression is investigated computationally using coarse-grained molecular statics/dynamics methods. In order to construct the coarse-grained PPTA model (specifically, in order to define the nature of the coarse-grained particles/beads and to parameterize various components of the bead/bead force-field functions, the results of an all-atom molecular-level computational investigation are used. In addition, the microstructure/topology of the fiber core, consisting of a number of coaxial crystalline fibrils, is taken into account. Also, following our prior work, various PPTA crystallographic/topological defects are introduced into the model (at concentrations consistent with the prototypical PPTA synthesis/processing conditions. The analysis carried out clearly revealed (a formation of the kink bands during axial compression; (b the role of defects in promoting the formation of kink bands; (c the stimulating effects of some defects on the fiber-fibrillation process; and (d the detrimental effect of the prior compression, associated with fiber fibrillation, on the residual longitudinal-tensile strength of the PPTA fibers.

  8. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-05-22

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe1-xS, 0<_ x<_ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  9. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe1-xS, 0 (le) x (le) 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  10. Intrinsic Josephson junctions in the iron-based multi-band superconductor (V2Sr4O6)Fe2As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Philip J. W.; Zhu, Xiyu; Cheng, Peng; Wen, Hai-Hu; Batlogg, Bertram

    2014-09-01

    In layered superconductors, Josephson junctions may be formed within the unit cell as a result of sufficiently low inter-layer coupling. These intrinsic Josephson junction (iJJ) systems have attracted considerable interest for their application potential in quantum computing as well as efficient sources of THz radiation, closing the famous `THz gap'. So far, iJJ have been demonstrated in single-band, copper-based high-Tc superconductors, mainly in Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (refs , , ). Here we report clear experimental evidence for iJJ behaviour in the iron-based superconductor (V2Sr4O6)Fe2As2. The intrinsic junctions are identified by periodic oscillations of the flux-flow voltage on increasing a well-aligned in-plane magnetic field. The periodicity is explained by commensurability effects between the Josephson vortex lattice and the crystal structure, which is a hallmark signature of Josephson vortices confined into iJJ stacks. This finding adds the pnictide (V2Sr4O6)Fe2As2 to the copper-based iJJ materials of interest for Josephson junction applications. In particular, novel devices based on multi-band Josephson coupling may be realized.

  11. Formation process of shear bands and protrusions in ultrafine grained copper under cyclic stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Oita University, Oita 870-1192 (Japan)]. E-mail: masagoto@cc.oita-u.ac.jp; Han, S.Z. [Materials Engineering Department, Korea Institute Machinery and Materials, Changwon, Kyungnam 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Yakushiji, T. [Department Mechanical Engineering, Oita National College of Technology, Maki, Oita 870-0152 (Japan); Lim, C.Y. [Materials Engineering Department, Korea Institute Machinery and Materials, Changwon, Kyungnam 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Chinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    afine grained copper processed by equal channel angular pressing was fatigued at two constant stress amplitudes: {sigma} {sub a} = 240 and 120 MPa (corresponding fatigue lives were N {sub f} = 2 x 10{sup 5}, and 4 x 10{sup 6} cycles, respectively). Significant differences in the morphological features of post-fatigued surfaces between the high and low cyclic stress amplitudes were observed. To clarify the formation process of the surface damage, the morphological changes in the surface damage caused by the cyclic stresses were monitored successively by an optical microscope. Putting the optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations of the post-fatigued surfaces together, the formation process of surface damage was discussed.

  12. Effect of chloride on the formation of PCDD/Fs and WHO-12 PCBs in iron ore sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.; Anderson, D.R.; Wilson, D.T.; Aries, E. [Corus R, D and T, Swinden Technology Centre, Rotherham (United Kingdom); Hemfrey, D. [Corus Strip Products UK, Port Talbot (United Kingdom); Fray, T.A.T. [Corus Construction and Industrial, Scunthorpe (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-15

    The emission of PCDD/Fs from the integrated iron and steelmaking process has been investigated by Corus UK (formerly British Steel plc) since 1995. Preliminary studies established an emissions inventory that showed that iron ore sintering is the only noteworthy source in this process route. Further research showed that emissions from the main waste gas stacks of five UK sinter plants that were operated in the 1990s and early part of this century were in the concentration range 0.28 to 4.4 ng I-TEQ/Nm from 94 measurements. The overall mean was 1.21 ng I-TEQ/Nm which is below the existing release limit of 2 ng I-TEQ/Nm3 set by the UK Environment Agency for UK sinter plants but above the achievable release limit of 0.1 to 0.5 ng I-TEQ/Nm3 specified in the European Reference Document on best available techniques in the Iron and Steel Industry. Although emission concentrations meet the current interim release limit, Corus UK has undertaken fundamental studies to develop process-integrated techniques for reducing emissions of PCDD/Fs, with particular focus on the effects of sinter mix composition on the formation of PCDD/Fs. More recently, studies have been carried out to investigate the formation of dioxin-like PCBs in iron and steelmaking processes. The sintering of iron ore is an essential stage in the so-called integrated steelmaking process and its main purpose is to prepare fine ores for use in the blast furnace. The sintering process is operated under tight control and it is therefore not possible to examine the influence of wide changes in raw mix composition on production plants. However, it has been demonstrated that such studies can be performed using an experimental sinter box that simulates the sintering process and allows process conditions to be varied over a wider range than is possible on production plants. The work presented here is concerned with studies on the effects of chloride content of the raw mixture on the formation of both PCDD/Fs and WHO-12

  13. Formation of ferrihydrite and associated iron corrosion products in permeable reactive barriers of zero-valent iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoko; Kim, Jin-Wook; Watkins, Janet; Wilkin, Richard T.

    2002-01-01

    Ferrihydrite, which is known to form in the presence of oxygen and to be stabilized by the adsorption of Si, PO4 and SO4, is ubiquitous in the fine-grained fractions of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center (Elizabeth City, NC) and the Denver Federal Center (Lakewood, CO) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The concurrent energy-dispersive X-ray data indicate a strong association between ferrihydrite and metals such as Si, Ca, and Cr. Magnetite, green rust 1, aragonite, calcite, mackinawite, greigite and lepidocrocite were also present, indicative of a geochemical environment that is temporally and spatially heterogeneous. Whereas magnetite, which is known to form due to anaerobic Fe0 corrosion, passivates the Fe0 surface, ferrihydrite precipitation occurs away from the immediate Fe0 surface, forming small (<0.1 microm) discrete clusters. Consequently, Fe0-PRBs may remain effective for a longer period of time in slightly oxidized groundwater systems where ferrihydrite formation occurs compared to oxygen-depleted systems where magnetite passivation occurs. The ubiquitous presence of ferrihydrite suggests that the use of Fe0-PRBs may be extended to applications that require contaminant adsorption rather than, or in addition to, redox-promoted contaminant degradation.

  14. Formation of the Mont Dieu IIE non-magmatic iron meteorite

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the Mont Dieu meteorite was confirmed as a fine octahedrite IIE iron meteorite [1, 2, 3]. The original fragments in the collection of the Musée National d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris show rust damage. The much better preserved ~450 kg fragment of the IIE non-magmatic iron (NMI) Mont Dieu II meteorite hosted at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, in Brussels, was studied. The metal phase shows a clear widmanstätten texture, composed essentially of kamacite, with fine lin...

  15. INVESTIGATION OF STRUCTURE-FORMATION MECHANISMS IN DIFFUSION BORATING OF WASTES WHILE PRODUCING STEEL AND IRON SHOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Panteleenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes development of new composite self-fluxing powders made of waste products while  producing  cast steel and iron shot.  Structure  and  properties  of  initial  and  borated  powders, dependence of boride layer thickness growth on chemical and thermal treatment time have been investigated in the paper. The paper proposes for the first time a description of structure-formation mechanism in the diffusion alloying process on the basis of the obtained data.

  16. INVESTIGATION OF STRUCTURE-FORMATION MECHANISMS IN DIFFUSION BORATING OF WASTES WHILE PRODUCING STEEL AND IRON SHOT

    OpenAIRE

    E. F. Panteleenko

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes development of new composite self-fluxing powders made of waste products while  producing  cast steel and iron shot.  Structure  and  properties  of  initial  and  borated  powders, dependence of boride layer thickness growth on chemical and thermal treatment time have been investigated in the paper. The paper proposes for the first time a description of structure-formation mechanism in the diffusion alloying process on the basis of the obtained data.

  17. Biogeophysical interactions control the formation of iron oxide microbial biofilms in acidic geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, J.; Berstein, H. C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, M. A.; Jennings, R. D.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    Amorphous iron oxyhydroxide microbial mats in acidic (pH ~ 3) geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are habitats for diverse populations of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms from the domains Archaea and Bacteria. These systems have been extensively characterized with regards to geochemical, physical, and microbiological (e.g., metagenomics) analyses; however, there is minimal data describing the formation of these iron oxide microbial mats. A conceptual model of Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was created, which includes four distinct stages. Autotrophic archaea (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis) and bacteria (Hydrogenobaculum spp.) are the first colonizers (Stage I) that provide pools of organic carbon for heterotrophic thermophiles (Stage II). M. yellowstonensis is an autotrophic Sulfolobales that is responsible for the oxidation of Fe(II) and can thus be defined as the mat 'architect' creating suitable habitats for microbial niches (e.g., anaerobic microorganisms) (Stage III). The last phase of mat formation (Stage IV) represents a pseudo-steady state mature microbial mat, which has been the subject of all previous microbial surveys of these systems. The conceptual model for Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was tested by inserting glass (SiO2) microscope slides into the main flow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP. Slides were removed at various time intervals and analyzed for total iron accretion, microbial community structure (i.e., 16S rRNA gene abundance), and mRNA expression of community members. Routine geochemical and physical (e.g., flow) parameters were also measured to decipher their relative contribution to mat development. Initial and previous results show that autotrophic microorganisms (e.g, M. yellowstonensis) are often the first to colonize the glass slides and their activity was confirmed by mRNA expression of genes related to iron oxidation and carbon fixation. Heterotrophs are rare

  18. Biogeophysical interactions control the formation of iron oxide microbial biofilms in acidic geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, J.; Berstein, H. C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, M. A.; Jennings, R. D.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    Amorphous iron oxyhydroxide microbial mats in acidic (pH ~ 3) geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are habitats for diverse populations of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms from the domains Archaea and Bacteria. These systems have been extensively characterized with regards to geochemical, physical, and microbiological (e.g., metagenomics) analyses; however, there is minimal data describing the formation of these iron oxide microbial mats. A conceptual model of Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was created, which includes four distinct stages. Autotrophic archaea (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis) and bacteria (Hydrogenobaculum spp.) are the first colonizers (Stage I) that provide pools of organic carbon for heterotrophic thermophiles (Stage II). M. yellowstonensis is an autotrophic Sulfolobales that is responsible for the oxidation of Fe(II) and can thus be defined as the mat 'architect' creating suitable habitats for microbial niches (e.g., anaerobic microorganisms) (Stage III). The last phase of mat formation (Stage IV) represents a pseudo-steady state mature microbial mat, which has been the subject of all previous microbial surveys of these systems. The conceptual model for Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was tested by inserting glass (SiO2) microscope slides into the main flow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP. Slides were removed at various time intervals and analyzed for total iron accretion, microbial community structure (i.e., 16S rRNA gene abundance), and mRNA expression of community members. Routine geochemical and physical (e.g., flow) parameters were also measured to decipher their relative contribution to mat development. Initial and previous results show that autotrophic microorganisms (e.g, M. yellowstonensis) are often the first to colonize the glass slides and their activity was confirmed by mRNA expression of genes related to iron oxidation and carbon fixation. Heterotrophs are rare

  19. Temperature dependence of enthalpies and entropies of formation and migration of mono-vacancy in BCC iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entropies and enthalpies of vacancy formation and diffusion in BCC iron are calculated for each temperature directly from free-energies using phase-space trajectories obtained from spin–lattice dynamics simulations. Magnon contributions are found to be particularly substantial in the temperature regime near the α−β (ferro/para-magnetic) transition. Strong temperature dependence and singular behavior can be seen in this temperature regime, reflecting magnon softening effects. Temperature dependence of the lattice component in this regime is also much more significant compared to previous estimations based on Arrhenius-type fitting. Similar effects on activation processes involving other irradiation-produced defects in magnetic materials are expected

  20. Effects of Gender and Estrogen Receptors on Iron-Induced Brain Edema Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that female mice have less brain edema and better recovery in neurological deficits after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and that 17β-estradiol treatment in male mice markedly reduces ICH-induced brain edema. In this study, we investigated the role of gender and the estrogen receptors (ERs) in iron-induced brain edema. There were three parts in this study: (1) either male or female mice received an injection of 10 μL FeCl2 (1 mM) into the right caudate; (2) females received an intracaudate injection of FeCl2 or saline with 1 μg of ICI 182,780 (antagonists of ERs) or vehicle; and (3) males were treated with the ER regulator tamoxifen (5 mg/kg subcutaneously) or vehicle 1 h after FeCl2 injection. Mice were euthanized 24 h later for brain edema determination. FeCl2 induced lower brain edema in females than in males. Co-injection of ICI 182,780 with FeCl2 aggravated iron-induced brain edema in female mice. ICI 182,780 itself did not induce brain edema at the dose of 1 μg. Tamoxifen treatment reduced FeCl2-induced brain edema in male mice. In conclusion, iron induced less brain edema in female mice than in males. ER modification can affect iron-induced brain edema. PMID:26463972

  1. Formation of the Mont Dieu IIE Non Magmatic Iron Meteorite, and Origin of its Silicate Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosbroek, N.; Goderis, S.; Debaille, V.; Valley, J. W.; Claeys, Ph.

    2012-03-01

    Mont Dieu is an IIE nonmagmatic iron meteorite showing primitive features such as preserved chondrules and glass. SEM and geochemical analyses demonstrate that it most likely originated from an H-chondrite parent body impacted by a Fe-Ni projectile.

  2. Group IIE Iron Meteorites; Metal Composition, Formation, Relationship to Ordinary Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, J. T.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2011-03-01

    INAA data for metal in 8 new and 12 known IIE irons show they crystallized from various silicate-rich Fe-Ni melts with diverse S contents after impacts melted an ordinary chondrite asteroid that was probably more reduced than H chondrites.

  3. Responses to Iron-Deficiency in Arabidopsis-Thaliana - The Turbo Iron Reductase does not depend on the Formation of Root Hairs and Transfer Cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moog, P.R.; Van der Kooij, T.A.W.; Bruggemann, W.; Schiefelbein, J.W.; Kuiper, P.J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Columbia wild type and a root hair-less mutant RM57 were grown on iron-containing and iron-deficient nutrient solutions. In both genotypes, ferric chelate reductase (FCR) of intact roots was induced upon iron deficiency and followed a Michaelis-Menten kinetic with a

  4. Assessment of PCDD/Fs formation in the Fenton oxidation of 2-chlorophenol: Influence of the iron dose applied.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Marta; Fernández-Castro, Pablo; San Román, M Fresnedo; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2015-10-01

    Toxic polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) may be formed during remediation of chlorinated phenols via Fenton oxidation. To highlight the need for monitoring the production of toxic byproducts in these reactions, this work assessed the influence of iron dose (0.09-0.36 mM) on the Fenton oxidation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP, 15.56 mM), a potential precursor of PCDD/Fs, by quantifying 2-CP removal and mineralization rates as well as byproducts yields, including PCDD/Fs. Although the increase in the iron dose showed positive contribution to 2-CP oxidation, under the operating conditions of the current study (H2O2 at 20% of the stoichiometric dose and 20 °C), there was no effect on the mineralization rate, and TOC and chlorine balances were far to be closed, depicting the presence of chlorinated organic byproducts in the reaction medium. After 4 h of treatment, the total PCDD/Fs concentrations increased by 14.5-39 times related to the untreated sample when the iron doses tested decreased from 0.36 to 0.09 mM, with preferential formation of PCDFs over PCDDs and dominance of lower chlorinated congeners such as tetra and penta-PCDD/Fs. The treatment with the highest iron dose (0.36 mM) exhibited the lowest PCDD/Fs yields and was thus most successful at mitigating toxic byproducts of the Fenton oxidation, leading to lower sample toxic equivalence (TEQ) value. PMID:26134538

  5. Formation of shear bands and strain-induced martensite during plastic deformation of metastable austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation of shear bands and strain-induced ε- and α'-martensite phases during tensile deformation of austenitic stainless steels was studied. Stacking fault energies (SFE) of the studied steels were measured by X-ray diffraction. Effects of external stress and SFE on the width of the stacking faults were analysed. An excellent correlation between the calculations and actual microstructures examined by scanning electron microscopy was found. Effect of overlapping of stacking faults on the fault width was discussed. Based on the discussions and experimental results, compositional, temperature and strain rate dependencies of the strain-induced α'-martensite transformation are believed to be governed mainly by the variation in the SFE

  6. Magneto-structural transformations via a solid-state nudged elastic band method: Application to iron under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We extend the solid-state nudged elastic band method to handle a non-conserved order parameter, in particular, magnetization, that couples to volume and leads to many observed effects in magnetic systems. We apply this formalism to the well-studied magneto-volume collapse during the pressure-induced transformation in iron—from ferromagnetic body-centered cubic (bcc) austenite to hexagonal close-packed (hcp) martensite. We find a bcc-hcp equilibrium coexistence pressure of 8.4 GPa, with the transition-state enthalpy of 156 meV/Fe at this pressure. A discontinuity in magnetization and coherent stress occurs at the transition state, which has a form of a cusp on the potential-energy surface (yet all the atomic and cell degrees of freedom are continuous); the calculated pressure jump of 25 GPa is related to the observed 25 GPa spread in measured coexistence pressures arising from martensitic and coherency stresses in samples. Our results agree with experiments, but necessarily differ from those arising from drag and restricted parametrization methods having improperly constrained or uncontrolled degrees of freedom

  7. Positron studies of interaction between yttrium atoms and vacancies in bcc iron with relevance for ODS nanoparticles formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The very high calculated binding energy of vacancy (V)–Ysub (1.45 eV) in Fe makes it be one possible earliest formation stage of (Y, Ti, O) nanoclusters in ODS alloy. Our direct slow positrons annihilation observations are used to valid the interaction between V and Y. The pure bcc iron samples have been implanted by 1.2 MeV Y ions at three fluences from 1 × 1014 to 3 × 1015 cm−2. Vacancy clusters are observed for all these three fluences. Their size and concentration decrease with Y concentration measured by using SIMS. Two hypotheses are proposed to explain the results, including the formation of complexes Vm–Yn and/or of precipitates Ym–Xn (X = Y, O, etc.). In addition, vacancy clusters are detected deeper than predicted by SRIM calculation due to, at least for a part, channelling which is confirmed by Marlowe calculation and SIMS measurements

  8. Siderophile element systematics of IAB complex iron meteorites: New insights into the formation of an enigmatic group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsham, Emily A.; Bermingham, Katherine R.; Walker, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    Siderophile trace element abundances and the 187Re-187Os isotopic systematics of the metal phases of 58 IAB complex iron meteorites were determined in order to investigate formation processes and how meteorites within chemical subgroups may be related. Close adherence of 187Re-187Os isotopic data of most IAB iron meteorites to a primordial isochron indicates that the siderophile elements of most members of the complex remained closed to elemental disturbance soon after formation. Minor, presumably late-stage open-system behavior, however, is observed in some members of the sLM, sLH, sHL, and sHH subgroups. The new siderophile element abundance data are consistent with the findings of prior studies suggesting that the IAB subgroups cannot be related to one another by any known crystallization process. Equilibrium crystallization, coupled with crystal segregation, solid-liquid mixing, and subsequent fractional crystallization can account for the siderophile element variations among meteorites within the IAB main group (MG). The data for the sLM subgroup are consistent with equilibrium crystallization, combined with crystal segregation and mixing. By contrast, the limited fractionation of siderophile elements within the sLL subgroup is consistent with metal extraction from a chondritic source with little subsequent processing. The limited data for the other subgroups were insufficient to draw robust conclusions about crystallization processes involved in their formation. Collectively, multiple formational processes are represented in the IAB complex, and modeling results suggest that fractional crystallization within the MG may have been a more significant process than has been previously recognized.

  9. Microstructure Formation and Fracturing Characteristics of Grey Cast Iron Repaired Using Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Yi; Pengyun Xu; Changfeng Fan; Guanghui Yang; Dan Liu; Yongjun Shi

    2014-01-01

    The repairing technology based on laser rapid fusion is becoming an important tool for fixing grey cast iron equipment efficiently. A laser repairing protocol was developed using Fe-based alloy powders as material. The microstructure and fracturing feature of the repaired zone (RZ) were analyzed. The results showed that regionally organized RZ with good density and reliable metallurgical bond can be achieved by laser repairing. At the bottom of RZ, dendrites existed in similar direction and e...

  10. A study of formation of iron nanoparticles in aluminium matrix with helium pores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kichanov, S.E.; Kozlenko, D. P.; Belushkin, A.V.; Reutov, V.F.; Samoilenko, S.O.; Jirák, Zdeněk; Savenko, B. N.; Bulavin, L. A.; Zubavichus, Y.V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 351, č. 1 (2012), "012013-1"-"012013-5". ISSN 1742-6588. [International Workshop on SANS-YuMO User Meeting at the Start-up of Scientific Experiments on the IBR-2M Reactor - Devoted to the 75th anniversary of Yu M Ostanevich's Birth /2./. Dubna, 27.05.2011-30.05.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : iron nanoparticles * aluminium matrix * helium pores Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  11. Alteration mineral mapping for iron prospecting using ETM+ data, Tonkolili iron field, northern Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansaray, Lamin R.; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Jun; Ma, Zhimin

    2013-10-01

    The Tonkolili iron field in northern Sierra Leone has the largest known iron ore deposit in Africa. It occurs in a greenstone belt in an Achaean granitic basement. This study focused mainly on mapping areas with iron-oxide and hydroxyl bearing minerals, and identifying potential areas for haematite mineralization and banded iron formations (BIFs) in Tonkolili. The predominant mineral assemblage at the surface (laterite duricrust) of this iron field is haematitegoethite- limonite ±magnetite. The mineralization occurs in quartzitic banded ironstones, layered amphibolites, granites, schists and hornblendites. In this study, Crosta techniques were applied on Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data to enhance areas with alteration minerals and target potential areas of haematite and BIF units in the Tonkolili iron field. Synthetic analysis shows that alteration zones mapped herein are consistent with the already discovered magnetite BIFs in Tonkolili. Based on the overlaps of the simplified geological map and the remote sensing-based alteration mineral maps obtained in this study, three new haematite prospects were inferred within, and one new haematite prospect was inferred outside the tenement boundary of the Tonkolili exploration license. As the primary iron mineral in Tonkolili is magnetite, the study concludes that, these haematite prospects could also be underlain by magnetite BIFs. This study also concludes that, the application of Crosta techniques on ETM+ data is effective not only in mapping iron-oxide and hydroxyl alterations but can also provide a basis for inferring areas of potential iron resources in Algoma-type banded iron formations (BIFs), such as those in the Tonkolili field.

  12. High-temperature miscibility of iron and rock during terrestrial planet formation

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    The accretion of a terrestrial body and differentiation of its silicate/oxide mantle from iron core provide abundant energy for heating its interior to temperatures much higher than the present day Earth. The consequences of differentiation on the structure and composition of planets are typically addressed considering only the interaction of molten iron with an immiscible `rocky' phase. We demonstrate that mixing in a representative system of liquid or solid MgO and liquid iron to a single homogeneous liquid occurs at sufficiently low temperature to be present in the aftermath of a giant impact. Applying the thermodynamic integration technique to density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations, we determine the solvus closure temperature for the Fe-MgO system for pressures up to 400 GPa. Solvus closure occurs at $\\sim$4000 K at low pressure, and has a weak positive pressure dependence, such that its gradient with respect to depth is less steep than an adiabatic temperature profile. This predicts a n...

  13. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  14. Simulation of austenite formation kinetics during fast heating of iron and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The austenitization of iron-based alloys was studied by working out a phase transformation model that makes possible the calculation of the kinetic curves of the α → γ transformation at various heating rates. The modelling algorithm was based on the discrete description of the transformation process. The effect of the nucleation parameters upon the kinetics of the isothermal transformation was studied. It was found that at a constant nucleation probability, the appearance of a predetermined proportion of pre-formed transformation nuclei has little effect upon the rate of transformation and the position of the isothermal plateau. And conversely, the increase in the nucleation probability lowers substantially the initial transformation point

  15. Controlled synthesis of magnetic iron oxides@SnO2 quasi-hollow core-shell heterostructures: formation mechanism, and enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Zhang, Shaofeng; Ren, Feng; Xiao, Xiangheng; Zhou, Juan; Jiang, Changzhong

    2011-11-01

    Iron oxide/SnO2 magnetic semiconductor core-shell heterostructures with high purity were synthesized by a low-cost, surfactant-free and environmentally friendly hydrothermal strategy via a seed-mediated method. The morphology and structure of the hybrid nanostructures were characterized by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The morphology evolution investigations reveal that the Kirkendall effect directs the diffusion and causes the formation of iron oxide/SnO2 quasi-hollow particles. Significantly, the as-obtained iron oxides/SnO2 core-shell heterostructures exhibited enhanced visible light or UV photocatalytic abilities, remarkably superior to as-used α-Fe2O3 seeds and commercial SnO2 products, mainly owing to the effective electron hole separation at the iron oxides/SnO2 interfaces.Iron oxide/SnO2 magnetic semiconductor core-shell heterostructures with high purity were synthesized by a low-cost, surfactant-free and environmentally friendly hydrothermal strategy via a seed-mediated method. The morphology and structure of the hybrid nanostructures were characterized by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The morphology evolution investigations reveal that the Kirkendall effect directs the diffusion and causes the formation of iron oxide/SnO2 quasi-hollow particles. Significantly, the as-obtained iron oxides/SnO2 core-shell heterostructures exhibited enhanced visible light or UV photocatalytic abilities, remarkably superior to as-used α-Fe2O3 seeds and commercial SnO2 products, mainly owing to the effective electron hole separation at the iron oxides/SnO2 interfaces. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM and HRTEM images of hematite seeds and iron oxide/SnO2 (12 h and 36 h). See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10728c

  16. Polyelectrolyte multilayer film-assisted formation of zero-valent iron nanoparticles onto polymer nanofibrous mats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facile approach that combines the electrospinning technique and layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly method has been developed to synthesize and immobilize zero-valent iron nanoparticles (ZVI NPs) onto the surface of nanofibers for potential environmental applications. In this approach, negatively charged cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibers fabricated by electrospinning CA solution were modified with bilayers composed of positively charged poly(diallyl-dimethyl-ammoniumchloride) (PDADMAC) and negatively charged poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) through electrostatic LbL assembly approach to form composite nanofibrous mats. The composite nanofibrous mats were immersed into the ferrous iron solution to allow Fe(II) ions to complex with the free carboxyl groups of PAA, and then ZVI NPs were immobilized onto the composite nanofibrous mats instantly by reducing the ferrous cations. Combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and thermogravimetry analysis demonstrated that the ZVI NPs are successfully synthesized and uniformly distributed into the polyelectrolyte (PE) multilayer films assembled onto the CA nanofibers. The present approach to synthesis ZVI NPs opens a new avenue to fabricating various materials with high surface area for environmental, catalytic, and sensing applications.

  17. Studies on the kinetics and mechanism of complex formation in the reactions of ferron with iron (III) and uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibria and kinetics of the reactions of ferron (7-iodo-8-hydroxyquindine-5-sulphonic acid) with iron(III) and uranium(VI) have been followed by stopped flow spectrophotometry under the conditions of mono-complex formation. The equilibrium constants obtained spectrophotmetrically have been compared with those obtained from kinetic studies. In the case of iron(III), in the acidity range, [H+]=(2.8-10.0)x10-2 mol dm-3, among the different possible reaction path-ways, the reaction has been found to proceed mainly through the interaction of Fe(OH)(aq)2+ and partially deprotonated form (LH-) of the ligand. In the case of uranium(VI), in the acidity range, [H+]=(2.5-25.0)x10-5 mol dm-3, a dual path mechanism involving UO2(aq)2+ and UO2(OH)(aq)- and the partially deprotonated (LH-) form of the ligand is consistent with the observations. The results in each case are in agreement with the Eigen mechanism and the characteristic water exchange rates have been obtained in each case, as a rough estimate, from the experimental data. Activation parameters (ΔHsup(≠) and ΔSsup(≠) for each path have been determined and compared. (author). 23 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Effect of Hot Deformation on Formation and Growth of Thermal Fatigue Crack in Chromium Wear Resistant Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Li-min; LIU Jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    The formation and growth of thermal fatigue crack in chromium wear resistant cast iron was investigated, and the effect of hot deformation on the crack was analyzed by means of optical microscope and scanning electron microscope and high frequency induction thermal fatigue tester. The results show that eutectic carbide is the main location and passage for initiation and extension of thermal fatigue cracks, hot deformation can improve the eutectic carbide′s morphology and distribution, inhibit the generation and propagation of thermal fatigue cracks. In the experiment, the propagation rate of thermal fatigue crack reduces with the quantity of hot deformation increasing, which was analyzed in the point view of the activation energy of crack propagation.

  19. Asbestos body formation and iron accumulation in mouse peritoneal granulomas after the introduction of crocidolite asbestos fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the cell biology of the development of asbestos bodies after a single intraperitoneal injection of a suspension of crocidolite asbestos fibers into the mouse peritoneal cavity. The majority of the infected fibers were found in aggregates of peritoneal macrophages, exudate cells, and fibrous tissue. These aggregates developed into granulomas containing not only numerous asbestos fibers, but also cells of various types, including macrophages, multinucleated giant cells, fibroblasts, plasma cells, granulocytes, and mast cells. Cytoplasmic ferritin was abundantly present in macrophages and giant cells. In addition, iron-rich inclusion bodies were detected. The results of this study show that asbestos body formation can occur outside the pleural cavity. Asbestos body formation occurred in the granulomas after periods of 1 month and longer. On the basis of morphologic criteria, various types of asbestos body were distinguished. X-ray microanalysis showed that variations in the density of the coat could attributed to the presence of chemical elements in various concentrations. Evidence is presented that asbestos body formation is an extracellular phenomenon

  20. SPHERICAL MICROSTRUCTURE FORMATION OF THE SEMI-SOLID HIGH CHROMIUM CAST IRON Cr20Mo2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.M. Mao; A.M. Zhao; X.Y. Zhong

    2004-01-01

    The nondendritic semi-solid slurry preparation of high chromium cast iron Cr20Mo2 has been studied in this paper. The experiments show that the proeutectic austenitic particles are more spherical under a larger stirring power condition, even if the stirring time is shorter, while the proeutectic austenitic particles are not very much spherical under a smaller stirring power condition and some proeutectic austenitic dendrites also exist, even if the stirring time is very long. The experiments also show that when stirred for 5 6 minutes under the test condition, the semi-solid slurry with 40vol. %-50vol. % solid fraction and spherical proeutectic austenite in the size of 50-80μm can be obtained.

