WorldWideScience

Sample records for band quasi-simultaneous observations

  1. Radio Band Observations of Blazar Variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The properties of blazar variability in the radio band are studied using the unique combination of temporal resolution from single dish monitoring and spatial resolution from VLBA imaging. Such measurements now available in all four Stokes parameters, together with theoretical simulations, identify the ...

  2. Generating Inviscid and Viscous Fluid Flow Simulations over a Surface Using a Quasi-simultaneous Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdza, Peter (Inventor); Martins-Rivas, Herve (Inventor); Suzuki, Yoshifumi (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated surface is generated using a quasi-simultaneous technique. The simulation includes a fluid-flow mesh of inviscid and boundary-layer fluid cells. An initial fluid property for an inviscid fluid cell is determined using an inviscid fluid simulation that does not simulate fluid viscous effects. An initial boundary-layer fluid property a boundary-layer fluid cell is determined using the initial fluid property and a viscous fluid simulation that simulates fluid viscous effects. An updated boundary-layer fluid property is determined for the boundary-layer fluid cell using the initial fluid property, initial boundary-layer fluid property, and an interaction law. The interaction law approximates the inviscid fluid simulation using a matrix of aerodynamic influence coefficients computed using a two-dimensional surface panel technique and a fluid-property vector. An updated fluid property is determined for the inviscid fluid cell using the updated boundary-layer fluid property.

  3. Quasi-simultaneous multimodal imaging of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wenqi; Gan, Qi; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous and quantitative assessment of multiple tissue parameters may facilitate more effective diagnosis and therapy in many clinical applications, such as wound healing. However, existing wound assessment methods are typically subjective and qualitative, with the need for sequential data acquisition and coregistration between modalities, and lack of reliable standards for performance evaluation or calibration. To overcome these limitations, we developed a multimodal imaging system for quasi-simultaneous assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion in a quantitative and noninvasive fashion. The system integrated multispectral and laser speckle imaging technologies into one experimental setup. Tissue oxygenation and perfusion were reconstructed by advanced algorithms. The accuracy and reliability of the imaging system were quantitatively validated in calibration experiments and a tissue-simulating phantom test. The experimental results were compared with a commercial oxygenation and perfusion monitor. Dynamic detection of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion was also demonstrated in vivo by a postocclusion reactive hyperemia procedure in a human subject and a wound healing process in a wounded mouse model. Our in vivo experiments not only validated the performance of the multimodal imaging system for cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion imaging but also demonstrated its technical potential for wound healing assessment in clinical practice.

  4. Effects of band-limited noise on human observer performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salem, S.; Jacobs, E.; Moore, R.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Bijl, P.

    2008-01-01

    Perception tests establish the effects of spatially band-limited noise and blur on human observer performance. Previously, Bijl showed that the contrast threshold of a target image with spatially band-limited noise is a function of noise spatial frequency. He used the method of adjustment to find

  5. Whistler Triggered Upper Band Chorus Observed in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; Golkowski, M.

    2017-12-01

    VLF radiation from lightning discharges is one of several sources of energy injection into the inner magnetosphere from the Earth. Lightning discharges initially produce a broadband impulse or `sferic' but after propagation in the dispersive magnetosphere this waveform soon becomes quasi narrow band with the characteristic spectrographic form of the whistler. Most of the lightning induced VLF wave energy injected into the magnetosphere will be unducted with a k-vector which becomes increasingly oblique. Although unducted radiation is ubiquitous throughout the inner magnetosphere, it is generally of a low amplitude due to Landau damping and is not expected to produce strong nonlinear phenomena such as triggered emissions and chorus waves. However, VLF wave energy ducted or trapped in field-aligned plasma density enhancements can have relatively large amplitudes due to focusing and also linear cyclotron resonance growth. Therefore high amplitude ducted whistler waves can trigger a number of complex nonlinear phenomena. These include the triggering of VLF emissions and triggering of VLF hiss or chorus. Such phenomena are generally considered to result from nonlinear electron cyclotron phase trapping. Observation of such VLF emissions triggered by natural whistlers have been reported since the 1970s in Antarctica. We present observations of whistlers triggered upper band chorus emission from Alaska. Dispersion analyze of whistlers determine the L-shell range to be 4.5 clear frequency band gap between upper and lower band of the observed chorus emissions. The observations point to ducted chorus generation in the vicinity of the plasmapause boundary.

  6. Observation of symmetry-protected topological band with ultracold fermions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Zhang, Long; He, Chengdong; Poon, Ting Fung Jeffrey; Hajiyev, Elnur; Zhang, Shanchao; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2018-02-01

    Symmetry plays a fundamental role in understanding complex quantum matter, particularly in classifying topological quantum phases, which have attracted great interests in the recent decade. An outstanding example is the time-reversal invariant topological insulator, a symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phase in the symplectic class of the Altland-Zirnbauer classification. We report the observation for ultracold atoms of a noninteracting SPT band in a one-dimensional optical lattice and study quench dynamics between topologically distinct regimes. The observed SPT band can be protected by a magnetic group and a nonlocal chiral symmetry, with the band topology being measured via Bloch states at symmetric momenta. The topology also resides in far-from-equilibrium spin dynamics, which are predicted and observed in experiment to exhibit qualitatively distinct behaviors in quenching to trivial and nontrivial regimes, revealing two fundamental types of spin-relaxation dynamics related to bulk topology. This work opens the way to expanding the scope of SPT physics with ultracold atoms and studying nonequilibrium quantum dynamics in these exotic systems.

  7. Multiflash whistlers in ELF-band observed at low latitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiflash whistler-like event in the ELF-band, observed during March 1998 at low latitude station Jammu, is reported. The most prominent feature of these events is the multiflash nature along with the decrease in frequency within a very short span of time resembling similar to terrestrial whistlers. The events have a significantly smaller time duration (0.5–3.5 s than those reported earlier from high, mid and low latitudes and also display a diurnal maximum occurring around 09:30 h (IST. There have been similar reportings from other latitudes, but whistlers in the ELF-band with a multiflash nature along with a precursor emission have never been reported. Lightning seems to be the dominant source for the ELF whistlers reported here.

  8. Radio Band Observations of Blazar Variability Margo F. Aller , Hugh ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this review we discuss the properties of centimeter-to-millimeter band variability in Stokes I (total flux density), and compare the derived values to those deter- mined in the Fermi γ-ray band. We summarize evidence for the shock-in-jet model invoked for explaining the optical-to-radio-band variations, and present new mod ...

  9. Observation of band gaps in the gigahertz range and deaf bands in a hypersonic aluminum nitride phononic crystal slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorisse, M.; Benchabane, S.; Teissier, G.; Billard, C.; Reinhardt, A.; Laude, V.; Defaÿ, E.; Aïd, M.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the observation of elastic waves propagating in a two-dimensional phononic crystal composed of air holes drilled in an aluminum nitride membrane. The theoretical band structure indicates the existence of an acoustic band gap centered around 800 MHz with a relative bandwidth of 6.5% that is confirmed by gigahertz optical images of the surface displacement. Further electrical measurements and computation of the transmission reveal a much wider attenuation band that is explained by the deaf character of certain bands resulting from the orthogonality of their polarization with that of the source.

  10. Online process monitoring at quasi-simultaneous laser transmission welding using a 3D-scanner with integrated pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmailzl, A.; Steger, S.; Dostalek, M.; Hierl, S.

    2016-03-01

    Quasi-simultaneous laser transmission welding is a well-known joining technique for thermoplastics and mainly used in the automotive as well as in the medical industry. For process control usually the so called set-path monitoring is used, where the weld is specified as "good" if the irradiation time is inside a defined confidence interval. However, the detection of small-sized gaps or thermal damaged zones is not possible with this technique. The analyzation of the weld seam temperature during welding offers the possibility to overcome this problem. In this approach a 3D-scanner is used instead of a scanner with flat-field optic. By using a pyrometer in combination with a 3D-scanner no color-corrected optic is needed in order to provide that laser- and detection-spot are concentric. Experimental studies on polyethylene T-joints have shown that the quality of the signal is adequate, despite the use of an optical setup with a long working distance and a small optical aperture. The effects on temperature are studied for defects like a gap in the joining zone. Therefore a notch was milled into the absorbent polymer. In case of producing housings for electronic parts the effect of an electrical wire between the joining partners is also investigated. Both defects can be identified by a local temperature deviation even at a feed rate of four meters per second. Furthermore a strategy for signal-processing is demonstrated. By this, remaining defects can be identified. Consequently an online detection of local defects is possible, which makes a dynamic process control feasible.

  11. Spectral band discrimination for species observed from hyperspectral remote sensing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudeni, N

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In vegetation spectroscopy, compositional information of leaves contained at band level or across the electromagnetic spectrum (EMS) and parts thereof, plays a huge rule in the analysis of spectra and their relations to the reflectance patterns...

  12. Observation of high-spin oblate band structures in Pm141

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, L.; Zhu, S. J.; Wang, J. G.; Yeoh, E. Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Zhang, S. Q.; Meng, J.; Zhang, M.; Liu, Y.; Ding, H. B.; Xu, Q.; Zhu, L. H.; Wu, X. G.; He, C. Y.; Li, G. S.; Wang, L. L.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, B.

    2011-06-01

    The high-spin states of Pm141 have been investigated through the reaction Te126(F19,4n) at a beam energy of 90 MeV. A previous level scheme has been updated with spins up to 49/2ℏ. Six collective bands at high spins are newly observed. Based on the systematic comparison, one band is proposed as a decoupled band; two bands with strong ΔI=1 M1 transitions inside the bands are suggested as the oblate bands with γ ~-60°; three other bands with large signature splitting have been proposed with the oblate-triaxial deformation with γ~ -90°. The triaxial n-particle-n-hole particle rotor model calculations for one of the oblate bands in Pm141 are in good agreement with the experimental data. The other characteristics for these bands have been discussed.

  13. Observation of rotational bands in neutron-rich sup 1 sup 0 sup 6 Mo nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Xu Rui Qing; Li Ke; Yang Li Ming; Zhu Ling Yan; Gan Cui Yun; Zhang Zheng; Jiang Zhuo; Xiao Shu Dong; Hamilton, J H; Ramayya, A V; Hwang, J K; Zhang, X Q; Kormicki, J; Jones, E F; Ma, W C; Cole, J D; Aryaeinejad, R; Drigert, M W; Lee, I Y; Rasmussen, J O; Stoyer, M A; Ter-Akopian, G M; Daniel, A V

    2002-01-01

    The rotational bands up to a spin of 16 Planck constant in the neutron-rich sup 1 sup 0 sup 6 Mo nucleus have been investigated by measuring high-fold prompt gamma-ray coincidence events following spontaneous fission of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf with a Gamma-sphere detector array. The ground-state band, the one-phonon and two-phonon gamma-vibrational bands, as well as a quasi-particle band have been confirmed and expanded. The other four collective rotational bands, three proposed as two quasi-particle bands and one proposed as a beta-vibrational band, have been newly observed. The characteristics of these collective bands and the possible configurations for the quasi-particle bands are discussed

  14. Using Lunar Observations to Assess Terra MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chen, Hongda

    2010-01-01

    MODIS collects data in both the reflected solar and thermal emissive regions using 36 spectral bands. The center wavelengths of these bands cover the3.7 to 14.24 micron region. In addition to using its on-board calibrators (OBC), which include a full aperture solar diffuser (SD) and a blackbody (BB), lunar observations have been scheduled on a regular basis to support both Terra and Aqua MODIS on-orbit calibration and characterization. This paper provides an overview of MODIS lunar observations and their applications for the reflective solar bands (RSB) and thermal emissive bands (TEB) with an emphasis on potential calibration improvements of MODIS band 21 at 3.96 microns. This spectral band has detectors set with low gains to enable fire detection. Methodologies are proposed and examined on the use of lunar observations for the band 21 calibration. Also presented in this paper are preliminary results derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations and remaining challenging issues.

  15. Observations of the initial stages of colloidal band formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanrong; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Yee, Andrew; Yoda, Minami

    2017-11-01

    A number of studies have shown that particles suspended in a conducting fluid near a wall are subject to wall-normal repulsive ``lift'' forces, even in the absence of interparticle interactions, in a flowing suspension. Evanescent-wave visualizations have shown that colloidal particles in a dilute (volume fractions channels by a pressure gradient and an electric field when the resulting combined Poiseuille and electroosmotic (EO) flow are in opposite direction, i.e., ``counterflow,'' although the particles and channel walls both have negative zeta-potentials. Above a minimum ``threshold'' electric field magnitude |Emin | , the particles assemble into dense ``bands'' with cross-sectional dimensions of a few μm and length comparable to that of the channel (i.e., a few cm). The results suggest that the threshold field |Emin | is large enough so that there is a region of ``reverse'' flow, along the direction of the EO flow, near the wall. Visualization of a large segment of the channel (>300 hydraulic diameters) at frame rates as great as 1 kHz is used to determine banding maps for a variety of dilute colloidal suspensions and to investigate the initial stages of band formation over a wide range of flow conditions. Supported by US Army Research Office.

  16. First direct observation of a nearly ideal graphene band structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprinkle, M.; Siegel, D.; Hu, Y.; Hicks, J.; Tejeda, A.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Le Fèvre, P.; Bertran, F.; Vizzini, S.; Enriquez, H.; Chiang, S.; Soukiassian, P.; Berger, C.; de Heer, W.A.; Lanzara, A.; Conrad, E.H.; (CNRS-UMR); (UCB); (CEAS); (SOLEIL); (GIT)

    2009-12-10

    Angle-resolved photoemission and x-ray diffraction experiments show that multilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the SiC(000{bar 1}) surface is a new form of carbon that is composed of effectively isolated graphene sheets. The unique rotational stacking of these films causes adjacent graphene layers to electronically decouple leading to a set of nearly independent linearly dispersing bands (Dirac cones) at the graphene K point. Each cone corresponds to an individual macroscale graphene sheet in a multilayer stack where AB-stacked sheets can be considered as low density faults.

  17. First direct observation of a nearly ideal graphene band structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, M; Siegel, D; Hu, Y; Hicks, J; Tejeda, A; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A; Le Fèvre, P; Bertran, F; Vizzini, S; Enriquez, H; Chiang, S; Soukiassian, P; Berger, C; de Heer, W A; Lanzara, A; Conrad, E H

    2009-11-27

    Angle-resolved photoemission and x-ray diffraction experiments show that multilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the SiC(0001) surface is a new form of carbon that is composed of effectively isolated graphene sheets. The unique rotational stacking of these films causes adjacent graphene layers to electronically decouple leading to a set of nearly independent linearly dispersing bands (Dirac cones) at the graphene K point. Each cone corresponds to an individual macroscale graphene sheet in a multilayer stack where AB-stacked sheets can be considered as low density faults.

  18. SKS splitting observed at Romanian broad-band seismic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, Marian; Popa, Mihaela; Ghica, Daniela

    2008-12-01

    Shear-wave splitting results are presented for the broad-band stations of the Romanian seismic network. For stations BUC1 and CRAR (located in Moesian Platform), IAS (in East-European Platform), TIRR and CVD (in Central Dobrudja-Black Sea microplate), TIM and DRGR (in Dacia-Tisza plate, including Apuseni Mts.), BURAR, BZS and GZR (in, or very close to the Carpathian Arc), the fast directions ( φ) are around 135°. The mean delay values ( δt) of the slow wave are slightly greater for the stations placed in platform areas ( δt ~ 1.5 s) than for the stations situated in the (proximity) of Carpathians ( δt ~ 1.2 s). For the MLR station located in the South-Western part of Vrancea area, at the Carpathian Bend, the fast direction is 48°, similar to VOIR station (located in Southern Carpathians, 70 km West of MLR). At VRI and PLOR, located in the North-Eastern part of Vrancea, the fast axis is oriented approximately on North-South direction, with a possible dependence of the splitting parameters with back azimuth. At least for some stations, the splitting results are not consistent with vertical coherent lithospheric anisotropy.

  19. Proposed colour banded early warning observation charts for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health care worker inability to recognise critically sick patients based on standard vital observations or to act upon abnormal observations is a South African phenomenon and at present poorly understood. Practices elsewhere in the world have shown that although health professionals are poor to comply with risk scoring ...

  20. Radio Band Observations of Blazar Variability Margo F. Aller , Hugh ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gle dish monitoring and spatial resolution from VLBA imaging. Such measurements now available in all four ... linear-to-circular mode conversion in a region that is at least partially self- absorbed. Detailed analysis of ... Single dish monitoring observations from Metsähovi, Michigan (hereafter. UMRAO), and recently from the ...

  1. Multi-band Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... This talk focuses on the various aspects we learnt from multiband observations of GRBs both, before and during the afterglow era. A statistical analysis to estimate the probable redshifts of host galaxies using the luminosity function of GRBs compatible with both the afterglow redshift data as well as the ...

  2. Novel Ka-band High Gain Antenna Design for Comm Systems for future Earth Observing Missions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel high gain antenna (HGA) for Ka-band RF communications is proposed in this IRAD. Such a concept is in the best interest for future Earth Observing (EO)...

  3. Observations of 40-70 micron bands of ice in IRAS 09371 + 1212 and other stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omont, A.; Forveille, T.; Moseley, S. H.; Glaccum, W. J.; Harvey, P. M.; Likkel, L.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Lisse, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    IRAS 09371 + 1212 is still an absolutely unique object. This M giant star, with circumstellar CO and a spectacular bipolar nebula, displays unique IRAS FIR colors which had been attributed to strong emission in the 40-70-micron bands of ice, as subsequently supported by the observation of a strong 3.1-micron absorption band. The results of the KAO observations have confirmed its unusual nature: the far-infrared bands of ice are by far the strongest known. Its dust temperature, 50 K or less, is by far the lowest known for a late-type circumstellar envelope.

  4. Multi-Band Intra-Night Optical Variability of BL Lacertae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haritma Gaur

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We monitored BL Lacertae frequently during 2014–2016 when it was generally in a high state. We searched for intra-day variability for 43 nights using quasi-simultaneous measurements in the B, V, R, and I bands (totaling 143 light curves; the typical sampling interval was about eight minutes. On hour-like timescales, BL Lac exhibited significant variations during 13 nights in various optical bands. Significant spectral variations are seen during most of these nights such that the optical spectrum becomes bluer when brighter. The amplitude of variability is usually greater for longer observations but is lower when BL Lac is brighter. No evidence for periodicities or characteristic variability time-scales in the light curves was found. The color variations are mildly chromatic on long timescales.

  5. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at the limits: first observation of rotational bands in 255Lr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelhut, S; Greenlees, P T; Ackermann, D; Antalic, S; Clément, E; Darby, I G; Dorvaux, O; Drouart, A; Eeckhaudt, S; Gall, B J P; Görgen, A; Grahn, T; Gray-Jones, C; Hauschild, K; Herzberg, R-D; Hessberger, F P; Jakobsson, U; Jones, G D; Jones, P; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Khoo, T-L; Korten, W; Leino, M; Leppänen, A-P; Ljungvall, J; Moon, S; Nyman, M; Obertelli, A; Pakarinen, J; Parr, E; Papadakis, P; Peura, P; Piot, J; Pritchard, A; Rahkila, P; Rostron, D; Ruotsalainen, P; Sandzelius, M; Sarén, J; Scholey, C; Sorri, J; Steer, A; Sulignano, B; Theisen, Ch; Uusitalo, J; Venhart, M; Zielinska, M; Bender, M; Heenen, P-H

    2009-05-29

    The rotational band structure of 255Lr has been investigated using advanced in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopic techniques. To date, 255Lr is the heaviest nucleus to be studied in this manner. One rotational band has been unambiguously observed and strong evidence for a second rotational structure was found. The structures are tentatively assigned to be based on the 1/2-[521] and 7/2-[514] Nilsson states, consistent with assignments from recently obtained alpha decay data. The experimental rotational band dynamic moment of inertia is used to test self-consistent mean-field calculations using the Skyrme SLy4 interaction and a density-dependent pairing force.

  6. Models for the water-ice librational band in cool dust: possible observational test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, G.

    2014-01-01

    Of all the water-ice (H2O-ice) bands the librational band, occurring at a wavelength of about 12 μm, has proved to be the most difficult to detect observationally and also to reproduce in radiative transfer models. In fact, the case for the positive identification of the feature is strong in only a few astronomical objects. A previously suggested explanation for this is that so-called radiative transfer effects may mask the feature. In this paper, radiative transfer models are produced which unambiguously reveal the presence of the librational band as a separate resolved feature provided that there is no dust present which radiates significantly in the 10-μm region, specifically silicate-type dust. This means that the maximum dust temperature must be ≲50 K. In this case, the models indicate that the librational band may clearly be observed as an absorption feature against the stellar continuum. This suggests that the feature may be best observed by obtaining the 10-μm spectrum of stars either with very cool circumstellar dust shells, with Tmax ≲ 50 K, or those without circumstellar dust shells at all but with interstellar extinction. The first option might, however, require unrealistically large amounts of dust in the circumstellar shell in order to produce measurable absorption. Thus, the best place to look for the water-ice librational band may not be protostars with the remnants of their dust cloud still present, or evolved objects with ejected dust shells, as one might first think, because of the warm dust (Tmax ≫ 50 K) usually present in the shells of these objects. If objects associated with very cool dust exclusively do show the 3.1-μm water-ice band in deep absorption, but the librational band still does not appear, this may imply that it is not radiative transfer effects which suppress the librational band, and that some other mechanism for its suppression is in play. One possibility is that a low water-ice to silicate abundance may mask the

  7. Development and Observation of the Phase Array Radar at X band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushio, T.; Shimamura, S.; Wu, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Yoshida, S.; Kawasaki, Z.; Mizutani, F.; Wada, M.; Satoh, S.; Iguchi, T.

    2013-12-01

    A new Phased Array Radar (PAR) system for thunderstorm observation has been developed by Toshiba Corporation and Osaka University under a grant of NICT, and installed in Osaka University, Japan last year. It is now well known that rapidly evolving severe weather phenomena (e.g., microbursts, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes) are a threat to our lives particularly in a densely populated area and is closely related to the production of lightning discharges. Over the past decade, mechanically rotating radar systems at the C-band or S-band have been proved to be effective for weather surveillance especially in a wide area more than 100 km in range. However, severe thunderstorm sometimes develops rapidly on the temporal and spatial scales comparable to the resolution limit (-10 min. and -500m) of typical S-band or C-band radar systems, and cannot be fully resolved with these radar systems. In order to understand the fundamental process and dynamics of such fast changing weather phenomena like lightning and tornado producing thunderstorm, volumetric observations with both high temporal and spatial resolution are required. The phased array radar system developed has the unique capability of scanning the whole sky with 100m and 10 to 30 second resolution up to 60 km. The system adopts the digital beam forming technique for elevation scanning and mechanically rotates the array antenna in azimuth direction within 10 to 30 seconds. The radar transmits a broad beam of several degrees with 24 antenna elements and receives the back scattered signal with 128 elements digitizing at each elements. Then by digitally forming the beam in the signal processor, the fast scanning is realized. After the installation of the PAR system in Osaka University, the initial observation campaign was conducted in Osaka urban area with Ku-band Broad Band Radar (BBR) network, C-band weather radar, and lightning location system. The initial comparison with C band radar system shows that the developed

  8. Preliminary Results on VLT K-band Imaging Observations of GRB ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. We have obtained K-band imaging observations of Gamma-. Ray Burst (GRB) host galaxies with the near-infrared spectro-imager. ISAAC installed on the Very Large Telescope at Paranal (Chile). The derived K magnitudes, combined with other photometric data taken from the literature, are used to investigate the ...

  9. An Observational Study of Intermediate Band Students' Self-Regulated Practice Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksza, Peter; Prichard, Stephanie; Sorbo, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate intermediate musicians' self-regulated practice behaviors. Thirty sixth- through eighth-grade students were observed practicing band repertoire individually for 20 min. Practice sessions were coded according to practice frame frequency and duration, length of musical passage selected, most prominent…

  10. Preliminary Results on VLT K-band Imaging Observations of GRB ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Host Galaxies. E. Le Floc'h, I. F. Mirabel & P.-A. Duc Service d'Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay, France. Abstract. We have obtained K-band imaging observations of Gamma- .... to the very poor statistics currently available regarding GRB hosts. Moreover, one must keep in mind that the GRBs for which host galaxies have been ...

  11. Preliminary Results on VLT K-band Imaging Observations of GRB ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We have obtained -band imaging observations of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) host galaxies with the near-infrared spectro-imager ISAAC installed on the Very Large Telescope at Paranal (Chile). The derived magnitudes, combined with other photometric data taken from the literature, are used to ...

  12. The Low Band Observatory (LOBO): Expanding the VLA Low Frequency Commensal System for Continuous, Broad-band, sub-GHz Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Helmboldt, Joseph F.; Peters, Wendy M.; Brisken, Walter; Hyman, Scott D.; Polisensky, Emil; Hicks, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) are currently commissioning the VLA Low Frequency Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) on a subset of JVLA antennas at modest bandwidth. Its bounded scientific goals are to leverage thousands of JVLA on-sky hours per year for ionospheric and transient studies, and to demonstrate the practicality of a prime-focus commensal system on the JVLA. Here we explore the natural expansion of VLITE to a full-antenna, full-bandwidth Low Band Observatory (LOBO) that would follow naturally from a successful VLITE experience. The new Low Band JVLA receivers, coupled with the existing primary focus feeds, can access two frequency bands: 4 band (54 - 86 MHz) and P band (236-492 MHz). The 4 band feeds are newly designed and now undergoing testing. If they prove successful then they can be permanently mounted at the primary focus, unlike their narrow band predecessors. The combination of Low Band receivers and fixed, primary-focus feeds could provide continuous, broad-band data over two complimentary low-frequency bands. The system would also leverage the relatively large fields-of-view of ~10 degrees at 4 band, and ~2.5 degrees at P band, coupling an excellent survey capability with a natural advantage for serendipitous discoveries. We discuss the compelling science case that flows from LOBO's robust imaging and time domain capabilities coupled with thousands of hours of wide-field, JVLA observing time each year. We also touch on the possibility to incorporate Long Wavelength Array (LWA) stations as additional 'dishes' through the LOBO backend, to improve calibration and sensitivity in LOBO's 4 band.

  13. Experimental observation on asymmetric energy flux within the forbidden frequency band in the LC transmission line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Feng; Chen Weizhong; Pan Junting; Xu Wen; Du Sidan

    2012-01-01

    We study the energy flux in a nonlinear electrical transmission line consisting of two coupled segments which are identical in structure and different in parameters. The asymmetry of energy flux caused by nonlinear wave has been observed experimentally in the forbidden band of the line. The experiment shows whether the energy can flow through the transmission line depends on the amplitude of the boundary driving voltages, which can be well explained in the theoretical framework of nonlinear supratransmission. The numerical simulation based on Kirchhoff’s laws further verifies the existence of the asymmetric energy flux in the forbidden band.

  14. CONSTRAINING THE SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH USING SPLIT-BAND TYPE II RADIO BURST OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, P.; Ramesh, R.; Hariharan, K.; Kathiravan, C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, 2nd Block, Koramangala, Bangalore—560034 (India); Gopalswamy, N., E-mail: kishore@iiap.res.in [Code 671, Solar Physics Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    We report on low-frequency radio (85–35 MHz) spectral observations of four different type II radio bursts, which exhibited fundamental-harmonic emission and split-band structure. Each of the bursts was found to be closely associated with a whitelight coronal mass ejection (CME) close to the Sun. We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength from the split-band characteristics of the bursts, by assuming a model for the coronal electron density distribution. The choice of the model was constrained, based on the following criteria: (1) when the radio burst is observed simultaneously in the upper and lower bands of the fundamental component, the location of the plasma level corresponding to the frequency of the burst in the lower band should be consistent with the deprojected location of the leading edge (LE) of the associated CME; (2) the drift speed of the type II bursts derived from such a model should agree closely with the deprojected speed of the LE of the corresponding CMEs. With the above conditions, we find that: (1) the estimated field strengths are unique to each type II burst, and (2) the radial variation of the field strength in the different events indicate a pattern. It is steepest for the case where the heliocentric distance range over which the associated burst is observed is closest to the Sun, and vice versa.

  15. Direct observation of a surface resonance state and surface band inversion control in black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlen, N.; Sanna, A.; Senkovskiy, B. V.; Petaccia, L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Profeta, G.; Grüneis, A.

    2018-01-01

    We report a Cs-doping-induced band inversion and the direct observation of a surface resonance state with an elliptical Fermi surface in black phosphorus (BP) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. By selectively inducing a higher electron concentration (1.7 ×1014cm-2 ) in the topmost layer, the changes in the Coulomb potential are sufficiently large to cause surface band inversion between the parabolic valence band of BP and a parabolic surface state around the Γ point of the BP Brillouin zone. Tight-binding calculations reveal that band gap openings at the crossing points in the two high-symmetry directions of the Brillouin zone require out-of-plane hopping and breaking of the glide mirror symmetry. Ab initio calculations are in very good agreement with the experiment if a stacking fault on the BP surface is taken into account. The demonstrated level of control over the band structure suggests the potential application of few-layer phosphorene in topological field-effect transistors.

  16. Mini-RF S- and X-band Bistatic Observations of the Floor of Cabeus Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Gerald Wesley; Stickle, Angela; Turner, Franklin; Jensen, James; Cahill, Joshua; Mini-RF Team

    2017-10-01

    The Mini-RF instrument aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is a hybrid dual-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and operates in concert with the Arecibo Observatory (AO) and the Goldstone deep space communications complex 34 meter antenna DSS-13 to collect S- and X-band bistatic radar data of the Moon. Bistatic radar data provide a means to probe the near subsurface for the presence of water ice, which exhibits a strong response in the form of a Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect (CBOE). This effect has been observed in radar data for the icy surfaces of the Galilean satellites, the polar caps of Mars, polar craters on Mercury, and terrestrial ice sheets in Greenland. Previous work using Mini-RF S-band (12.6 cm) bistatic data suggests the presence of a CBOE associated with the floor of the lunar south polar crater Cabeus. The LRO spacecraft has begun its third extended mission. For this phase of operations Mini-RF is leveraging the existing AO architecture to make S-band radar observations of additional polar craters (e.g., Haworth, Shoemaker, Faustini). The purpose of acquiring these data is to determine whether other polar craters exhibit the response observed for Cabeus. Mini-RF has also initiated a new mode of operation that utilizes the X-band (4.2cm) capability of the instrument receiver and a recently commissioned X/C-band transmitter within the Deep Space Network’s (DSN) Goldstone complex to collect bistatic X-band data of the Moon. The purpose of acquiring these data is to constrain the depth/thickness of materials that exhibit a CBOE response - with an emphasis on observing the floor of Cabeus. Recent Mini-RF X-band observations of the floors of the craters Cabeus do not show evidence for a CBOE. This would suggest that the upper ~0.5 meters of the regolith for the floor of Cabeus do not harber water ice in a form detectable at 4.2 cm wavelengths.

  17. Typhoon 9707 observations with the MU radar and L-band boundary layer radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teshiba

    Full Text Available Typhoon 9707 (Opal was observed with the VHF-band Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, an L-band boundary layer radar (BLR, and a vertical-pointing C-band meteorological radar at the Shigaraki MU Observatory in Shiga prefecture, Japan on 20 June 1997. The typhoon center passed about 80 km southeast from the radar site. Mesoscale precipitating clouds developed due to warm-moist airmass transport from the typhoon, and passed over the MU radar site with easterly or southeasterly winds. We primarily present the wind behaviour including the vertical component which a conventional meteorological Doppler radar cannot directly observe, and discuss the relationship between the wind behaviour of the typhoon and the precipitating system. To investigate the dynamic structure of the typhoon, the observed wind was divided into radial and tangential wind components under the assumption that the typhoon had an axi-symmetric structure. Altitude range of outflow ascended from 1–3 km to 2–10 km with increasing distance (within 80–260 km range from the typhoon center, and in-flow was observed above and below the outflow. Outflow and inflow were associated with updraft and downdraft, respectively. In the tangential wind, the maximum speed of counterclockwise winds was confirmed at 1–2 km altitudes. Based on the vertical velocity and the reflectivity obtained with the MU radar and the C-band meteorological radar, respectively, precipitating clouds, accompanied by the wind behaviour of the typhoon, were classified into stratiform and convective precipitating clouds. In the stratiform precipitating clouds, a vertical shear of radial wind and the maximum speed of counterclockwise wind were observed. There was a strong reflectivity layer called a ‘bright band’ around the 4.2 km altitude. We confirmed strong updrafts and down-drafts below and above it, respectively, and the existence of a relatively dry layer around the bright band level from radiosonde

  18. Optical observations of the nearby galaxy IC342 with narrow band [SII] and Hα filters. I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučetić M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of a portion of the nearby spiral galaxy IC342 using narrow band [SII] and Hα filters. These observations were carried out in November 2011 with the 2m RCC telescope at Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory in Bulgaria. In this paper we report coordinates, diameters, Hα and [SII] fluxes for 203 HII regions detected in two fields of view in IC342 galaxy. The number of detected HII regions is 5 times higher than previously known in these two parts of the galaxy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176005: Emission nebulae: structure and evolution

  19. OH populations and temperatures from simultaneous spectroscopic observations of 25 bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Noll

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OH rotational temperatures are widely used to derive mesopause temperatures and their variations. Since most data sets are only based on a fixed set of lines of a single band, it is important to know possible systematic uncertainties related to the choice of lines. Therefore, a comprehensive study of as many OH bands as possible is desirable. For this purpose, astronomical echelle spectrographs at large telescopes are the most suitable instruments. They offer a wide wavelength coverage, relatively high spectral resolution, and high sensitivity. Moreover, since each ground-based astronomical observation has an imprint of the Earth's atmosphere, the data archives of large astronomical facilities are a treasure for atmospheric studies. For our project, we used archival data of the medium-resolution X-shooter echelle spectrograph operated by the European Southern Observatory at Cerro Paranal in Chile. The instrument can simultaneously observe all OH bands that are accessible from ground. We reduced and analysed a set of 343 high-quality spectra taken between 2009 and 2013 to measure OH line intensities and to derive rotational and vibrational temperatures of 25 bands between 0.58 and 2.24 μm. We studied the influence of the selected line set, OH band, upper vibrational level v′, and the molecular data on the derived level populations and temperatures. The rotational temperature results indicate differences by several degrees depending on the selection. The temperatures for bands of even and odd v′ show deviations which increase with v′. A study of the temporal variations revealed that the nocturnal variability pattern changes for v′ from 2 to 9. In particular, the spread of temperatures tends to increase during the night, and the time of the minimum temperature depends on v′. The vibrational temperatures depend on the range of v′ used for their determination, since the higher vibrational levels from 7 to 9 seem to be overpopulated

  20. Observation of dark-current signals from the S-band structures of the SLAC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, R.; Decker, F.J.; Seidel, M.; Siemann, R.H.; Whittum, D.

    1997-07-01

    It is well known that the electro-magnetic fields in high-gradient RF structures can cause electron emission from the metallic structure walls. If the emitted electrons are captured and accelerated by the accelerating fields so-called dark-current is induced. Dark-currents have been measured and studied for various RF-structures. In this paper the authors present measurements of RF induced signals for the SLC S-band structures. For nominal gradients of 17 MV/m it is shown that the dark-current can be strong enough to significantly reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the SLC beam wire scanners. They also show results from RF measurements in the dipole band. The measurements are compared to more direct observations of dark-current and it is tried to connect the results to possible effects on the accelerated particle beam

  1. REFIR/BB initial observations in the water vapour rotational band: Results from a field campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, F.; Grieco, G.; Leone, L.; Restieri, R.; Serio, C.; Bianchini, G.; Palchetti, L.; Pellegrini, M.; Cuomo, V.; Masiello, G.; Pavese, G.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the far infrared spectral region 17-50 μm as a remote sensing tool in atmospheric sciences, since this portion of the spectrum contains the characteristic molecular rotational band for water vapour. Much of the Earth energy lost to space is radiated through this spectral region. The Radiation Explorer in the Far InfraRed Breadboard (REFIR/BB) spectrometer was born because of the quest to make observations in the far infrared. REFIR/BB is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a sampling resolution of 0.5 cm -1 and it was tested for the first time in the field to check its reliability and radiometric performance. The field campaign was held at Toppo di Castelgrande (40 o 49' N, 15 o 27' E, 1258 m a. s. l.), a mountain site in South Italy. The spectral and radiometric performance of the instrument and initial observations are shown in this paper. Comparisons to both (1) BOMEM MR100 Fourier Transform spectrometer observations and (2) line-by-line radiative transfer calculations for selected clear sky are presented and discussed. These comparisons (1) show a very nice agreement between radiance measured by REFIR/BB and by BOMEM MR100 and (2) demonstrate that REFIR/BB accurately observes the very fine spectral structure in the water vapour rotational band

  2. Optical observations of M81 galaxy group in narrow band [SII] and Hα filters: Holmberg IX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbutina B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of the nearby tidal dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX in M81 galaxy group in narrow band [SII] and Hα filters, carried out in March and November 2008 with the 2m RCC telescope at NAO Rozhen, Bulgaria. Our search for resident supernova remnants (identified as sources with enhanced [SII] emission relative to their Hα emission in this galaxy yielded no sources of this kind, besides M&H 10-11 or HoIX X-1. Nevertheless, we found a number of objects with significant H® emission that probably represent uncatalogued HII regions.

  3. Evaluation of Detector-to-Detector and Mirror Side Differences for Terra MODIS Reflective Solar Bands Using Simultaneous MISR Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Angal, A.; Barnes, W.

    2011-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the five Earth-observing instruments on-board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth-Observing System(EOS) Terra spacecraft, launched in December 1999. It has 36 spectral bands with wavelengths ranging from 0.41 to 14.4 mm and collects data at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25 km for 2 bands with 40 detectors each, 0.5 km for 5 bands with 20 detectors each and 1 km for the remaining 29 bands with 10 detectors each. MODIS bands are located on four separate focal plane assemblies (FPAs) according to their spectral wavelengths and aligned in the cross-track direction. Detectors of each spectral band are aligned in the along-track direction. MODIS makes observations using a two-sided paddle-wheel scan mirror. Its on-board calibrators (OBCs) for the reflective solar bands (RSBs) include a solar diffuser (SD), a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) and a spectral-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). Calibration is performed for each band, detector, sub-sample (for sub-kilometer resolution bands) and mirror side. In this study, a ratio approach is applied to MODIS observed Earth scene reflectances to track the detector-to-detector and mirror side differences. Simultaneous observed reflectances from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), also onboard the Terra spacecraft, are used with MODIS observed reflectances in this ratio approach for four closely matched spectral bands. Results show that the detector-to-detector difference between two adjacent detectors within each spectral band is typically less than 0.2% and, depending on the wavelengths, the maximum difference among all detectors varies from 0.5% to 0.8%. The mirror side differences are found to be very small for all bands except for band 3 at 0.44 mm. This is the band with the shortest wavelength among the selected matching bands, showing a time-dependent increase for the mirror side difference. This

  4. IR thermographic observation and shear bands plasticity analysis in Fe-based metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzakher, B.; Benameur, T.; Sidhom, H.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared thermography observation and in situ atomic force microscopy characterization were carried out to investigate the mechanical damage processes at the edge-notch region of large ribbons of Fe 78 Si 10 B 12 metallic glass. An obvious thermoelastic and inelastic degradation phenomenon was observed ahead at the notched region of the specimens, which probably result from free volume accumulation process and shear band activity during plane stress solicitations. Moreover, AFM topographic and frictional analysis of changes in the crack path during stable crack propagation regime revealed a periodic morphology evolution, formation of nanoscale damage cavity in the range of 20-140 nm and a maximum temperature rise ahead of the pre-crack tip was found in the order of 1.5 deg. C. The nanometer scaled shear offset, discreteness and shear bands density were determined. While these key parameters play a role in observing a large plastic zone in front of the crack, however they are unable to explain the distinct intrinsic ductility of some monolithic metallic glasses. A general Mohr-Coulomb-type constitutive description was used to deduce analytic expressions for prediction of the variation of hydrostatic component of the applied stress to the shear stress ratio as function of Poisson's ratio.

  5. Band gap opening in strongly compressed diamond observed by x-ray energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamboa, E. J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; MacDonald, M. J.; Zastrau, U.; Gauthier, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    The extraordinary mechanical and optical properties of diamond are the basis of numerous technical applications and make diamond anvil cells a premier device to explore the high-pressure behavior of materials. However, at applied pressures above a few hundred GPa, optical probing through the anvils becomes difficult because of the pressure-induced changes of the transmission and the excitation of a strong optical emission. Such features have been interpreted as the onset of a closure of the optical gap in diamond, and can significantly impair spectroscopy of the material inside the cell. In contrast, a comparable widening has been predicted for purely hydrostatic compressions, forming a basis for the presumed pressure stiffening of diamond and resilience to the eventual phase change to BC8. We here present the first experimental evidence of this effect at geo-planetary pressures, exceeding the highest ever reported hydrostatic compression of diamond by more than 200 GPa and any other measurement of the band gap by more than 350 GPa. We here apply laser driven-ablation to create a dynamic, high pressure state in a thin, synthetic diamond foil together with frequency-resolved x-ray scattering as a probe. The frequency shift of the inelastically scattered x-rays encodes the optical properties and, thus, the behavior of the band gap in the sample. Using the ultra-bright x-ray beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we observe an increasing direct band gap in diamond up to a pressure of 370 GPa. This finding points to the enormous strains in the anvils and the impurities in natural Type Ia diamonds as the source of the observed closure of the optical window. Our results demonstrate that diamond remains an insulating solid to pressures approaching its limit strength.

  6. Band gap opening in strongly compressed diamond observed by x-ray energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, E. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lee, H. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); MacDonald, M. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zastrau, U. [High-Energy Density Science Group, Hamburg (Germany); Gauthier, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gericke, D. O. [Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom); Vorberger, J. [Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres, Dresden (Germany); Granados, E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, J. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-01-25

    The extraordinary mechanical and optical properties of diamond are the basis of numerous technical applications and make diamond anvil cells a premier device to explore the high-pressure behavior of materials. However, at applied pressures above a few hundred GPa, optical probing through the anvils becomes difficult because of the pressure-induced changes of the transmission and the excitation of a strong optical emission. Such features have been interpreted as the onset of a closure of the optical gap in diamond, and can significantly impair spectroscopy of the material inside the cell. In contrast, a comparable widening has been predicted for purely hydrostatic compressions, forming a basis for the presumed pressure stiffening of diamond and resilience to the eventual phase change to BC8. We here present the first experimental evidence of this effect at geo-planetary pressures, exceeding the highest ever reported hydrostatic compression of diamond by more than 200 GPa and any other measurement of the band gap by more than 350 GPa. We here apply laser driven-ablation to create a dynamic, high pressure state in a thin, synthetic diamond foil together with frequency-resolved x-ray scattering as a probe. The frequency shift of the inelastically scattered x-rays encodes the optical properties and, thus, the behavior of the band gap in the sample. Using the ultra-bright x-ray beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we observe an increasing direct band gap in diamond up to a pressure of 370 GPa. This finding points to the enormous strains in the anvils and the impurities in natural Type Ia diamonds as the source of the observed closure of the optical window. Our results demonstrate that diamond remains an insulating solid to pressures approaching its limit strength.

  7. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-01

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  8. Aquarius L-band scatterometer and radiometer observations over a Tibetan Plateau site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; van der Velde, Rogier; Su, Zhongbo; Wen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the impact of freeze-thaw, soil moisture and vegetation on L-band backscatter and emission is studied using Aquarius scatterometer/radiometer measurements collected from August 2011 to May 2013 over the northeastern part of the Tibetan Plateau. The study area is the Maqu region that holds a regional-scale monitoring network consisting of twenty soil moisture/temperature stations, which is selected as one of the core international Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) sites for NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission. Comparisons of Aquarius scatterometer/radiometer measurements with soil moisture recorded by capacitance probes installed at a 5-cm soil depth illustrate that (i) L-band microwave observations are also sensitive to the amount of liquid water in soil below freezing point, and (ii) the sensitivity of Aquarius observations over the Maqu area dissipates above soil moisture contents of 0.3 m3 m-3. Further effects of vegetation become directly noticeable only within passive microwave observations at moisture levels larger than 0.4 m3 m-3. The impact of vegetation is studied in more detail through analysis of the Radar Vegetation Index (RVI). Although seasonal variability is captured, the dynamic range of the RVI is insufficient for a meaningful signal-to-noise. Further vegetation optical depth (τ) is estimated using the τ-ω concept by reconstructing the Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) derived from Aquarius radiometer data. Peaks in the τ estimates are noted in the months January/February and July/August. Evidence suggests that the magnitude of τ is a measure for the frost depth when temperatures are below freezing point whereas the behavior of τ in the warm season is in line with the vegetation dynamics.

  9. Isotropic band gaps and freeform waveguides observed in hyperuniform disordered photonic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Williamson, Eric Paul; He, Yingquan; Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Leung, Brian Y C; Liner, Devin Robert; Torquato, Salvatore; Chaikin, Paul M; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2013-10-01

    Recently, disordered photonic media and random textured surfaces have attracted increasing attention as strong light diffusers with broadband and wide-angle properties. We report the experimental realization of an isotropic complete photonic band gap (PBG) in a 2D disordered dielectric structure. This structure is designed by a constrained optimization method, which combines advantages of both isotropy due to disorder and controlled scattering properties due to low-density fluctuations (hyperuniformity) and uniform local topology. Our experiments use a modular design composed of Al2O3 walls and cylinders arranged in a hyperuniform disordered network. We observe a complete PBG in the microwave region, in good agreement with theoretical simulations, and show that the intrinsic isotropy of this unique class of PBG materials enables remarkable design freedom, including the realization of waveguides with arbitrary bending angles impossible in photonic crystals. This experimental verification of a complete PBG and realization of functional defects in this unique class of materials demonstrate their potential as building blocks for precise manipulation of photons in planar optical microcircuits and has implications for disordered acoustic and electronic band gap materials.

  10. Mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics of omega bands determined from ground-based electromagnetic and satellite optical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We present ground-based electromagnetic data from the MIRACLE and BEAR networks and satellite optical observations from the UVI and PIXIE instruments on the Polar satellite of an omega band event over Northern Scandinavia on 26 June 1998, which occured close to the morning side edge of a substorm auroral bulge. Our analysis of the data concentrates on one omega band period from 03:18-03:27 UT, for which we use the method of characteristics combined with an analysis of the UVI and PIXIE data to derive a time series of instantaneous, solely data-based distributions of the mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamic parameters with a 1-min time resolution. In addition, the AMIE method is used to derive global Hall conductance patterns. Our results show that zonally alternating regions of enhanced ionospheric conductances ("tongues" up to ~60S and low conductance regions are associated with the omega bands. The tongues have a poleward extension of ~400km from their base and a zonal extension of ~380km. While they are moving coherently eastward with a velocity of ~770ms-1, the structures are not strictly stationary. The current system of the omega band can be described as a superposition of two parts: one consists of anticlockwise rotating Hall currents around the tongues, along with Pedersen currents, with a negative divergence in their centers. The sign of this system is reversing in the low conductance areas. It causes the characteristic ground magnetic signature. The second part consists of zonally aligned current wedges of westward flowing Hall currents and is mostly magnetically invisible below the ionosphere. This system dominates the field-aligned current (FAC pattern and causes alternating upward and downward FAC at the flanks of the tongues with maximum upward FAC of ~25µA m-2. The total FAC of ~2MA are comparable to the ones diverted inside a westward traveling surge. Throughout the event, the overwhelming part of the FAC are associated with

  11. Mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics of omega bands determined from ground-based electromagnetic and satellite optical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We present ground-based electromagnetic data from the MIRACLE and BEAR networks and satellite optical observations from the UVI and PIXIE instruments on the Polar satellite of an omega band event over Northern Scandinavia on 26 June 1998, which occured close to the morning side edge of a substorm auroral bulge. Our analysis of the data concentrates on one omega band period from 03:18-03:27 UT, for which we use the method of characteristics combined with an analysis of the UVI and PIXIE data to derive a time series of instantaneous, solely data-based distributions of the mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamic parameters with a 1-min time resolution. In addition, the AMIE method is used to derive global Hall conductance patterns. Our results show that zonally alternating regions of enhanced ionospheric conductances ("tongues" up to ~60S and low conductance regions are associated with the omega bands. The tongues have a poleward extension of ~400km from their base and a zonal extension of ~380km. While they are moving coherently eastward with a velocity of ~770ms-1, the structures are not strictly stationary. The current system of the omega band can be described as a superposition of two parts: one consists of anticlockwise rotating Hall currents around the tongues, along with Pedersen currents, with a negative divergence in their centers. The sign of this system is reversing in the low conductance areas. It causes the characteristic ground magnetic signature. The second part consists of zonally aligned current wedges of westward flowing Hall currents and is mostly magnetically invisible below the ionosphere. This system dominates the field-aligned current (FAC pattern and causes alternating upward and downward FAC at the flanks of the tongues with maximum upward FAC of ~25µA m-2. The total FAC of ~2MA are comparable to the ones diverted inside a westward traveling surge. Throughout the event, the overwhelming part of the FAC

  12. Ionospheric artifacts in simultaneous L-band InSAR and GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, H. A.; Chen, J.; Chen, A. C.

    2009-12-01

    Current (ALOS) and planned (ALOS II, NASA DESDynI) InSAR satellite systems operate at 24-cm wavelength (L-band) to increase temporal and spatial correlation. These phase data are 16 times more sensitive to ionospheric path delays than those acquired by existing C-band (6 cm wavelength) systems. We analyze here ionosphere-induced phase artifacts that translate into apparent surface deformations and corrupt data interpretation. We examine dual frequency GPS data acquired at the same time as the radar interferograms and solve for the dispersive ionospheric phase directly from the carrier phases, which we then relate to artifacts in the interferograms. Since the carrier phase measurements are cycle-ambiguous, we solve for the ambiguity by fitting the carrier phase to the predicted path length as a function of time, which depends on elevation angle and oblique path through the ionosphere. The unambiguous phase histories acquired on both days of the interferogram show a difference signature that gives the statistics of the ionospheric delay. Typical midlatitude results range from 1-way propagation delay differences of several mm to a cm or two, usually much less than one “fringe.” For some acquisitions, especially at high latitudes, the gradient of ionospheric path delay leads to a significant along-track shift of output pixels in an image. This leads to decorrelation artifacts in the interferograms, even though the total delay is still quite small. Gradients of 10 cm over the 20 km SAR aperture length shift the pixel locations by a full resolution element and lead to complete decorrelation. However, this shift is easily measured during the interferogram formation and we show that it is readily corrected in the data products. The shift would be observed in split frequency or other wideband radar implementations and could be corrected a priori, but spectrum limitations imply that the correction would be only approximate. The ionospheric signature is also observable in

  13. Field observations of mating behavior in the neck-banded snake Scaphiodontophis annulatus (Serpentes: Colubridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Sasa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We observed the mating behavior of the neck-banded snake Scaphiodontophis annulatus (a common species of colubrid in the South Pacific of Costa Rica in the pre-montane wet forest of Las Cruces Biological Station (San Vito de Java, Costa Rica. Three S. annulatus were observed during courtship between 10-12 AM in a patch of primary forest. The two males were observed to interact with the female, but not signs of male-male agonistic interactions were observed. Their behavior includes grabbing and holding the female, copula, and biting during the copula. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(2: 647-650. Epub 2006 Jun 01.El comportamiento de apareamiento es descrito para la serpiente Scaphiodontophis annulatus, una especie de colúbrido común en el Pacífico sur de Costa Rica. El comportamiento incluye capturar y sujetar a la hembra, mordiscos durante la cópula y coito. Dos machos fueron observados al interactuar con una sola hembra, pero no se detectó señales de interacciones antagónicas macho-macho.

  14. ESO Diffuse Interstellar Bands Large Exploration Survey (EDIBLES) - Merging Observations and Laboratory Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2016-01-01

    The Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) are a set of 500 absorption bands that are detected in the spectra of stars with interstellar clouds in the line of sight. DIBs are found from the NUV to the NIR in the spectra of reddened stars spanning different interstellar environments in our local, and in other galaxies. DIB carriers are a significant part of the interstellar chemical inventory. They are stable and ubiquitous in a broad variety of environments and play a unique role in interstellar physics/chemistry. It has long been realized that the solving of the DIB problem requires a strong synergy between astronomical observations, laboratory astrophysics, and astrophysical modeling of line-of-sights. PAHs are among the molecular species that have been proposed as DIB carriers. We will present an assessment of the PAH-DIB model in view of the progress and the advances that have been achieved over the past years through a series of studies involving astronomical observations of DIBs, laboratory simulation of interstellar analogs for neutrals and ionized PAHs, theoretical calculations of PAH spectra and the modelization of diffuse and translucent interstellar clouds. We will present a summary of what has been learned from these complementary studies, the constraints that can now be derived for the PAHs as DIB carriers in the context of the PAH-DIB model and how these constraints can be applied to the EDIBLES project. The spectra of several neutral and ionized PAHs isolated in the gas phase at low temperature have been measured in the laboratory under experimental conditions that mimic interstellar conditions and are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. The comparisons of astronomical and laboratory data provide upper limits for the abundances of specific neutral PAH molecules and ions along specific lines-of-sight. Something that is not attainable from infrared observations alone. We present the characteristics of the

  15. Wide-banded NTC radiation: local to remote observations by the four Cluster satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. E. Décréau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster multi-point mission offers a unique collection of non-thermal continuum (NTC radio waves observed in the 2–80 kHz frequency range over almost 15 years, from various view points over the radiating plasmasphere. Here we present rather infrequent case events, such as when primary electrostatic sources of such waves are embedded within the plasmapause boundary far from the magnetic equatorial plane. The spectral signature of the emitted electromagnetic waves is structured as a series of wide harmonic bands within the range covered by the step in plasma frequency encountered at the boundary. Developing the concept that the frequency distance df between harmonic bands measures the magnetic field magnitude B at the source (df = Fce, electron gyrofrequency, we analyse three selected events. The first one (studied in Grimald et al., 2008 presents electric field signatures observed by a Cluster constellation of small size (~ 200 to 1000 km spacecraft separation placed in the vicinity of sources. The electric field frequency spectra display frequency peaks placed at frequencies fs = n df (n being an integer, with df of the order of Fce values encountered at the plasmapause by the spacecraft. The second event, taken from the Cluster tilt campaign, leads to a 3-D view of NTC waves ray path orientations and to a localization of a global source region at several Earth radii (RE from Cluster (Décréau et al., 2013. The measured spectra present successive peaks placed at fs ~ (n+ 1/2 df. Next, considering if both situations might be two facets of the same phenomenon, we analyze a third event. The Cluster fleet, configured into a constellation of large size (~ 8000 to 25 000 km spacecraft separation, allows us to observe wide-banded NTC waves at different distances from their sources. Two new findings can be derived from our analysis. First, we point out that a large portion of the plasmasphere boundary layer, covering a large range of magnetic

  16. Extraordinary terahertz absorption bands observed in micro/nanostructured Au/polystyrene sphere arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy is carried out for micro/nanostructured periodic Au/dielectric sphere arrays on Si substrate. We find that the metal-insulator transition can be achieved in THz bandwidth via varying sample parameters such as the thickness of the Au shell and the diameter of the Au/dielectric sphere. The Au/polystyrene sphere arrays do not show metallic THz response when the Au shell thickness is larger than 10 nm and the sphere diameter is smaller than 500 nm. This effect is in sharp contrast to the observations in flat Au films on Si substrate. Interestingly, the Au/polystyrene sphere arrays with a 5-nm-thick Au shell show extraordinary THz absorption bands or metallic optical conductance when the diameter of the sphere is larger than 200 nm. This effect is related to the quantum confinement effect in which the electrons in the structure are trapped in the sphere potential well of the gold shell. PMID:23190688

  17. Observations of magnetospheric ionization enhancements using upper-hybrid resonance noise band data from the RAE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    Noise bands associated with the upper-hybrid resonance were used to provide direct evidence for the existence of regions of enhanced density in the equatorial magnetosphere near L = 2. Density enhancements ranging from several percent to as high as 45 percent are observed with radial dimensions of several hundred kilometers. The enhancement characteristics strongly suggest their identification as magnetospheric whistler ducts.

  18. On the role of covariance information for GRACE K-band observations in the Celestial Mechanics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentel, Katrin; Meyer, Ulrich; Arnold, Daniel; Jean, Yoomin; Jäggi, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    The Astronomical Institute at the University of Bern (AIUB) derives static and time-variable gravity fields by means of the Celestial Mechanics Approach (CMA) from GRACE (level 1B) data. This approach makes use of the close link between orbit and gravity field determination. GPS-derived kinematic GRACE orbit positions, inter-satellite K-band observations, which are the core observations of GRACE, and accelerometer data are combined to rigorously estimate orbit and spherical harmonic gravity field coefficients in one adjustment step. Pseudo-stochastic orbit parameters are set up to absorb unmodeled noise. The K-band range measurements in along-track direction lead to a much higher correlation of the observations in this direction compared to the other directions and thus, to north-south stripes in the unconstrained gravity field solutions, so-called correlated errors. By using a full covariance matrix for the K-band observations the correlation can be taken into account. One possibility is to derive correlation information from post-processing K-band residuals. This is then used in a second iteration step to derive an improved gravity field solution. We study the effects of pre-defined covariance matrices and residual-derived covariance matrices on the final gravity field product with the CMA.

  19. Optical methane-band observations of Jovian Shoemaker-Levy 9 impact debris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, NG

    1996-01-01

    During the encounter of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter in July 1994, narrow-band imaging was used to detect changes in methane opacity in the upper atmosphere resulting from the impacts. Of nine debris clouds visible in the data, seven show clear evidence of a significant change, when compared

  20. Polarimetric C-Band SAR Observations of Sea Ice in the Greenland Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bjørn Bavnehøj; Nghiem, S.V.; Kwok, R.

    1998-01-01

    The fully polarimetric EMISAR acquired C-band radar signatures of sea ice in the Greenland Sea during a campaign in March 1995. The authors present maps of polarimetric signatures over an area containing various kinds of ice and discuss the use of polarimetric SAR for identification of ice types...

  1. Electronic band structure of epitaxial PbTe (111) thin films observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhenyu; Cui, Shengtao; Shu, Tianyu; Ma, Songsong; Liu, Yang; Sun, Zhe; Luo, Jun-Wei; Wu, Huizhen

    2017-04-01

    Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we studied bulk and surface electronic band structures of narrow-gap semiconductor lead telluride (PbTe) thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy both perpendicular and parallel to the Γ -L direction. The comparison of ARPES data with the first-principles calculation reveals the details of band structures, orbital characters, spin-orbit splitting energies, and surface states. The photon-energy-dependent spectra show the bulk character. Both the L and Σ valence bands are observed and their energy difference is determined. The spin-orbit splitting energies at L and Γ points are 0.62 eV and 0.88 eV, respectively. The surface states below and close to the valence band maximum are identified. The valence bands are composed of a mixture of Pb 6 s and Te 5 pz orbitals with dominant in-plane even parity, which is attributed to the layered distortion in the vicinity of the PbTe (111) surface. These findings provide insights into PbTe fundamental properties and shall benefit relevant thermoelectric and optoelectronic applications.

  2. Relief Effects on the L-Band Emission of a Bare Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Völksch

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In a combined experimental and model study, we investigated effects of surface topography (relief on the thermal L-band emission of a sandy soil. To this end, brightness temperatures of two adjacent footprint areas were measured quasi-simultaneously with an L-band radiometer at the observation angle of 55° relative to nadir for one year. One footprint featured a distinct relief in the form of erosion gullies with steep slopes, whereas the surface of the second footprint was smooth. Additionally, hydrometeorological variables, in situ soil moisture and temperature were measured, and digital terrain models of the two scenes were derived from terrestrial laser scanning. A facet model, taking into account the topography of the footprint surfaces as well as the antenna’s directivity, was developed and brightness temperatures of both footprints were simulated based on the hydrometeorological and in situ soil data. We found that brightness temperatures of the footprint with the distinct surface relief were increased at horizontal and decreased at vertical polarization with respect to those of the plane footprint. The simulations showed that this is mainly due to modifications of local (facet observation angles and due to polarization mixing caused by the pronounced relief. Measurements furthermore revealed that brightness temperatures of both areas respond differently to changing ambient conditions indicating differences in their hydrological properties.

  3. Observation of wakefields in a beam-driven photonic band gap accelerating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jing

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Wakefield excitation has been experimentally studied in a three-cell X-band standing wave photonic band gap (PBG accelerating structure. Major monopole (TM_{01}- and TM_{02}-like and dipole (TM_{11}- and TM_{12}-like modes were identified and characterized by precisely controlling the position of beam injection. The quality factor Q of the dipole modes was measured to be ∼10  times smaller than that of the accelerating mode. A charge sweep, up to 80 nC, has been performed, equivalent to ∼30  MV/m accelerating field on axis. A variable delay low charge witness bunch following a high charge drive bunch was used to calibrate the gradient in the PBG structure by measuring its maximum energy gain and loss. Experimental results agree well with numerical simulations.

  4. Dual-Polarization Observations of Slowly Varying Solar Emissions from a Mobile X-Band Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabella, Marco; Leuenberger, Andreas

    2017-05-22

    The radio noise that comes from the Sun has been reported in literature as a reference signal to check the quality of dual-polarization weather radar receivers for the S-band and C-band. In most cases, the focus was on relative calibration: horizontal and vertical polarizations were evaluated versus the reference signal mainly in terms of standard deviation of the difference. This means that the investigated radar receivers were able to reproduce the slowly varying component of the microwave signal emitted by the Sun. A novel method, aimed at the absolute calibration of dual-polarization receivers, has recently been presented and applied for the C-band. This method requires the antenna beam axis to be pointed towards the center of the Sun for less than a minute. Standard deviations of the difference as low as 0.1 dB have been found for the Swiss radars. As far as the absolute calibration is concerned, the average differences were of the order of -0.6 dB (after noise subtraction). The method has been implemented on a mobile, X-band radar, and this paper presents the successful results that were obtained during the 2016 field campaign in Payerne (Switzerland). Despite a relatively poor Sun-to-Noise ratio, the "small" (~0.4 dB) amplitude of the slowly varying emission was captured and reproduced; the standard deviation of the difference between the radar and the reference was ~0.2 dB. The absolute calibration of the vertical and horizontal receivers was satisfactory. After the noise subtraction and atmospheric correction a, the mean difference was close to 0 dB.

  5. Experimental Observation of a Large Low-Frequency Band Gap in a Polymer Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Miniaci

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The quest for large and low-frequency band gaps is one of the principal objectives pursued in a number of engineering applications, ranging from noise absorption to vibration control, and to seismic wave abatement. For this purpose, a plethora of complex architectures (including multiphase materials and multiphysics approaches have been proposed in the past, often involving difficulties in their practical realization. To address the issue of proposing a material design that enables large band gaps using a simple configuration, in this study we propose an easy-to-manufacture design able to open large, low-frequency complete Lamb band gaps exploiting a suitable arrangement of masses and stiffnesses produced by cavities in a monolithic material. The performance of the designed structure is evaluated by numerical simulations and confirmed by scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV measurements on an isotropic polyvinyl chloride plate in which a square ring region of cross-like cavities is fabricated. The full wave field reconstruction clearly confirms the ability of even a limited number of unit cell rows of the proposed design to efficiently attenuate Lamb waves. In addition, numerical simulations show that the structure allows to shift the central frequency of the BG through geometrical modifications. The design may be of interest for applications in which large BGs at low frequencies are required.

  6. Monitoring the On-Orbit Calibration of Terra MODIS Reflective Solar Bands Using Simultaneous Terra MISR Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, Amit; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wu, Aisheng

    2016-01-01

    On December 18, 2015, the Terra spacecraft completed 16 years of successful operation in space. Terra has five instruments designed to facilitate scientific measurements of the earths land, ocean, and atmosphere. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instruments provide information for the temporal studies of the globe. After providing over 16 years of complementary measurements, a synergistic use of the measurements obtained from these sensors is beneficial for various science products. The 20 reflective solar bands (RSBs) of MODIS are calibrated using a combination of solar diffuser and lunar measurements, supplemented by measurements from pseudoinvariant desert sites. MODIS views the on-board calibrators and the earth via a two-sided scan mirror at three spatial resolutions: 250 m using 40 detectors in bands 1 and 2, 500 m using 20 detectors in bands 3 and 4, and 1000 m using 10 detectors in bands 819 and 26. Simultaneous measurements of the earths surface are acquired in a push-broom fashion by MISR at nine view angles spreading out in the forward and backward directions along the flight path. While the swath width for MISR acquisitions is 360 km, MODIS scans a wider swath of 2330 km via its two-sided scan mirror. The reflectance of the MODIS scan mirror has an angle dependence characterized by the response versus scan angle (RVS). Its on-orbit change is derived using the gain from a combination of on-board and earth-view measurements. The on-orbit RVS for MODIS has experienced a significant change, especially for the short-wavelength bands. The on-orbit RVS change for the short-wavelength bands (bands 3, 8, and 9) at nadir is observed to be greater than 10 over the mission lifetime. Due to absence of a scanning mechanism, MISR can serve as an effective tool to evaluate and monitor the on-orbit performance of the MODIS RVS. Furthermore, it can also monitor the detector and scan

  7. Dynamics of isolated magnetic bright points derived from Hinode/SOT G-band observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, D.; Hanslmeier, A.; Muller, R.; Veronig, A.; Rybák, J.; Muthsam, H.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Small-scale magnetic fields in the solar photosphere can be identified in high-resolution magnetograms or in the G-band as magnetic bright points (MBPs). Rapid motions of these fields can cause magneto-hydrodynamical waves and can also lead to nanoflares by magnetic field braiding and twisting. The MBP velocity distribution is a crucial parameter for estimating the amplitudes of those waves and the amount of energy they can contribute to coronal heating. Aims: The velocity and lifetime distributions of MBPs are derived from solar G-band images of a quiet sun region acquired by the Hinode/SOT instrument with different temporal and spatial sampling rates. Methods: We developed an automatic segmentation, identification and tracking algorithm to analyse G-Band image sequences to obtain the lifetime and velocity distributions of MBPs. The influence of temporal/spatial sampling rates on these distributions is studied and used to correct the obtained lifetimes and velocity distributions for these digitalisation effects. Results: After the correction of algorithm effects, we obtained a mean MBP lifetime of (2.50 ± 0.05) min and mean MBP velocities, depending on smoothing processes, in the range of (1-2) km~s-1. Corrected for temporal sampling effects, we obtained for the effective velocity distribution a Rayleigh function with a coefficient of (1.62 ± 0.05) km~s-1. The x- and y-components of the velocity distributions are Gaussians. The lifetime distribution can be fitted by an exponential function.

  8. Direct space-time observation of pulse tunneling in an electromagnetic band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doiron, Serge; Hache, Alain; Winful, Herbert G.

    2007-01-01

    We present space-time-resolved measurements of electromagnetic pulses tunneling through a coaxial electromagnetic band gap structure. The results show that during the tunneling process the field distribution inside the barrier is an exponentially decaying standing wave whose amplitude increases and decreases as it slowly follows the temporal evolution of the input pulse. At no time is a pulse maximum found inside the barrier, and hence the transmitted peak is not the incident peak that has propagated to the exit. The results support the quasistatic interpretation of tunneling dynamics and confirm that the group delay is not the traversal time of the input pulse peak

  9. Observation of intermediate bands in Eu3+ doped YPO4 host: Li+ ion effect and blue to pink light emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Kareem Parchur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the tuning of blue to pink colour generation from Li+ ion co-doped YPO4:5Eu nanoparticles prepared by polyol method at ∼100-120 °C with ethylene glycol (EG as a capping agent. Interaction of EG molecules capped on the surface of the nanoparticles and/or created oxygen vacancies induces formation of intermediate/mid gap bands in the host structure, which is supported by UV-Visible absorption data. Strong blue and pink colors can be observed in the cases of as-prepared and 500 °C annealed samples, respectively. Co-doping of Li+ enhances the emission intensities of intermediate band as well as Eu3+. On annealing as-prepared sample to 500 °C, the intermediate band emission intensity decreases, whereas Eu3+ emission intensity increases suggesting increase of extent of energy transfer from the intermediate band to Eu3+ on annealing. Emission intensity ratio of electric to magnetic dipole transitions of Eu3+ can be varied by changing excitation wavelength. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS study of as-prepared samples confirms the presence of oxygen vacancies and Eu3+ but absence of Eu2+. Dispersed particles in ethanol and polymer film show the strong blue color, suggesting that these materials will be useful as probes in life science and also in light emitting device applications.

  10. Partially Observable Markov Decision Process-Based Transmission Policy over Ka-Band Channels for Space Information Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Jiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ka-band and higher Q/V band channels can provide an appealing capacity for the future deep-space communications and Space Information Networks (SIN, which are viewed as a primary solution to satisfy the increasing demands for high data rate services. However, Ka-band channel is much more sensitive to the weather conditions than the conventional communication channels. Moreover, due to the huge distance and long propagation delay in SINs, the transmitter can only obtain delayed Channel State Information (CSI from feedback. In this paper, the noise temperature of time-varying rain attenuation at Ka-band channels is modeled to a two-state Gilbert–Elliot channel, to capture the channel capacity that randomly ranging from good to bad state. An optimal transmission scheme based on Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDP is proposed, and the key thresholds for selecting the optimal transmission method in the SIN communications are derived. Simulation results show that our proposed scheme can effectively improve the throughput.

  11. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zribi, Mehrez; Parde, Mickael; Boutin, Jacquline

    2011-01-01

    The "Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies" (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed ...... is conforming to specification and is a useful tool for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite validation as well as for specific studies on surface soil moisture or ocean salinity.......The "Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies" (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed...... flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight...

  12. Evaluating the potential use of a high-resolution X-band polarimetric radar observations in Urban Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Marios N.; Kalogiros, John; Marzano, Frank S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Baldini, Luca; Nikolopoulos, EfThymios; Montopoli, Mario; Picciotti, Errico

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean area concentrates the major natural risks related to the water cycle, including heavy precipitation and flash-flooding during the fall season. Every year in central and south Europe we witness several fatal and economical disasters from severe storm rainfall triggering Flash Floods, and its impacts are increasing worldwide, but remain very difficult to manage. The spatial scale of flash flood occurrence is such that its vulnerability is often focused on dispersed urbanization, transportation and tourism infrastructures (De Marchi and Scolobig 2012). Urbanized and industrialized areas shows peculiar hydrodynamic and meteo-oceanographic features and they concentrate the highest rates of flash floods and fatal disasters. The main causes of disturbance being littoral urban development and harbor activities, the building of littoral rail- and highways, and the presence of several polluted discharges. All the above mentioned characteristics limit our ability to issue timely flood warnings. Precipitation estimates based on raingauge networks are usually associated with low coverage density, particularly at high altitudes. On the other hand, operational weather radar networks may provide valuable information of precipitation at these regimes but reliability of their estimates is often limited due to retrieval (e.g. variability in the reflectivity-to-rainfall relationship) and spatial extent constrains (e.g. blockage issues, overshooting effects). As a result, we currently lack accurate precipitation estimates over urban complex terrain areas, which essentially means that we lack accurate knowledge of the triggering factor for a number of hazards like flash floods and debris flows/landslides occurring in those areas. A potential solution to overcome sampling as well as retrieval uncertainty limitations of current observational networks might be the use of network of low-power dual-polarization X-band radars as complement to raingauges and gap-filling to

  13. The first observations of wide-band interferometers and the spectra of relic gravitons

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic backgrounds of relic gravitons of cosmological origin extend from frequencies of the order of the aHz up to the GHz range. Since the temperature and polarization anisotropies constrain the low frequency normalization of the spectra, in the concordance paradigm the strain amplitude corresponding to the frequency window of wide-band interferometers turns out to be, approximately, nine orders of magnitude smaller than the astounding signal recently reported and attributed to a binary black hole merger. The backgrounds of relic gravitons expected from the early Universe are compared with the stochastic foregrounds stemming from the estimated multiplicity of the astrophysical sources. It is suggested that while the astrophysical foregrounds are likely to dominate between few Hz and 10 kHz, relic gravitons with frequencies exceeding 100 kHz represent a potentially uncontaminated signal for the next generation of high-frequency detectors currently under scrutiny.

  14. Observation of Dirac bands in artificial graphene in small-period nanopatterned GaAs quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Scarabelli, Diego; Du, Lingjie; Kuznetsova, Yuliya Y.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W.; Gardner, Geoff C.; Manfra, Michael J.; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Wind, Shalom J.; Pinczuk, Aron

    2018-01-01

    Charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions (MDFs) with linear energy-momentum dispersion1, 2, providing a condensed-matter platform for studying quasiparticles with relativistic-like features. Artificial graphene (AG)—a structure with an artificial honeycomb lattice—exhibits novel phenomena due to the tunable interplay between topology and quasiparticle interactions3-6. So far, the emergence of a Dirac band structure supporting MDFs has been observed in AG using molecular5, atomic6, 7 and photonic systems8-10, including those with semiconductor microcavities11. Here, we report the realization of an AG that has a band structure with vanishing density of states consistent with the presence of MDFs. This observation is enabled by a very small lattice constant (a = 50 nm) of the nanofabricated AG patterns superimposed on a two-dimensional electron gas hosted by a high-quality GaAs quantum well. Resonant inelastic light-scattering spectra reveal low-lying transitions that are not present in the unpatterned GaAs quantum well. These excitations reveal the energy dependence of the joint density of states for AG band transitions. Fermi level tuning through the Dirac point results in a collapse of the density of states at low transition energy, suggesting the emergence of the MDF linear dispersion in the AG.

  15. Broad Band Observations of Gravitationally Lensed Blazar during a Gamma-Ray Outburst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Sitarek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available QSO B0218+357 is a gravitationally lensed blazar located at a cosmological redshift of 0.944. In July 2014 a GeV flare was observed by Fermi-LAT, triggering follow-up observations with the MAGIC telescopes at energies above 100 GeV. The MAGIC observations at the expected time of arrival of the trailing component resulted in the first detection of QSO B0218+357 in Very-High-Energy (VHE, >100 GeV gamma rays. We report here the observed multiwavelength emission during the 2014 flare.

  16. L Band Brightness Temperature Observations over a Corn Canopy during the Entire Growth Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia T. Joseph

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available During a field campaign covering the 2002 corn growing season, a dual polarized tower mounted L-band (1.4 GHz radiometer (LRAD provided brightness temperature (TB measurements at preset intervals, incidence and azimuth angles. These radiometer measurements were supported by an extensive characterization of land surface variables including soil moisture, soil temperature, vegetation biomass, and surface roughness. In the period May 22 to August 30, ten days of radiometer and ground measurements are available for a corn canopy with a vegetation water content (W range of 0.0 to 4.3 kg m−2. Using this data set, the effects of corn vegetation on surface emissions are investigated by means of a semi-empirical radiative transfer model. Additionally, the impact of roughness on the surface emission is quantified using TB measurements over bare soil conditions. Subsequently, the estimated roughness parameters, ground measurements and horizontally OPEN ACCESS (H-polarized TB are employed to invert the H-polarized transmissivity (γh for the monitored corn growing season.

  17. Beam-induced wakefield observation in X-band choke-mode cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The X-band choke-mode structure is currently being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC main linac. The geometry of the choke-mode structure is designed to ensure the strong suppression of the beam-induced long-range transverse wakefield and therefore maintain the stability and quality of the beam in the CLIC main linac. Experiments conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility are presented in this study to verify the design of the wakefield suppressor. The beam-induced radio frequency (rf signals in a three-cell choke-mode structure were measured, and measured results show good agreement with the simulation results. The measured results also show strong damping in high-order dipolar modes with a quality factor Q of 10 to 20. The difference between the frequencies of the first and second dipole modes is about 3 GHz, which validates the special design of the cancelling dipole modes at the time of the succeeding bunch (0.5 ns.

  18. Beam-induced wakefield observation in X -band choke-mode cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Hao; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Conde, Manoel; Power, John G.; Doran, Darrell S.; Liu, Wanming; Shi, Jiaru; Li, Chen; Gai, Wei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-08-01

    The X -band choke-mode structure is currently being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC) main linac. The geometry of the choke-mode structure is designed to ensure the strong suppression of the beam-induced long-range transverse wakefield and therefore maintain the stability and quality of the beam in the CLIC main linac. Experiments conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility are presented in this study to verify the design of the wakefield suppressor. The beam-induced radio frequency (rf) signals in a three-cell choke-mode structure were measured, and measured results show good agreement with the simulation results. The measured results also show strong damping in high-order dipolar modes with a quality factor Q of 10 to 20. The difference between the frequencies of the first and second dipole modes is about 3 GHz, which validates the special design of the cancelling dipole modes at the time of the succeeding bunch (0.5 ns).

  19. Polarimetric C-/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar Observations of Melting Sea Ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, J. A.; Beckers, J. F.; Brossier, E.; Haas, C.

    2013-12-01

    Operational ice information services rely heavily on space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for the production of ice charts to meet their mandate of providing timely and accurate sea ice information to support safe and efficient marine operations. During the summer melt period, the usefulness of SAR data for sea ice monitoring is limited by the presence of wet snow and melt ponds on the ice surface, which can mask the signature of the underlying ice. This is a critical concern for ice services whose clients (e.g. commercial shipping, cruise tourism, resource exploration and extraction) are most active at this time of year when sea ice is at its minimum extent, concentration and thickness. As a result, there is a need to further quantify the loss of ice information in SAR data during the melt season and to identify what information can still be retrieved about ice surface conditions and melt pond evolution at this time of year. To date the majority of studies have been limited to analysis of single-polarization C-band SAR data. This study will investigate the potential complimentary and unique sea ice information that polarimetric C- and X-band SAR data can provide to supplement the information available from traditional single co-polarized C-band SAR data. A time-series of polarimetric C- and X-band SAR data was acquired over Jones Sound in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, in the vicinity of the Grise Fiord, Nunavut. Five RADARSAT-2 Wide Fine Quad-pol images and 11 TerraSAR-X StripMap dual-pol (HH/VV) images were acquired. The time-series begins at the onset of melt in early June and extends through advanced melt conditions in late July. Over this period several ponding and drainage events and two snowfall events occurred. Field observations of sea ice properties were collected using an Ice Mass Balance (IMB) buoy, hourly photos from a time-lapse camera deployed on a coastal cliff, and manual in situ measurements of snow thickness and melt pond depth

  20. Near-infrared Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) by WINERED: CN Red-system Band Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Yasui, Chikako; Izumi, Natsuko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kawakita, Hideyo; Kondo, Sohei; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Fukue, Kei; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Otsubo, Shogo; Takenaka, Keiichi; Watase, Ayaka; Kawanishi, Takafumi; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Nakaoka, Tetsuya [Laboratory of Infrared High-resolution Spectroscopy, Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Mizumoto, Misaki, E-mail: yoshiharu.shinnaka@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: kawakthd@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    Although high-resolution spectra of the CN red-system band are considered useful in cometary sciences, e.g., in the study of isotopic ratios of carbon and nitrogen in cometary volatiles, there have been few reports to date due to the lack of high-resolution ( R  ≡  λ /Δ λ  > 20,000) spectrographs in the near-infrared region around ∼1 μ m. Here, we present the high-resolution emission spectrum of the CN red-system band in comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), acquired by the near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph WINERED mounted on the 1.3 m Araki telescope at the Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto, Japan. We applied our fluorescence excitation models for CN, based on modern spectroscopic studies, to the observed spectrum of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) to search for CN isotopologues ({sup 13}C{sup 14}N and {sup 12}C{sup 15}N). We used a CN fluorescence excitation model involving both a “pure” fluorescence excitation model for the outer coma and a “fully collisional” fluorescence excitation model for the inner coma region. Our emission model could reproduce the observed {sup 12}C{sup 14}N red-system band of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy). The derived mixing ratio between the two excitation models was 0.94(+0.02/−0.03):0.06(+0.03/−0.02), corresponding to the radius of the collision-dominant region of ∼800–1600 km from the nucleus. No isotopologues were detected. The observed spectrum is consistent, within error, with previous estimates in comets of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C (∼90) and {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N (∼150).

  1. Optical Observations of M81 Galaxy Group in Narrow Band [SII] and H_alpha Filters: Holmberg IX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbutina, B.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of the nearby tidal dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX in M81 galaxy group in narrow band [SII] and H$alpha$ filters, carried out in March and November 2008 with the 2m RCC telescope at NAO Rozhen, Bulgaria. Our search for resident supernova remnants (identified as sources with enhanced [SII] emission relative to their H$alpha$ emission in this galaxy yielded no sources of this kind, besides M&H 10-11 or HoIX X-1. Nevertheless, we found a number of objects with significant H$alpha$ emission that probably represent uncatalogued HII regions.

  2. Characterization of VHF radar observations associated with equatorial Spread F by narrow-band optical measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sekar

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The VHF radars have been extensively used to investigate the structures and dynamics of equatorial Spread F (ESF irregularities. However, unambiguous identification of the nature of the structures in terms of plasma depletion or enhancement requires another technique, as the return echo measured by VHF radar is proportional to the square of the electron density fluctuations. In order to address this issue, co-ordinated radar backscatter and thermospheric airglow intensity measurements were carried out during March 2003 from the MST radar site at Gadanki. Temporal variations of 630.0-nm and 777.4-nm emission intensities reveal small-scale ("micro" and large-scale ("macro" variations during the period of observation. The micro variations are absent on non-ESF nights while the macro variations are present on both ESF and non-ESF nights. In addition to the well-known anti-correlation between the base height of the F-region and the nocturnal variation of thermospheric airglow intensities, the variation of the base height of the F-layer, on occasion, is found to manifest as a bottomside wave-like structure, as seen by VHF radar on an ESF night. The micro variations in the airglow intensities are associated with large-scale irregular plasma structures and found to be in correspondence with the "plume" structures obtained by VHF radar. In addition to the commonly observed depletions with upward movement, the observation unequivocally reveals the presence of plasma enhancements which move downwards. The observation of enhancement in 777.4-nm airglow intensity, which is characterized as plasma enhancement, provides an experimental verification of the earlier prediction based on numerical modeling studies.

  3. Broad Band Data and Noise Observed with Surface Station and Borehole Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc, Suleyman; Ozel, Oguz; Safa Arslan, Mehmet; Behiye Akşahin, Bengi; Hatipoglu, Mustafa; Cagin Yalcintepe, Ragip; Ada, Samim; Meral Ozel, Nurcan

    2016-04-01

    Marmara region tectonically is very active and many destructive earthquakes happened in the past. North Anatolian Fault Zone crosses the Marmara region and it has three branches. The northern branch passes through Marmara Sea and expected future large earthquake will happen along this fault zone. There is a gap in seismic network in the Marmara region at offshore and onshore areas. We have started broadband borehole seismographic observations to obtain the detailed information about fault geometry and its stick-slip behavior beneath the western Marmara Sea, as a part of the MARsite collaborative Project, namely "New Directions in Seismic Hazard Assessment through Focused Earth Observation in the Marmara Supersite-MARsite". The target area western Marmara of Turkey. In the beginning of the project, we installed eight Broadband surface station around Marmara Sea in April 2014. Then, we added broadband sensor and broadband surface sensor at the same location in November 2014. In this study, we developed a Matlab application to calculate Power Spectral Density against the New Low Noise Model (NLNM) and New High Noise Model (NHNM) determined for one-hour segments of the data. Also we compared ambient noise of broadband borehole sensor and surface broadband sensor.

  4. Uncertainty Quantification of GEOS-5 L-band Radiative Transfer Model Parameters Using Bayesian Inference and SMOS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties in L-band (1.4 GHz) radiative transfer modeling (RTM) affect the simulation of brightness temperatures (Tb) over land and the inversion of satellite-observed Tb into soil moisture retrievals. In particular, accurate estimates of the microwave soil roughness, vegetation opacity and scattering albedo for large-scale applications are difficult to obtain from field studies and often lack an uncertainty estimate. Here, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation method is used to determine satellite-scale estimates of RTM parameters and their posterior uncertainty by minimizing the misfit between long-term averages and standard deviations of simulated and observed Tb at a range of incidence angles, at horizontal and vertical polarization, and for morning and evening overpasses. Tb simulations are generated with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) and confronted with Tb observations from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The MCMC algorithm suggests that the relative uncertainty of the RTM parameter estimates is typically less than 25 of the maximum a posteriori density (MAP) parameter value. Furthermore, the actual root-mean-square-differences in long-term Tb averages and standard deviations are found consistent with the respective estimated total simulation and observation error standard deviations of m3.1K and s2.4K. It is also shown that the MAP parameter values estimated through MCMC simulation are in close agreement with those obtained with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO).

  5. Observation of Dirac-like energy band and ring-torus Fermi surface associated with the nodal line in topological insulator CaAgAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takane, Daichi; Nakayama, Kosuke; Souma, Seigo; Wada, Taichi; Okamoto, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Koshi; Yamakawa, Youichi; Yamakage, Ai; Mitsuhashi, Taichi; Horiba, Koji; Kumigashira, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Takashi; Sato, Takafumi

    2018-01-01

    One of key challenges in current material research is to search for new topological materials with inverted bulk-band structure. In topological insulators, the band inversion caused by strong spin-orbit coupling leads to opening of a band gap in the entire Brillouin zone, whereas an additional crystal symmetry such as point-group and nonsymmorphic symmetries sometimes prohibits the gap opening at/on specific points or line in momentum space, giving rise to topological semimetals. Despite many theoretical predictions of topological insulators/semimetals associated with such crystal symmetries, the experimental realization is still relatively scarce. Here, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with bulk-sensitive soft-x-ray photons, we experimentally demonstrate that hexagonal pnictide CaAgAs belongs to a new family of topological insulators characterized by the inverted band structure and the mirror reflection symmetry of crystal. We have established the bulk valence-band structure in three-dimensional Brillouin zone, and observed the Dirac-like energy band and ring-torus Fermi surface associated with the line node, where bulk valence and conducting bands cross on a line in the momentum space under negligible spin-orbit coupling. Intriguingly, we found that no other bands cross the Fermi level and therefore the low-energy excitations are solely characterized by the Dirac-like band. CaAgAs provides an excellent platform to study the interplay among low-energy electron dynamics, crystal symmetry, and exotic topological properties.

  6. Towards an improved soil moisture retrieval for organic-rich soils from SMOS passive microwave L-band observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Simone; Richaume, Philippe; Mahmoodi, Ali; Mialon, Arnaud; Fernandez-Moran, Roberto; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Demontoux, François; Jonard, François; Weihermüller, Lutz; Andreasen, Mie; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Ikonen, Jaakko; Schwank, Mike; Drusch, Mattias; Kerr, Yann H.

    2017-04-01

    evaluated using the default dielectric model for mineral soils is ongoing for the "organic" L-MEB version. Additionally, in order to decide where a soil moisture retrieval using the "organic" dielectric model should be triggered, information on soil organic matter content in the soil surface layer has to be considered in the retrieval algorithm. For this purpose, SoilGrids (www.soilgrids.org) providing soil organic carbon content (SOCC) in g/kg is under study. A SOCC threshold based on the relation between the SoilGrids' SOCC and the presence of organic soil surface layers (relevant to alter the microwave L-band emissions from the land surface) in the SoilGrids' source soil profile information has to be established. In this communication, we present the current status of the above outlined studies with the objective to advance towards an improved soil moisture retrieval for organic-rich soils from SMOS passive microwave L-band observations.

  7. Observation of bright-band height data from TRMM-PR for satellite communication in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olurotimi, E. O.; Sokoya, O.; Ojo, J. S.; Owolawi, P. A.

    2017-07-01

    The deleterious effects of rain on a satellite link operating at a frequency above 10 GHz can be estimated using various parameters such as rain rate, drop size distribution, and rain height. In order to accurately account for rain fade along satellite link, real-time measurement of rain height data are needed. In this paper, Bright-Band Height (BBH) and 0 °C isotherm height (ZDIH) over some selected stations in South Africa were processed and used to determine rain height based on the precipitation data of 5-year (2011-2015) collected by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission-Precipitation Radar (TRMM-PR) satellite. These results are then compared with the previous ITU-R P.839-2 and the recent ITU-R P.839-4. The results show that the BBH vary over the years and locations, and will mostly lie between 3.4557 and 4.2244 km. The average rain height observed also lies between 4.085 and 4.457 km across the studied locations. Comparison between the two versions of Recommendation P.839 showed that the ITU-R P.839-2 performs better with respect to three chosen locations such as Durban, Johannesburg, and Kimberley. However, the most recent version (ITU-R P.839-4) appears to be better in the case of a location like Cape Town. The overall results suggest the use of locally derived rain height values for rain attenuation prediction.

  8. Study of directivity effect on electromagnetic emissions in the HF band as earthquake precursors: Preliminary results on field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakas, I.; Clarke, M.; Koulouras, G.; Stavrakakis, G.; Nomicos, C.

    2007-02-01

    This work focuses on the use of electromagnetic emissions (EM) in the HF band as a warning event for earthquakes. EM at HF components 41 MHz and 46 MHz were monitored and recorded from eight field stations in Greece and correlated with seismological events. Directivity effect raised since EM emissions at specific station locations were correlated to earthquake events from prescribed regions. EM recordings during 1999 were used and by visual inspection were associated to most of the earthquake events greater than 5R. Using these observations a novel algorithm based on the ratio of short term to long term signal average, together with a prediction rules set derived from 1999's EM emissions study were developed to combine results from several field stations. Performance of the system was promising, but was dependent on the geographic area of interest. Overall performance for earthquakes events of magnitude greater than 5.7 R was 75% of seismic events were correctly predicted by EM activity, while 25% were not predicted.

  9. Observation of a hidden hole-like band approaching the fermi level in K-doped iron selenide superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunagawa, Masanori; Terashima, Kensei; Hamada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals of the study of iron-based superconductors is to identify the common feature that produces the high critical temperature (T c ). In the early days, based on a weak-coupling viewpoint, the nesting between hole- and electron-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) leading to the so-called s± state was considered to be one such key feature. However, this theory has faced a serious challenge ever since the discovery of alkali-metal-doped FeSe (AFS) superconductors, in which only electron-like FSs with a nodeless superconducting gap are observed. Several theories have been proposed, but a consistent understanding is yet to be achieved. Here we show experimentally that a hole-like band exists in K x Fe 2-y Se 2 , which presumably forms a hole-like Fermi surface. The present study suggests that AFS can be categorized in the same group as iron arsenides with both hole- and electron-like FSs present. This result provides a foundation for a comprehensive understanding of the superconductivity in iron-based superconductors. (author)

  10. The Impact of Warm-Rain Microphysical Processes on Rain Rate and Polarimetric Observables at X-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Troemel, Silke; Simmer, Clemens

    2015-04-01

    Microphysical processes govern the evolution of drop size distribution (DSD) during the development of precipitating systems. Thus, an accurate knowledge on precipitating systems from a microphysical perspective is required for better quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE). Additionally, detection of microphysical processes in 3D polarimetric radar volumes paves the way for better parameterizations in numerical weather predictions (NWP). In this study, we focus on the impact of different microphysical processes on rain rate (RR) and polarimetric observables at X band. Microphysical processes during the evolution of warm-rain precipitating systems, including size sorting, evaporation, coalescence and breakup, are taken into account. Assuming that vertical rain shaft is composed of liquid spheroids distributed in a normalized Gamma size distribution, microphysical processes are reconstructed. The variation of RR governed by microphysical processes is also examined. Unique fingerprints caused by microphysical processes have been identified in polarimetric radar observations. For size sorting, large rain drops concentrating near ground surface or at leading edge induce strong Zdr (differential reflectivity) accompanied by small Zh (reflectivity). A larger mean size in DSD results in stronger Zdr during size sorting. The increasing mean size due to evaporation and coalescence enhances Zdr, while Zh during evaporation is reduced by the depletion of small rain drops. The reduction of Zh ranges between -10 dB and 0 dB considering different DSDs during evaporation. Zh, Zdr and Kdp (specific differential phase) all decrease when large rain drops break up. The evolution of DSD which depends on the ongoing microphysical processes results in a variation in RR. Though size sorting due to differential sedimentation occurs, RR approaches stable within 15 min. Suffering from vertical wind shear, RR is reduced because of the categorization of rain drops with different terminal

  11. Observation of an electron band above the Fermi level in FeTe0.55Se0.45 from in-situ surface doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, P.; Ma, J.; Qian, T.; Richard, P.; Ding, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y.-M.; Fedorov, A. V.; Denlinger, J. D.; Gu, G. D.

    2014-01-01

    We used in-situ potassium (K) evaporation to dope the surface of the iron-based superconductor FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 . The systematic study of the bands near the Fermi level confirms that electrons are doped into the system, allowing us to tune the Fermi level of this material and to access otherwise unoccupied electronic states. In particular, we observe an electron band located above the Fermi level before doping that shares similarities with a small three-dimensional pocket observed in the cousin, heavily electron-doped KFe 2−x Se 2 compound.

  12. The Narrowest Band Gap Ever Observed in Molecular Ferroelectrics: Hexane-1,6-diammonium Pentaiodobismuth(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han-Yue; Wei, Zhenhong; Li, Peng-Fei; Tang, Yuan-Yuan; Liao, Wei-Qiang; Ye, Heng-Yun; Cai, Hu; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2018-01-08

    Narrow band gaps and excellent ferroelectricity are intrinsically paradoxical in ferroelectrics as the leakage current caused by an increase in the number of thermally excited carriers will lead to a deterioration of ferroelectricity. A new molecular ferroelectric, hexane-1,6-diammonium pentaiodobismuth (HDA-BiI 5 ), was now developed through band gap engineering of organic-inorganic hybrid materials. It features an intrinsic band gap of 1.89 eV, and thus represents the first molecular ferroelectric with a band gap of less than 2.0 eV. Simultaneously, low-temperature solution processing was successfully applied to fabricate high-quality ferroelectric thin films based on HDA-BiI 5 , for which high-precision controllable domain flips were realized. Owing to its narrow band gap and excellent ferroelectricity, HDA-BiI 5 can be considered as a milestone in the exploitation of molecular ferroelectrics, with promising applications in high-density data storage and photovoltaic conversion. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Nonpolar nitrous oxide dimer: Observation of combination bands of (14N2O)2 and (15N2O)2 involving the torsion and antigeared bending modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, M.; Michaelian, K. H.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.

    2012-03-01

    Spectra of the nonpolar nitrous oxide dimer in the region of the N2O ν1 fundamental band were observed in a supersonic slit-jet apparatus. The expansion gas was probed using radiation from a quantum cascade or a tunable diode laser, with both lasers employed in a rapid-scan signal averaging mode. Four bands were observed and analyzed: new combination bands involving the intermolecular conrotation of the monomers (Ag antigeared bend) for (14N2O)2 and (15N2O)2, the previously reported torsional combination band for (14N2O)2 with improved signal-to-noise ratio, and the same torsional combination band for (15N2O)2. The resulting frequencies for the intermolecular antigeared mode are 96.0926(1) and 95.4912(1) cm-1 for (14N2O)2 and (15N2O)2, respectively. This is the third of the four intermolecular frequencies which has now been measured experimentally, the others being the out-of-plane torsion and the geared bend modes. Our experimental results are in good agreement with two recent high level ab initio theoretical calculations.

  14. LOCAL BENCHMARKS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF MAJOR-MERGER GALAXIES-SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF A K-BAND SELECTED SAMPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, C. Kevin; Cheng Yiwen; Lu Nanyao; Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Cutri, Roc; Domingue, Donovan; Huang Jiasheng; Gao Yu; Sun, W.-H.; Surace, Jason

    2010-01-01

    We present Spitzer observations for a sample of close major-merger galaxy pairs (KPAIR sample) selected from cross-matches between the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3. The goals are to study the star formation activity in these galaxies and to set a local bench mark for the cosmic evolution of close major mergers. The Spitzer KPAIR sample (27 pairs, 54 galaxies) includes all spectroscopically confirmed spiral-spiral (S+S) and spiral-elliptical (S+E) pairs in a parent sample that is complete for primaries brighter than K = 12.5 mag, projected separations of 5 h -1 kpc ≤ s ≤ 20 h -1 kpc, and mass ratios ≤2.5. The Spitzer data, consisting of images in seven bands (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8, 24, 70, 160 μm), show very diversified IR emission properties. Compared to single spiral galaxies in a control sample, only spiral galaxies in S+S pairs show significantly enhanced specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M), whereas spiral galaxies in S+E pairs do not. Furthermore, the SFR enhancement of spiral galaxies in S+S pairs is highly mass-dependent. Only those with M ∼> 10 10.5 M sun show significant enhancement. Relatively low-mass (M ∼ 10 10 M sun ) spirals in S+S pairs have about the same SFR/M compared to their counterparts in the control sample, while those with 10 11 M sun have on average a ∼3 times higher SFR/M than single spirals. There is evidence for a correlation between the global star formation activities (but not the nuclear activities) of the component galaxies in massive S+S major-merger pairs (the H olmberg effect ) . There is no significant difference in the SFR/M between the primaries and the secondaries, nor between spirals of SEP KPAIR =2.54 x 10 -4 (M sun yr -1 Mpc -3 ).

  15. N-parameter retrievals from L-band microwave observations acquired over a variety of crop fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pardé, M.; Wigneron, J-P.; Waldteufel, P.

    2004-01-01

    A number of studies have shown the feasibility of estimating surface soil moisture from L-band passive microwave measurements. Such measurements should be acquired in the near future by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The SMOS measurements will be done at many incidence angles...

  16. High-resolution polarimetric X-band weather radar observations at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, T.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the horizontally scanning polarimetric X-band radar IDRA (IRCTR Drizzle Radar) was installed on top of the 213 m high mast at the Dutch meteorological observatory Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR) at Netherlands. This radar complements a large variety of measurement

  17. Weekly gridded Aquarius L-band radiometer/scatterometer observations and salinity retrievals over the polar regions - Part 2: Initial product analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, L.; Dinnat, E. P.; Koenig, L. S.

    2014-05-01

    Following the development and availability of Aquarius weekly polar-gridded products, this study presents the spatial and temporal radiometer and scatterometer observations at L band (frequency ~1.4 GHz) over the cryosphere including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, sea ice in both hemispheres, and over sub-Arctic land for monitoring the soil freeze/thaw state. We provide multiple examples of scientific applications for the L-band data over the cryosphere. For example, we show that over the Greenland Ice Sheet, the unusual 2012 melt event lead to an L-band brightness temperature (TB) sustained decrease of ~5 K at horizontal polarization. Over the Antarctic ice sheet, normalized radar cross section (NRCS) observations recorded during ascending and descending orbits are significantly different, highlighting the anisotropy of the ice cover. Over sub-Arctic land, both passive and active observations show distinct values depending on the soil physical state (freeze/thaw). Aquarius sea surface salinity (SSS) retrievals in the polar waters are also presented. SSS variations could serve as an indicator of fresh water input to the ocean from the cryosphere, however the presence of sea ice often contaminates the SSS retrievals, hindering the analysis. The weekly grided Aquarius L-band products used are distributed by the US Snow and Ice Data Center at blank"> http://nsidc.org/data/aquarius/index.html , and show potential for cryospheric studies.

  18. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy of sup 1 sup 9 sup 0 Po: First observation of a low-lying prolate band in Po isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Van De Vel, K; Andreyev, A N; Page, R D; Kettunen, H; Greenlees, P T; Jones, P; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Kankaanpaeae, H; Keenan, A; Kuusiniemi, P; Leino, M; Muikku, M; Nieminen, P; Rahkila, P; Uusitalo, J; Eskola, Kari J; Hürstel, A; Le Coz, Y L; Smith, M B; Van Duppen, P; Wyss, R

    2003-01-01

    Gamma rays from excited states of sup 1 sup 9 sup 0 Po have been observed using the Jurosphere Ge-detector array coupled to the RITU gas-filled separator. They were associated with a collective band which from spin 4 Planck constant onwards resembles the prolate rotational bands known in the isotones sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Pb and sup 1 sup 8 sup 6 Hg. This indicates that in sup 1 sup 9 sup 0 Po the prolate configuration becomes yrast above I=2 Planck constant. The experimental results are interpreted in a two-band mixing calculation and are in agreement with alpha-decay data and potential energy surface calculations. (orig.)

  19. Inferring Land Surface Model Parameters for the Assimilation of Satellite-Based L-Band Brightness Temperature Observations into a Soil Moisture Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission provides global measurements of L-band brightness temperatures at horizontal and vertical polarization and a variety of incidence angles that are sensitive to moisture and temperature conditions in the top few centimeters of the soil. These L-band observations can therefore be assimilated into a land surface model to obtain surface and root zone soil moisture estimates. As part of the observation operator, such an assimilation system requires a radiative transfer model (RTM) that converts geophysical fields (including soil moisture and soil temperature) into modeled L-band brightness temperatures. At the global scale, the RTM parameters and the climatological soil moisture conditions are still poorly known. Using look-up tables from the literature to estimate the RTM parameters usually results in modeled L-band brightness temperatures that are strongly biased against the SMOS observations, with biases varying regionally and seasonally. Such biases must be addressed within the land data assimilation system. In this presentation, the estimation of the RTM parameters is discussed for the NASA GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, which is based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the Catchment land surface model. In the GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, soil moisture and brightness temperature biases are addressed in three stages. First, the global soil properties and soil hydraulic parameters that are used in the Catchment model were revised to minimize the bias in the modeled soil moisture, as verified against available in situ soil moisture measurements. Second, key parameters of the "tau-omega" RTM were calibrated prior to data assimilation using an objective function that minimizes the climatological differences between the modeled L-band brightness temperatures and the corresponding SMOS observations. Calibrated parameters include soil roughness parameters, vegetation structure parameters

  20. Observation of coherently enhanced tunable narrow-band terahertz transition radiation from a relativistic sub-picosecond electron bunch train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piot, P.; Maxwell, T. J.; Sun, Y.-E; Ruan, J.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Rihaoui, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (δf/f≅20% at f≅0.5THz) transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. The bunch train is generated via a transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchange technique. We also show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

  1. K'-band observations of the evil eye galaxy: Are the optical and near-infrared dust albedos identical?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Adolf N.; Lindell, Rebecca S.; Block, David L.; Evans, Rhodri

    1994-05-01

    New measurements of the reduction of the V-band surface brightness across the prominent dust feature in the galaxy NGC 4826 are compared with corresponding increases in the V-K' color within the context of radiative transfer models invoking both absorption and scattering. The K'-band surface brightness is found to be higher than expected from standard dust models. We interpret the difference as resulting from a high effective dust albedo at K', with a likely value in excess of 0.8, provided the near-IR extinction curve in NGC 4826 is identical to the Galactic one. The high effective albedo may result from scattering by dust with a maximum grain size at least twice as large as assumed by standard models, a conclusion already indirectly hinted at by recent studies of dust star-forming regions and reflection nebulae. At least part of the high effective albedo at K' may result from near-IR nonequilibrium continuum emission attributable to very small grains.

  2. Observation of band bending of metal/high-k Si capacitor with high energy x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and its application to interface dipole measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakushima, K.; Okamoto, K.; Tachi, K.; Song, J.; Sato, S.; Kawanago, T.; Tsutsui, K.; Sugii, N.; Ahmet, P.; Hattori, T.; Iwai, H.

    2008-11-01

    Band bendings of Si substrates have been observed using hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. With a capability of collecting photoelectrons generated as deep as 40 nm, the binding energy shift in a core level caused by the potential profile at the surface of the substrate results in a spectrum broadening. The broadening is found to be significant when heavily doped substrates are used owing to its steep potential profile. The surface potential of the substrate can be obtained by deconvolution of the spectrum. This method has been applied to observe the band bending profile of metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with high-k gate dielectrics. By comparing the band bending profiles of heavily-doped n+- and p+-Si substrates, the interface dipoles presented at interfaces can be estimated. In the case of W gated La2O3/La-silicate capacitor, an interface dipole to shift the potential of -0.45 V has been estimated at La-silicate/Si interface, which effectively reduces the apparent work function of W. On the other hand, an interface dipole of 0.03-0.07 V has been found to exist at Hf-silicate/SiO2 interface for W gated HfO2/Hf-silicate/SiO2 capacitor.