  1. Effect of rare earth element on microstructure formation and mechanical properties of thin wall ductile iron castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ductile iron castings with 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 25 mm thickness and various amount of rare earth elements (RE) (from 0 to 0.04%), were cast in sand molds to identify the effects of sample thickness and the content of RE% on microstructural formation and selected mechanical properties. The effects of RE content and sample thickness on microstructural formation, including on graphite nodule count, graphite nodule shape, spherodization, and ferrite amount, were observed. The yield strength of the samples with RE within the range investigated were lower than those of the specimens without RE. The elongation was improved with the addition of RE up to 0.03% in ductile iron castings. The additions of 0.02% RE caused a smaller graphite nodule size and a higher number of graphite nodules than those in the specimen without RE at all levels of RE addition; the nodule count decreased with increase in section size. The chill zones were observed in the 2 mm thick samples, but were absent in the samples from castings which were thicker than 2 mm, irrespective of the addition of RE. The nodularity of graphite nodules improved due to the addition of 0.02-0.04% RE. The specimens with RE content up to 0.03% had a lower tensile strength and hardness, higher elongation than that of the specimens without RE. The ferrite content in all castings increased with additions of 0.02% RE. The tensile strengths of the 2 and 3 mm thick samples were also estimated using the relationship between strength and hardness, obtained from the data on the tensile strength and hardness of the 25 mm thick samples

  2. Fe2+ oxidation rate drastically affect the formation and phase of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral occurred in acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the processes of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral formation, Fe2+ ion was oxidized by the following three methods: (1) biooxidation treatment by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans); (2) rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe2+ with H2O2 (rapid oxidation treatment); (3) slow abiotic oxidation of Fe2+ with H2O2 (slow oxidation treatment). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, element composition, precipitate weight and total Fe removal efficiency were analyzed. The XRD patterns and element composition of precipitates synthesized through the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments well coincide with those of potassium jarosite, while precipitates formed at the initial stage of incubation in the rapid oxidation treatment showed a similar XRD pattern to schwertmannite. With the ongoing incubation, XRD patterns and element composition of the precipitates that occurred in the rapid oxidation treatment were gradually close to those in the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments. Due to the inhibition of A. ferrooxidans itself and its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in aggregation of precipitates, the amount of precipitates and soluble Fe removal efficiency were lower in the biooxidation treatment than in the slow oxidation treatment. Therefore, it is concluded that Fe2+ oxidation rate can greatly affect the mineral phase of precipitates, and slow oxidation of Fe2+ is helpful in improving jarosite formation. - Highlights: ► Slow oxidation of Fe2+ is helpful in jarosite formation. ► The already-formed schwertmannite can be gradually transformed to jarosite. ► Precipitates formation can be inhibited probably by EPS from A. ferrooxidans.

  3. ABOUT MECHANISM OF STRUCTURE FORMATION OF PARTICULAR SOLID CARBONIC PHASE IN NANOCOMPOSITE ON THE BASIS OF IRON AND NANO-DISPERSE CARBON

    OpenAIRE

    D. V. Kuis; N. A. Svidunovich; G. P. Okatova; V. S. Urbanovich; V. M. Oichenko

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of structure formation in super-solid carbon phase in nanocomposite on the basis of iron and nano-disperse carbon, which can be used at development of technology and composition of creation of new materials using inexpensive nano-carbon materials is offered.

  4. ABOUT MECHANISM OF STRUCTURE FORMATION OF PARTICULAR SOLID CARBONIC PHASE IN NANOCOMPOSITE ON THE BASIS OF IRON AND NANO-DISPERSE CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Kuis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of structure formation in super-solid carbon phase in nanocomposite on the basis of iron and nano-disperse carbon, which can be used at development of technology and composition of creation of new materials using inexpensive nano-carbon materials is offered.

  5. Role of coating agent in iron oxide nanoparticle formation in an aqueous dispersion: Experiments and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachhar, Nirmalya; Bandyopadhyaya, Rajdip

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticle was synthesized by coprecipitation and was modeled and solved using a hybrid (discrete-continuous) model, based on a kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulation scheme. The latter was combined with the constant number MC method, to improve both speed and accuracy of the simulation. Complete particle size distribution (PSD) from simulation matches very well with PSD of both uncoated and coated (with either polyacrylic acid or dextran) Fe3O4 nanoparticles, obtained from our experiments. The model is general, as the time scales of various processes (nucleation, diffusion-growth and coagulation-growth) are incorporated in rate equations, while, input simulation parameters are experimentally measured quantities. With the help of the validated model, effect of coating agent on coagulation-growth was estimated by a single, fitted, coagulation-efficiency parameter. Our simulation shows that, logarithm of coagulation-efficiency scales linearly with logarithm of inverse of the molecular weight of the coating agent. With this scaling law, our model is able to a priori predict the experimental PSD of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, synthesized with an even higher molecular weight of dextran. PMID:26624531

  6. Positron studies of interaction between yttrium atoms and vacancies in bcc iron with relevance for ODS nanoparticles formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, C.W., E-mail: chenwei.he@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans (France); Barthe, M.F.; Desgardin, P. [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans (France); Akhmadaliev, S. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, BautznerLandstr. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Behar, M. [Instituto de Fisica, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, Agronomia, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Jomard, F. [GEMac, Univ. Versailles, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles cedex (France)

    2014-12-15

    The very high calculated binding energy of vacancy (V)–Y{sub sub} (1.45 eV) in Fe makes it be one possible earliest formation stage of (Y, Ti, O) nanoclusters in ODS alloy. Our direct slow positrons annihilation observations are used to valid the interaction between V and Y. The pure bcc iron samples have been implanted by 1.2 MeV Y ions at three fluences from 1 × 10{sup 14} to 3 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}. Vacancy clusters are observed for all these three fluences. Their size and concentration decrease with Y concentration measured by using SIMS. Two hypotheses are proposed to explain the results, including the formation of complexes V{sub m}–Y{sub n} and/or of precipitates Y{sub m}–X{sub n} (X = Y, O, etc.). In addition, vacancy clusters are detected deeper than predicted by SRIM calculation due to, at least for a part, channelling which is confirmed by Marlowe calculation and SIMS measurements.

  7. Electronic structure of the conduction band upon the formation of ultrathin fullerene films on the germanium oxide surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolov, A. S.; Lazneva, E. F.; Gerasimova, N. B.; Panina, Yu. A.; Baramygin, A. V.; Zashikhin, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    The results of the investigation of the electronic structure of the conduction band in the energy range 5-25 eV above the Fermi level E F and the interfacial potential barrier upon deposition of aziridinylphenylpyrrolofullerene (APP-C60) and fullerene (C60) films on the surface of the real germanium oxide ((GeO2)Ge) have been presented. The content of the oxide on the (GeO2)Ge surface has been determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electronic properties have been measured using the very low energy electron diffraction (VLEED) technique in the total current spectroscopy (TCS) mode. The regularities of the change in the fine structure of total current spectra (FSTCS) with an increase in the thickness of the APP-C60 and C60 coatings to 7 nm have been investigated. A comparison of the structures of the FSTCS maxima for the C60 and APP-C60 films has made it possible to reveal the energy range (6-10 eV above the Fermi level E F) in which the energy states are determined by both the π* and σ* states and the FSTCS spectra have different structures of the maxima for the APP-C60 and unsubstituted C60 films. The formation of the interfacial potential barrier upon deposition of APP-C60 and C60 on the (GeO2)Ge surface is accompanied by an increase in the work function of the surface E vac- E F by the value of 0.2-0.3 eV, which corresponds to the transfer of the electron density from the substrate to the organic films under investigation. The largest changes occur with an increase in the coating thickness to 3 nm, and with further deposition of APP-C60 and C60, the work function of the surface changes only slightly.

  8. The role of iron in the formation of porosity in Al-Si-Cu-based casting alloys. Part 3: A microstructural model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.A.; Schaffer, G.B.; StJohn, D.H. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    1999-06-01

    Iron has been shown to have a significant effect on the formation of porosity and shrinkage defects in Al-Si-Cu-based foundry alloys. This is not simply a direct consequence of the physical presence of the {beta}-Al{sub 5}FeSi platelets in the microstructure, but is also due to the effect that these platelets have on the nucleation and growth of eutectic silicon. The alloy-dependent critical iron content determines when the {beta} phase first solidifies and, hence, when it can participate in the silicon nucleation event. At critical iron contents, the {beta} phase solidifies as the initial component of the ternary eutectic. However, at supercritical iron contents, the {beta} phase solidifies as the initial component of the ternary eutectic solidification begins, while, at subcritical iron contents, the {beta} phase forms as a component of the ternary eutectic only after the binary Al-Si eutectic is well established. Each of these paths of microstructural evolution leads to different variations in microstructural permeability and, hence, interdendritic feedability and porosity formation. The actual porosity-forming response to these alloy-induced microstructural changes is influenced by the solidification conditions in the casting.

  9. Effect of initial pH and temperature of iron salt solutions on formation of magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanaprakash, G. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Mahadevan, S. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kalyanasundaram, P. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Philip, John [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)]. E-mail: philip@igcar.gov.in; Raj, Baldev [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2007-05-15

    We report the effect of initial pH and temperature of iron salt solutions on formation of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles during co-precipitation. We synthesized nanoparticles by keeping the initial pH at 0.7, 1.5, 3.0, 4.7, 5.7, 6.7 for two different temperatures of 30 and 60 deg. C. When the initial pH (prior to alkali addition) of the salt solution was below 5, the nanoparticles formed were 100% spinel iron oxide. Average size of the magnetite particles increases with initial pH until ferrihydrite is formed at a pH of 3 and the size remains the same till 4.7 pH. The percentage of goethite formed along with non-stoichiometric magnetite was 35 and 78%, respectively, when the initial pH of the solution was 5.7 and 6.7. As the reaction temperature was increased to 60 deg. C, maintaining a pH of 6.7, the amount of goethite increased from 78 to 100%. These results show that the initial pH and temperature of the ferrous and ferric salt solution before initiation of the precipitation reaction are critical parameters controlling the composition and size of nanoparticles formed. We characterize the samples using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. The results of the present work provide the right conditions to synthesis pure magnetite nanoparticles, without goethite impurities, through co-precipitation technique for ferrofluid applications.

  10. Formation of a barrier to groundwater contaminants by the injection of zero-valent iron colloids: Suspension properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero-valent iron (Fe0) (metallic iron) is a strong chemical reductant that is capable of degrading several halogenated-hydrocarbon compounds (e.g., trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene) and chemically reducing several highly mobile oxidized oxyanions and oxycations to their immobile forms. A series of studies was undertaken to develop methods of injecting micrometer-sized Fe0 colloids into the subsurface environment to form a chemical barrier to these highly mobile contaminants. Forming a barrier by means of this technique may have the distinct advantage over traditional trench-and-fill technologies: it may be safer, more cost-effective, and may be used at greater depths. Several commercially available Fe0 colloids were evaluated. One type was selected for further study based on its small size (1 to 2 microm) and the presence of an organic coating. This organic coating was weathered away within 7 days by Hanford ground water (CaCO3 system, pH 8.1) and exposed the chemically active Fe0-colloid surface. Through the use of surfactants in a low ionic strength solution, the length of time that these extremely dense (7.8 g cm-3) colloids remained in suspension increased as much as 250%. The efficiency of quartz-sand columns to remove surfactant-coated Fe0 colloids appeared to be at least partially controlled by injection rate; the filter coefficient values at injection rates of 6, 124, and 248 ml min-1 were 0.30, 0.05, and 0.02 cm-1, respectively. Studies are underway to develop further understanding of this relationship and to determine the interactive effect of influent colloid concentration and injection flow rate on colloid placement in aquifer sediments for barrier formation

  11. Effect of iron and indium on IMC formation and mechanical properties of lead-free solder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The addition of In and Ce/Fe affected the IMC morphology and increased shear strength. ► The addition of Fe resulted in increased wettability of the SAC solder. ► The melting Point of the SAC solder was decreased by the addition of In and Ce. ► The addition of Fe/In and Ce led to a decrease in the CTE. ► The addition of 0.6Fe/In and Ce resulted in a single peak in DSC, despite the addition of 0.2Fe. - Abstract: In recent years, because of environmental concerns, lead solders have been replaced by lead-free solders. One of the numerous lead-free solders developed in the past several years is the Sn–Ag–Cu (SAC) eutectic solder. This work explored the effects of adding iron and indium to the reliability of SAC solder. Four different solders have been fabricated by adding Fe or In into the solder, i.e., Sn3.6Ag0.9Cu (SAC–E), SAC–Fe02, SAC–Fe06 and SAC–InCe. DSC results showed that adding indium decreased the melting point of SAC, and the single eutectic peak was maintained in all cases. Solders were reflowed on bare Cu and electroless Ni–P-coated substrates. It was found that the SAC–E and SAC–InCe gave the highest and the lowest IMC thickness, respectively among all solders. The same pattern was observed in the wetting angle measurement. Shear strength results showed that the SAC–Fe06 and SAC–Fe02 solder displayed the highest strength, followed by SAC–InCe and the SAC–E solder had the lowest strength. Results suggest that adding small amounts of Fe and In and Ce improved the wettability and shear strength of the SAC solder. Also, the Coefficient of thermal expansion measurement showed a possible decrease in thermal expansion mismatch with the addition of In and Ce and Fe into the SAC eutectic solder.

  12. The role of iron in the formation of porosity in Al-Si-Cu-based casting alloys. Part 1: Initial experimental observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.A.; Schaffer, G.B.; StJohn, D.H. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    1999-06-01

    Outbreaks of interconnected porosity in industrial Al-Si-based alloy castings have, on occasion, been attributed to variations in metal chemistry rather than to changes in process parameters. This work identifies the role that iron plays in porosity formation and reports a threefold effect in an Al-5 pct Si-1 pct Cu-0.5 pct Mg alloy. In addition to a detailed analysis of casting porosity profiles, metallographic and thermal studies also point to inadequacies in the existing theories regarding the role of iron and suggest that a new theory is required to understand the observed behavior.

  13. Sulfur (S)-induced enhancement of iron plaque formation in the rhizosphere reduces arsenic accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of two sulfur (S) sources (SO42-, S0), and three rates of S application (0, 30, 120 mg S/kg) on the formation of iron plaque in the rhizosphere, and on the root surface of rice, and As (arsenic) uptake into rice (Oryza sativa L.) were studied in a combined soil-sand culture experiment. Significant differences in As uptake into rice between +S and -S treatments were observed in relation to S sources, and rates of S application. Concentrations of As in rice shoots decreased with increasing rates of S application. The mechanism could be ascribed to sulfur, induced the formation of iron plaque, since concentrations of Fe in iron plaque on quartz sands in the rhizosphere, and on the root surface of rice increased with increasing rates of S application. The results suggest that sulfur fertilization may be important for the development approaches to reducing As accumulation in rice. - Sulfur-induced enhancement of iron plaque formation on the root surface of rice

  14. Iron and Iron Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Melike Sezgin Evim; Birol Baytan; Adalet Meral Güneş

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for almost all living organisms except some bacteria. A great number of new articles related to the iron metabolism have been published in recent years explaining new findings. Hepsidine, a peptide hormon, that is recently found, regulates iron methabolism by effecting iron absorbsion from gut, secreting iron from hepatic store and flows iron from macrophages. Hepsidin blockes to effluxe iron from cells by bounding to ferroportin and by inducing ferroportin destru...

  15. Formation and growth mechanisms of ion-induced iron-carbon nanocomposites at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation of graphite surfaces with a simultaneous Fe supply have resulted into the development of various types of carbon nanocomposites. Their morphologies - diameter, density, length and apex angle strongly depend on the ratios of Fe deposition rate (DFe) to ion sputtering rate (Sion). By optimizing the ratio of DFe/Sion (2.40%), the denser and well-aligned Fe-carbon nanocomposite fibers (Fe-CNFs) could be obtained, whose average length and diameter were 0.95 μm and 17 nm, respectively. As confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, the Fe-CNFs with amorphous-like or fine-polycrystalline phase were surely composed of carbon and Fe. Two types of growth models have been employed to explain the formation of metal-carbon nanocomposites.

  16. Crystal structures and phase formation thermodynamics of iron-gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Pinaki

    Alloy nanoparticles are being increasingly used in wide variety of applications (catalysis, contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging, etc.). Knowledge of crystal structure and phase formation of the alloy nanoparticles is critical for these applications. Anomalous thermodynamic behavior and unusual phase formation have been reported for nanoparticles with size below 10 nm. In the present work, inert gas condensation (IGC) has been used to produce Au-Fe nanoclusters of varied compositions with a mean size between 5-10 nm. Here, the nanoclusters below 10 nm display complete solubility between Fe and Au in Fex Au1-x (0.3 0.65 and fcc for x self-interstitials. The as-deposited clusters were ferromagnetic at room temperature. Heat treatment at 600°C for 15 minutes followed by furnace cooling resulted in the size-dependent transformation of the clusters into additional, non-equilibrium structures that depended on cluster composition, while larger clusters followed bulk behavior. At about 65 atom % Fe, clusters transformed to a well-ordered, single fcc phase with a lattice parameter of 0.363 nm, whereas the phase diagram predicted two-phase equilibrium. The stabilization of a single fcc phase was explained by a thermodynamic analysis. This analysis suggests that the single phase stability in the Fe-Au nanoparticles arises from the fact that the introduction of a phase boundary is energetically opposed. Heat treatment of as-deposited particles results in L12 and L1 0ordered structures near 1:3, 3:1 and 1:1 (Fe:Au) stoichiometries respectively. Magnetically, these nanoparticles display strong ferromagnetic behavior for Fe-rich solid solutions and for the 3:1 L12 structure, and weak ferromagnetic behavior, possibly due to a combination of antiferromagnetic core and uncompensated spins at the surface for other compositions.

  17. Formation mechanism of the low-frequency locally resonant band gap in the two-dimensional ternary phononic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Gang; Liu Yao-Zong; Wen Ji-Hong; Yu Dian-Long

    2006-01-01

    The low-frequency band gap and the corresponding vibration modes in two-dimensional ternary locally resonant phononic crystals are restudied successfully with the lumped-mass method. Compared with the work of C. Goffaux and J. Sanchez-Dehesa (Phys. Rev. B 67 14 4301(2003)), it is shown that there exists an error of about 50% in their calculated results of the band structure, and one band is missing in their results. Moreover, the in-plane modes shown in their paper are improper, which results in the wrong conclusion on the mechanism of the ternary locally resonant phononic crystals. Based on the lumped-mass method and better description of the vibration modes according to the band gaps, the locally resonant mechanism in forming the subfrequency gaps is thoroughly analysed. The rule used to judge whether a resonant mode in the phononic crystals can result in a corresponding subfrequency gap is also verified in this ternary case.

  18. Soil Formation of "Atlantic Rankers" from NW Spain - A High Resolution Aluminium and Iron Fractionation Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. KAAL; M. COSTA-CASAIS; C. FERRO-V(A)ZQUEZ; X. PONTEVEDRA-POMBAL; A. MARTINEZ-CORTIZAS

    2008-01-01

    Atlantic rankers belong to the group of "cryptopodzolic rankers", which are ubiquitous in the mountainous cool/tempe-rate humid regions of Western Europe. The rankers of Galicia (NW Spain) formed by thousands of years of colluviation.The preponderance of Al-stabilised organic matter (OM) masks the horizonation and polycyclic character (I.e., stratifi-cation) of these soils. Cryptopodzolic rankers are generally thought to be the outcome of podzolisation. This soil type is part of the recent discussion on how to classify soils developed from nonvolcanic parent material having andic properties.To better understand the formation processes of these soils, the Al and Fe fractionation of four typical Atlantic rankers were studied by selective dissolution in acid NH4-oxalate, Na-pyrophosphatc and the chlorides of K, La and Cu.A high-resolution sampling approach allowed us to investigate the soils in greater detail than simply sampling by horizon.The rankers studied display a distribution of Fe- and Al-OM complexes that is typical of cryptopodzolic soils. However,these organomineral associations were probably immobile due to the high Al saturation. We argue that the soils owe their characteristic chemical status to external factors rather than to translocation of organomineral associations: variations in Al-OM concentrations could be linked to changes in weathering/leaching intensity and colluviation rates caused by anthropogenic disturbances or changes in regional climate regime.

  19. Structural and magnetic phase formation in nanophase brass–iron electron compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mishra; C Bansal

    2005-11-01

    Starting with Cu0.65Zn0.35 with an e/a ratio of 1.35 we studied the phase formation in nanophase (Cu0.65Zn0.35)1−Fe alloys in the concentration range 0.1 ≤ ≤ 0.7 to see the effect of altering the electron concentration. The evolution of bcc phase from the fcc phase as a function of Fe concentration was investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The grain size, lattice parameters, and average hyperfine magnetic field distributions were estimated for the nanophase alloys. The fcc phase was observed to persist up to 40 atomic per cent Fe substitutions, a mixed (fcc + bcc) phase region up to 70 atomic per cent Fe and bcc phase beyond 70 atomic per cent Fe. The magnetic state of the alloys changed from nonmagnetic for ≤ 0.3 to magnetically ordered state at room temperature for ≥ 0.33, which lies in the fcc phase region. The fcc phase alloys of Fe with non-magnetic metals have very low magnetic transition temperatures. However, in this system the room temperature state is unusually magnetic.

  20. The influence of platinum(IV) ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehula, Stjepko; Musić, Svetozar

    2011-05-01

    The effect of the presence of platinum(IV) ions, in the form of Pt(OH)62- at a high pH, on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline precipitation system was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), 57Fe Mössbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Monodispersed lath-like α-FeOOH (goethite) particles precipitated by hydrothermal treatment in a highly alkaline medium with the addition of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) were used as reference material. In the presence of 1 or 5 mol% of platinum ions in the precipitation system the lath-like α-FeOOH particles were formed as a single phase after a short hydrothermal treatment (2 h). No significant change in the size and shape of these particles in comparison to the reference sample was observed. After 6 h of autoclaving the formation of platinum nanoparticles at the surface of α-FeOOH particles via reduction by TMAH and/or its decomposition products became visible. These nanoparticles acted as a catalyst for the reduction of Fe(III) ions into Fe(II) and gradual transformation of α-FeOOH into a mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxide (Fe 3O 4, magnetite) by the dissolution-recrystallization mechanism. The presence of a higher concentration of platinum ions accelerates the process of α-FeOOH → Fe 3O 4 transformation with the appearance of α-Fe 2O 3 (hematite) particles as an intermediate product.

  1. Formation of potentially protective oxide-free phosphate films on titanium characterized by valence band x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the results of a continuing study focused on preparing novel surface chemistries on metal surfaces. In this paper we report how it is possible to prepare oxide-free titanium metal surfaces protected by a film consisting of phosphate. The surface is prepared by electrochemical treatment in an anaerobic cell which allows electrochemistry to be conducted on samples located in a vacuum system attached to an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer. When a clean metal surface is subjected to electrochemical treatment in aqueous orthophosphoric acid an oxide-free phosphate film can be formed on the metal which is stable on subsequent air exposure. Compositional variations were found with potential and other factors. Identical electrochemical treatment of as-received titanium metal yielded samples that had a surface consisting largely of oxide. The chemical composition of these surface films was studied by core level and valence band x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Valence band photoemission interpreted by band structure calculations was found to be especially effective in understanding subtle differences in surface chemistry, enabling the clear identification of phosphate (being able to distinguish between orthophosphate and metaphosphate films) and its distinction from surface oxide. Valance band spectra calculated from band structure calculations for TiO, Ti2O3, TiO2, TiC, TiPO4, and TiP2O7 are reported

  2. Residual Stress, Structure and Other Properties Formation by Combined Thermo-Hardening Processing of Surface Layer of Gray Cast Iron Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimyanov, Kh M.; Nikitin, Yu V.; Semenova, Yu S.; Eremina, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The proposed combined thermo-hardening processing of gray cast iron enables to control the surface layer structure and mechanical properties formation. The processing includes high-speed heating by low-temperature plasma source and ultrasonic surface plastic deformation. The algorithm of calculation the stress-strain state of a surface layer at combined processing of gray cast iron is developed. This algorithm is based on method of sections. The ultrasonic surface deformation contribution is determined during formation of residual stresses. It is established that the combination of the thermal and deformation effects on the material provides an additional increment of microhardness and increase of surface layer thickness. Experimental results shows that the features of structural and phase transformations in a surface layer are revealed without a surface melting by energy of low-temperature plasma. The top of a layer does not contain inclusions of graphite that testifies to change of structural transformations in conditions of combined processing.

  3. Environmental control on the occurrence of high-coercivity magnetic minerals and formation of iron sulfides in a 640 ka sediment sequence from Lake Ohrid (Balkans)

    OpenAIRE

    Just, Janna; Nowaczyk, Norbert R.; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Francke, Alexander; Vogel, Hendrik; Lacey, Jack H.; Wagner, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The bulk magnetic mineral record from Lake Ohrid, spanning the past 637 kyr, reflects large-scale shifts in hydrological conditions, and, superimposed, a strong signal of environmental conditions on glacial–interglacial and millennial timescales. A shift in the formation of early diagenetic ferrimagnetic iron sulfides to siderites is observed around 320 ka. This change is probably associated with variable availability of sulfide in the pore water. We propose that sulfate concentrations were s...

  4. Environmental control on the occurrence of high-coercivity magnetic minerals and formation of iron sulfides in a 640 ka sediment sequence from Lake Ohrid (Balkans)

    OpenAIRE

    Just, Janna; Nowaczyk, Norbert R.; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Francke, Alexander; Vogel, Hendrik; Lacey, Jack H.; Wagner, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The bulk magnetic mineral record from Lake Ohrid, spanning the past 637 kyr, reflects large-scale shifts in hydrological conditions, and, superimposed, a strong signal of environmental conditions on glacial–interglacial and millennial timescales. A shift in the formation of early diagenetic ferrimagnetic iron sulfides to siderites is observed around 320 ka. This change is probably associated with variable availability of sulfide in the pore water. We propose that sulfate con...

  5. Ferrous Iron Binding Key to Mms6 Magnetite Biomineralisation: A Mechanistic Study to Understand Magnetite Formation Using pH Titration and NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Andrea E; Bramble, Jonathan P; Hounslow, Andrea M; Williamson, Michael P; Monnington, Amy E; Cooke, David J; Staniland, Sarah S

    2016-06-01

    Formation of magnetite nanocrystals by magnetotactic bacteria is controlled by specific proteins which regulate the particles' nucleation and growth. One such protein is Mms6. This small, amphiphilic protein can self-assemble and bind ferric ions to aid in magnetite formation. To understand the role of Mms6 during in vitro iron oxide precipitation we have performed in situ pH titrations. We find Mms6 has little effect during ferric salt precipitation, but exerts greatest influence during the incorporation of ferrous ions and conversion of this salt to mixed-valence iron minerals, suggesting Mms6 has a hitherto unrecorded ferrous iron interacting property which promotes the formation of magnetite in ferrous-rich solutions. We show ferrous binding to the DEEVE motif within the C-terminal region of Mms6 by NMR spectroscopy, and model these binding events using molecular simulations. We conclude that Mms6 functions as a magnetite nucleating protein under conditions where ferrous ions predominate. PMID:27112228

  6. Broad-band X-ray emission and the reality of the broad iron line from the neutron star-white dwarf X-ray binary 4U 1820-30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Aditya S.; Dewangan, G. C.; Pahari, M.; Misra, R.; Kembhavi, A. K.; Raychaudhuri, B.

    2016-09-01

    Broad relativistic iron lines from neutron star X-ray binaries are important probes of the inner accretion disc. The X-ray reflection features can be weakened due to strong magnetic fields or very low iron abundances such as is possible in X-ray binaries with low mass, first generation stars as companions. Here, we investigate the reality of the broad iron line detected earlier from the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1820-30 with a degenerate helium dwarf companion. We perform a comprehensive, systematic broad-band spectral study of the atoll source using Suzaku and simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift observations. We have used different continuum models involving accretion disc emission, thermal blackbody and thermal Comptonization of either disc or blackbody photons. The Suzaku data show positive and negative residuals in the region of Fe K band. These features are well described by two absorption edges at 7.67 ± 0.14 keV and 6.93 ± 0.07 keV or partial covering photoionized absorption or by blurred reflection. Though, the simultaneous Swift and NuSTAR data do not clearly reveal the emission or absorption features, the data are consistent with the presence of either absorption or emission features. Thus, the absorption based models provide an alternative to the broad iron line or reflection model. The absorption features may arise in winds from the inner accretion disc. The broad-band spectra appear to disfavour continuum models in which the blackbody emission from the neutron-star surface provides the seed photons for thermal Comptonization. Our results suggest emission from a thin accretion disc (kTdisc ˜ 1 keV), Comptonization of disc photons in a boundary layer most likely covering a large fraction of the neutron-star surface and innermost parts of the accretion disc, and blackbody emission (kTbb ˜ 2 keV) from the polar regions.

  7. Ammonium and formate ions in interstellar ice analogues. Ice morphology and the elusive 6.85 μm band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, V. J.; Mate, B.; Galvez, O.; Fernandez-Torre, D.; Moreno, M. A.; Escribano, R.

    2011-05-01

    Tentative identifications of ions in interstellar ices, based on mid IR spectra, have been reported in the literature for about two decades, but these identifications remain often vague or controversia. NH4+ and HCOO- are among the purportedly identified ions. In particular the ν4 deformation mode of NH4+ has been put forward as a firm candidate for the ubiquitous 6.85 μm band. For the generation of the ions in laboratory ice mixtures the samples are often processed with high energy photons or charged particles. On other occasions acid-base reactions of suitable precursors, which can be very efficient even at very low temperatures, are employed. These procedures, can shed light on astrophysical generation pathways, but can also lead to uncertainties in the assignment of newly formed spectral bands to a given species. In this work we have used a different approach. To minimize ambiguity we produce directly (compact) ice samples containing the ions of interest through the sudden freeze of aqueous solution droplets of NH4Cl, NaCOOH, and NH4COOH on a cold (14 K) Si substrate, where their spectra are recorded. In complementary experiments, NH4+ and HCOO- ions are produced through acid-base reactions in (porous) ices formed by co-deposition of H2O, NH3 and HCOOH. The comparison of the ice spectra with those of liquid solutions, solid salts, and DFT calculations indicate that the ν4 band of ammonium ions embedded in compact ice becomes very broad and disappears virtually. The broadening effect is also present, though not so marked, for HCCO-. In the porous ices there seems to be a segregation of NH4+HCOO- ionic networks from the ice that gives rise to more pronounced spectral features. We conclude that NH4+ is not a likely carrier for the prominent 6.85 μm band in the compact ices often assumed for the interstellar grain mantles.

  8. On the Influence of Cross-Rolling on Shear Band Formation and Texture Evolution in Low Carbon Steel Sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, M. Y.; Engler, O.; Raabe, D.

    1995-01-01

    In order to understand the influence of the crystallographic texture and the dislocation structure on the deformation mechanism in low carbon steels, the development of the texture and the microstructure in cross-rolled specimens was investigated by employing X-ray texture measurements and TEM observations. The cross-rolled specimens were obtained by rotating the rolling direction by various angles up to 90° after 30% initial straight-rolling of the hot rolled band. Whereas only few shear ban...

  9. Magnetic iron oxide/clay composites: effect of the layer silicate support on the microstructure and phase formation of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Tamás; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Tzitzios, Vassilios; Papp, Szilvia; Korösi, László; Galbács, Gábor; Musabekov, Kuanyshbek; Bolatova, Didara; Petridis, Dimitris; Dékány, Imre

    2007-07-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized on two different clay supports: natural montmorillonite and synthetic laponite. The nanocomposites obtained, characterized by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption, small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), vibrating sample magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy, were found to exhibit highly different physicochemical properties despite their similar iron content. The observed size effect of the layered silicate support, resulting in the high abundance of very small particles (diameter of 1-5 nm) on laponite, was explained in terms of the difference between the surface charge densities and the lamellar dimensions of the clay substrates. Moreover, it was revealed that the nature of the layered support greatly affected the nanostructure (fractal dimensions, surface area, porosity) of the formed hybrid solids as well as the phase formation of iron oxide crystals. The high surface area laponite composites, due to the dominance of very small iron oxide particles, exhibited more pronounced superparamagnetic behaviour as compared to the montmorillonite samples prepared under identical conditions. The observed higher saturation magnetization of the laponite composites, attributed to their lower content in the antiferromagnetic hematite and to the onset of superferromagnetism in the aggregated particles, shows their excellent utility for adsorption/magnetic separation.

  10. Magnetic iron oxide/clay composites: effect of the layer silicate support on the microstructure and phase formation of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized on two different clay supports: natural montmorillonite and synthetic laponite. The nanocomposites obtained, characterized by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption, small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), vibrating sample magnetometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy, were found to exhibit highly different physicochemical properties despite their similar iron content. The observed size effect of the layered silicate support, resulting in the high abundance of very small particles (diameter of 1-5 nm) on laponite, was explained in terms of the difference between the surface charge densities and the lamellar dimensions of the clay substrates. Moreover, it was revealed that the nature of the layered support greatly affected the nanostructure (fractal dimensions, surface area, porosity) of the formed hybrid solids as well as the phase formation of iron oxide crystals. The high surface area laponite composites, due to the dominance of very small iron oxide particles, exhibited more pronounced superparamagnetic behaviour as compared to the montmorillonite samples prepared under identical conditions. The observed higher saturation magnetization of the laponite composites, attributed to their lower content in the antiferromagnetic hematite and to the onset of superferromagnetism in the aggregated particles, shows their excellent utility for adsorption/magnetic separation

  11. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Iron sulfide scales formation on surfaces covered by fabrication produced films. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the assays aimed to passivate the steel carbon of the process pipings. This steel is marked by the ASTM A 333 G6 and is chemically similar to those of isotopic exchange towers which corrode in contact with in-water hydrogen sulfide solutions forming iron sulfide protective layers. The differences between both materials lie in the surface characteristics to be passivated. The steel of towers has an internal side covered by paint which shall be removed prior to passivation. The steel's internal side shall be covered by a film formed during the fabrication process and constituted by calcinated wastes and iron oxides (magnetite, hematite and wustite). This film interferes in the formation process of passivating layers of pyrrhotite and pyrite. The possibility to passivate the pipes in their actual state was evaluated since it would result highly laborious and expensive to eliminate the film. (Author)

  12. Formation of Highly Misoriented Fragments at Hot Band Grain Boundaries During Cold Rolling of Interstitial-Free Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Nasima; Quadir, Md. Zakaria; Ferry, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The deformation heterogeneities that form in the vicinity of prior hot band grain boundaries in a 75 pct cold-rolled interstitial-free steel have been investigated by 3D electron backscatter diffraction. Grain boundary-affected regions occupy a large fraction of the overall material volume. The coexistence of several features, such as steep orientation gradients up to 5 deg/ μm, high-angle boundary networks, and thin, elongated grain boundary fragments, has confirmed the highly complex nature of these regions. Most notably, these thin boundary fragments were found to be significantly misoriented from any of the deformed grains immediately adjacent to the boundary. Overall, grain boundary regions adopt the so-called `deformation banding' mode of deformations on both the micro ( e.g., steep gradients)- and nano ( e.g., thin fragments)-length scales. Grain boundary structures comprise the essential features to act as preferred sites for recrystallization. The discovery of numerous thin grain boundary fragments in the deformation microstructure provides a plausible explanation for the origin of recrystallized grains with orientations other than those found within the adjoining deformed grains in the vicinity of grain boundaries; this phenomenon has been commonly observed in texture data for many years but remained unexplained.

  13. Aerogravity and remote sensing observations of an iron deposit in Gara Djebilet, southwestern Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersi, Mohand; Saibi, Hakim; Chabou, Moulley Charaf

    2016-04-01

    The Gara Djebilet iron ore region is one of the most important regions in Africa. Located in the southwestern part of Algeria at the border with Mauritania, the Gara Djebilet region is characterized by steep terrain, which makes this area not easily accessible. Due to these conditions, remote sensing techniques and geophysics are the best ways to map this iron ore. The Gara Djebilet formations are characterized by high iron content that is especially rich in hematite, chamosite and goethite. The high iron content causes an absorption band at 0.88 μm, which is referred to as band 5 in the Operational Land Imager (OLI) Landsat 8 images. In this study, we integrated geological data, aerogravity data, and remote sensing data for the purpose of mapping the distribution of the Gara Djebilet iron deposit. Several remote sensing treatments were applied to the Landsat 8 OLI image, such as color composites, band ratioing, principal component analysis and a mathematical index, which helped locate the surface distribution of the iron ore. The results from gravity gradient interpretation techniques, 2-D forward modeling and 3-D inversion of aerogravity data provided information about the 2-D and 3-D distribution of the iron deposit. The combination of remote sensing and gravity results help us evaluate the ore potential of Gara Djebilet. The estimated tonnage of the iron ore at Gara Djebilet is approximately 2.37 billion tonnes with 57% Fe.

  14. NO2-induced synthesis of nitrato-iron(III) porphyrin with diverse coordination mode and the formation of isoporphyrin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jagannath Bhuyan; Sabyasachi Sarkar

    2013-07-01

    Two nitrato-iron(III) porphyrinates [Fe(4-Me-TPP)(NO3)] 1 and [Fe(4-OMe-TPP)(NO3)] 2 are reported. Interestingly, [Fe(4-Me-TPP)(NO3)] 1 has nitrate ion coordinated as monodentate (by single oxygen atom), while [Fe(4-OMe-TPP)(NO3)] 2 has nitrate coordination through bidentate mode. Compound 1 was found serendipitously in the reaction of [Fe(4-Me-TPP)Cl] with nitrous acid, which was performed for the synthesis of nitro-iron(III) porphyrin, [Fe(4-Me-TPP)NO2]. The compound 2 was synthesized by passing NO2 gas through a solution of [Fe(4-OMe-TPP)]2O. Upon passing NO2 gas through a solution of a -oxo-dimer, [Fe(4-Me-TPP)]2O also produces 1. It is interesting that in more electron-rich porphyrin 2, binding of the nitrate in a symmetrical bidentate way while in less electron-rich porphyrin 1, binding of the anion is unidentate by a terminal oxygen atom. However, it is expected that the energy difference between the monodentate and bidentate coordination mode is very small and the interchange between these coordination is possible. Upon passing NO2 gas through a solution of -oxo-dimeric iron(III) porphyrin, the nitrato-iron(III) porphyrin forms first, that later gets oxidized to -cation radical to yield hydroxy-isoporphyrin in the presence of trace amount of water. These nitrato-iron(III) porphyrinates in moist air slowly converted back to their respective -oxo-dimeric iron(III) porphyrins.

  15. Experimental demonstration of a novel bio-sensing platform via plasmonic band gap formation in gold nano-patch arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Grande, Marco; Stomeo, Tiziana; Morea, Giuseppe; Marani, Roberto; Marrocco, Valeria; Petruzzelli, Vincenzo; D'Orazio, Antonella; Cingolani, Roberto; De Vittorio, Massimo; de Ceglia, Domenico; Scalora, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of implementing a novel bio-sensing platform based on the observation of the shift of the leaky surface plasmon mode that occurs at the edge of the plasmonic band gap of metal gratings when an analyte is deposited on top of the metallic structure. We provide experimental proof of the sensing capabilities of a two-dimensional array of gold nano-patches by observing color variations in the diffracted field when the air overlayer is replaced with a small quantity of Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA). Effects of rounded corners and surface imperfections are also discussed. Finally, we also report proof of changes in color intensities as a function of the air/filling ratio of the structure and discuss their relation with the diffracted spectra.

  16. Influence of Gas Composition and Exposure Cycle on the Formation of Surface and Subsurface Oxides in Iron-Aluminum-Based Alloys at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, June H.; Yin, Hogbin; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Auinger, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The slab reheating process of binary iron-aluminum alloys and an industrial TRIP steel grade has been investigated in both dry and wet atmospheres. The presence of water vapor has a significant effect on the overall scale growth and internal corrosion depth. Heating rate greatly influences the porosity of the surface oxide layer with the surface getting more porous at faster heating rates. Nitride formation could be suppressed in the presence of water vapor, leading to a reduction of internal corrosion depth and a better formability of the final material. Experimental results were compared to thermodynamic predictions and critically discussed.

  17. Formation of a Mineral Layer during Coke Dissolution into Liquid Iron and Its Influence on the Kinetics of Coke Dissolution Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Michael W.; Monaghan, Brian J.; Nightingale, Sharon A.; Mathieson, John G.; Nightingale, Robert J.

    2008-06-01

    The formation and development of the mineral layer that forms between coke and liquid iron during carbon dissolution has been characterized. Coke particles (-2 mm, +0.5 mm) were added to the top surface of an iron 2 mass pct C melt at representative iron-making temperatures, for periods of time between 2 and 120 minutes, before being quenched. The quenched samples were then sectioned, and the solidified coke-melt interfacial region analyzed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Analysis showed that a mineral layer was present at the interface at all experimental temperatures (1450 °C to 1550 °C) from 2 minutes and persisted beyond 120 minutes. The mineral layer was found to be composed of calcium aluminate phases, with the proportions of these phases dictating its morphology. Further, changes observed in the rate of carbon dissolution from the coke were related to the composition and morphology of the mineral layer. The effect of this mineral layer on the rate of carbon dissolution has been interpreted as a change in the reaction control mechanism.

  18. Microscopic mechanism for the Rashba spin-band splitting: Perspective from formation of local orbital angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We review the developments in the orbital–angular–momentum (OAM) based approach to the Rashba effect. • Combination of OAM and linear momentum results in significant electrostatic energy which along with the atomic spin–orbit coupling explains all aspects of the Rashba effect. • The results indicate shift from spin-based to OAM-based approach in the Rashba effect. • Experimental results that support the existence of OAM from circular dichroism in angle-resolved-photoemission are also reviewed. - Abstract: Despite its history, the microscopic mechanism for the Rashba spin-band splitting was not well understood. It was very recently pointed out that local orbital angular momentum (OAM) plays a crucial role in the Rashba effect. Subsequently, an effective Hamiltonian was proposed. The proposed Hamiltonian was found to not only explain all the known aspects of the Rashba phenomena but also correctly predict properties that were not known before. It brings about shifts from spin-based to OAM-based approaches in the understanding of the Rashba effect. Here, we review the developments in the new approach. Starting from a brief introduction, issues in the conventional understanding of the Rashba effect are discussed. It is then described in detail that local OAM results in significant electrostatic energy which along with the atomic spin–orbit coupling explains the Rashba effect. Experimental evidences for the existence of OAM from circular dichroism in angle resolved photoemission, thus the validity of the model, are also reviewed

  19. Microscopic mechanism for the Rashba spin-band splitting: Perspective from formation of local orbital angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Ryong [Department of Physics, Incheon National University, Incheon 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Changyoung, E-mail: changyoung@yonsei.ac.kr [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We review the developments in the orbital–angular–momentum (OAM) based approach to the Rashba effect. • Combination of OAM and linear momentum results in significant electrostatic energy which along with the atomic spin–orbit coupling explains all aspects of the Rashba effect. • The results indicate shift from spin-based to OAM-based approach in the Rashba effect. • Experimental results that support the existence of OAM from circular dichroism in angle-resolved-photoemission are also reviewed. - Abstract: Despite its history, the microscopic mechanism for the Rashba spin-band splitting was not well understood. It was very recently pointed out that local orbital angular momentum (OAM) plays a crucial role in the Rashba effect. Subsequently, an effective Hamiltonian was proposed. The proposed Hamiltonian was found to not only explain all the known aspects of the Rashba phenomena but also correctly predict properties that were not known before. It brings about shifts from spin-based to OAM-based approaches in the understanding of the Rashba effect. Here, we review the developments in the new approach. Starting from a brief introduction, issues in the conventional understanding of the Rashba effect are discussed. It is then described in detail that local OAM results in significant electrostatic energy which along with the atomic spin–orbit coupling explains the Rashba effect. Experimental evidences for the existence of OAM from circular dichroism in angle resolved photoemission, thus the validity of the model, are also reviewed.

  20. Localization of shear strain and shear band formation induced by deformation in semi-solid Al-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagira, T.; Morita, S.; Yasuda, H.; Gourlay, C. M.; Yoshiya, M.; Sugiyama, A.; Uesugi, K.

    2015-06-01

    In situ observation of deformation in globular Al-Cu samples at a solid fraction of ∼⃒50% and a global shear strain rate of 10-1 s-1 was performed using time-resolved X-ray imaging. The solid particle motion during shear was quantitatively analysed. The force was transmitted though the contacts between solid particles over a long distance parallel to the shear plane (18 mean grain size, d) after only a 1d increment of the Al2O3 push-plate motion. On the other hand, the distance of transmitted force in the perpendicular direction to the shear plane was restricted to approximately 11d even for a high displacement of the Al2O3 push-plate. A relatively high shear strain rate became localized at the shear domain after a small amount of deformation (a 1d increment). The solid fraction decreased in the region of localized shear strain rate. The shear band width, where the shear strain was localized and the solid fraction decreased, remained mostly unchanged over a 4 d increment of Al2O3 push-plate motion.

  1. Spectroscopic evidence of NO{sub x} formation and band-gap narrowing in N-doped TiO{sub 2} films grown by pulsed magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gago, R., E-mail: rgago@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Redondo-Cubero, A. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Vinnichenko, M.; Lehmann, J.; Munnik, F. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Palomares, F.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    N-containing TiO{sub 2} (TiO{sub 2}:N) films have been grown by reactive pulsed magnetron sputtering (RPMS) with different N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixtures and substrate temperatures (T{sub s}) up to 450 Degree-Sign C. In this way, highly-doped films (N between 5 and 8 at.%) have been produced, as derived by elastic recoil detection analysis. The structural properties have been studied by grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). On unheated substrates, the films are X-ray amorphous and N incorporation induces a transformation from rutile-like to highly disordered anatase-like structures. The crystal growth is enhanced by increasing T{sub s}, being the effect larger for doped films. In this way, nearly single-phase (nanocrystalline) anatase TiO{sub 2}:N films are achieved. The latter can be related to the imprinted anatase-like character by N incorporation observed on unheated substrates. XANES reveals that N sites are preferentially in the form of N{sub 2} or NO{sub x} (nitrite-like) complexes for growth on unheated and heated substrates, respectively. The dominant formation of NO{sub x} structures is corroborated by XPS, together with a small contribution of N at substitutional sites. Spectroscopic ellipsometry shows an effective reduction of the optical band-gap for doped films. A maximum decrease of {approx}0.3 eV at T{sub s} = 450 Degree-Sign C is observed, which correlates with a rigid red-shift of the valence band XPS spectra. The spectroscopic results indicate that band-gap narrowing is due to N interstitials as NO{sub x} complexes. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly-doped TiO{sub 2}:N films have been grown by reactive pulsed magnetron sputtering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic structure has been assessed by XANES and high-resolution XPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N incorporation favors the formation of anatase structures and narrows the

  2. Intrinsic Josephson junctions in the iron-based multi-band superconductor (V2Sr4O6)Fe2As2

    OpenAIRE

    Moll, Philip J. W.; Zhu, Xiyu; Cheng, Peng; Wen, Hai-Hu; Batlogg, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    In layered superconductors, Josephson junctions may be formed within the unit cell due to sufficiently low interlayer coupling. These intrinsic Josephson junction (iJJ) systems have attracted considerable interest for their application potential in quantum computing as well as efficient sources of THz radiation, closing the famous "THz gap". So far, iJJ have been demonstrated in single-band, copper-based high-Tc superconductors, mainly in Ba-Sr-Ca-Cu-O. Here we report clear experimental evide...

  3. Severe plastic deformation through adiabatic shear banding in Fe-C steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D; Syn, C; Sherby, O

    2004-12-01

    Severe plastic deformation is observed within adiabatic shear bands in iron-carbon steels. These shear bands form under high strain rate conditions, in excess of 1000 s{sup -1}, and strains in the order 5 or greater are commonly observed. Studies on shear band formation in a ultrahigh carbon steel (1.3%C) are described in the pearlitic condition. A hardness of 11.5 GPa (4600 MPa) is obtained within the band. A mechanism is described to explain the high strength based on phase transformation to austenite from adiabatic heating resulting from severe deformation. Rapid re-transformation leads to an ultra-fine ferrite grain size containing carbon principally in the form of nanosize carbides. It is proposed that the same mechanism explains the ultrahigh strength of iron-carbon steels observed in ball-milling, ball drop tests and in severely deformed wires.

  4. Role of the Initial Formation of the Iron Nano-Particles in the Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Growth Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leszek Stobinski; Hong-Ming Lin

    2004-01-01

    Careful preparation of the iron nano-particle catalyst for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fabrication has crucial importance for initial growth of multi-wall carbon-nanotubes (MWCNTs). Thin iron layer was thermally deposited in a high vacuum onto the surface of the SiO2/Si wafer at about 300 K. The sample was heated up to 700℃ in a hydrogen atmosphere, and then the sample was heated once again at750℃ in ethylene atmosphere. After hydrogen treatment continuous Fe layer was changed into many well separated Fe nano-peaks. AFM, SEM and HR-TEM studies of deposited MWCNTs allow us to propose a growth mechanism for long, straight MWCNTs.

  5. A polar-localized iron-binding protein determines the polar targeting of Burkholderia BimA autotransporter and actin tail formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiuhe; Xu, Yue; Yao, Qing; Niu, Miao; Shao, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens including Shigella, Listeria, Mycobacteria, Rickettsia and Burkholderia spp. deploy a specialized surface protein onto one pole of the bacteria to induce filamentous actin tail formation for directional movement within host cytosol. The mechanism underlying polar targeting of the actin tail proteins is unknown. Here we perform a transposon screen in Burkholderia thailandensis and identify a conserved bimC that is required for actin tail formation mediated by BimA from B. thailandensis and its closely related pathogenic species B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. bimC is located upstream of bimA in the same operon. Loss of bimC results in even distribution of BimA on the outer membrane surface, where actin polymerization still occurs. BimC is targeted to the same bacterial pole independently of BimA. BimC confers polar targeting of BimA prior to BimA translocation across bacterial inner membrane. BimC is an iron-binding protein, requiring a four-cysteine cluster at the carboxyl terminus. Mutation of the cysteine cluster disrupts BimC polar localization. Truncation analyses identify the transmembrane domain in BimA being responsible for its polar targeting. Consistently, BimC can interact with BimA transmembrane domain in an iron binding-dependent manner. Our study uncovers a new mechanism that determines the polar distribution of bacteria-induced actin tail in infected host cells. PMID:25293534

  6. He and Cr effects on radiation damage formation in ion-irradiated pure iron and Fe–5.40 wt.% Cr: A transmission electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first walls of future fusion reactors will be exposed to 14 MeV neutron irradiation. In order to gain insight into their radiation resistance, model materials (a high purity iron and a Fe–5.40 wt.% Cr alloy) have been ion-irradiated in the JANNuS facility to high doses with and without helium. The materials were self-ion-irradiated at 500 °C up to ∼100 displacements per atom (dpa) with gas implantation rates equal to 0, 2.5 and 25 appm He dpa−1. He and Cr effects on the radiation damage formation have been studied at the microscopic scale by transmission electron microscopy. In pure Fe, a coarse dislocation network was observed after irradiation, irrespective of helium implantation rate. Concerning the V-containing features (nanobubbles or cavities), few large cavities were observed in pure iron irradiated without helium. The main effect of helium implantation was to increase their density and diminish their size. The main effect of chromium was to reduce the swelling for all the He implantation rates. Furthermore, in both materials, the cavity formation was mainly heterogeneous

  7. Local shear texture formation in adiabatic shear bands by high rate compression of high manganese TRIP steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Yang, P.; Mao, W. M.; Cui, F. E.

    2015-04-01

    Local shear textures in ASBs of high manganese TRIP steels under high rate straining are determined and the influences of initial microstructure is analyzed using EBSD technique. It is seen that even at the presence of majority of two types of martensite before deformation, ASB is preferred to evolve in austenite, rather than in martenite, due to reverse transformation. Ultrafine grains of thress phases due to dynamic recrystallization are formed and all show shear textures. The less ε-martensite in ASB is distributed as islands and its preferred orientation can be found to originate from the variants in matrix. The grain orientation rotation around ASB in multi-phase alloy reveals significant influence of α'- martensite on texture in ASB. The mechanism of local texture formation in ASB of high manganese TRIP steel is proposed in terms of the interaction of early TRIP and later reverse transformation.

  8. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Iron sulfide scales formation conditions. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ASTM A 516 degree 60 carbon steel superficial protection technique submitted to a hydrogen-water sulfide corrosive medium at 2 MPa of pressure and 40-125 deg C forming on itself an iron sulfide layer was tested. Studies on pH influence, temperature, passivating mean characteristics and exposure time as well as the mechanical resistance of sulfide layers to erosion are included. (Author)

  9. Grafting of diazonium salts on oxides surface: formation of aryl-O bonds on iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combining ab initio modeling and 57Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, we characterized the nature of the chemical linkage of aminoalkyl arenediazonium salt on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. We established that it is built through a metal–oxygen–carbon bonding and not a metal–carbon one, as usually suggested and commonly observed in previously studied metal- or carbon-based surfaces

  10. Grafting of diazonium salts on oxides surface: formation of aryl-O bonds on iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brymora, Katarzyna [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France); Fouineau, Jonathan; Eddarir, Asma; Chau, François [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS CNRS UMR 7086 (France); Yaacoub, Nader; Grenèche, Jean-Marc [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France); Pinson, Jean; Ammar, Souad [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS CNRS UMR 7086 (France); Calvayrac, Florent, E-mail: florent.calvayrac@univ-lemans.fr [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Combining ab initio modeling and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, we characterized the nature of the chemical linkage of aminoalkyl arenediazonium salt on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. We established that it is built through a metal–oxygen–carbon bonding and not a metal–carbon one, as usually suggested and commonly observed in previously studied metal- or carbon-based surfaces.

  11. Formation of the conduction band electronic structure during deposition of ultrathin dicarboximide-substituted perylene films on the oxidized silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolov, A. S.; Lazneva, E. F.; Gerasimova, N. B.; Panina, Yu. A.; Baramygin, A. V.; Ovsyannikov, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    The results of the investigation of the conduction band electronic structure and the interfacial potential barrier during deposition of ultrathin dicarboximide-substituted perylene films (PTCBI-C8) on the oxidized silicon surface have been presented. The measurements have been performed using the very low energy electron diffraction (VLEED) technique implemented in the total current spectroscopy (TCS) mode with a variation in the incident electron energy from 0 to 25 eV. Changes in the intensities of the maxima from the deposited PTCBI-C8 film and from the substrate with an increase in the organic coating thickness to 7 nm have been analyzed using TCS measurements. A comparison of the structure of the maxima of PTCBI-C8 and perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) films has made it possible to distinguish the energy range (8-13 eV above E F) in which distinct differences in the structures of maxima for PTCDA and PTCBI-C8 films are observed. This energy range corresponds to low-lying σ*-states of the conduction band of the films studied. The formation of the interfacial region of the PTCBI-C8 film and (SiO2) n-Si substrate is accompanied by an increase in the surface work function by 0.6 eV, which corresponds to the electron density charge transfer from the (SiO2) n-Si substrate to the PTCBI-C8 film.

  12. Iron toxicity in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśnicka, R; Krzepiłko, A; Wawryn, J; Biliński, T

    1997-01-01

    It has been found that yeast cells are sensitive to iron overload only when grown on glucose as a carbon source. Effective concentration of ferrous iron is much higher than that found in natural environments. Effects of ferrous iron are strictly oxygen dependent, what suggest that the formation of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction is a cause of the toxicity. Respiratory deficiency and pretreatment of cells with antimycin A prevent toxic effects in the late exponential phase of growth, whereas uncouplers and 2mM magnesium salts completely protect even the most vulnerable exponential cells. Generally, toxic effects correlate with the ability of cells to take up this metal. The results presented suggest that during ferrous iron overload iron is transported through the unspecific divalent cation uptake system which is known in fungi. The data suggest that recently described high and low affinity systems of iron uptake in yeast are the only source of iron in natural environments. PMID:9516981

  13. Direct imaging of the water snow line at the time of planet formation using two ALMA continuum bands

    CERN Document Server

    Banzatti, Andrea; Ricci, Luca; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Birnstiel, Til; Ciesla, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Molecular snow lines in protoplanetary disks have been studied theoretically for decades because of their importance in shaping planetary architectures and compositions. The water snow line lies in the planet formation region at < 10 AU, and so far its location has been estimated only indirectly from spatially-unresolved spectroscopy. This work presents a proof-of-concept method to directly image the water snow line in protoplanetary disks through its physical and chemical imprint in the local dust properties. We adopt a physical disk model that includes dust coagulation, fragmentation, drift, and a change in fragmentation velocities of a factor 10 between dry silicates and icy grains as found by laboratory work. We find that the presence of a water snow line leads to a sharp discontinuity in the radial profile of the dust emission spectral index {\\alpha}_mm, due to replenishment of small grains through fragmentation. We use the ALMA simulator to demonstrate that this effect can be observed in protoplaneta...

  14. Transient formation of the oxo-iron(IV) porphyrin radical cation during the reaction of iron(III) tetrakis-5,10,15,20-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin with hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Tapan Kumar; Karmaker, Subarna; Tamagake, Keietsu

    2003-01-01

    The reaction of iron(III) tetrakis-5,10,15,20-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (Fe(III)TMPyP) with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and the catalytic activity of the reaction intermediates on the luminescent peroxidation of luminol in aqueous solution were studied by using a double-mixing stopped-flow system. The observed luminescence intensities showed biphasic decay depending on the conditions. The initial flashlight decayed within flashlight appeared during the formation of the oxo-iron(IV) porphyrin, TMPyPFe(IV) = O, which is responsible for the sustained emission. The absorption spectra 0.0-0.5 s did not reproduce well by a simple combination of the two spectra of Fe(III)TMPyP and TMPyPFe(IV) = O, indicating that transient species was formed at the initial stage. Addition of uric acid (UA) caused a significant delay in the initiation of the luminol emission as well as in the formation of the TMPyPFe(IV) = O. Both of them were completely diminished in the presence of UA equimolar with H(2)O(2), while mannitol had no effect at all. The delay of the light emission as well as the appearance of TMPyPFe(IV) = O was directly proportional to the [UA](0) but other kinetic profiles were not changed significantly. Based on these observations and the kinetic analysis, we confirmed the involvement of the oxo-iron(IV) porphyrin radical cation, (TMPyP)(.+)Fe(IV) = O, as an obligatory intermediate in the rate-determining step of the overall reaction, Fe(III)TMPyP + H(2)O(2) --> TMPyPFe(IV) = O, with a rate constant of k = 4.3 x 10(4)/mol/L/s. The rate constants for the reaction between the (TMPyP)(.+)Fe(IV) = O and luminol, and between the TMPyPFe(IV) = O and luminol were estimated to be 3.6 x 10(6)/mol/L/s and 1.31 x 10(4)/mol/L/s, respectively. PMID:12701092

  15. Ferrite grade iron oxides from ore rejects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K S Rane; V M S Verenkar; P Y Sawant

    2001-06-01

    Iron oxyhydroxides and hydroxides were synthesized from chemically beneficiated high SiO2/Al2O3 low-grade iron ore (57.49% Fe2O3) rejects and heated to get iron oxides of 96–99.73% purity. The infrared band positions, isothermal weight loss and thermogravimetric and chemical analysis established the chemical formulas of iron-oxyhydroxides as -FeOOH.0.3H2O; -FeOOH.0.2H2O and amorphous FeOOH. The thermal products of all these were -Fe2O3 excepting that of -FeOOH.0.3H2O which gave mainly -Fe2O3 and some admixture of -Fe2O3. The hydrazinated iron hydroxides and oxyhydroxides, on the other hand, decomposed autocatalytically to mainly -Fe2O3. Hydrazine method modifies the thermal decomposition path of the hydroxides. The saturation magnetization, s, values were found to be in the range 60–71 emu g–1 which are close to the reported values for -Fe2O3. Mechanism of the -Fe2O3 formation by hydrazine method is discussed.