  3. Ground-based L-band active and passive observations of growing corn and soybean during SMAPVEX16-MicroWEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Jasmeet; Liu, Pang-Wei; Chakrabarti, Subit; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Monsivais-Huertero, Alejandro; Bongiovanni, Tara; DeRoo, Roger; England, Anthony

    2017-04-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) and the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) missions include microwave radiometers at L-band that provides global observations of SM at 36 and 25km, respectively, with a repeat coverage of every 2-3 days. Agricultural regions, with their highly dynamic vegetation and spatial heterogeneity are particularly challenging for soil moisture retrieval algorithms. The Microwave Water and Energy Balance Experiment was conducted as part of the SMAP Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX16-MicroWEX) during the summer of 2016 in a predominantly agricultural region in Iowa, USA. During SMAPVEX16-MicroWEX, ground-based observations of active and passive signatures were obtained every 15-30 minutes during a growing season of corn and soybean from May 23 through September 2, 2016. The field site was within the South Fork Watershed at the Sweeney Farms, near the city of Buckeye. The University of Florida L-band Automated Radar System (UF-LARS) observed the backscatter from corn. The brightness temperatures (TB) at the corn site were observed by the University of Michigan L-Band Radiometer (UMLMR), while those at the soybean site were observed by the University of Florida L-band Microwave Radiometer (UFLMR). Concurrent and co-located observations of soil, vegetation, and micro-meteorological conditions were also conducted at both the sites. The passive signatures from both the corn and the soybean sites were found to be similar during the early season, as both the fields were nearly bare terrains. As expected, the TB diverge during the mid-season, when the vegetation water content (VWC) of the corn is about 2 kg/m2. Interestingly, the TB of the two crops are similar again toward the end of the season, when VWC of the soybean crop reaches about 2 kg/m2. Preliminary modeling results show that physically-based emission models significantly underestimate vegetation opacity for a mature soybean canopy. These findings provide insights into

  4. The observation of valence band change on resistive switching of epitaxial Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3 film using removable liquid electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2015-12-01

    The resistive switching (RS) phenomenon in transition metal oxides (TMOs) has received a great deal of attention for non-volatile memory applications. Various RS mechanisms have been suggested as to explain the observed RS characteristics. Many reports suggest that changes of interface and the role of oxygen vacancies originate in RS phenomena; therefore, in this study, we use a liquid drop of mercury as the top electrode (TE), epitaxial Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (PCMO) (110) film of the perovskite manganite family for RS material, and an Nb-doped (0.7 at. %) SrTiO3 (100) single crystal as the substrate to observe changes in the interface between the TE and TMOs. The use of removable liquid electrode Hg drop as TE not only enables observation of the RS characteristic as a bipolar RS curve (counterclockwise) but also facilitates analysis of the valence band of the PCMO surface after resistive switching via photoelectron spectroscopy. The observed I-V behaviors of the low and high resistance states (HRS) are explained with an electrochemical migration model in PCMO film where accumulated oxygen vacancies at the interface between the Hg TE and PCMO (110) surface induce the HRS. The interpreted RS mechanism is directly confirmed via valence band spectrum analysis.

  5. Prompt and delayed spectroscopy of 203At: Observation of a shears band and a 29 /2+ isomeric state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auranen, K.; Uusitalo, J.; Juutinen, S.; Badran, H.; Defranchi Bisso, F.; Cox, D.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; HerzáÅ, A.; Jakobsson, U.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Leino, M.; Lightfoot, A.; Mallaburn, M. J.; Neuvonen, O.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Partanen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Wang, Y. K.

    2018-02-01

    Using fusion-evaporation reactions, a gas-filled recoil separator, recoil-gating technique and recoil-isomer decay tagging technique we have extended the level scheme of 203At(N =118 ) significantly. We have observed an isomeric [τ =14.1 (3 )μ s ] state with a spin and parity of 29 /2 + . The isomeric state is suggested to originate from the π (h9 /2 ) ⊗|202Po;11-> coupling, and it is depopulated through 286 keV E 2 and 366 keV E 3 transitions. In addition, we have observed a cascade of magnetic-dipole transitions which is suggested to be generated by the shears mechanism.

  6. The broad-band X-ray spectrum of IC 4329A from a joint NuSTAR/Suzaku observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenneman, L. W.; Madejski, G.; Fuerst, F.

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained a deep, simultaneous observation of the bright, nearby Seyfert galaxy IC 4329A with Suzaku andNuSTAR. Through a detailed spectral analysis, we are able to robustly separate the continuum, absorption, and distant reflection components in the spectrum. The absorbing column is found...... also updated our previously reported measurement of the high-energy cutoff of the hard X-ray emission using both observatories rather than justNuSTAR alone: Ecut = 186±14 keV. This high-energy cutoff acts as a proxy for the temperature of the coronal electron plasma, enabling us to further separate...

  7. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperature and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate in Hurricanes Earl And Karl (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy; James, Mark; Roberts, Brent J.; Biswax, Sayak; Uhlhorn, Eric; Black, Peter; Linwood Jones, W.; Johnson, Jimmy; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem

    2012-01-01

    Ocean surface emission is affected by: a) Sea surface temperature. b) Wind speed (foam fraction). c) Salinity After production of calibrated Tb fields, geophysical fields wind speed and rain rate (or column) are retrieved. HIRAD utilizes NASA Instrument Incubator Technology: a) Provides unique observations of sea surface wind, temp and rain b) Advances understanding & prediction of hurricane intensity c) Expands Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer capabilities d) Uses synthetic thinned array and RFI mitigation technology of Lightweight Rain Radiometer (NASA Instrument Incubator) Passive Microwave C-Band Radiometer with Freq: 4, 5, 6 & 6.6 GHz: a) Version 1: H-pol for ocean wind speed, b) Version 2: dual ]pol for ocean wind vectors. Performance Characteristics: a) Earth Incidence angle: 0deg - 60deg, b) Spatial Resolution: 2-5 km, c) Swath: approx.70 km for 20 km altitude. Observational Goals: WS 10 - >85 m/s RR 5 - > 100 mm/hr.

  8. Mesoscale spiral vortex embedded within a Lake Michigan snow squall band - High resolution satellite observations and numerical model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Walter A.; Keen, Cecil S.; Hjelmfelt, Mark; Pease, Steven R.

    1988-01-01

    It is known that Great Lakes snow squall convection occurs in a variety of different modes depending on various factors such as air-water temperature contrast, boundary-layer wind shear, and geostrophic wind direction. An exceptional and often neglected source of data for mesoscale cloud studies is the ultrahigh resolution multispectral data produced by Landsat satellites. On October 19, 1972, a clearly defined spiral vortex was noted in a Landsat-1 image near the southern end of Lake Michigan during an exceptionally early cold air outbreak over a still very warm lake. In a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional Eulerian hydrostatic primitive equation mesoscale model with an initially uniform wind field, a definite analog to the observed vortex was generated. This suggests that intense surface heating can be a principal cause in the development of a low-level mesoscale vortex.

  9. Combined optical, EISCAT and magnetic observations of the omega bands/Ps6 pulsations and an auroral torch in the late morning hours: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We present here the results of multi-instrument observations of auroral torch and Ps6 magnetic pulsations, which are assumed to be the magnetic signature of the spatially periodic optical auroras known as omega bands. Data from TV and ASC cameras in Barentsburg and Ny Ålesund, EISCAT radars in Longyearbyen and Tromsø, as well as IMAGE network were used in this study. The auroral phenomenon which was considered differed from that previously discussed, as it occurred both in an unusual place (high latitudes and at an unusual time (late morning hours. We show that this might occur due to specific conditions in the interplanetary medium, causing the appropriate deformation of the magnetosphere. In such a case, the IMF turned out to be an additional factor in driving the regime of Ps6/omega bands, namely, only by acting together could a substorm onset in the night sector and Bz variations result in their generation. Since the presumable source of Ps6/omega bands does not co-locate with convection reversal boundaries, we suggest the interpretation of the phenomena in the frame of the interchange instability instead of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that is widely discussed in the literature in connection with omega auroras. Some numerical characteristics of the auroral torch were obtained. We also emphasize to the dark hole in the background luminosity and the short-lived azimuthally-restricted auroral arc, since their appearance could initiate the auroral torch development. Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena; Plasma convection; Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction

  10. Combined optical, EISCAT and magnetic observations of the omega bands/Ps6 pulsations and an auroral torch in the late morning hours: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We present here the results of multi-instrument observations of auroral torch and Ps6 magnetic pulsations, which are assumed to be the magnetic signature of the spatially periodic optical auroras known as omega bands. Data from TV and ASC cameras in Barentsburg and Ny Ålesund, EISCAT radars in Longyearbyen and Tromsø, as well as IMAGE network were used in this study. The auroral phenomenon which was considered differed from that previously discussed, as it occurred both in an unusual place (high latitudes and at an unusual time (late morning hours. We show that this might occur due to specific conditions in the interplanetary medium, causing the appropriate deformation of the magnetosphere. In such a case, the IMF turned out to be an additional factor in driving the regime of Ps6/omega bands, namely, only by acting together could a substorm onset in the night sector and Bz variations result in their generation. Since the presumable source of Ps6/omega bands does not co-locate with convection reversal boundaries, we suggest the interpretation of the phenomena in the frame of the interchange instability instead of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that is widely discussed in the literature in connection with omega auroras. Some numerical characteristics of the auroral torch were obtained. We also emphasize to the dark hole in the background luminosity and the short-lived azimuthally-restricted auroral arc, since their appearance could initiate the auroral torch development.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena; Plasma convection; Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction

  11. Formation of bands of ultrafine beryllium particles during rapid solidification of Al-Be alloys: Modeling and direct observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmer, J.W.; Tanner, L.E.; Smith, P.M.; Wall, M.A.; Aziz, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid solidification of dilute hyper-eutectic and monotectic alloys sometimes produces a dispersion of ultrafine randomly-oriented particles that lie in arrays parallel to the advancing solidification front. The authors characterize this effect in Al-Be where Be-rich particles with diameters on the order of 10 nm form in arrays spaced approximately 25 nm apart, and they present a model of macroscopically steady state but microscopically oscillatory motion of the solidification front to explain this unusual microstructure. The proposed mechanism involves; (i) the build-up of rejected solute in a diffusional boundary layer which slows down the growing crystal matrix, (2) the boundary layer composition entering a metastable liquid miscibility gap, (3) homogeneous nucleation of solute rich liquid droplets in the boundary layer, and crystallization of these droplets, and (4) growth of the matrix past the droplets and its reformation into a planar interface. The size of the Be-rich particles is limited by the beryllium supersaturation in the diffusional boundary layer. A numerical model was developed to investigate this solidification mechanism, and the results of the model are in good agreement with experimental observations of rapidly solidified Al-5 at.% Be

  12. New Observations of C-band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate From the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Buckley, C. D.; Biswas, S.; May, C.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; hide

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on the WB-57 during NASA's GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August September of 2010. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP campaign will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the GRIP campaign, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eyewall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  13. Multiband Observations of the Quasar PKS 2326–502 during Active and Quiescent Gamma-Ray States in 2010–2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutka, Michael S. [The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Carpenter, Bryce D.; Gehrels, Neil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ojha, Roopesh [UMBC/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Finke, Justin D. [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Code 7653, 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); D’Ammando, Filippo [Università di Bologna Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, INAF-IRA, Bologna (Italy); Kadler, Matthias [Lehrstuhl für Astronomie, Universität Würzburg, Emil -Fischer-Straße 31, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Edwards, Philip G. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); Stevens, Jamie [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, 1828 Yarrie Lake Road, Narrabri NSW 2390 (Australia); Torresi, Eleonora; Grandi, Paola [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, (National Institute of Astrophysics) INAF-IASFBO, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Nesci, Roberto [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, (National Institute of Astrophysics) INAF-IAPS, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Krauß, Felicia [GRAPPA and Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Müller, Cornelia [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Wilms, Joern, E-mail: ditko86@gmail.com, E-mail: carpbr01@gmail.com [Remeis Observatory and ECAP, Sternwartstr. 7, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    Quasi-simultaneous observations of the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar PKS 2326−502 were carried out in the γ -ray, X-ray, UV, optical, near-infrared, and radio bands. Using these observations, we are able to characterize the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source during two flaring and one quiescent γ -ray states. These data were used to constrain one-zone leptonic models of the SEDs of each flare and investigate the physical conditions giving rise to them. While modeling one flare required only changes in the electron spectrum compared to the quiescent state, modeling the other flare required changes in both the electron spectrum and the size of the emitting region. These results are consistent with an emerging pattern of two broad classes of flaring states seen in blazars. Type 1 flares are explained by changes solely in the electron distribution, whereas type 2 flares require a change in an additional parameter. This suggests that different flares, even in the same source, may result from different physical conditions or different regions in the jet.

  14. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) during GRIP and HS3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2013-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and at the time of this writing plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  15. Hyperspectral observation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollution in coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrova, Olga; Loupian, Evgeny; Mityagina, Marina; Uvarov, Ivan

    The work presents results of anthropogenic and biogenic pollution detection in coastal zones of the Black and Caspian Seas based on satellite hyperspetral data provided by the Hyperion and HICO instruments. Techniques developed on the basis of the analysis of spectral characteristics calculated in special points were employed to address the following problems: (a) assessment of the blooming intensity of cyanobacteria and their distribution in bays of western Crimea and discrimination between anthropogenic pollutant discharge events and algae bloom; (b) detection of anthropogenic pollution in Crimean lakes utilized as industrial liquid discharge reservoirs; (c) detection of oil pollution in areas of shelf oil production in the Caspian Sea. Information values of different spectral bands and their composites were estimated in connection with the retrieval of the main sea water components: phytoplankton, suspended matter and colored organic matter, and also various anthropogenic pollutants, including oil. Software tools for thematic hyperspectral data processing in application to the investigation of sea coastal zones and internal water bodies were developed on the basis of the See the Sea geoportal created by the Space Research Institute RAS. The geoportal is focused on the study of processes in the world ocean with the emphasis on the advantages of satellite systems of observation. The tools that were introduced into the portal allow joint analysis of quasi-simultaneous satellite data, in particular data from the Hyperion, HICO, OLI Landsat-8, ETM Landsat-7 and TM Landsat-5 instruments. Results of analysis attempts combining data from different sensors are discussed. Their strong and weak points are highlighted. The study was completed with partial financial support from The Russian Foundation for Basic Research grants # 14-05-00520-a and 13-07-12017.

  16. A particle swarm optimized kernel-based clustering method for crop mapping from multi-temporal polarimetric L-band SAR observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiminia, Haifa; Homayouni, Saeid; McNairn, Heather; Safari, Abdoreza

    2017-06-01

    Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) data, thanks to their specific characteristics such as high resolution, weather and daylight independence, have become a valuable source of information for environment monitoring and management. The discrimination capability of observations acquired by these sensors can be used for land cover classification and mapping. The aim of this paper is to propose an optimized kernel-based C-means clustering algorithm for agriculture crop mapping from multi-temporal PolSAR data. Firstly, several polarimetric features are extracted from preprocessed data. These features are linear polarization intensities, and several statistical and physical based decompositions such as Cloude-Pottier, Freeman-Durden and Yamaguchi techniques. Then, the kernelized version of hard and fuzzy C-means clustering algorithms are applied to these polarimetric features in order to identify crop types. The kernel function, unlike the conventional partitioning clustering algorithms, simplifies the non-spherical and non-linearly patterns of data structure, to be clustered easily. In addition, in order to enhance the results, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is used to tune the kernel parameters, cluster centers and to optimize features selection. The efficiency of this method was evaluated by using multi-temporal UAVSAR L-band images acquired over an agricultural area near Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, during June and July in 2012. The results demonstrate more accurate crop maps using the proposed method when compared to the classical approaches, (e.g. 12% improvement in general). In addition, when the optimization technique is used, greater improvement is observed in crop classification, e.g. 5% in overall. Furthermore, a strong relationship between Freeman-Durden volume scattering component, which is related to canopy structure, and phenological growth stages is observed.

  17. Seeing the Night in a New Light—VIIRS Day/Night Band Capabilities and Prospects for a Joint Suomi/JPSS-1 Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbrig, J. E.; Miller, S. D.; Straka, W. C.; Seaman, C.; Combs, C.; Heidinger, A.; Walther, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Day/Night Band (DNB), a special sensor on board the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) devoted to low-light visible imaging, has representated a kind of `disruptive technology' in terms of how we observe the nocturnal environment. Since its debut on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP), launched in Fall 2011, the DNB has solidified its claim to fame as the most novel addition to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's future polar-oribitng program, represented by the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The first member of which (JPSS-1) is scheduled to launch in Fall of 2017, joining Suomi in its 1330 local time ascending node orbit. JPSS-1 will be displaced by ½ orbit ahead of Suomi, providing roughly 50 min between overpasses. Importantly, JPSS-1 will provide a second DNB observation, enabling the first time-resolved measurements of low-light visible at low and mid-latitudes from this new sensor technology. The DNB provides unprecedented capability to leverage light emissions from natural and artificial nocturnal sources, ranging from moonlight and city lights, ships, fires, lightning flashes, and even atmospheric nightglow. The calibrated DNB observations enable use of moonlight in similar way to daytime visible, allowing for quantitative description of cloud and aerosol optical properties. This presentation updates the community on DNB-related research initiatives. Statistics based on a multi-year collection of data at Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia and White Sands, New Mexico lend confidence to the performance of a lunar irradiance model used to enable nighttime optical property retrievals. Selected examples of notable events, including the devastating Portugal wildfires, emergence of the massive rift in the Larsen C ice shelf, and examples from the growing compilation of atmospheric gravity waves in nightglow, will also be highlighted.

  18. Anomalous ELF phenomena in the Schumann resonance band as observed at Moshiri (Japan in possible association with an earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The ELF observation at Moshiri (geographic coordinates: 44.29° N, 142.21° E in Hokkaido, Japan, was used to find anomalous phenomena in the Schumann resonance band, possibly associated with a large earthquake (magnitude of 7.8 in Taiwan on 26 December 2006. The Schumann resonance signal (fundamental (n=1, 8 Hz; 2nd harmonic, 14 Hz, 3rd harmonic, 20 Hz, 4th, 26 Hz etc. is known to be supported by electromagnetic radiation from the global thunderstorms, and the anomaly in this paper is characterized by an increase in intensity at frequencies from the third to fourth Schumann resonance modes mainly in the BEW component with a minor corresponding increase in the BNS component also. Spectral modification takes place only in the interval of 21:00 UT±1 h, which corresponds to the global lightning activity concentrated in America. While distortions were absent in other lightning-active UT intervals, in particular, around 08:00 UT±1 h (Asian thunderstorms and around 15±1 h (African lightning activity. The anomaly occurred on 23 December three days prior to the main shock. The results observed were explained in terms of ELF radio wave perturbation caused by the lower ionospheric depression around the earthquake epicenter. The difference in the path lengths between the direct radio wave from an active global thunderstorm center and the wave scattered from the non-uniformity above Taiwan causes interference at higher resonance modes, which is successful in explaining the observational data.

  19. LOFAR low-band antenna observations of the 3C 295 and Boötes fields: source counts and ultra-steep spectrum sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Weeren, R. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Williams, W. L.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Rafferty, D. A.; Van der Tol, S. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Tasse, C. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Heald, G. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), P.O. Box 2, NL-7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); White, G. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Open University, Buckinghamshire MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Shulevski, A. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, P.O. Box 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Best, P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Intema, H. T.; Bhatnagar, S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Reich, W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Van Velzen, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics (IMAPP), Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Enßlin, T. A. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschildstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Prandoni, I.; Brunetti, G. [INAF—Istituto di Radioastronomia, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); De Gasperin, F. [Hamburger Sternwarte, University of Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Jamrozy, M., E-mail: rvanweeren@cfa.harvard.edu [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, 30-244 Kraków (Poland); and others

    2014-10-01

    We present Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Low Band observations of the Boötes and 3C 295 fields. Our images made at 34, 46, and 62 MHz reach noise levels of 12, 8, and 5 mJy beam{sup –1}, making them the deepest images ever obtained in this frequency range. In total, we detect between 300 and 400 sources in each of these images, covering an area of 17-52 deg{sup 2}. From the observations, we derive Euclidean-normalized differential source counts. The 62 MHz source counts agree with previous GMRT 153 MHz and Very Large Array 74 MHz differential source counts, scaling with a spectral index of –0.7. We find that a spectral index scaling of –0.5 is required to match up the LOFAR 34 MHz source counts. This result is also in agreement with source counts from the 38 MHz 8C survey, indicating that the average spectral index of radio sources flattens toward lower frequencies. We also find evidence for spectral flattening using the individual flux measurements of sources between 34 and 1400 MHz and by calculating the spectral index averaged over the source population. To select ultra-steep spectrum (α < –1.1) radio sources that could be associated with massive high-redshift radio galaxies, we compute spectral indices between 62 MHz, 153 MHz, and 1.4 GHz for sources in the Boötes field. We cross-correlate these radio sources with optical and infrared catalogs and fit the spectral energy distribution to obtain photometric redshifts. We find that most of these ultra-steep spectrum sources are located in the 0.7 ≲ z ≲ 2.5 range.

  20. Defining a relationship between incident wave parameters and morphologic evolution of shoals on ebb tidal deltas using long term X-band radar observation from RIOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humberston, J. L.; McNinch, J.; Lippmann, T. C.

    2016-12-01

    The morphology of tidal inlet ebb-shoals varies dynamically over time, particularly in response to large wave events. Understanding which wave qualities most influence shoals' evolution would support advancements in sediment bypassing models as well as targeted maintenance dredging for hydrographic purposes. Unfortunately, shallow and rapidly changing bathymetry, turbid waters and ambiguous wave speeds resulting from multiple shoaling and de-shoaling areas limits many traditional surveying techniques from obtaining the spatial and temporal resolution necessary to effectively characterize shoal development. The Radar Inlet Observing System (RIOS) is a uniquely designed mobile X-band radar system that can be deployed to inlet environments and, using roof-mounted solar panels and an automatically triggered highly efficient diesel generator, run automated hourly collections and wirelessly stream data for up to several months at a time in nearly all weather and water conditions. During 2015 and early 2016, RIOS was deployed to St. Augustine Inlet, FL., New River Inlet, N.C., and Oregon Inlet, N.C. for periods of one to six months to allow for measureable shoal evolution. During deployments, ten minute collections (at 1 Hz) were conducted every hour and the data gridded to a 5m alongshore/cross-shore grid. Raw intensity returns were time-averaged and analyzed to define three metrics of shoal evolution: movement direction, movement velocity and inferred bathymetry. For each location and time period, wave frequencies, wave directions and significant wave heights were collected from the nearest wave-buoy. Time lapse videos of shoal positions were inspected and used in concert with cross-correlations values from each pair of shoal and wave parameters to determine the incident wave qualities most strongly relating to shoal evolution. Preliminary results suggest wave height, more than frequency, controls shoal movement. Wave direction and size collaboratively appear to direct

  1. Time-resolved observation of band-gap shrinking and electron-lattice thermalization within X-ray excited gallium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaja, Beata; Medvedev, Nikita; Tkachenko, Victor; Maltezopoulos, Theophilos; Wurth, Wilfried

    2015-12-11

    Femtosecond X-ray irradiation of solids excites energetic photoelectrons that thermalize on a timescale of a few hundred femtoseconds. The thermalized electrons exchange energy with the lattice and heat it up. Experiments with X-ray free-electron lasers have unveiled so far the details of the electronic thermalization. In this work we show that the data on transient optical reflectivity measured in GaAs irradiated with femtosecond X-ray pulses can be used to follow electron-lattice relaxation up to a few tens of picoseconds. With a dedicated theoretical framework, we explain the so far unexplained reflectivity overshooting as a result of band-gap shrinking. We also obtain predictions for a timescale of electron-lattice thermalization, initiated by conduction band electrons in the temperature regime of a few eVs. The conduction and valence band carriers were then strongly non-isothermal. The presented scheme is of general applicability and can stimulate further studies of relaxation within X-ray excited narrow band-gap semiconductors.

  2. Morphologies of omega band auroras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Natsuo; Yukimatu, Akira Sessai; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Hori, Tomoaki

    2017-08-01

    We examined the morphological signatures of 315 omega band aurora events observed using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm ground-based all-sky imager network over a period of 8 years. We find that omega bands can be classified into the following three subtypes: (1) classical (O-type) omega bands, (2) torch or tongue (T-type) omega bands, and (3) combinations of classical and torch or tongue (O/T-type) omega bands. The statistical results show that T-type bands occur the most frequently (45%), followed by O/T-type bands (35%) and O-type bands (18%). We also examined the morphologies of the omega bands during their formation, from the growth period to the declining period through the maximum period. Interestingly, the omega bands are not stable, but rather exhibit dynamic changes in shape, intensity, and motion. They grow from small-scale bumps (seeds) at the poleward boundary of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, rather than via the rotation or shear motion of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, and do not exhibit any shear motion during the periods of auroral activity growth. Furthermore, the auroral luminosity is observed to increase during the declining period, and the total time from the start of the growth period to the end of the declining period is found to be about 20 min. Such dynamical signatures may be important in determining the mechanism responsible for omega band formation.

  3. Magnetic structure of deformation-induced shear bands in amorphous Fe80B16Si4 observed by magnetic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.W.; Hawley, M.E.; Markiewicz, D.J.; Spaepen, F.; Barth, E.P.

    1999-01-01

    Processing-induced magnetic structures in amorphous metallic alloys are of interest because of their impact on the performance of materials used in electric device applications. Plastic deformation associated with cutting or bending the material to the desired shape occurs through the formation of shear bands. The stress associated with these shear bands induces magnetic domains that can lead to power losses through interaction with the fields and currents involved in normal device operation. These domains have been studied previously using a variety of techniques capable of imaging magnetic domain structures. In an effort to better characterize and understand these issues, we have applied atomic and magnetic force microscopy to these materials to provide three-dimensional nanometer-scale topographic resolution and micrometer-scale magnetic resolution. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  4. Direct Observation on the Evolution of Shear Banding and Buckling in Tungsten Fiber Reinforced Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, M. Q.; Chen, X. W.; Fu, H. M.; Zhang, H. F.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of micro-damage and deformation of each phase in the composite plays a pivotal role in the clarification of deformation mechanism of composite. However, limited model and mechanical experiments were conducted to reveal the evolution of the deformation of the two phases in the tungsten fiber reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composite. In this study, quasi-static compressive tests were performed on this composite. For the first time, the evolution of micro-damage and deformation of the two phases in this composite, i.e., shear banding of the metallic glass matrix and buckling deformation of the tungsten fiber, were investigated systematically by controlling the loading process at different degrees of deformation. It is found that under uniaxial compression, buckling of the tungsten fiber occurs first, while the metallic glass matrix deforms homogeneously. Upon further loading, shear bands initiate from the fiber/matrix interface and propagate in the metallic glass matrix. Finally, the composite fractures in a mixed mode, with splitting in the tungsten fiber, along with shear fracture in the metallic glass matrix. Through the analysis on the stress state in the composite and resistance to shear banding of the two phases during compressive deformation, the possible deformation mechanism of the composite is unveiled. The deformation map of the composite, which covers from elastic deformation to final fracture, is obtained as well.

  5. Surface sensing behavior and band edge properties of AgAlS2: Experimental observations in optical, chemical, and thermoreflectance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hwa Ho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical examination of a chaocogenide compound AgAlS2 which can spontaneously transfer to a AgAlO2 oxide has been investigated by thermoreflectance (TR spectroscopy herein. The single crystals of AgAlS2 were grown by chemical vapor transport (CVT method using ICl3 as a transport agent sealed in evacuated quartz tubes. The as-grown AgAlS2 crystals essentially possess a transparent and white color in vacuum. The crystal surface of AgAlS2 becomes darkened and brownish when putting AgAlS2 into atmosphere for reacting with water vapor or hydrogen gas. Undergoing the chemical reaction process, oxygen deficient AgAlO2-2x with brownish and reddish-like color on surface of AgAlS2 forms. The transition energy of deficient AgAlO2-2x was evaluated by TR experiment. The value was determined to be ∼2.452 eV at 300 K. If the sample is kept dry and moved away from moisture, AgAlS2 crystal can stop forming more deficient AgAlO2-2x surface oxides. The experimental TR spectra for the surface-reacted sample show clearly two transition features at EW=2.452 eV for deficient AgAlO2-2x and EU=3.186 eV for AgAlS2, respectively. The EU transition belongs to direct band-edge exciton of AgAlS2. Alternatively, for surface-oxidation process of AgAlS2 lasting for a long time, a AgAlO2 crystal with yellowish color will eventually form. The TR measurements show mainly a ground-state band edge exciton of E OX 1 detected for AgAlO2. The energy was determined to be E OX 1=2.792 eV at 300 K. The valence-band electronic structure of AgAlS2 has been detailed characterized using polarized-thermoreflectance (PTR measurements in the temperature range between 30 and 340 K. Physical chemistry behaviors of AgAlS2 and AgAlO2 have been comprehensively studied via detailed analyses of PTR and TR spectra. Based on the experimental analyses, optical and chemical behaviors of the AgAlS2 crystals under atmosphere are realized. A possible optical-detecting scheme for using AgAlS2 as a humidity

  6. Retrieval of the optical depth and vertical distribution of particulate scatterers in the atmosphere using O2 A- and B-band SCIAMACHY observations over Kanpur: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Platt

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the well-defined vertical profile of O2 in the atmosphere, the strong A-band (757–774 nm has long been used to estimate vertical distributions of aerosol/cloud from space. We extend this approach to include part of the O2 B-band (684–688 nm as well. SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT is the first instrument to provide spectral data at moderate resolution (0.2–1.5 nm in the UV/VIS/NIR including both the O2 A- and B-bands. Using SCIAMACHY specifications, we make combined use of these bands in an optimal estimation algorithm. Theoretical studies show that our algorithm is applicable both over bright and dark surfaces for the retrieval of a lognormal approximation of the vertical profile of particulate matter, in addition to its optical thickness. Synthetic studies and information content analyses prove that such a combined use provides additional information on the vertical distribution of atmospheric scatterers, attributable to differences in the absorption strengths of the two bands and their underlying surface albedos. Due to the high computational cost of the retrieval, we restrict application to real data to a case study over Kanpur through the year 2003. Comparison with AERONET data shows a commonly observed seasonal pattern of haziness, manifesting a correlation coefficient of r = 0.92 for non-monsoon monthly mean AOTs. The retrieved particulate optical thickness is found to be anti-correlated with the relative contrast of the Lambertian equivalent reflectivity (LER at 682 nm and 755 nm by a coefficient of 0.788, confirming the hypothesis made in Sanghavi et al. (2010. Our case study demonstrates a stable physics-based retrieval of particulate matter using only SCIAMACHY data. The feasibility of our approach is enhanced by the information provided by measurements around the O2 B-band in addition to the A-band. Nonetheless, operational application to SCIAMACHY data remains challenged by radiometric uncertainties, yielding simultaneous

  7. OH-asterisk (7-5) Meinel band dayglow and nightglow measured by the SME limb scanning near infrared spectrometer - Comparison of the observed seasonal variability with two-dimensional model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Texier, H.; Solomon, S.; Thomas, R. J.; Garcia, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    Seasonal variations of the OH-asterisk (7-5) mesospheric hydroxyl emission at 1.89 microns observed by the SME near-IR spectrometer are compared with the theoretical predictions of a two-dimensional dynamical/chemical model. The good agreement found at low latitudes for both dayglow and nightglow provides support for the model assumption that breaking gravity waves induce seasonal and latitudinal variations in diffusion. The seasonal behavior of atomic hydrogen in the upper mesosphere (related to vertical transport) and/or uncertainties in the OH Meinel band parameters are proposed as possible explanations for the discrepancy noted between model and observational data for the middle latitudes.

  8. Beam-induced wakefield observation in X -band choke-mode cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Hao; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Conde, Manoel; Power, John G.; Doran, Darrell S.; Liu, Wanming; Shi, Jiaru; Li, Chen; Gai, Wei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-08-01

    The X-band choke-mode structure is currently being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC) main linac. The geometry of the choke-mode structure is designed to ensure the strong suppression of the beam-induced long-range transverse wakefield and therefore maintain the stability and quality of the beam in the CLIC main linac. Experiments conducted at the ArgonneWakefield Accelerator Facility are presented in this study to verify the design of the wakefield suppressor. The beam-induced radio frequency (rf) signals in a three-cell choke-mode structure were measured, and measured results show good agreement with the simulation results. The measured results also show strong damping in high-order dipolar modes with a quality factor Q of 10 to 20. The difference between the frequencies of the first and second dipole modes is about 3 GHz, which validates the special design of the cancelling dipole modes at the time of the succeeding bunch (0.5 ns).

  9. HYBASE : HYperspectral BAnd SElection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Seijen, H.H. van

    2009-01-01

    Band selection is essential in the design of multispectral sensor systems. This paper describes the TNO hyperspectral band selection tool HYBASE. It calculates the optimum band positions given the number of bands and the width of the spectral bands. HYBASE is used to assess the minimum number of

  10. Relating C-band Microwave and Optical Satellite Observations as A Function of Snow Thickness on First-Year Sea Ice during the Winter to Summer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Yackel, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice and its snow cover have a direct impact on both the Arctic and global climate system through their ability to moderate heat exchange across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere (OSA) interface. Snow cover plays a key role in the OSA interface radiation and energy exchange, as it controls the growth and decay of first-year sea ice (FYI). However, meteoric accumulation and redistribution of snow on FYI is highly stochastic over space and time, which makes it poorly understood. Previous studies have estimated local-scale snow thickness distributions using in-situ technique and modelling but it is spatially limited and challenging due to logistic difficulties. Moreover, snow albedo is also critical for determining the surface energy balance of the OSA during the critical summer ablation season. Even then, due to persistent and widespread cloud cover in the Arctic at various spatio-temporal scales, it is difficult and unreliable to remotely measure albedo of snow cover on FYI in the optical spectrum. Previous studies demonstrate that only large-scale sea ice albedo was successfully estimated using optical-satellite sensors. However, space-borne microwave sensors, with their capability of all-weather and 24-hour imaging, can provide enhanced information about snow cover on FYI. Daily spaceborne C-band scatterometer data (ASCAT) and MODIS data are used to investigate the the seasonal co-evolution of the microwave backscatter coefficient and optical albedo as a function of snow thickness on smooth FYI. The research focuses on snow-covered FYI near Cambridge Bay, Nunavut (Fig.1) during the winter to advanced-melt period (April-June, 2014). The ACSAT time series (Fig.2) show distinct increase in scattering at melt onset indicating the first occurrence of melt water in the snow cover. The corresponding albedo exhibits no decrease at this stage. We show how the standard deviation of ASCAT backscatter on FYI during winter can be used as a proxy for surface roughness

  11. Observation of Combination Bands Involving Intermolecular Vibrations of N_2O-N_2, N_2O-OCS and N_2O-CO_2 Complexes Using AN External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, M.; Sheybani-Deloui, S.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2013-06-01

    Spectra of the weakly-bound N_2O-CO_2, N_2O-OCS, and N_2O-N_2 complexes in the region of the N_2O ν_1 fundamental band (˜2224 cm^{-1}) are observed in a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion probed with a quantum cascade laser. One new band is observed for each complex: two combination bands involving the intermolecular in-plane bending for N_2O-CO_2 and N_2O-N_2 complexes, and the out-of-plane torsional vibration for N_2O-OCS. The resulting intermolecular frequencies are 34.17, 17.11 and 22.33 cm^{-1} for N_2O-CO_2, N_2O-OCS, and N_2O-N_2 complexes, respectively. The intermolecular vibrations provide clear spectroscopic data against which theory can be benchmarked. These results will be discussed, along with a brief introduction to our pulsed-jet supersonic apparatus which has been retrofitted by an infrared cw external-cavity quantum cascade laser (QCL) manufactured by Daylight Solutions. The QCL is used in the rapid-scan signal averaging mode. Although the repetition rate of the QCL is limited by its PZT scan rate, which is 100 Hz, we describe a simple technique to increase the effective repetition rate to 625 Hz. In addition, we have significantly reduced the long term frequency drift of the QCL by locking the laser frequency to the sides of a reference line. Limin Zheng, Soo-Ying Lee, Yunpeng Lu, and Minghui Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 044302 (2013).

  12. Dust bands in the asteroid belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, M.V.; Greenberg, R.; Dermott, S.F.; Nicholson, P.D.; Burns, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the original IRAS observations leading to the discovery of the three dust bands in the asteroid belt and the analysis of data. Special attention is given to an analytical model of the dust band torus and to theories concerning the origin of the dust bands, with special attention given to the collisional equilibrium (asteroid family), the nonequilibrium (random collision), and the comet hypotheses of dust-band origin. It is noted that neither the equilibrium nor nonequilibrium models, as currently formulated, present a complete picture of the IRAS dust-band observations. 32 refs

  13. Multiwavelength Observations of the Powerful Gamma-ray Quasar PKS 1510-089: Clues on the Jet Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, J.; Madejski, G.; Sikora, M.; Roming, P.; Chester, M.M.; Grupe, D.; Tsubuku, Y.; Sato, R.; Kawai, N.; Tosti, G.; Impiombato, D.; Kovalev, Y.Y.; Kovalev, Y.A.; Edwards, Philip G.; Wagner, S.J.; Moderski, R.; Stawarz, L.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.

    2007-09-28

    We present the results from a multiwavelength campaign conducted in August 2006 of the powerful {gamma}-ray quasar PKS 1510--089 (z = 0.361). This campaign commenced with a deep Suzaku observation lasting three days for a total exposure time of 120 ks, and continued with Swift monitoring over 18 days. Besides Swift observations, which sampled the optical/UV flux in all 6 UVOT filters as well as the X-ray spectrum in the 0.3--10 keV energy range, the campaign included ground-based optical and radio data, and yielded a quasi-simultaneous broad-band spectral energy distribution from 109 Hz to 1019 Hz. Thanks to its low instrumental background, the Suzaku observation provided a high S/N X-ray spectrum, which is well represented by an extremely hard power-law with photon index {Gamma}{approx_equal}1.2, augmented by a soft component apparent below 1 keV, which is well described by a black-body model with temperature kT {approx_equal}0.2 keV. Monitoring by Suzaku revealed temporal variability which is different between the low and high energy bands, again suggesting the presence of a second, variable component in addition to the primary power-law emission. We model the broadband spectrum of PKS 1510--089 assuming that the high energy spectral component results from Comptonization of infrared radiation produced by hot dust located in the surrounding molecular torus. In the adopted internal shock scenario, the derived model parameters imply that the power of the jet is dominated by protons but with a number of electrons/positrons exceeding a number of protons by a factor {approx} 10. We also find that inhomogeneities responsible for the shock formation, prior to the collision may produce bulk-Compton radiation which can explain the observed soft X-ray excess and possible excess at {approx} 18 keV. We note, however, that the bulk-Compton interpretation is not unique, and the observed soft excess could arise as well via some other processes discussed briefly in the text.

  14. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  15. Atomic-Monolayer MoS2 Band-to-Band Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Lan, Yann Wen

    2016-09-05

    The experimental observation of band-to-band tunneling in novel tunneling field-effect transistors utilizing a monolayer of MoS2 as the conducting channel is demonstrated. Our results indicate that the strong gate-coupling efficiency enabled by two-dimensional materials, such as monolayer MoS2, results in the direct manifestation of a band-to-band tunneling current and an ambipolar transport.

  16. L-band brightness temperature disaggregation for use with S-band and C-band radiometer data for WCOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, P.; Shi, J.; Zhao, T.; Cosh, M. H.; Bindlish, R.

    2017-12-01

    There are two passive microwave sensors onboard the Water Cycle Observation Mission (WCOM), which includes a synthetic aperture radiometer operating at L-S-C bands and a scanning microwave radiometer operating from C- to W-bands. It provides a unique opportunity to disaggregate L-band brightness temperature (soil moisture) with S-band C-bands radiometer data. In this study, passive-only downscaling methodologies are developed and evaluated. Based on the radiative transfer modeling, it was found that the TBs (brightness temperature) between the L-band and S-band exhibit a linear relationship, and there is an exponential relationship between L-band and C-band. We carried out the downscaling results by two methods: (1) downscaling with L-S-C band passive measurements with the same incidence angle from payload IMI; (2) downscaling with L-C band passive measurements with different incidence angle from payloads IMI and PMI. The downscaling method with L-S bands with the same incident angle was first evaluated using SMEX02 data. The RMSE are 2.69 K and 1.52 K for H and V polarization respectively. The downscaling method with L-C bands is developed with different incident angles using SMEX03 data. The RMSE are 2.97 K and 2.68 K for H and V polarization respectively. These results showed that high-resolution L-band brightness temperature and soil moisture products could be generated from the future WCOM passive-only observations.

  17. Band-in-band segregation of multidisperse granular mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newey, M.; Ozik, J.; van der Meer, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Radial and axial segregation is investigated experimentally in polydisperse mixtures of granular materials rotated in a long, partly filled, horizontal cylinder. Radial segregation by size is observed in all polydisperse mixtures. Axial segregation, with smaller-size particles forming bands within

  18. Polygonal deformation bands in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonellini, Marco; Nella Mollema, Pauline

    2017-04-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are dm-wide zones of shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions in the lower portion of the Jurassic Entrada Fm (Utah, USA). The edges of the polygons are 1 to 5 meters long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. Density inversion, that takes place where under-compacted and over-pressurized layers (Carmel Fm) lay below normally compacted sediments (Entrada Sandstone), may be an important process for polygonal deformation bands formation. The gravitational sliding and soft sediment structures typically observed within the Carmel Fm support this hypothesis. Soft sediment deformation may induce polygonal faulting in the section of the Entrada Sandstone just above the Carmel Fm. The permeability of the polygonal deformation bands is approximately 10-14 to 10-13 m2, which is less than the permeability of the host, Entrada Sandstone (range 10-12 to 10-11 m2). The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  19. Evaluation of Cloud Microphysics Simulated using a Meso-Scale Model Coupled with a Spectral Bin Microphysical Scheme through Comparison with Observation Data by Ship-Borne Doppler and Space-Borne W-Band Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, T.; Nakajima, T.; Khain, A. P.; Saito, K.; Takemura, T.; Okamoto, H.; Nishizawa, T.; Tao, W.-K.

    2012-01-01

    Equivalent radar reflectivity factors (Ze) measured by W-band radars are directly compared with the corresponding values calculated from a three-dimensional non-hydrostatic meso-scale model coupled with a spectral-bin-microphysical (SBM) scheme for cloud. Three case studies are the objects of this research: one targets a part of ship-borne observation using 95 GHz Doppler radar over the Pacific Ocean near Japan in May 2001; other two are aimed at two short segments of space-borne observation by the cloud profiling radar on CloudSat in November 2006. The numerical weather prediction (NWP) simulations reproduce general features of vertical structures of Ze and Doppler velocity. A main problem in the reproducibility is an overestimation of Ze in ice cloud layers. A frequency analysis shows a strong correlation between ice water contents (IWC) and Ze in the simulation; this characteristic is similar to those shown in prior on-site studies. From comparing with the empirical correlations by the prior studies, the simulated Ze is overestimated than the corresponding values in the studies at the same IWC. Whereas the comparison of Doppler velocities suggests that large-size snowflakes are necessary for producing large velocities under the freezing level and hence rules out the possibility that an overestimation of snow size causes the overestimation of Ze. Based on the results of several sensitivity tests, we conclude that the source of the overestimation is a bias in the microphysical calculation of Ze or an overestimation of IWC. To identify the source of the problems needs further validation research with other follow-up observations.

  20. Photoionization bands of rubidium molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakić, M.; Pichler, G.

    2018-03-01

    We studied the absorption spectrum of dense rubidium vapor generated in a T-type sapphire cell with a special emphasis on the structured photoionization continuum observed in the 200-300 nm spectral region. The photoionization spectrum has a continuous atomic contribution with a pronounced Seaton-Cooper minimum at about 250 nm and a molecular photoionization contribution with many broad bands. We discuss the possible origin of the photoionization bands as stemming from the absorption from the ground state of the Rb2 molecule to excited states of Rb2+* and to doubly excited autoionizing states of Rb2** molecule. All these photoionization bands are located above the Rb+ and Rb2+ ionization limits.

  1. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... nuclei, e.g., in 16O (Z = N = 8) [12,13] and 56Ni (Z = N = 28) [14–16], coexisting with the spherical ground configuration. Recently, Hwang et al [2] have observed deformed rotational bands in 82Ge. To our knowledge, these deformed rotational bands have not been studied theoretically so far though there ...

  2. Wide Band to ''Double Band'' upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, P.; Currier, R.; Garbincius, P.; Butler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The Wide Band beam currently uses electrons obtained from secondary photon conversions to produce the photon beam incident on the experimental targets. By transporting the positrons produced in these conversions as well as the electrons it is possible to almost double the number of photons delivered to the experiments per primary beam proton. 11 figs

  3. Band - Weg interactie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Andries; ter Huerne, Henderikus L.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.; Schipper, Dirk J.; prof.dr.ir. Molenaar, A.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    De huidige infrastructuur van wegen waarover men zich snel en comfortabel kan verplaatsen is niet meer weg te denken uit onze maatschappij. Twee “componenten” die hierbij een belangrijke rol spelen zijn het wegdek en de band. Het contact tussen band en wegdek is mede bepalend voor de veiligheid. De

  4. Photonic band structure computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, D; Frank, M; Busch, K; Wolfle, P

    2001-01-29

    We introduce a novel algorithm for band structure computations based on multigrid methods. In addition, we demonstrate how the results of these band structure calculations may be used to compute group velocities and effective photon masses. The results are of direct relevance to studies of pulse propagation in such materials.

  5. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric

  6. Deep K-band Observations of TMC-1 with the Green Bank Telescope: Detection of HC7O, Nondetection of HC11N, and a Search for New Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Kisiel, Z.; McGuire, B. A.; Kuan, Y.-J.

    2017-12-01

    The 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope K-band (KFPA) receiver was used to perform a high-sensitivity search for rotational emission lines from complex organic molecules in the cold interstellar medium toward TMC-1 (cyanopolyyne peak), focussing on the identification of new carbon-chain-bearing species as well as molecules of possible prebiotic relevance. We report a detection of the carbon-chain oxide species HC7O and derive a column density of (7.8+/- 0.9)× {10}11 cm-2. This species is theorized to form as a result of associative electron detachment reactions between oxygen atoms and C7H-, and/or reaction of C6H2 + with CO (followed by dissociative electron recombination). Upper limits are given for the related HC6O, C6O, and C7O molecules. In addition, we obtained the first detections of emission from individual 13C isotopologues of HC7N, and derive abundance ratios HC7N/HCCC13CCCCN = 110 ± 16 and HC7N/HCCCC13CCCN = 96 ± 11, indicative of significant 13C depletion in this species relative to the local interstellar elemental 12C/13C ratio of 60-70. The observed spectral region covered two transitions of HC11N, but emission from this species was not detected, and the corresponding column density upper limit is 7.4× {10}10 {{cm}}-2 (at 95% confidence). This is significantly lower than the value of 2.8× {10}11 {{cm}}-2 previously claimed by Bell et al. and confirms the recent nondetection of HC11N in TMC-1 by Loomis et al. Upper limits were also obtained for the column densities of malononitrile and the nitrogen heterocycles quinoline, isoquinoline, and pyrimidine.

  7. C-band Scatterometers and Their Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Naeimi, Vahid; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    C-band scatterometers have demonstrated to be valuable sensors for large-scale observation of the Earth's surface in a variety of disciplines. High temporal sampling in all weather conditions, multi-viewing capability and availability of long-term measurements make the European C-band scatterometers excellent Earth observation tools. Scatterometer data are used to extract geophysical parameters such as wind speed and direction, surface soil moisture, seasonal dynamics of vegetation, spatial a...

  8. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory...... are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene....

  9. Infrared Absorption Band Assignment in Benzanilide and Some of its p

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2014-07-10

    nitrobenzanilide only. However, no absorption band(s) that can be readily attributed to Amide VI mode was observed for all the benzanilides. Keywords: Benzanilide, IR Absorption Band. INTRODUCTION. The infrared absorption spectra ...

  10. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food. After surgery, your doctor can adjust the band ... You will feel full after eating just a small amount of food. The food in the small upper pouch will ...

  11. Decay of superdeformed bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in 194 Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs

  12. HYBASE - HYperspectral BAnd SElection tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Seijen, H.H. van

    2008-01-01

    Band selection is essential in the design of multispectral sensor systems. This paper describes the TNO hyperspectral band selection tool HYBASE. It calculates the optimum band positions given the number of bands and the width of the spectral bands. HYBASE is used to calculate the minimum number of

  13. Hurricane Spiral Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Thomas A.; Schubert, Wayne H.

    1993-10-01

    The spiral bands that occur in tropical cyclones can be conveniently divided into two classes-outer bands and inner bands. Evidence is presented here that the outer bands form as the result of nonlinear effects during the breakdown of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) through barotropic instability. In this process a zonal strip of high potential vorticity (the ITCZ shear zone or monsoon trough) begins to distort in a varicose fashion, with the potential vorticity (PV) becoming pooled in local regions that are connected by filaments of high PV. As the pooled regions become more axisymmetric, the filaments become thinner and begin to wrap around the PV centers.It is argued that inner bands form in a different manner. As a tropical cyclone intensifies due to latent heat release, the PV field becomes nearly circular with the highest values of PV in the cyclone center. The radial gradient of PV provides a state on which PV waves (the generalization of Rossby waves) can propagate. The nonlinear breaking of PV waves then leads to an irreversible distortion of the PV contours and a downgradient flux of PV. The continuation of this proem tends to erode the high PV core of the tropical cyclone, to produce a surrounding surf zone, and hence to spread the PV horizontally. In a similar fashion, inner bands can also form by the merger of a vortex with a patch of relatively high PV air. As the merger proem occurs the patch of PV is quickly elongated and wrapped around the vortex. The resulting vortex is generally larger in horizontal extent and exhibits a spiral band of PV.When the formation of outer and inner bands is interpreted in the context of a normal-mode spectral model, they emerge as slow manifold phenomena; that is, they have both rotational and (balanced or slaved) gravitational mode aspects. In this sense, regarding them as simply gravity waves leads to an incomplete dynamical picture.

  14. Exploring accretion and disk-jet connections in the LLAGN M81*

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, J.M.; Nowak, M.; Markoff, S.; Rupen, M.P.; Maitra, D.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a year-long effort to monitor the central supermassive black hole in M81 in the X-ray and radio bands. Using Chandra and the Very Large Array, we obtained quasi-simultaneous observations of M81* on seven occasions during 2006. The X-ray and radio luminosity of M81* are not strongly

  15. Optical flickering of the symbiotic star CH Cyg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, K. A.; Martí, J.; Zamanov, R.; Dimitrov, V. V.; Kurtenkov, A.; Sánchez-Ayaso, E.; Bujalance-Fernández, I.; Latev, G. Y.; Nikolov, G.

    2018-02-01

    Here we present quasi-simultaneous observations of the flickering of the symbiotic binary star CH Cyg in U, B and V bands. We calculate the flickering source parameters and discuss the possible reason for the flickering cessation in the period 2010-2013.

  16. Photonic band gap materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassagne, D.

    Photonic band gap materials Photonic band gap materials are periodic dielectric structures that control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. We describe the plane wave method, which allows to calculate the band structures of photonic crystals. By symmetry analysis and a perturbative approach, we predict the appearance of the low energy photonic band gaps of hexagonal structures. We propose new two-dimensional structures called graphite and boron nitride. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmission of the graphite structure and we show the crucial role of the coupling with external modes. We study the appearance of allowed modes in the photonic band gap by the introduction of localized defects in the periodicity. Finally, we discuss the properties of opals formed by self-organized silica microspheres, which are very promising for the fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals. Les matériaux à bandes interdites photoniques sont des structures diélectriques périodiques qui contrôlent la propagation des ondes électromagnétiques. Nous décrivons la méthode des ondes planes qui permet de calculer les structures de bandes des cristaux photoniques. Par une analyse de la symétrie et une approche perturbative, nous précisons les conditions d'existence des bandes interdites de basse énergie. Nous proposons de nouvelles structures bidimensionnelles appelées graphite et nitrure de bore. Grâce à une méthode de matrices de transfert, nous calculons la transmission de la structure graphite et nous mettons en évidence le rôle fondamental du couplage avec les modes extérieurs. Nous étudions l'apparition de modes permis dans la bande interdite grâce à l'introduction de défauts dans la périodicité. Enfin, nous discutons les propriétés des opales constituées de micro-billes de silice auto-organisées, qui sont très prometteuses pour la fabrication de cristaux photoniques tridimensionnels.