  16. Formation of self-assembled quantum dots of iron oxide thin films by spray pyrolysis from non-aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum dots (QDs) of iron oxide have been deposited onto ITO coated glass substrates by spray pyrolysis technique, using ferric chloride (FeCl3.7H2O) in non-aqueous medium as a starting material. The non-aqueous solvents namely methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol and pentanol were used as solvents. The effect of solvents on the film structure and morphology was studied. The structural, morphological, compositional and optical properties were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), and optical absorption measurement techniques

  17. Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mucolytic drug ambroxol through ion-pair formation with iron and thiocyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levent, Abdulkadir; Sentürk, Zühre

    2010-09-01

    Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods have been developed for the determination of mucolytic drug Ambroxol. These procedures depend upon the reaction of iron(III) metal ion with the drug in the presence of thiocyanate ion to form stable ion-pair complex which extractable chloroform. The red-coloured complex was determined either colorimetrically at 510 nm or by indirect atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) via the determination of the iron content in the formed complex. The optimum experimental conditions for pH, concentrations of Fe(3+) and SCN(-), shaking time, phase ratio, and the number of extractions were determined. Under the proposed conditions, linearity was obeyed in the concentration ranges 4.1x10(-6) - 5.7x10(-5) M (1.7-23.6 µg mL(-1)) using both methods, with detection limits of 4.6x10(-7) M (0.19 µg mL(-1)) for colorimetry and 1.1x10(-6) M (0.46 µg mL(-1)) for AAS. The proposed methods were applied for the determination of Ambroxol in tablet dosage forms. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the high-performance liquid chromatographic method with diode-array detection. PMID:20426742

  18. Environmental control on the occurrence of high-coercivity magnetic minerals and formation of iron sulfides in a 640 ka sediment sequence from Lake Ohrid (Balkans)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Janna; Nowaczyk, Norbert R.; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Francke, Alexander; Vogel, Hendrik; Lacey, Jack H.; Wagner, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The bulk magnetic mineral record from Lake Ohrid, spanning the past 637 kyr, reflects large-scale shifts in hydrological conditions, and, superimposed, a strong signal of environmental conditions on glacial-interglacial and millennial timescales. A shift in the formation of early diagenetic ferrimagnetic iron sulfides to siderites is observed around 320 ka. This change is probably associated with variable availability of sulfide in the pore water. We propose that sulfate concentrations were significantly higher before ˜ 320 ka, due to either a higher sulfate flux or lower dilution of lake sulfate due to a smaller water volume. Diagenetic iron minerals appear more abundant during glacials, which are generally characterized by higher Fe / Ca ratios in the sediments. While in the lower part of the core the ferrimagnetic sulfide signal overprints the primary detrital magnetic signal, the upper part of the core is dominated by variable proportions of high- to low-coercivity iron oxides. Glacial sediments are characterized by high concentration of high-coercivity magnetic minerals (hematite, goethite), which relate to enhanced erosion of soils that had formed during preceding interglacials. Superimposed on the glacial-interglacial behavior are millennial-scale oscillations in the magnetic mineral composition that parallel variations in summer insolation. Like the processes on glacial-interglacial timescales, low summer insolation and a retreat in vegetation resulted in enhanced erosion of soil material. Our study highlights that rock-magnetic studies, in concert with geochemical and sedimentological investigations, provide a multi-level contribution to environmental reconstructions, since the magnetic properties can mirror both environmental conditions on land and intra-lake processes.

  19. Intracellular iron minerals in a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, Susan; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    Among prokaryotes, there are few examples of controlled mineral formation; the formation of crystalline iron oxides and sulfides [magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4)] by magnetotactic bacteria is an exception. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium that is capable of dissimilatory iron reduction, produced microscopic intracellular grains of iron oxide minerals during growth on two-line ferrihydrite in a hydrogen-argon atmosphere. The minerals, formed at iron concentrations found in the soil and sedimentary environments where these bacteria are active, could represent an unexplored pathway for the cycling of iron by bacteria. PMID:11778045

  20. Formation of high electrical-resistivity thin surface layer on carbonyl-iron powder (CIP and thermal stability of nanocrystalline structure and vortex magnetic structure of CIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sugimura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the carbonyl-iron powder (CIP used in the metal composite bulk magnetic core for high-efficient/light-weight SiC/GaN power device MHz switching dc-dc converter, where the fine CIP with a mean diameter of 1.1 μm is used to suppress the MHz band eddy current inside the CIP body. When applying the CIP to composite core together with the resin matrix, high electrical resistivity layer must be formed on the CIP-surface in order to suppress the overlapped eddy current between adjacent CIPs. In this study, tens nm thick silica (SiO2 was successfully deposited on the CIP-surface by using hydrolysis of TEOS (Si(OC2H54. Also tens nm thick oxidized layer of the CIP-surface was successfully formed by using CIP annealing in dry air. The SiC/GaN power device can operate at ambient temperature over 200 degree-C, and the composite magnetic core is required to operate at such ambient temperature. The as-made CIP had small coercivity below 800 A/m (10 Oe due to its nanocrystalline-structure and had a single vortex magnetic structure. From the experimental results, both nanocrystalline and single vortex magnetic structure were maintained after heat-exposure of 250 degree-C, and the powder coercivity after same heat-exposure was nearly same as that of the as-made CIP. Therefore, the CIP with thermally stable nanocrystalline-structure and vortex magnetic state was considered to be heat-resistant magnetic powder used in the iron-based composite core for SiC/GaN power electronics.

  1. Formation of high electrical-resistivity thin surface layer on carbonyl-iron powder (CIP) and thermal stability of nanocrystalline structure and vortex magnetic structure of CIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, K.; Miyajima, Y.; Sonehara, M.; Sato, T.; Hayashi, F.; Zettsu, N.; Teshima, K.; Mizusaki, H.

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the carbonyl-iron powder (CIP) used in the metal composite bulk magnetic core for high-efficient/light-weight SiC/GaN power device MHz switching dc-dc converter, where the fine CIP with a mean diameter of 1.1 μm is used to suppress the MHz band eddy current inside the CIP body. When applying the CIP to composite core together with the resin matrix, high electrical resistivity layer must be formed on the CIP-surface in order to suppress the overlapped eddy current between adjacent CIPs. In this study, tens nm thick silica (SiO2) was successfully deposited on the CIP-surface by using hydrolysis of TEOS (Si(OC2H5)4). Also tens nm thick oxidized layer of the CIP-surface was successfully formed by using CIP annealing in dry air. The SiC/GaN power device can operate at ambient temperature over 200 degree-C, and the composite magnetic core is required to operate at such ambient temperature. The as-made CIP had small coercivity below 800 A/m (10 Oe) due to its nanocrystalline-structure and had a single vortex magnetic structure. From the experimental results, both nanocrystalline and single vortex magnetic structure were maintained after heat-exposure of 250 degree-C, and the powder coercivity after same heat-exposure was nearly same as that of the as-made CIP. Therefore, the CIP with thermally stable nanocrystalline-structure and vortex magnetic state was considered to be heat-resistant magnetic powder used in the iron-based composite core for SiC/GaN power electronics.

  2. Transformation of heavy metals and the formation of secondary iron minerals during pig manure bioleaching by the co-inoculation acidophilic thiobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Zhou, Lixiang; Liu, Fenwu; Zheng, Chaocheng; Deng, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Bioleaching of heavy metals from pig manure using a mixture of harmless iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in an air-lift reactor was conducted. The transformation of heavy metals and the formation of secondary Fe minerals during bioleaching were also investigated in the present study. The removal efficiencies of Zn, Cu, and Mn from pig manure were 95.1%, 80.9%, and 87.5%, respectively. Zn mainly existed in the form of Fe-Mn oxides in fresh pig manure; most of the pig manure-borne Cu was in organic matter form; Mn existed mainly in Fe-Mn oxides, carbonates, and residual forms. The pig manure can be applied to land more safely after bioleaching because the heavy metals mainly existed in stable forms. The removal efficiencies Zn, Cu, and Mn had good relationships with pH and oxidation reduction potential during bioleaching. A mixture ofjarosite and schwertmannite was found in the bioleached pig manure, which might have an adverse effect on the solubilization efficiency of toxic metals from pig manure. The bioleaching process using a mixture of harmless iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria was shown to be a very feasible technology for the removal of heavy metals from pig manure. PMID:23437654

  3. Sol-gel formation of γ-Fe2O3/SiO2 nanocomposites: Effects of different iron raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silica coated magnetic γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The crystal phase and magnetic properties of serials of α, γ-Fe2O3/SiO2 from different iron raw materials, submitted to thermal treatment at a temperature of 400 deg. C were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy and magnetometry. Different amounts of TEOS, ethanol, water (media), and the different sources of iron, including ferric citrate (adjusting pH with citric acid), ferric chloride (adjusting pH with HCl), ferric nitrate (adjusting pH with nitrate) as raw material were mixed to form sol, and then gel. After drying at 60 deg. C in vacuum, the dry gels were sintered at the temperature of 400 deg. C to produce the Fe2O3 particles. Ferric citrate raw material favored the occurrence of γ-Fe2O3, while ferric chloride gave rise to α-Fe2O3 formation in SiO2 matrix

  4. Enhancing electrochemical water-splitting kinetics by polarization-driven formation of near-surface iron(0): an in situ XPS study on perovskite-type electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Alexander K; Nenning, Andreas; Rameshan, Christoph; Rameshan, Raffael; Blume, Raoul; Hävecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Rupprechter, Günther; Fleig, Jürgen; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2015-02-23

    In the search for optimized cathode materials for high-temperature electrolysis, mixed conducting oxides are highly promising candidates. This study deals with fundamentally novel insights into the relation between surface chemistry and electrocatalytic activity of lanthanum ferrite based electrolysis cathodes. For this means, near-ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) and impedance spectroscopy experiments were performed simultaneously on electrochemically polarized La0.6 Sr0.4 FeO3-δ (LSF) thin film electrodes. Under cathodic polarization the formation of Fe(0) on the LSF surface could be observed, which was accompanied by a strong improvement of the electrochemical water splitting activity of the electrodes. This correlation suggests a fundamentally different water splitting mechanism in presence of the metallic iron species and may open novel paths in the search for electrodes with increased water splitting activity. PMID:25557533

  5. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Pressure influence on iron sulfide scales formation. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to protect carbon steel towers and piping of Girlder sulfide (G.S.) experimental heavy water plants against corrosion produced by the action of aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, a method, previously published, was developed. Carbon steel, exposed to saturated aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, forms iron sulfide scales. In oxygen free solutions evolution of corrosion follows the sequence: mackinawite → cubic ferrous sulfide → troilite → pyrrotite → pyrite. Scales formed by pyrrotite-pyrite or pyrite are the most protective layers (these are obtained at 130 deg C, 2MPa, for periods of 14 days). Experiments, at 125 deg C and periods of 10-25 days, were performed in two different ways: 1- constant pressure operations at 0.5 and 1.1 MPa. 2- variable pressure operation between 0.3-1 MPa. In all cases pyrrotite-pyrite scales were obtained. (Author)

  6. Study of the sulfur mechanism on the formation of coke deposition on iron surfaces; Etude des mecanismes d'action du soufre sur le cokage catalytique du fer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, F.

    2001-12-01

    The formation of coke deposition which occurs in a range of temperature 500 deg C-650 deg C is a major problem in many chemical and petrochemical processes where hydrocarbons or other strongly carburizing atmospheres are involved. To reduce the rate of coke deposition, sulfur can be added in the gas phase. The topic of this work is to study the sulfur mechanism on the formation of coke deposition on iron surfaces. Firstly, we study the mechanism of graphitic filament formation on reduced and oxidised iron surfaces. A new mechanism of catalytic particle formation is proposed when the surface is initially oxidised. This mechanism is based on thermodynamic, kinetic and structural considerations. The results show that oxide/carbide transitions are involved in the transformation of the oxide layer in catalytic particles. Although the different iron oxides are precursors for the formation of catalytic particles, wustite (FeO) has a better reactivity than magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Sulfur acts on different steps of the coke formation, preventing phase transformations (carburation, graphitization) which occur during the formation of catalytic particles. Sulfur activity required to prevent these transformations changes with the temperature, the chemical state of iron (reduced or oxidised) and the carbon activity in the gas phase. Sulfur/ethylene co-adsorption studies were performed on mono-crystal of iron (110). The results show that sulfur can prevent adsorption and decomposition of this hydrocarbon on metallic surface (Fe) and on magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Then, sulfur prevents the reaction leading to the carburation and graphitization of the surface. (author)

  7. Experimental Constraints on the Stability of Clinopyroxene (+) Magnesite in Iron Bearing Planetary Mantles: Implications for Nakhlite Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Audrey M.; Righter, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Carbon is present in various forms in the Earth s upper mantle (carbonate- or diamond-bearing mantle xenoliths, carbonatite magmas, CO2 emissions from volcanoes...). Moreover, there is enough carbon in chondritic material to stabilize carbonates into the mantles of Mars or Venus as well as in the Earth. However, the interactions with iron have to be constrained, because Fe is commonly thought to buffer oxygen fugacity into planetary mantles. [1] and [2] show evidences of the stability of clinopyroxene Ca(Mg,Fe)Si2O6 + magnesite (Mg,Fe)CO3 in the Earth s mantle around 6GPa (about 180km). The stability of oxidized forms of carbon (like magnesite) depends on the oxygen fugacity of the system. In the Earth s mantle, the maximum carbon content is 10000 ppm [3]. The fO2 parameter varies vertically as a function of pressure, but also laterally because of geodynamic processes like subduction. Thus, carbonates, graphite, diamond, C-rich gases and melts are all stable forms of carbon in the Earth s mantle. [4] show that the fO2 variations observed in SNC meteorites can be explained by polybaric graphite-CO-CO2 equilibria in the Martian mantle. [5] inferred from thermodynamic calculations that the stable form of carbon in the source regions of the Martian basalts should be graphite (and/or diamond). After [6], a metasomatizing agent like a CO2-rich melt may infiltrate the mantle source of nakhlites. However, according to [7] and [8], the FeO wt% value in the Martian bulk mantle is more than twice that of the Earth s mantle (KLB-1 composition by [9]). As iron and carbon are two elements with various oxidation states, Fe/C interaction mechanisms must be considered.

  8. The role of sedimentology, oceanography, and alteration on the δ56Fe value of the Sokoman Iron Formation, Labrador Trough, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raye, Urmidola; Pufahl, Peir K.; Kyser, T. Kurtis; Ricard, Estelle; Hiatt, Eric E.

    2015-09-01

    The Sokoman Formation is a ca. 100-m-thick succession of interbedded iron formation and fine-grained siliciclastics deposited at 1.88 Ga. Accumulation occurred on a dynamic paleoshelf where oxygen stratification, coastal upwelling of hydrothermally derived Fe and Si, microbial processes, tide and storm currents, diagenesis, and low-grade prehnite-pumpellyite metamorphism controlled lithofacies character and produced complex associations of multigenerational chert, hematite, magnetite, greenalite, stilpnomelane and Fe carbonate. Hematite-rich facies were deposited along suboxic segments of the coastline where photosynthetic oxygen oases impinged on the seafloor. Hematitic, cross-stratified grainstones were formed by winnowing and reworking of freshly precipitated Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide and opal-A by waves and currents into subaqueous dunes. Magnetite-rich facies contain varying proportions of greenalite and stilpnomelane and record deposition in anoxic middle shelf environments beneath an oxygen chemocline. Minor negative Ce anomalies in hematitic facies, but prominent positive Ce and Eu anomalies and high LREE/HREE ratios in magnetite-rich facies imply the existence of a weakly oxygenated surface ocean above anoxic bottom waters. The Fe isotopic composition of 31 whole rock (-0.46 ⩽ δ56Fe ⩽ 0.47‰) and 21 magnetite samples (-0.29 ⩽ δ56Fe ⩽ 0.22‰) from suboxic and anoxic lithofacies was controlled primarily by the physical oceanography of the paleoshelf. Despite low-grade metamorphism recorded by the δ18O values of paragenetically related quartz and magnetite, the Sokoman Formation preserves a robust primary Fe isotopic signal. Coastal upwelling is interpreted to have affected the isotopic equilibria between Fe2+aq and Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide in open marine versus coastal environments, which controlled the Fe isotopic composition of lithofacies. Unlike previous work that focuses on microbial and abiotic fractionation processes with little regard for

  9. Structural evolution of the Mount Wall region in the Hamersley province, Western Australia and its control on hydrothermal alteration and formation of high-grade iron deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalstra, Hilke J.

    2014-10-01

    The discovery of two relatively small but high-grade iron ore deposits near Mt Wall, an intensely faulted part of the southwestern Hamersley province provides unique insights into the structural control on ore formation in this region. The deposits have many geological features typical of the high grade microplaty hematite group which also contains the much larger Mt Tom Price, Paraburdoo and Mt Whaleback deposits. The deposits are structurally controlled along early normal faults and contain abundant microplaty hematite and martite, and are largely confined to the Dales Gorge member of the Brockman Iron Formation. In addition to the microplaty hematite-martite ore, there are martite-goethite ores and rare magnetite-goethite or magnetite-hematite ores. Below the modern weathering surface, hydrothermally altered zones in wallrock BIF from the Lower Dales Gorge member contain magnetite, hematite and carbonate/talc bearing mineral assemblages. A staged ore genesis model involving early extension and fluid circulation along normal faults, hypogene silica leaching and carbonate alteration, followed by deep meteoric oxidation with microplaty hematite formation and finally weathering can explain most features of the Mt Wall deposits. The role of deformation was to provide pathways for mineralising fluids and initiate the seed points for the mineralised systems. High grade iron in the Wellthandalthaluna deposit is situated between the NW to NNW trending Boolgeeda Creek fault and a synthetic joining splay, the Northern fault. Both are high angle normal faults and formed during early extension in this part of the province. Faults are characterised by localised small scale deformation and brecciation, deep carbonate alteration and oxidation. Recent weathering has penetrated deeply into the fault zones, converting the carbonate-rich assemblages into goethite. Mineralisation in the Arochar deposit is situated in the overlap or relay zone between two segments of the Mt Wall

  10. K band SINFONI spectra of two $z \\sim 5$ SMGs: upper limits to the un-obscured star formation from [O II] optical emission line searches

    CERN Document Server

    Couto, Guilherme S; López, Javier Piqueras; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Arribas, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    We present deep SINFONI K band integral field spectra of two submillimeter (SMG) galaxy systems: BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0234, at $z=4.69$ and $4.55$ respectively. Spectra extracted for each object in the two systems do not show any signature of the [O II]$\\lambda\\lambda$3726,29\\AA$\\,$ emission-lines, placing upper flux limits of $3.9$ and $2.5 \\times 10^{-18}\\,$${\\rm erg\\,s^{-1}\\,\\,cm^{-2} \\,}$ for BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0234, respectively. Using the relation between the star formation rate (SFR) and the luminosity of the [O II] doublet from Kennicutt (1998), we estimate unobscured SFR upper limits of $\\sim$ $10-15\\,\\rm M_\\odot\\,yr^{-1} \\,$ and $\\sim$ $30-40\\,\\rm M_\\odot\\,yr^{-1} \\,$ for the objects of the two systems, respectively. For the SMGs, these values are at least two orders of magnitude lower than those derived from SED and IR luminosities. The differences on the SFR values would correspond to internal extinction of, at least, $3.4 - 4.9$ and $2.1 - 3.6$ mag in the visual for BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0...

  11. Effects of formation of mini-bands in two-dimensional array of silicon nanodisks with SiC interlayer for quantum dot solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sub-10 nm, high-density, periodic silicon nanodisk (Si-ND) array with a SiC interlayer has been fabricated using a new top-down process that involves a 2D array of a bio-template etching mask and damage-free neutral beam etching. Optical and electrical measurements were carried out to clarify the formation of mini-bands due to wavefunction coupling. We found that the SiC interlayer could enhance the optical absorption coefficient in the layer of Si-NDs due to the stronger coupling of wavefunctions. Theoretical simulation also indicated that wavefunction coupling was effectively enhanced in Si-NDs with a SiC interlayer, which precisely matched the experimental results. Furthermore, the I–V properties of a 2D array of Si-NDs with a SiC interlayer were studied through conductive AFM measurements, which indicated conductivity in the structure was enhanced by strong lateral electronic coupling between neighboring Si-NDs. We confirmed carrier generation and less current degradation in the structure due to high photon absorption and conductivity by inserting the Si-NDs into p–i–n solar cells. (paper)

  12. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral found in many over-the-counter supplements. Iron overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ... This can be by accident or on purpose. Iron overdose is especially dangerous for children. A severe ...

  13. The isotope geochemical characteristics of the precambrian iron-bearing formation gold deposit in Dongfengshan, Heilongjiang Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongfengshan gold deposit is occurred in hornstone of Dongfengshan group under iron-bearing stratum. Ore-bearing stratum contain richly pyrrhotite, pyrite, spessartine and dannemorite. Additionally, there are smaller arsenopyrite and cobaltite. The δ34S values of pyrrhotite and pyrite are -1.54%∼0.98% and -0.27%∼0.61%, respectively. Sulfur of sulfide occurrence mainly from plutonic source. The δ18O values of different rocks and minerals show following: marble 1.31%∼2.39%, magnetite 0.41%∼1.05%, quarts 1.37%∼2.09%, grunerite 1.09%∼1.68%, garnet 0.99%∼1.75%. These δ18O values reflect thermal contact metamorphic character of gold deposit. The δ18O values of the Paleozoic granite obviously are of two groups: one is terrene granite in southern ore area, its δ18O values are 0.87%∼1.14%; the other is drill hole plutonic granite in northern ore area, its δ18O values are 0.05%∼0.11%. The granite from drill hole was strongly sericitized. Dongfengshan group was formed in early Proterozoic. Dongfengshan gold deposit is a high temperature thermal contact metamorphic syngenetic deposit

  14. Energetics of formation and migration of self-interstitials and self-interstitial clusters in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energetic primary recoil atoms from fast neutron irradiation generate both isolated point defects and clusters of vacancies and interstitials. Self-interstitial mobility as well as defect cluster stability and mobility play key roles in the subsequent fate of defects and, hence, in the overall microstructural evolution under irradiation. Self-interstitials and two, three and four-member self-interstitial clusters are highly mobile at low temperatures as observed in molecular-dynamics simulations and high mobility probably also extends to larger clusters. In this study, the morphology, energetics and mobility of self-interstitials and small self-interstitial clusters in α-iron are studied by molecular-statics and molecular-dynamics simulations using a Finnis-Sinclair many-body interatomic potential. Self-interstitial migration is found to be a two-step process consisting of a rotation out of the split-dumbbell configuration into the split-dumbbell configuration and translational jumps through the crowdion configuration before returning to the dumbbell configuration. Self-interstitial clusters of type split-interstitials assembled on adjacent {110} planes migrate along directions in an amoeba-like fashion by sequential local dissociation and re-association processes. (orig.)

  15. Electrochemical studies of iron/carbonates system applied to the formation of thin layers of siderite on inert substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the complex mechanisms of the reactions occurring, a methodology is developed. It is based on the use of compounds electrodeposited under the form of thin layers and which are used then as electrodes to study their interactions with the toxic species. It is in this framework that is studied the electrodeposition of siderite on inert substrates. At first, have been studied iron electrochemical systems in carbonated solutions. These studies have been carried out with classical electrochemical methods (cyclic voltametry, amperometry) coupled to in-situ measurements: quartz microbalance, pH. Different compounds have been obtained under the form of homogeneous and adherent thin layers. The analyses of these depositions, by different ex-situ characterizations (XRD, IR, SEM, EDS..) have revealed particularly the presence of siderite. Then, the influence of several experimental parameters (substrate, potential, medium composition, temperature) on the characteristics of siderite thin layers has been studied. From these experimental results, models have been proposed. (O.M.)

  16. Sclerite formation in the hydrothermal-vent “scaly-foot” gastropod — possible control of iron sulfide biomineralization by the animal

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Yohey; Kopp, Robert E.; Kogure, Toshihiro; Suga, Akinobu; Takai, Ken; Tsuchida, Shinji; Ozaki, Noriaki; Endo, Kazuyoshi; Hashimoto, Jun; Kato, Yasuhiro; Mizota, Chitoshi; Hirata, Takafumi; CHIBA, Hitoshi; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki

    2006-01-01

    A gastropod from a deep-sea hydrothermal field at the Rodriguez triple junction, Indian Ocean, has scale-shaped structures, called sclerites, mineralized with iron sulfides on its foot. No other organisms are known to produce a skeleton consisting of iron sulfides. To investigate whether iron sulfide mineralization is mediated by the gastropod for the function of the sclerites, we performed a detailed physical and chemical characterization. Nanostructural characterization of the iron sulfide ...

  17. Effect of Mn, Si, and Cooling Rate on the Formation of Iron-Rich Intermetallics in 206 Al-Cu Cast Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Cao, X.; Chen, X.-G.

    2012-10-01

    The solidification structures of commercial 206 Al-Cu cast alloys with 0.15 pct Fe have been studied using thermal analysis (TA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The EBSD results have shown that there are two iron-rich intermetallics: Chinese script α-Fe and platelet-like β-Fe. The addition of either Mn or Si has helped to promote the formation of α-Fe and hinder the precipitate of β-Fe. The combined addition of both Mn and Si is even more effective than the individual addition of either Mn or Si. The full solidification sequence of the 206 cast alloy has been established. The volume percent and formation temperature increase for α-Fe but decrease for β-Fe with increasing cooling rate. The platelet β-Fe can be effectively suppressed in 206 cast alloys by controlling the alloy chemistry and cooling rate. A casting process map is proposed to correlate the Mn and Si contents with cooling rates for the 206 cast alloys.

  18. Ab initio scaling laws for the formation energy of nanosized interstitial defect clusters in iron, tungsten, and vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R.; Marinica, M.-C.; Proville, L.; Willaime, F.; Arakawa, K.; Gilbert, M. R.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    The size limitation of ab initio calculations impedes first-principles simulations of crystal defects at nanometer sizes. Considering clusters of self-interstitial atoms as a paradigm for such crystal defects, we have developed an ab initio-accuracy model to predict formation energies of defect clusters with various geometries and sizes. Our discrete-continuum model combines the discrete nature of energetics of interstitial clusters and continuum elasticity for a crystalline solid matrix. The model is then applied to interstitial dislocation loops with and 1 /2 Burgers vectors, and to C15 clusters in body-centered-cubic crystals Fe, W, and V, to determine their relative stabilities as a function of size. We find that in Fe the C15 clusters were more stable than dislocation loops if the number of self-interstitial atoms involved was fewer than 51, which corresponds to a C15 cluster with a diameter of 1.5 nm. In V and W, the 1 /2 loops represent the most stable configurations for all defect sizes, which is at odds with predictions derived from simulations performed using some empirical interatomic potentials. Further, the formation energies predicted by the discrete-continuum model are reparametrized by a simple analytical expression giving the formation energy of self-interstitial clusters as a function of their size. The analytical scaling laws are valid over a very broad range of defect sizes, and they can be used in multiscale techniques including kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and cluster dynamics or dislocation dynamics studies.

  19. Low temperature aging mechanism identification and lithium deposition in a large format lithium iron phosphate battery for different charge profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Minggao; Chu, Zhengyu; Lu, Languang; Li, Jianqiu; Han, Xuebing; Feng, Xuning; Liu, Guangming

    2015-07-01

    Charging procedures at low temperatures severely shorten the cycle life of lithium ion batteries due to lithium deposition on the negative electrode. In this paper, cycle life tests are conducted to reveal the influence of the charging current rate and the cut-off voltage limit on the aging mechanisms of a large format LiFePO4 battery at a low temperature (-10 °C). The capacity degradation rates accelerate rapidly after the charging current reaches 0.25 C or the cut-off voltage reaches 3.55 V. Therefore the scheduled current and voltage during low-temperature charging should be reconsidered to avoid capacity degradation. Lithium deposition contributes to low-temperature aging mechanisms, as something needle-like which might be deposited lithium is observed on the surface of the negative electrode after disassembling the aged battery cell. To confirm our explanation, incremental capacity analysis (ICA) is performed to identify the characteristics of the lithium deposition induced battery aging mechanisms. Furthermore, the aging mechanism is quantified using a mechanistic model, whose parameters are estimated with the particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO). The loss of reversible lithium originating from secondary SEI formation and dead lithium is confirmed as the cause of the aging.

  20. Mechanism of formation of Fe-N alloy in the solid-state reaction process between iron and boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processes and resulting products of solid-state reaction between Fe and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) were studied by ball milling a mixture of Fe and h-BN with an Fe to h-BN volume ratio of 1:12.5 and/or heat-treating under normal or high pressure. The 30 h-milled mixture was annealed for 1 h under an atmospheric pressure at 770 and 1170 K, respectively. A small amount of γ'-Fe4N was observed in the mixture annealed at 770 K and a little γ-Fe(N) was obtained at 1170 K. All Fe atoms in the mixture reacted with N atoms in the BN to form a single phase of ε-FexN when the mixture was milled for 60 h or annealed for 1 h under 4 GPa at temperatures of 690-800 K. However, no Fe-B phase was observed in the present experiment. Formation and phase transition of Fe-N alloy in the solid-state reaction process as well as effect of pressure on the reaction and resulting products are discussed in the present paper. The mechanism of formation of Fe-N and Fe-B alloys in the reaction processes are also investigated in terms of the Miedema model and thermodynamics and kinetics

  1. Strain hardening and ductility of iron: axisymmetric vs. plane strain elongation. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langford, G.

    1979-05-01

    The strain hardening of iron at high strains in plane strain elongation (strip drawing) is shown to fall increasngly below that of drawn iron wires at true strains above 2. This makes it unnecessary to invoke shear band formation simultaneously as a strengthening mechanism and as a ductility reducing mechanism in the drawn strip. Rather, shear bands may be a weakening mechanism in all contexts. A set of specimens of interstitial-free iron deformed in three of the four main classifications of deformation symmetry (wire, strip, and chips, representing axisymmetric elongation, plane strain elongation, and pure shear) has been prepared in the form of mechanical test specimens and thin foils for high resolution selected area diffraction. A simple technique for rapid discovery of the <110> axis of foils of strongly textured bcc wire has been worked out.

  2. The formation of iron aluminides on aluminum surface by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidin, Noriah; Al-Wafi, Yusef A.

    2014-03-01

    The formation and growth of Fe based aluminum diffusion layers at the Fe-Al interface have been investigated to improve the surface hardness. The diffusion of Fe into Al has been accomplished by focusing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser on the modified surface. The variety of the layer depth is achieved based on the type of heating and quenching media. Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of the modified surface were carried out via gas discharge spectrometer GDS, X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Vickers Hardness tester. The results indicate that hardness at the interface of Fe-Al layer is increased. The optimum hardness achieved as 93 HV at corresponding critical energy density of 438 Jcm-2.

  3. The formation of iron aluminides on aluminum surface by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and growth of Fe based aluminum diffusion layers at the Fe-Al interface have been investigated to improve the surface hardness. The diffusion of Fe into Al has been accomplished by focusing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser on the modified surface. The variety of the layer depth is achieved based on the type of heating and quenching media. Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of the modified surface were carried out via gas discharge spectrometer GDS, X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Vickers Hardness tester. The results indicate that hardness at the interface of Fe-Al layer is increased. The optimum hardness achieved as 93 HV at corresponding critical energy density of 438 Jcm−2

  4. The formation of iron aluminides on aluminum surface by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidin, Noriah; Al-Wafi, Yusef A. [Advanced Photonic Science Institute, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, 81310, Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05

    The formation and growth of Fe based aluminum diffusion layers at the Fe-Al interface have been investigated to improve the surface hardness. The diffusion of Fe into Al has been accomplished by focusing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser on the modified surface. The variety of the layer depth is achieved based on the type of heating and quenching media. Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of the modified surface were carried out via gas discharge spectrometer GDS, X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Vickers Hardness tester. The results indicate that hardness at the interface of Fe-Al layer is increased. The optimum hardness achieved as 93 HV at corresponding critical energy density of 438 Jcm{sup −2}.

  5. Phase separation in iron chalcogenide superconductor Rb0.8+xFe1.6+ySe2 as seen by Raman light scattering and band structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkevich, Yu.; Gnezdilov, V.; Lemmens, P.; Shevtsova, T.; Gusev, A.; Lamonova, K.; Wulferding, D.; Gnatchenko, S.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.

    2016-06-01

    We report Raman light scattering in the phase separated superconducting single crystal Rb0.77Fe1.61Se2 with Tc = 32 K over a wide temperature region 3-500 K. The observed phonon lines from the majority vacancy ordered Rb2Fe4Se5 (245) antiferromagnetic phase with TN = 525 K demonstrate modest anomalies in the frequency, intensity and halfwidth at the superconductive phase transition. We identify phonon lines from the minority compressed RbδFe2Se2 (122) conductive phase. The superconducting gap with d x 2 - y 2 symmetry has been detected in our spectra. In the range 0-600 cm-1 we observe a weak but highly polarized B1g-type background which becomes well-structured upon cooling. A possible magnetic or multiorbital origin of this background is discussed. We argue that the phase separation in M0.8+xFe1.6+ySe2 is of pure magnetic origin. It occurs below the Néel temperature when the magnetic moment of iron reaches a critical value. We state that there is a spacer between the majority 245 and minority 122 phases. Using ab initio spin-polarized band structure calculations we demonstrate that the compressed vacancy ordered Rb2Fe4Se5 phase can be conductive and therefore may serve as a protective interface spacer between the purely metallic RbδFe2Se2 phase and the insulating Rb2Fe4Se5 phase providing percolative Josephson-junction like superconductivity all throughout of Rb0.8+xFe1.6+ySe2. Our lattice dynamics calculations show significant differences in the phonon spectra of the conductive and insulating Rb2Fe4Se5 phases.

  6. Jarosite versus Soluble Iron-Sulfate Formation and Their Role in Acid Mine Drainage Formation at the Pan de Azúcar Mine Tailings (Zn-Pb-Ag, NW Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesica Murray

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Secondary jarosite and water-soluble iron-sulfate minerals control the composition of acid mine waters formed by the oxidation of sulfide in tailings impoundments at the (Zn-Pb-Ag Pan de Azúcar mine located in the Pozuelos Lagoon Basin (semi-arid climate in Northwest (NW Argentina. In the primary zone of the tailings (9.5 wt % pyrite-marcasite precipitation of anglesite (PbSO4, wupatkite ((Co,Mg,NiAl2(SO44 and gypsum retain Pb, Co and Ca, while mainly Fe2+, Zn2+, Al3+, Mg2+, As3+/5+ and Cd2+ migrate downwards, forming a sulfate and metal-rich plume. In the oxidation zone, jarosite (MFe3(TO42(OH6 is the main secondary Fe3+ phase; its most suitable composition is M = K+, Na+, and Pb2+and TO4 = SO42−; AsO42−. During the dry season, iron-sulfate salts precipitate by capillary transport on the tailings and at the foot of DC2 (tailings impoundment DC2 tailings dam where an acid, Fe2+ rich plume outcrops. The most abundant compounds in the acid mine drainage (AMD are SO42−, Fe2+, Fe3+, Zn2+, Al3+, Mg2+, Cu2+, As3+/5+, Cd2+. These show peak concentrations at the beginning of the wet season, when the soluble salts and jarosite dissolve. The formation of soluble sulfate salts during the dry season and dilution during the wet season conform an annual cycle of rapid metals and acidity transference from the tailings to the downstream environment.

  7. Investigation of iron status in Terric Histosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokołowska Z.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The iron status in 14 differently transformed muck formations (Terric Histosols was studied. The Moessbauer spectra showed that most of the iron in all the samples was trivalent. An attempt to find the relationship between the iron content and the state of the soil transformation was performed. The w/w percentage of the total iron as well as the (alkaline extractable organic iron increased with the increase of the ratio of humic to fulvic acids.

  8. Microbes: Mini Iron Factories

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via con...

  9. Charge-ordering transition in iron oxide Fe4O5 involving competing dimer and trimer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikov, Sergey V.; Bykov, Maxim; Bykova, Elena; Kozlenko, Denis P.; Tsirlin, Alexander A.; Karkin, Alexander E.; Shchennikov, Vladimir V.; Kichanov, Sergey E.; Gou, Huiyang; Abakumov, Artem M.; Egoavil, Ricardo; Verbeeck, Johan; McCammon, Catherine; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; van Smaalen, Sander; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S.

    2016-05-01

    Phase transitions that occur in materials, driven, for instance, by changes in temperature or pressure, can dramatically change the materials’ properties. Discovering new types of transitions and understanding their mechanisms is important not only from a fundamental perspective, but also for practical applications. Here we investigate a recently discovered Fe4O5 that adopts an orthorhombic CaFe3O5-type crystal structure that features linear chains of Fe ions. On cooling below ∼150 K, Fe4O5 undergoes an unusual charge-ordering transition that involves competing dimeric and trimeric ordering within the chains of Fe ions. This transition is concurrent with a significant increase in electrical resistivity. Magnetic-susceptibility measurements and neutron diffraction establish the formation of a collinear antiferromagnetic order above room temperature and a spin canting at 85 K that gives rise to spontaneous magnetization. We discuss possible mechanisms of this transition and compare it with the trimeronic charge ordering observed in magnetite below the Verwey transition temperature.

  10. Iron and cancer: recent insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, David H; Blanchette, Nicole L; Paul, Bibbin T; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential dietary element. However, the ability of iron to cycle between oxidized and reduced forms also renders it capable of contributing to free radical formation, which can have deleterious effects, including promutagenic effects that can potentiate tumor formation. Dysregulation of iron metabolism can increase cancer risk and promote tumor growth. Cancer cells exhibit an enhanced dependence on iron relative to their normal counterparts, a phenomenon we have termed iron addiction. Work conducted in the past few years has revealed new cellular processes and mechanisms that deepen our understanding of the link between iron and cancer. Control of iron efflux through the combined action of ferroportin, an iron efflux pump, and its regulator hepcidin appears to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Ferroptosis is a form of iron-dependent cell death involving the production of reactive oxygen species. Specific mechanisms involved in ferroptosis, including depletion of glutathione and inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4, have been uncovered. Ferritinophagy is a newly identified mechanism for degradation of the iron storage protein ferritin. Perturbations of mechanisms that control transcripts encoding proteins that regulate iron have been observed in cancer cells, including differences in miRNA, methylation, and acetylation. These new insights may ultimately provide new therapeutic opportunities for treating cancer. PMID:26890363

  11. Formation Reason and Countermeasures of Non-Metal Inclusions of Cast Irons%铸铁非金属夹杂物的形成原因与应对措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文和; 王峰; 赵鲁生

    2011-01-01

    The composition and source of slag of cast irons melted in cupola and medium frequency furnace was introduced. The measures to reduce non-metal inclusions in cast irons were proposed as follows: ( 1 )improving metallurgical quality of the cast irons; (2 )improving the morphology and distribution of the nonmetal inclusions. The formation reason of the secondary slag was described. It's considered that, by adopting proper measures and iron melt treating technique, the secondary oxidation of the iron melt and its harmful effect can be reduced.%介绍了冲天炉和中频炉熔炼铸铁的炉渣成分及来源,提出减少铸铁内部非金属夹杂物的措施:(1)提高铸铁的冶金质量;(2)改善铸铁中非金属夹杂物的形态及分布.描述了铁液二次渣的形成原因,认为采取适宜的措施及铁液处理技术,可以减轻铁液二次氧化及其不利影响.

  12. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Burckhardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3−4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II (ferrous salts or iron(III (ferric complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia.

  13. Significant Reduction in NiO Band Gap upon Formation of LixNi1−xO Alloys: Applications to Solar Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alidoust, Nima; Toroker, Maytal; Keith, John A.; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term sustainable solar energy conversion relies on identifying economical and versatile semiconductor materials with appropriate band structures for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications (e.g., band gaps of ∼1.5–2.0 eV). Nickel oxide (NiO) is an inexpensive yet highly promising candidate. Its charge-transfer character may lead to longer carrier lifetimes needed for higher efficiencies, and its conduction band edge is suitable for driving hydrogen evolution via water-splitting. However, NiO’s large band gap (∼4 eV) severely limits its use in practical applications. Our first-principles quantum mechanics calculations show band gaps dramatically decrease to ∼2.0 eV when NiO is alloyed with Li2O. We show that LixNi1−xO alloys (with x=0.125 and 0.25) are p-type semiconductors, contain states with no impurity levels in the gap and maintain NiO’s desirable charge-transfer character. Lastly, we show that the alloys have potential for photoelectrochemical applications, with band edges well-placed for photocatalytic hydrogen production and CO2 reduction, as well as in tandem dye-sensitized solar cells as a photocathode.

  14. Formation, reactivity, and aging of ferric oxide particles formed from Fe(II) and Fe(III) sources: Implications for iron bioavailability in the marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bligh, Mark W.; Waite, T. David

    2011-12-01

    Freshly formed amorphous ferric oxides (AFO) in the water column are potentially highly reactive, but with reactivity declining rapidly with age, and have the capacity to partake in reactions with dissolved species and to be a significant source of bioavailable iron. However, the controls on reactivity in aggregated oxides are not well understood. Additionally, the mechanism by which early rapid aging occurs is not clear. Aging is typically considered in terms of changes in crystallinity as the structure of an iron oxide becomes more stable and ordered with time thus leading to declining reactivity. However, there has been recognition of the role that aggregation can play in determining reactivity, although it has received limited attention. Here, we have formed AFO in seawater in the laboratory from either an Fe(II) or Fe(III) source to produce either AFO(II) or AFO(III). The changes in reactivity of these two oxides following formation was measured using both ligand-promoted dissolution (LPD) and reductive dissolution (RD). The structure of the two oxides was examined using light scattering and X-ray adsorption techniques. The dissolution rate of AFO(III) was greater than that of AFO(II), as measured by both dissolution techniques, and could be attributed to both the less ordered molecular structure and smaller primary particle size of AFO(III). From EXAFS analysis shortly (90 min) following formation, AFO(II) and AFO(III) were shown to have the same structure as aged lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite respectively. Both oxides displayed a rapid decrease in dissolution rate over the first hours following formation in a pattern that was very similar when normalised. The early establishment and little subsequent change of crystal structure for both oxides undermined the hypothesis that increasing crystallinity was responsible for early rapid aging. Also, an aging model describing this proposed process could only be fitted to the data with kinetic parameters that were

  15. Gastric Banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gastric banding before deciding to have the procedure. Advertisements for a device or procedure may not include ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  16. The connection between iron ore formations and "mud-shrimp" colonizations around sunken wood debris and hydrothermal sediments in a Lower Cretaceous continental rift basin, Mecsek Mts., Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáger, Viktor; Molnár, Ferenc; Buchs, David; Koděra, Peter

    2012-09-01

    In the Early Cretaceous, the continental rift basin of the Mecsek Mts. (Hungary), was situated on the southern edge of the European plate. The opening of the North Atlantic Ocean created a dilatational regime that expanded to the southern edge of the European plate, where several extensional basins and submarine volcanoes were formed during the Early Cretaceous epoch. Permanent seaquake activity caused high swell events during which a large amount of terrestrial wood fragments entered into submarine canyons from rivers or suspended woods which had sunk into the deep seafloor. These fragments created extended wood-fall deposits which contributed large-scale flourishing of numerous burrowing thalassinid crustaceans. Twelve different thalassinid coprolite ichnospecies can be found in the Berriasian-Hauterivian volcano-sedimentary formations. According to the seladonitic crustacean burrows which associated with framboidal pyrite containing Zoophycos and Chondrites ichnofossils (i.e. a "fodinichnia" trace fossil association), the bottom water was aerobic and the pore water was anaerobic; in the latter sulfate reduction occurred. The preservation of wood fragments around thalassinid burrows can be explained by rapid sedimentation related to turbidity currents. Due to the low temperature hydrothermal circulations of seawater, large amounts of iron were released from intrusive, pillowed basaltic sills; these sills intruded into soft, water-saturated sediments containing large amounts of thalassinid excrement. In the coprolites can be found idiomorphic mineral particles originating from the basalts, and coprolites can often be found in peperitic interpillow sediments. This indicates that the life-activity of the decapoda crustaceans in many Lower Cretaceous occurrences initially preceded the first magmatic eruptions. The paroxysm of the rift volcanism took place during the Valanginian age, when some submarine volcanoes emerged above sea level, reaching a maximum height of

  17. Iron Overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drug called an iron chelator to remove excess iron from your body because of transfusion-dependent anemias. Be sure to talk with your doctor about the potential benefits and risks of using these drugs. Previous Article ...

  18. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  19. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to iron and contribution to normal formation of haemoglobin and red blood cells pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Specialised Nutrition Europe (formerly IDACE), submitted pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of France, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific...... substantiation of a health claim related to iron and contribution to normal formation of haemoglobin and red blood cells. The food constituent, iron, which is the subject of the health claim, is sufficiently characterised. Contribution to normal formation of haemoglobin and red blood cells is a beneficial...... physiological effect for infants and young children. A claim on iron and contribution to normal formation of haemoglobin and red blood cells in the general population has already been assessed by the Panel with a favourable outcome. The Panel considers that the role of iron in normal formation of haemoglobin...

  20. Algoma-, Superior-, and oolitic-type iron deposits of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 83): Chapter O in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Finn, Carol A.; Anderson, Eric D.; Joud, M. Y.; Taleb, M. A.; Horton, John D.

    2015-01-01

    High-grade hematitic iron ores (or HIF, containing 60–65 percent Fe) have been mined in Mauritania from Superior-type iron deposits since 1952. Depletion of the high grade ores in recent years has resulted in a number of new projects focused on lower grade magnetite ores in Algoma-type banded iron formation (or BIF, containing approximately 35 percent Fe). Large deposits of oolitic-type iron ores are also present in Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks in Mauritania. According to recent U.S. Geological Survey figures, Mauritania is the fifteenth largest iron producer in the World and currently has about 1.1 billion tonnes of crude iron ore reserves (USGS, 2012).

  1. Ferride geochemistry of Swedish precambrian iron ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loberg, B. E. H.; Horndahl, A.-K.

    1983-10-01

    Chemical analysis for major and trace elements have been performed on 30 Swedish Precambrian iron ores and on some from Iran and Chile. The Swedish ores consist of apatite iron ores, quartz-banded iron ores, skarn and limestone iron ores from the two main ore districts of Sweden, the Bergslagen and the Norrbotten province. Some Swedish titaniferous iron ores were also included in the investigation. The trace element data show that the Swedish ores can be subdivided into two major groups: 1. orthomagmatic and exhalative, 2. sedimentary. Within group 1 the titaniferous iron ores are distinguished by their high Ti-contents. From the ferride contents of the Kiruna apatite iron ores, the ores are considered to be mobilization products of skarn iron ores from the Norbotten province.

  2. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the Noamundi-Koira basin iron ore deposits (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Azimuddin; Alvi, Shabbar Habib; Ilbeyli, Nurdane

    2015-04-01

    India is one of the richest sources of iron ore deposits in the world; and one of them is located in the Noamundi-Koira basin, Singhbhum-Orissa craton. The geological comparative studies of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Noamundi-Koira iron ore deposits, belonging to the iron ore group in eastern India, focus on the study of mineralogy and major elemental compositions along with the geological evaluation of different iron ores. The basement of the Singhbhum-Orissa craton is metasedimentary rocks which can be traced in a broadly elliptical pattern of granitoids, surrounded by metasediments and metavolcanics of Greenstone Belt association. The Singhbhum granitoid is intrusive into these old rocks and to younger, mid Archaean metasediments, including iron formations, schists and metaquartzites and siliciclastics of the Precambrian Iron Ore Group (Saha et al., 1994; Sharma, 1994). The iron ore of Noamundi-Koira can be divided into seven categories (Van Schalkwyk and Beukes 1986). They are massive, hard laminated, soft laminated, martite-goethite, powdery blue dust and lateritic ore. Although it is more or less accepted that the parent rock of iron ore is banded hematite jasper (BHJ), the presence of disseminated martite in BHJ suggests that the magnetite of protore was converted to martite. In the study area, possible genesis of high-grade hematite ore could have occurred in two steps. In the first stage, shallow, meteoric fluids affect primary, unaltered BIF by simultaneously oxidizing magnetite to martite and replacing quartz with hydrous iron oxides. In the second stage of supergene processes, deep burial upgrades the hydrous iron oxides to microplaty hematite. Removal of silica from BIF and successive precipitation of iron resulted in the formation of martite- goethite ore. Soft laminated ores were formed where precipitation of iron was partial or absent. The leached out space remains with time and the interstitial space is generally filled

  3. Niobium in gray cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for utilization of niobium in gray cast iron is appraised and reviewed. Experiments described in literature indicate that niobium provides structural refinement of the eutectic cells and also promotes pearlite formation. (Author)

  4. Trace-element and multi-isotope geochemistry of Late-Archean black shales in the Carajas iron-ore district, Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabral, A. R.; Creaser, R. A.; Naegler, T.; Lehmann, B.; Voegelin, A. R.; Belyatsky, B.; Pasava, J.; Seabra Gomes, Jr., A. A.; Galbiatti, H.; Boettcher, M. E.; Escher, P.

    The 250-300-m-thick Carajas Formation in the Carajas mineral province, northern Brazil, consists of banded iron formation (including giant high-grade iron-ore deposits) and minor black shale, overlying a thick pile (2-3 km) of about 2.75-Ga-old metabasalt. Carbonaceous shale with pyrite-and locally......, with heavy data restricted to pyrrhotite-free samples. The data suggest microbial sulfate reduction under, at least partially, sulfate-limiting conditions with later overprint by migrating solutions. The black shale is affected by pronounced low-temperature potassium metasomatism (K2O/Na2O > 100; up to...

  5. Raman spectroscopy of the system iron(III)-sulfuric acid-water: an approach to Tinto River's (Spain) hydrogeochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobron, P; Rull, F; Sobron, F; Sanz, A; Medina, J; Nielsen, C J

    2007-12-15

    Acid mine drainage is formed when pyrite (FeS(2)) is exposed and reacts with air and water to form sulfuric acid and dissolved iron. Tinto River (Huelva, Spain) is an example of this phenomenon. In this study, Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate the speciation of the system iron(III)-sulfuric acid-water as an approach to Tinto River's aqueous solutions. The molalities of sulfuric acid (0.09 mol/kg) and iron(III) (0.01-1.5 mol/kg) were chosen to mimic the concentration of the species in Tinto River waters. Raman spectra of the solutions reveal a strong iron(III)-sulfate inner-sphere interaction through the nu(1) sulfate band at 981 cm(-1) and its shoulder at 1005 cm(-1). Iron(III)-sulfate interaction may also be facilitated by hydrogen bonds and monitored in the Raman spectra through the symmetric stretching band of bisulfate at 1052 cm(-1) and a shoulder at 1040 cm(-1). Other bands in the low-frequency region of the Raman spectra are attributed to the hydrogen-bonded complexes formation as well. PMID:17869164

  6. Alginate-Iron Speciation and Its Effect on In Vitro Cellular Iron Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horniblow, Richard D.; Dowle, Miriam; Iqbal, Tariq H.; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O.; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Alginates are a class of biopolymers with known iron binding properties which are routinely used in the fabrication of iron-oxide nanoparticles. In addition, alginates have been implicated in influencing human iron absorption. However, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles employs non-physiological pH conditions and whether nanoparticle formation in vivo is responsible for influencing cellular iron metabolism is unclear. Thus the aims of this study were to determine how alginate and iron interact at gastric-comparable pH conditions and how this influences iron metabolism. Employing a range of spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions alginate-iron complexation was confirmed and, in conjunction with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticles were observed. The results infer a nucleation-type model of iron binding whereby alginate is templating the condensation of iron-hydroxide complexes to form iron oxide centred nanoparticles. The interaction of alginate and iron at a cellular level was found to decrease cellular iron acquisition by 37% (p < 0.05) and in combination with confocal microscopy the alginate inhibits cellular iron transport through extracellular iron chelation with the resulting complexes not internalised. These results infer alginate as being useful in the chelation of excess iron, especially in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer where excess unabsorbed luminal iron is thought to be a driver of disease. PMID:26378798

  7. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  8. The role of iron in the formation of porosity in Al-Si-Cu-based casting alloys. Part 2: A phase-diagram approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.A.; Schaffer, G.B.; StJohn, D.H. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    1999-06-01

    The mechanism by which iron causes casting defects in the AA309 (Al-5 pct Si-1.2 pct Cu-0.5 pct Mg) may be related to the solidification sequence of the alloy. Superimposing calculated segregation lines on the liquidus projection of the ternary Al-Si-Fe phase diagram suggests that porosity is minimized at a critical iron content when solidification proceeds directly from the primary field to the ternary Al-Si-{beta}Al{sub 5}FeSi eutectic point. Solidification via the binary Al-{beta}Al{sub 5}FeSi eutectic is detrimental to casting integrity. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the critical iron content observed in the standard AA309 alloy to that of a high-silicon (10 pct Si) variant of this alloy.

  9. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES. II. NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND SILICON LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Wuerl, Matthias [Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str.1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Plez, Bertrand [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Davies, Ben [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Gazak, Zach, E-mail: mbergema@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: Matthias.Wuerl@physik.uni-muenchen.de, E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: zgazak@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: bertrand.plez@univ-montp2.fr, E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Medium-resolution J-band spectroscopy of individual red supergiant stars is a promising tool to investigate the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star-forming galaxies. As a continuation of recent work on iron and titanium, detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of silicon lines in the J-band spectra of red supergiants. Substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger absorption lines of neutral silicon in NLTE. As a consequence, silicon abundances determined in NLTE are significantly smaller than in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) with the NLTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between -0.4 dex and -0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4400 K. The effects are largest at low metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  10. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES. II. NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND SILICON LINES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medium-resolution J-band spectroscopy of individual red supergiant stars is a promising tool to investigate the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star-forming galaxies. As a continuation of recent work on iron and titanium, detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of silicon lines in the J-band spectra of red supergiants. Substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger absorption lines of neutral silicon in NLTE. As a consequence, silicon abundances determined in NLTE are significantly smaller than in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) with the NLTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between –0.4 dex and –0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4400 K. The effects are largest at low metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  11. Red Supergiant Stars as Cosmic Abundance Probes: II. NLTE Effects in J-band Silicon Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Bergemann, Maria; Wueurl, Matthias; Plez, Bertrand; Davies, Ben; Gazak, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Medium resolution J-band spectroscopy of individual red supergiant stars is a promising tool to investigate the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star forming galaxies. As a continuation of recent work on iron and titanium, detailed non-LTE calculations are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of silicon lines in the J-band spectra of red supergiants. Substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger absorption lines of neutral silicon in non-LTE. As a consequence, silicon abundances determined in non-LTE are significantly smaller than in LTE with the non-LTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between -0.4 dex to -0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400K to 4400K. The effects are largest at low metallicity. The physical reasons behind the non-LTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  12. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES...... understand iron metabolism in elderly HF patients....

  13. Microbial Reducibility of Fe(III Phases Associated with the Genesis of Iron Ore Caves in the Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceth W. Parker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The iron mining regions of Brazil contain thousands of “iron ore caves” (IOCs that form within Fe(III-rich deposits. The mechanisms by which these IOCs form remain unclear, but the reductive dissolution of Fe(III (hydroxides by Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB could provide a microbiological mechanism for their formation. We evaluated the susceptibility of Fe(III deposits associated with these caves to reduction by the FeRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to test this hypothesis. Canga, an Fe(III-rich duricrust, contained poorly crystalline Fe(III phases that were more susceptible to reduction than the Fe(III (predominantly hematite associated with banded iron formation (BIF, iron ore, and mine spoil. In all cases, the addition of a humic acid analogue enhanced Fe(III reduction, presumably by shuttling electrons from S. oneidensis to Fe(III phases. The particle size and quartz-Si content of the solids appeared to exert control on the rate and extent of Fe(III reduction by S. oneidensis, with more bioreduction of Fe(III associated with solid phases containing more quartz. Our results provide evidence that IOCs may be formed by the activities of Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB, and the rate of this formation is dependent on the physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of the Fe(III phases of the surrounding rock.

  14. 双色大面阵量子阱红外探测器读出电路设计%Design of dual-band large-format QWIP ROIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于艳; 谭振; 宁玮

    2016-01-01

    The key design points of large format readout circuit are described with dual-band QWIP 640 ×512 ROIC design as an example.The design idea and specific circuit configuration are explained in detail.The simulation results and test results are given.Finally,some key design points of dual-band large format ROIC are analyzed from point of view of circuit and layout.%以双色量子阱640×512读出电路的设计为例阐述大面阵读出电路的设计要点,分模块详细说明了设计思路和具体电路结构,给出了电路仿真结果和实测结果,最后从电路、版图的角度分析了双波段大规格读出电路的一些设计要点。

  15. Band alignments in Fe/graphene/Si(001) junctions studied by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Breton, J.-C.; Tricot, S.; Delhaye, G.; Lépine, B.; Turban, P.; Schieffer, P.

    2016-08-01

    The control of tunnel contact resistance is of primary importance for semiconductor-based spintronic devices. This control is hardly achieved with conventional oxide-based tunnel barriers due to deposition-induced interface states. Manipulation of single 2D atomic crystals (such as graphene sheets) weakly interacting with their substrate might represent an alternative and efficient way to design new heterostructures for a variety of different purposes including spin injection into semiconductors. In the present paper, we study by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy the band alignments and interface chemistry of iron-graphene-hydrogenated passivated silicon (001) surfaces for a low and a high n-doping concentration. We find that the hydrogen passivation of the Si(001) surface remains efficient even with a graphene sheet on the Si(001) surface. For both doping concentrations, the semiconductor is close to flat-band conditions which indicates that the Fermi level is unpinned on the semiconductor side of the Graphene/Si(001):H interface. When iron is deposited on the graphene/Si(001):H structures, the Schottky barrier height remains mainly unaffected by the metallic overlayer with a very low barrier height for electrons, a sought-after property in semiconductor based spintronic devices. Finally, we demonstrate that the graphene layer intercalated between the metal and semiconductor also serves as a protection against iron-silicide formation even at elevated temperatures preventing from the formation of a Si-based magnetic dead layer.

  16. Heterojunction nanowires having high activity and stability for the reduction of oxygen: Formation by self-assembly of iron phthalocyanine with single walled carbon nanotubes (FePc/SWNTs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jia

    2014-04-01

    A self-assembly approach to preparing iron phthalocyanine/single-walled carbon nanotube (FePc/SWNT) heterojunction nanowires as a new oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst has been developed by virtue of water-adjusted dispersing in 1-cyclohexyl-pyrrolidone (CHP) of the two components. The FePc/SWNT nanowires have a higher Fermi level compared to pure FePc (d-band center, DFT. =. -0.69. eV versus -0.87. eV, respectively). Consequently, an efficient channel for transferring electron to the FePc surface is readily created, facilitating the interaction between FePc and oxygen, so enhancing the ORR kinetics. This heterojunction-determined activity in ORR illustrates a new stratagem to preparing non-noble ORR electrocatalysts of significant importance in constructing real-world fuel cells. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  17. Effect of different sulphur precursors on morphology and band-gap on the formation of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) particles with microwave irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, Bharati; Vijaylakshmi, S.; Sharma, Pratibha

    2016-05-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a promising semiconductor material for ecological cost effective thin film Photovoltaic (PV) devices. As it contains earth abundant and non-toxic elements, it has the advantages over commercially available CIGS and CdTe thin film PV devices. In the present work, the pure phase Cu2ZnSnS4 particles were successfully synthesised with microwave irradiation. The morphology and phase study was carried out for the samples prepared with two different sulphur precursors viz. thiourea and thioacetamide (TAA). CZTS particles with thiourea as sulphur precursor are more crystalline than CZTS particles with TAA. The band gap of 1.654eV and 1.713eV were calculated for the samples prepared with thiourea and TAA respectively.

  18. Covalent bonding and band-gap formation in ternary transition-metal di-aluminides: Al4MnCo and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we extend our previous study of the electronic structure of and bonding mechanism in transition-metal (TM) di-aluminides to ternary systems. We have studied the character of the bonding in Al4MnCo and related TM di-aluminides in the C11b (MoSi2) and C54 (TiSi2) crystal structures. A peculiar feature of the electronic structure of these TM di-aluminides is the existence of a semiconducting gap at the Fermi level. In our previous work we predicted a gap in Al2TM compounds where the TM atoms have eight valence electrons. Here we demonstrate that the semiconducting gap does not disappear if the TM sites are occupied by two different TMs, provided that the electron-per-atom ratio is conserved. Such a replacement substantially increases the class of possibly semiconducting TM di-aluminides. Substitution for 3d TMs of 4d or 5d TMs enhances the width of the gap. From the analysis of the charge density distribution and the crystal orbital overlap population, we conclude that the bonding between atoms has dominantly covalent character. This is confirmed not only by the enhanced charge density halfway between atoms, but also by the clear bonding-antibonding splitting of the electronic states. If the gaps between split states that correspond to all bonding configurations in the crystal have a common overlap at the Fermi level, the intermetallic compound becomes a semiconductor. However, the results of the total-energy calculations suggest that the existence of a band gap does not necessarily imply a stable structure. Strong covalent bonds can exist also in Al-TM structures where no band gap is observed. (author)

  19. Effect of iron overload and iron deficiency on liver hemojuvelin protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Krijt

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hemojuvelin (Hjv is a key component of the signaling cascade that regulates liver hepcidin (Hamp expression. The purpose of this study was to determine Hjv protein levels in mice and rats subjected to iron overload and iron deficiency. METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were injected with iron (200 mg/kg; iron deficiency was induced by feeding of an iron-deficient diet, or by repeated phlebotomies. Erythropoietin (EPO-treated mice were administered recombinant EPO at 50 U/mouse. Wistar rats were injected with iron (1200 mg/kg, or fed an iron-deficient diet. Hjv protein was determined by immunoblotting, liver samples from Hjv-/- mice were used as negative controls. Mouse plasma Hjv content was determined by a commercial ELISA kit. RESULTS: Liver crude membrane fraction from both mice and rats displayed a major Hjv-specific band at 35 kDa, and a weaker band of 20 kDa. In mice, the intensity of these bands was not changed following iron injection, repeated bleeding, low iron diet or EPO administration. No change in liver crude membrane Hjv protein was observed in iron-treated or iron-deficient rats. ELISA assay for mouse plasma Hjv did not show significant difference between Hjv+/+ and Hjv-/- mice. Liver Hamp mRNA, Bmp6 mRNA and Id1 mRNA displayed the expected response to iron overload and iron deficiency. EPO treatment decreased Id1 mRNA, suggesting possible participation of the bone morphogenetic protein pathway in EPO-mediated downregulation of Hamp mRNA. DISCUSSION: Since no differences between Hjv protein levels were found following various experimental manipulations of body iron status, the results indicate that, in vivo, substantial changes in Hamp mRNA can occur without noticeable changes of membrane hemojuvelin content. Therefore, modulation of hemojuvelin protein content apparently does not represent the limiting step in the control of Hamp gene expression.