  17. Restrictive techniques: gastric banding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Cristina da Cunha

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgery for the treatment of severe obesity has a definite role onthe therapeutic armamentarium all over the world. Initiated 40years ago, bariatric surgery has already a long way thanks tohundred of surgeons, who had constantly searched for the besttechnique for the adequate control of severe obesity. Among theimportant breakthroughs in obesity surgery there is theadjustable gastric band. It is a sylastic band, inflatable andadjustable, which is placed on the top of the stomach in order tocreate a 15-20 cc pouch, with an outlet of 1.3cm. The adjustablegastric band has also a subcutaneous reservoir through whichadjustments can be made, according to the patient evolution.The main feature of the adjustable gastric band is the fact thatis minimal invasive, reversible, adjustable and placedlaparoscopically. Then greatly diminishing the surgical traumato the severe obese patient. Belachew and Favretti’s techniqueof laparoscopic application of the adjustable gastric band isdescribed and the evolution of the technique during this years,as we has been practiced since 1998. The perioperative care ofthe patient is also described, as well as the follow-up and shortand long term controls.

  18. Excitation of Banded Whistler Waves in the Magnetosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Kaijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13

    Banded whistler waves can be generated by the whistler anisotropy instability driven by two bi-Maxwellian electron components with T{sub {perpendicular}}/T{sub {parallel}} > 1 at different T{sub {parallel}} For typical magnetospheric condition of 1 < {omega}{sub e}/{Omega}{sub e} < 5 in regions associated with strong chorus, upper-band waves can be excited by anisotropic electrons below {approx} 1 keV, while lower-band waves are excited by anisotropic electrons above {approx} 10 keV. Lower-band waves are generally field-aligned and substantially electromagnetic, while upper-band waves propagate obliquely and have quasi-electrostatic fluctuating electric fields. The quasi-electrostatic feature of upper-band waves suggests that they may be more easily identified in electric field observations than in magnetic field observations. Upper-band waves are liable to Landau damping and the saturation level of upperband waves is lower than lower-band waves, consistent with observations that lower-band waves are stronger than upper-band waves on average. The oblique propagation, the lower saturation level, and the more severe Landau damping together would make upper-band waves more tightly confined to the geomagnetic equator (|{lambda}{sub m}| < {approx}10{sup o}) than lower-band waves.

  19. The 450-band resolution G- and R-banded standard karyotype of the donkey (Equus asinus, 2n = 62).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Meo, G P; Perucatti, A; Peretti, V; Incarnato, D; Ciotola, F; Liotta, L; Raudsepp, T; Di Berardino, D; Chowdhary, B; Iannuzzi, L

    2009-01-01

    Donkey chromosomes were earlier characterized separately by C-, G- and R-banding techniques. However, direct comparisons between G- and R-banding patterns have still not been carried out in this species. The present study reports this comparison at the 450-band level by using replication G- and R-banding patterns. Two sets of synchronized lymphocyte cultures were set up to obtain early (GBA+CBA-banding) and late (RBA-banding) BrdU incorporation. Slides were stained with acridine orange and observed under a fluorescence microscope. Reverse GBA+CBA- and RBA-banded karyotypes at the 450-band level were constructed. To verify G- and R-banding patterns in some acrocentric chromosomes, sequential GBA+CBA/Ag-NORs and RBA/Ag-NORs were also performed. The results of CBA-banding patterns obtained in 12 animals from 2 breeds showed a pronounced polymorphism of heterochromatin, especially in EAS1q-prox. Ideogrammatic representations of G- and R-banded karyotypes were constructed using only one common G- and R-banding nomenclature. In the present study both G- and R-banding patterns and relative ideograms are presented as standard karyotype for this species at the 450-band level. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Ultra wide band antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Begaud, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Ultra Wide Band Technology (UWB) has reached a level of maturity that allows us to offer wireless links with either high or low data rates. These wireless links are frequently associated with a location capability for which ultimate accuracy varies with the inverse of the frequency bandwidth. Using time or frequency domain waveforms, they are currently the subject of international standards facilitating their commercial implementation. Drawing up a complete state of the art, Ultra Wide Band Antennas is aimed at students, engineers and researchers and presents a summary of internationally recog

  1. Band-notched spiral antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jae; Chang, John

    2018-03-13

    A band-notched spiral antenna having one or more spiral arms extending from a radially inner end to a radially outer end for transmitting or receiving electromagnetic radiation over a frequency range, and one or more resonance structures positioned adjacent one or more segments of the spiral arm associated with a notch frequency band or bands of the frequency range so as to resonate and suppress the transmission or reception of electromagnetic radiation over said notch frequency band or bands.

  2. Experimental study on the adiabatic shear bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affouard, J.

    1984-07-01

    Four martensitic steels (Z50CDV5 steel, 28CND8 steel, 35NCDV16 steel and 4340 steel) with different hardness between 190 and 600 Hsub(B) (Brinell hardness), have been studied by means of dynamic compressive tests on split Hopkinson pressure bar. Microscopic observations show that the fracture are associated to the development of adiabatic shear bands (except 4340 steel with 190 Hsub(B) hardness). By means of tests for which the deformation is stopped at predetermined levels, the measurement of shear and hardness inside the band and the matrix indicates the chronology of this phenomenon: first the localization of shear, followed by the formation of adiabatic shear band and ultimatly crack initiation and propagation. These results correlated with few simulations by finite elements have permitted to suggest two mecanisms of deformation leading to the formation of adiabatic shear bands in this specific test [fr

  3. Band Edge Dynamics and Multiexciton Generation in Narrow Band Gap HgTe Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livache, Clément; Goubet, Nicolas; Martinez, Bertille; Jagtap, Amardeep; Qu, Junling; Ithurria, Sandrine; Silly, Mathieu G; Dubertret, Benoit; Lhuillier, Emmanuel

    2018-04-02

    Mercury chalcogenide nanocrystals and especially HgTe appear as an interesting platform for the design of low cost mid-infrared (mid-IR) detectors. Nevertheless, their electronic structure and transport properties remain poorly understood, and some critical aspects such as the carrier relaxation dynamics at the band edge have been pushed under the rug. Some of the previous reports on dynamics are setup-limited, and all of them have been obtained using photon energy far above the band edge. These observations raise two main questions: (i) what are the carrier dynamics at the band edge and (ii) should we expect some additional effect (multiexciton generation (MEG)) as such narrow band gap materials are excited far above the band edge? To answer these questions, we developed a high-bandwidth setup that allows us to understand and compare the carrier dynamics resonantly pumped at the band edge in the mid-IR and far above the band edge. We demonstrate that fast (>50 MHz) photoresponse can be obtained even in the mid-IR and that MEG is occurring in HgTe nanocrystal arrays with a threshold around 3 times the band edge energy. Furthermore, the photoresponse can be effectively tuned in magnitude and sign using a phototransistor configuration.

  4. Theoretical band alignment in an intermediate band chalcopyrite based material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos Águila, J. E.; Palacios, P.; Conesa, J. C.; Arriaga, J.; Wahnón, P.

    2017-12-01

    Band alignment is key to enhance the performance of heterojunction for chalcopyrite thin film solar cells. In this paper we report ab initio calculations of the electronic structures of CuGaS2:Cr with various Cr compositions, CuAlSe2 and ZnSe and the band alignment between their interfaces. We use density functional theory and the more accurate self-consistent GW scheme to obtain improved bulk band-gaps and band offsets. Band alignments of the interfacial region for CuGaS2:Cr/CuAlSe2 and CuGaS2:Cr/ZnSe systems were aligned with respect of an average electrostatic potential. Our results are in good agreement with experimental values for the bulk band-gaps. These theoretical band alignments show a characteristic staggered band alignment for the design of heterojunction devices in photovoltaic applications.

  5. Observing the semiconducting band-gap alignment of MoS{sub 2} layers of different atomic thicknesses using a MoS{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si heterojunction tunnel diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko, E-mail: nishiguchi.katsuhiko@lab.ntt.co.jp; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Akira [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Zant, Herre S. J. van der; Steele, Gary A. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-08-03

    We demonstrate a tunnel diode composed of a vertical MoS{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si heterostructure. A MoS{sub 2} flake consisting four areas of different thicknesses functions as a gate terminal of a silicon field-effect transistor. A thin gate oxide allows tunneling current to flow between the n-type MoS{sub 2} layers and p-type Si channel. The tunneling-current characteristics show multiple negative differential resistance features, which we interpret as an indication of different conduction-band alignments of the MoS{sub 2} layers of different thicknesses. The presented tunnel device can be also used as a hybrid-heterostructure device combining the advantages of two-dimensional materials with those of silicon transistors.

  6. The first multi-wavelength campaign of AXP 4U 0142+61 from radio to hard X-rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, P.R.; Kuiper, L.; Hermsen, W.; Rea, N.; Durant, M.; Stappers, B.; Kaspi, V.M.; Dib, R.

    2007-01-01

    For the first time a quasi-simultaneous multi-wavelength campaign has been performed on an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar from the radio to the hard X-ray band. 4U 0142+61 was an INTEGRAL target for 1 Ms in July 2005. During these observations it was also observed in the X-ray band with Swift and RXTE, in

  7. Comparative study of three reconnection X line models at the Earth's dayside magnetopause using in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, V. M.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Koga, D.; Walsh, B. M.; Mendes, O.

    2017-04-01

    This work examines the large-scale aspects of magnetic field reconnection at the Earth's dayside magnetopause. We use two sets of reconnection events, which are identified mostly by the in situ detection of accelerated and Alfvénic plasma flows. We intercompare three analytical models that predict the reconnection X line location and orientation, namely, the Trattner et al. (2007) and Swisdak and Drake (2007) models and also a modified version of the component merging model. In the first set of reconnection observations, we show three fortuitous, quasi-simultaneous dayside magnetopause crossing events where two widely separated spacecraft detect reconnection signatures, and the X line location and orientation can be inferred from the observations. We compare X line model predictions to those inferred from observations. These three reconnection events indicate the presence of an extended (>7 Earth radii in length), component-type reconnection X line on Earth's dayside magnetopause connecting and structuring the reconnection signatures at locations far apart. In the second set of reconnection events, we analyze the X line models' performance in predicting the observed reconnection outflow direction, i.e., its north-south and/or east-west senses, in a total of 75 single, rather than multiple and quasi-simultaneous, magnetopause crossing events, where reconnection-associated plasma flows were clearly present. We found that the Swisdak and Drake's (2007) X line model performs slightly better, albeit not statistically significant, when predicting both accelerated plasma flow north-south and east-west components in 73% and 53% of the cases, respectively, as compared to the Trattner et al. (2007) model (70% north-south and 42% east-west) and the modified component merging model (66% north-south and 50% east-west).

  8. Comparative Study of Three Reconnection X-Line Models at the Earth's Dayside Magnetopause Using In Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, V. M. C. E. S.; Gonzalez, W.; Sibeck, D. G.; Koga, D.; Walsh, B.; Mendes, O., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    This work examines the large-scale aspects of magnetic field reconnection at the Earth's dayside magnetopause. We use two sets of reconnection events, which are identified mostly by the in situ detection of accelerated and Alfvénic plasma flows. We intercompare three analytical models that predict the reconnection X-line location and orientation, namely the Trattner et al., (2007) and Swisdak and Drake (2007) models, and also a modified version of the component merging model (Gonzalez and Mozer 1974, Sonnerup 1974). In the first set of reconnection observations, we show three fortuitous, quasi-simultaneous dayside magnetopause crossing events where two widely separated spacecraft detect reconnection signatures, and the X-line location and orientation can be inferred from the observations. We compare X-line model predictions to those inferred from observations. These three reconnection events indicate the presence of an extended (>7 Earth radii in length), component-type reconnection X-line on Earth's dayside magnetopause connecting and structuring the reconnection signatures at locations far apart. In the second set of reconnection events, we analyze the X-line models' performance in predicting the observed reconnection outflow direction, i.e., its north-south and/or east-west senses, in a total of 75 single, rather than multiple and quasi-simultaneous, magnetopause crossing events, where reconnection-associated plasma flows were clearly present. We found that the Swisdak and Drake's (2007) X-line model performs slightly better, albeit not statistically significant, when predicting both accelerated plasma flow north-south and east-west components in 73% and 53% of the cases, respectively, as compared to the Trattner et al., (2007) model (70% north-south, 42% east-west), and the modified component merging model (66% north-south, 50% east-west).

  9. Semiconductors bonds and bands

    CERN Document Server

    Ferry, David K

    2013-01-01

    As we settle into this second decade of the twenty-first century, it is evident that the advances in micro-electronics have truly revolutionized our day-to-day lifestyle. The technology is built upon semiconductors, materials in which the band gap has been engineered for special values suitable to the particular application. This book, written specifically for a one semester course for graduate students, provides a thorough understanding of the key solid state physics of semiconductors. It describes how quantum mechanics gives semiconductors unique properties that enabled the micro-electronics revolution, and sustain the ever-growing importance of this revolution.

  10. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave band gap structures exhibit certain stop band characteristics based on the periodicity, impedance contrast and effective refractive index contrast. These structures though formed in one-, two- and three-dimensional periodicity, are huge in size. In this paper, microstrip-based microwave band gap structures are ...

  11. Statistical study of auroral omega bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of very few statistical studies on auroral omega bands motivated us to test-use a semi-automatic method for identifying large-scale undulations of the diffuse aurora boundary and to investigate their occurrence. Five identical all-sky cameras with overlapping fields of view provided data for 438 auroral omega-like structures over Fennoscandian Lapland from 1996 to 2007. The results from this set of omega band events agree remarkably well with previous observations of omega band occurrence in magnetic local time (MLT, lifetime, location between the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, as well as current density estimates. The average peak emission height of omega forms corresponds to the estimated precipitation energies of a few keV, which experienced no significant change during the events. Analysis of both local and global magnetic indices demonstrates that omega bands are observed during substorm expansion and recovery phases that are more intense than average substorm expansion and recovery phases in the same region. The omega occurrence with respect to the substorm expansion and recovery phases is in a very good agreement with an earlier observed distribution of fast earthward flows in the plasma sheet during expansion and recovery phases. These findings support the theory that omegas are produced by fast earthward flows and auroral streamers, despite the rarity of good conjugate observations.

  12. Superdeformed rotational bands in Pu-240

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunyadi, M; Gassmann, D; Krasznahorkay, A; Habs, D; Csatlos, M; Eisermann, Y; Faestermann, T; Graw, G; Gulyas, J; Hertenberger, R; Maier, HJ; Mate, Z; Metz, A; Thirolf, P; Chromik, M; van der Werf, SY

    The intermediate structure of the fission resonances has been observed in Pu-240. A resonance structure found around the excitation energy of 4.5 MeV was interpreted as a group of K-pi = 0(+) superdeformed rotational bands. The moments of inertia and level density distributions were also deduced for

  13. Observation of the anisotropic Dirac cone in the band dispersion of 112-structured iron-based superconductor Ca{sub 0.9}La{sub 0.1}FeAs{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z. T.; Li, M. Y.; Fan, C. C.; Yang, H. F.; Liu, J. S.; Wang, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Xing, X. Z.; Zhou, W.; Sun, Y.; Shi, Z. X. [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of MEMS of the Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Yao, Q. [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Department of Physics, and Advanced Materials Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Li, W. [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Department of Physics, and Advanced Materials Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); CAS-Shanghai Science Research Center, Shanghai 201203 (China); Shen, D. W., E-mail: dwshen@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); CAS-Shanghai Science Research Center, Shanghai 201203 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Superconducting Electronics (CENSE), Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2016-07-25

    CaFeAs{sub 2} is a parent compound of recently discovered 112-type iron-based superconductors. It is predicted to be a staggered intercalation compound that naturally integrates both quantum spin Hall insulating and superconducting layers and an ideal system for the realization of Majorana modes. We performed a systematical angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation study of the slightly electron-doped CaFeAs{sub 2}. We found that the zigzag As chain of 112-type iron-based superconductors play a considerable role in the low-energy electronic structure, resulting in the characteristic Dirac-cone like band dispersion as the prediction. Our experimental results further confirm that these Dirac cones only exist around the X but not Y points in the Brillouin zone, breaking the S{sub 4} symmetry at iron sites. Our findings present the compelling support to the theoretical prediction that the 112-type iron-based superconductors might host the topological nontrivial edge states. The slightly electron doped CaFeAs{sub 2} would provide us a unique opportunity to realize and explore Majorana fermion physics.

  14. Changes in wall motion and blood flow in the outflow tract of chick embryonic hearts observed with optical coherence tomography after outflow tract banding and vitelline-vein ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugonyi, Sandra; Liu Aiping; Wang, Ruikang K [Division of Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health and Science University, 3303 SW Bond Ave., CH13B, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Shaut, Carley; Thornburg, Kent [Heart Research Center, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)

    2008-09-21

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-contact, non-invasive and high-resolution imaging technique, suited to study early cardiovascular development. Alterations in hemodynamic conditions during early development are known to lead to cardiac defects, presumably as a result of changes in cardiac biomechanics produced by the alterations. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of a spectral domain OCT in visualizing and quantifying changes in cardiac wall motion and blood-flow velocities under normal and altered hemodynamic conditions in chicken embryos at an early stage of development (Hamburger-Hamilton stage HH18, {approx}3 days of incubation), focusing on the heart outflow tract (OFT). The OCT system employed acquired simultaneously microstructural and blood-flow images at a rate of 92 frames s{sup -1}with a spatial resolution of {approx}10 {mu}m. OCT imaging allowed in vivo visualization of the OFT microstructures, e.g. the lumen, cardiac cushions and myocardium. We found that alterations in hemodynamic conditions, through OFT banding and vitelline-vein ligation, changed blood-flow velocities through the OFT, as expected. Further, OCT allowed quantification of changes in the dynamics of OFT wall motion. Our results therefore establish the utility of spectral domain OCT to study the influence of hemodynamic conditions on heart development in intact, in vivo chicken embryo models.

  15. Ka-band waveguide rotary joint

    KAUST Repository

    Yevdokymov, Anatoliy

    2013-04-11

    The authors present a design of a waveguide rotary joint operating in Ka-band with central frequency of 33 GHz, which also acts as an antenna mount. The main unit consists of two flanges with a clearance between them; one of the flanges has three circular choke grooves. Utilisation of three choke grooves allows larger operating clearance. Two prototypes of the rotary joint have been manufactured and experimentally studied. The observed loss is from 0.4 to 0.8 dB in 1.5 GHz band.

  16. Wide band ENDOR spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca Filho, C.

    1973-01-01

    The construction of an ENDOR spectrometer operating from 0,5 to 75 MHz within a single band, with ore Klystron and homodine detection, and no fundamental changes on the electron spin resonance spectrometer was described. The ENDOR signal can be detected both by amplitude modulation of the frequency field, or direct detection of the ESR output, which is taken to a signal analyser. The signal-to-noise ratio is raised by averaging rather than filtering avoiding the use of long time constants, providing natural line widths. The experimental apparatus and the spectra obtained are described. A discussion, relating the ENDOR line amplitudes with the experimental conditions is done and ENDOR mechanism, in which there is a relevant presence of cross relaxation is proposed

  17. Wide Band Artificial Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Zackary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Band Artificial Pulsar (WBAP) is an instrument verification device designed and built by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virgina. The site currently operates the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) and the Versatile Green Bank Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) digital backends for their radio telescopes. The commissioning and continued support for these sophisticated backends has demonstrated a need for a device capable of producing an accurate artificial pulsar signal. The WBAP is designed to provide a very close approximation to an actual pulsar signal. This presentation is intended to provide an overview of the current hardware and software implementations and to also share the current results from testing using the WBAP.

  18. Assessment of S-NPP VIIRS band-to-band registration using Earth-scene features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Daniel; Wang, Zhipeng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2017-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is currently operating onboard the Suomi National Polarorbiting Partnership (S-NPP) spacecraft. VIIRS records Earth imagery with spectral bands ranging from 0.4 to 12.2 micrometers at a combination of resolutions. Five imaging bands (I1-5) have a 375 m spatial resolution at nadir, which is half of the 750 m resolution of the 16 moderate resolution bands (M1-16). These bands are mounted according to their wavelengths at three separate Focal Plane Assemblies (FPA). The proper spatial registration among imaging bands is required to create multi-spectral images and analyses. Measurement of the band-to-band registration (BBR) is a determination of how well these bands are coincident. Using an external target such as the moon has proven to be a valid method and has been thoroughly investigated using VIIRS raw data record (RDR). Calibrated VIIRS radiometric data has been investigated using normalized mutual information (NMI) for BBR and shown stable results, by focusing on high-contrast shoreline sites. However, these results focus on a relatively small number of observations. We have previously reported analyses using earth-scene targets to determine BBR for MODIS instruments. This approach focuses on an African Desert site with high contrast spots generated through agricultural pivot irrigation. Using the near-daily observations provided by the VIIRS instrument, we investigate a large data set and track the BBR stability over the VIIRS mission. We discuss our results and compare them with prelaunch measurements and design specifications.

  19. Replication patterns and no differential banding in Colombian squirrels, Sciurus (rodentia, sciuridae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arango, Carolina; Bueno, Marta Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Colombian Squirrels cytogenetic showed a great variability which has renewed the interest in evolutionary aspects within the group. Many chromosome banding tools must be analyzed carefully in addition to the classical G-banding G technique. These techniques include other differential bands like Q and R banding and no differential banding (C and NOR). In this article the use of each of these supplements in the cytogenetic analysis of species and cytotypes observations for the Colombian squirrels is explained.

  20. Band structure engineered layered metals for low-loss plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Morten Niklas; Pandey, Mohnish; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2017-01-01

    dichalcogenide TaS2, due to an extraordinarily small density of states for scattering in the near-IR originating from their special electronic band structure. On the basis of this observation, we propose a new class of band structure engineered van der Waals layered metals composed of hexagonal transition metal...

  1. Band-monitoring Payload for a CubeSat Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vagner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available During changing sun activity, the ionosphere is responding accordingly and therefore it is interesting to observe the propagation behavior of shortwave bands. For the above mentioned purpose we have designed a band-monitoring payload for an experimental CubeSat satellite. The payload consists of a receiver, which is able to receive SSB modulated narrowband signals in 28 MHz uplink band, and a transmitter with FM modulation in UHF downlink band. The receiver frequency is selected to be at the center of radio amateur activity with low data rate digital modulations.

  2. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  3. Very compact quad band-notched UWB monopole antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Xia, Yingqing; Ye, Lei; Li, Lingzhi

    2016-10-01

    A very compact UWB antenna with four notched bands is proposed. The antenna consists of a rectangular radiating patch with a half circle at bottom, a tapered microstrip feed-line, and a semielliptical ground plane. With a pair of Lshaped slots, complementary co-directional SRR on the patch and a pair of L-shaped slots on the ground plane, four notched bands are created to prevent interference from WiMAX /WLAN/X-band. Experimental results show that the designed antenna, with compact size 20×30mm2, has an operating band(VSWR<2) from 2.7 to 20GHz,except four stop bands of 3.1 3.7GHz, 5.13 5.48GHz, 5.74 6.04GHz, 7.3 7.96GHz. And good radiation patterns within the operating band have been observed.

  4. Microscopic insight in the study of yrast bands in selenium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    low-lying states up to Iπ = 4+ were observed. The level scheme was later extended to Iπ = 8+ and rotational band built on the 0+ ground state was observed. This band undergoes a band crossing in the spin region I = 4 → 8. A systematic de- crease of B(E2) transition strengths with increasing spin in the same spin region.

  5. BROADBAND OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH REDSHIFT BLAZARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Kinard Lab of Physics, Clemson, SC 29634-0978 (United States); Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Stalin, C. S., E-mail: vpaliya@g.clemson.edu [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Block II, Koramangala, Bangalore-560034 (India)

    2016-07-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of four high redshift blazars, S5 0014+81 ( z = 3.37), CGRaBS J0225+1846 ( z = 2.69), BZQ J1430+4205 ( z = 4.72), and 3FGL J1656.2−3303 ( z = 2.40) using quasi-simultaneous data from the Swift , Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array ( NuSTAR ) and the Fermi -Large Area Telescope (LAT) and also archival XMM-Newton observations. Other than 3FGL J1656.2−3303, none of the sources were known as γ -ray emitters, and our analysis of ∼7.5 yr of LAT data reveals the first time detection of statistically significant γ -ray emission from CGRaBS J0225+1846. We generate the broadband spectral energy distributions (SED) of all the objects, centering at the epoch of NuSTAR observations and reproduce them using a one-zone leptonic emission model. The optical−UV emission in all the objects can be explained by radiation from the accretion disk, whereas the X-ray to γ -ray windows of the SEDs are found to be dominated by inverse Compton scattering off the broad line region photons. All of them host black holes that are billions of solar masses. Comparing the accretion disk luminosity and the jet power of these sources with a large sample of blazars, we find them to occupy a high disk luminosity–jet power regime. We also investigate the X-ray spectral properties of the sources in detail with a major focus on studying the causes of soft X-ray deficit, a feature generally seen in high redshift radio-loud quasars. We summarize that this feature could be explained based on the intrinsic curvature in the jet emission rather than being due to the external effects predicted in earlier studies, such as host galaxy and/or warm absorption.

  6. Transport in bilayer and trilayer graphene: band gap engineering and band structure tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Controlling the stacking order of atomically thin 2D materials offers a powerful tool to control their properties. Linearly dispersed bands become hyperbolic in Bernal (AB) stacked bilayer graphene (BLG). Both Bernal (ABA) and rhombohedral (ABC) stacking occur in trilayer graphene (TLG), producing distinct band structures and electronic properties. A symmetry-breaking electric field perpendicular to the sample plane can further modify the band structures of BLG and TLG. In this talk, I will describe our experimental effort in these directions using dual-gated devices. Using thin HfO2 film deposited by ALD as gate dielectric, we are able to apply large displacement fields D > 6 V/nm and observe the opening and saturation of the field-induced band gap Eg in bilayer and ABC-stacked trilayer graphene, where the conduction in the mid gap changes by more than six decades. Its field and temperature dependence highlights the crucial role played by Coulomb disorder in facilitating hopping conduction and suppressing the effect of Eg in the tens of meV regime. In contrast, mid-gap conduction decreases with increasing D much more rapidly in clean h-BN dual-gated devices. Our studies also show the evolution of the band structure in ABA-stacked TLG, in particular the splitting of the Dirac-like bands in large D field and the signatures of two-band transport at high carrier densities. Comparison to theory reveals the need for more sophisticated treatment of electronic screening beyond self-consistent Hartree calculations to accurately predict the band structures of trilayer graphene and graphenic materials in general.

  7. Dual-band infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, H.; Schlemmer, H.

    2005-10-01

    Every year, numerous accidents happen on European roads due to bad visibility (fog, night, heavy rain). Similarly, the dramatic aviation accidents of year 2001 in Milan and Zurich have reminded us that aviation safety is equally affected by reduced visibility. A dual-band thermal imager was developed in order to raise human situation awareness under conditions of reduced visibility especially in the automotive and aeronautical context but also for all transportation or surveillance tasks. The chosen wavelength bands are the Short Wave Infrared SWIR and the Long Wave Infrared LWIR band which are less obscured by reduced visibility conditions than the visible band. Furthermore, our field tests clearly show that the two different spectral bands very often contain complementary information. Pyramidal fusion is used to integrate complementary and redundant features of the multi-spectral images into a fused image which can be displayed on a monitor to provide more and better information for the driver or pilot.

  8. Strongly coupled band in 140Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falla-Sotelo, F.; Oliveira, J.R.B.; Rao, M.N.

    2005-01-01

    Several high-K states are known to exist in the mass 130-140 region. For the N=74 even-even isotopes, Kπ = 8 - isomers, with lifetimes ranging from ns to ms, are known in 128 Xe, 130 Ba, 132 Ce, 134 Nd, 136 Sm, and 138 Gd[. In 140 Gd, we have observed for the first time a band also based on an Iπ = 8 - state. This could be the first case of a Kπ = 8 - state observed in an N=76 even-even isotope. The systematics of the Kπ = 8 - isomeric states in N=74 isotopes has been studied by A.M. Bruce et al. These states decay towards the K = 0 ground state band, and the transitions are K-forbidden. The 140 Gd case presents strong similarities but also some significant differences with relation to the N=74 isotopes. We propose the same configuration but with larger deformation in 140 Gd

  9. Terra MODIS Band 27 Electronic Crosstalk Effect and Its Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Wenny, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the primary instruments in the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS). The first MODIS instrument was launched in December, 1999 on-board the Terra spacecraft. MODIS has 36 bands, covering a wavelength range from 0.4 micron to 14.4 micron. MODIS band 27 (6.72 micron) is a water vapor band, which is designed to be insensitive to Earth surface features. In recent Earth View (EV) images of Terra band 27, surface feature contamination is clearly seen and striping has become very pronounced. In this paper, it is shown that band 27 is impacted by electronic crosstalk from bands 28-30. An algorithm using a linear approximation is developed to correct the crosstalk effect. The crosstalk coefficients are derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations. They show that the crosstalk is strongly detector dependent and the crosstalk pattern has changed dramatically since launch. The crosstalk contributions are positive to the instrument response of band 27 early in the mission but became negative and much larger in magnitude at later stages of the mission for most detectors of the band. The algorithm is applied to both Black Body (BB) calibration and MODIS L1B products. With the crosstalk effect removed, the calibration coefficients of Terra MODIS band 27 derived from the BB show that the detector differences become smaller. With the algorithm applied to MODIS L1B products, the Earth surface features are significantly removed and the striping is substantially reduced in the images of the band. The approach developed in this report for removal of the electronic crosstalk effect can be applied to other MODIS bands if similar crosstalk behaviors occur.

  10. SINGLE-BAND, TRIPLE-BAND, OR MULTIPLE-BAND HUBBARD MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ESKES, H; SAWATZKY, GA

    1991-01-01

    The relevance of different models, such as the one-band t-J model and the three-band Emery model, as a realistic description of the electronic structure of high-T(c) materials is discussed. Starting from a multiband approach using cluster calculations and an impurity approach, the following

  11. Band-notched ultrawide band antenna loaded with ferrite slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Zong, Weihua; Sun, Nian X.; Lin, Hwaider; Li, Shandong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a novel technique to design a band-notched UWB antenna by using Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) ferrite is proposed. A printed slot UWB antenna with size of 21mm×26 mm×0.8 mm is adopted as a basic antenna. A piece of ferrite slab with size of 5 mm×10 mm×2 mm is attached on the feeding layer of the antenna to achieve band-notched characteristics. The measured -10 dB bandwidth of the antenna without ferrite slab is 2.91-10.98 GHz. With loading of ferrite slab, the bandwidth turns to 2.73-5.12 and 5.87-10.78 GHz. A band notch of 5.12- 5.87 GHz is achieved to filter WLAN 5 GHz (5.15-5.825 GHz) band. The proposed technique has virtue of easy fabrication and keeping antenna miniaturization.

  12. Band-to-Band Tunneling Transistors: Scalability and Circuit Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    55* MEDICI ...3.2.1 Tunneling Theory 3.3 Simulation Methods 3.3.1 MEDICI 3.3.2 Sentaurus Local Tunneling 3.3.3 Sentaurus Nonlocal Tunneling 3.4 Sentaurus...tunneling current. 3.3.1 MEDICI MEDICI is a one and two-dimensional simulator created by Synopsys, Inc. [18]. It contains a band-to-band

  13. Experimental study of shear bands formation in a granular material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thai Binh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental investigation of the formation of shear bands in a granular sample submitted to a biaxial test. Our principal result is the direct observation of the bifurcation at the origin of the localization process in the material. At the bifurcation, the shear band is spatially extended: we observe a breaking of symmetry without any sudden localization of the deformation in a narrow band. Our work thus allows to clearly distinguish different phenomena: bifurcation which is a ponctual event which occurs before the peak, localization which is a process that covers a range of deformation of several percents during which the peak occurs and finally stationary shear bands which are well-defined permanent structures that can be observed at the end of the localization process, after the peak.

  14. Phase Field Modeling of Microstructure Banding in Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalekian, Mehran; Azizi-Alizamini, Hamid; Militzer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    A phase field model (PFM) is applied to simulate the effects of microsegregation, cooling rate, and austenite grain size on banding in a C-Mn steel. The PFM simulations are compared with experimental observations of continuous cooling transformation tests in the investigated steel. Using electron probe microanalysis, the microsegregation characteristics of Mn were determined and introduced into the model. Ferrite nucleation is assumed to occur at austenite grain boundaries, and ferrite growth is simulated as mixed-mode reaction for para-equilibrium conditions. The driving pressure for the austenite to ferrite transformation depends on Mn concentration and thus varies between the alternating microsegregation layers. In agreement with experimental observations, the simulation results demonstrate that by increasing the cooling rate and/or austenite grain size, banding tends to disappear as the transformation shifts to lower temperatures such that ferrite also forms readily in the layers with higher Mn levels. Further, a parametric study is conducted by changing thickness and Mn content of the bands. In accordance with experimental observations, it is shown that for sufficiently large band thickness, band splitting takes place where ferrite grains form close to the center of the Mn-rich band. Changing the degree of Mn segregation indicates that a segregation level of 0.2 wt pct is necessary in the present case to achieve banded microstructures.

  15. Chiral topological excitons in a Chern band insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke; Shindou, Ryuichi

    2017-10-01

    A family of semiconductors called Chern band insulators are shown to host exciton bands with nonzero topological Chern integers and chiral exciton edge modes. Using a prototypical two-band Chern insulator model, we calculate a cross-correlation function to obtain the exciton bands and their Chern integers. The lowest exciton band acquires Chern integers such as ±1 and ±2 in the electronic Chern insulator phase. The nontrivial topology can be experimentally observed both by a nonlocal optoelectronic response of exciton edge modes and by a phase shift in the cross-correlation response due to the bulk mode. Our result suggests that magnetically doped HgTe, InAs/GaSb quantum wells, and (Bi,Sb)2Te3 thin films are promising candidates for a platform of topological excitonics.

  16. Quantum electrodynamics near a photonic band-gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanbing; Houck, Andrew

    Quantum electrodynamics predicts the localization of light around an atom in photonic band-gap (PBG) medium or photonic crystal. Here we report the first experimental realization of the strong coupling between a single artificial atom and an one dimensional PBG medium using superconducting circuits. In the photonic transport measurement, we observe an anomalous Lamb shift and a large band-edge avoided crossing when the artificial atom frequency is tuned across the band-edge. The persistent peak within the band-gap indicates the single photon bound state. Furthermore, we study the resonance fluorescence of this bound state, again demonstrating the breakdown of the Born-Markov approximation near the band-edge. This novel architecture can be directly generalized to study many-body quantum electrodynamics and to construct more complicated spin chain models.

  17. Deep space propagation experiments at Ka-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, Stanley A.

    1990-01-01

    Propagation experiments as essential components of the general plan to develop an operational deep space telecommunications and navigation capability at Ka-band (32 to 35 GHz) by the end of the 20th century are discussed. Significant benefits of Ka-band over the current deep space standard X-band (8.4 GHz) are an improvement of 4 to 10 dB in telemetry capacity and a similar increase in radio navigation accuracy. Propagation experiments are planned on the Mars Observer Mission in 1992 in preparation for the Cassini Mission to Saturn in 1996, which will use Ka-band in the search for gravity waves as well as to enhance telemetry and navigation at Saturn in 2002. Subsequent uses of Ka-band are planned for the Solar Probe Mission and the Mars Program.

  18. Intensity formulas for triplet bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budo, A.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work in this area is surveyed and the mathematics involved in determining the quantitative intensity measurements in triplet bands is presented. Explicit expressions for the intensity distribution in the branches of the 3 Sigma-3 Pi and 1 Sigma-3Pi bands valid for all values of the coupling constant Y of the 3 Pi terms are given. The intensity distribution calculated according to the formulas given is compared with measurements of PH, 3 Pi-3 Sigma. Good quantitative agreement is obtained.

  19. Intrinsic properties of high-spin band structures in triaxial nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehangir, S.; Bhat, G. H.; Sheikh, J. A.; Palit, R.; Ganai, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    The band structures of 68,70Ge, 128,130,132,134Ce and 132,134,136,138Nd are investigated using the triaxial projected shell model (TPSM) approach. These nuclei depict forking of the ground-state band into several s-bands and in some cases, both the lowest two observed s-bands depict neutron or proton character. It was discussed in our earlier work that this anomalous behaviour can be explained by considering γ-bands based on two-quasiparticle configurations. As the parent band and the γ-band built on it have the same intrinsic structure, g-factors of the two bands are expected to be similar. In the present work, we have undertaken a detailed investigation of g-factors for the excited band structures of the studied nuclei and the available data for a few high-spin states are shown to be in fair agreement with the predicted values.

  20. L-Band RFI in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldo, Yan; de Matthaeis, Paolo; Le Vine, David M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, three instruments have been launched into orbit with the aim of producing global maps of sea surface salinity and soil moisture using the 1400-1427 MHz band: SMOS, Aquarius and SMAP. Although this frequency band is allocated to passive measurements only, RFI (Radio-Frequency Interference) is present in the data of all three missions. On a global scale, the three sensors have observed approximately the same distribution of RFI. Japan is an important exception that has implications for the design of RFI detection algorithms. RFI in Japan is caused by a large number of emitters belonging to the same system (TV receivers) and for this reason some traditional RFI detection strategies detect little to no RFI over Japan. The study of this case has led to an improvement of the approach to detect RFI in Aquarius data.

  1. Proxy magnetometry of the photosphere: why are G-band bright points so bright?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.; Kiselman, Dan; Voort, Luc Rouppe van der; Plez, Bertrand

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the formation of G-band bright points in terms of standard uxtube modeling, in particular the 1D LTE models constructed by Solanki and coworkers. Combined with LTE spectral synthesis they explain observed G-band bright point contrasts quite well. The G-band contrast increase over the

  2. Multi-band Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    thesis adviser, Prof Ramanath Cowsik for the guidance and useful comments on this manuscript; Dr Shiv Sethi (HRI, Allahabad) for discussions and help in the analysis of luminosity functions of GRBs; Drs. F Vrba & A Henden (USNO, Flagstaff) for providing the calibration data on IPN fields. References. Bhargavi, S. G. 2001 ...

  3. Multi-band Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    duced in their equation (3) which comes from cosmological time dilation of the rate of. GRBs. Secondly, p(z) in their equation (8), probability that burst of a given flux will occur in a redshift range of z to z+dz here, is a joint redshift-flux probability P (z, F ). Assuming a simple number density evolution the number of GRBs in the ...

  4. Experimental studies of narrow band effects in the actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    In many actinide metallic systems the f-electrons exhibit band behavior. This is a consequence of direct f-f wave function overlap or hybridization of f-electrons with s-, p-, and d-electrons. The f-bands can be responsible for large electronic densities of states at the Fermi level which may lead to band magnetism of various types. Although the concept of valence instabilities must be approached cautiously especially in the light actinides, it would not be surprising to observe them in the future, especially in Am compounds.

  5. Experimental studies of narrow band effects in the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    In many actinide metallic systems the f-electrons exhibit band behavior. This is a consequence of direct f-f wave function overlap or hybridization of f-electrons with s-, p-, and d-electrons. The f-bands can be responsible for large electronic densities of states at the Fermi level which may lead to band magnetism of various types. Although the concept of valence instabilities must be approached cautiously especially in the light actinides, it would not be surprising to observe them in the future, especially in Am compounds

  6. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope observes cells and tissues in open medium through silicon nitride film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Ogura, Toshihiko; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Mio, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Shinichi; Sato, Chikara

    2010-03-01

    Direct observation of subcellular structures and their characterization is essential for understanding their physiological functions. To observe them in open environment, we have developed an inverted scanning electron microscope with a detachable, open-culture dish, capable of 8 nm resolution, and combined with a fluorescence microscope quasi-simultaneously observing the same area from the top. For scanning electron microscopy from the bottom, a silicon nitride film window in the base of the dish maintains a vacuum between electron gun and open sample dish while allowing electrons to pass through. Electrons are backscattered from the sample and captured by a detector under the dish. Cells cultured on the open dish can be externally manipulated under optical microscopy, fixed, and observed using scanning electron microscopy. Once fine structures have been revealed by scanning electron microscopy, their component proteins may be identified by comparison with separately prepared fluorescence-labeled optical microscopic images of the candidate proteins, with their heavy-metal-labeled or stained ASEM images. Furthermore, cell nuclei in a tissue block stained with platinum-blue were successfully observed without thin-sectioning, which suggests the applicability of this inverted scanning electron microscope to cancer diagnosis. This microscope visualizes mesoscopic-scale structures, and is also applicable to non-bioscience fields including polymer chemistry. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. William Band at Yenching University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Danian

    2008-04-01

    William Band (1906-1993) has been widely remembered by his American colleagues and students as ``a fine physicist and teacher,'' who taught at Washington State University in Pullman between 1949 and 1971 and authored Introduction to Quantum Statistics (1954) and Introduction to Mathematical Physics (1959). Not many, however, knew much about Band's early career, which was very ``uncommon and eventful.'' Born in England, Band graduated from University of Liverpool in 1927 with an MsSc degree in physics. Instead of pursuing his Ph.D. at Cambridge, he chose to teach physics at Yenching University, a prestigious Christian university in Beijing, China. Arriving in 1929, Band established his career at Yenching, where he taught and researched the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, pioneered the study on low-temperature superconductivity in China, founded the country's first graduate program in physics, and chaired the Physics Department for 10 years until he fled from Yenching upon hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It took him two years to cross Japanese occupied areas under the escort of the Communist force; he left China in early 1945. This presentation will explore Band's motivation to work in China and his contributions to the Chinese physics research and education.

  8. Cranking model interpretation of weakly coupled bands in Hg isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Huebel, H.

    1982-01-01

    The positive-parity yrast states of the transitional sup(189-198)Hg isotopes are interpreted within the Bengtsson and Frauendorf version of the cranking model. The very sharp backbendings can be explained by small interaction matrix elements between the ground and s-bands. The experimentally observed large aligned angular momenta and the low band-crossing frequencies are well reproduced in the calculations. (orig.)

  9. Characterization of MODIS VIS/NIR Spectral Band Detector-to-Detector Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X.; Sun, J.; Meister, G.; Kwiakowska, E.

    2008-01-01

    MODIS has 36 spectral bands with wavelengths in the visible (VIS), near-infrared (NIR), shortwave infrared (SWTR), mid-wave infrared (MWIR), and long-wave infrared (LWIR). It makes observations at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0,25km for bands 1-2 with 40 detectors per band, 0.5km for bands 3-7 with 20 detectors per band, and 1km for bands 8-36 with 10 detectors per band. The VIS, NIR, and S\\VIR spectral bands are the reflective solar bands (RSB), which are calibrated on-orbit by a solar diffuser (SD). In addition, MODIS lunar observations are used to track the RSB calibration stability. In this study, we examine detector-to-detector calibration difference for the VIStNIR spectral bands using the SD and lunar observations. The results will be compared with an independent analysis with additional information, such as polarization correction, derived from standard ocean color data products. The current MODIS RSB calibration approach only carries a band-averaged RVS (response versus scan angle) correction. The results from this study suggest that a detector-based RVS correction should be used to improve the L1B data quality, especially for several VIS bands in Terra MODIS due to large changes of the scan mirror's optical properties in recent years.

  10. Endoscopic management of erosion after banded bariatric procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Matthew D; Aher, Chetan V; English, Wayne J; Williams, D Brandon

    2017-11-01

    Prosthetic materials wrapped around a portion of the stomach have been used to provide gastric restriction in bariatric surgery for many years. Intraluminal erosion of adjustable and nonadjustable gastric bands typically occurs many years after placement and results in various symptoms. Endoscopic management of gastric band erosion has been described and allows for optimal patient outcomes. We will describe our methods and experience with endoscopic management of intraluminal gastric band erosions after bariatric procedures. University hospital in the United States. A retrospective review of our bariatric surgery database identified patients undergoing removal of gastric bands. A chart review was then undertaken to confirm erosion of prosthetic material into the gastrointestinal tract. Baseline characteristics, operative reports, and follow-up data were analyzed. Sixteen patients were identified with an eroded gastric band: 11 after banded gastric bypass, 3 after laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB), and 2 after vertical banded gastroplasty. All patients were successfully treated with endoscopic removal of the prosthetic materials using either endoscopic scissors or ligation of the banding material with off-label use of a mechanical lithotripter device. Complications included a postoperative gastrointestinal bleed requiring repeat endoscopy, 1 patient with asymptomatic pneumoperitoneum requiring observation, and 1 with seroma at the site of LAGB port removal. Endoscopic management of intraluminal prosthetic erosion after gastric banded bariatric procedures can be safe and effective and should be considered when treating this complication. Erosion of the prosthetic materials inside the gastric lumen allows for potential endoscopic removal without free intraabdominal perforation. Endoscopic devices designed for dividing eroded LAGBs may help standardize and increase utilization of this approach. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery

  11. Spins, Parity, Excitation Energies, and Octupole Structure of an Excited Superdeformed Band in 194Hg and Implications for Identical Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackman, G.; Khoo, T. L.; Carpenter, M. P.; Lauritsen, T.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Calderin, I. J.; Janssens, R. V.; Ackermann, D.; Ahmad, I.; Agarwala, S.; Blumenthal, D. J.; Fischer, S. M.; Nisius, D.; Reiter, P.; Young, J.; Amro, H.; Moore, E. F.; Hannachi, F.; Korichi, A.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Døssing, T.; Nakatsukasa, T.

    1997-11-01

    An excited superdeformed band in 194Hg, observed to decay directly to both normal-deformed and superdeformed yrast states, is proposed to be a Kπ = 2- octupole vibrational band, based on its excitation energies, spins, and likely parity. The transition energies are identical to those of the yrast superdeformed band in 192Hg, but originate from levels with different spins and parities. The evolution of transition energies with spin suggests that cancellations between pairing and particle alignment are partly responsible for the identical transition energies.

  12. Topological magnon bands in ferromagnetic star lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    The experimental observation of topological magnon bands and thermal Hall effect in a kagomé lattice ferromagnet Cu(1-3, bdc) has inspired the search for topological magnon effects in various insulating ferromagnets that lack an inversion center allowing a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin-orbit interaction. The star lattice (also known as the decorated honeycomb lattice) ferromagnet is an ideal candidate for this purpose because it is a variant of the kagomé lattice with additional links that connect the up-pointing and down-pointing triangles. This gives rise to twice the unit cell of the kagomé lattice, and hence more interesting topological magnon effects. In particular, the triangular bridges on the star lattice can be coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically which is not possible on the kagomé lattice ferromagnets. Here, we study DM-induced topological magnon bands, chiral edge modes, and thermal magnon Hall effect on the star lattice ferromagnet in different parameter regimes. The star lattice can also be visualized as the parent material from which topological magnon bands can be realized for the kagomé and honeycomb lattices in some limiting cases.

  13. Cluster rotational bands in 11B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilov A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential cross-sections of 11B+α inelastic scattering at E(α =65 MeV leading to most of the known 11B states at excitation energies up to 14 MeV were measured [1]. The data analysis was done using Modified diffraction model (MDM [2] allowing determining radii of excited states. Radii of the states with excitation energies less than ∼ 7 MeV coincide with the radius of the ground state with an accuracy not less than 0.1 - 0.15 fm. This result is consistent with traditional view on shell structure of low-lying states in 11B. Most of the observed high-energy excited states are distributed among four rotational bands. Moments of inertia of band states are close to the moment of inertia of the Hoyle state of 12C. The calculated radii, related to these bands, are 0.7 - 1.0 fm larger than the radius of the ground state, and are close to the Hoyle state radius. These results are in agreement with existing predictions about various cluster structure of 11B at high excitation energies.

  14. Oxygen Isotope Variability within Nautilus Shell Growth Bands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Linzmeier

    Full Text Available Nautilus is often used as an analogue for the ecology and behavior of extinct externally shelled cephalopods. Nautilus shell grows quickly, has internal growth banding, and is widely believed to precipitate aragonite in oxygen isotope equilibrium with seawater. Pieces of shell from a wild-caught Nautilus macromphalus from New Caledonia and from a Nautilus belauensis reared in an aquarium were cast in epoxy, polished, and then imaged. Growth bands were visible in the outer prismatic layer of both shells. The thicknesses of the bands are consistent with previously reported daily growth rates measured in aquarium reared individuals. In situ analysis of oxygen isotope ratios using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS with 10 μm beam-spot size reveals inter- and intra-band δ18O variation. In the wild-caught sample, a traverse crosscutting 45 growth bands yielded δ18O values ranging 2.5‰, from +0.9 to -1.6 ‰ (VPDB, a range that is larger than that observed in many serial sampling of entire shells by conventional methods. The maximum range within a single band (~32 μm was 1.5‰, and 27 out of 41 bands had a range larger than instrumental precision (±2 SD = 0.6‰. The results from the wild individual suggest depth migration is recorded by the shell, but are not consistent with a simple sinusoidal, diurnal depth change pattern. To create the observed range of δ18O, however, this Nautilus must have traversed a temperature gradient of at least ~12°C, corresponding to approximately 400 m depth change. Isotopic variation was also measured in the aquarium-reared sample, but the pattern within and between bands likely reflects evaporative enrichment arising from a weekly cycle of refill and replacement of the aquarium water. Overall, this work suggests that depth migration behavior in ancient nektonic mollusks could be elucidated by SIMS analysis across individual growth bands.

  15. Oxygen Isotope Variability within Nautilus Shell Growth Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Nautilus is often used as an analogue for the ecology and behavior of extinct externally shelled cephalopods. Nautilus shell grows quickly, has internal growth banding, and is widely believed to precipitate aragonite in oxygen isotope equilibrium with seawater. Pieces of shell from a wild-caught Nautilus macromphalus from New Caledonia and from a Nautilus belauensis reared in an aquarium were cast in epoxy, polished, and then imaged. Growth bands were visible in the outer prismatic layer of both shells. The thicknesses of the bands are consistent with previously reported daily growth rates measured in aquarium reared individuals. In situ analysis of oxygen isotope ratios using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with 10 μm beam-spot size reveals inter- and intra-band δ18O variation. In the wild-caught sample, a traverse crosscutting 45 growth bands yielded δ18O values ranging 2.5‰, from +0.9 to -1.6 ‰ (VPDB), a range that is larger than that observed in many serial sampling of entire shells by conventional methods. The maximum range within a single band (~32 μm) was 1.5‰, and 27 out of 41 bands had a range larger than instrumental precision (±2 SD = 0.6‰). The results from the wild individual suggest depth migration is recorded by the shell, but are not consistent with a simple sinusoidal, diurnal depth change pattern. To create the observed range of δ18O, however, this Nautilus must have traversed a temperature gradient of at least ~12°C, corresponding to approximately 400 m depth change. Isotopic variation was also measured in the aquarium-reared sample, but the pattern within and between bands likely reflects evaporative enrichment arising from a weekly cycle of refill and replacement of the aquarium water. Overall, this work suggests that depth migration behavior in ancient nektonic mollusks could be elucidated by SIMS analysis across individual growth bands. PMID:27100183

  16. Radiology of vertical banded gastroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leekam, R.N.; Deitel, M.; Shankar, L.; Salsberg, B.

    1987-01-01

    Vertical banded gastroplasty is now the most common procedure for the surgical treatment of obesity. In the past 4 years 120 patients have been referred for radiologic examination. This exhibit describes the normal and abnormal findings in many of these patients. The authors divided radiologic abnormalities into three groups: abnormalities of the partition, abnormalities of the banded channel, and ulcers and extragastric leaks. The authors' examination technique has been adapted from those described by others, our important addition being the preliminary precontrast film, on which the staple lines can be examined. This has proved most effective in the detection of partition defects

  17. SUBARCSEC OPTICAL AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-10-08

    Oct 8, 2005 ... MHz are presented. The radio image at L~band andB, V, R and 1 band images with a. 0.6 arcsec seeing resolve the components. These observations show that the brightness ratio of the components at optical bands is similar to those at radio hands. This strengthens the case for a gravitational lens ...

  18. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  19. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  20. Decay from the superdeformed bands in {sup 194}Hg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, R.G.; Khoo, T.L.; Carpenter, M.P. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Superdeformed bands in {sup 194}H g were studied using the early implementation of Gammasphere. The response functions for the Ge detectors were measured for the first time as part of this experiment. Experiments were performed with both a backed target (where the residue stopped in the Au backing) and a thin target (where the residue recoiled into vacuum). This will permit measurements of the decay times of the quasicontinuum {gamma}rays. The spectrum in coincidence with the yrast SD band in {sup 194}Hg reveals the same features as found in the quasicontinuum structure in {sup 192}Hg. These features include: statistical {gamma}rays feeding the SD band, a pronounced E2 peak from transitions feeding the SD band, a Ml/E2 bump at low energies that is associated with the last stages of feeding of the superdeformed band, and a quasicontinuous distribution from {gamma}rays linking SD and normal states, including a sizable clustering of strength around 1.7 MeV. The remarkable similarity of the spectra coincident with SD bands in {sup 192,194}Hg provides additional support for a statistical process for decay out of the SD states. This similarity contrasts with differences observed in the spectrum coincident with the SD band in the odd-even {sup 191}Hg, confirming the predictions about the role of pairing (in normal states) in influencing the shape of the decay-out spectrum.