  20. Moessbauer study of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes of some nitrogen-, oxygen- and sulphur donor ligands, reduction of iron(III) by the mercaptide group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawhney, G.L.; Baijal, J.S. (Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics); Chandra, S. (Zakir Hussain College, Ajmeri Gate, Delhi (India). Dept. of Chemistry); Pandeya, K.B. (Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-01-01

    Complex formation reactions of iron(II) and iron(III) with semicarbazones and thiosemicarbazones of pyruvic acid and phenyl pyruvic acid have been studied by magnetic measurements and Moessbauer spectroscopy. With iron(II), all the ligands form hexa-coordinated octahedral complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H/sub 2/). With iron(III) semicarbazones, complexes of the composition (Fe(ligand-H)/sub 2/)(OH) are formed. Thiosemicarbazones first reduce iron(III) to iron(II) and then form iron(II) complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H)/sub 2/.

  1. Moessbauer study of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes of some nitrogen-, oxygen- and sulphur donor ligands, reduction of iron(III) by the mercaptide group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex formation reactions of iron(II) and iron(III) with semicarbazones and thiosemicarbazones of pyruvic acid and phenyl pyruvic acid have been studied by magnetic measurements and Moessbauer spectroscopy. With iron(II), all the ligands form hexa-coordinated octahedral complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H2). With iron(III) semicarbazones, complexes of the composition [Fe(ligand-H)2](OH) are formed. Thiosemicarbazones first reduce iron(III) to iron(II) and then form iron(II) complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H)2. (author)

  2. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  3. Comparison of ammonia, morpholine and ethanolamine as conditioning agent on the formation and deposition of iron oxides on stainless steel and carbon steel in conditions of PWR secondary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental circulating water loop was built to follow the formation, the transport and the deposition of iron oxides in the feedwater system of the secondary circuit of PWR plants. The test section operated at high temperature (up to 250oC) is made in carbon steel steel and includes three removable segments for characterization, one of which is in stainless steel for comparison, while all the other parts of the loop are made in stainless steel. Tests were performed from 18 to 101 days in one-phase flow conditions at 150 L.h-1 with a linear velocity between 0.92 m/s and 1.1 m/s at 220oC in ammonia/hydrazine, morpholine/hydrazine and ethanolamine/hydrazine media. The obtained results confirm the formation of iron oxide on carbon steel and stainless steel surface in the conditions of PWR secondary circuits. The surface characterizations show that magnetite is the corrosion product formed on carbon steel and stainless steel at 220oC and goethite is formed at room temperature on stainless steel. At high temperature, on carbon steel, the deposit is thicker in the ammonia medium than in the ethanolamine and morpholine medium. (author)

  4. Characteristics of a transient axial mode from the formation of anode plasma in a gigawatt-class L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sun-Hong; Kwon, Ohjoon; Sattorov, Matlabjon; Jung, Hoechun; Shin, Sang-Ho; Baek, In-Keun; Kim, Seontae; Park, Seunghyuk; Park, Gun-Sik

    2016-06-01

    An experimental result of a gigawatt-class L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) shows the generation of a transient axial mode pertaining to an anode plasma effect in the circuit of the MILO. The transient axial mode between the desired π mode and the 5 π / 6 mode causes the output power to become eccentric. When the electrons impact onto the metallic surface, plasma exists on the surface of the anode due to the electron-impact distortion process. As a result, the anode plasma causes the emitted current to increase the neutralization near the cathode. The increase of the current induces faster and stronger magnetic insulation, which lowers the drift velocity and suppresses the mode earlier during the beam pulse. After the 5 π / 6 mode, which initially interacts with the electron beam, remains as a transient axial mode for a very short time, it shows the capability to convert to the π mode, which is more stable and slowly grows.

  5. A Coherent Study of Emission Lines from Broad-Band Photometry: Specific Star-Formation Rates and [OIII]/H{\\beta} Ratio at 3 < z < 6

    CERN Document Server

    Faisst, A L; Hsieh, B C; Laigle, C; Salvato, M; Tasca, L; Cassata, P; Davidzon, I; Ilbert, O; Fevre, O Le; Masters, D; McCracken, H J; Steinhardt, C; Silverman, J D; De Barros, S; Hasinger, G; Scoville, N Z

    2016-01-01

    We measure the H{\\alpha} and [OIII] emission line properties as well as specific star-formation rates (sSFR) of spectroscopically confirmed 33 cannot be fully explained in a picture of cold accretion driven growth. We find a progressively increasing [OIII]{\\lambda}5007/H{\\beta} ratio out to z~6, consistent with the ratios in local galaxies selected by increasing H{\\alpha} EW (i.e., sSFR). This demonstrates the potential of using "local high-z analogs" to investigate the spectroscopic properties and relations of galaxies in the re-ionization epoch.

  6. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar...... System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course of...... situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3...

  7. Reactions of OH Radicals with Tris (1,10-Phenanthroline) Iron (II) Studied by Pulse Radiolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siekierska Floryan, E.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1976-01-01

    The reaction of OH radicals with aqueous tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) leads to the formation of an adduct, which exhibits a broad absorption band at rmpH = 6, λmax = 460 nm, and epsilon (Porson)460 = 6700 (molar, decadic, 1 mol−1 cm−1). The rate of formation of the adduct is first order in...... Image The reaction of OH radicals with aqueous tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) leads to the formation of an adduct, which exhibits a broad absorption band at rmpH = 6, λmax = 460 nm, and epsilon (Porson)460 = 6700 (molar, decadic, 1 mol−1 cm−1). The rate of formation of the adduct is first order in...... complex concentration with a bimolecular rate constant Image independent of pH in the range pH 3–11. The adduct decays by mixed-order kinetics, but at 310 nm a second-order formation of a decay product can be directly observed. The reaction of OH radicals with aqueous 1,10-phenanthroline leads also to the...

  8. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of iron, iron oxide and iron carbide nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3) and iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles of different geometrical shapes: cubes, spheres, rods and plates, have been prepared by thermal decomposition of a mixture containing the metal precursor Fe(CO)5 and the stabilizer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) at 300 °C in a sealed cell under inert atmosphere. The thermal decomposition process was performed for 4 or 24 h at ([PVP]/[Fe(CO)5]) (w/v) ratio of 1:1 or 1:5. Elemental iron nanospheres embedded within a mixture of amorphous and graphitic carbon coating were obtained by hydrogen reduction of the prepared iron oxide and iron carbide nanoparticles at 450 °C. The formation of the graphitic carbon phase at such a low temperature is unique and probably obtained by catalysis of the elemental iron nanoparticles. Changing the annealing time period and the ([PVP]/[Fe(CO)5]) ratio allowed control of the composition, size, size distribution, crystallinity, geometrical shape and magnetic properties of the different magnetic nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Thermal decomposition at 300 °C of a mixture of PVP and Fe(CO)5 leads to the formation of magnetic nanoparticles of different phases and shapes. • Changing the annealing time period and the ([PVP]/[Fe(CO)5]) (w/v) ratio allowed control of the nanoparticles different properties. • H2 reduction of the former magnetic nanoparticles leads to the formation of almost pure Fe nanospheres phase

  10. Kinetics of the formation of Fe2B layers in gray cast iron: Effects of boron concentration and boride incubation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth kinetics of Fe2B layers formed at the surface of gray cast iron were evaluated in this study. The pack-boriding process was applied to produce the Fe2B phase at the material surface, and the variables included three temperatures (1173, 1223 and 1273 K) and four exposure times (2, 4, 6 and 8 h). Taking into account the growth fronts obtained at the surface of the material and the mass balance equation at the Fe2B/substrate interface, the boron diffusion coefficient on the borided phase was estimated for the range of treatment temperatures. Likewise the parabolic growth constant, the instantaneous velocity of the Fe2B/substrate interface, and the weight gain in the borided samples were established as a function of the parameters τ(t) and α(C), which are related to the boride incubation time (t0(T)) and boron concentration at the Fe2B phase, respectively. Observation of the growth kinetics of the Fe2B layers in gray cast irons suggest an optimum value of boron concentration that is in good agreement with the set of boriding experimental conditions used in this work.

  11. Nanocrystalline gadolinium iron garnet for circulator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to high resistivity and low microwave losses, gadolinium iron garnets (GdIG) are useful materials for non-reciprocal devices such as circulators or isolators. Keeping the miniaturization and cost reduction in mind, the trend is to modify the conventional methods of preparation of samples. In this connection we have synthesized nanocystalline GdIG by using the Microwave Hydrothermal method at 160 °C/45 min. As synthesized powders were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. XRD patterns show the formation of a garnet phase with crystallite size varying between 19 nm and 40 nm. Differential Thermal Analysis studies were also carried out on the nanopowders. The powders were densified at a lower sintering temperature of 1100 °C/45 min using a microwave sintering method. The sintered samples were characterized by XRD and atomic force microscopy. The frequency dependence of complex permittivity and ferromagnetic resonance were measured in the Ka band frequency (27–40 GHz). Magnetic properties were also measured at room temperature. - Highlights: ► GdIG ferrites were synthesized using the microwave hydrothermal method. ► Densification of the GdIG samples was done at a low temperature of 1100 °C/45 min. ► Our samples possess low dielectric constant and loss at a Ka band frequency. ► Nanocrystalline GdIG samples for circulator application have been tested.

  12. Mineral chemical and petrographic occurrences os iron of the south east of Uruguay (Nico Pere z terrane)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two iron-formation deposits from S E Uruguay were petrographic ally and mineralogically investigated (including microprobe mineral chemistry). The deposit from Piedra de Gigante (ANCAP) quarry is related to tectonic slivers of a platform succession in ortho gneiss of ca. 1750 Ma. Data of detrital zircon in this platform succession point to Meso- to Neo proterozoic age.The iron deposit of Piedra del Gigante (ANCAP) quarry belongs to a succession of mica schists, quartz-muscovite schists, marbles and basic rocks. Magnetite rich layers alternate with banded rocks rich in hematite, carbonate and amphibole. Carbonate is dolomite (Mg0.7Ca1.08Mn0.05Fe0.11(CO3)2) and the amphibole is a pale green tremolite (Na0,18Ca1,68Mn0,07Mg4,16Fe+++0,2Fe++0,55Al0,03(Si7,86Al0,13)O22(OH)2). This iron deposit shows strong deformation associated with martitization of magnetite and formation of specularite rich layers where relicts of magnetite (partly martitized) are occasionally observed. Available data are not conclusive about the genesis. The low iron-content of the amphibole together with dolomite in the mineral association cast doubts on a BIF-type origin, but low contents of Al2O3, V2O3, MnO and ZnO in magnetite do not indicate an igneous origin. High oxygen fugacity during martitization in medium-T metamorphic conditions could have determined that iron rich amphiboles were not formed as is normally expected in iron-formations. In the outcrop of Cerro la Higuerita (Grupo Arroyo del Soldado; Ediacaran) a succession of metapelites (bottom), iron rich pelites and iron formations (top) is observed. The metapelites contain evidences of volcanic contribution (phenochrysts of quartz and alkali feldspar as well as shards in the matrix) suggesting a volcanic source for the iron. This iron-formation contains magnetite pheno blasts (partly martitized) and fine disseminated laths of hematite in the matrix, together with grunerite (Na0,04Ca0,17 Mn0,02Mg1,36Fe5,35Al0,07(Si7,97Al0,03)O22(OH)2

  13. Quasiparticles in calcium doped yttrium-iron garnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In yttrium-iron garnets an electrical charge is carried by quasiparticles based on compensating holes which move either at oxygen or iron ions of the tetragonal sublattice. The quasiparticles can also get localized because of their coupling to optical phonons on the iron sites. A multi-band model of holes coupled to phonons is applied to find additional energy levels in the gap between the lower of the narrow 3d bands and the wide 2p band, whose occurrence plays a crucial role in the conductivity mechanism. The density of states is considerably modified by the interaction between the holes and local distortion of the lattice. (author)

  14. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron and ... enough iron in their daily diets. How Much Iron Do Kids Need? Kids require different amounts of ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, ... iron supplements and multivitamins to improve her iron levels. Susan also made changes to her diet, such ...

  16. Study of clustering point defects under irradiation in dilute iron alloys; Etude de la formation sous irradiation des amas de defauts ponctuels dans les alliages ferritiques faiblement allies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duong-Hardouin Duparc, T.H.A

    1998-12-31

    In low copper steels for nuclear reactor pressure vessel, point defect clustering plays an important role in hardening. These clusters are very small and invisible by transmission electron microscopy. In order to study the hardening component which results from the clustering of freely migrating point defects, we irradiated in a high voltage electron microscope Fe, the FeCu{sub 0.13%}, FeP{sub 0.015%} and FeN{sub 33ppm} alloys and the complex FeMn{sub 1.5%}Ni{sub 0.8%}Cu{sub 0.13%}P{sub 0.01%} alloy the composition of which is close to the matrix of pressure vessel steel. We studied the nucleation of dislocation loops and their growth velocity. The observations and the analyses have shown that in the complex model alloy, the interstitial dislocation loops are smaller and their density is more important than for the others alloys. The diffusion coefficients of interstitials and vacancies are obtained with the help of a simplified model. The densities of dislocation loops and their growth velocities obtained experimentally are reproduced by means of a cluster dynamics model we have developed. This is achieved self-consistently by using as a first trial the approximated coefficients obtained with the simplified model. The results of calculations have shown that the binding energy of di-interstitials must be very important in the binary iron alloys and only 0.95 eV in iron. Copper, nitrogen and phosphorus stabilize di-interstitials in iron. Finally the distribution of interstitial loops at 290 deg C and at 2.10{sup -9} dpa/s is calculated with the diffusion coefficient of point defects adjusted in FeCu. A distribution of small loops appears which gives an increase of hardening estimated to 10 Hv instead of 33 Hv experimentally observed. This low value can be improved by assuming in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations that a little fraction of di-interstitials is created at 2.5 MeV. (author) 111 refs.

  17. Gastric digestion of pea ferritin and modulation of its iron bioavailability by ascorbic and phytic acids in caco-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satyanarayana Bejjani; Raghu Pullakhandam; Ravinder Punjal; K Madhavan Nair

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To understand the digestive stability and mechanism of release and intestinal uptake of pea ferritin iron in caco-2 cell line model.METHODS: Pea seed ferritin was purified using salt fractionation followed by gel filtration chromatography.The bioavailability of ferritin iron was assessed using coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model in the presence or absence of ascorbic acid and phytic acid.Caco-2 cell ferritin formation was used as a surrogate marker of iron uptake. Structural changes of pea ferritin under simulated gastric pH were characterized using electrophoresis, gel filtration and circular dichroism spectroscopy.RESULTS: The caco-2 cell ferritin formation was significantly increased (P < 0.001) with FeSO4 (19.3±9.8 ng/mg protein) and pea ferritin (13.9 ± 6.19 ng/mg protein) compared to the blank digest (3.7 ± 1.8 ng/mg protein). Ascorbic acid enhanced while phytic acid decreased the pea ferritin iron bioavailability. However,either in the presence or absence of ascorbic acid, the ferritin content of caco-2 cells was significantly less with pea ferritin than with FeSO4. At gastric pH, no band corresponding to ferritin was observed in the presence of pepsin either on native PAGE or SDS-PAGE. Gel filtration chromatography and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed a pH dependent loss of quaternary and secondary structure.CONCLUSION: Under gastric conditions, the iron core of pea ferritin is released into the digestive medium due to acid induced structural alterations and dissociation of protein. The released iron interacts with dietary factors leading to modulation of pea ferritin iron bioavailability,resembling the typical characteristics of non-heme iron.

  18. NUMERICAL EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SOFT-MELTING PROPERTIES ON THE KINETIC OF (CAFE2 O4 -CA2 FE2 O5 FORMATION IN THE IRON ORE SINTERING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Adilson de Castro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model able to predict the influence of soft-melting properties of the blend of raw materials used in the iron ore sintering process in the kinetic formation of calcium ferrite and di-calcium ferrite constituents. The model is based on the simultaneous solution of transport equations of Momentum, energy and chemical species in multiphase multicomponent systems coupled with the chemical reactions kinetics and phase transformations that occur within the sinter bed. The numerical solution is obtained using the finite volume method and the model is validated using monitoring data from an industrial scale sintering plant. After validation, the model was used to predict processing conditions using raw materials with different soft-melting properties. Results indicate that the temperatures of starting soft-melting, shrinkage and melting range are the main parameters to be controlled in order to attain liquid phases formation responsible to confer good mechanical and reducibility properties for the sinter product. In this study was found that raw materials with high soft-melting temperature and wilder temperature of mushy zone could decrease up to 30% the calcium ferrites formation and hence deteriorates the metallurgical properties of the sinter.

  19. New Kronig-Penney Equation Emphasizing the Band Edge Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmulowicz, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Kronig-Penney problem is a textbook example for discussing band dispersions and band gap formation in periodic layered media. For example, in photonic crystals, the behaviour of bands next to the band edges is important for further discussions of such effects as inhibited light emission, slow light and negative index of refraction. However,…

  20. Jarosite versus Soluble Iron-Sulfate Formation and Their Role in Acid Mine Drainage Formation at the Pan de Azúcar Mine Tailings (Zn-Pb-Ag), NW Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Jesica Murray; Alicia Kirschbaum; Bernhard Dold; Edi Mendes Guimaraes; Elisa Pannunzio Miner

    2014-01-01

    Secondary jarosite and water-soluble iron-sulfate minerals control the composition of acid mine waters formed by the oxidation of sulfide in tailings impoundments at the (Zn-Pb-Ag) Pan de Azúcar mine located in the Pozuelos Lagoon Basin (semi-arid climate) in Northwest (NW) Argentina. In the primary zone of the tailings (9.5 wt % pyrite-marcasite) precipitation of anglesite (PbSO4), wupatkite ((Co,Mg,Ni)Al2(SO4)4) and gypsum retain Pb, Co and Ca, while mainly Fe2+, Zn2+, Al3+, Mg2+, As3+/5+ ...

  1. Iron-titanium oxide minerals and magnetic susceptibility anomalies in the Mariano Lake-Lake Valley cores - Constraints on conditions of uranium mineralization in the Morrison Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrographic study of the Mariano Lake-Lake Valley cores reveals three distinct zones of postdepositional alteration of detrital Fe-Ti (iron-titanium) oxide minerals in the Westwater Canyon Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrisson Formation. In the uranium-bearing and adjacent portions of the Westwater Canyon, these detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals have been thoroughly altered by leaching of iron. Stratigraphically lower parts of the Westwater Canyon and the underlying Recapture Member are characterized by preservation of Fe-Ti oxide grains, primarily magnetite and ilmenite, and of hematite, and by an absence or uranium concentrations. Partly destroyed Fe-Ti oxide minerals occupy an interval between the zones of destruction and preservation. Alteration patterns of the Fe-Ti oxide minerals are reflected in bore-hole magnetic susceptibility logs. Magnetic susceptibility response in the upper parts of the Westwater Canyon Member is flat and uniformly <500 μSI units, but at greater depths it fluctuates sharply, from <1,000 to nearly 8,000 μSI units. The boundary between uniformly low and high magnetic susceptibility response corresponds closely to the interval that divides the zone of completely altered from the zone of preserved detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals. The alteration pattern suggests that solutions responsible for destruction of the Fe-ti oxide minerals originated in the overlying Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation. Previous studies indicate that these solutions were rich in soluble organic matter and perhaps in uranium. Uranium precipitation may have been controlled by a vertically fluctuation interface between organic-rich solutions and geochemically different fluids in which the detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals were preserved

  2. Iron homeostasis and nutritional iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Elizabeth C

    2011-04-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins encoded in iron responsive element (IRE)-mRNA. The noncoding IRE-mRNA structures bind protein repressors, IRP1 or 2, during iron deficiency. Integration of the IRE-RNA in translation regulators (near the cap) or turnover elements (after the coding region) increases iron uptake (DMT1/TRF1) or decreases iron storage/efflux (FTN/FPN) when IRP binds. An antioxidant response element in FTN DNA binds Bach1, a heme-sensitive transcription factor that coordinates expression among antioxidant response proteins like FTN, thioredoxin reductase, and quinone reductase. FTN, an antioxidant because Fe(2+) and O(2) (reactive oxygen species generators) are consumed to make iron mineral, is also a nutritional iron concentrate that is an efficiently absorbed, nonheme source of iron from whole legumes. FTN protein cages contain thousands of mineralized iron atoms and enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, an absorption mechanism distinct from transport of nonheme iron salts (ferrous sulfate), iron chelators (ferric-EDTA), or heme. Recognition of 2 nutritional nonheme iron sources, small and large (FTN), will aid the solution of iron deficiency, a major public health problem, and the development of new policies on iron nutrition. PMID:21346101

  3. Phosphine by bio-corrosion of phosphide-rich iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glindemann, D; Eismann, F; Bergmann, A; Kuschk, P; Stottmeister, U

    1998-01-01

    Phosphine is a toxic agent and part of the phosphorus cycle. A hitherto unknown formation mechanism for phosphine in the environment was investigated. When iron samples containing iron phosphide were incubated in corrosive aquatic media affected by microbial metabolites, phosphine was liberated and measured by gas chromatography. Iron liberates phosphine especially in anoxic aquatic media under the influence of sulfide and an acidic pH. A phosphine-forming mechanism is suggested: Phosphate, an impurity of iron containing minerals, is reduced abioticly to iron phosphide. When iron is exposed to the environment (e.g. as outdoor equipment, scrap, contamination in iron milled food or as iron meteorites) and corrodes, the iron phosphide present in the iron is suspended in the medium and can hydrolyze to phosphine. Phosphine can accumulate to measurable quantities in anoxic microbial media, accelerating corrosion and preserving the phosphine formed from oxidation. PMID:19005813

  4. Neutron spectrometry measurements in iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact structure was prepared for use in making measurements of neutron penetration in iron which could serve as reference data and as a check for computer codes. About 30 iron plates were put together giving a useful overall length of 130 cm. At various depths along the central axis of the iron block, measurements were made with liquid scintillator spectrometers and proton recoil proportional counters. The energy band explored was between 14 KeV and 10 MeV. Here we report the original spectra of the impulses and the neutron spectra found by the NE213 code based on the differential method and by unfolding with the SPEC4 code for liquid scintillation counters and proton recoil spectrometers, respectively. 12 figs., 60 tabs., 6 refs

  5. 复杂微生物浸出液生物成矾法净化除铁的研究%Iron Purification by Formation of Jarosite in Complex Bioleaching Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘美荣; 周桂英; 温建康

    2012-01-01

    The characteristic of bioleaching solution with high concentration of Fe and low concentration of valuable metals, the separation of Fe by the formation of jarosite with bacteria at low temperature and low pH were studied. The factors, such as pH, temperature , inoculate quantity and time, which affected the separation of Fe from solvent system consisting of sulphate were investigated. And the factors that affected the formation of jarosite were studied by the orthogonal test. The experimental results showed that, in the biological oxidation process, for the solution containing ferrous Fe 9.46 g·L-1, in the pH range of 1.4 ~2.0, temperature range of 30 -40 ℃ , the oxidation of ferrous iron by bacteria was completed after 36 h, and the effect of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron was better. In the process of iron removal by the formation of jarosite with bacteria, at pH of 2, temperature of 45 ℃, inoculate quantity of 15% , time of 10 d, the iron removal rate was 99. 97% with low residual iron concentration of 0. 015 g·L-1. Through orthogonal test, the primary and secondary factors that effected the jarosite precipitation were confirmed as time, inoculate quantity and the concentration of i-ron. The optimal combination of factors was total Fe concentration of 50 g·L-1, inoculate quantity of 20% , time of 10 d. With these optimal factors, the iron removal rate was 99.95%. It was realized to remove iron by biological purification under the conditions of low temperature and low pH values, providing a new way to purify complex biological leaching solution.%针对低品位矿石生物浸出液中铁含量高而有价金属含量低的特点,研究低温、低pH条件下微生物成矾除铁方法,考察了温度、pH值、菌液接种量、时间等主要因素对微生物氧化及铁矾形成的影响规律,并采用正交实验对微生物成矾除铁规律进行多因素影响分析.结果表明:在生物氧化过程中,亚铁含量为9.46 g·L-1

  6. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  7. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume; Kappler, Andreas; Bernard, Sylvain; Obst, Martin; Férard, Céline; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Posth, Nicole; Galvez, Matthieu; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Guyot, François

    2009-02-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II) using electron microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). All detected minerals consisted mainly of amorphous iron phosphates, but based on their morphology and localization, three types of precipitates could be discriminated: (1) mineralized filaments at distance from the cells, (2) globules of 100 ± 25 nm in diameter, at the cell surface and (3) a 40-nm thick mineralized layer within the periplasm. All of those phases were shown to be intimately associated with organic molecules. Periplasmic encrustation was accompanied by an accumulation of protein moieties. In the same way, exopolysaccharides were associated with the extracellular mineralized filaments. The evolution of cell encrustation was followed by TEM over the time course of a culture: cell encrustation proceeded progressively, with rapid precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All these findings provide new information to further the understanding of molecular processes involved in iron biomineralization by anaerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria and

  8. Analysis of shear banding in twelve materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, R. C.; Kim, C. H.

    The problem of the initiation and growth of shear bands in 12 different materials, namely, OFHC copper, Cartridge brass, Nickel 200, Armco IF (interstitial free) iron, Carpenter electric iron, 1006 steel, 2024-T351 aluminum, 7039 aluminum, low alloy steel, S-7 tool steel, Tungsten alloy, and Depleted Uranium (DU -0.75 Ti) is studied with the objectives of finding out when a shear band initiates, and upon what parameters does the band width depend. The nonlinear coupled partial differential equations governing the overall simple shearing deformations of a thermally softening viscoplastic block are analyzed. It is assumed that the thermomechanical response of these materials can be adequately represented by the Johnson-Cook law, and the only inhomogeneity present in the block is the variation in its thickness. The effect of the defect size on the initiation and subsequent growth of the band is also studied. It is found that, for each one of these 12 materials, the deformation has become nonhomogeneous by the time the maximum shear stress occurs. Also the band width, computed when the shear stress has dropped to 85 percent of its peak value, does not correlate well with the thermal conductivity of the material. The band begins to grow rapidly when the shear stress has dropped to 90 percent of its maximum value.

  9. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. PMID:26475190

  10. The evaluation of iron deficiency and anemia in male blood donors with other related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefinejad Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Background: Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide and blood donation may cause iron depletion. Limited studies with large sample size have been done on male donors. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among male donors in the Kurdistan Organization of Blood Transfusion in Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was 1184 blood donors selected by systematic random sampling. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron banding capacity (TIBC and transferin saturation were measured in donors. Iron depletion, lack of iron stores, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and anemia were evaluated among them. Data was analyzed with SPSS software and X΂, one-way ANOVA, and LSD test. Results: Iron deficiency, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, iron depletion and lack of iron resources were seen in 2.3, 4.08, 2.14, 22.76 and 4.66 percent respectively. There was a significant relationship of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia with instances of donation and interval from last donation (P < 0.05. A significant relationship was seen between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among blood donors with more than ten times blood donation (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study showed regular male donors require especial attention. Therefore, serum ferritin is recommended as a more adequate index to use for iron deficiency screening and planning purposes for iron supplementation among them.

  11. The formation mechanism of iron oxide nanoparticles within the microwave-assisted solvothermal synthesis and its correlation with the structural and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakova, Z; Kuritka, I; Kazantseva, N E; Babayan, V; Pastorek, M; Machovsky, M; Bazant, P; Saha, P

    2015-12-28

    Magnetic nanoparticles based on Fe3O4 were prepared by a facile and rapid one-pot solvothermal synthesis using FeCl3·6H2O as a source of iron ions, ethylene glycol as a solvent and NH4Ac, (NH4)2CO3, NH4HCO3 or aqueous NH3 as precipitating and nucleating agents. In contrast to previous reports we reduce the synthesis time to 30 minutes using a pressurized microwave reactor without the requirement of further post-treatments such as calcination. Dramatically reduced synthesis time prevents particle growth via Ostwald ripening thus the obtained particles have dimensions in the range of 20 to 130 nm, they are uniform in shape and exhibit magnetic properties with saturation magnetization ranging from 8 to 76 emu g(-1). The suggested method allows simple particle size and crystallinity tuning resulting in improved magnetic properties by changing the synthesis parameters, i.e. temperature and nucleating agents. Moreover, efficiency of conversion of raw material into the product is almost 100%. PMID:26595518

  12. An investigation of reaction parameters on geochemical storage of non-pure CO2 streams in iron oxides-bearing formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Susana; Liu, Q.; Bacon, Diana H.; Maroto-Valer, M. M.

    2014-08-26

    Hematite deposit that is the main FeIII-bearing mineral in sedimentary red beds was proposed as a potential host repository for converting CO2 into carbonate minerals such as siderite (FeCO3), when CO2–SO2 gas mixtures are co-injected. This work investigated CO2 mineral trapping using hematite and sensitivity of the reactive systems to different parameters, including particle size, gas composition, temperature, pressure, and solid-to-liquid ratio. Experimental and modelling studies of hydrothermal experiments were conducted, which emulated a CO2 sequestration scenario by injecting CO2-SO2 gas streams into a NaCl-NaOH brine hosted in iron oxide-containing aquifer. This study provides novel information on the mineralogical changes and fluid chemistry derived from the co-injection of CO2-SO2 gas mixtures in hematite deposit. It can be concluded that the amount of siderite precipitate depends primarily on the SO2 content of the gas stream. Increasing SO2 content in the system could promote the reduction of Fe3+ from the hematite sample to Fe2+, which will be further available for its precipitation as siderite. Moreover, siderite precipitation is enhanced at low temperatures and high pressures. The influence of the solid to liquid ratio on the overall carbonation reaction suggests that the conversion increases if the system becomes more diluted.