  1. Decay from the superdeformed bands in 194Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.G.; Khoo, T.L.; Carpenter, M.P.

    1995-01-01

    Superdeformed bands in 194 H g were studied using the early implementation of Gammasphere. The response functions for the Ge detectors were measured for the first time as part of this experiment. Experiments were performed with both a backed target (where the residue stopped in the Au backing) and a thin target (where the residue recoiled into vacuum). This will permit measurements of the decay times of the quasicontinuum γrays. The spectrum in coincidence with the yrast SD band in 194 Hg reveals the same features as found in the quasicontinuum structure in 192 Hg. These features include: statistical γrays feeding the SD band, a pronounced E2 peak from transitions feeding the SD band, a Ml/E2 bump at low energies that is associated with the last stages of feeding of the superdeformed band, and a quasicontinuous distribution from γrays linking SD and normal states, including a sizable clustering of strength around 1.7 MeV. The remarkable similarity of the spectra coincident with SD bands in 192,194 Hg provides additional support for a statistical process for decay out of the SD states. This similarity contrasts with differences observed in the spectrum coincident with the SD band in the odd-even 191 Hg, confirming the predictions about the role of pairing (in normal states) in influencing the shape of the decay-out spectrum

  2. Broad-band spectrophotometry of HAT-P-32 b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallonn, M.; Bernt, I.; Herrero, E.

    2016-01-01

    Multicolour broad-band transit observations offer the opportunity to characterize the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet with small- to medium-sized telescopes. One of the most favourable targets is the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32 b. We combined 21 new transit observations of this planet with 36 previou...

  3. Blue band photometry of Cygnus X-1. [and Fourier analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, E. N.

    1976-01-01

    Results of blue band photometry of HDE 226868 in the years 1972-3-4 and provisional results for 1975 are presented. A mean light curve is obtained from the first three years observations which is based on 192 nights observations. Intercomparison of the results from the different years shows that the light curve is not constant.

  4. Band-edge lasing in Rh6G-doped dichromated gelatin at different excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Cui-Feng; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Ye, Qing; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2010-11-01

    One-dimensional photonic crystal band-edge lasing at different excitations was studied experimentally by altering the excitation angle. We considered almost every condition including in-band, out-of-band and near the band edge while keeping the density of states unchanged. Holographic rhodamin 6G-doped dichromated gelatin was used for creating low-threshold photonic band-edge lasing (PBEL). Lasing actions excited near the high-energy and low-energy band edges were observed simultaneously, and their full widths at half maximum were different. The results show that the PBEL intensity and pump efficiency are sensitive to the excitation angle, enhanced obviously at the excitation near the band edge and suppressed distinctly in the band which agreed well with the theoretical prediction. We also demonstrated for the first time that active matters exist not only in the air voids but also in the high-index regions of the gelatin.

  5. Correlations in a band insulator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sentef, M.; Kuneš, Jan; Werner, P.; Kampf, A. P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 15 (2009), 155116/1-155116/7 ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : electronic correlations * dynamical mean-field theory * band insulator Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009

  6. Metaphyseal bands in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta are undergoing pamidronate therapy to prevent the incidence of fragility fractures. The authors herein report a child aged 3 years who received five cycles of pamidronate, resulting in metaphyseal bands, known as "zebra lines."

  7. Singing in the Band Rehearsal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbers, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Explains how singing can be incorporated into the band rehearsal. Discusses how to improve student aural skills by including singing in the rehearsal and the benefits of having students sing. Describes how music teachers can use songs or chorales in the classroom. (CMK)

  8. Detection of scattering in the 2175 A interstellar band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, A.N.; Bohlin, R.C.; Stecher, T.P.; Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD; NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD)

    1986-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of two reflection nebulae and their illuminating stars obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite have provided the first evidence for the presence of a scattering contribution to the 2175 A interstellar extinction band. Lower than normal far-UV extinction for the stars embedded in the nebulae indicates that the nebulae have a dust particle size distribution that is dominated by larger particles. The strength of the 2175 A band is larger than normal in both cases. The scattering is found to dominate the long-wavelength wing of the band, without shifting the central wavelength of the band by more than 20 A toward longer wavelengths. These observations are taken to indicate that the solid particles responsible for the 2175 A band can be considerably larger than the Rayleigh limit in some interstellar locations. The absence of a notable shift in the central wavelength of the band in such large particles presents a new severe constraint for models of interstellar grains. 29 references

  9. A Small UWB Antenna with Dual Band-Notched Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A small novel ultrawideband (UWB antenna with dual band-notched functions is proposed. The dual band rejection is achieved by etching two C-shaped slots on the radiation patch with limited area. A single band-notched antenna is firstly presented, and then an optimized dual band-notched antenna is presented and analyzed. The measured VSWR shows that the proposed antenna could operate from 3.05 to 10.7 GHz with VSWR less than 2, except two stopbands at 3.38 to 3.82 GHz and 5.3 to 5.8 GHz for filtering the WiMAX and WLAN signals. Radiation patterns are simulated by HFSS and verified by CST, and quasiomnidirectional radiation patterns in the H-plane could be observed. Moreover, the proposed antenna has a very compact size and could be easily integrated into portable UWB devices.

  10. Strongly coupled band in {sup 140}Gd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falla-Sotelo, F.; Oliveira, J.R.B.; Rao, M.N. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    Several high-K states are known to exist in the mass 130-140 region. For the N=74 even-even isotopes, K{pi} = 8{sup -} isomers, with lifetimes ranging from ns to ms, are known in {sup 128}Xe, {sup 130}Ba, {sup 132}Ce, {sup 134}Nd, {sup 136}Sm, and {sup 138}Gd[. In {sup 140}Gd, we have observed for the first time a band also based on an I{pi} = 8{sup -} state. This could be the first case of a K{pi} = 8{sup -} state observed in an N=76 even-even isotope. The systematics of the K{pi} = 8{sup -} isomeric states in N=74 isotopes has been studied by A.M. Bruce et al. These states decay towards the K = 0 ground state band, and the transitions are K-forbidden. The {sup 140}Gd case presents strong similarities but also some significant differences with relation to the N=74 isotopes. We propose the same configuration but with larger deformation in {sup 140}Gd.

  11. Level spin assignment of superdeformed bands for A ∼ 190 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chunmei; Liu Tong

    1994-01-01

    About 50 superdeformed (SD) bands in nuclei with A∼190, 150, and 130 regions have been observed in recent years. The level spins of SD bands can not be fully determined from the experimental measurements. The level energy formula of nuclear rotational bands can be used to fit transition γ-ray energies within SD band to assign the level spin. The level spins extracted from these fits of 27 SD bands in nuclei of A∼190 region are obtained and compared with those of others

  12. Band Anticrossing in Highly Mismatched Compound Semiconductor Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kin Man; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Su, Ching-Hua; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys in which metallic anions are partially replaced with more electronegative isoelectronic atoms have recently attracted significant attention. Group IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys with a small amount of the electronegative N substituting more metallic column V elements has been the most extensively studied class of such Highly Mismatched Alloys (HMAs). We have shown that many of the unusual properties of the IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys can be well explained by the Band Anticrossing (BAC) model that describes the electronic structure in terms of an interaction between highly localized levels of substitutional N and the extended states of the host semiconductor matrix. Most recently the BAC model has been also used to explain similar modifications of the electronic band structure observed in Te-rich ZnS(sub x)Te(sub 1-x) and ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys. To date studies of HMAs have been limited to materials with relatively small concentrations of highly electronegative atoms. Here we report investigations of the electronic structure of ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys in the entire composition range, y between 0 and 1. The samples used in this study are bulk ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) crystals grown by either a modified Bridgman method or by physical vapor transport. Photomodulated reflection (PR) spectroscopy was used to measure the composition dependence of optical transitions from the valence band edge and from the spin-orbit split off band to the conduction band. The pressure dependence of the band gap was measured using optical absorption in a diamond anvil cell. We find that the energy of the spin-orbit split off valence band edge does not depend on composition and is located at about 3 eV below the conduction band edge of ZnSe. On the Te-rich side the pressure and the composition dependence of the optical transitions are well explained by the BAC model which describes the downward shift of the conduction band edge in terms of the

  13. Nonideal anion displacement, band gap variation, and valence band splitting in Cu-In-Se compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reena Philip, Rachel; Pradeep, B.

    2005-01-01

    Polycrystalline thin films of ternary chalcopyrite CuInSe 2 and defect compounds CuIn 3 Se 5 and CuIn 5 Se 8 are prepared in vacuum by three-source coevaporation method. Structural and optical characterizations of the films are done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and optical absorbance spectra measurements. With variation in the composition of CuInSe 2 , a change over from p-type to n-type conductivity is observed (as noted by the hot probe method). The deformation parameters and the anion displacements are calculated from the X-ray diffraction data, and the cation-anion bond lengths are deduced. The dependence of band gap variation on nonideal anion displacement in the ternary compounds and the effect of Se-p-Cu-d repulsion on band gap are studied. The threefold optical structure observed in the fundamental absorption region of the absorption spectra is analysed to extract the valence band splitting parameters. Hopfields quasi-cubic model adapted for chalcopyrites with tetragonal deformation is used to determine the crystal field splittings and spin orbit splittings, and the linear hybridization model is used to calculate the percentage of d-orbital and p-orbital contribution to hybridization in the compounds under consideration

  14. Linear methods in band theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O. Krogh

    1975-01-01

    Two approximate methods for solving the band-structure problem in an efficient and physically transparent way are presented and discussed in detail. The variational principle for the one-electron Hamiltonian is used in both schemes, and the trial functions are linear combinations of energy......-independent augmented plane waves (APW) and muffin-tin orbitals (MTO), respectively. The secular equations are therefore eigenvalue equations, linear in energy. The trial functions are defined with respect to a muffin-tin (MT) potential and the energy bands depend on the potential in the spheres through potential...... parameters which describe the energy dependence of the logarithmic derivatives. Inside the spheres, the energy-independent APW is that linear combination of an exact solution, at the arbitrary but fixed energy Eν, and its energy derivative which matches continuously and differentiably onto the plane...

  15. NCenter wide band neutrino beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stutte, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    This memo describes the physical properties of the currently operating N-Center wide band neutrino beam---commonly called the triplet train, following a past tradition of a triplet lens configuration. In reality, in order to gain a larger momentum acceptance and to minimize the angular divergence of the beam, a quadruplet beam (4 lenses) employing point-to-parallel optics at a central momentum of 300 GeV was built. 6 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  16. [Gastric band erosion: Alternative management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaverry-Navarrete, Denis José; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Cabrera-Jardines, Ricardo; Mondragón-Pinzón, Erwin Eduardo; Castillo-González, Federico Armando

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem, for which the prevalence has increased worldwide at an alarming rate, affecting 1.7 billion people in the world. To describe the technique employed in incomplete penetration of gastric band where endoscopic management and/or primary closure is not feasible. Laparoscopic removal of gastric band was performed in five patients with incomplete penetrance using Foley catheterization in the perforation site that could lead to the development of a gastro-cutaneous fistula. The cases presented include a leak that required surgical lavage with satisfactory outcome, and one patient developed stenosis 3 years after surgical management, which was resolved endoscopically. In all cases, the penetration site closed spontaneously. Gastric band erosion has been reported in 3.4% of cases. The reason for inserting a catheter is to create a controlled gastro-cutaneous fistula, allowing spontaneous closure. Various techniques have been described: the totally endoscopic, hybrid techniques (endoscopic/laparoscopic) and completely laparoscopic. A technique is described here that is useful and successful in cases where the above-described treatments are not viable. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  17. First record of a banded Sandwich Tern (Thalasseus sandvicensis) moving from England to the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spendelow, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    A Sandwich Tern (Thalasseus sandvicensis sandvicensis) banded as a chick in 2002 at Coquet Island off the northeast coast of Great Britain was observed at two locations on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, in August and September 2013. This is the first record of a banded Sandwich Tern from the United Kingdom being observed in the United States.

  18. Viscous-inviscid interaction with the quasi-simultaneous method for 2D and 3D aerodynamic flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Edith Gerda Maria

    2001-01-01

    Flow phenomena are around us everywhere. One can think of the waves in the sea or the wind playing with the leaves fallen from the trees. Most of these fluid flow situations are described by the so-called Navier-Stokes equations which are based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy.

  19. Temporal patterns of apparent leg band retention in North American geese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Guthrie S.; Kendall, William L.; Moser, Timothy J.; White, Gary C.; Doherty, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    An important assumption of mark?recapture studies is that individuals retain their marks, which has not been assessed for goose reward bands. We estimated aluminum leg band retention probabilities and modeled how band retention varied with band type (standard vs. reward band), band age (1-40 months), and goose characteristics (species and size class) for Canada (Branta canadensis), cackling (Branta hutchinsii), snow (Chen caerulescens), and Ross?s (Chen rossii) geese that field coordinators double-leg banded during a North American goose reward band study (N = 40,999 individuals from 15 populations). We conditioned all models in this analysis on geese that were encountered with >1 leg band still attached (n = 5,747 dead recoveries and live recaptures). Retention probabilities for standard aluminum leg bands were high (estimate of 0.9995, SE = 0.001) and constant over 1-40 months. In contrast, apparent retention probabilities for reward bands demonstrated an interactive relationship between 5 size and species classes (small cackling, medium Canada, large Canada, snow, and Ross?s geese). In addition, apparent retention probabilities for each of the 5 classes varied quadratically with time, being lower immediately after banding and at older age classes. The differential retention probabilities among band type (reward vs. standard) that we observed suggests that 1) models estimating reporting probability should incorporate differential band loss if it is nontrivial, 2) goose managers should consider the costs and benefits of double-banding geese on an operational basis, and 3) the United States Geological Survey Bird Banding Lab should modify protocols for receiving recovery data.

  20. Occurrence features of simultaneous H+- and He+-band EMIC emissions in the outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Song; He, Fengming; Gu, Xudong; Ni, Binbin; Xiang, Zheng; Liu, Jiang

    2018-04-01

    As an important loss mechanism of radiation belt electrons, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves show up as three distinct frequency bands below the hydrogen (H+), helium (He+), and oxygen (O+) ion gyrofrequencies. Compared to O+-band EMIC waves, H+- and He+-band emissions generally occur more frequently and result in more efficient scattering removal of understanding the evolution of the relativistic electron population. To evaluate the occurrence pattern and wave properties of H+- and He+-band EMIC waves when they occur concurrently, we investigate 64 events of multi-band EMIC emissions identified from high quality Van Allen Probes wave data. Our quantitative results demonstrate a strong occurrence dependence of the multi-band EMIC emissions on magnetic local time (MLT) and L-shell to mainly concentrate on the dayside region of L = ∼4-6. We also find that the average magnetic field amplitude of H+-band waves is larger than that of He+-band waves only when L 2 nT He+-band amplitude, indicating that the He+-band waves can be more easily amplified than the H+-band waves under the same circumstances. For simultaneous occurrences of the two EMIC wave bands, their frequencies vary with L-shell and geomagnetic activity: the peak wave frequency of H+-band emissions varies between 0.25 and 0.8 fcp with the average between 0.25 and 0.6 fcp, while that of He+-band emissions varies between 0.03 and 0.23 fcp with the average between 0.05 and 0.15 fcp. These newly observed occurrence features of simultaneous H+- and He+-band EMIC emissions provide improved information to quantify the overall contribution of multi-band EMIC waves to the loss processes of radiation belt electrons.

  1. Optical model with multiple band couplings using soft rotator structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyanov, Dmitry; Soukhovitskii, Efrem; Capote, Roberto; Quesada, Jose Manuel; Chiba, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    A new dispersive coupled-channel optical model (DCCOM) is derived that describes nucleon scattering on 238U and 232Th targets using a soft-rotator-model (SRM) description of the collective levels of the target nucleus. SRM Hamiltonian parameters are adjusted to the observed collective levels of the target nucleus. SRM nuclear wave functions (mixed in K quantum number) have been used to calculate coupling matrix elements of the generalized optical model. Five rotational bands are coupled: the ground-state band, β-, γ-, non-axial- bands, and a negative parity band. Such coupling scheme includes almost all levels below 1.2 MeV of excitation energy of targets. The "effective" deformations that define inter-band couplings are derived from SRM Hamiltonian parameters. Conservation of nuclear volume is enforced by introducing a monopolar deformed potential leading to additional couplings between rotational bands. The present DCCOM describes the total cross section differences between 238U and 232Th targets within experimental uncertainty from 50 keV up to 200 MeV of neutron incident energy. SRM couplings and volume conservation allow a precise calculation of the compound-nucleus (CN) formation cross sections, which is significantly different from the one calculated with rigid-rotor potentials with any number of coupled levels.

  2. More on Estimation of Banded and Banded Toeplitz Covariance Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Berntsson, Fredrik; Ohlson, Martin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we consider two different linear covariance structures, e.g., banded and bended Toeplitz, and how to estimate them using different methods, e.g., by minimizing different norms. One way to estimate the parameters in a linear covariance structure is to use tapering, which has been shown to be the solution to a universal least squares problem. We know that tapering not always guarantee the positive definite constraints on the estimated covariance matrix and may not be a suitable me...

  3. Reprint of: Atmospheric scanning electron microscope observes cells and tissues in open medium through silicon nitride film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Ogura, Toshihiko; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Mio, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Shinichi; Sato, Chikara

    2010-11-01

    Direct observation of subcellular structures and their characterization is essential for understanding their physiological functions. To observe them in open environment, we have developed an inverted scanning electron microscope with a detachable, open-culture dish, capable of 8 nm resolution, and combined with a fluorescence microscope quasi-simultaneously observing the same area from the top. For scanning electron microscopy from the bottom, a silicon nitride film window in the base of the dish maintains a vacuum between electron gun and open sample dish while allowing electrons to pass through. Electrons are backscattered from the sample and captured by a detector under the dish. Cells cultured on the open dish can be externally manipulated under optical microscopy, fixed, and observed using scanning electron microscopy. Once fine structures have been revealed by scanning electron microscopy, their component proteins may be identified by comparison with separately prepared fluorescence-labeled optical microscopic images of the candidate proteins, with their heavy-metal-labeled or stained ASEM images. Furthermore, cell nuclei in a tissue block stained with platinum-blue were successfully observed without thin-sectioning, which suggests the applicability of this inverted scanning electron microscope to cancer diagnosis. This microscope visualizes mesoscopic-scale structures, and is also applicable to non-bioscience fields including polymer chemistry. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Study of band terminating in the A {approx_equal} 100 by EUROGAM; Recherche de terminaisons de bandes dans la region A {approx_equal} 100 avec EUROGAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizon, J.; Gizon, A.; Genevey, J.; Santos, D. [Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France); Nyako, B.M.; Timar, J.; Zolnai, L. [Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Boston, A.J.; Zoss, D.T.; Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); O`Brien, N.J.; Parry, C.M. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); Cata-Danil, Gh.; Bucurescu, D. [Horia Hulubei Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Afanasjev, A.V.; Ragnarsson, I. [Department of Mathematical Physics, University of Lund, Lund (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    Terminating bands in nuclei in the A{approx_equal} 100 region have been investigated using the EUROGAM2 array. Results have been obtained for Pd (Z 46) and Rh (Z = 45) isotopes. In the nucleus {sup 102}Pd, eight terminating configurations are identified. It is the first nucleus where terminating bands built on the valence space configurations and on core excited configurations are observed. Terminating bands have been also found in {sup 103}Pd and {sup 102}Rh. For {sup 102}Rh it is the first case of band terminations identified in a doubly-odd nucleus below the Z = 50 shell closure. (authors) 9 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Urban High-Resolution Precipitation Product: Combining C-Band and Local X-Band Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengfeld, Katharina; Clemens, Marco; Münster, Hans; Ament, Felix

    2014-05-01

    Modelling precipitation induced floods and their impact on flood-prone regions is one of the biggest challenges for hydrometeorological forecasters. The largest source of error in flood forecasting systems is uncertainty in precipitation estimation. In state of the art rainfall-runoff models, precipitation fields from C-band radars are used as input with temporal resolution in the order of 5 minutes and spatial resolution in the order of kilometres. These radars cannot observe the small scale structure of rain events that influences runoff especially in impermeable urban areas. Therefore, precipitation fields with higher spatial and temporal resolution would improve flood forecasting. In recent years radar systems operating in the X-band frequency range have been developed to provide precipitation fields for areas of special interest in higher temporal (1 min or below) and higher spatial resolution (250 m or below) in complementation to nationwide radar networks. However single X-band radars are highly influenced by attenuation. Within the project Precipitation and Attenuation Estimates from a High-Resolution Weather Radar Network (PATTERN) the University of Hamburg and the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology operate a single X-band radar covering the city of Hamburg, Germany. The radar provides precipitation fields with temporal resolution of 30 s and range resolution of 60 m. The area is also covered by the C-band radar Fuhlsbüttel operated by the German Weather Service (DWD) that gives precipitation estimates with a temporal resolution of 5 min and a range resolution of 1 km. We will introduce a method to merge the precipitation fields derived from the X-band radar into the precipitation field provided by the C-band radar Fuhlsbüttel. The observations of radar Fuhlsbüttel will also be integrated in the correction of the attenuated measurements of the X-band radar. The merged precipitation field of both radars will be a valid product to improve rainfall

  6. Induction of a new alkaline band at a target position in internodal cells of Chara corallina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimmen, Teruo; Yamamoto, Ako

    2002-09-01

    Characean cells develop alternating alkaline and acid bands on their surface upon illumination. However, the mechanism of band formation is not fully understood. In the present study, we succeeded in inducing a new alkaline band at an original acid band in internodal cells of Chara corallina. Chloroplasts in an acid band were locally removed by wounding the cell in the absence of the cell turgor pressure. The chloroplast-removed area was observed as a white belt in a green cylindrical internodal cell. This internodal cell developed a new alkaline band on the surface at the chloroplast-removed area. The narrower the chloroplast-removed area, the less significant the extent of OH(-) extrusion. This is the first success in inducing a new alkaline band at a target position in Characeae.

  7. Band Subset Selection for Hyperspectral Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a new approach to band subset selection (BSS for hyperspectral image classification (HSIC which selects multiple bands simultaneously as a band subset, referred to as simultaneous multiple band selection (SMMBS, rather than one band at a time sequentially, referred to as sequential multiple band selection (SQMBS, as most traditional band selection methods do. In doing so, a criterion is particularly developed for BSS that can be used for HSIC. It is a linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV derived from adaptive beamforming in array signal processing which can be used to model misclassification errors as the minimum variance. To avoid an exhaustive search for all possible band subsets, two numerical algorithms, referred to as sequential (SQ and successive (SC algorithms are also developed for LCMV-based SMMBS, called SQ LCMV-BSS and SC LCMV-BSS. Experimental results demonstrate that LCMV-based BSS has advantages over SQMBS.

  8. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  9. Spectra of γ rays feeding superdeformed bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    The spectrum of γrays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding γrays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by ∼30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the γ cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed

  10. Changing optical band structure with single photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Caneva, Tommaso; Chang, Darrick E.

    2017-11-01

    Achieving strong interactions between individual photons enables a wide variety of exciting possibilities in quantum information science and many-body physics. Cold atoms interfaced with nanophotonic structures have emerged as a platform to realize novel forms of nonlinear interactions. In particular, when atoms are coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide, long-range atomic interactions can arise that are mediated by localized atom-photon bound states. We theoretically show that in such a system, the absorption of a single photon can change the band structure for a subsequent photon. This occurs because the first photon affects the atoms in the chain in an alternating fashion, thus leading to an effective period doubling of the system and a new optical band structure for the composite atom-nanophotonic system. We demonstrate how this mechanism can be engineered to realize a single-photon switch, where the first incoming photon switches the system from being highly transmissive to highly reflective, and analyze how signatures can be observed via non-classical correlations of the outgoing photon field.

  11. Multiple band structures in 70Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring-Kaye, R. A.; Morrow, S. I.; Döring, J.; Tabor, S. L.; Le, K. Q.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Bender, P. C.; Elder, R. M.; Medina, N. H.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Tripathi, Vandana

    2018-02-01

    High-spin states in 70Ge were studied using the 55Mn(18O,p 2 n ) fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. Prompt γ -γ coincidences were measured using the Florida State University Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. An investigation of these coincidences resulted in the addition of 31 new transitions and the rearrangement of four others in the 70Ge level scheme, providing a more complete picture of the high-spin decay pattern involving both positive- and negative-parity states with multiple band structures. Spins were assigned based on directional correlation of oriented nuclei ratios, which many times also led to unambiguous parity determinations based on the firm assignments for low-lying states made in previous work. Total Routhian surface calculations, along with the observed trends in the experimental kinematic moment of inertia with rotational frequency, support the multiquasiparticle configurations of the various crossing bands proposed in recent studies. The high-spin excitation spectra predicted by previous shell-model calculations compare favorably with the experimental one determined from this study.

  12. Combination Bands of the Nonpolar OCS Dimer Involving Intermolecular Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, M.; Oliaee, J. Norooz; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2012-06-01

    Spectra of the nonpolar carbonyl sulfide in the region of the OCS ν_1 fundamental band were observed in a supersonic slit-jet apparatus. The expansion gas was probed using radiation from a tunable diode laser employed in a rapid-scan signal averaging mode. Three bands centered at 2085.906, 2103.504, and 2114.979 cm-1 were observed and anlysed. The rotational assignment and fitting of the bands were made by fixing the lower state parameters to those for the ground state of nonpolar (OCS)_2, thus confirming that they were indeed combination bands of the of the most stable isomer of OCS dimer. The band centered at 2085.906 cm-1 is a combination of the forbidden A_g intramolecular mode plus the geared bend intermolecular mode and that centered at 2114.979 cm-1 is a combination of the allowed B_u intramolecular mode plus the intermolecular van der Waals stretch. The combination at 2103.504 cm-1 can be assigned as a band whose upper state involves four quanta of the intramolecular bend or the B_u intramolecular mode plus two quanta of the intermolecular torsional mode. Isotopic work is needed to conclusively identify the vibrational assignment of this band. Our experimental frequencies for the geared bend and van der Waals modes are in good agreement with a recent high level ab initio calculation by Brown et al. J. Brown, Xiao-Gang Wang, T. Carrington Jr. and Richard Dawes, Journal of Chemical Physics, submitted.

  13. A New Wide-Band Double-Negative Metamaterial for C- and S-Band Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Ikbal; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ullah, Mohammad Habib

    2014-12-25

    A new design and analysis of a wide-band double-negative metamaterial, considering a frequency range of 0.5 to 7 GHz, is presented in this paper. Four different unit cells with varying design parameters are analyzed to evaluate the effects of the unit-cell size on the resonance frequencies of the metamaterial. Moreover, open and interconnected 2 × 2 array structures of unit cells are analyzed. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, based on the Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio, is utilized in the majority of this investigation. The experimental portion of the study was performed in a semi-anechoic chamber. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured S parameters of the developed unit cell and array. The designed unit cell exhibits negative permittivity and permeability simultaneously at S-band (2.95 GHz to 4.00 GHz) microwave frequencies. In addition, the designed unit cell can also operate as a double-negative medium throughout the C band (4.00 GHz to 4.95 GHz and 5.00 GHz to 5.57 GHz). At a number of other frequencies, it exhibits a single negative value. The two array configurations cause a slight shift in the resonance frequencies of the metamaterial and hence lead to a slight shift of the single- and double-negative frequency ranges of the metamaterial.

  14. A PHOTONIC BAND GAP FIBRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    An optical fibre having a periodicidal cladding structure provididing a photonic band gap structure with superior qualities. The periodical structure being one wherein high index areas are defined and wherein these are separated using a number of methods. One such method is the introduction...... of additional low index elements, another method is providing elongated elements deformed in relation to a circular cross section. Also described is a cladding structure comprising elongated elements of a material having an index of refraction higher than that of the material adjacent thereto. Using...

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of amniotic band syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Devi Padmanabhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amniotic band can cause a broad spectrum of anomalies ranging from simple band constrictions to major craniofacial and visceral defects. It can cause significant neonatal morbidity. Accurate diagnosis will help in the management of the present pregnancy and in counseling with regard to future pregnancies. Here we report three cases of amniotic band syndrome detected in the prenatal period.

  16. High-energy band structure of gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N. Egede

    1976-01-01

    The band structure of gold for energies far above the Fermi level has been calculated using the relativistic augmented-plane-wave method. The calculated f-band edge (Γ6-) lies 15.6 eV above the Fermi level is agreement with recent photoemission work. The band model is applied to interpret...

  17. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...

  18. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...

  19. Differential cortical activation during observation and observation-and-imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berends, H I; Wolkorte, R; Ijzerman, M J; van Putten, M J A M

    2013-09-01

    The activity of the brain during observation or imagination of movements might facilitate the relearning of motor functions after stroke. The present study examines whether there is an additional effect of imagination over observation-only. Eight healthy subjects observed and observed-and-imagined a movement of a hand; 64-channel EEG was used to measure brain activity. The synchronization of the theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-13 Hz) and beta (13-25 Hz) frequency bands was calculated and plotted in topoplots. The temporal changes of the sensorimotor area (C3, C4) and the centro-parietal cortex (Pz) were analyzed in the two experimental conditions. During observation-and-imagination, a significant larger desynchronization (p = 0.004) in the sensorimotor area was found compared to observation-only in all electrodes and frequency bands. In addition, temporal differences were found between observation and observation-and-imagination in the alpha frequency bands. During observation-and-imagination, modulations of EEG rhythms were stronger than during observation-only in the theta, alpha and beta frequency bands and during almost the whole activity fragment. These findings suggest an additive effect of imagination to observation in the rehabilitation after stroke.

  20. Intestinal malrotation and Ladd's bands in a young child | Gaido ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... typical age for duodenal stenosis due to Ladd's bands, which is often mostly observed earlier in life. Stenosis of the duodenum is relatively rare, and may represent a surgical challenge, especially in setting with limited diagnostic and treatment facilities. We also discuss implication of language barriers to potentially delay ...

  1. Simply folded band chaos in a VHF microstrip oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakely, Jonathan N.; Holder, J. Darryl; Corron, Ned J.; Pethel, Shawn D.

    2005-01-01

    We present experimental observations of a microstrip circuit that produces Roessler-like chaos with center frequency of 175 MHz. A simply folded band chaotic attractor is created through a period doubling route. The circuit provides an experimental realization of a chaotic neutral delay differential equation, a largely unexplored type of nonlinear dynamical system

  2. Signature splitting in two quasiparticle rotational bands of Ta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-20

    Jun 20, 2016 ... ... of 182Ta are analysed within the framework of two-quasiparticle rotor model. The phase as well as magni- tude of the experimentally observed signature splitting in Kπ = 1+ band of 180Ta, which could not be explained in earlier calculations, is successfully reproduced. The conflict regarding placement of ...

  3. Differential effects of gastric bypass and banding on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hala Mourad Demerdash

    2012-09-01

    Sep 1, 2012 ... Abstract Background: Weight loss (5–10%) improves obesity-associated cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of this work was ... (BAND), on the cardiovascular risk profile in morbidly obese patients and its correlation with the plasma ..... elevation is observed during the first week of high fat con- sumption but ...

  4. Amniotic band syndrom at Bobo Dioulasso university teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... a Z-plasty. The functional outcome was satisfactory with the acquisition of a plantar support for both children. Through these two observations, epidemiological, diagnostic, and particularities of the management of this condition are discussed in the Burkina-Faso. Key words: Amniotic band syndrom, surgery, birth defects ...

  5. Reconfigurable L-Band Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Rafael F.

    2008-01-01

    The reconfigurable L-Band radar is an ongoing development at NASA/GSFC that exploits the capability inherently in phased array radar systems with a state-of-the-art data acquisition and real-time processor in order to enable multi-mode measurement techniques in a single radar architecture. The development leverages on the L-Band Imaging Scatterometer, a radar system designed for the development and testing of new radar techniques; and the custom-built DBSAR processor, a highly reconfigurable, high speed data acquisition and processing system. The radar modes currently implemented include scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and altimetry; and plans to add new modes such as radiometry and bi-static GNSS signals are being formulated. This development is aimed at enhancing the radar remote sensing capabilities for airborne and spaceborne applications in support of Earth Science and planetary exploration This paper describes the design of the radar and processor systems, explains the operational modes, and discusses preliminary measurements and future plans.

  6. Photonic Band Gap Accelerator Demonstration at Ku-Band.

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Evgenya I; Edwards, Randall L; Kesar, Amit S; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Temkin, Richard J

    2005-01-01

    We report progress on the design and cold test of a metal Ku-band PBG accelerator structure. The 17.140 GHz 6-cell PBG accelerator structure with reduced long-range wakefields was designed for the experiment. The copper structure was electroformed and cold-tested. Tuning was performed through chemical etching of the rods. Final cold test measurements were found to be in very good agreement with the design. The structure will be installed on the beam line at the accelerator laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and will be powered with 3 MW of peak power from the Haimson 17.14 GHz klystron. Results of the design, fabrication, cold test and hot test on the Haimson accelerator will be presented.

  7. Dual-Band Optical Bench for Terahertz Radiometer for Outer Planet Atmospheres (TROPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecht, Erich; Jamnejad, Vahraz

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a wide-band dual frequency spectrometer for use in deep space planetary atmospheric spectroscopy. The instrument uses a dual-band architecture, both to be able to observe spectral lines from a wide range of atmospheric species, and to allow a higher precision retrieval of temperature/pressure/partial pressure and wind profiles. This dual-band approach requires a new design for the optical bench to couple both frequencies into their respective receivers.

  8. Size effects in band gap bowing in nitride semiconducting alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2011-01-01

    Chemical and size contributions to the band gap bowing of nitride semiconducting alloys (InxGa1-xN, InxAl1-xN, and AlxGa1-xN) are analyzed. It is shown that the band gap deformation potentials of the binary constituents determine the gap bowing in the ternary alloys. The particularly large gap bo...... bowing in In-containing nitride alloys can be explained by specific properties of InN, which do not follow trends observed in several other binaries....

  9. Limitations to band gap tuning in nitride semiconductor alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2010-01-01

    Relations between the band gaps of nitride alloys and their lattice parameters are presented and limits to tuning of the fundamental gap in nitride semiconductors are set by combining a large number of experimental data with ab initio theoretical calculations. Large band gap bowings obtained...... theoretically for GaxAl1-xN, InxGa1-xN, and InxAl1-xN for uniform as well as clustered arrangements of the cation atoms are considered in the theoretical analysis. It is shown that indium plays a particular role in nitride alloys being responsible for most of the observed effects....

  10. Deformation bands in porous sandstones their microstructure and petrophysical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabi, Anita

    2007-12-15

    Deformation bands are commonly thin tabular zones of crushed or reorganized grains that form in highly porous rocks and sediments. Unlike a fault, typically the slip is negligible in deformation bands. In this dissertation the microstructure and petrophysical properties of deformation bands have been investigated through microscopy and numerical analysis of experimental and natural examples. The experimental work consists of a series of ring-shear experiments performed on porous sand at 5 and 20 MPa normal stresses and followed by microscopic examination of thin sections from the sheared samples. The results of the ring-shear experiments and comparison of them to natural deformation bands reveals that burial depth (level of normal stress in the experiments) and the amount of shear displacement during deformation are the two significant factors influencing the mode in which grains break and the type of shear zone that forms. Two end-member types of experimental shear zones were identified: (a) Shear zones with diffuse boundaries, which formed at low levels of normal stress and/or shear displacement; and (b) Shear zones with sharp boundaries, which formed at higher levels of normal stress and/or shear displacement. Our interpretation is that with increasing burial depth (approximately more than one kilometer, simulated in the experiments by higher levels of normal stress), the predominant mode of grain fracturing changes from flaking to splitting; which facilitates the formation of sharp-boundary shear zones. This change to grain splitting increases the power law dimension of the grain size distribution (D is about 1.5 in sharp boundary shear zones). Based on our observations, initial grain size has no influence in the deformation behavior of the sand at 5 MPa normal stresses. A new type of cataclastic deformation band is described through outcrop and microscopic studies; here termed a 'slipped deformation band'. Whereas previously reported cataclastic

  11. Table of superdeformed nuclear bands and fission isomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R.B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Singh, B. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    1994-06-01

    A minimum in the second potential well of deformed nuclei was predicted and the associated shell gaps are illustrated in the harmonic oscillator potential shell energy surface calculations shown in this report. A strong superdeformed minimum in {sup 152}Dy was predicted for {beta}{sub 2}-0.65. Subsequently, a discrete set of {gamma}-ray transitions in {sup 152}DY was observed and, assigned to the predicted superdeformed band. Extensive research at several laboratories has since focused on searching for other mass regions of large deformation. A new generation of {gamma}-ray detector arrays is already producing a wealth of information about the mechanisms for feeding and deexciting superdeformed bands. These bands have been found in three distinct regions near A=l30, 150, and 190. This research extends upon previous work in the actinide region near A=240 where fission isomers were identified and also associated with the second potential well. Quadrupole moment measurements for selected cases in each mass region are consistent with assigning the bands to excitations in the second local minimum. As part of our committment to maintain nuclear structure data as current as possible in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Reference File (ENSDF) and the Table of Isotopes, we have updated the information on superdeformed nuclear bands. As of April 1994, we have complied data from 86 superdeformed bands and 46 fission isomers identified in 73 nuclides for this report. For each nuclide there is a complete level table listing both normal and superdeformed band assignments; level energy, spin, parity, half-life, magneto moments, decay branchings; and the energies, final levels, relative intensities, multipolarities, and mixing ratios for transitions deexciting each level. Mass excess, decay energies, and proton and neutron separation energies are also provided from the evaluation of Audi and Wapstra.

  12. Search for superdeformed bands in {sup 154}Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisius, D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The island of superdeformation in the vicinity of the doubly magic {sup 152}Dy yrast superdeformed (SD) band is thought to be well understood in the framework of cranked mean field calculations. In particular, the calculations suggested that in {sup 154}Dy there should be no yrast or near yrast SD minimum in the 40-60 h spin range, where SD bands in this mass region are thought to be {sup 153}Dy nucleus, it is populated. However, with the presence of five SD bands in the neighboring necessary to ascertain if the addition of one single neutron diminishes the importance of shell effects to the extent that superdeformation can no longer be sustained. In an experiment utilizing the increased resolving power of the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, the reaction {sup 122}Sn({sup 36}S,4n) at 165 MeV was employed to populate high spin states in {sup 154}Dy. In a four-day run with 36 detectors, over one billion triple and higher fold coincidence events were recorded. One new SD band was identified and was assigned to {sup 154}Dy. From comparisons with the Im{sup (2)} moments of inertia of the SD bands in {sup 152}Dy and {sup 153}Dy, a configuration based on (514)9/2{sup 2} neutrons coupled to the {sup 152}Dy SD core was proposed. One unexpected and as yet unexplained feature of this new SD band is that the transition energies are almost identical to those of an excited SD band in {sup 153}Dy. It is also worth noting that the feeding of the yrast states is similar to that achieved by the deexcitation from the ensemble of all entry states in the reaction. This observation emphasizes the statistical nature of the decay-out process. A paper reporting these results was accepted for publication.

  13. Table of superdeformed nuclear bands and fission isomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firestone, R.B.; Singh, B.

    1994-06-01

    A minimum in the second potential well of deformed nuclei was predicted and the associated shell gaps are illustrated in the harmonic oscillator potential shell energy surface calculations shown in this report. A strong superdeformed minimum in 152 Dy was predicted for β 2 -0.65. Subsequently, a discrete set of γ-ray transitions in 152 DY was observed and, assigned to the predicted superdeformed band. Extensive research at several laboratories has since focused on searching for other mass regions of large deformation. A new generation of γ-ray detector arrays is already producing a wealth of information about the mechanisms for feeding and deexciting superdeformed bands. These bands have been found in three distinct regions near A=l30, 150, and 190. This research extends upon previous work in the actinide region near A=240 where fission isomers were identified and also associated with the second potential well. Quadrupole moment measurements for selected cases in each mass region are consistent with assigning the bands to excitations in the second local minimum. As part of our committment to maintain nuclear structure data as current as possible in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Reference File (ENSDF) and the Table of Isotopes, we have updated the information on superdeformed nuclear bands. As of April 1994, we have complied data from 86 superdeformed bands and 46 fission isomers identified in 73 nuclides for this report. For each nuclide there is a complete level table listing both normal and superdeformed band assignments; level energy, spin, parity, half-life, magneto moments, decay branchings; and the energies, final levels, relative intensities, multipolarities, and mixing ratios for transitions deexciting each level. Mass excess, decay energies, and proton and neutron separation energies are also provided from the evaluation of Audi and Wapstra

  14. Giemsa C-banding of Barley Chromosomes. I: Banding Pattern Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib

    1978-01-01

    Twenty barley (Hordeum vulgare) lines studied had a common basic chromosome banding pattern. Most bands ranged from medium to very small in size. The most conspicuous banding occurred at or near the centromeres, in the proximal, intercalary parts of most chromosome arms and beside the secondary c...... 7. Seventeen differently banded karyotypes were found. Some banding pattern polymorphisms can be used in cytological and cytogenetic studies....

  15. Search for excited superdeformed bands in {sup 151}Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisius, D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Crowell, B. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Following the first report of superdeformed (SD) bands with identical transition energies in the pairs ({sup 151}Tb*,{sup 152}Dy), ({sup 150}Gd*, {sup 151}Tb) and ({sup 153}Dy*, {sup 152}Dy) (where * denotes an excited SD band), it was proposed by Nazarewicz et al. that the observations could be understood in a strong-coupling approach if pseudo SU(3) symmetry were invoked. In this model there are three limiting values of the decoupling parameter; i.e. a = 0, {plus_minus}1. In the first two cases mentioned above the pairs of bands have nearly identical transition energies and are interpreted as proton excitations involving the [200]1/2 pseudospin orbital coupled to the {sup 152}Dy core, for which the value of the decoupling parameter is calculated to be a =+1.

  16. New bands and spin-parity assignments in 111Ru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, W.; Rzaca-Urban, T.; Droste, C.; Rohozinski, S.G.; Durell, J.L.; Phillips, W.R.; Smith, A.G.; Varley, B.J.; Schulz, N.; Ahmad, I.; Pinston, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    The 111 Ru nucleus, populated in the spontaneous fission of 248 Cm has been studied by means of prompt gamma spectroscopy using the EUROGAM2 array. Spin and parity assignments, based on angular correlations, linear polarization, and conversion coefficient measurements differ from those available in the literature. New bands are reported, which incorporate γ transitions seen previously but not placed in the scheme of 111 Ru or placed incorrectly. The bands are interpreted as neutron excitations into subshells originating predominantly from the h 11/2 , g 7/2 and s 1/2 spherical orbitals. The s 1/2 band, strongly mixed with the d 3/2 , d 5/2 and g 7/2 configurations, is observed for the first time in this region. (orig.)

  17. Oblate bands in A ∼ 200 bismuth nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagnall, P.J.; Beausang, C.W.; Clark, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclei 198-200 Bi were populated via the 186 W( 19 F,xn) 198-200 Bi reaction at beam energies of 115 MeV and 105 MeV. Another experiment, aimed at investigating the high-spin-level structure of 203,204 Bi, used the 198 Pt( 11 B,xn) reaction at a beam energy of 74 MeV. Five new ΔI = 1 rotational structures, consisting of stretched magnetic dipole transitions, have been observed. One of these bands is assigned to 198 Bi, one to 199 Bi, two to 200 Bi, and one to 203 Bi. The behaviour of the dynamic moments of inertia of these oblate bands is compared with other bands in neighbouring Pb and Bi nuclei. (author)

  18. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  19. Broad-band beam buncher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, D.A.; Flood, W.S.; Arthur, A.A.; Voelker, F.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a broad-band beam buncher. This beam buncher consists of: a housing adapted to be eacuated, an electron gun in the housing for producing a beam of electrons, buncher means in the housing forming a buncher cavity which has an entrance opening for receiving the electron beam and an exit opening through which the electron beam passes out of the buncher cavity, a drift tube electrode in the buncher cavity and disposed between the entrance opening and the exit opening with first and second gaps between the drift tube electrode and the entrance and exit openings, the drift tube electrode which has a first drift space through which the electron beam passes in traveling between the entrance and exit openings, modulating means for supplying an ultrahigh frequeny modulating signal to the drift tube electrode for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the electron beam as the electrons pass through the buncher cavity and the drift tube electrode between the entrance opening and the exit opening, drift space means in the housing forming a second drift space for receiving the velocity modulated electron beam from the exit opening, the velocity modulated electron beam being bunched as it passes along the second drift space, the drift space means has a discharge opening through which the electron beam is discharged from the second drift space after being bunched therein, the modulating means containing a signal source for producing an ultrahigh frequency signal, a transmission line connected between the signal source and the drift tube electrode, and terminating means connected to the drift tube electrode for terminating the transmission line in approximately its characteristic impedance to afford a broad response band with minimum 6 variations therein

  20. Annual Growth Bands in Hymenaea courbaril

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, J A; Guilderson, T P; Colinvaux, P A

    2004-02-09

    One significant source of annual temperature and precipitation data arises from the regular annual secondary growth rings of trees. Several tropical tree species are observed to form regular growth bands that may or may not form annually. Such growth was observed in one stem disk of the tropical legume Hymenaea courbaril near the area of David, Panama. In comparison to annual reference {Delta}{sup 14}C values from wood and air, the {Delta}{sup 14}C values from the secondary growth rings formed by H. courbaril were determined to be annual in nature in this one stem disk specimen. During this study, H. courbaril was also observed to translocate recently produced photosynthate into older growth rings as sapwood is converted to heartwood. This process alters the overall {Delta}{sup 14}C values of these transitional growth rings as cellulose with a higher {Delta}{sup 14}C content is translocated into growth rings with a relatively lower {Delta}{sup 14}C content. Once the annual nature of these growth rings is established, further stable isotope analyses on H. courbaril material in other studies may help to complete gaps in the understanding of short and of long term global climate patterns.

  1. Single and multi-band electromagnetic induced transparency-like metamaterials with coupled split ring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, Fulya; Akaoglu, Baris

    2017-08-01

    We present a metamaterial configuration exhibiting single and multi-band electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT)-like properties. The unit cell of the single band EIT-like metamaterial consists of a multi-split ring resonator surrounded by a split ring resonator. The multi-split ring resonator acts as a quasi-dark or dark resonator, depending on the polarization of the incident wave, and the split ring resonator serves as the bright resonator. Combination of these two resonators results in a single band EIT-like transmission inside the stop band. EIT-like transmission phenomenon is also clearly observed in the measured transmission spectrum at almost the same frequencies for vertical and horizontal polarized waves, and the numerical results are verified for normal incidence. Moreover, multi-band transmission windows are created within a wide band by combining the two slightly different single band EIT-like metamaterial unit cells that exhibit two different coupling strengths inside a supercell configuration. Group indices as high as 123 for single band and 488 for tri-band transmission, accompanying with high transmission rates (over 80%), are achieved, rendering the metamaterial very suitable for multi-band slow light applications. It is shown that the group delay of the propagating wave can be increased and dynamically controlled by changing the polarization angle. Multi-band EIT-like transmission is also verified experimentally, and a good agreement with simulations is obtained. The proposed novel methodology for obtaining multi-band EIT, which takes advantage of a supercell configuration by hosting slightly different configured unit cells, can be utilized for easily formation and manipulation of multi-band transmission windows inside a stop band.

  2. Diffusion properties of band 3 in human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Jeffrey O.

    The plasma membrane of the human erythrocyte (RBC) is a six fold symmetric network held together at various pinning points by several multi-protein complexes. This unique architecture is what gives the RBC its remarkable material properties and any disruptions to the network can have severe consequences for the cell. Band 3 is a major transmembrane protein that plays the role of linking the fluid lipid bilayer to the cytoskeletal network. To interrogate the structural integrity of the RBC membrane we have tracked individual band 3 molecules in RBCs displaying a variety of pathologies that are all a consequence of membrane or network related defects. These diseases are spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and pyropokilocytosis. We have also investigated the protein related diseases sickle cell, and south east asian ovalocytosis. To assess the impact that the network has on the dynamic organization of the cell we have also studied the mobility of band 3 in RBC progenitor cells. Individual band 3 molecules were imaged at 120 frames/second and their diffusion coefficients and compartment sizes recorded. The distributions of the compartment sizes combined with the information about the short and long time diffusion of band 3 has given us insight into the architecture of the membrane in normal and diseased cells. The observation that different membrane pathologies can be distinguished, even to the point of different molecular origins of the same disease, implies that the mobility of transmembrane proteins may be a useful tool for characterizing the "health" of the membrane.

  3. The Red Edge Problem in asteroid band parameter analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sean S.; Dunn, Tasha L.; Emery, Joshua P.; Bowles, Neil E.

    2016-04-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectra of S-type asteroids contain two absorptions at 1 and 2 μm (band I and II) that are diagnostic of mineralogy. A parameterization of these two bands is frequently employed to determine the mineralogy of S(IV) asteroids through the use of ordinary chondrite calibration equations that link the mineralogy to band parameters. The most widely used calibration study uses a Band II terminal wavelength point (red edge) at 2.50 μm. However, due to the limitations of the NIR detectors on prominent telescopes used in asteroid research, spectral data for asteroids are typically only reliable out to 2.45 μm. We refer to this discrepancy as "The Red Edge Problem." In this report, we evaluate the associated errors for measured band area ratios (BAR = Area BII/BI) and calculated relative abundance measurements. We find that the Red Edge Problem is often not the dominant source of error for the observationally limited red edge set at 2.45 μm, but it frequently is for a red edge set at 2.40 μm. The error, however, is one sided and therefore systematic. As such, we provide equations to adjust measured BARs to values with a different red edge definition. We also provide new ol/(ol+px) calibration equations for red edges set at 2.40 and 2.45 μm.

  4. Interpretation of Absorption Bands in Airborne Hyperspectral Radiance Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. David Miller

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available It is demonstrated that hyperspectral imagery can be used, without atmospheric correction, to determine the presence of accessory phytoplankton pigments in coastal waters using derivative techniques. However, care must be taken not to confuse other absorptions for those caused by the presence of pigments. Atmospheric correction, usually the first step to making products from hyperspectral data, may not completely remove Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption bands and these absorptions may interfere with identification of phytoplankton accessory pigments. Furthermore, the ability to resolve absorption bands depends on the spectral resolution of the spectrometer, which for a fixed spectral range also determines the number of observed bands. Based on this information, a study was undertaken to determine under what circumstances a hyperspectral sensor may determine the presence of pigments. As part of the study a hyperspectral imager was used to take high spectral resolution data over two different water masses. In order to avoid the problems associated with atmospheric correction this data was analyzed as radiance data without atmospheric correction. Here, the purpose was to identify spectral regions that might be diagnostic for photosynthetic pigments. Two well proven techniques were used to aid in absorption band recognition, the continuum removal of the spectra and the fourth derivative. The findings in this study suggest that interpretation of absorption bands in remote sensing data, whether atmospherically corrected or not, have to be carefully reviewed when they are interpreted in terms of photosynthetic pigments.

  5. The dynamics of a shear band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarola, Diana; Capuani, Domenico; Bigoni, Davide

    2018-03-01

    A shear band of finite length, formed inside a ductile material at a certain stage of a continued homogeneous strain, provides a dynamic perturbation to an incident wave field, which strongly influences the dynamics of the material and affects its path to failure. The investigation of this perturbation is presented for a ductile metal, with reference to the incremental mechanics of a material obeying the J2-deformation theory of plasticity (a special form of prestressed, elastic, anisotropic, and incompressible solid). The treatment originates from the derivation of integral representations relating the incremental mechanical fields at every point of the medium to the incremental displacement jump across the shear band faces, generated by an impinging wave. The boundary integral equations (under the plane strain assumption) are numerically approached through a collocation technique, which keeps into account the singularity at the shear band tips and permits the analysis of an incident wave impinging a shear band. It is shown that the presence of the shear band induces a resonance, visible in the incremental displacement field and in the stress intensity factor at the shear band tips, which promotes shear band growth. Moreover, the waves scattered by the shear band are shown to generate a fine texture of vibrations, parallel to the shear band line and propagating at a long distance from it, but leaving a sort of conical shadow zone, which emanates from the tips of the shear band.

  6. Retrieval of Wind Speed Using an L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaldo, Frank M.; Thompson, Donald R.; Badger, Merete

    2007-01-01

    usefulness over the ocean. Most recent wind retrievals from spaceborne SARs have been at C-band for ERS-1/2, Radarsat, and Envisat. With the launch of the sophisticated multi- polarization Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) on the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS), we renew...

  7. Theoretical study of relative width of photonic band gap for the 3-D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of refractive index and relative radius of the photonic band gap for the fcc closed packed 3-D dielectric microstructure are reported and comparison of experimental observations and theoretical predictions are given. This work is useful for the understanding of photonic crystals and occurrence of the photonic band gap.

  8. Studies on the red absorption band of chlorophyll a in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, J.B.; Kleinen Hammans, J.W.; Arnolds, W.J.

    1965-01-01

    It was studied whether certain earlier observed weak shoulders on the red absorption band of chlorophyll a in vivo might represent anomalies due to overlap of absorption bands. The results are suggested of the fact that no such anomalies occur. It is therefore concluded that the present study

  9. Urbach's rule derived from thermal fluctuations in the band-gap energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1978-01-01

    The exponential absorption edge (known as Urbach's rule) observed in most materials is interpreted in terms of thermal fluctuations in the band-gap energy. The main contribution to the temperature shift of the band-gap energy is due to the temperature-dependent self-energies of the electrons...... and holes interacting with the phonons. Since the phonon number is fluctuating in thermal equilibrium, the band-gap energy is also fluctuating resulting in an exponential absorption tail below the average band-gap energy. These simple considerations are applied to derive Urbach's rule at high temperatures...

  10. Study of band terminating in the A ≅ 100 by EUROGAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gizon, J.; Gizon, A.; Genevey, J.; Santos, D.; Nyako, B.M.; Timar, J.; Zolnai, L.; Boston, A.J.; Zoss, D.T.; Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T.; O'Brien, N.J.; Parry, C.M.; Cata-Danil, Gh.; Bucurescu, D.; Afanasjev, A.V.; Ragnarsson, I.

    1997-01-01

    Terminating bands in nuclei in the A≅ 100 region have been investigated using the EUROGAM2 array. Results have been obtained for Pd (Z 46) and Rh (Z = 45) isotopes. In the nucleus 102 Pd, eight terminating configurations are identified. It is the first nucleus where terminating bands built on the valence space configurations and on core excited configurations are observed. Terminating bands have been also found in 103 Pd and 102 Rh. For 102 Rh it is the first case of band terminations identified in a doubly-odd nucleus below the Z = 50 shell closure. (authors)

  11. L- and X-Band Multi-Temporal InSAR Analysis of Tianjin Subsidence

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Qingli; Perissin, Daniele; Zhang, Yuanzhi; Jia, Youliang

    2014-01-01

    When synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) technology is applied in the monitoring of land subsidence, the sensor band plays an important role. An X-band SAR system as TerraSAR-X (TSX) provides high resolution and short revisit time, but it has no capability of global coverage. On the other side, an L-band sensor as Advanced Land Observing Satellite-Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (ALOS-PALSAR) has global coverage and it produces highly coherent interferograms, but it ...

  12. Outcome of band ligation in oesophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, A.; Bhutto, A.R.; Bhatti, K.I.; Mahmood, K.; Lal, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find out the outcome og band ligation of oesophageal varices in decompensated chronic liver disease patients. Methods: The quasi experimental study was conducted at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, and Civil Hospital, Karachi, unit from September 2007 to August 2011. Subjects were eligible if they had a diagnosis of cirrhosis based on history, physical examination, biochemical parameters and liver biopsy in some cases. Patients with advanced cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class C), antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus, hepatocellular carcinoma, portal vein thrombosis evident on ultrasonography, parenteral drug addiction, current alcohol abuse, previous or current treatment with β-blockers were excluded from the study. All patients were asked about alcohol intake and tested to determine the cause of liver cirrhosis. Tests for other causes of cirrhosis were carried out only if there was a suggestive clue. All patients under-went upper gastrointestinal endoscopy after consent. SPSS 15 was used for statistical analysis. Results: The age of the 173 patients who met the inclusion criteria ranged from 15 to 85 years, with a mean of 48.39+-13.38 years. There were 112 (64.7%) males. High-grade varices were seen in 130 (75.1%) patients, while low-grade varices were observed in 43 (24.9%) on first endoscopy. At initial endoscopy, 111 (64.2%) patients had portal hypertensive gastropathy. The patients were followed up for a mean period of 5.20+-2.67 months. Variceal obliteration was achieved in 138 (79.8%), while 33 (19.1%) cases developed re-bleeding. Mean number of endoscopy sessions for these patients were 2.28+-.918 with a maximum of 4. Conclusion: Band ligation eradicated oesophageal varices with less complications and a lower re-bleeding rate, but at the same time eradication was associated with more frequent development of portal hypertensive gastropathy. (author)

  13. The 890 nm Band of Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spickler, Philip T.; Benner, D.; O'Brien, J.; Devi, V.; Shaji, S.; Houck, C.; Coakley, J.

    2010-01-01

    The near infrared bands of methane were the first observed in the outer planets and Titan. With the very long paths of rays in this spectral region within the atmospheres of these objects, scattering and pressure and temperature inhomogeneities are important. Here the spectrum is very complex and long absorption paths in the laboratory are difficult to cool to outer solar system temperatures. Many significant spectral lines appear per Doppler width, so the absorption is usually modeled statistically. The problem with these statistical models is that violations of the modeling assumptions can cause the extrapolation of laboratory parameters to predict absorption that diverges from the actual. These models generally do not provide transmissions that are multiplicative, so scattering and inhomogeneous atmospheres cannot be properly modeled. The intracavity laser spectrometer of the University of Missouri-St. Louis was used to obtain low temperature (99-161K), low pressure (0.12-7.13 Torr), long path (3.14-5.65 km) and high resolution ( 0.01 cm-1 HWHM) spectra of methane covering the entire 890nm feature (10925-11500 cm-1), the deepest band in the CCD spectral region. At these temperatures the spectral lines originating from higher energy levels are not visible and the Doppler width is decreased substantially from room temperature. The result is a dense, but manageable spectrum from which line positions, intensities and lower state energies are derived on a line by line basis by the William and Mary multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting program, allowing for the simulation of the spectrum at infinite resolution for any physical conditions with temperature less than 160K. A sample spectrum will be shown. Support for work at William and Mary provided by NASA through grant NNX08AF06G. Support for work at UM-St. Louis provided by NASA through grant NAG5-12013, from NSF through grant CHE-0213356 and by the University of Missouri Research Board.

  14. Low-bias flat band-stop filter based on velocity modulated gaussian graphene superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari-Esfahlan, S. M.; Shojaei, S.

    2018-05-01

    Transport properties of biased planar Gaussian graphene superlattice (PGGSL) with Fermi velocity barrier is investigated by transfer matrix method (TMM). It is observed that enlargement of bias voltage over miniband width breaks the miniband to WSLs leads to suppressing resonant tunneling. Transmission spectrum shows flat wide stop-band property controllable by external bias voltage with stop-band width of near 200 meV. The simulations demonstrate that strong velocity barriers prevent tunneling of Dirac electrons leading to controllable enhancement of stop-band width. By increasing ratio of Fermi velocity in barriers to wells υc stop-band width increase. As wide transmission stop-band width (BWT) of filter is tunable from 40 meV to 340 meV is obtained by enhancing ratio of υc from 0.2 to 1.5, respectively. Proposed structure suggests easy tunable wide band-stop electronic filter with a modulated flat stop-band characteristic by height of electrostatic barrier and structural parameters. Robust sensitivity of band width to velocity barrier intensity in certain bias voltages and flat band feature of proposed filter may be opens novel venue in GSL based flat band low noise filters and velocity modulation devices.

  15. Adaptive Confidence Bands for Nonparametric Regression Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, T Tony; Low, Mark; Ma, Zongming

    2014-01-01

    A new formulation for the construction of adaptive confidence bands in non-parametric function estimation problems is proposed. Confidence bands are constructed which have size that adapts to the smoothness of the function while guaranteeing that both the relative excess mass of the function lying outside the band and the measure of the set of points where the function lies outside the band are small. It is shown that the bands adapt over a maximum range of Lipschitz classes. The adaptive confidence band can be easily implemented in standard statistical software with wavelet support. Numerical performance of the procedure is investigated using both simulated and real datasets. The numerical results agree well with the theoretical analysis. The procedure can be easily modified and used for other nonparametric function estimation models.

  16. Band resolution of optical spectra of solvated electrons in water, alcohols, and tetrahydrofuran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jou, F.-Y.; Freeman, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of solvated electrons in water, alcohols, and tetrahydrofuran are empirically resolved into two Gaussian bands and a continuum tail. The first Gaussian band covers most of the low energy side of the spectrum. The second Gaussian band lies at an energy slightly above that of the absorption maximum of the total spectrum. With the exception of tert-butyl alcohol, in water and alcohols the following were observed: (a) the first Gaussian bands have the same half-width, but the oscillator strength in water is about double that in an alcohol; (b) the second Gaussian bands have similar half-widths and oscillator strengths; (c) the continuum tails have similar half-widths, yet that in water possesses only about one third as much oscillator strength as the one in alcohol. In tert-butyl alcohol and tetrahydrofuran the first Gaussian band and the continuum tail each carry nearly half of the total oscillator strength. (author)

  17. X-BAND KLYSTRON DEVELOPMENT AT SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlieks, Arnold E.; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    The development of X-band klystrons at SLAC originated with the idea of building an X-band Linear Collider in the late 1980's. Since then much effort has been expended in developing a reliable X-band Power source capable of delivering >50 MW RF power in pulse widths >1.5 {micro}s. I will report on some of the technical issues and design strategies which have led to the current SLAC klystron designs.

  18. ANALISIS TIPOGRAFI PADA LOGOTYPE BAND FORGOTTEN

    OpenAIRE

    Atang Riyan Isnandar; wantoro wantoro wantoro

    2016-01-01

    Abstrak Forgotten merupakan band asal kota Bandung yang beraliran death metal. Band ini telah memiliki beberapa album yang cukup sukses. Salah satu faktor yang turut berperan penting dalam album-album Forgotten adalah desain sampul album. Sampul album merupakan identitas dan pesan dari musik yang dibawakan oleh Forgotten. Dalam sampul album, terdapat salah satu elemen visual yaitu Tipografi. Salah satu peran tipografi dalam sampul album Forgotten adalah sebagai logotype dari band. Yang menar...

  19. Computational Design of Flat-Band Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, I.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kawashima, K.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum mechanics states that hopping integral between local orbitals makes the energy band dispersive. However, in some special cases, there are bands with no dispersion due to quantum interference. These bands are called as flat band. Many models having flat band have been proposed, and many interesting physical properties are predicted. However, no real compound having flat band has been found yet despite the 25 years of vigorous researches. We have found that some pyrochlore oxides have quasi-flat band just below the Fermi level by first principles calculation. Moreover, their valence bands are well described by a tight-binding model of pyrochlore lattice with isotropic nearest neighbor hopping integral. This model belongs to a class of Mielke model, whose ground state is known to be ferromagnetic with appropriate carrier doping and on-site repulsive Coulomb interaction. We have also performed a spin-polarized band calculation for the hole-doped system from first principles and found that the ground state is ferromagnetic for some doping region. Interestingly, these compounds do not include magnetic element, such as transition metal and rare-earth elements.

  20. Computational Design of Flat-Band Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, I; Yanagisawa, T; Kawashima, K

    2018-02-26

    Quantum mechanics states that hopping integral between local orbitals makes the energy band dispersive. However, in some special cases, there are bands with no dispersion due to quantum interference. These bands are called as flat band. Many models having flat band have been proposed, and many interesting physical properties are predicted. However, no real compound having flat band has been found yet despite the 25 years of vigorous researches. We have found that some pyrochlore oxides have quasi-flat band just below the Fermi level by first principles calculation. Moreover, their valence bands are well described by a tight-binding model of pyrochlore lattice with isotropic nearest neighbor hopping integral. This model belongs to a class of Mielke model, whose ground state is known to be ferromagnetic with appropriate carrier doping and on-site repulsive Coulomb interaction. We have also performed a spin-polarized band calculation for the hole-doped system from first principles and found that the ground state is ferromagnetic for some doping region. Interestingly, these compounds do not include magnetic element, such as transition metal and rare-earth elements.

  1. Spontaneous reduction of the prolapsed stomach in a case of anterior band slippage after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darius, T; Aelvoet, Ch; Tollens, T; Vanrykel, J P

    2007-01-01

    Band slippage is a common late complication after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. We present the first report in literature of a spontaneous reduction of the prolapsed stomach after band deflation in a case of anterior band slippage.

  2. Spins of superdeformed band in {sup 192}Hg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Determination of the spins of SD states is the most important challenge in the study of superdeformation. Knowledge of the spin will provide crucial information on SD bands, in particular on the fascinating phenomenon of bands with identical energies and moments of inertia. Angular distribution coefficients of the {gamma}rays decaying out of the {sup 192}Hg SD band were determined using Eurogam data. These coefficients, as well as the spectral shape and multiplicity of the spectrum, are compared with the results of calculations, thereby providing a check on these calculations. From the measured decay multiplicity and the calculated average spin removed per photon (0.3 h), we deduce the average spin {bar I}{sub decay} removed by the {gamma} rays connecting SD and normal states. The spin I{sub SD} of the SD band from which the decay occurs is given by I{sub SD} = {bar I} decay + {bar I} ND, where {bar I} ND is the average spin removed by the normal yrast states. The state from which the major decay out of the SD band occurs is found to have spin 9.5 {plus_minus} 0.8 h. Since angular momentum is (quantized), this leads to a spin assignment of 9 or 10 h. The latter value is favored since the yrast band in the SD well must have only even spin values. This constitutes the first deduction of spin from data in the mass 150 and 190 regions. The spin of 10 h agrees with the spin which is inferred from a model, using the observed moment of inertia (Im){sup (2)}{omega}.

  3. Galaxy properties from J-PAS narrow-band photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Narváez, A.; Bruzual, G.; Magris, C. G.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Benítez, N.; Carneiro, S.; Cenarro, A. J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Dupke, R.; Ederoclite, A.; Marín-Franch, A.; de Oliveira, C. Mendes; Moles, M.; Sodre, L.; Taylor, K.; Varela, J.; Ramió, H. Vázquez

    2017-11-01

    We study the consistency of the physical properties of galaxies retrieved from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting as a function of spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Using a selection of physically motivated star formation histories, we set up a control sample of mock galaxy spectra representing observations of the local Universe in high-resolution spectroscopy, and in 56 narrow-band and 5 broad-band photometry. We fit the SEDs at these spectral resolutions and compute their corresponding stellar mass, the mass- and luminosity-weighted age and metallicity, and the dust extinction. We study the biases, correlations and degeneracies affecting the retrieved parameters and explore the role of the spectral resolution and the SNR in regulating these degeneracies. We find that narrow-band photometry and spectroscopy yield similar trends in the physical properties derived, the former being considerably more precise. Using a galaxy sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we compare more realistically the results obtained from high-resolution and narrow-band SEDs (synthesized from the same SDSS spectra) following the same spectral fitting procedures. We use results from the literature as a benchmark to our spectroscopic estimates and show that the prior probability distribution functions, commonly adopted in parametric methods, may introduce biases not accounted for in a Bayesian framework. We conclude that narrow-band photometry yields the same trend in the age-metallicity relation in the literature, provided it is affected by the same biases as spectroscopy, albeit the precision achieved with the latter is generally twice as large as with the narrow-band, at SNR values typical of the different kinds of data.

  4. The VLA Low-band Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Tracy; Peters, Wendy; Brisken, Walter; Giacintucci, Simona; Kassim, Namir; Polisensky, Emil; Helmboldt, Joseph; Richards, Emily E.; Erickson, Alan; Ray, Paul S.; Kerr, Matthew T.; Deneva, Julia; Coburn, William; Huber, Robert; Long, Jeff

    2018-01-01

    The VLA Low-band Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE, http://vlite.nrao.edu/ ) is a commensal low-frequency observing system that has been operational on the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) since late 2014. The separate optical paths of the prime-focus sub-GHz dipole feeds and the Cassegrain-focus 1-50 GHz feeds allow both systems to operate simultaneously with independent correlators. The initial 2.5 years of VLITE operation provided real-time correlation of 10 antennas across the 320-384 MHz band with a total observing time approaching 12,000 hours. During the summer of 2017, VLITE was upgraded to a total of 16 antennas (more than doubling the number of baselines) with enhanced correlator capabilities to enable correlation of the on-the-fly observing mode being used for the new NRAO VLA Sky Survey (VLASS).We present an overview of the VLITE system, including highlights of the complexities of a commensal observing program, sparse-array challenges, and scientific capabilities from our science-ready data pipeline. In the longer term, we seek a path to broadband expansion across all VLA antennas to develop a powerful new LOw Band Observatory (LOBO).

  5. Solid State KA-Band, Solid State W-Band and TWT Amplifiers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I of the proposal describes plans to develop a state of the art transmitter for the W-Band and KA -Band Cloud Radar system. Our focus will be concentrated in...

  6. Maximizing band gaps in plate structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    Band gaps, i.e., frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate, can be found in elastic structures for which there is a certain periodic modulation of the material properties or structure. In this paper, we maximize the band gap size for bending waves in a Mindlin plate. We analyze an infinite...

  7. Link adaptation in unlicensed radio bands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haartsen, J.C.; Schutter, George B.W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new collaborative mechanism for efficient coordination of radio communication devices, in particular addressing the unlicensed ISM band at 2.4 GHz. As the traffic in the ISM band is increasing tremendously, the potential for interference between uncoordinated devices is

  8. Symptomatic mesodiverticular bands in children | Bertozzi | Annals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Symptomatic mesodiverticular bands in children. ... Abstract. Objective: The aim of this study was to review the English literature about a rare condition such as symptomatic mesodiverticular bands (MDBs) in children. Background: The MDB is an ... All cases reported an intestinal occlusion as clinical picture. Internal hernia ...

  9. Concert Band Instrumentation: Realities and Remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, George L.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests ways to solve problems resulting from imbalanced instrumentation in school concert bands. Identifies sources of imbalance. Encourages band directors to plan for correct instrumentation, to match students' characteristics and abilities to instruments, and to recruit students to play needed instruments. Discusses the benefits of balanced…

  10. Low band gap polymers for organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Eva; Krebs, Frederik C

    2007-01-01

    Low band gap polymer materials and their application in organic photovoltaics (OPV) are reviewed. We detail the synthetic approaches to low band gap polymer materials starting from the early methodologies employing quinoid homopolymer structures to the current state of the art that relies...... in photovoltaic applications and give a tabular overview of rarely applied materials....

  11. Complex band structure and electronic transmission eigenchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Strange, Mikkel; Smidstrup, Soren

    2017-01-01

    molecular junctions. The molecular junctions show that both the length dependence of the total transmission and the individual transmission eigenvalues can be, almost always, found through the complex band structure. The complex band structure of the semi-conducting material, however, does not predict...

  12. Stop! Look! Listen! for Effective Band Rehearsals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alfred S.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how band conductors can develop student skills in three areas: (1) when the conductor stops the band; (2) teaching the students to pay attention and watch the conductor; and (3) improving the student listening skills. Includes information on instructing students to play chorales. (CMK)

  13. Conduction bands in classical periodic potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a quantum particle in a conduction band and drift at a constant average velocity through the potential as if it were undergoing resonant tunnelling. The classical conduction bands for this potential are determined numerically with high precision. Keywords. PT symmetry; complex trajectories; complex classical mechanics; ...

  14. Artificial Oxide Heterostructures with Tunable Band Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-20

    tunable band gap and band structures in epitaxial grown CaMnO3. The efforts have been devoted to (1) the thin film growth; (2) the tunable optical...plan to pursue a claim for personal or organizational intellectual property? Changes in research objectives (if any): Change in AFOSR Program Officer

  15. Error Analysis of Band Matrix Method

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Takeo; Soga, Akira

    1984-01-01

    Numerical error in the solution of the band matrix method based on the elimination method in single precision is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and the behaviour of the truncation error and the roundoff error is clarified. Some important suggestions for the useful application of the band solver are proposed by using the results of above error analysis.

  16. Low-Noise Band-Pass Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    Circuit uses standard components to overcome common limitation of JFET amplifiers. Low-noise band-pass amplifier employs JFET and operational amplifier. High gain and band-pass characteristics are achieved with suitable choice of resistances and capacitances. Circuit should find use as low-noise amplifier, for example as first stage instrumentation systems.

  17. Signature splitting in two quasiparticle rotational bands of 180, 182 Ta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    quasiparticle rotor model. The phase as well as magnitudeof the experimentally observed signature splitting in K π = 1 + band of 180 Ta, which could not be explained in earlier calculations, is successfully reproduced. The conflict regarding placement of ...

  18. Information retrieval from wide-band meteorological data - An example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelfang, S. I.; Smith, O. E.

    1983-01-01

    The methods proposed by Smith and Adelfang (1981) and Smith et al. (1982) are used to calculate probabilities over rectangles and sectors of the gust magnitude-gust length plane; probabilities over the same regions are also calculated from the observed distributions and a comparison is also presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the statistical model. These and other statistical results are calculated from samples of Jimsphere wind profiles at Cape Canaveral. The results are presented for a variety of wavelength bands, altitudes, and seasons. It is shown that wind perturbations observed in Jimsphere wind profiles in various wavelength bands can be analyzed by using digital filters. The relationship between gust magnitude and gust length is modeled with the bivariate gamma distribution. It is pointed out that application of the model to calculate probabilities over specific areas of the gust magnitude-gust length plane can be useful in aerospace design.

  19. Band-type microelectrodes for amperometric immunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ga-Yeon; Chang, Young Wook; Ko, Hyuk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min-Jung [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyun, Jae-Chul, E-mail: jcpyun@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-20

    A band-type microelectrode was made using a parylene-N film as a passivation layer. A circular-type, mm-scale electrode with the same diameter as the band-type microelectrode was also made with an electrode area that was 5000 times larger than the band-type microelectrode. By comparing the amperometric signals of 3,5,3′,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) samples at different optical density (OD) values, the band-type microelectrode was determined to be 9 times more sensitive than the circular-type electrode. The properties of the circular-type and the band-type electrodes (e.g., the shape of their cyclic voltammograms, the type of diffusion layer used, and the diffusion layer thickness per unit electrode area) were characterized according to their electrode area using the COMSOL Multiphysics software. From these simulations, the band-type electrode was estimated to have the conventional microelectrode properties, even when the electrode area was 100 times larger than a conventional circular-type electrode. These results show that both the geometry and the area of an electrode can influence the properties of the electrode. Finally, amperometric analysis based on a band-type electrode was applied to commercial ELISA kits to analyze human hepatitis B surface antigen (hHBsAg) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies. - Highlights: • A band-type microelectrode was made using a parylene-N film as a passivation layer. • The band-type microelectrode was 14-times more sensitive than circular-type electrode. • The influence of geometry on microelectrode properties was simulated using COMSOL. • The band-type electrode was applied to ELISA kits for hHBsAg and hHIV-antibodies.

  20. Exercise-induced changes in EEG alpha power depend on frequency band definition mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Boris; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Mierau, Julia; Strüder, Heiko K; Mierau, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    In the majority of studies investigating cortical alpha oscillations the alpha frequency is defined as a fixed band thus, neglecting recommendations in the EEG literature to adjust the alpha band according to the individual alpha peak frequency (iAPF). Based on our previous findings indicating exhaustive exercise induces an increase of the post-exercise iAPF, we scrutinized the influence of exercise on post-exercise alpha power by comparing fixed and iAPF-adjusted alpha frequency bands. Resting EEG was recorded from 13 scalp locations in nine subjects before, immediately after as well as ten minutes following an exhaustive exercise protocol on a cycle ergometer. Lower and upper band alpha power was calculated for fixed and iAPF-adjusted frequency bands. Post-exercise lower alpha power increased in both fixed and individually defined bands while a higher upper alpha power was only observed in the fixed frequency band condition. Further, the increase in iAPF was positively related to the changes in fixed-band upper alpha power. It is concluded that lower alpha power is significantly increased following exhaustive exercise whereas the results for upper alpha power are substantially influenced by the method of frequency band definition. Therefore, caution is indicated when analyzing and interpreting exercise-induced changes in alpha power. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stability of graphene band structures against an external periodic perturbation: Na on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C. G.; Shin, S. Y.; Choi, Seon-Myeong; Kim, N. D.; Uhm, S. H.; Kim, H. S.; Hwang, C. C.; Noh, D. Y.; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Chung, J. W.

    2009-03-01

    The electronic structure of Na-adsorbed graphenes formed on the 6H-SiC(0001) substrate was studied using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with synchrotron photons and ab initio pseudopotential calculations. It was found that the band of the graphenes sensitively changes upon Na adsorption especially at low temperature. With increasing Na dose, the π band appears to be quickly diffused into the background at 85 K whereas it becomes significantly enhanced with its spectral intensity at room temperature (RT). A new parabolic band centered at ktilde 1.15Å-1 also forms near Fermi energy with Na at 85 K while no such band was observed at RT. Such changes in the band structure are found to be reversible with temperature. The changes in the π band of graphene are mainly driven by the Na-induced potential especially at low temperature where the potential becomes periodic due to the crystallized Na overlayer. The new parabolic band turns out to be the π band of the underlying buffer layer partially filled by the charge transfer from Na adatoms. The increase in the hopping rate of Na adatoms at RT by 5 orders of magnitude prevents such a charge transfer, explaining the absence of the new band at RT.

  2. Substrate-controlled band positions in CH₃NH₃PbI₃ perovskite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elisa M; Zhao, Yixin; Mercado, Candy C; Saha, Sudip K; Luther, Joseph M; Zhu, Kai; Stevanović, Vladan; Perkins, Craig L; van de Lagemaat, Jao

    2014-10-28

    Using X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, the surface band positions of solution-processed CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin films deposited on an insulating substrate (Al2O3), various n-type (TiO2, ZrO2, ZnO, and F:SnO2 (FTO)) substrates, and various p-type (PEDOT:PSS, NiO, and Cu2O) substrates are studied. Many-body GW calculations of the valence band density of states, with spin-orbit interactions included, show a clear correspondence with our experimental spectra and are used to confirm our assignment of the valence band maximum. These surface-sensitive photoelectron spectroscopy measurements result in shifting of the CH3NH3PbI3 valence band position relative to the Fermi energy as a function of substrate type, where the valence band to Fermi energy difference reflects the substrate type (insulating-, n-, or p-type). Specifically, the insulating- and n-type substrates increase the CH3NH3PbI3 valence band to Fermi energy difference to the extent of pinning the conduction band to the Fermi level; whereas, the p-type substrates decrease the valence band to Fermi energy difference. This observation implies that the substrate's properties enable control over the band alignment of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin-film devices, potentially allowing for new device architectures as well as more efficient devices.

  3. Derivations of 18O Abundances in Comets Using the Ultraviolet Bands of 18OH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Joon Kim

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescent equilibrium model for the 1-0 band of the A-X system of 18OH has been constructed. Line positions and intensities have been calculated for possible future spectroscopic observations of these bands from space in order to derive 18O/16O ratios in comets. It is demonstrated that the strong lines of the 1-0 band can be observable for a moderately bright comet using a high resolution spectrometer with a reasonable exposure time.

  4. Demosaicking Based on Optimization and Projection in Different Frequency Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer OsamaA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A fast and effective iterative demosaicking algorithm is described for reconstructing a full-color image from single-color filter array data. The missing color values are interpolated on the basis of optimization and projection in different frequency bands. A filter bank is used to decompose an initially interpolated image into low-frequency and high-frequency bands. In the low-frequency band, a quadratic cost function is minimized in accordance with the observation that the low-frequency components of chrominance slowly vary within an object region. In the high-frequency bands, the high-frequency components of the unknown values are projected onto the high-frequency components of the known values. Comparison of the proposed algorithm with seven state-of-the-art demosaicking algorithms showed that it outperforms all of them for 20 images on average in terms of objective quality and that it is competitive with them from the subjective quality and complexity points of view.

  5. Interface band alignment in high-k gate stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric, Bersch; Hartlieb, P.

    2005-03-01

    In order to successfully implement alternate high-K dielectric materials into MOS structures, the interface properties of MOS gate stacks must be better understood. Dipoles that may form at the metal/dielectric and dielectric/semiconductor interfaces make the band offsets difficult to predict. We have measured the conduction and valence band densities of states for a variety MOS stacks using in situ using inverse photoemission (IPE) and photoemission spectroscopy (PES), respectively. Results obtained from clean and metallized (with Ru or Al) HfO2/Si, SiO2/Si and mixed silicate films will be presented. IPE indicates a shift of the conduction band minimum (CBM) to higher energy (i.e. away from EF) with increasing SiO2. The effect of metallization on the location of band edges depends upon the metal species. The addition of N to the dielectrics shifts the CBM in a way that is thickness dependent. Possible mechanisms for these observed effects will be discussed.

  6. Recursive confidence band construction for an unknown distribution function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatsupaibul, Seksan; Hayter, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Given a sample X1,...,Xn of independent observations from an unknown continuous distribution function F, the problem of constructing a confidence band for F is considered, which is a fundamental problem in statistical inference. This confidence band provides simultaneous inferences on all quantiles and also on all of the cumulative probabilities of the distribution, and so they are among the most important inference procedures that address the issue of multiplicity. A fully nonparametric approach is taken where no assumptions are made about the distribution function F. Historical approaches to this problem, such as Kolmogorov's famous () procedure, represent some of the earliest inference methodologies that address the issue of multiplicity. This is because a confidence band at a given confidence level 1-α allows inferences on all of the quantiles of the distribution, and also on all of the cumulative probabilities, at that specified confidence level. In this paper it is shown how recursive methodologies can be employed to construct both one-sided and two-sided confidence bands of various types. The first approach operates by putting bounds on the cumulative probabilities at the data points, and a recursive integration approach is described. The second approach operates by providing bounds on certain specified quantiles of the distribution, and its implementation using recursive summations of multinomial probabilities is described. These recursive methodologies are illustrated with examples, and R code is available for their implementation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Relaxation and cross section effects in valence band photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFeely, F.R.

    1976-09-01

    Various problems relating to the interpretation of valence band x-ray photoemission (XPS) spectra of solids are discussed. The experiments and calculations reported herein deal with the following questions: (1) To what extent do many-body effects manifest themselves in an XPS valence band spectrum, and thus invalidate a direct comparison between the photoemission energy distribution, I(E), and the density of states, N(E), calculated on the basis of ground-state one-electron theory. (2) The effect of the binding-energy-dependent photoemission cross section on I(E) at XPS energies. (3) In favorable cases indicated by (1) and (2) we examine the effect of the interaction of the crystal field with the apparent spin-orbit splittings of core levels observed in XPS spectra. (4) The use of tight binding band structure calculations to parameterize the electronic band structure from XPS and other data is described. (5) The use of high energy angle-resolved photoemission on oriented single crystals to gain orbital symmetry information is discussed. (6) The evolution of the shape of the photoemission energy distribution (of polycrystalline Cu) as a function of photon energy from 50 less than or equal h ω less than or equal 175 is discussed

  8. Rotational bands in the quadrupole-octupole collective model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, A.; Mazurek, K.; Góźdź, A.

    2018-02-01

    A collective band of positive as well as negative parity could be composed of vibrational and rotational motions. The octupole vibrational configurations can be based either on axial or nonaxial octupole excitations. A consistent approach to the quadrupole-octupole collective vibrations coupled with the rotational motion enables us to distinguish between various scenarios of disappearance of the E 2 transitions in negative-parity bands observed in several nuclei. The theoretical estimates presented here are compared with the very recent experimental energies and transition probabilities in and between the ground-state and low-energy negative-parity bands in 156Dy. A realistic collective Hamiltonian contains the potential-energy term obtained through the macroscopic-microscopic Strutinsky-like method with a particle-number-projected BCS approach and a deformation-dependent mass tensor. The potential energy and the inertia parameters are defined in the vibrational-rotational, nine-dimensional collective space of the multipole-deformation parameters and Euler angles. The symmetrization procedure applied to the eigenstates of the collective Hamiltonian ensures their uniqueness with respect to the laboratory coordinate system. This quadrupole-octupole collective approach may also allow us to find and/or verify some fingerprints of possible high-rank symmetries (e.g., tetrahedral, octahedral, ...) in nuclear collective bands.

  9. Severe neurological complication following adjustable gastric banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martines, G; Musa, N; Aquilino, F; Capuano, P

    2018-01-01

    In the last years with the increase of bariatric surgery, first of all as a result of new indications, a rise in the incidence of nutrient-related complications has been observed. Currently little is known about the impact of post-bariatric malnutrition and neurological complications. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a severe neurological syndrome which occurs as a result of thiamine deficiency. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome must be considered a serious neurological complication of bariatric surgery with significant morbidity and mortality, with rapidly progressing neurological symptoms, and must be treated immediately. We report the case of a 35 years-old male patient, affected by morbid obesity, anxious-depressive syndrome and alcohol use disorder, who after adjustable gastric banding implanted in another hospital developed a severe malnutrition and neurological syndrome. The patient showed poor adherence to the follow-up and to the dietary indications and after all, we needed to place a PEG for enteral nutrition in order to resolve the malnutrition condition and the neurological syndrome. Our experience emphasizes that preoperative selection and assessment of a patient's nutritional status according to guidelines, is required to identify potential problems, and that bariatric surgeons or physicians caring for patient who have undergone bariatric surgery should be familiar with the constellation of nutritional and neurological disorder that may occur after surgery. We want to remark the importance of preoperative selection of the patients, the follow-up and the cooperation between patient and physician in order to obtain the best result and avoid severe complications.

  10. Diffuse Interstellar Bands: Successes and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnentrucker, Paule G.; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Hobbs, Lew M.; Fan, Haoyu; DIB Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    To-date, the spectroscopic signatures of over 170 molecular species have been positively identified in interstellar clouds. However, the number of unidentified features observed either in emission (UIB, ERE, AME) or in absorption (Diffuse Interstellar Bands, DIBs) points to the existence of a substantial reservoir of species in interstellar space that are unaccounted for in theories of interstellar clouds and of star and planet formation. The DIBs are a set of about 600 weak absorption features detected mostly in the optical/NIR (4400 to 12000 Å) that appear to be ubiquitous in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). The carriers of the DIBs are potentially the champion contributors, by number, to this pool of unidentified species. While the nature of the DIB carriers remains elusive to this day, our understanding of the DIB behavior has matured to a point at which some DIBs can be used as ISM diagnostics regardless of their true nature. I will briefly review progress made in understanding the DIB dependence on the local ISM physical conditions. I will also present recent results - and the challenges that emerged- from an optical survey tailored to characterize a subset of the DIB spectrum: the broadest (FWHM >6 Å) DIB features.

  11. Endoscopic treatment of food intolerance after a banded gastric bypass: inducing band erosion for removal using a plastic stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marins Campos, Josemberg; Moon, Rena C; Magalhães Neto, Galeno E J; Teixeira, Andre F; Jawad, Muhammad A; Bezerra Silva, Lyz; Neto, Manoel Galvão; Ferraz, Álvaro Antônio B

    2016-06-01

    Ring complications after a banded Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are usually managed surgically. The aim of this study was to analyze the safety and effectiveness of endoscopic removal of noneroded rings after banded-RYGB, by inducing intragastric erosion of the ring using a self-expandable plastic stent (SEPS). A total of 41 patients with banded RYGB who had noneroded rings and food intolerance were prospectively enrolled. Patients were treated with endoscopic SEPS placement and ring removal. Data from time of stenting, resolution of symptoms, need for endoscopic dilation, and complications were recorded. Successful ring removal was possible in all patients. In 21 cases, the SEPS induced complete erosion, and in 17 cases the ring was removed a month later because of incomplete erosion at the time of SEPS removal. Nine patients (22.0 %) needed endoscopic dilation after stent removal in order to treat fibrotic strictures. Food tolerance was observed in 32 patients (78.0 %) after the procedure. No patient needed surgery and there were no deaths. Endoscopic removal of the ring using SEPS appeared to be safe and effective after a banded RYGB. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Visible bands of ammonia: band strengths, curves of growth, and the spatial distribution of ammonia on Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, B.L.; Owen, T.

    1980-01-01

    We report room-temperature laboratory studies of the 5520 A (6ν 1 ) and 6475 A (5ν 1 ) bands of self-broadened ammonia at column densities ranging from 1.7--435.7 meter-amagats (m-am). Detailed equivalent-width measurements at 24 different pressure-pathlength combinations corresponding to four pressures between 44 and 689 torr and pathlengths between 32 and 512 m are used to determin curves of growth and integrated band strengths. The band strengths for the 6ν 1 and 5ν 1 overtones are 5520 A: S=0.096 +- 0.005 cm -1 (m-am) -1 and 6475 A: S=0.63 +- 0.03 cm -1 (m-am) -1 , respectively.Using these band strengths and curves of growth, we analyze new spatially resolved spectra of Jupiter showing a nonhomogeneous distribution of ammonia in the Jovian atmosphere. The observed variations in the CH 4 /NH 3 mixing ratio are interpreted as evidence of altitude-dependent depletion of ammonia in the atmosphere

  13. Band-to-band tunneling in Γ valley for Ge source lateral tunnel field effect transistor: Thickness scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prateek; Rastogi, Priyank; Yadav, Chandan; Agarwal, Amit; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh

    2017-07-01

    The direct and indirect valleys in Germanium (Ge) are separated by a very small offset, which opens up the prospect of direct tunneling in the Γ valley of an extended Ge source tunnel field effect transistor (TFET). We explore the impact of thickness scaling of extended Ge source lateral TFET on the band to band tunneling (BTBT) current. The Ge source is extended inside the gate by 2 nm to confine the tunneling in Ge only. We observe that as the thickness is scaled, the band alignment at the Si/Ge heterojunction changes significantly, which results in an increase in Ge to Si BTBT current. Based on density functional calculations, we first obtain the band structure parameters (bandgap, effective masses, etc.) for the Ge and Si slabs of varying thickness, and these are then used to obtain the thickness dependent Kane's BTBT tunneling parameters. We find that electrostatics improves as the thickness is reduced in the ultra-thin Ge film ( ≤ 10 nm). The ON current degrades as we scale down in thickness; however, the subthreshold slope ( S S AVG ) improves remarkably with thickness scaling due to subsurface BTBT. We predict that 8 nm thin devices offer the best option for optimized ON current and S S AVG .

  14. Hyperspectral band selection and classification of Hyperion image of Bhitarkanika mangrove ecosystem, eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashokkumar, L.; Shanmugam, S.

    2014-10-01

    Tropical mangrove forests along the coast evolve dynamically due to constant changes in the natural ecosystem and ecological cycle. Remote sensing has paved the way for periodic monitoring and conservation of such floristic resources, compared to labour intensive in-situ observations. With the laboratory quality image spectra obtained from hyperspectral image data, species level discrimination in habitats and ecosystems is attainable. One of the essential steps before classification of hyperspectral image data is band selection. It is important to eliminate the redundant bands to mitigate the problems of Hughes effect that are likely to affect further image analysis and classification accuracy. This paper presents a methodology for the selection of appropriate hyperspectral bands from the EO-1 Hyperion image for the identification and mapping of mangrove species and coastal landcover types in the Bhitarkanika coastal forest region, eastern India. Band selection procedure follows class based elimination procedure and the separability of the classes are tested in the band selection process. Individual bands are de-correlated and redundant bands are removed from the bandwise correlation matrix. The percent contribution of class variance in each band is analysed from the factors of PCA component ranking. Spectral bands are selected from the wavelength groups and statistically tested. Further, the band selection procedure is compared with similar techniques (Band Index and Mutual information) for validation. The number of bands in the Hyperion image was reduced from 196 to 88 by the Factor-based ranking approach. Classification was performed by Support Vector Machine approach. It is observed that the proposed Factor-based ranking approach performed well in discriminating the mangrove species and other landcover units compared to the other statistical approaches. The predominant mangrove species Heritiera fomes, Excoecaria agallocha and Cynometra ramiflora are spectral

  15. Lunar Noise-Temperature Increase Measurements at S-Band, X-Band, and Ka-Band Using a 34-Meter-Diameter Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2006-08-01

    The Moon radiates energy at infrared and microwave wavelengths, in addition to reflecting sunlight at optical wavelengths. As a result, an antenna pointed at or near the Moon will cause an increase in receiver noise temperature that needs to be accounted for in telemetry, radio science, or ranging link budgets. The Deep Space Network may be required to use its antennas in future lunar robotic or human missions, and thus it is important to understand the nature of this temperature increase as a function of observing frequency, lunar phase, and angular offset of the antenna beam from the center of the lunar disk. This article quantifies such a set of measurements acquired at DSS 13, a 34-m-diameter research and development beam-waveguide antenna located at Goldstone, California, at three different telecommunication frequencies, S-band (2.3 GHz), X-band (8.4 GHz), and Ka-band (32 GHz), over a wide range of lunar phase, for both disk-centered and limb-centered positions of the antenna beam.

  16. A Multiple-Channel Sub-Band Transient Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Smith

    1998-11-01

    We have developed a unique multiple-channel sub-band transient detection system to record transient electromagnetic signals in carrier-dominated radio environments; the system has been used to make unique observations of weak, transient HF signals. The detection system has made these observations possible through improved sensitivity compared to conventional broadband transient detection systems; the sensitivity improvement is estimated to be at least 20 dB. The increase in sensitivity has been achieved through subdivision of the band of interest (an 18 MHz tunable bandwidth) into eight sub-band independent detection channels, each with a 400 kHz bandwidth and its own criteria. The system generates a system trigger signal when a predetermined number of channels (typically five) trigger within a predetermined window of time (typically 100 ~s). Events are recorded with a broadband data acquisition system sampling at 50 or 100 Msample/s, so despite the fact that the detection system operates on portions of the signal confined to narrow bands, data acquisition is broadband. Between May and September of 1994, the system was used to detect and record over six thousand transient events in the frequency band from 3 to 30 MHz. Approximately 500 of the events have been characterized as paired bursts of radio noise with individual durations of 2 to 10 ps and separations between the bursts of 5 to 160 ps. The paired transients are typically 5 to 40 dB brighter than the background electromagnetic spectrum between carrier signals. We have termed these events SubIonospheric Pulse Pairs (SIPPS) and presently have no explanation as to their source. Our observations of SIPPS resemble observations of TransIonospheric Pulse Pairs (TIPPs) recorded by the Blackboard instrument on the ALEXIS satellite; the source of TIPP events is also unknown. Most of the recorded SIPP events do not exhibit frequency dispersion, implying propagation along a line-of-sight (groundwave) path; but seven of

  17. Frequency band analysis of muscle activation during cycling to exhaustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Diefenthaeler

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n3p243 Lower limb muscles activation was assessed during cycling to exhaustion using frequency band analysis. Nine cyclists were evaluated in two days. On the first day, cyclists performed a maximal incremental cycling exercise to measure peak power output, which was used on the second day to define the workload for a constant load time to exhaustion cycling exercise (maximal aerobic power output from day 1. Muscle activation of vastus lateralis (VL, long head of biceps femoris (BF, lateral head of gastrocnemius (GL, and tibialis anterior (TA from the right lower limb was recorded during the time to exhaustion cycling exercise. A series of nine band-pass Butterworth digital filters was used to analyze muscle activity amplitude for each band. The overall amplitude of activation and the high and low frequency components were defined to assess the magnitude of fatigue effects on muscle activity via effect sizes. The profile of the overall muscle activation during the test was analyzed using a second order polynomial, and the variability of the overall bands was analyzed by the coefficient of variation for each muscle in each instant of the test. Substantial reduction in the high frequency components of VL and BF activation was observed. The overall and low frequency bands presented trivial to small changes for all muscles. High relationship between the second order polynomial fitting and muscle activity was found (R2 > 0.89 for all muscles. High variability (~25% was found for muscle activation at the four instants of the fatigue test. Changes in the spectral properties of the EMG signal were only substantial when extreme changes in fatigue state were induced.

  18. Acoustic band gaps of the woodpile sonic crystal with the simple cubic lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Liang-Yu; Chen, Lien-Wen, E-mail: chenlw@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-02

    This study theoretically and experimentally investigates the acoustic band gap of a three-dimensional woodpile sonic crystal. Such crystals are built by blocks or rods that are orthogonally stacked together. The adjacent layers are perpendicular to each other. The woodpile structure is embedded in air background. Their band structures and transmission spectra are calculated using the finite element method with a periodic boundary condition. The dependence of the band gap on the width of the stacked rods is discussed. The deaf bands in the band structure are observed by comparing with the calculated transmission spectra. The experimental transmission spectra for the {Gamma}-X and {Gamma}-X' directions are also presented. The calculated results are compared with the experimental results.

  19. Effects of texture on shear band formation in plane strain tension/compression and bending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuroda, M.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    model analysis. Third, shear band developments in plane strain pure bending of a sheet specimen with the typical textures are studied. Regions near the surfaces in a bent sheet specimen are approximately subjected to plane strain tension or compression. From this viewpoint, the bendability of a sheet......In this study, effects of typical texture components observed in rolled aluminum alloy sheets on shear band formation in plane strain tension/compression and bending are systematically studied. The material response is described by a generalized Taylor-type polycrystal model, in which each grain...... are obtained: i.e. the critical strain at the onset of shear banding and the corresponding orientation of shear band. Second, the shear band development in plane strain tension/compression is analyzed by the finite element method. Predictability of the finite element analysis is compared to that of the simple...

  20. Identification of the pattern of heterochromatin distribution in Passiflora species with C-banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, A J C; Souza, M M

    2010-09-28

    We tested four C-banding protocols to obtain heterochromatic bands in the passion fruit species Passiflora edulis and P. cacaoensis (Passifloraceae). Three of these protocols had been previously described. The three published protocols were not adequate to obtain C-bands in these species. An adapted protocol demonstrated heterochromatin distribution in metaphasic chromosomes of species of Passiflora for the first time. The differentiated coloration for C-bands was obtained with immersion of the slides in 99% ethanol, 45% acetic acid (additional step), 0.2 N hydrochloric acid, hydroxide of barium, 45% acetic acid, and 2X standard saline citrate at four different temperatures. The C-bands were observed in the satellites and in the telomere and centromere regions of all chromosomes, both in P. edulis and in P. cacaoensis.

  1. Bird Migration Echoes Observed by Polarimetric Radar

    OpenAIRE

    MINDA, Haruya; FURUZAWA, Fumie A.; SATOH, Shinsuke; NAKAMURA, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    A C-band polarimetric radar on Okinawa Island successfully observed large-scale bird migrations over the western Pacific Ocean. The birds generated interesting polarimetric signatures. This paper describes the signatures and speculates bird behavior.

  2. Simulating Precambrian banded iron formation diagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R.; K??hler, Inga; D. Swanner, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Post-depositional diagenetic alteration makes the accurate interpretation of key precipitation processes in ancient sediments, such as Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs), difficult. While microorganisms are proposed as key contributors to BIF deposition, the diagenetic transformation...

  3. The Novel Microwave Stop-Band Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Chernobrovkin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The stop-band filter with the new band-rejection element is proposed. The element is a coaxial waveguide with the slot in the centre conductor. In the frame of this research, the numerical and experimental investigations of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the filter are carried out. It is noted that according to the slot parameters the two typical resonances (half-wave and quarter-wave can be excited. The rejection band of the single element is defined by the width, depth, and dielectric filling of the slot. Fifth-order Chebyshev filter utilizing the aforementioned element is also synthesized, manufactured, and tested. The measured and simulated results are in good agreement. The experimental filter prototype exhibits the rejection band 0.86 GHz at the level −40 dB.

  4. Microbiological processes in banded iron formation deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Banded iron formations have been studied for decades, particularly regarding their potential as archives of the Precambrian environment. In spite of this effort, the mechanism of their deposition and, specifically, the role that microbes played in the precipitation of banded iron formation minerals......, remains unresolved. Evidence of an anoxic Earth with only localized oxic areas until the Great Oxidation Event ca 2·45 to 2·32 Ga makes the investigation of O2-independent mechanisms for banded iron formation deposition relevant. Recent studies have explored the long-standing proposition that Archean...... banded iron formations may have been formed, and diagenetically modified, by anaerobic microbial metabolisms. These efforts encompass a wide array of approaches including isotope, ecophysiological and phylogeny studies, molecular and mineral marker analysis, and sedimentological reconstructions. Herein...

  5. Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tyvak, in collaboration with UCLA, proposes a novel approach to the challenge of creating a large reflector for Ka-band high data rate links. We propose to attach...

  6. Full L-S Band Telemetry System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jensen, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Recent changes in spectrum availability as well as higher demands for spectrum have motivated the development of telemetry transmit systems capable of fully operating over both L and S telemetry bands...

  7. Full L-S Band Telemetry System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jensen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Recent changes in spectrum availability as well as higher demands for spectrum have motivated the development of telemetry transmit systems capable of fully operating over both L and S telemetry bands...

  8. Full L-S Band Telemetry System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jensen, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Recent changes in spectrum availability as well as higher demands for spectrum have motivated the development of telemetry transmit systems capable of fully operating over both L and S telemetry bands...

  9. Confidence bands for inverse regression models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birke, Melanie; Bissantz, Nicolai; Holzmann, Hajo

    2010-01-01

    We construct uniform confidence bands for the regression function in inverse, homoscedastic regression models with convolution-type operators. Here, the convolution is between two non-periodic functions on the whole real line rather than between two periodic functions on a compact interval, since the former situation arguably arises more often in applications. First, following Bickel and Rosenblatt (1973 Ann. Stat. 1 1071–95) we construct asymptotic confidence bands which are based on strong approximations and on a limit theorem for the supremum of a stationary Gaussian process. Further, we propose bootstrap confidence bands based on the residual bootstrap and prove consistency of the bootstrap procedure. A simulation study shows that the bootstrap confidence bands perform reasonably well for moderate sample sizes. Finally, we apply our method to data from a gel electrophoresis experiment with genetically engineered neuronal receptor subunits incubated with rat brain extract

  10. Troposcatter at the KU Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    edge of the common volume at about ten am . 2.4 Ducting Although ducting is a special case of clear turbulence, it is usually not considered as --jc...that power would also be very small. Neither of these charactensucs ame observed for any extended penod of ume on the path. 2.7 Aircraft Scatter The...where d is the location of the receiver relative to the trasmitter [Crane 1981 ]. The scatterng cross Secuons are as given in chapter 2. This equation

  11. Intraluminal penetration of the band in patients with adjustable silicone gastric banding: radiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretolesi, F.; Derchi, L.E. [Cattedra di Radiologia R, Univ. di Genova (Italy); Camerini, G.; Gianetta, E.; Marinari, G.M.; Scopinaro, N. [Semeiotica Chirurgica R, Univ. di Genova (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse radiological findings in patients surgically treated for adjustable silicone gastric banding (ASGB) for morbid obesity complicated by band penetration into the gastric lumen. We reviewed the records of four patients with surgically confirmed penetration of gastric band into the gastric lumen; three had preoperative opaque meal, one only a plain abdominal film. Vomiting was the presenting symptom in two cases, whereas others had new weight gain and loss of early satiety. Two patients had normally closed bands: radiography showed that their position had changed from previous controls and the barium meal had passed out of their lumen. Two patients had an open band. One patient had the band at the duodeno-jejunal junction, and the tube connecting the band to the subcutaneous port presented a winding course suggesting the duodenum. In the other case, both plain film and barium studies failed to demonstrate with certainty the intragastric position of the band. As ASGB is becoming widely used, radiologists need to be familiar with its appearances and its complications. Band penetration into the stomach is a serious complication which needs band removal. Patients with this problem, often with non-specific symptoms and even those who are asymptomatic, are encountered during radiographic examinations requested either for gastric problems or follow-up purposes, and have to be properly diagnosed. (orig.)

  12. A compact dual band MIMO PIFA for 5G applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachakonda, A.; Bang, P.; Mudiganti, J.