  13. Human iron transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Garrick, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Human iron transporters manage iron carefully because tissues need iron for critical functions, but too much iron increases the risk of reactive oxygen species. Iron acquisition occurs in the duodenum via divalent metal transporter (DMT1) and ferroportin. Iron trafficking depends largely on the transferrin cycle. Nevertheless, non-digestive tissues have a variety of other iron transporters that may render DMT1 modestly redundant, and DMT1 levels exceed those needed for the just-mentioned task...

  14. Iron and Atherosclerosis: Nailing Down a Novel Target with Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Sharkey-Toppen, Travis P.; Tewari, Arun K.; Subha V. Raman

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential mineral in many proteins and enzymes in human physiology, with limited means of iron elimination to maintain iron balance. Iron accrual incurs various pathological mechanisms linked to cardiovascular disease. In atherosclerosis, iron catalyzes the creation of reactive oxygen free radicals that contribute to lipid modification, which is essential to atheroma formation. Inflammation further fuels iron-related pathologic processes associated with plaque progression. Given ir...

  15. Sr and Nd isotope systematics and Pb-Pb step wise leaching of banded hematite quartzites from Morar sub group, Gwalior Basin M.P. : implications on their diagenetic history and petrogenesis. CP-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low abundances of Rb, Sr, Sm and Nd in Banded Iron Formations (B,F's) result in insufficient spread of data points to obtain reliable isochrons using conventional geochronometers. Under these constraints, stepwise Pb leaching has been used effectively to obtain a better spread in Pb ratios so as to yield a reliable age data. Since B, F's are formed by marine chemical sedimentation, their isotopic signatures carry a record of the source of Rb b and Fe in these sediments

  16. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Christides, Tatiana; Wray, David; McBride, Richard; Fairweather, Rose; Sharp, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including th...

  17. Assessment of polyphase sintered iron-cobalt-iron boride cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sintering of iron, cobalt and boron powders has been analysed. As a result iron-iron boride, Fe-Fe2B and iron/cobalt boride with a slight admixture of molybdenum, Fe - Co - (FeMoCo)2B cermets have been produced. Iron was introduced to the mixture as the Astalloy Mo Hoeganaes grade powder. Elemental amorphous boron powder was used, and formation of borides occurred both during heating and isothermal sintering periods causing dimensional changes of the sintered body. Dilatometry was chosen to control basic phenomena taking place during multiphase sintering of investigated systems. The microstructure and phase constituents of sintered compacts were controlled as well. The cermets produced were substituted to: metallographic tests, X-ray analysis, measurements of hardness and of microhardness, and of wear in the process of sliding dry friction. Cermets are made up of two phases; hard grains of iron - cobalt boride, (FeCo)2B (1800 HV) constituting the reinforcement and a relatively soft and plastic eutectic mixture Fe2B - Co (400-500 HV) constituting the matrix. (author)

  18. Formation process of dislocation loops in iron under irradiations with low-energy helium, hydrogen ions or high-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, K.; Mori, H.; Ono, K.

    2002-12-01

    Formation processes of interstitial-type dislocation loops (I loops) in high-purity Fe under irradiations with 5 keV H + ions or 1000 keV electrons are examined by in situ transmission electron microscopy at temperatures below room temperature, and the results are compared with that obtained under He + ion irradiation. For the electron irradiation, conventional model of I-loop nucleation based on the assumption that di-interstitial atoms are stable nuclei of I loops is questioned. The volume density of I loops by H + ion irradiation is one-order of magnitude higher than that by electron irradiation, and several times lower than that by He + ion irradiation. The temperature dependence of the volume density of I loops by H + ion irradiation supports the idea that such enhancement of I-loop formation is due to trapping of self-interstitial atoms by gas atom-vacancy complexes.

  19. Feasibility of infrared analysis of iron in zircon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A feasibility study has concluded that quantitative infrared analysis can be employed to determine the concentration of iron in zircon. The spectral transmission curves have shown that the iron absorption band is located at 1.15 microns. These curves also revealed a second absorption band at 1.49 microns. The source of this second peak is not known; but it exhibits some features which suggest its dependance on natural α-recoil damage. 23 references, 14 figures, 2 tables

  20. Determination of the stable iron isotopic composition of sequentially leached iron phases in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Henkel, Susann; Kasten, Sabine; Poulton, Simon W.; Michael STAUBWASSER

    2016-01-01

    Reactive iron (oxyhydr)oxide minerals preferentially undergo early diagenetic redox cycling which can result in the production of dissolved Fe(II), the adsorption of Fe(II) onto particle surfaces, and the formation of authigenic Fe minerals. The partitioning of iron in sediments has traditionally been studied by applying sequential extractions that target operationally-defined iron phases. Here, we complement an existing sequential leaching method by developing a sample processing protocol fo...

  1. Iron and iron derived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Atherogenesis and iron: from epidemiology to cellular level

    OpenAIRE

    Vinchi, Francesca; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Da Silva, Milene C.; Balla, György; Balla, József; Jeney, Viktória

    2014-01-01

    Iron accumulates in human atherosclerotic lesions but whether it is a cause or simply a downstream consequence of the atheroma formation has been an open question for decades. According to the so called “iron hypothesis,” iron is believed to be detrimental for the cardiovascular system, thus promoting atherosclerosis development and progression. Iron, in its catalytically active form, can participate in the generation of reactive oxygen species and induce lipid-peroxidation, triggering endoth...

  3. Atherogenesis and iron: from epidemiology to cellular level

    OpenAIRE

    ViktóriaJeney; FrancescaVinchi; GyörgyBalla

    2014-01-01

    Iron accumulates in human atherosclerotic lesions but whether it is a cause or simply a downstream consequence of the atheroma formation has been an open question for decades. According to the so called “iron hypothesis”, iron is believed to be detrimental for the cardiovascular system, thus promoting atherosclerosis development and progression. Iron, in its catalytically active form, can participate in the generation of reactive oxygen species and induce lipid-peroxidation, triggering endoth...

  4. Bioavailability of caseinophosphopeptide-bound iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Oukhatar, Nabil; Peres, Jean Michel; Bouhallab, Said; Neuville, Dominique; Bureau, Francois; Bouvard, Gerard; Arhan, Pierre; Bougle, Dominique

    2002-10-01

    Iron deficiency, one of the main worldwide nutritional deficiencies, results from the low bioavailability of most dietary iron, including cow milk. Hydrolysis of the cow milk protein casein produces low molecular weight caseinophosphopeptides (CPPs). Binding of iron to CPPs keeps it soluble in the digestive tract and prevents the formation of high molecular weight ferric hydroxides, which are poorly absorbed. Previous experimental studies have shown that iron bound to the phosphopeptide containing the first 25 amino acids of beta-casein, or beta-CN (1-25), is well absorbed and corrects efficiently iron deficiency. We sought to assess in vivo iron absorption and uptake by tissues involved in iron metabolism and storage (liver, spleen, bone marrow), using radiolabeled iron. beta-CN (1-25)-Fe displayed better absorption and tissue uptake by the vascularized rat loop model compared with a control substance, ferric ascorbate. The metabolism of beta-CN (1-25)-Fe labeled with iron 59, added to cow milk, was also studied in young women. Although the absorption of beta-CN (1-25)-Fe was not significantly higher than that of ferrous sulfate, it displayed significantly higher tissue uptake. This increase was transient and had disappeared by the 14th day of the study, suggesting that iron was used for metabolic purposes. PMID:12389027

  5. Microstructures and mechanical properties of commercial purity iron processed by asymmetric rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of grain refinement, commercial purity iron processed by asymmetric rolling (ASR) has been studied by optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Equiaxed ultra fined grains with a grain size of about 0.9 μm and a large fraction of high angle grain boundaries were obtained. The formation of the equiaxed grains is suggested to result from the additional shear strain which is observed by the shape change of a Cu band inserted into the rolled materials. The rolled iron exhibits high yield strength with a low work hardening ability and high microhardness, which are attributed to the high dislocation density and the large fraction of the high angle boundaries.

  6. Iron ore pollution in Mandovi and Zuari estuarine sediments and its fate after mining ban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessarkar, Pratima M; Suja, S; Sudheesh, V; Srivastava, Shubh; Rao, V Purnachandra

    2015-09-01

    Iron ore was mined from the banded iron formations of Goa, India, and transported through the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries for six decades until the ban on mining from September 2012. Here we focus on the environmental magnetic properties of sediments from the catchment area, upstream and downstream of these estuaries, and adjacent shelf during peak mining time. Magnetic susceptibility (χ lf) and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) values of sediments were highest in upstream (catchment area and estuaries), decreased gradually towards downstream (catchment area and estuaries), and were lowest on the adjacent shelf. The χ lf values of the Mandovi estuary were two to fourfold higher than those in the Zuari. The sediments of these two estuaries after the mining ban showed enrichment of older magnetite and sharp decrease in the SIRM values. Although the input of ore material has been reduced after mining ban, more flushing of estuarine sediments is required for healthier environment. PMID:26271913

  7. Al2O3 Scale Development on Iron Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Thaidigsmann, Katja; Ager, Joel; Hou, Peggy Y.

    2005-11-10

    The structure and phase of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale that forms on an Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy (Fe-28Al-5Cr) (at %) was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). Oxidation was performed at 900 C and 1000 C for up to 190 min. TEM revealed that single-layer scales were formed after short oxidation times. Electron diffraction was used to show that the scales are composed of nanoscale crystallites of the {theta}, {gamma}, and {alpha} phases of alumina. Band-like structure was observed extending along three 120{sup o}-separated directions within the surface plane. Textured {theta} and {gamma} grains were the main components of the bands, while mixed {alpha} and transient phases were found between the bands. Extended oxidation produced a double-layered scale structure, with a continuous {alpha} layer at the scale/alloy interface, and a {gamma}/{theta} layer at the gas surface. The mechanism for the formation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales on iron aluminide alloys is discussed and compared to that for nickel aluminide alloys.

  8. IRON INCREASES EXPRESSION OF IRON-EXPORT PROTEIN MTP1 IN LUNG CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accumulation of reactive iron in acute and chronic lung disease suggests that iron-driven free radical formation could contribute to tissue injury. Safe transport and sequestration of this metal is likely to be of importance in lung defense. We provide evidence for the expression...

  9. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized inside highly ordered mesoporous silica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Bhaumik; S Samanta; N K Mal

    2005-11-01

    Nanosized iron oxide, a moderately large band-gap semiconductor and an essential component of optoelectrical and magnetic devices, has been prepared successfully inside the restricted internal pores of mesoporous silica material through in-situ reduction during impregnation. The samples were characterized by powder XRD, TEM, SEM/EDS, N2 adsorption, FT-IR and UV–visible spectroscopies. Characterization data indicated well-dispersed isolated nanoclusters of (Fe2O3),` within the internal surface of 2D-hexagonal mesoporous silica structure. No occluded Fe/Fe2O3 crystallites were observed at the external surface of the mesoporous silica nanocomposites. Inorganic mesoporous host, such as hydrophilic silica in the pore walls, directs a physical constraint necessary to prevent the creation of large Fe2O3 agglomerates and enables the formation of nanosized Fe2O3 particles inside the mesopore.

  10. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so ... ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron dextran (Dexferrum, Infed, Proferdex), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit); any other medications; or any ...

  11. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so ... carboxymaltose (Injectafer), ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit);any other medications; or any ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... refers to a condition in which your blood has a lower than normal number of red blood ... iron, your body starts using the iron it has stored. Soon, the stored iron gets used up. ...

  13. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  14. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Iron-rich foods include: Chicken and turkey Dried lentils, peas, and beans Fish Meats (liver is the ... and egg yolks are high sources of iron. Flour, bread, and some cereals are fortified with iron. ...

  15. Iron overload in very low birth weight infants: Serum Ferritin and adverse outcomes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barrett, M

    2011-11-01

    Adequate iron isessential for growth and haematpoiesis. Oral iron supplementation is the standard of care in VLBW infants. Post mortem evidence has confirmed significant iron overload. Excessive free iron has been associated with free radical formation and brain injury in term infants.

  16. Sulfide-iron interactions in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Lens, P.N.L.; Vollertsen, J.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between iron and sulfide in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer were investigated with particular emphasis on redox cycling of iron and iron sulfide formation. The concentration ranges of iron and total sulfide in the experiments were 0.4-5.4 mg Fe L-1 and 0-5.1 mg S L-1, respectiv

  17. Pharmacology of Iron Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Shaina L.; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential phar...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  19. Gutzwiller theory of band magnetism in LaOFeAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the iron pnictide LaOFeAs we investigate multi-band Hubbard models which are assumed to capture the relevant physics. In our calculations, we employ the Gutzwiller variational theory which is a genuine many particle approach. We will present results both on the paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of our model systems. These results show that a five band-model is not adequate to capture the relevant physics in LaOFeAs. However, our results for the eight band-model which includes the arsenic 4p bands reproduce the experimental data, especially the small magnetic moment, for a broad parameter regime.

  20. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release. PMID:25150521

  1. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep...

  2. Influence of copper in spheres of iron and aluminum oxide; Influencia do cobre nas propriedades texturais e estruturais de esferas de oxido de ferro e aluminio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, A.F. de; Gomes, E.C.C.; Valentini, A.; Longhinotti, E., E-mail: adfrsou@hotmail.co [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica; Sales, F.A.M. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2010-07-01

    The various applications of mesoporous materials in adsorption and catalysis have driven research for new synthetic routes to improve the structural and morphological characteristics of the compounds currently available. Spherical mesoporous materials of aluminum oxide and / or iron were synthesized in proportions of 10.30 and 50%, and then impregnated with copper oxide by wet impregnation method. Supporters of spherical iron oxide and aluminum before and after impregnation with copper were characterized by XRD, SEM, chemical analysis, BET and TPR. The analysis results of XRD showed the formation of crystalline phases AB{sub 2}O{sub 4} type, the results of TPR showed a shift of the band of iron reduction with the incorporation of copper and the samples indicated a decrease in porosity, possibly due to the closure of pores with the addition of copper. (author)

  3. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  4. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... contours are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  5. Liver iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ross M Graham; Anita CG Chua; Carly E Herbison; John K Olynyk; Debbie Trinder

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in iron metabolism. It is the major storage site for iron and also expresses a complex range of molecules which are involved in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis. An increasing number of genes associated with hepatic iron transport or regulation have been identified. These include transferrin receptors (TFR1 and 2), a ferrireductase (STEAP3), the transporters divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) as well as the haemochromatosis protein, HFE and haemojuvelin (HJV),which are signalling molecules. Many of these genes also participate in iron regulatory pathways which focus on the hepatic peptide hepcidin. However, we are still only beginning to understand the complex interactions between liver iron transport and iron homeostasis. This review outlines our current knowledge of molecules of iron metabolism and their roles in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis.

  6. Photonic band gap materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the theoretical and experimental efforts in obtaining a photonic band gap, a frequency band in three-dimensional dielectric structures in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, is presented

  7. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.;

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory are co...

  8. Flat Band Quastiperiodic Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodyfelt, Joshua; Flach, Sergej; Danieli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Translationally invariant lattices with flat bands (FB) in their band structure possess irreducible compact localized flat band states, which can be understood through local rotation to a Fano structure. We present extension of these quasi-1D FB structures under incommensurate lattices, reporting on the FB effects to the Metal-Insulator Transition.

  9. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  10. Special thermite cast irons

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. Zhiguts; I. Kurytnik

    2008-01-01

    The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  11. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  12. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  13. Urinary iron excretion test in iron deficiency anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura,Ikuro; Yamana,Masatoshi; NNishishita,Akira; Sugiyama,Motoharu; Miyata, Akira

    1980-01-01

    A urinary iron excretion test was carried out in 22 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The iron excretion index was significantly higher in patients with intractable iron deficiency anemia compared with normal subjects and anemic patients who were responsive to iron therapy. The findings suggest that iron excretion may be a factor that modulates the response of patients to iron therapy.

  14. Mammalian iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory Jon; Vulpe, Christopher D

    2009-10-01

    Iron is essential for basic cellular processes but is toxic when present in excess. Consequently, iron transport into and out of cells is tightly regulated. Most iron is delivered to cells bound to plasma transferrin via a process that involves transferrin receptor 1, divalent metal-ion transporter 1 and several other proteins. Non-transferrin-bound iron can also be taken up efficiently by cells, although the mechanism is poorly understood. Cells can divest themselves of iron via the iron export protein ferroportin in conjunction with an iron oxidase. The linking of an oxidoreductase to a membrane permease is a common theme in membrane iron transport. At the systemic level, iron transport is regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin which acts on ferroportin to control iron release to the plasma. PMID:19484405

  15. Iron deposits in relation to magmatism in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaochong; Santosh, M.; Li, Jianwei

    2015-12-01

    China has a rich reserve of iron ores, and hosts most of the major types of iron deposits recognized over the world. However, most of these deposits are low-grade ores (end during 1980's to 2005. In the recent years, however, there has been an increasing demand for iron resources due to China's rapid industrialization and economic development. Thus, a new surge of studies and prospecting of high-grade iron deposits started, which resulted in many advances in our understanding of the formation and exploration of iron deposits.

  16. Phosphorus in iron alloys surface engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nowacki

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose consideration of role of phosphorus in iron alloys surface engineering and relations of the iron phosphides layers growth parameters in processes of phosphorising, phosphorcarburising, and phosphonitriding with their structure and properties.Design/methodology/approach: The layers were generated on a base of Armco iron and 0.4%C, 1.1%Cr steel as a result of annealing in a mixture of argon or carburising, nitriding atmosphere and phosphorus vapours in: temperature T = 700 - 1170 K, phosphorus partial pressure p = 0.1 - 20 kPa, process duration t = 3.6 - 21.6 ks. The diffusion layers were investigated by means of the methods: metallographic, X - ray structural analysis, microanalysis, Vickers and wear dry friction resistance tests.Findings: Formation of compact layer of phosphides with the adjustable relation of Fe3P to Fe2P was described; means of growth and kinetics of iron phosphides layers and phosphocarburised and phosphonitrided were explained, it was found that iron phosphides presence in steel surface increases its hardness and resistance to wear.Research limitations/implications: Research implications it was found that nucleation Fe3P crystals starts in areas of surface being found in a certain distance from iron grains boundaries and the growth process of iron phosphide continuous layers is an effect of iron diffusion through phosphide layer from the core towards the surface. In advanced phases of the of iron phosphide layer growth, a gap between the layer and the base is created as a process of degradation of the base layer interface.Practical implications: Practical implications: it has found that the obtained layers are new kind of composites diffusive layers with iron phosphide particles generated as a result of phosphorising, phosphorcarburising or phosphonitriding with very promising tribobiological propertiesOriginality/value: An original value of the paper is description of the formation elementary processes

  17. Iron metabolism and iron supplementation in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Heinz; Evstatiev, Rayko; Kornek, Gabriela; Aapro, Matti; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Fridrik, Michael; Geissler, Dietmar; Geissler, Klaus; Gisslinger, Heinz; Koller, Elisabeth; Kopetzky, Gerhard; Lang, Alois; Rumpold, Holger; Steurer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Iron deficiency and iron deficiency-associated anemia are common complications in cancer patients. Most iron deficient cancer patients present with functional iron deficiency (FID), a status with adequate storage iron, but insufficient iron supply for erythroblasts and other iron dependent tissues. FID is the consequence of the cancer-associated cytokine release, while in absolute iron deficiency iron stores are depleted resulting in similar but often more severe symptoms of insuffici...

  18. Experimental study on the adiabatic shear bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four martensitic steels (Z50CDV5 steel, 28CND8 steel, 35NCDV16 steel and 4340 steel) with different hardness between 190 and 600 Hsub(B) (Brinell hardness), have been studied by means of dynamic compressive tests on split Hopkinson pressure bar. Microscopic observations show that the fracture are associated to the development of adiabatic shear bands (except 4340 steel with 190 Hsub(B) hardness). By means of tests for which the deformation is stopped at predetermined levels, the measurement of shear and hardness inside the band and the matrix indicates the chronology of this phenomenon: first the localization of shear, followed by the formation of adiabatic shear band and ultimatly crack initiation and propagation. These results correlated with few simulations by finite elements have permitted to suggest two mecanisms of deformation leading to the formation of adiabatic shear bands in this specific test

  19. Formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes in isolated developing pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to chlorophyll-protein complexes, other proteins were labeled when isolated developing pea chloroplasts were incubated with [14C]-5-aminolevulinic acid [14C]-ALA. The major labeled band (M/sub r/ = 43 kDa by LDS-PAGE) was labeled even in the presence of chloramphenicol. Heme-dependent peroxidase activity (as detected by the tetramethyl benzidine-H2O2 stain) was not visibly associated with this band. The radioactive band was stable to heat, 5% HCl in acetone, and was absent if the incubation with [14C]-5-aminolevulinic acid was carried out in the presence of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (a specific inhibitor of ferrochelatase). Organic solvent extraction procedures for the enrichment of cytochrome f from chloroplast membranes also extracted this unknown labeled product. It was concluded that this labeled product was probably a c-type cytochrome. The effect of exogenous iron, iron chelators, gabaculine (an inhibitor of ALA synthesis) and other incubation conditions upon the in vitro formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes will be discussed

  20. Graphitization in chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    LECOMTE-BECKERS, Jacqueline; Terziev, L.; Breyer, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Some trials with graphite Hi-Cr iron rolls have been done mainly in Japan, for the rolling of stainless steel. This material could lead to good compromise between oxidation, wear and thermal behaviour. By using thermal analysis and resistometry, the conditions for secondary graphite formation have been studied. The amount and volume of free graphite may be strongly increased by a suitable heat treatment, allowing a good thermal conductivity as well as high wear and mechanical properties.

  1. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. This chapter deals with our current knowledge of these meteorites. How did they form? What can they tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and its solid bodies? How closely do they resemble the materials from planetary interiors? What do and...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar......Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...

  2. 过共晶球墨铸铁中石墨球周围奥氏体壳的形成机制%Formation Mechanism of the Austenite Shell around Nodular Graphite in the Hypereutectic Nodular Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟秋亚; 徐锦锋; 袁森

    2001-01-01

    The high-temperature solidification structure in hypereutectic nodular iron has been showed clearly by the color etching technique and the formation mechanism of the austenite shell (the austenite shell is a part of the austenite dendrites) around the nodular graphite has been observed and analyzed. The result shows that the primary austenite dendrite and austenite shell dendrite grows alternately through the primary nodular graphite, this helps to bring about the formation of the austenite shell around nodular graphite. Around the primary nodular graphite, the austenite nucleates and grows based on the graphite growth face (0001), and forms a ring like austenite shell finally. At the earlier stage of eutectic, the graphite nodules nucleate and grow between dendrites arm or in the frame of the austenite dendrites, then are surrounded by the austenite dendrite arms formed later, finally the enveloped or nor-enveloped frame austenite shell has formed. But, There is no austenite shell formed around the nodular graphite formed in the later stage of eutectic.%采用着色腐蚀技术,可清晰地显示出过共晶球墨铸铁中的高温凝固组织,观察分析了石墨球周围奥氏体壳(奥氏体壳是奥氏体枝晶的一部分)的形成机制。结果表明,初生枝晶和晕圈枝晶交替生长,促成石墨球周围奥氏体壳的形成;奥氏体以石墨生长面(0001)为衬底形核、生长,在初生石墨球周围形成环状封闭奥氏体壳;共晶前期石墨球在枝晶臂间或框架中形核、生长,尔后为枝晶高次臂所包围,形成封闭或不封闭的框架奥氏体壳。共晶后期石墨球不形成奥氏体壳。

  3. One-man band

    OpenAIRE

    Stillman, R.

    2013-01-01

    This website presents practice-based research related to solo simultaneous instrumental performance ('one-man band'). The site was conceived as a creative and widely accessible platform for music and ideas resulting from one-man band activates carried out between 2008 and 2013. Central to this project is an interest in how one-man band technique informs compositional process, including studio production. Through presentation and analysis of the author’s own creative practice, the site exp...

  4. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  5. Shear banding deformation in Cu/Ta nano-multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Formation of shear bands in Cu/Ta multilayers is layer thickness dependent. → Unique layer-morphology with prevalent mismatched laminate structure was observed. → A new physical mechanism that dominates shear band formation is suggested. - Abstract: Nanoscale Cu/Ta multilayers with individual layer thickness ranging from 3 to 70 nm were deformed under nanoindentation at room temperature. Shear bands can be observed only when individual layer thickness is reduced to 9 nm or below, indicating formation of shear bands in the Cu/Ta multilayers is layer thickness dependent. By observing the cross sectional transmission electron microscope images of the indentation fabricated through focused ion beam technique, shear banding deformation causing a unique layer-morphology with prevalent mismatched laminate structure has been reported for the first time. By capturing and analyzing a series of typical indentation-induced deformed microstructures, a new physical mechanism of shear banding behavior in metallic nano-multilayers is suggested.

  6. Red Supergiant Stars as Cosmic Abundance Probes. III. NLTE effects in J-band Magnesium lines

    CERN Document Server

    Bergemann, Maria; Gazak, Zach; Davies, Ben; Plez, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Non-LTE calculations for Mg I in red supergiant stellar atmospheres are presented to investigate the importance of non-LTE for the formation of Mg I lines in the NIR J-band. Recent work using medium resolution spectroscopy of atomic lines in the J-band of individual red supergiant stars has demonstrated that technique is a very promising tool to investigate the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star forming galaxies. As in previous work, where non-LTE effects were studied for iron, titanium and silicon, substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger Mg I absorption lines. For the quantitative spectral analysis the non-LTE effects lead to magnesium abundances significantly smaller than in LTE with the non-LTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between -0.4 dex to -0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K to 4400 K. We discuss the physical reasons of the non-LTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies using individual red supe...

  7. Magnetic separation of algae genetically modified for increased intracellular iron uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Amy [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Moore, Lee R. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lane, Christopher D.; Kumar, Anil; Stroff, Clayton; White, Nicolas [Phycal Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Xue, Wei; Chalmers, Jeffrey J. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Zborowski, Maciej, E-mail: zborowm@ccf.org [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Algae were investigated in the past as a potential source of biofuel and other useful chemical derivatives. Magnetic separation of algae by iron oxide nanoparticle binding to cells has been proposed by others for dewatering of cellular mass prior to lipid extraction. We have investigated feasibility of magnetic separation based on the presence of natural iron stores in the cell, such as the ferritin in Auxenochlorella protothecoides (A. protothecoides) strains. The A. protothecoides cell constructs were tested for inserted genes and for increased intracellular iron concentration by inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption (ICP–AA). They were grown in Sueoka’s modified high salt media with added vitamin B1 and increasing concentration of soluble iron compound (FeCl{sub 3} EDTA, from 1× to 8× compared to baseline). The cell magnetic separation conditions were tested using a thin rectangular flow channel pressed against interpolar gaps of a permanent magnet forming a separation system of a well-defined fluid flow and magnetic fringing field geometry (up to 2.2 T and 1000 T/m) dubbed “magnetic deposition microscopy”, or MDM. The presence of magnetic cells in suspension was detected by formation of characteristic deposition bands at the edges of the magnet interpolar gaps, amenable to optical scanning and microscopic examination. The results demonstrated increasing cellular Fe uptake with increasing Fe concentration in the culture media in wild type strain and in selected genetically-modified constructs, leading to magnetic separation without magnetic particle binding. The throughput in this study is not sufficient for an economical scale harvest. - Highlights: • Auxenochlorella protothecoides algae were genetically modified for biofuel production. • Algal iron metabolism was sufficient for their label-less magnetic separation. • High magnetic field and low flow required make the separation scale-up uneconomical.

  8. Magnetic separation of algae genetically modified for increased intracellular iron uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algae were investigated in the past as a potential source of biofuel and other useful chemical derivatives. Magnetic separation of algae by iron oxide nanoparticle binding to cells has been proposed by others for dewatering of cellular mass prior to lipid extraction. We have investigated feasibility of magnetic separation based on the presence of natural iron stores in the cell, such as the ferritin in Auxenochlorella protothecoides (A. protothecoides) strains. The A. protothecoides cell constructs were tested for inserted genes and for increased intracellular iron concentration by inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption (ICP–AA). They were grown in Sueoka’s modified high salt media with added vitamin B1 and increasing concentration of soluble iron compound (FeCl3 EDTA, from 1× to 8× compared to baseline). The cell magnetic separation conditions were tested using a thin rectangular flow channel pressed against interpolar gaps of a permanent magnet forming a separation system of a well-defined fluid flow and magnetic fringing field geometry (up to 2.2 T and 1000 T/m) dubbed “magnetic deposition microscopy”, or MDM. The presence of magnetic cells in suspension was detected by formation of characteristic deposition bands at the edges of the magnet interpolar gaps, amenable to optical scanning and microscopic examination. The results demonstrated increasing cellular Fe uptake with increasing Fe concentration in the culture media in wild type strain and in selected genetically-modified constructs, leading to magnetic separation without magnetic particle binding. The throughput in this study is not sufficient for an economical scale harvest. - Highlights: • Auxenochlorella protothecoides algae were genetically modified for biofuel production. • Algal iron metabolism was sufficient for their label-less magnetic separation. • High magnetic field and low flow required make the separation scale-up uneconomical

  9. Rapid Determination of Iron in Water by Modified Thiocyanate Method

    OpenAIRE

    D. C. Goswami; H. Kalita

    1988-01-01

    A rapid spectrophotometric method for determination of iron in water by oxidising ferrous iron with ceric ammonium sulphate at roomtemperature followed by formation of ferric thiocyanate colour complexwith potassium thiocyanate has been described. The method is simple and rapid as compared to other standard methods used in water analysis and iron content of water upto 5 ppm can be determined by this method with a maximum error of 2.8 per cent

  10. Rapid Determination of Iron in Water by Modified Thiocyanate Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Goswami

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available A rapid spectrophotometric method for determination of iron in water by oxidising ferrous iron with ceric ammonium sulphate at roomtemperature followed by formation of ferric thiocyanate colour complexwith potassium thiocyanate has been described. The method is simple and rapid as compared to other standard methods used in water analysis and iron content of water upto 5 ppm can be determined by this method with a maximum error of 2.8 per cent

  11. Microbial Iron Respiration Can Protect Steel from Corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Dubiel, M.; Hsu, C H; Chien, C. C.; Mansfeld, F.; Newman, D. K.

    2002-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MC) of steel has been attributed to the activity of biofilms that include anaerobic microorganisms such as iron-respiring bacteria, yet the mechanisms by which these organisms influence corrosion have been unclear. To study this process, we generated mutants of the iron-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that were defective in biofilm formation and/or iron reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to determine changes...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ...

  13. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  14. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - iron; Ferric acid; Ferrous acid; Ferritin ... The human body needs iron to make the oxygen-carrying proteins hemoglobin and myoglobin. Hemoglobin is found in red blood cells and myoglobin is found ...

  15. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully ... With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from ... iron levels. Susan also made changes to her diet, such as focusing more on green leafy vegetables, ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ...