    2017-11-01

    5G applications support operations in 28, 37, 60 and 73GHz bands and is expected to support 1GHz bandwidth. In the present paper, planar inverted F antenna for 28GHz operation has been proposed for 5G applications for which a return loss of -17.46dB and a gain of 9.30dB have been observed. In addition, the design has been extended for dual band operation at 28 and 37GHz by implementing an L slot in the patch. An excellent return loss of -32.54dB and -18.57dB with a gain of 8.62dB has been observed. Moreover, a feasible bandwidth of 1.02GHz has been obtained in former design, while an enhanced bandwidth of 1.3GHz has been obtained at both bands in case of latter design. However, for better gain & data rate considerations, the previous design has been extended as a MIMO configuration with 2 antenna elements (2x1) and corresponding performance parameters have been evaluated.

  13. A case study on large-scale dynamical influence on bright band using cloud radar during the Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ambuj K.; Kalapureddy, M. C. R.; Devisetty, Hari Krishna; Deshpande, Sachin M.; Pandithurai, G.

    2018-02-01

    The present study is a first of its kind attempt in exploring the physical features (e.g., height, width, intensity, duration) of tropical Indian bright band using a Ka-band cloud radar under the influence of large-scale cyclonic circulation and attempts to explain the abrupt changes in bright band features, viz., rise in the bright band height by 430 m and deepening of the bright band by about 300 m observed at around 14:00 UTC on Sep 14, 2016, synoptically as well as locally. The study extends the utility of cloud radar to understand how the bright band features are associated with light precipitation, ranging from 0 to 1.5 mm/h. Our analysis of the precipitation event of Sep 14-15, 2016 shows that the bright band above (below) 3.7 km, thickness less (more) than 300 m can potentially lead to light drizzle of 0-0.25 mm/h (drizzle/light rain) at the surface. It is also seen that the cloud radar may be suitable for bright band study within light drizzle limits than under higher rain conditions. Further, the study illustrates that the bright band features can be determined using the polarimetric capability of the cloud radar. It is shown that an LDR value of - 22 dB can be associated with the top height of bright band in the Ka-band observations which is useful in the extraction of the bright band top height and its width. This study is useful for understanding the bright band phenomenon and could be potentially useful in establishing the bright band-surface rain relationship through the perspective of a cloud radar, which would be helpful to enhance the cloud radar-based quantitative estimates of precipitation.

  14. Electron correlations in narrow band systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, R.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the electron correlations in narrow bands, such as d(f) bands in the transition (rare earth) metals and their compounds and the impurity bands in doped semiconductors is studied. The narrow band systems is described, by the Hubbard Hamiltonian. By proposing a local self-energy for the interacting electron, it is found that the results are exact in both atomic and band limits and reduce to the Hartree Fock results for U/Δ → 0, where U is the intra-atomic Coulomb interaction and Δ is the bandwidth of the noninteracting electrons. For the Lorentzian form of the density of states of the noninteracting electrons, this approximation turns out to be equivalent to the third Hubbard approximation. A simple argument, based on the mean free path obtained from the imaginary part of the self energy, shows how the electron correlations can give rise to a discontinous metal-nonmetal transition as proposed by Mott. The band narrowing and the existence of the satellite below the Fermi energy in Ni, found in photoemission experiments, can also be understood. (Author) [pt

  15. Pressure induced FFLO instability in multi-band superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilha, I T; Continentino, M A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Campus da Praia Vermelha, 24210-340, Niteroi, JR (Brazil)], E-mail: mucio@if.uff.br

    2009-03-04

    Multi-band systems such as inter-metallic and heavy fermion compounds have quasi-particles arising from different orbitals at their Fermi surface. Since these quasi-particles have different masses or densities, there is a natural mismatch of the Fermi wavevectors associated with different orbitals. This makes these materials potential candidates to observe exotic superconducting phases as Sarma or FFLO phases, even in the absence of an external magnetic field. The distinct orbitals coexisting at the Fermi surface are generally hybridized and their degree of mixing can be controlled by external pressure. In this work we investigate the existence of an FFLO type of phase in a two-band BCS superconductor controlled by hybridization. At zero temperature, as hybridization (pressure) increases we find that the BCS state becomes unstable with respect to an inhomogeneous superconducting state characterized by a single wavevector q.

  16. Band structure engineered layered metals for low-loss plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerding, Morten N.; Pandey, Mohnish; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2017-04-01

    Plasmonics currently faces the problem of seemingly inevitable optical losses occurring in the metallic components that challenges the implementation of essentially any application. In this work, we show that Ohmic losses are reduced in certain layered metals, such as the transition metal dichalcogenide TaS2, due to an extraordinarily small density of states for scattering in the near-IR originating from their special electronic band structure. On the basis of this observation, we propose a new class of band structure engineered van der Waals layered metals composed of hexagonal transition metal chalcogenide-halide layers with greatly suppressed intrinsic losses. Using first-principles calculations, we show that the suppression of optical losses lead to improved performance for thin-film waveguiding and transformation optics.

  17. Aerosol Properties From Combined Oxygen A Band Radiances and Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winker, Dave; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new aerosol retrieval technique based on combing high-resolution A band spectra with lidar profiles. Our goal is the development of a technique to retrieve aerosol absorption, one of the critical parameters affecting the global radiation budget and one which is currently poorly constrained by satellite measurements. Our approach relies on two key factors: 1) the use of high spectral resolution (17,000:1) measurements which resolve the A-band line structure, and 2) the use of co-located lidar profile measurements to constrain the vertical distribution of scatterers in the forward model. The algorithm has been developed to be applied to observations from the CALIPSO and OCO-2 satellites, flying in formation as part of the A-train constellation. We describe the approach and present simulated retrievals to illustrate performance potential.

  18. Three-dimensional photonic band gaps in woven structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai Ya Chih; Pendry, J B

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the photonic properties of dielectric fibres woven into three-dimensional (3D) structures. Such fibres can be fabricated on the micrometre scale, and hence the gaps are in the far-infrared to the infrared regime. The vector-wave transfer matrix method is applied to evaluate the photonic band structures. We have also employed the constant-frequency dispersion surface scheme to investigate the development of a full band gap. Such a 3D absolute gap is observed in a rectangular lattice, but at a fairly large dielectric constant for the fibres. Ways to improve on this have been suggested. Our study indicates that woven structures are promising materials for realizing the 3D photonic insulator in the infrared regime. (author)

  19. Probability of Two-Step Photoexcitation of Electron from Valence Band to Conduction Band through Doping Level in TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Masami; Shiroishi, Wataru; Honghao, Hou; Suizu, Hiroshi; Nagai, Hideyuki; Saito, Nobuo

    2017-08-17

    For an Ir-doped TiO 2 (Ir:TiO 2 ) photocatalyst, we examined the most dominant electron-transfer path for the visible-light-driven photocatalytic performance. The Ir:TiO 2 photocatalyst showed a much higher photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation than nondoped TiO 2 after grafting with the cocatalyst of Fe 3+ . For the Ir:TiO 2 photocatalyst, the two-step photoexcitation of an electron from the valence band to the conduction band through the Ir doping level occurred upon visible-light irradiation, as observed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The two-step photoexcitation through the doping level was found to be a more stable process with a lower recombination rate of hole-electron pairs than the two-step photoexcitation process through an oxygen vacancy. Once electrons are photoexcited to the conduction band by the two-step excitation, the electrons can easily transfer to the surface because the conduction band is a continuous electron path, whereas the electrons photoexcited at only the doping level could not easily transfer to the surface because of the discontinuity of this path. The observed two-step photoexcitation from the valence band to the conduction band through the doping level significantly contributes to the enhancement of the photocatalytic performance.

  20. Microstructural evolution of a model, shear-banding micellar solution during shear startup and cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barrón, Carlos R; Gurnon, A Kate; Eberle, Aaron P R; Porcar, Lionel; Wagner, Norman J

    2014-04-01

    We present direct measurements of the evolution of the segmental-level microstructure of a stable shear-banding polymerlike micelle solution during flow startup and cessation in the plane of flow. These measurements provide a definitive, quantitative microstructural understanding of the stages observed during flow startup: an initial elastic response with limited alignment that yields with a large stress overshoot to a homogeneous flow with associated micellar alignment that persists for approximately three relaxation times. This transient is followed by a shear (kink) band formation with a flow-aligned low-viscosity band that exhibits shear-induced concentration fluctuations and coexists with a nearly isotropic band of homogenous, highly viscoelastic micellar solution. Stable, steady banding flow is achieved only after approximately two reptation times. Flow cessation from this shear-banded state is also found to be nontrivial, exhibiting an initial fast relaxation with only minor structural relaxation, followed by a slower relaxation of the aligned micellar fluid with the equilibrium fluid's characteristic relaxation time. These measurements resolve a controversy in the literature surrounding the mechanism of shear banding in entangled wormlike micelles and, by means of comparison to existing literature, provide further insights into the mechanisms driving shear-banding instabilities in related systems. The methods and instrumentation described should find broad use in exploring complex fluid rheology and testing microstructure-based constitutive equations.

  1. Metal-like Band Structures of Ultrathin Si {111} and {112} Surface Layers Revealed through Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Huang, Michael H

    2017-09-04

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on Si (100), (110), (111), and (112) planes with tunable number of planes for evaluation of their band structures and density of states profiles. The purpose is to see whether silicon can exhibit facet-dependent properties derived from the presence of a thin surface layer having different band structures. No changes have been observed for single to multiple layers of Si (100) and (110) planes with a consistent band gap between the valence band and the conduction band. However, for 1, 2, 4, and 5 Si (111) and (112) planes, metal-like band structures were obtained with continuous density of states going from the valence band to the conduction band. For 3, 6, and more Si (111) planes, as well as 3 and 6 Si (112) planes, the same band structure as that seen for Si (100) and (110) planes has been obtained. Thus, beyond a layer thickness of five Si (111) planes at ≈1.6 nm, normal semiconductor behavior can be expected. The emergence of metal-like band structures for the Si (111) and (112) planes are related to variation in Si-Si bond length and bond distortion plus 3s and 3p orbital electron contributions in the band structure. This work predicts possession of facet-dependent electrical properties of silicon with consequences in FinFET transistor design. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Clamped seismic metamaterials: ultra-low frequency stop bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaoui, Y.; Antonakakis, T.; Brûlé, S.; Craster, R. V.; Enoch, S.; Guenneau, S.

    2017-06-01

    The regularity of earthquakes, their destructive power, and the nuisance of ground vibration in urban environments, all motivate designs of defence structures to lessen the impact of seismic and ground vibration waves on buildings. Low frequency waves, in the range 1-10 Hz for earthquakes and up to a few tens of Hz for vibrations generated by human activities, cause a large amount of damage, or inconvenience; depending on the geological conditions they can travel considerable distances and may match the resonant fundamental frequency of buildings. The ultimate aim of any seismic metamaterial, or any other seismic shield, is to protect over this entire range of frequencies; the long wavelengths involved, and low frequency, have meant this has been unachievable to date. Notably this is scalable and the effects also hold for smaller devices in ultrasonics. There are three approaches to obtaining shielding effects: bragg scattering, locally resonant sub-wavelength inclusions and zero-frequency stop-band media. The former two have been explored, but the latter has not and is examined here. Elastic flexural waves, applicable in the mechanical vibrations of thin elastic plates, can be designed to have a broad zero-frequency stop-band using a periodic array of very small clamped circles. Inspired by this experimental and theoretical observation, all be it in a situation far removed from seismic waves, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve elastic surface (Rayleigh) wave reflectors at very large wavelengths in structured soils modelled as a fully elastic layer periodically clamped to bedrock. We identify zero frequency stop-bands that only exist in the limit of columns of concrete clamped at their base to the bedrock. In a realistic configuration of a sedimentary basin 15 m deep we observe a zero frequency stop-band covering a broad frequency range of 0-30 Hz.

  3. ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Jeffrey David [Grandview, MO; Hensley, Dale [Grandview, MO

    2006-09-12

    A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz 6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

  4. Effects of band-tails on the subthreshold characteristics of nanowire band-to-band tunneling transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayer, M. Abul; Lake, Roger K.

    2011-10-01

    High source doping is required to support the high electric fields necessary to provide sufficient drive currents in interband tunnel field effect transistors (TFETs). High doping is associated with band-tails in the density of states that decay exponentially into the bandgap with decay constants that can be comparable to the room temperature thermal energy kBT. This compromises the core operational principal of a TFET of a hard energy cut-off to the injected channel carrier distribution provided by the source valence band edge. If the band-tails are limited to the source region, they have minimal effect for short channels ≤10 nm, since the leakage current is dominated by direct, coherent tunneling through the channel. For longer 20 nm channels, source band-tails can double the inverse subthreshold slope but still leave it below the ideal 60 mV/decade value with on-off current ratios greater than 106 using a supply voltage of 0.4 V. Band-tails both in the source and channel are more detrimental for both 10 and 20 nm channels. On-off current ratios are reduced to ≥103 and ≥104 for the 10 nm and 20 nm channel devices, respectively.

  5. Theoretical study on the two-band degenerate-gaps superconductors: Application to SrPt3P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Hou, Li-Chao; Zhao, Bin-Peng

    2016-09-01

    We study the magnetic properties of two-band degenerate-gaps superconductors with two-band isotropic Ginzburg-Landau theory. The exact solutions of upper critical field and London penetration depth are obtained, and the calculations reproduce the experimental data of the recently observed superconducting crystal SrPt3P in a broad temperature range. It directly underlies that SrPt3P is a multi-band superconductor with equal gaps in two Fermi surface sheets.

  6. Three-dimensional band structure of LaSb and CeSb: Absence of band inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oinuma, H.; Souma, S.; Takane, D.; Nakamura, T.; Nakayama, K.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Horiba, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Yoshida, M.; Ochiai, A.; Takahashi, T.; Sato, T.

    2017-07-01

    We have performed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) of LaSb and CeSb, a candidate of topological insulators. Using soft-x-ray photons, we have accurately determined the three-dimensional bulk band structure and revealed that the band inversion at the Brillouin-zone corner, a prerequisite for realizing the topological-insulator phase, is absent in both LaSb and CeSb. Moreover, unlike the ARPES data obtained with soft-x-ray photons, those with VUV photons were found to suffer significant kz broadening. These results suggest that LaSb and CeSb are topologically trivial semimetals, and unusual Dirac-cone-like states observed with VUV photons are not of the topological origin.

  7. RRI-GBT MULTI-BAND RECEIVER: MOTIVATION, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maan, Yogesh; Deshpande, Avinash A.; Chandrashekar, Vinutha; Chennamangalam, Jayanth; Rao, K. B. Raghavendra; Somashekar, R.; Ezhilarasi, M. S.; Sujatha, S.; Kasturi, S.; Sandhya, P.; Duraichelvan, R.; Amiri, Shahram; Aswathappa, H. A.; Sarabagopalan, G.; Ananda, H. M.; Anderson, Gary; Bauserman, Jonah; Beaudet, Carla; Bloss, Marty; Barve, Indrajit V.

    2013-01-01

    We report the design and development of a self-contained multi-band receiver (MBR) system, intended for use with a single large aperture to facilitate sensitive and high time-resolution observations simultaneously in 10 discrete frequency bands sampling a wide spectral span (100-1500 MHz) in a nearly log-periodic fashion. The development of this system was primarily motivated by need for tomographic studies of pulsar polar emission regions. Although the system design is optimized for the primary goal, it is also suited for several other interesting astronomical investigations. The system consists of a dual-polarization multi-band feed (with discrete responses corresponding to the 10 bands pre-selected as relatively radio frequency interference free), a common wide-band radio frequency front-end, and independent back-end receiver chains for the 10 individual sub-bands. The raw voltage time sequences corresponding to 16 MHz bandwidth each for the two linear polarization channels and the 10 bands are recorded at the Nyquist rate simultaneously. We present the preliminary results from the tests and pulsar observations carried out with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope using this receiver. The system performance implied by these results and possible improvements are also briefly discussed.

  8. Sensitivity of gap symmetry to an incipient band: Application to iron based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vivek; Scalapino, Douglas; Maier, Thomas

    Observation of high temperature superconductivity in iron-based superconductors with a submerged hole band has attracted wide interest. A spin fluctuation mediated pairing mechanism has been proposed as a possible explanation for the high transition temperatures observed in these systems. Here we discuss the importance of the submerged band in the context of the gap symmetry. We show that the incipient band can lead to an attractive pairing interaction and thus have significant effects on the pairing symmetry. We propose a framework to include the effect of the incipient band in the standard multi-orbital spin-fluctuation theories which are widely used for studying various iron-based superconductors. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  9. Band Jahn-Teller structural phase transition in Y2In

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanidze, E.; Georgen, C.; Hallas, A. M.; Huang, Q.; Santiago, J. M.; Lynn, J. W.; Morosan, E.

    2018-02-01

    The number of paramagnetic materials that undergo a structural phase transition is rather small, which can perhaps explain the limited understanding of the band Jahn-Teller mechanism responsible for this effect. Here we present a structural phase transition observed in paramagnetic Y2In at temperature T0=250 ±5 K. Below T0, the high-temperature hexagonal P 63/m m c phase transforms into the low-temperature orthorhombic P n m a phase. This transition is accompanied by an unambiguous thermal hysteresis of about 10 K, observed in both magnetic susceptibility M /H (T ) and resistivity ρ (T ) , indicating a first-order transition. Band structure calculations suggest a band Jahn-Teller mechanism, during which the degeneracy of electron bands close to the Fermi energy is broken. We establish that this structural phase transition does not have a magnetic component; however, the possibility of a charge density wave formation has not been eliminated.

  10. Shifts and Splittings of the Hole Bands in the Nematic Phase of FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew D.; Haghighirad, Amir A.; Takita, Hitoshi; Mansuer, Wumiti; Iwasawa, Hideaki; Schwier, Eike F.; Ino, Akihiro; Hoesch, Moritz

    2017-05-01

    We report a high-resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (laser-ARPES) study of single crystals of FeSe, focusing on the temperature-dependence of the hole-like bands around the Γ point. As the system cools through the tetragonal-orthorhombic "nematic" structural transition at 90 K, the splitting of the dxz/dyz bands is observed to increase by a magnitude of 13 meV. Moreover, the onset of a ˜10 meV downward shift of the dxy band is also observed at 90 K. These measurements provide clarity on the nature, magnitude and temperature-dependence of the band shifts at the Γ point in the nematic phase of FeSe.

  11. Automated coregistration of MTI spectral bands.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theiler, J. P. (James P.); Galbraith, A. E. (Amy E.); Pope, P. A. (Paul A.); Ramsey, K. A. (Keri A.); Szymanski, J. J. (John J.)

    2002-01-01

    In the focal plane of a pushbroom imager, a linear array of pixels is scanned across the scene, building up the image one row at a time. For the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI), each of fifteen different spectral bands has its own linear array. These arrays are pushed across the scene together, but since each band's array is at a different position on the focal plane, a separate image is produced for each band. The standard MTI data products resample these separate images to a common grid and produce coregistered multispectral image cubes. The coregistration software employs a direct 'dead reckoning' approach. Every pixel in the calibrated image is mapped to an absolute position on the surface of the earth, and these are resampled to produce an undistorted coregistered image of the scene. To do this requires extensive information regarding the satellite position and pointing as a function of time, the precise configuration of the focal plane, and the distortion due to the optics. These must be combined with knowledge about the position and altitude of the target on the rotating ellipsoidal earth. We will discuss the direct approach to MTI coregistration, as well as more recent attempts to 'tweak' the precision of the band-to-band registration using correlations in the imagery itself.

  12. Excited negative parity bands in 160Yb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, A.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Curien, D.; Dedes, I.; Mazurek, K.; Banerjee, S. R.; Rajbanshi, S.; Bisoi, A.; de Angelis, G.; Bhattacharya, Soumik; Bhattacharyya, S.; Biswas, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Das Gupta, S.; Dey, B.; Goswami, A.; Mondal, D.; Pandit, D.; Palit, R.; Roy, T.; Singh, R. P.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Saha, S.; Sethi, J.

    2018-03-01

    Negative parity rotational bands in {} 70160Yb{}90 nucleus have been studied. They were populated in the 148Sm(16O, 4n)160Yb reaction at 90 MeV. The gamma-coincidence data have been collected using Indian National Gamma Array composed of twenty Compton suppressed clover germanium (Ge) detectors. Double gating on triple gamma coincidence data were selectively used to develop the decay scheme for these negative parity bands by identifying and taking care of the multiplet transitions. The even- and odd-spin negative parity bands in 160Yb have been studied by comparing the reduced transition probability ratios with the similar bands in neighbouring even-even rare earth nuclei. It is concluded that the concerned odd-spin and even-spin bands are not signature partners and that their structures are compatible with those of the ‘pear-shape’ and ‘pyramid-shape’ oscillations, respectively, the octupole shapes superposed with the quadrupole shape of the ground-state.

  13. Mesoscopic colonization of a spectral band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertola, M; Lee, S Y; Mo, M Y

    2009-01-01

    We consider the unitary matrix model in the limit where the size of the matrices becomes infinite and in the critical situation when a new spectral band is about to emerge. In previous works, the number of expected eigenvalues in the neighborhood of the band was fixed and finite, a situation that was termed 'birth of a cut' or 'first colonization'. We now consider the transitional regime where this microscopic population in the new band grows without bounds but at a slower rate than the size of the matrix. The local population in the new band organizes in a 'mesoscopic' regime, in between the macroscopic behavior of the full system and the previously studied microscopic one. The mesoscopic colony may form a finite number of new bands, with a maximum number dictated by the degree of criticality of the original potential. We describe the delicate scaling limit that realizes and controls the mesoscopic colony. The method we use is the steepest descent analysis of the Riemann-Hilbert problem that is satisfied by the associated orthogonal polynomials.

  14. Percutaneous tension band wiring for patellar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Akhilesh; Swamy, M K S; Prasantha, I; Consul, Ashu; Bansal, Abhishek; Bahl, Vibhu

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate outcome of percutaneous tension band wiring for transverse fractures of the patella. 16 men and 7 women aged 27 to 65 (mean, 40) years underwent percutaneous tension band wiring for transverse fractures of the patella with a displacement of >3 mm. Pain, operating time, mobility, functional score, and complications were evaluated. 20 patients underwent successful percutaneous tension band wiring. The remaining 3 patients in whom closed reduction failed underwent open reduction and tension band wiring. The mean operating time was 46 (range, 28-62) minutes. The mean follow-up period was 20 (range, 15-30) months. At the latest follow-up, all patients had regained full extension. The objective score was excellent in 20 patients and good in 3, whereas the subjective score was excellent in 17, good in 5, and fair in one. All patients had radiological union at week 8. One patient had patellofemoral arthritis (secondary to a postoperative articular step). Two patients developed superficial infections, which resolved after antibiotic therapy. Mean thigh muscle wasting was 0.7 (range, 0.4-1) cm. Three patients encountered hardware problems (impingement/irritation of the skin over the knee) necessitating implant removal. Percutaneous tension band wiring is a viable option for transverse fractures of the patella.

  15. Ferritin associates with marginal band microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infante, Anthony A.; Infante, Dzintra; Chan, M.-C.; How, P.-C.; Kutschera, Waltraud; Linhartova, Irena; Muellner, Ernst W.; Wiche, Gerhard; Propst, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    We characterized chicken erythrocyte and human platelet ferritin by biochemical studies and immunofluorescence. Erythrocyte ferritin was found to be a homopolymer of H-ferritin subunits, resistant to proteinase K digestion, heat stable, and contained iron. In mature chicken erythrocytes and human platelets, ferritin was localized at the marginal band, a ring-shaped peripheral microtubule bundle, and displayed properties of bona fide microtubule-associated proteins such as tau. Red blood cell ferritin association with the marginal band was confirmed by temperature-induced disassembly-reassembly of microtubules. During erythrocyte differentiation, ferritin co-localized with coalescing microtubules during marginal band formation. In addition, ferritin was found in the nuclei of mature erythrocytes, but was not detectable in those of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors. These results suggest that ferritin has a function in marginal band formation and possibly in protection of the marginal band from damaging effects of reactive oxygen species by sequestering iron in the mature erythrocyte. Moreover, our data suggest that ferritin and syncolin, a previously identified erythrocyte microtubule-associated protein, are identical. Nuclear ferritin might contribute to transcriptional silencing or, alternatively, constitute a ferritin reservoir

  16. The dilemma of the wedding band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Daniel T; Pankovich-Wargula, Alanna L

    2009-02-01

    The postoperative infection rate in procedures where no ring is worn, and those where a plain metal wedding band is worn under the glove was studied retrospectively. From January 1998 through June 2002, 2127 surgeries were performed by the lead author (D.T.S.), the first 2 years without a wedding band and the next 2 years with a simple platinum wedding band worn under the glove. Attention was paid to sliding the ring proximal and distal on the finger, ensuring scrub solution was under the ring and that the area of skin below the ring was cleansed. Twenty-two postoperative infections were recorded in 2127 surgeries. This is a postoperative infection rate of 1.0%, and wedding ring worn, nor do they demonstrate an increased infection rate with wearing jewelry. This study suggests that there is no correlation between wearing a plain wedding band under the surgical glove and an increase in postoperative infections. The crevices and cuticle of the fingers and nails may provide more significant infection risk than a plain metal wedding band. This is a level III retrospective cohort study.

  17. Band warping, band non-parabolicity, and Dirac points in electronic and lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resca, Lorenzo; Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-10-01

    We illustrate at a fundamental level the physical and mathematical origins of band warping and band non-parabolicity in electronic and vibrational structures. We point out a robust presence of pairs of topologically induced Dirac points in a primitive-rectangular lattice using a p-type tight-binding approximation. We analyze two-dimensional primitive-rectangular and square Bravais lattices with implications that are expected to generalize to more complex structures. Band warping is shown to arise at the onset of a singular transition to a crystal lattice with a larger symmetry group, which allows the possibility of irreducible representations of higher dimensions, hence band degeneracy, at special symmetry points in reciprocal space. Band warping is incompatible with a multi-dimensional Taylor series expansion, whereas band non-parabolicities are associated with multi-dimensional Taylor series expansions to all orders. Still band non-parabolicities may merge into band warping at the onset of a larger symmetry group. Remarkably, while still maintaining a clear connection with that merging, band non-parabolicities may produce pairs of conical intersections at relatively low-symmetry points. Apparently, such conical intersections are robustly maintained by global topology requirements, rather than any local symmetry protection. For two p-type tight-binding bands, we find such pairs of conical intersections drifting along the edges of restricted Brillouin zones of primitive-rectangular Bravais lattices as lattice constants vary relatively to each other, until these conical intersections merge into degenerate warped bands at high-symmetry points at the onset of a square lattice. The conical intersections that we found appear to have similar topological characteristics as Dirac points extensively studied in graphene and other topological insulators, even though our conical intersections have none of the symmetry complexity and protection afforded by the latter more

  18. Determinants and dynamics of banded vegetation pattern migration in arid climates

    OpenAIRE

    Deblauwe, Vincent; Couteron, Pierre; Bogaert, J.; Barbier, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Dense vegetation bands aligned to contour levels and alternating at regular intervals with relatively barren interbands have been reported at the margins of all tropical deserts. Since their discovery in the 1950s, it has been supposed that these vegetation bands migrate upslope, forming a space time cyclic pattern. Evidence to date has been relatively sparse and indirect, and observations have remained conflicting. Unequivocal photographic evidence of upslope migration (a few decimeters per ...

  19. Recent Asteroid Disruptions in the WISE Dataset - Constraining Asteroid Surface Properties Using Solar System Dust Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, A. E.; Shaw, C.; Kehoe, T. J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Zodiacal dust bands are a fine-structure feature of the mid-IR emission profile of the zodiacal cloud. The dust bands have been studied for many years dating back to the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data of the 1980's. The recent discovery and modeling (Espy et al., 2009; 2010; Espy Kehoe et al., 2015) of a very young, still-forming dust band structure has shown that, in the early stages following an asteroid disruption, much information on the dust parameters of the original disruption is retained in the band. Partial dust bands allow a never-before-seen observational look at the size distribution and cross-sectional area of dust produced in an asteroidal disruption, before it has been lost or significantly altered by orbital and collisional decay. The study of these partial band structures reveals information on the way asteroids disrupt and allow us to reconstruct the surface properties of the parent asteroid, including the depth of the surface regolith and the size distribution of particles composing the regolith. Using the greatly increased sensitivity of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we can now detect much fainter (and thus younger) dust bands. The WISE data also reveals much better longitudinal resolution of the bands, allowing a better constraint on the source and age of the disruption. We will present our newest results from the WISE dataset, including detection of faint partial dust bands, improved models of more prominent bands, and our constraints on the asteroid surface properties from modeling these structures.

  20. Bed-parallel compaction bands in aeolian sandstone: Their identification, characterization and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Atilla; Ahmadov, Ramil

    2009-12-01

    This study combines field observations and laboratory analyses to identify and characterize predominantly bed-parallel compaction bands in the aeolian Aztec Sandstone exposed in the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada. These bed-parallel compaction bands display morphological and geometrical characteristics of deformation bands of various modes previously described in the literature, such as positive relief, echelon geometry, "bridge" and "eye" structure, and zonal occurrence. Portions of some bands cross-cut sedimentary layers, thereby distinguishing themselves from depositional bedding. Laboratory image analyses of several samples collected from bed-parallel bands, using a computational rock physics algorithm, show that their porosities are less than half that of the host rock and their permeability is nearly one order of magnitude less. In addition, the study area includes compaction bands that have dip angles ranging from sub-horizontal to greater than 20°. Parts of these bands have even higher dip angles and show evidence for increasing intragranular fracturing and shearing as the band inclination increases. We attribute this variation to shear-enhanced compaction, a mechanism proposed earlier by experimental rock mechanists. One of the implications of the occurrence of localized compaction in the form of discrete bands parallel to flat-lying and low-angle bedding is that it provides an alternative or an additional mode to a vertically continuous compaction in loose or poorly cemented sediments. If pervasive, bed-parallel compaction bands with significantly lower porosity than that of the surrounding undeformed rock should result in a significant heterogeneity and vertical anisotropy in seismic velocities and hydraulic properties of granular rocks.

  1. Modulation of EEG Theta Band Signal Complexity by Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Lee, Eun-Jeong

    The primary goal of this study was to investigate the impact of monochord (MC) sounds, a type of archaic sounds used in music therapy, on the neural complexity of EEG signals obtained from patients undergoing chemotherapy. The secondary goal was to compare the EEG signal complexity values for monochords with those for progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), an alternative therapy for relaxation. Forty cancer patients were randomly allocated to one of the two relaxation groups, MC and PMR, over a period of six months; continuous EEG signals were recorded during the first and last sessions. EEG signals were analyzed by applying signal mode complexity, a measure of complexity of neuronal oscillations. Across sessions, both groups showed a modulation of complexity of beta-2 band (20-29Hz) at midfrontal regions, but only MC group showed a modulation of complexity of theta band (3.5-7.5Hz) at posterior regions. Therefore, the neuronal complexity patterns showed different changes in EEG frequency band specific complexity resulting in two different types of interventions. Moreover, the different neural responses to listening to monochords and PMR were observed after regular relaxation interventions over a short time span.

  2. Band gap engineering of indium zinc oxide by nitrogen incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.J.; Aguilar-Frutis, M.A.; Alarcón, G.; Falcony, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • IZON thin films were deposited by RF reactive sputtering at room temperature. • The effects of nitrogen on physical properties of IZO were analyzed. • Optical properties of IZON were studied by SE and UV–vis spectroscopy. • Adachi and classical parameters were quantitative and qualitatively congruent. • Nitrogen induces a gradual narrowing band gap from 3.5 to 2.5 eV on IZON films. - Abstract: The effects of nitrogen incorporation in indium zinc oxide films, as grown by RF reactive magnetron sputtering, on the structural, electrical and optical properties were studied. It was determined that the variation of the N 2 /Ar ratio, in the reactive gas flux, was directly proportional to the nitrogen percentage measured in the sample, and the incorporated nitrogen, which substituted oxygen in the films induces changes in the band gap of the films. This phenomenon was observed by measurement of absorption and transmission spectroscopy in conjunction with spectral ellipsometry. To fit the ellipsometry spectra, the classical and Adachi dispersion models were used. The obtained optical parameters presented notable changes related to the increment of the nitrogen in the film. The band gap narrowed from 3.5 to 2.5 eV as the N 2 /Ar ratio was increased. The lowest resistivity obtained for these films was 3.8 × 10 −4 Ω cm with a carrier concentration of 5.1 × 10 20 cm −3

  3. Analysis of 2ν3 Band of Hto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Maki, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Hara, Masanori; Hatano, Yuji; Ozeki, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. Tritium released into natural enviroment is said to be converted into mostly HTO. The detection of HTO is important from the viewpoint of basic science as well as its radioactivity. Spectroscopy is a good tool for detection, however, high-resolution spectroscopy studies are still limited. The microwave study were carried out and the molecular constants of the ground state were determined. All fundamental ν_1, ν_2 and the ν_3 bands of HTO were reported. At 1.38 micron region, overtone and combination bands are expected. In this study, we prepared a new double wall cell for safe handling of highly concentrated tritiated water and carried out the near-infrared measurement. More than 100 transitions were observed and most of them were assigned to belong to the 2ν_3 band based on the previous quantum chemical calculations. We will report the current status of the analysis. P. Helminger, F. C. De Lucia, W. Gordy, P. A. Staats and H. W. Morgan, Phys. Rev. A, 10, 1072 (1974). S. D. Cope, D. K. Russell, H. A. Fry, L. H. Jones, and J. E. Barefield, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 127, 464 (1988). P. P. Cherrier, P. H. Beckwith, and J. Reid, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 121, 69 (1987). M. Tine, D. Kobor, I. Sakho, and L. H. Coudert, J. Mod. Phys., 3, 1945 (2012). M. J. Down, J. Tennyson, M. Hara, Y. Hatano, and K. Kobayashi, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 289, 35 (2013).

  4. Band gap engineering of indium zinc oxide by nitrogen incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J.J., E-mail: jjosila@hotmail.com [Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad esq. Paseo la Bufa, Fracc. Progreso, C.P. 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico); Doctorado Institucional de Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78270 San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Aguilar-Frutis, M.A.; Alarcón, G. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Unidad Legaría, Calz. Legaría No. 694, Col. Irrigación, C.P. 11500 México D.F. (Mexico); Falcony, C. [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional campus Zacatenco, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C.P. 07360 México D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • IZON thin films were deposited by RF reactive sputtering at room temperature. • The effects of nitrogen on physical properties of IZO were analyzed. • Optical properties of IZON were studied by SE and UV–vis spectroscopy. • Adachi and classical parameters were quantitative and qualitatively congruent. • Nitrogen induces a gradual narrowing band gap from 3.5 to 2.5 eV on IZON films. - Abstract: The effects of nitrogen incorporation in indium zinc oxide films, as grown by RF reactive magnetron sputtering, on the structural, electrical and optical properties were studied. It was determined that the variation of the N{sub 2}/Ar ratio, in the reactive gas flux, was directly proportional to the nitrogen percentage measured in the sample, and the incorporated nitrogen, which substituted oxygen in the films induces changes in the band gap of the films. This phenomenon was observed by measurement of absorption and transmission spectroscopy in conjunction with spectral ellipsometry. To fit the ellipsometry spectra, the classical and Adachi dispersion models were used. The obtained optical parameters presented notable changes related to the increment of the nitrogen in the film. The band gap narrowed from 3.5 to 2.5 eV as the N{sub 2}/Ar ratio was increased. The lowest resistivity obtained for these films was 3.8 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm with a carrier concentration of 5.1 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}.

  5. Obituary: David L. Band (1957-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cominsky, Lynn

    2011-12-01

    David L. Band, of Potomac Maryland, died on March 16, 2009 succumbing to a long battle with spinal cord cancer. His death at the age of 52 came as a shock to his many friends and colleagues in the physics and astronomy community. Band showed an early interest and exceptional aptitude for physics, leading to his acceptance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an undergraduate student in 1975. After graduating from MIT with an undergraduate degree in Physics, Band continued as a graduate student in Physics at Harvard University. His emerging interest in Astrophysics led him to the Astronomy Department at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), where he did his dissertation work with Jonathan Grindlay. His dissertation (1985) entitled "Non-thermal Radiation Mechanisms and Processes in SS433 and Active Galactic Nuclei" was "pioneering work on the physics of jets arising from black holes and models for their emission, including self-absorption, which previewed much to come, and even David's own later work on Gamma-ray Bursts," according to Grindlay who remained a personal friend and colleague of Band's. Following graduate school, Band held postdoctoral positions at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley and the Center for Astronomy and Space Sciences at the University of California San Diego where he worked on the BATSE experiment that was part of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), launched in 1991. BATSE had as its main objective the study of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and made significant advances in this area of research. Band became a world-renowned figure in the emerging field of GRB studies. He is best known for his widely-used analytic form of gamma-ray burst spectra known as the "Band Function." After the CGRO mission ended, Band moved to the Los Alamos National Laboratory where he worked mainly on classified research but continued to work on GRB energetics and spectra. When NASA planned

  6. Simplicial band depth for multivariate functional data

    KAUST Repository

    López-Pintado, Sara

    2014-03-05

    We propose notions of simplicial band depth for multivariate functional data that extend the univariate functional band depth. The proposed simplicial band depths provide simple and natural criteria to measure the centrality of a trajectory within a sample of curves. Based on these depths, a sample of multivariate curves can be ordered from the center outward and order statistics can be defined. Properties of the proposed depths, such as invariance and consistency, can be established. A simulation study shows the robustness of this new definition of depth and the advantages of using a multivariate depth versus the marginal depths for detecting outliers. Real data examples from growth curves and signature data are used to illustrate the performance and usefulness of the proposed depths. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  7. Determination of Primary Spectral Bands for Remote Sensing of Aquatic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MingXia He

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available About 30 years ago, NASA launched the first ocean-color observing satellite:the Coastal Zone Color Scanner. CZCS had 5 bands in the visible-infrared domain with anobjective to detect changes of phytoplankton (measured by concentration of chlorophyll inthe oceans. Twenty years later, for the same objective but with advanced technology, theSea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS, 7 bands, the Moderate-ResolutionImaging Spectrometer (MODIS, 8 bands, and the Medium Resolution ImagingSpectrometer (MERIS, 12 bands were launched. The selection of the number of bands andtheir positions was based on experimental and theoretical results achieved before thedesign of these satellite sensors. Recently, Lee and Carder (2002 demonstrated that foradequate derivation of major properties (phytoplankton biomass, colored dissolved organicmatter, suspended sediments, and bottom properties in both oceanic and coastalenvironments from observation of water color, it is better for a sensor to have ~15 bands inthe 400 – 800 nm range. In that study, however, it did not provide detailed analysesregarding the spectral locations of the 15 bands. Here, from nearly 400 hyperspectral (~ 3-nm resolution measurements of remote-sensing reflectance (a measure of water colortaken in both coastal and oceanic waters covering both optically deep and optically shallowwaters, first- and second-order derivatives were calculated after interpolating themeasurements to 1-nm resolution. From these derivatives, the frequency of zero values foreach wavelength was accounted for, and the distribution spectrum of such frequencies wasobtained. Furthermore, the wavelengths that have the highest appearance of zeros wereidentified. Because these spectral locations indicate extrema (a local maximum orminimum of the reflectance spectrum or inflections of the spectral curvature, placing the bands of a sensor at these wavelengths maximizes the potential of capturing (and then restoring

  8. 193Hg collective oblate band with Ex>5.7 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, N.; Henry, E.A.; Becker, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Rotational bands in the neutron-deficient Pb nuclei 192,194,196-201 Pb have been reported recently. Band members are connected by L = 1 transitions, with crossover L = 2 transitions observed at the higher γ-ray energies. Regular and irregular patterns of γ-ray energies are observed. Conversion coefficients determined from intensity balance suggest the L = 1 transitions are M1. The bands have generally been interpreted as collective oblate, involving deformation aligned high-j proton configurations such as π(s 1/2 -2 h 9/2 i 13/2 ), and rotation aligned i 13/2 -n neutrons. Evidence for a similar band in 193 Hg has been obtained. 193 Hg was populated in the reaction 176 Yb( 22 Ne,5n) at E i ( 22 Ne) = 110 MeV. Reaction γ rays were detected with the Ge detector array HERA. A new 'collective' structure was observed with E x >5.7 MeV. States of the structure extend from I≥47/2 to I +10, and they decay with competing dipole and quadrupole transitions. The ratio B(M1)/B(E2), ∼ 2μ 2 /(e b) 2 , is approximately 10x lower in 193 Hg than in the Pb bands. The lowest member is produced with ∼20% of the 193 Hg cross section. Evidence for a similar band in 196 Hg will be presented at this meeting

  9. S-band active array filtenna with enhanced X-band spurious interference suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cifola, L.; Gerini, G.; Berg, S. van den; Water, F. van de

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the design of an S-band active array antenna with inherent frequency selectivity properties is described. The radiating element, based on a stacked-patch configuration, is characterized by an operational bandwidth of [2.8-3.4] GHz. In-band frequency selectivity is performed by a

  10. Fuzzy Riesz subspaces, fuzzy ideals, fuzzy bands and fuzzy band projections

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Fuzzy ordered linear spaces, Riesz spaces, fuzzy Archimedean spaces and $\\sigma$-complete fuzzy Riesz spaces were defined and studied in several works. Following the efforts along this line, we define fuzzy Riesz subspaces, fuzzy ideals, fuzzy bands and fuzzy band projections and establish their fundamental properties.

  11. Band-gap and band-edge engineering of multicomponent garnet scintillators from first principles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yadav, S.K.; Uberuaga, B.P.; Nikl, Martin; Jiang, C.; Stanek, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 5 (2015), "054012-1"-"054012-9" ISSN 2331-7019 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0805 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillator * electronic band gap structure * garnets * band gap engineering Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.061, year: 2015

  12. Active fire detection using Landsat 8 reflective bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyachandran, S. K.; Roy, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation fires can alter landscapes and are a significant source of atmospheric emissions, particulates and greenhouse gases. Currently, only coarse spatial resolution sensors with high temporal coverage, such as MODIS or VIIRS, are used for routine global active fire mapping. Higher spatial resolution satellites have not been used due to their low temporal coverage and so are less useful for monitoring fires at the time of satellite overpass. However, looking forward, combination of the recently launched Landsat-8 (2013), Sentinel-2A (2015) and upcoming Sentinel-2B (2016) sensor data will provide 10-30m global coverage multi-spectral reflective wavelength observations approximately every three days. Therefore the development of reflective wavelength active fire detections to take advantage of these new data is highly attractive. Conventional detection algorithms use the elevated thermal emission of fire to detect the location of fires burning at the time of satellite overpass and apply contextual checks to remove commission errors by examination of neighboring pixels. A Landsat 8 active fire detection algorithm that takes advantage of the improved 12-bit radiometric resolution and high reflectance saturation of the Landsat 8 OLI detectors is presented. The algorithm uses the 1.6 μm and 2.2 μm bands without the need for a contextual implementation, or thermal bands, and was parameterized using six months of Landsat 8 data over the conterminous United States. Active fire detection results for Landsat 8 scenes acquired over a range of fire sizes and temperatures in Canada, Brazil and Southern Africa are presented and compared to detections found using an existing Landsat 7 contextual algorithm adapted to the Landsat 8 bands. Results show that the Landsat 8 algorithm has potential for global application, with relatively low omission and commission errors, and is suitable for application to the corresponding Sentinel 2 reflectance wavelength bands.

  13. Near-infrared diffuse interstellar bands in APOGEE telluric standard star spectra . Weak bands and comparisons with optical counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elyajouri, M.; Lallement, R.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Capitanio, L.; Cox, N. L. J.

    2017-04-01

    Aims: Information on the existence and properties of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) outside the optical domain is still limited. Additional infra-red (IR) measurements and IR-optical correlative studies are needed to constrain DIB carriers and locate various absorbers in 3D maps of the interstellar matter. Methods: We extended our study of H-band DIBs in Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) Telluric Standard Star (TSS) spectra. We used the strong λ15273 band to select the most and least absorbed targets. We used individual spectra of the former subsample to extract weaker DIBs, and we searched the two stacked series for differences that could indicate additional bands. High-resolution NARVAL and SOPHIE optical spectra for a subsample of 55 TSS targets were additionally recorded for NIR/optical correlative studies. Results: From the TSS spectra we extract a catalog of measurements of the poorly studied λλ15617, 15653, and 15673 DIBs in ≃300 sightlines, we obtain a first accurate determination of their rest wavelength and constrained their intrinsic width and shape. In addition, we studied the relationship between these weak bands and the strong λ15273 DIB. We provide a first or second confirmation of several other weak DIBs that have been proposed based on different instruments, and we add new constraints on their widths and locations. We finally propose two new DIB candidates. Conclusions: We compared the strength of the λ15273 absorptions with their optical counterparts λλ5780, 5797, 6196, 6283, and 6614. Using the 5797-5780 ratio as a tracer of shielding against the radiation field, we showed that the λ15273 DIB carrier is significantly more abundant in unshielded (σ-type) clouds, and it responds even more strongly than the λ5780 band carrier to the local ionizing field. Full Table 5 is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  14. Electron currents associated with an auroral band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiger, R. J.; Anderson, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of electron pitch angle distributions and energy spectra over a broad auroral band were used to calculate net electric current carried by auroral electrons in the vicinity of the band. The particle energy spectrometers were carried by a Nike-Tomahawk rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, at 0722 UT on February 25, 1972. Data are presented which indicate the existence of upward field-aligned currents of electrons in the energy range 0.5-20 keV. The spatial relationship of these currents to visual structure of the auroral arc and the characteristics of the electrons carrying the currents are discussed.

  15. Itinerant ferromagnetism in the narrow band limit

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, S H

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that in the narrow band, strong interaction limit the paramagnetic state of an itinerant ferromagnet is described by the disordered local moment state. As a result, the Curie temperature is orders of magnitude lower than what is expected from the large exchange splitting of the spin bands. An approximate analysis has also been carried out for the partially ordered state, and the result explains the temperature evolvement of the magnetic contributions to the resistivity and low-energy optical conductivity of CrO sub 2.

  16. Banding of connection standards for distributed generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-05-04

    This report presents the views of distributed network operators (DNOs), developers, equipment manufacturers and consultants on the current banding of distributed generation in terms of connection standards and recommendations. The Documents ER G59/1, ER G75/1, ER G83/1 and ETR 113/1 covering recommendations for the connection of embedded generating plant to distribution systems and guidance notes for the protection of embedded generating plant are examined. The way in which the recommendations are applied in practice is investigated. Multiple distribution generator installations, fault ride through, and banding are considered as well as both protection required and maximum generator sizes at respective voltage levels.

  17. Band theory of metals the elements

    CERN Document Server

    Altmann, Simon L

    1970-01-01

    Band Theory of Metals: The Elements focuses on the band theory of solids. The book first discusses revision of quantum mechanics. Topics include Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, normalization, stationary states, wave and group velocities, mean values, and variational method. The text takes a look at the free-electron theory of metals, including heat capacities, density of states, Fermi energy, core and metal electrons, and eigenfunctions in three dimensions. The book also reviews the effects of crystal fields in one dimension. The eigenfunctions of the translations; symmetry operations of t

  18. Proximal iliotibial band syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Guadagnini Falotico

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The overuse injuries in the hip joint occur commonly in sports practitioners and currently due to technical advances in diagnostic imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, are often misdiagnosed. Recently, a group of people were reported, all female, with pain and swelling in the pelvic region.T2-weighted MRI showed increased signal in the enthesis of the iliotibial band (ITB along the lower border of the iliac tubercle. We report a case of a 34 year old woman, non-professional runner, with pain at the iliac crest with no history of trauma and whose MRI was compatible with the proximal iliotibial band syndrome.

  19. Radiology of vertical-banded gastroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leekam, R.N.; Deitel, M.; Shankar, L.; Salsberg, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    Vertical banded gastroplasty is the most frequently performed operation for the treatment of morbid obesity. More than 550 such procedures have been done at our hospital over the past 4 years. This presentation describes the postoperative radiographic findings in many of these patients. Normal and abnormal appearances on plain films and on contrast agent-enhanced examinations are discussed. The authors found it useful to divide abnormal findings into three groups: abnormalities of the partition, abnormalities of the banded channel, and ulcers and extragastric leaks

  20. EXOSAT X-ray and optical observations of the X-ray source EXO 020528 + 1454.8 = G 035-027

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, R.; Peresty, R.; Valnicek, B.; Tremko, J.; Lovas, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the EXOSAT X-ray observations and quasi-simultaneous optical photographic photometry of the X-ray source EXO 020528+1454.8 = 1 E 0205+149, found independently as a serendipitous source both with EXOSAT and Einstein satellites, are presented and discussed. The optical counterpart represents a pair of faint (16 mag.) dMe stars and is variable both in X-rays and optical wavelenghts. The integral X-ray luminosity represents ∼5.3=10 2' 8 erg s -1 and the L x /L 0 ratios were estimated to be of the order of 10 -4 to 10 -3 for the individual components, too high for non-flaring dMe stars. It is concluded that the source belongs to the dMe flaring stars. One possible flare was detected in visible light on Sep 15, 1985. The characteristics of the object are discussed. (author). 7 figs., 4 tabs., 19 refs

  1. First Nustar Observations of the Bl Lac-Type Blazar Pks 2155-304: Constraints on the Jet Content and Distribution of Radiating Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madejski, G. M.; Nalewajko, K.; Madsen, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    , covering the energy range 0.5–60 keV, is best described by a model consisting of a log-parabola component with curvature β = 0.3 -0.1+0.2 and a (local) photon index 3.04 ± 0.15 at photon energy of 2 keV, and a hard power-law tail with photon index 2.2 ± 0.4. The hard X-ray tail can be smoothly joined......We report the first hard X-ray observations with NuSTAR of the BL Lac-type blazar PKS 2155-304, augmented with soft X-ray data from XMM-Newton and γ-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope, obtained in 2013 April when the source was in a very low flux state. A joint NuSTAR and XMM spectrum...... to the quasi-simultaneous γ-ray spectrum by a synchrotron self-Compton component produced by an electron distribution with index p = 2.2. Assuming that the power-law electron distribution extends down to γ min = 1 and that there is one proton per electron, an unrealistically high total jet power of Lp ~ 10...

  2. Intercomparison of attenuation correction algorithms for single-polarized X-band radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengfeld, K.; Berenguer, M.; Sempere Torres, D.