  1. Synthesis of Fe-MCM-41 Using Iron Ore Tailings as the Silicon and Iron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Honghao; He, Yan; Xue, Xiangxin

    2012-01-01

    Highly ordered Fe-MCM-41 molecular sieve was successfully synthesized by using n-hexadecyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as the template and the iron ore tailings (IOTs) as the silicon and iron source. X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy, 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and nitrogen adsorption/desorption were used to characterize the samples. The results showed that the mesoporous materials had highly ordered 2-dimensional hexagonal structure. The synthesized sample had high surface area, and part of iron atoms is retained in the framework with formation of tetrahedron after removal of the template by calcinations. The results obtained in the present work demonstrate the feasibility of employing iron ore tailings as a potential source of silicon and iron to produce Fe-MCM-41 mesoporous materials. PMID:22567574

  2. Synthesis of Fe-MCM-41 Using Iron Ore Tailings as the Silicon and Iron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly ordered Fe-MCM-41 molecular sieve was successfully synthesized by using n-hexadecyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB as the template and the iron ore tailings (IOTs as the silicon and iron source. X-ray diffraction (XRD, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy, 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption were used to characterize the samples. The results showed that the mesoporous materials had highly ordered 2-dimensional hexagonal structure. The synthesized sample had high surface area, and part of iron atoms is retained in the framework with formation of tetrahedron after removal of the template by calcinations. The results obtained in the present work demonstrate the feasibility of employing iron ore tailings as a potential source of silicon and iron to produce Fe-MCM-41 mesoporous materials.

  3. Iron Therapy for Preterm Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    Preterm infants are at risk for both iron deficiency and iron overload. The role of iron in multiple organ functions suggests that iron supplementation is essential for the preterm infant. Conversely, the potential for iron overload and the poorly developed anti-oxidant measures in the preterm infant argues against indiscriminate iron supplementation in this population. The purpose of this article is to review the predisposing factors and consequences of iron deficiency and iron overload in t...

  4. Special thermite cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Zhiguts

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  5. Alternative iron making routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, P.; Sharma, T. [Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India)

    2002-07-01

    The versatile route of iron production 'blast furnace' technique is being replaced by widely accepted Corex technology, Midrex process using Fastmelt ironmaking, eco-friendly Romelt process, more innovative Ausmelt & Hismelt technology, TATA KORF Mini blast furnace improvement, 'quickest iron through Orbiting Plasma', Direct iron ore smelting process, Conred, AISI-Hyl, Inred processes, Direct iron ore reduction methods, their comparison and proposed modifications. 18 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Iron deficiency and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Hulthén, Lena

    2003-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder in the world. One of the most worrying consequences of iron deficiency in children is the alteration of behaviour and cognitive performance. In iron-deficient children, striking behavioural changes are observed, such as reduced attention span, reduced emotional responsiveness and low scores on tests of intelligence. Animal studies on nutritional iron deficiency show effects on learning ability that parallel the human studies. Despite ...

  7. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    was recently challenged and a new structure based on a thin film of Fe3O4(111) on α-Fe2O3(0001) was proposed. The merits of the competing models are discussed. The α-Fe2O3(1 1 bar02) "R-cut" surface is recommended as an excellent prospect for future study given its apparent ease of preparation and its prevalence in nanomaterial. In the latter sections the literature regarding adsorption on iron oxides is reviewed. First, the adsorption of molecules (H2, H2O, CO, CO2, O2, HCOOH, CH3OH, CCl4, CH3I, C6H6, SO2, H2S, ethylbenzene, styrene, and Alq3) is discussed, and an attempt is made to relate this information to the reactions in which iron oxides are utilized as a catalyst (water-gas shift, Fischer-Tropsch, dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene) or catalyst supports (CO oxidation). The known interactions of iron oxide surfaces with metals are described, and it is shown that the behaviour is determined by whether the metal forms a stable ternary phase with the iron oxide. Those that do not, (e.g. Au, Pt, Ag, Pd) prefer to form three-dimensional particles, while the remainder (Ni, Co, Mn, Cr, V, Cu, Ti, Zr, Sn, Li, K, Na, Ca, Rb, Cs, Mg, Ca) incorporate within the oxide lattice. The incorporation temperature scales with the heat of formation of the most stable metal oxide. A particular effort is made to underline the mechanisms responsible for the extraordinary thermal stability of isolated metal adatoms on Fe3O4 surfaces, and the potential application of this model system to understand single atom catalysis and sub-nano cluster catalysis is discussed. The review ends with a brief summary, and a perspective is offered including exciting lines of future research.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... Institutes of Health—shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron- ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented ...

  13. DFT studies of iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeri, Lilia; Dolgov, Oleg V.; Krogh Andersen, Ole [MPI-FKF, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Golubov, Alexander A. [Faculty of Science and Technology, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente,7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in iron pnicticides has generated considerable interest. So far, however, not only the pairing mechanism, but even the basic electronic structure of these materials is not well understood. We use Density Functional Theory to understand the electronic and vibrational properties of LaOFeAs, which can be considered a prototype for iron pnictides. First, we calculate the phonon dispersions and electron-phonon coupling using linear response and show that standard Migdal-Eliashberg theory cannot explain the experimental T{sub c}. Then we derive ab-initio an accurate tight-binding Hamiltonian, which allows us to elucidate the origin of the complicated band structure of iron pnicticides. As a first application of our model, we study itinerant magnetism.

  14. Broad iron lines in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fabian, A C; Reynolds, C S; Young, A J

    2000-01-01

    An intrinsically narrow line emitted by an accretion disk around a black hole appears broadened and skewed as a result of the Doppler effect and gravitational redshift. The fluorescent iron line in the X-ray band at 6.4-6.9keV is the strongest such line and is seen in the X-ray spectrum of many active galactic nuclei and, in particular, Seyfert galaxies. It is an important diagnostic with which to study the geometry and other properties of the accretion flow very close to the central black hole. The broad iron line indicates the presence of a standard thin accretion disk in those objects, often seen at low inclination. The broad iron line has opened up strong gravitational effects around black holes to observational study with wide-reaching consequences for both astrophysics and physics.

  15. Chemical environment of iron atoms in iron oxynitride films synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An iron oxynitride film was deposited on silicon and glass substrates by magnetron sputtering in an Ar-N2-O2 reactive mixture. Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry was used to determine the film composition (Fe1.06O0.35N0.65). X-ray diffraction revealed the formation of a face-centred cubic (fcc) structure with a lattice parameter close to that of γ'''-FeN. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the occurrence of Fe-N and Fe-O bonds in the film. The local environment of iron atoms studied by 57Fe Moessbauer spectrometry at both 300 and 77 K gives clear evidence that the Fe1.06O0.35N0.65 is not a mixture of iron oxide and iron nitride phases. Despite a small amount of an iron nitride phase, the main sample consists of an iron oxynitride phase with an NaCl-type structure where oxygen atoms partially substitute for nitrogen atoms, thus indicating the formation of a iron oxynitride with an fcc structure

  16. Nature of the emission band of Dergaon meteorite in the region 5700—6700 Å

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bhattacharyya; A Gohain Barua; R Konwar; R Changmai; G D Baruah

    2004-06-01

    An emission band system in the region 5700—6700 Å from Dergaon stoney iron meteorite which fell at Dergaon, India on March 2, 16.40 local time (2001) was excited with the help of a continuous 500 mW Ar+ laser. The band system is attributed to silicate (olivine), a major component of the meteorite.

  17. Shear banding in mesoscopic dusty plasma liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experimentally demonstrate shear banding and construct a microscopic dynamic picture of a sheared 2D mesoscopic dust Coulomb liquid at the kinetic level. Under the topological constraints from the discreteness and finite boundary, the nonlinear threshold-type response of motion to the local stress induced by thermal and external drives leads to shear thinning and the enhanced avalanche-type local topological transitions with stress relaxation in the form of clusters. It causes the formation of the outer shear bands in which the mean shear rate, the velocity fluctuations, and the structural rearrangement rate are all enhanced, and leaves a weakly perturbed center band. The typical size of the cooperative hopping vortex (about three interparticle distance) sets up a common length scale for the widths of the confinement induced layering and the shear band

  18. Influence of fuel on phase formation of ZnFe2O4 prepared by self-propagated combustion route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc iron oxide (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles were prepared by self-propagated combustion route.The fuel plays a major role on the formation of structure and particle size. Here three different fuels like alanine, glycine and proline were used to synthesis the zinc iron oxide nanoparticle. Influence of combustion nature through the fuel, the phase formation, particle size, band gap and surface morphology has been modified. The prepared powder was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction method (PXRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and the composition of the material was analysed by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDAX).The elemental mapping was confirmed the uniform distribution of Zn, Fe and O elements in the prepared material of ZnFe2O4

  19. Electrodeposition of iron and iron-aluminium alloys in an ionic liquid and their magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridhar, P; Weidenfeller, B; El Abedin, S Zein; Endres, F

    2014-05-28

    In this work we show that nanocrystalline iron and iron-aluminium alloys can be electrodeposited from the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium trifluoromethylsulfonate, [Py1,4]TfO, at 100 °C. The study comprises CV, SEM, XRD, and magnetic measurements. Two different sources of iron(ii) species, Fe(TfO)2 and FeCl2, were used for the electrodeposition of iron in [Py1,4]TfO. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to evaluate the electrochemical behavior of FeCl2, Fe(TfO)2, and (FeCl2 + AlCl3) in the employed ionic liquid. Thick iron deposits were obtained from FeCl2/[Py1,4]TfO at 100 °C. Electrodeposition of iron-aluminium alloys was successful in the same ionic liquid at 100 °C. The morphology and crystallinity of the obtained deposits were investigated using SEM and XRD, respectively. XRD measurements reveal the formation of iron-aluminium alloys. First magnetic measurements of some deposits gave relatively high coercive forces and power losses in comparison to commercial iron-silicon samples due to the small grain size in the nanometer regime. The present study shows the feasibility of preparing magnetic alloys from ionic liquids. PMID:24715034

  20. Clearer, Simpler and more Efficient LAPACK Routines for Symmetric Positive Definite Band Factorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavson, Fred G.; Quintania-Orti, Enrique S.; Quintana-Orti, Gregorio;

    We describe a minor format change for representing a symmetric band matrix AB using the same array space specified by LAPACK. In LAPACK, band codes operating on the lower part of a symmetric matrix reference matrix element (i, j) as AB1+i−j,j . The format change we propose allows LAPACK band codes...

  1. Effect of neutrase, alcalase, and papain hydrolysis of whey protein concentrates on iron uptake by Caco-2 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, K.Q.; Y. Z. Liu; Zhang, L B; Yang, X.G.; Z.W. Huang; Nout, M.J.R.; Liang, J.

    2010-01-01

    Effects of enzymatic hydrolysates of whey protein concentrates (WPC) on iron absorption were studied using in vitro digestion combined with Caco-2 cell models for improved iron absorption. Neutrase- and papain-treated WPC could improve iron absorption; especially hydrolysates by Neutrase could significantly increase iron absorption to 12.8% compared to 3.8% in the control. Hydrolysates by alcalase had negative effects to the lowest at 0.57%. Two new bands at molecular weights (MW) around and ...

  2. Machining of Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahm, A.; Abele, E.; Schulz, H. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Produktionsmanagement

    2002-09-01

    The industrial application of compacted graphite iron in the automotive industry is taking a rather long time due to its uneconomic machinability, because of a significant decrease in tool life. After six years of holistic research of the PTW in cooperation with foundries, manufactures and material scientists, the wear mechanism was understood and clarified: Sulphur in the microstructure of cast iron has direct influence on the formation of a manganese-sulphur layer on the cutting edge. For machining gray cast iron this layer protects the cutting edge against abrasive wear. In case of CGI no layer formation occurs. Against the abrasive wear new cutting materials and tools for the machining of CGI must be developed. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Method and circuit for processing narrow band signals located in a wide band having disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to a method and a system for formatting and processing narrow band signals located in a wide band having disturbance. The signals are particularly caused by single-energy gamma-rays, as emitted by a radioactive source, and produced by a radiation detection device, such as a gamma-camera. The disturbance is particularly caused by Compton scattering of said signals. (author). 8 figs

  4. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make the band tighter or looser any time after you have this surgery. It may be tightened or ... Having problems eating Not losing enough weight Vomiting after you eat Outlook (Prognosis) The final weight loss with ...

  5. CSF oligoclonal banding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100145.htm CSF oligoclonal banding - series—Normal anatomy ... Overview The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves to supply nutrients to the central nervous system (CNS) and collect waste products, as well as ...

  6. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  7. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensly, Fernanda; Picheth, Geraldo; Brand, Debora; Bonfim, Tania M B

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, and compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended. PMID:25242932

  8. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Gaensly

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, and compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended.

  9. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Gaensly; Geraldo Picheth; Debora Brand; Tania M. B. Bonfim

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, and compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended.

  10. The Band Pass Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Christiano, Lawrence J.; Terry J. Fitzgerald

    1999-01-01

    The `ideal' band pass filter can be used to isolate the component of a time series that lies within a particular band of frequencies. However, applying this filter requires a dataset of infinite length. In practice, some sort of approximation is needed. Using projections, we derive approximations that are optimal when the time series representations underlying the raw data have a unit root, or are stationary about a trend. We identify one approximation which, though it is only optimal for one...

  11. Iliotibial band friction syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for ili...

  12. Surface effects in metallic iron nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Linderoth, Søren

    1994-01-01

    Nanoparticles of metallic iron on carbon supports have been studied in situ by use of Mossbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic anisotropy energy constant increases with decreasing particle size, presumably because of the influence of surface anisotropy. Chemisorption of oxygen results in formation of a...

  13. Iron and manganese deposits in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the results of the study carried out for the United Nations expert which the main object was: the study of the information available about iron and manganese formation in Uruguay, as well as the main researching deposit to determinate economical possibilities in the exportation.

  14. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses. PMID:24052052

  15. A precise zircon U-Pb age for the base of the BIF of the Mulaingiri formation, (Bababudan group, Dharwar supergroup) of the Karnataka craton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHRIMP U-Pb analyses of zircon grains from two thin dark shales believed to be syndepositional ashfall tuffs close to the base of the banded iron-formation (BIF) within the Mulaingiri formation of the Bababudan group (Dharwar supergroup) of the western Karnataka craton provide a precise age for the onset of BIF deposition in the basin. Sample 120019C, from the exact base of the BIF, gave an age of 2720 ± 7 Ma, while sample 120018C, 14.5m above the base, gave an age of 2718 ± 6 Ma. The second sample contained younger grains which may have been affected by a late thermal event. (author)

  16. Band-edge BCS–BEC crossover in a two-band superconductor: physical properties and detection parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconductivity in iron-based magnesium diborides and other novel superconducting materials has a strong multi-band and multi-gap character. Recent experiments support the possibillity for a BCS–BEC crossover induced by strong-coupling and proximity of the chemical potential to the edge of one of the bands. Here we study the simplest theoretical model which accounts for the BCS–BEC crossover in a two-band superconductor, considering tunable interactions and tunable energy separations between the bands. Mean-field results for condensate fraction, correlation length, and superconducting gap are reported in typical crossover diagrams to locate the boundaries of the BCS, crossover and BEC regimes. When the superconducting gap is of the order of the local chemical potential, superconductivity is in the crossover regime of the BCS–BEC crossover and the Fermi surface of the small band is smeared by the gap opening. In this situation, small and large Cooper pairs coexist in the total condensate, which is the optimal condition for high-Tc superconductivity. The ratio between the gap and the Fermi energy in a given band results in the best detection parameter for experiments to locate the system in the BCS–BEC crossover. Using available experimental data, our analysis shows that iron-based superconductors have the partial condensate of the small Fermi surface in the crossover regime of the BCS–BEC crossover, supporting the recent ARPES findings. (paper)

  17. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  18. Processes of luminescence sensibility and quenching of iron and lanthanide ions in silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processes of sensibilization and quenching of luminescence of iron and lanthanide ions in silicate glasses were investigated. It is shown that luminescence of examined iron-containing glasses is composed of a series of wide bands, conditioned by interconfigurational transition of Fe(2) ions, electron recombination with photoionized Fe(2)+ ions, as well as by decomposition of excited Fe(3) states. All three types of luminescence centers of iron-containing glasses participate in sensibilization of Nd(3), Er(3), Yb(3) luminescence

  19. Concurrent repletion of iron and zinc reduces intestinal oxidative damage in iron-and zinc-deficient rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To understand the interactions between iron and zinc during absorption in iron- and zinc-deficient rats,and their consequences on intestinal oxidant-antioxidant balance.METHODS: Twenty-four weanling Wistar-Kyoto rats fed an iron- and zinc-deficient diet (< 6.5 mg Fe and 4.0 mg Zn/kg diet) for 4 wk were randomly divided into three groups (n = 8, each) and orally gavaged with 4 mg iron, 3.3 mg zinc, or 4 mg iron + 3.3 mg zinc for 2wk. At the last day of repletion, 3 h before the animals were sacrificed, they received either 37 mBq of 55Fe or 65Zn, to study their localization in the intestine, using microautoradiography. Hemoglobin, iron and zinc content in plasma and liver were measured as indicators of iron and zinc status. Duodenal sections were used for immunochemical staining of ferritin and metallothionein.Duodenal homogenates (mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions), were used to assess aconitase activity,oxidative stress, functional integrity and the response of antioxidant enzymes.RESULTS: Concurrent repletion of iron- and zinc-deficient rats showed reduced localization of these minerals compared to rats that were teated with iron or zinc alone;these data provide evidence for antagonistic interactions.This resulted in reduced formation of lipid and protein oxidation products and better functional integrity of the intestinal mucosa. Further, combined repletion lowered iron-associated aconitase activity and ferritin expression,but significantly elevated metallothionein and glutathione levels in the intestinal mucosa. The mechanism of interactions during combined supplementation and its subsequent effects appeared to be due to through modulation of cytosolic aconitase, which in turn influenced the labile iron pool and metallothionein levels, and hence reduced intestinal oxidative damage.CONCLUSION: Concurrent administration of iron and zinc corrects iron and zinc deficiency, and also reduces the intestinal oxidative damage associated with iron

  20. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(I) Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, SG iron in short, refers to the cast iron in which graphite precipitates as spheroidal shape during solidification of liquid iron. The graphite in common commercial cast iron can only be changed from flake to spheroidal shape by spheroidising treatment. Since spheroidal graphite reduces the cutting effect of stress concentration, the metal matrix strength of SG iron can be applied around 70%-90%, thus the mechanical property of SG iron is significantly superior to other cast irons;even the tensile strength of SG iron is higher than that carbon steel.

  1. Taurine supplementation reduces oxidative stress and protects the liver in an iron-overload murine model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zeyu; Liu, Dan; Yi, Bo; LIAO, ZHANGPING; Tang, Lei; Yin, Dong; He, Ming

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that iron overload induces liver damage by causing the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Taurine is a potent free radical scavenger that attenuates the damage caused by excessive oxygen free radicals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether taurine could reduce the hepatotoxicity of iron overload with regard to ROS production. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with iron 5 days/week for 13 weeks to achieve iron overload. It was...

  2. Atherogenesis and iron: from epidemiology to cellular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ViktóriaJeney

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron accumulates in human atherosclerotic lesions but whether it is a cause or simply a downstream consequence of the atheroma formation has been an open question for decades. According to the so called “iron hypothesis”, iron is believed to be detrimental for the cardiovascular system, thus promoting atherosclerosis development and progression. Iron, in its catalytically active form, can participate in the generation of reactive oxygen species and induce lipid-peroxidation, triggering endothelial activation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and macrophage activation; all of these processes are considered to be proatherogenic. On the other hand, the observation that hemochromatotic patients, affected by life-long iron overload, do not show any increased incidence of atherosclerosis is perceived as the most convincing evidence against the “iron hypothesis”. Epidemiological studies and data from animal models provided conflicting evidences about the role of iron in atherogenesis. Therefore more careful studies are needed in which issues like the source and the compartmentalization of iron will be addressed. This review article summarizes what we have learnt about iron and atherosclerosis from epidemiological studies, animal models and cellular systems and highlights the rather contributory than innocent role of iron in atherogenesis.

  3. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(Ⅳ) 3.7 Segregation of SG iron The non-uniform distribution of solute elements during solidification results in the micro segregation of SG iron.As for the redistribution of elements in the phases of the solidification structure,there is no intrinsic difference between SG iron and grey iron[132].

  4. Iron regulation by hepcidin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ningning; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A

    2013-01-01

    Hepcidin is a key hormone that is involved in the control of iron homeostasis in the body. Physiologically, hepcidin is controlled by iron stores, inflammation, hypoxia, and erythropoiesis. The regulation of hepcidin expression by iron is a complex process that requires the coordination of multiple proteins, including hemojuvelin, bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), hereditary hemochromatosis protein, transferrin receptor 2, matriptase-2, neogenin, BMP receptors, and transferrin. Misregulati...

  5. Iron deficiency anemia Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, İnci

    2009-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most frequent and widespread anemia around the world Its prevalence is increased in infants and adolescent girls The etiologic factors may vary but anemia is essentially related to iron deficient nutrition blood loss and malabsorption Children may have paleness cardiovascular and neurologic impacts of anemia pica epithelial changes as koilonychia glossitis angular stomatitis Treatment is by oral or parenteral supplementation of iron Turk Arch Ped 2009; 44 Suppl: ...

  6. Hydrogen Storage in Iron/Carbon Nano powder Composite Materials: Effect of Varying Spiked Iron Content on Hydrogen Adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the effects of varying the spiked iron content of iron/carbon nano powder (Fe/CNP) composite materials on hydrogen storage capacity. Among four such samples, a maximum hydrogen uptake of approximately 0.48 wt % was obtained with 14 wt % of spiked iron under 37 atm and 300 K. This higher hydrogen uptake capacity was believed to be closely related to the physisorption mechanism rather than chemisorption. In this case, the formation of maghemite catalyzed the attraction of hydrogen molecules and the CNP skeleton was the principal absorbent material for hydrogen storage. However, as the iron content exceeded 14 wt %, the formation of larger and poorly dispersed maghemite grains reduced the available surface areas of CNP for the storage of hydrogen molecules, leading to decreased uptake. Our study shows that hydrogen uptake capacities can be improved by appropriately adjusting the surface polarities of the CNP with well dispersed iron oxides crystals.

  7. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅰ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  8. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 4: Vermicular Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  9. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅳ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  10. The formation of sunspot penumbra. I. Magnetic field properties

    CERN Document Server

    Rezaei, Reza; Schlichenmaier, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    We study the formation of a sunspot penumbra in the active region NOAA11024. We simultaneously observed the Stokes parameters of the photospheric iron lines at 1089.6 nm with the TIP and 617.3 nm with the GFPI spectropolarimeters along with broad-band images using G-band and CaIIK filters at the German VTT. The formation of the penumbra is intimately related to the inclined magnetic field. Within 4.5 h observing time, the magnetic flux of the penumbra increases from 9.7E+20 to 18.2E+20 Mx, while the magnetic flux of the umbra remains constant at about 3.8E+20 Mx. Magnetic flux in the immediate surroundings is incorporated into the spot, and new flux is supplied via small flux patches (SFPs), which on average have a flux of 2-3E+18 Mx. The spot's flux increase rate of 4.2E+16 Mx/s corresponds to the merging of one SFP per minute. We also find that during the formation of the spot penumbra: a) the maximum magnetic field strength of the umbra does not change, b) the magnetic neutral line keeps the same position ...

  11. Iron overload and immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gra(c)a Porto; Maria De Sousa

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the characterization of genes involved in the control of iron homeostasis in humans and in mice has improved the definition of iron overload and of the cells affected by it. The cell involved in iron overload with the greatest effect on immunity is the macrophage.Intriguing evidence has emerged, however, in the last 12 years indicating that parenchymal iron overload is linked to genes classically associated with the immune system. This review offers an update of the genes and proteins relevant to iron metabolism expressed in cells of the innate immune system, and addresses the question of how this system is affected in clinical situations of iron overload. The relationship between iron and the major cells of adaptive immunity, the T lymphocytes,will also be reviewed. Most studies addressing this last question in humans were performed in the clinical model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis. Data will also be reviewed demonstrating how the disruption of molecules essentially involved in adaptive immune responses result in the spontaneous development of iron overload and how they act as modifiers of iron overload.

  12. Recalling the Iron Girls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The phrase "iron girl" is symbolic of an era. Widely used in the 1960s and the early 1970s, it was a term that described women who, in the spirit of sexual equality, found in themselves a physical strength that surpassed their psychologi cal expectations. With their might and power, they proved to society that women could do everything that men could. The title of "iron girl" was their pride.The well-known writer Fan Xiaoqing, was one such iron girl. She says the "iron girls" were nothing less than a quest for perfection.

  13. Iron metabolism and iron supplementation in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Heinz; Evstatiev, Rayko; Kornek, Gabriela; Aapro, Matti; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Fridrik, Michael; Geissler, Dietmar; Geissler, Klaus; Gisslinger, Heinz; Koller, Elisabeth; Kopetzky, Gerhard; Lang, Alois; Rumpold, Holger; Steurer, Michael; Kamali, Houman; Link, Hartmut

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency-associated anemia are common complications in cancer patients. Most iron deficient cancer patients present with functional iron deficiency (FID), a status with adequate storage iron, but insufficient iron supply for erythroblasts and other iron dependent tissues. FID is the consequence of the cancer-associated cytokine release, while in absolute iron deficiency iron stores are depleted resulting in similar but often more severe symptoms of insufficient iron supply. Here we present a short review on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, clinical symptoms, and treatment of iron deficiency in cancer patients. Special emphasis is given to intravenous iron supplementation and on the benefits and limitations of different formulations. Based on these considerations and recommendations from current international guidelines we developed recommendations for clinical practice and classified the level of evidence and grade of recommendation according to the principles of evidence-based medicine. PMID:26373748

  14. Formation of protective oxide film on the surface of carbon steel in the presence of trilonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron trilonate effect on formation of protective oxide film on the surface of pearlitic steel is studied. It is shown that iron trilonate accumulation in the solution is not obligatory for formation of protective oxide film, it is formed not only of iron trilonate but under conditions following trilonate decomposition. Basing on the carried out investigations and literary data it is possible to suppose on similarity of the mechanisms of protective oxide film formation in iron trilonate and hydrazine solutions

  15. Preliminary Iron Distribution on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of iron on the surface of the asteroid Vesta was investigated using Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) [1,2]. Iron varies predictably with rock type for the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites, thought to be representative of Vesta. The abundance of Fe in howardites ranges from about 12 to 15 wt.%. Basaltic eucrites have the highest abundance, whereas, lower crustal and upper mantle materials (cumulate eucrites and diogenites) have the lowest, and howardites are intermediate [3]. We have completed a mapping study of 7.6 MeV gamma rays produced by neutron capture by Fe as measured by the bismuth germanate (BGO) detector of GRaND [1]. The procedures to determine Fe counting rates are presented in detail here, along with a preliminary distribution map, constituting the necessary initial step to quantification of Fe abundances. We find that the global distribution of Fe counting rates is generally consistent with independent mineralogical and compositional inferences obtained by other instruments on Dawn such as measurements of pyroxene absorption bands by the Visual and Infrared Spectrometer (VIR) [4] and Framing Camera (FC) [5] and neutron absorption measurements by GRaND [6].

  16. Banded transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  17. Ultra wide band antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Begaud, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Ultra Wide Band Technology (UWB) has reached a level of maturity that allows us to offer wireless links with either high or low data rates. These wireless links are frequently associated with a location capability for which ultimate accuracy varies with the inverse of the frequency bandwidth. Using time or frequency domain waveforms, they are currently the subject of international standards facilitating their commercial implementation. Drawing up a complete state of the art, Ultra Wide Band Antennas is aimed at students, engineers and researchers and presents a summary of internationally recog

  18. Exploring Microbial Iron Oxidation in Wetland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Muyzer, G.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; den Oudsten, F.; Laanbroek, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    sequences all represented novel culturable iron oxidizers most closely related to Gallionella spp. Based on their nucleotide sequences four groups could be identified, which were comparable to the DGGE banding pattern obtained before with the gradient tubes enrichments. The above mentioned nested PCR-DGGE method was used to study the distribution and community composition of Gallionella-like iron-oxidizing bacteria under the influence of plants species, soil depth, as well as season. Soil samples from Appels, Belgium, an intertidal, freshwater marsh known to hold intensive iron cycling, were taken from 5 different vegetation types in April, July and October 2007. Soil cores were sliced at 1-cm intervals and subjected to chemical and molecular analyses. The DGGE patterns showed that the community of iron-oxidizing bacteria differed with vegetation type, and sediment depth. Samples taken in autumn held lower diversity in Gallionella-related iron oxidizers than those sampled in spring and summer.

  19. Molecular control of vertebrate iron homeostasis by iron regulatory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wallander, Michelle L.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    Both deficiencies and excesses of iron represent major public health problems throughout the world. Understanding the cellular and organismal processes controlling iron homeostasis is critical for identifying iron-related diseases and in advancing the clinical treatments for such disorders of iron metabolism. Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 are key regulators of vertebrate iron metabolism. These RNA binding proteins post-transcriptionally control the stability or translation of mRNAs ...

  20. Magnetic separation of algae genetically modified for increased intracellular iron uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Amy; Moore, Lee R.; Lane, Christopher D.; Kumar, Anil; Stroff, Clayton; White, Nicolas; Xue, Wei; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2015-04-01

    Algae were investigated in the past as a potential source of biofuel and other useful chemical derivatives. Magnetic separation of algae by iron oxide nanoparticle binding to cells has been proposed by others for dewatering of cellular mass prior to lipid extraction. We have investigated feasibility of magnetic separation based on the presence of natural iron stores in the cell, such as the ferritin in Auxenochlorella protothecoides (A. protothecoides) strains. The A. protothecoides cell constructs were tested for inserted genes and for increased intracellular iron concentration by inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption (ICP-AA). They were grown in Sueoka's modified high salt media with added vitamin B1 and increasing concentration of soluble iron compound (FeCl3 EDTA, from 1× to 8× compared to baseline). The cell magnetic separation conditions were tested using a thin rectangular flow channel pressed against interpolar gaps of a permanent magnet forming a separation system of a well-defined fluid flow and magnetic fringing field geometry (up to 2.2 T and 1000 T/m) dubbed "magnetic deposition microscopy", or MDM. The presence of magnetic cells in suspension was detected by formation of characteristic deposition bands at the edges of the magnet interpolar gaps, amenable to optical scanning and microscopic examination. The results demonstrated increasing cellular Fe uptake with increasing Fe concentration in the culture media in wild type strain and in selected genetically-modified constructs, leading to magnetic separation without magnetic particle binding. The throughput in this study is not sufficient for an economical scale harvest.