    2018-03-01

    Attenuation due to liquid water is one of the largest uncertainties in radar observations. The effects of attenuation are generally inversely proportional to the wavelength, i.e. observations from X-band radars are more affected by attenuation than those from C- or S-band systems. On the other hand, X-band radars can measure precipitation fields in higher temporal and spatial resolution and are more mobile and easier to install due to smaller antennas. A first algorithm for attenuation correction in single-polarized systems was proposed by Hitschfeld and Bordan (1954) (HB), but it gets unstable in case of small errors (e.g. in the radar calibration) and strong attenuation. Therefore, methods have been developed that restrict attenuation correction to keep the algorithm stable, using e.g. surface echoes (for space-borne radars) and mountain returns (for ground radars) as a final value (FV), or adjustment of the radar constant (C) or the coefficient α. In the absence of mountain returns, measurements from C- or S-band radars can be used to constrain the correction. All these methods are based on the statistical relation between reflectivity and specific attenuation. Another way to correct for attenuation in X-band radar observations is to use additional information from less attenuated radar systems, e.g. the ratio between X-band and C- or S-band radar measurements. Lengfeld et al. (2016) proposed such a method based isotonic regression of the ratio between X- and C-band radar observations along the radar beam. This study presents a comparison of the original HB algorithm and three algorithms based on the statistical relation between reflectivity and specific attenuation as well as two methods implementing additional information of C-band radar measurements. Their performance in two precipitation events (one mainly convective and the other one stratiform) shows that a restriction of the HB is necessary to avoid instabilities. A comparison with vertically pointing

  3. ANALISIS TIPOGRAFI PADA LOGOTYPE BAND FORGOTTEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atang Riyan Isnandar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Forgotten merupakan band asal kota Bandung yang beraliran death metal. Band ini telah memiliki beberapa album yang cukup sukses. Salah satu faktor yang turut berperan penting dalam album-album Forgotten adalah desain sampul album. Sampul album merupakan identitas dan pesan dari musik yang dibawakan oleh Forgotten. Dalam sampul album, terdapat salah satu elemen visual yaitu Tipografi. Salah satu peran tipografi dalam sampul album Forgotten adalah sebagai logotype dari band. Yang menarik, dari lima album yang telah dirilis Forgotten yaitu “Future Syndrome” (1997, “Obsesi Mati” (2000, “Tuhan Telah Mati” (2001, “Tiga Angka Enam” (2003 dan “Laras Perlaya” (2011 adalah tampilan logotype band yang selalu berbeda. Perubahan logotype Forgotten disebabkan oleh beberapa faktor seperti adanya perubahan selera, transformasi musik dan pergantian personil yang dialami oleh band Forgotten. Perubahan ini berakibat pada munculnya kesan visual yang berbeda-beda dari masing-masing logotype di setiap sampul albumnya. Apalagi logotype band dengan genre death metal memiliki kecendrungan yang unik, dekoratif, bahkan sulit untuk dibaca. Oleh karena itu untuk mengetahui kesan visual yang dimunculkan oleh setiap logotype akan dilakukan penelitian dengan pendekatan tipografi. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah selain untuk mengetahui perubahan logotype dari kelima sampul album yang telah dirilis oleh Forgotten juga ingin mengetahui kesan visual terhadap tipografi terkait dengan prinsip kejelasan (legibility, keterbacaan (readability dan kemampuannya untuk dilihat pada jarak tertentu (visibility. Kata Kunci: Sampul Album, Tipografi, Logotype, Forgotten Abstract Forgotten is a band from Bandung, the death metal genre. The band has had some fairly successful album. One of important factor in albums Forgotten is the album cover design. The album cover are the identity and the message of the music performed by the Forgotten. In the cover of the album

  4. Effect of segregation bands on corrosion of steel plate for ship hull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazur

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress in the manufacturing of sheet metal ships carried both by optimizing the chemical compositions of steel mills as well as rolling and heat treatment, it still fails to remove the effects of persistent segregation. As a result we observed anisotropy of mechanical properties of the material which essentially complicates the process of construction for shipbuilding industry. Anisotropy of mechanical properties occurring in sheet metal hull is even more dangerous, that during their work, they are exposed to continuous exposure variable charges arising from sea surface waves. Another factor weakening the resistance to cracking metal ship is sea-water, which in the surface layer is highly aerated and very aggressive corrosion. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of the segregation bands in the process of corrosion of low alloy steels used for ship hull. It was estimate a rate of corrosion in aerated sea water areas of the metal with or without segregation bands. After corrosion tests were made observations of specimens surfaces. Inside the segregation bands were found phosphorus. The contents of it were exceeded the average this element content in the steel. At the same time areas of the sheet metal with segregation bands were slowly corroded than areas without bands, although the changes of corrosion rate was similar in nature.Corrosion activity of rich in phosphorus segregation band is similar to phosphate corrosion inhibitors. These are effective in the presenceof chloride in seawater to form a protective layer that protects against corrosion segregation band. Under the observation on scanningelectron microscope there was no change in the appearance of surface samples after corrosion tests. A future direction of research will be estimate the stress corrosion in the same species – with and without segregation bands.

  5. C-H Hot Bands in the Near-IR Emission Spectra of Leonids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, F. T.; Scoville, J.; Holm, R.; Seelemann, R.; Freund, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    The reported infrared (IR) emission spectra from 1999 Leonid fireballs show a 3.4 micron C-H emission band and unidentified bands at longer wavelengths. Upon atmospheric entry, the Leonid meteorites were flash-heated to temperatures around 2400K, which would destroy any organics on the surface of the meteorite grains. We propose that the nu(sub )CH emission band in the Leonid emission spectra arises from matrix-embedded C(sub n)-H-O entities that are protected from instant pyrolysis. Our model is based on IR absorption nu(sub )CH bands, which we observed in laboratory-grown MgO and natural olivine single crystals, where they arise from C(sub n)-H-O units imbedded in the mineral matrix, indicative of aliphatic -CH2- and -CH3 organics. Instead of being pyrolyzed, the C(sub n)-H-O entities in the Leonid trails become vibrationally excited to higher levels n = 1, 2, 3 etc. During de-excitation they emit at 3.4 microns, due to the (0 => 1) transition, and at longer wavelengths, due to hot bands. As a first step toward verifying this hypothesis we measured the C-H vibrational manifold of hexane (C6H14). The calculated positions of the (2 => l ) , (3 => 2), and possibly (4 => 3) hot bands agree with the Leonid emission bands at 3.5, 3.8 and 4.l microns.

  6. A Novel Approach for Controlling the Band Formation in Medium Mn Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, H.; Xu, W.; van der Zwaag, S.

    2018-03-01

    Formation of the microstructural ferrite/pearlite bands in medium Mn steels is an undesirable phenomenon commonly addressed through fast cooling treatments. In this study, a novel approach using the cyclic partial phase transformation concept is applied successfully to prevent microstructural band formation in a micro-chemically banded Fe-C-Mn-Si steel. The effectiveness of the new approach is assessed using the ASTM E1268-01 standard. The cyclic intercritical treatments lead to formation of isotropic microstructures even for cooling rates far below the critical one determined in conventional continuous cooling. In contrast, isothermal intercritical experiments have no effect on the critical cooling rate to suppress microstructural band formation. The origin of the suppression of band formation either by means of fast cooling or a cyclic partial phase transformation is investigated in detail. Theoretical modeling and microstructural observations confirm that band formation is suppressed only if the intercritical annealing treatment leads to partial reversion of the austenite-ferrite interfaces. The resulting interfacial Mn enrichment is responsible for suppression of the band formation upon final cooling at low cooling rates.

  7. A Ka-Band Celestial Reference Frame with Applications to Deep Space Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. Eric; Garcia-Miro, Cristina; Horiuchi, Shinji; Sotuela, Ioana

    2011-01-01

    The Ka-band radio spectrum is now being used for a wide variety of applications. This paper highlights the use of Ka-band as a frequency for precise deep space navigation based on a set of reference beacons provided by extragalactic quasars which emit broadband noise at Ka-band. This quasar-based celestial reference frame is constructed using X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) from fifty-five 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network antennas in California, Australia, and Spain. We report on observations which have detected 464 sources covering the full 24 hours of Right Ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the international standard S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of approximately 200 micro-arcsec in alpha cos(delta) and approximately 300 micro-arcsec in delta. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 micro-arcsec level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of instrumental phase calibration, tropospheric refraction mis-modeling, and limited southern geometry. The motivation for extending the celestial reference frame to frequencies above 8 GHz is to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability and to support spacecraft navigation for Ka-band based NASA missions.

  8. The decay-out of superdeformed bands in the A = 190 region. What have we learned?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritsen, T.; Hackman, G.; Khoo, T.L.; Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ackermann, D.; Ahmad, I.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Lopez-Martens, A.

    1997-01-01

    One-step decay transitions linking the superdeformed (SD) bands 1 and 3 in 194 Hg to yrast levels are discussed. Inter-band transitions between bands 1 and 3 have also been identified. For the first time, the spin, parity and excitation energy have been determined for two SD bands in the same nucleus. The low excitation energy of the excited band supports the view that it is based on an octupole excitation. It is believed that Porter-Thomas fluctuations play a major role in determining the strength of the one-step transitions as suggested by the fact that only one other SD band has been linked in the A = 190 mass region ( 194 Pb) at the present time. When Porter-Thomas fluctuations prevent the observation of one-step or two-step linking transitions, as e.g. in the case of 192 Hg, the analysis of the quasi-continuous part of the decay-out spectrum provides an alternative method for the determination of the excitation energy and spin of an SD band. This method is discussed in detail. (author)

  9. Modeling and analysis of renewable energy obligations and technology bandings in the UK electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürkan, Gül; Langestraat, Romeo

    2014-01-01

    In the UK electricity market, generators are obliged to produce part of their electricity with renewable energy resources in accordance with the Renewable Obligation Order. Since 2009 technology banding has been added, meaning that different technologies are rewarded with a different number of certificates. We analyze these two different renewable obligation policies in a mathematical representation of an electricity market with random availabilities of renewable generation outputs and random electricity demand. We also present another, alternative, banding policy. We provide revenue adequate pricing schemes for the three obligation policies. We carry out a simulation study via sampling. A key finding is that the UK banding policy cannot guarantee that the original obligation target is met, hence potentially resulting in more pollution. Our alternative provides a way to make sure that the target is met while supporting less established technologies, but it comes with a significantly higher consumer price. Furthermore, as an undesirable side effect, we observe that a cost reduction in a technology with a high banding (namely offshore wind) leads to more CO 2 emissions under the UK banding policy and to higher consumer prices under the alternative banding policy. - Highlights: • We model and analyze three renewable obligation policies in a mathematical framework. • We provide revenue adequate pricing schemes for the three policies. • We carry out a simulation study via sampling. • The UK policy cannot guarantee that the original obligation target is met. • Cost reductions can lead to more pollution or higher prices under banding policies

  10. Deformation band clusters on Mars and implications for subsurface fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, C.H.; Schultz, R.A.; Chan, M.A.; Komatsu, G.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution imagery reveals unprecedented lines of evidence for the presence of deformation band clusters in layered sedimentary deposits in the equatorial region of Mars. Deformation bands are a class of geologic structural discontinuity that is a precursor to faults in clastic rocks and soils. Clusters of deformation bands, consisting of many hundreds of individual subparallel bands, can act as important structural controls on subsurface fluid flow in terrestrial reservoirs, and evidence of diagenetic processes is often preserved along them. Deformation band clusters are identified on Mars based on characteristic meter-scale architectures and geologic context as observed in data from the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. The identification of deformation band clusters on Mars is a key to investigating the migration of fluids between surface and subsurface reservoirs in the planet's vast sedimentary deposits. Similar to terrestrial examples, evidence of diagenesis in the form of light- and dark-toned discoloration and wall-rock induration is recorded along many of the deformation band clusters on Mars. Therefore, these structures are important sites for future exploration and investigations into the geologic history of water and water-related processes on Mars. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  11. Band structure and orbital character of monolayer MoS2 with eleven-band tight-binding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Majid; Ghalambor Dezfuli, Abdolmohammad; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, based on a tight-binding (TB) model, first we present the calculations of eigenvalues as band structure and then present the eigenvectors as probability amplitude for finding electron in atomic orbitals for monolayer MoS2 in the first Brillouin zone. In these calculations we are considering hopping processes between the nearest-neighbor Mo-S, the next nearest-neighbor in-plan Mo-Mo, and the next nearest-neighbor in-plan and out-of-plan S-S atoms in a three-atom based unit cell of two-dimensional rhombic MoS2. The hopping integrals have been solved in terms of Slater-Koster and crystal field parameters. These parameters are calculated by comparing TB model with the density function theory (DFT) in the high-symmetry k-points (i.e. the K- and Γ-points). In our TB model all the 4d Mo orbitals and the 3p S orbitals are considered and detailed analysis of the orbital character of each energy level at the main high-symmetry points of the Brillouin zone is described. In comparison with DFT calculations, our results of TB model show a very good agreement for bands near the Fermi level. However for other bands which are far from the Fermi level, some discrepancies between our TB model and DFT calculations are observed. Upon the accuracy of Slater-Koster and crystal field parameters, on the contrary of DFT, our model provide enough accuracy to calculate all allowed transitions between energy bands that are very crucial for investigating the linear and nonlinear optical properties of monolayer MoS2.

  12. 47 CFR 15.714 - TV bands database administration fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TV bands database administration fees. 15.714 Section 15.714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Television Band Devices § 15.714 TV bands database administration fees. (a) A TV bands database administrator...

  13. 47 CFR 15.715 - TV bands database administrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TV bands database administrator. 15.715 Section... Band Devices § 15.715 TV bands database administrator. The Commission will designate one or more entities to administer a TV bands database. Each database administrator shall: (a) Maintain a database that...

  14. New Kronig-Penney Equation Emphasizing the Band Edge Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmulowicz, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Kronig-Penney problem is a textbook example for discussing band dispersions and band gap formation in periodic layered media. For example, in photonic crystals, the behaviour of bands next to the band edges is important for further discussions of such effects as inhibited light emission, slow light and negative index of refraction. However,…

  15. Predicting superdeformed rotational band-head spin in A∼ 190 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The band-head spin (0) of superdeformed (SD) rotational bands in ∼ 190 mass region is predicted using the variable moment of inertia (VMI) model for 66 SD rotational bands. The superdeformed rotational bands exhibited considerably good rotational property and rigid behaviour. The transition energies were ...

  16. S-Band Doppler Wave Radar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zezong Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel shore-based S-band microwave Doppler coherent wave radar (Microwave Ocean Remote SEnsor (MORSE is designed to improve wave measurements. Marine radars, which operate in the X band, have been widely used for ocean monitoring because of their low cost, small size and flexibility. However, because of the non-coherent measurements and strong absorption of X-band radio waves by rain, these radar systems suffer considerable performance loss in moist weather. Furthermore, frequent calibrations to modify the modulation transfer function are required. To overcome these shortcomings, MORSE, which operates in the S band, was developed by Wuhan University. Because of the coherent measurements of this sensor, it is able to measure the radial velocity of water particles via the Doppler effect. Then the relation between the velocity spectrum and wave height spectrum can be used to obtain the wave height spectra. Finally, wave parameters are estimated from the wave height spectra by the spectrum moment method. Comparisons between MORSE and Waverider MKIII are conducted in this study, and the results, including the non-directional wave height spectra, significant wave height and average wave period, are calculated and displayed. The correlation coefficient of the significant wave height is larger than 0.9, whereas that of the average wave period is approximately 0.4, demonstrating the effectiveness of MORSE for the continuous monitoring of ocean areas with high accuracy.

  17. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... The deformed configurations and rotational band structures in =50 Ge and Se nuclei are studied by deformed Hartree–Fock with quadrupole constraint and angular momentum projection. Apart from the `almost' spherical HF solution, a well-deformed configuration occurs at low excitation. A deformed ...

  18. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... Here, we study theoretically the low-lying as well as the excited deformed bands and their electromagnetic properties to search for various structures, spherical and deformed, of the exotic nuclei 82Ge and 84Se by employing the deformed Hartree–Fock (HF) and angular momentum (J) projection method ...

  19. Energy bands and gaps near an impurity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mihóková, Eva; Schulman, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 380, č. 41 (2016), s. 3430-3433 ISSN 0375-9601 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09876S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : crystal structure * impurity * modeling * energy bands Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.772, year: 2016

  20. Teaching Strategies for High School Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaching Music, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Provides a strategy, from the book entitled "Strategies for Teaching High School Band," that addresses Standard 8B of the National Standards for Music Education. Explains that students will discover relationships among music, visual art, and architecture of the Classical period. (CMK)

  1. Electron band theory 1952-1962

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomer, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Work undertaken by the Theoretical Physics Division between 1952 and 1965 to obtain an understanding of electrons in metals, with uranium and the actinides and the structurally-important transition metals as the main targets is examined. A main result of that period was a conviction that the majority of the physical properties of all metals, except the 4f rare-earth series and the actinides beyond uranium, were dominated by band effects which could be described well enough for most purposes by simple one-electron calculations with simple self-consistent fields. The period from 1960 on showed increasingly clearly the necessity of incorporating relativistic spin-orbit coupling terms in the heavy metals, and some 'local exchange field' correction to the fields close to nuclei. The problems of the non-local interaction of spins - highly important for alloy theory and for antiferromagnetic instability -required the evolution of computers large enough to produce wave-functions at all wave-vectors for all bands so that the susceptibility at arbitrary wave-vector could be computed. This work has not proved to be very illuminating so far, and much interest again focusses today on heuristic arguments that give qualitative descriptions of band structures, such as canonical d-bands to account for crystal structure. (UK)

  2. The end of the unique myocardial band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacIver, David H; Partridge, John B; Agger, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Two of the leading concepts of mural ventricular architecture are the unique myocardial band and the myocardial mesh model. We have described, in an accompanying article published in this journal, how the anatomical, histological and high-resolution computed tomographic studies strongly favour...

  3. Faraday Rotation and L Band Oceanographic Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Spaceborne radiometric measurements of the L band brightness temperature over the oceans make it possible to estimate sea surface salinity. However, Faraday rotation in the ionosphere disturbs the signals and must be corrected. Two different ways of assessing the disturbance directly from...

  4. Fluorescence bands and chlorophyll a forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.

    1964-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra were determined at temperatures between 20° and −196° for a number of photosynthetic organisms. Below −90° the single fluorescence maximum around 685 mμ was replaced by a system of three bands, at 686, 696 and 717–720 mμ in algal cells. Cooling usually resulted in a decrease of

  5. Phononic band gap structures as optimal designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use topology optimization to design phononic band gap structures. We consider 2D structures subjected to periodic loading and obtain the distribution of two materials with high contrast in material properties that gives the minimal vibrational response of the structure. Both in...

  6. Conduction bands in classical periodic potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The particle may hop from classically allowed site to nearest-neighbour classically allowed site in the potential, behaving as if it were a quantum particle in an energy gap and undergoing repeated tunnelling processes or; the particle may behave as a quantum particle in a conduction band and drift at a constant average ...

  7. PHARUS: A C-band Airborne SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.; Koomen, P.J.; Pouwels, H.; Snoeij, P.

    1990-01-01

    In The Netherlands a plan to design aircraft and build a polarimetric C-band SAR system of a novel design, called PHARUS (PHased Array Universal SAR) is carried out by three institutes. These institutes are the Physics and Electronics Laboratory TNO in The Hague (prime contractor and project

  8. Band-Structure of Thallium by the LMTO Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtham, P. M.; Jan, J. P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1977-01-01

    The relativistic band structure of thallium has been calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) method. The positions and extents of the bands were found to follow the Wigner-Seitz rule approximately, and the origin of the dispersion of the bands was established from the canonical s...... and p bands for the HCP structure. Energy bands have been evaluated both with and without spin-orbit coupling which is particularly large in thallium. Energy bands close to the Fermi level were found to be mainly 6p like in character. The 6s states lay below the 6p bands and were separated from them...

  9. Band profiles of Mott-insulator/band-insulator heterointerfaces revealed by photocurrent and electromodulation spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masao

    2011-03-01

    Heterointerfaces of Mott insulators provide a good laboratory to explore unprecedented electronic states induced by the strong electron correlation. Although a number of intriguing phenomena have been reported so far, their fundamental origins have not been fully addressed yet. This is partly because the interface band profile, which is one of the most basic knowledge to understand the interface electronic states, is still left to be unveiled. In this study, we have investigated in detail the interface band profiles of Mott insulators employing photocurrent and electromodulation spectroscopies as well as the conventional current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characterizations. We chose p -type (LaMn O3 and La 2 Cu O4) and n -type (SrMn O3 and Sm 2 Cu O4) as the Mott insulators and these are epitaxially connected to Nb doped SrTi O3 (electron-doped band insulator). The photocurrent action spectra for these heterojunctions showed negligibly-small band reconstruction as well as the existence of band bending and discontinuity in the Mott insulators, which are of no salient discrepancy with the rigid-band picture valid in the interface of conventional semiconductors~. However, the electromodulation spectra clearly indicate the band reconstruction in the Mott insulators~. The results mean that the rigid-band picture is valid in the low carrier-density regime even in Mott-insulator/band-insulator interfaces, but the intentional charge modulation leads the electron correlation effect in the Mott insulators. This work was done in collaboration with A. Sawa, J. Fujioka, M. Kawasaki and Y. Tokura. I acknowledge the support from Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through its ``Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program)''.

  10. Coherent multiple Pc1 pulsation bands: possible evidence for the ionospheric Alfvén resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Z. Feygin

    Full Text Available A fair fraction of Pc1 pulsation events observed on the ground includes more than one simultaneous pulsation band. In most such multiband events the bands display different characteristics and, therefore, come from different source regions via horizontal ducting in the ionosphere. However, in this report we identify a new "coherent" subclass of multiband Pc1 events where the pearls of the simultaneous bands have the same group velocities (repetition rates as well as dispersion and other properties, thus implying that the bands are produced by the same source. Studying one example of such a coherent multiband event in more detail, we argue that these events defy an explanation in terms of band splitting by magnetospheric heavy ions because the observed frequency gap between the bands is smaller than would result in such a case. We interpret these events to be due to the frequency dependence of the ionospheric reflection coefficient of Alfvén waves. An oscillatory frequency dependence of the coefficient is a natural consequence of the idea that the ionosphere acts as a resonator for Alfvén waves. We also discuss other predictions of this interpretation.

  11. Paranodal reorganization results in the depletion of transverse bands in the aged central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Mark N.; Pomicter, Anthony D.; Velazco, Cristine S.; Henderson, Scott C.; Dupree, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Paranodal axo-glial junctional complexes anchor the myelin sheath to the axon and breakdown of these complexes presumably facilitates demyelination. Myelin deterioration is also prominent in the aging central nervous system (CNS); however, the stability of the paranodal complexes in the aged CNS has not been examined. Here, we show that transverse bands, prominent components of paranodal junctions, are significantly reduced in the aged CNS; however, the number of paired clusters of both myelin and axonal paranodal proteins is not altered. Ultrastructural analyses also reveal that thicker myelin sheaths display a “piling” of paranodal loops, the cytoplasm-containing sacs that demarcate the paranode. Loops involved in piling are observed throughout the paranode and are not limited to loops positioned in either the nodal- or juxtanodal-most regions. Here, we propose that as myelination continues, previously anchored loops lose their transverse bands and recede away from the axolemma. Newly juxtaposed loops then lose their transverse bands, move laterally to fill in the gap left by the receded loops and finally reform their transverse bands. This paranodal reorganization results in conservation of paranodal length, which may be important in maintaining ion channel spacing and axonal function. Furthermore, we propose that transverse band reformation is less efficient in the aged CNS, resulting in the significant reduction of these junctional components. Although demyelination was not observed, we propose that loss of transverse bands facilitates myelin degeneration and may predispose the aged CNS to a poorer prognosis following a secondary insult. PMID:20888080

  12. Band gap reduction in GaNSb alloys due to the anion mismatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veal, T.D.; Piper, L.F.J.; Jollands, S.; Bennett, B.R.; Jefferson, P.H.; Thomas, P.A.; McConville, C.F.; Murdin, B.N.; Buckle, L.; Smith, G.W.; Ashley, T.

    2005-01-01

    The structural and optoelectronic properties in GaN x Sb 1-x alloys (0≤x x Sb 1-x epilayers are of high crystalline quality and the alloy composition is found to be independent of substrate, for identical growth conditions. The band gap of the GaNSb alloys is found to decrease with increasing nitrogen content from absorption spectroscopy. Strain-induced band-gap shifts, Moss-Burstein effects, and band renormalization were ruled out by XRD and Hall measurements. The band-gap reduction is solely due to the substitution of dilute amounts of highly electronegative nitrogen for antimony, and is greater than observed in GaNAs with the same N content

  13. A compact 5.5 GHz band-rejected UWB antenna using complementary split ring resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M M; Faruque, M R I; Islam, M T

    2014-01-01

    A band-removal property employing microwave frequencies using complementary split ring resonators (CSRRs) is applied to design a compact UWB antenna wishing for the rejection of some frequency band, which is meanwhile exercised by the existing wireless applications. The reported antenna comprises optimization of a circular radiating patch, in which slotted complementary SRRs are implanted. It is printed on low dielectric FR4 substrate material fed by a partial ground plane and a microstrip line. Validated results exhibit that the reported antenna shows a wide bandwidth covering from 3.45 to more than 12 GHz, with a compact dimension of 22 × 26 mm(2), and VSWR < 2, observing band elimination of 5.5 GHz WLAN band.

  14. A Compact 5.5 GHz Band-Rejected UWB Antenna Using Complementary Split Ring Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Islam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A band-removal property employing microwave frequencies using complementary split ring resonators (CSRRs is applied to design a compact UWB antenna wishing for the rejection of some frequency band, which is meanwhile exercised by the existing wireless applications. The reported antenna comprises optimization of a circular radiating patch, in which slotted complementary SRRs are implanted. It is printed on low dielectric FR4 substrate material fed by a partial ground plane and a microstrip line. Validated results exhibit that the reported antenna shows a wide bandwidth covering from 3.45 to more than 12 GHz, with a compact dimension of 22 × 26 mm2, and VSWR < 2, observing band elimination of 5.5 GHz WLAN band.

  15. Use of GPS TEC Maps for Calibrating Single Band VLBI Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David

    2010-01-01

    GPS TEC ionosphere maps were first applied to a series of K and Q band VLBA astrometry sessions to try to eliminate a declination bias in estimated source positions. Their usage has been expanded to calibrate X-band only VLBI observations as well. At K-band, approx.60% of the declination bias appears to be removed with the application of GPS ionosphere calibrations. At X-band however, it appears that up to 90% or more of the declination bias is removed, with a corresponding increase in RA and declination uncertainties of approx.0.5 mas. GPS ionosphere calibrations may be very useful for improving the estimated positions of the X-only and S-only sources in the VCS and RDV sessions.

  16. Raman bands in Ag nanoparticles obtained in extract of Opuntia ficus-indica plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocarando-Chacon, J.-G.; Cortez-Valadez, M.; Vargas-Vazquez, D.; Rodríguez Melgarejo, F.; Flores-Acosta, M.; Mani-Gonzalez, P. G.; Leon-Sarabia, E.; Navarro-Badilla, A.; Ramírez-Bon, R.

    2014-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been obtained in an extract of Opuntia ficus-indica plant. The size and distribution of nanoparticles were quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The diameter was estimated to be about 15 nm. In addition, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) peaks of silver were observed in these samples. Three Raman bands have been experimentally detected at 83, 110 and 160 cm-1. The bands at 83 and 110 cm-1 are assigned to the silver-silver Raman modes (skeletal modes) and the Raman mode located at 160 cm-1 has been assigned to breathing modes. Vibrational assignments of Raman modes have been carried out based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum mechanical calculation. Structural and vibrational properties for small Agn clusters with 2≤n≤9 were determined. Calculated Raman modes for small metal clusters have an approximation trend of Raman bands. These Raman bands were obtained experimentally for silver nanoparticles (AgNP).

  17. UWB Filtering Power Divider with Two Narrow Notch-bands and Wide Stop-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feng; Wang, Xin-Yi; Zou, Xin Tong; Shi, Xiao Wei

    2017-12-01

    A compact filtering ultra-wideband (UWB) microstrip power divider (PD) with two sharply rejected notch-bands and wide stopband is analyzed and designed in this paper. The proposed UWB PD is based on a conventional Wilkinson power divider, while two stub loaded resonators (SLRs) are coupled into two symmetrical output ports to achieve a bandpass filtering response. The simplified composite right/left-handed (SCRLH) resonators are employed to generate the dual notched bands. Defected ground structure (DGS) is introduced to improve the passband performance. Good insertion/return losses, isolation and notch-band rejection are achieved as demonstrated in both simulation and experiment.

  18. Search for entrance-channel dependence in the population of superdeformed bands in {sup 191}Hg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soramel, F.; Khoo, T.L.; Janssens, R.V.F. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The population intensity of some SD bands in the mass 150 region were observed to depend on the mass symmetry of the entrance channel in the fusion reaction. The authors raised the possibility that the population of SD bands had a memory of the entrance channel. To check this interesting possibility, we made measurements of the population intensities of superdeformed (SD) bands in the {sup 160}Gd({sup 36}S,5n){sup 191}Hg and {sup 130}Te({sup 64}Ni,3n){sup 191}Hg reactions. To ensure that any observed effect was not due to a simple angular momentum difference in the entrance channels, we also measured the average entry points and spin distributions of normal and SD states in {sup 191}Hg in the two reactions. The entry points and spin distributions for {sup 191}Hg are the same and, indeed, so are the SD intensities in the two reactions. Hence, no entrance-channel effect is observed in the population of the SD band in {sup 191}Hg, in contrast with data for SD bands in the mass 150 regions. We suggest that the effect observed previously in the mass 150 region is due to an angular momentum effect. A letter reporting our results was submitted for publication.

  19. Electronic crosstalk impact assessment in the Terra MODIS mid-wave infrared bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Truman; Shrestha, Ashish; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2017-09-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the Terra spacecraft is one of the key instruments in NASA's Earth Observing System. Since 2000, MODIS has collected continuous data in 36 spectral bands ranging in wavelength between 0.4 μm and 14.2 μm. Since before launch, signal contamination in the form of electronic crosstalk has been observed in many of the MODIS thermal emissive bands, particularly for bands 27-30, a correction for which has been applied to the current Collection 6 algorithm. The mid-wave infrared bands in Terra MODIS, 20-25, also show signs of electronic crosstalk contamination, which can be seen clearly during observations of the Moon. In this paper, we'll present an impact assessment of electronic crosstalk on the mid-wave infrared bands in Terra MODIS. We will also derive correction coefficients from the lunar observations, which can be applied to correct the calibrated radiance in the MODIS Level-1B product. We will provide an analysis of these results and potential improvements to the MODIS Level-1B product.

  20. Effect of band gap engineering in anionic-doped TiO2 photocatalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Band gap engineering using anion dopants. • Mid band energy level. • Ti 3+ and oxygen vacancies as impurities states. • Valence band tail extension due to doping. • Wider solar light absorption. - Abstract: A simple yet promising strategy to modify TiO 2 band gap was achieved via dopants incorporation which influences the photo-responsiveness of the photocatalyst. The mesoporous TiO 2 was successfully mono-doped and co-doped with nitrogen and fluorine dopants. The results indicate that band gap engineering does not necessarily requires oxygen substitution with nitrogen or/and fluorine, but from the formation of additional mid band and Ti 3+ impurities states. The formation of oxygen vacancies as a result of modified color centres and Ti 3+ ions facilitates solar light absorption and influences the transfer, migration and trapping of the photo-excited charge carriers. The synergy of dopants in co-doped TiO 2 shows better optical properties relative to single N and F doped TiO 2 with c.a 0.95 eV band gap reduction. Evidenced from XPS, the synergy between N and F in the co-doped TiO 2 uplifts the valence band towards the conduction band. However, the photoluminescence data reveals poorer electrons and holes separation as compared to F-doped TiO 2 . This observation suggests that efficient solar light harvesting was achievable via N and F co-doping, but excessive defects could act as charge carriers trapping sites.

  1. Effect of band gap engineering in anionic-doped TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee, E-mail: sharifahbee@um.edu.my

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Band gap engineering using anion dopants. • Mid band energy level. • Ti{sup 3+} and oxygen vacancies as impurities states. • Valence band tail extension due to doping. • Wider solar light absorption. - Abstract: A simple yet promising strategy to modify TiO{sub 2} band gap was achieved via dopants incorporation which influences the photo-responsiveness of the photocatalyst. The mesoporous TiO{sub 2} was successfully mono-doped and co-doped with nitrogen and fluorine dopants. The results indicate that band gap engineering does not necessarily requires oxygen substitution with nitrogen or/and fluorine, but from the formation of additional mid band and Ti{sup 3+} impurities states. The formation of oxygen vacancies as a result of modified color centres and Ti{sup 3+} ions facilitates solar light absorption and influences the transfer, migration and trapping of the photo-excited charge carriers. The synergy of dopants in co-doped TiO{sub 2} shows better optical properties relative to single N and F doped TiO{sub 2} with c.a 0.95 eV band gap reduction. Evidenced from XPS, the synergy between N and F in the co-doped TiO{sub 2} uplifts the valence band towards the conduction band. However, the photoluminescence data reveals poorer electrons and holes separation as compared to F-doped TiO{sub 2}. This observation suggests that efficient solar light harvesting was achievable via N and F co-doping, but excessive defects could act as charge carriers trapping sites.

  2. The marginal band system in nymphalid butterfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Wataru; Kinjo, Seira; Otaki, Joji M

    2015-01-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns are highly complex and diverse, but they are believed to be derived from the nymphalid groundplan, which is composed of several color pattern systems. Among these pattern systems, the marginal band system, including marginal and submarginal bands, has rarely been studied. Here, we examined the color pattern diversity of the marginal band system among nymphalid butterflies. Marginal and submarginal bands are usually expressed as a pair of linear bands aligned with the wing margin. However, a submarginal band can be expressed as a broken band, an elongated oval, or a single dot. The marginal focus, usually a white dot at the middle of a wing compartment along the wing edge, corresponds to the pupal edge spot, one of the pupal cuticle spots that signify the locations of color pattern organizing centers. A marginal band can be expressed as a semicircle, an elongated oval, or a pair of eyespot-like structures, which suggest the organizing activity of the marginal focus. Physical damage at the pupal edge spot leads to distal dislocation of the submarginal band in Junonia almana and in Vanessa indica, suggesting that the marginal focus functions as an organizing center for the marginal band system. Taken together, we conclude that the marginal band system is developmentally equivalent to other symmetry systems. Additionally, the marginal band is likely a core element and the submarginal band a paracore element of the marginal band system, and both bands are primarily specified by the marginal focus organizing center.

  3. Thermally switchable photonic band-edge to random laser emission in dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lihua; Wang, Yan; Feng, Yangyang; Liu, Bo; Gu, Bing; Cui, Yiping; Lu, Yanqing

    2018-03-01

    By changing the doping concentration of the chiral agent to adjust the relative position of the reflection band of cholesteric liquid crystals and the fluorescence emission spectrum of the dye, photonic band-edge and random lasing were observed, respectively. The reflection band of the cholesteric phase liquid crystal can also be controlled by adjusting the temperature: the reflection band is blue-shifted with increasing temperature, and a reversible switch from photonic band-edge to random lasing is obtained. Furthermore, the laser line width can be thermally adjusted from 1.1 nm (at 27 °C) to 4.6 nm (at 32.1 °C). A thermally tunable polarization state of a random laser from dual cells was observed, broadening the field of application liquid crystal random lasers.

  4. DISCOVERY OF SiO BAND EMISSION FROM GALACTIC B[e] SUPERGIANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, M. [Astronomický ústav, Akademie věd České republiky, Fričova 298, 251 65 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Oksala, M. E. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8109, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92190, Meudon (France); Cidale, L. S.; Arias, M. L.; Torres, A. F. [Departamento de Espectroscopía Estelar, Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Fernandes, M. Borges, E-mail: michaela.kraus@asu.cas.cz [Observatório Nacional, Rua General José Cristino 77, 20921-400 São Cristovão, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-02-20

    B[e] supergiants (B[e]SGs) are evolved massive stars in a short-lived transition phase. During this phase, these objects eject large amounts of material, which accumulate in a circumstellar disk-like structure. The expelled material is typically dense and cool, providing the cradle for molecule and dust condensation and for a rich, ongoing chemistry. Very little is known about the chemical composition of these disks, beyond the emission from dust and CO revolving around the star on Keplerian orbits. As massive stars preserve an oxygen-rich surface composition throughout their life, other oxygen-based molecules can be expected to form. As SiO is the second most stable oxygen compound, we initiated an observing campaign to search for first-overtone SiO emission bands. We obtained high-resolution near-infrared L-band spectra for a sample of Galactic B[e]SGs with reported CO band emission. We clearly detect emission from the SiO first-overtone bands in CPD-52 9243 and indications for faint emission in HD 62623, HD 327083, and CPD-57 2874. From model fits, we find that in all these stars the SiO bands are rotationally broadened with a velocity lower than observed in the CO band forming regions, suggesting that SiO forms at larger distances from the star. Hence, searching for and analyzing these bands is crucial for studying the structure and kinematics of circumstellar disks, because they trace complementary regions to the CO band formation zone. Moreover, since SiO molecules are the building blocks for silicate dust, their study might provide insight in the early stage of dust formation.

  5. Alpha band cortico-muscular coherence occurs in healthy individuals during mechanically-induced tremor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Budini

    Full Text Available The present work aimed at investigating the effects of mechanically amplified tremor on cortico-muscular coherence (CMC in the alpha band. The study of CMC in this specific band is of particular interest because this coherence is usually absent in healthy individuals and it is an aberrant feature in patients affected by pathological tremors; understanding its mechanisms is therefore important. Thirteen healthy volunteers (23±4 years performed elbow flexor sustained contractions both against a spring load and in isometric conditions at 20% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC. Spring stiffness was selected to induce instability in the stretch reflex servo loop. 64 EEG channels, surface EMG from the biceps brachii muscle and force were simultaneously recorded. Contractions against the spring resulted in greater fluctuations of the force signal and EMG amplitude compared to isometric conditions (p<.05. During isometric contractions CMC was systematically found in the beta band and sporadically observed in the alpha band. However, during the contractions against the spring load, CMC in the alpha band was observed in 12 out of 13 volunteers. Partial directed coherence (PDC revealed an increased information flow in the EMG to EEG direction in the alpha band (p<.05. Therefore, coherence in the alpha band between the sensory-motor cortex and the biceps brachii muscle can be systematically induced in healthy individuals by mechanically amplifying tremor. The increased information flow in the EMG to EEG direction may reflect enhanced afferent activity from the muscle spindles. These results may contribute to the understanding of the presence of alpha band CMC in tremor related pathologies by suggesting that the origin of this phenomenon may not only be at cortical level but may also be affected by spinal circuit loops.

  6. Elastic Band Causing Exfoliation of the Upper Permanent Central Incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Ghislaine Oliveira Alves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study reports a case in which elastic band use culminated in the loss of the incisors. Case Report. An 11-year-old white girl was seen complaining of pain, with purulent discharge and severe tooth mobility. The bone destruction detected radiographically in the region, despite its single location and absence in posterior quadrants of the maxilla and/or mandible, was similar to that observed in Langerhans cell disease. To our surprise, an elastic band involving the midportion of the roots of the two upper central incisors was found during biopsy. The debris was removed and a metal wire was placed in permanent maxillary right and left incisors. The patient was followed up, but no improvement in tooth mobility was observed. Bone loss increased, and internal resorption and root exposure occurred, which culminated in the extraction of permanent maxillary right and left incisors. Conclusion. The present case highlights the fact that professionals sometimes are confronted by anamnestic reports never seen before.

  7. Three band crossings in the yrast structure of 162Hf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Courtney, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    The yrast sequence of 162 Hf has been observed up to a level tentatively assigned as 38 + and reveals a continuing rotational character up to that spin. Sharp backbends at rotational frequencies of 0.27 and 0.42 MeV/ℎ are attributed to isub(13/2) neutron and hsub(11/2) proton alignments, respectively. A gradual increase in the aligned angular momentum of the yrast levels between these two sharp backbends is attributed to the rotational alignment of a pair of negative parity quasineutrons (mostly hsub(9/2) in character). The interpretation of this effect is supported by the failure of the negative parity bands, which already contain this aligned hsub(9/2) neutron, to gain alignment in the same rotational frequency range. While the alignment of the hsub(9/2) quasineutrons has been predicted in the cranked shell model to occur in the rare-earth region with a large interaction strength, this represents the first clear observation of such a band crossing. (author)

  8. Observations Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    of different sexes or racial /ethnic groups interact and in a respectful manner? Are groups inclusive or exclusive? Be particularly observant of...translating your observations consider the emotions, prejudices , values, and physical condition of those exhibiting the behaviors and the

  9. Band head spin assignment of superdeformed bands in 133Pr using two-parameter formulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Honey; Mittal, H. M.

    2018-03-01

    The two-parameter formulae viz. the power index formula, the nuclear softness formula and the VMI model are adopted to accredit the band head spin (I0) of four superdeformed rotational bands in 133Pr. The technique of least square fitting is used to accredit the band head spin for four superdeformed rotational bands in 133Pr. The root mean deviation among the computed transition energies and well-known experimental transition energies are attained by extracting the model parameters from the two-parameter formulae. The determined transition energies are in excellent agreement with the experimental transition energies, whenever exact spins are accredited. The power index formula coincides well with the experimental data and provides minimum root mean deviation. So, the power index formula is more efficient tool than the nuclear softness formula and the VMI model. The deviation of dynamic moment of inertia J(2) against the rotational frequency is also examined.

  10. Band connectivity for topological quantum chemistry: Band structures as a graph theory problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradlyn, Barry; Elcoro, L.; Vergniory, M. G.; Cano, Jennifer; Wang, Zhijun; Felser, C.; Aroyo, M. I.; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2018-01-01

    The conventional theory of solids is well suited to describing band structures locally near isolated points in momentum space, but struggles to capture the full, global picture necessary for understanding topological phenomena. In part of a recent paper [B. Bradlyn et al., Nature (London) 547, 298 (2017), 10.1038/nature23268], we have introduced the way to overcome this difficulty by formulating the problem of sewing together many disconnected local k .p band structures across the Brillouin zone in terms of graph theory. In this paper, we give the details of our full theoretical construction. We show that crystal symmetries strongly constrain the allowed connectivities of energy bands, and we employ graph theoretic techniques such as graph connectivity to enumerate all the solutions to these constraints. The tools of graph theory allow us to identify disconnected groups of bands in these solutions, and so identify topologically distinct insulating phases.

  11. Diagnosis and management of early gastric band slip after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sertkaya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB used to be a very popular bariatric procedure at a certain time for the treatment of obesity as it has many advantages and is associated with low morbidity and mortality rates. Complications are often late and are rarely seen by general surgeons due to the limited number of patients, and physicians should be aware of the symptoms. We present a case of a 40-year-old female patient who underwent LAGB and was admitted for a huge gastric pouch dilatation on postoperative day 5. She had a history of food consumption on the fourth day after surgery. She was diagnosed with early gastric band slippage (EGBS. The band was repositioned and gastrogastric sutures were placed to prevent reprolapse of the band. The EGBS is an immediate postoperative complication. Diagnosis of EGBS can be made with oral contrast X-ray studies, and surgical intervention is necessary.

  12. Electronic pairing mechanism due to band modification in a two-band model: Tc evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizia, J.; Gorski, G.; Traa, M.R.M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Following the electronic model developed by us previously (Mizia and Romanowski, Mizia) we estimate the superconducting transition temperature in a simple electronic two-band model for materials characterized by a broad superconducting band and a narrow level within the same energy range. A large electron deformation coupling constant and large electron correlation effects are assumed. It is shown that high-temperature superconductivity is entirely possible within a range of reasonable electronic parameters. This model does not assume any artificial interactions to obtain a negative pairing potential. Instead, the negative part of the electronic interaction potential comes from the modification of the electron dispersion relation with growing number of superconducting pairs. Such a modification is possible in soft electronic systems, i.e. in systems partial to band modification due to large internal stresses, strong electronic correlation effects and broad band narrow level charge transfer during the superconducting transition. (orig.)

  13. Observing nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book enables anyone with suitable instruments to undertake an examination of nebulae and see or photograph them in detail. Nebulae, ethereal clouds of gas and dust, are among the most beautiful objects to view in the night sky. These star-forming regions are a common target for observers and photographers. Griffiths describes many of the brightest and best nebulae and includes some challenges for the more experienced observer. Readers learn the many interesting astrophysical properties of these clouds, which are an important subject of study in astronomy and astrobiology. Non-mathematical in approach, the text is easily accessible to anyone with an interest in the subject. A special feature is the inclusion of an observational guide to 70 objects personally observed or imaged by the author. The guide also includes photographs of each object for ease of identification along with their celestial coordinates, magnitudes and other pertinent information. Observing Nebulae provides a ready resource to allow an...

  14. Life with a Gastric Band. Long-Term Outcomes of Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding-a Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Piotr K; Olszewski, Robert; Kwiatkowski, Andrzej; Gałązka-Świderek, Natalia; Cichoń, Krzysztof; Paśnik, Krzysztof

    2017-05-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is the third most popular bariatric procedure worldwide. Various authors present ambivalent long-term follow up results. We revised records of the patients who underwent LAGB between 2003 and 2006 along with history of additional check-ins. Patients with outdated details were tracked with the national health insurance database and social media (Facebook). An online survey was sent. The patients who did not have their band removed were included in this study. We calculated the percent total weight loss (%TWL) and percent excess weight loss (%EWL), along with changes in body mass index (ΔBMI). Satisfactory weight loss was set at >50% EWL (for BMI = 25 kg/m 2 ). Since eight patients gained weight, we decided to include negative values of %TWL, %EWL, and ΔBMI. One hundred seven patients underwent LAGB from 2003 to 2006. The mean follow-up time was 11.2 (±1.2) years. Eleven percent of patients were lost to follow up (n = 12). There was one perioperative death. Fifty-four of the patients (n = 57) had their band removed. Thirty-seven patients still have the band (39%) and were included in the study. The mean %EWL was 27% (-56-112%) and %TWL was 11% (-19-53%). Twelve patients achieved %EWL > 50% (32%). Thiry-two patients still suffer from obesity, with BMI over 30 kg/m 2 . Eight patients (22%) gained additional weight. Patients with %EWL > 50% suffered less from gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms than those with EWL < 50% (p < 0.05). Out of 107 cases, only 11.2% of patients with gastric band (n = 12) achieved satisfactory %EWL. Twenty-two percent of patients regained their weight or even exceeded it. Overall results suggest that LAGB is not an effective bariatric procedure in long term observation.

  15. Development of softcopy environment for primary color banding visibility assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byungseok; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Allebach, Jan P.

    2008-01-01

    Fine-pitch banding is one of the most unwanted artifacts in laser electrophotographic (EP) printers. It is perceived as a quasiperiodic fluctuation in the process direction. Therefore, it is essential for printer vendors to know how banding is perceived by humans in order to improve print quality. Monochrome banding has been analyzed and assessed by many researchers; but there is no literature that deals with the banding of color laser printers as measured from actual prints. The study of color banding is complicated by the fact that the color banding signal is physically defined in a three-dimensional color space, while banding perception is described in a one-dimensional sense such as more banding or less banding. In addition, the color banding signal arises from the independent contributions of the four primary colorant banding signals. It is not known how these four distinct signals combine to give rise to the perception of color banding. In this paper, we develop a methodology to assess the banding visibility of the primary colorant cyan based on human visual perception. This is our first step toward studying the more general problem of color banding in combinations of two or more colorants. According to our method, we print and scan the cyan test patch, and extract the banding profile as a one dimensional signal so that we can freely adjust the intensity of banding. Thereafter, by exploiting the pulse width modulation capability of the laser printer, the extracted banding profile is used to modulate a pattern consisting of periodic lines oriented in the process direction, to generate extrinsic banding. This avoids the effect of the halftoning algorithm on the banding. Furthermore, to conduct various banding assessments more efficiently, we also develop a softcopy environment that emulates a hardcopy image on a calibrated monitor, which requires highly accurate device calibration throughout the whole system. To achieve the same color appearance as the hardcopy

  16. NIMBUS: A Near-Infrared Multi-Band Ultraprecise Spectroimager for SOFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwain, Michael W.; Mandell, Avi; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Spiegel, David S.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Amatucci, Edward; Blake, Cullen; Budinoff, Jason; Burgasser, Adam; Burrows, Adam; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present a new and innovative near-infrared multi-band ultraprecise spectroimager (NIMBUS) for SOFIA. This instrument will enable many exciting observations in the new age of precision astronomy. This optical design splits the beam into 8 separate spectral bandpasses, centered around key molecular bands from 1 to 4 microns. Each spectral channel has a wide field of view for simultaneous observations of a reference star that can decorrelate time-variable atmospheric and optical assembly effects, allowing the instrument to achieve ultraprecise photometry for a wide variety of astrophysical sources

  17. A Compact Tri-Band Bandpass Filter with High Out-of-Band Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdul-Niby

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a planar tri-band bandpass filter with high out-of-band rejection over a wide band. The filter is based on two pairs of λ/4 resonators embedded inside an open loop ring resonator without any size increase, where each pair of resonators are electromagnetically coupled to each other and the feedlines. This results in the excitations of passbands, where the first passband is generated by the open loop resonators. The second and the third passbands are excited by λ/4 resonators. The proposed technique provides sufficient degrees of freedom to control the center frequency and bandwidth of the three passbands independently. In addition, the six transmission zeros created around the passbands results in a tri-band filter with high selectivity, sharp 3 dB cut-off frequency, high isolation, low passband insertion-loss and high out-of-band harmonic rejection across an ultra-broadband frequency range up to 17 GHz. The proposed technique has the ability to switch from triple to dual band by removing one pair of the inner resonators. Design methodology and simulation results of the filter are provided.

  18. Wide band interferometry for thickness measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Santiago; Martinez, Oscar E.; Torga, Jorge R.

    2003-04-01

    In this work we present the concept of wide band interferometry as opposed to white-light interferometry to introduce a thickness measurement method that gains precision when the bandwidth is reduced to an adequate compromise in order to avoid the distortions arising from the material dispersion. The use of the widest possible band is a well established dogma when the highest resolution is desired in distance measurements with white-light interferometry. We will show that the dogma falls when thickness measurements must be carried out due to material dispersion. In fact the precise knowledge of the frequency dependence of the refractive index is essential for adequate thickness retrieval from the optical experiments. The device we present is also useful to obtain the group refractive index that is necessary to calculate the absolute thickness value. As an example, we show the spreading of a silicone oil on a reference surface in real time.

  19. X-Band RF Gun Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieks, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  20. High resolution color band pyrometer ratioing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickler, Donald B. (Inventor); Henry, Paul K. (Inventor); LoGiurato, D. Daniel (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The sensing head of a two-color band ratioing pyrometer of a known type using a fiber optic cable to couple radiation to dual detector photodiodes is improved to have high spatial resolution by focusing the radiation received through an objective lens (i.e., by focusing the image of a target area) onto an opaque sheet spaced in front of the input end of the fiber optic cable. A two-mil hole in that sheet then passes radiation to the input end of the cable. The detector has two channels, one for each color band, with an electronic-chopper stabilized current amplifier as the input stage followed by an electronic-chopper stabilized voltage amplifier.

  1. Design of an Electronic Chest-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakan, R.; Acikgoz Tufan, H.; Baskan, H.; Eryuruk, S. H.; Akalin, N.; Kose, H.; Li, Y.; Kursun Bahadir, S.; Kalaoglu, F.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, an electronic chest strap prototype was designed for measuring fitness level, performance optimization, mobility and fall detection. Knitting technology is used for production by using highly elastic nylon yarn. In order to evaluate comfort performance of the garment, yarn strength and elongation, air permeability, moisture management and FAST tests (Fabric Assurance Fabric Testing) were carried out, respectively. After testing of textile part of the chest band, IMU sensors were integrated onto the garment by means of conductive yarns. Electrical conductivity of the circuit was also assessed at the end. Results indicated that the weight and the thickness of the product are relatively high for sports uses and it has a negative impact on comfort properties. However, it is highly stretchable and moisture management properties are still in acceptable values. From the perspective of possible application areas, developed smart chest band in this research could be used in sports facilities as well as health care applications for elderly and disabled people.

  2. Sea ice thickness retrieval from L-band radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleschke, L.; Maaß, N.; Hendricks, S.; Heygster, G.; Tonboe, R.

    2008-12-01

    Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) is an earth observation mission developed by the European Space Agency to be launched in 2009. The main objective is to provide global measurements of soil moisture over land and sea surface salinity over ocean from L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometric observations. An exciting spin-off is the retrieval of sea ice thickness which we demonstrate to be possible due to the large penetration depth at L-band. SMOS will provide sea ice thickness information complementary to those from altimeters because of the expected sensitivity for thin ice thickness variations. Moreover, SMOS will provide data with an almost global coverage every second day. A three layer (ocean-ice-atmosphere) dielectric slab model is used to calculate the brightness temperature as a function of ice thickness and the dielectric properties. The dielectric properties depend on the relative brine volume as a function of bulk salinity and temperature. A model for the brightness temperature of a mixture of open water and sea ice reveals that the parameters ice concentration and thickness can hardly be retrieved both simultaneously. With the assumption of a closed ice cover the retrieval of ice thickness is feasible. The model calculations suggest a thickness sensitivity of up to 150 cm for low salinity (multi year or brackish) sea ice at low temperatures. At temperatures approaching the melting point the thickness sensitivity reduces to a few centimeters. For first year ice the modeled thickness sensitivity is roughly half a meter. The brightness temperature at 1.4 GHz (L-band) was measured in the Bothnia in Bay in March 2007 as part of the SMOS Sea-Ice campaign. The research aircraft was equipped with the Technical University of Denmark (TUD) Electromagnetics Institute Radiometer (EMIRAD). The EMIRAD measurements were coordinated with helicopter EM ice thickness measurements. The campaign was conducted under non- favorable conditions with temperatures around the melting

  3. Large Aperture, Scanning, L-Band SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussessian, Alina; DelCastillo, Linda; Bach, Vinh; Grando, Maurio; Quijano, Ubaldo; Smith, Phil; Zawadzki, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We have developed the first L-band membrane-based active phased array. The antenna is a 16x16 element patch array with dimensions of 2.3mx2.6m. The array uses membrane-compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the antenna design, the fabrication of this large array, the T/R module development, the signal distribution approach and the measured results of the array

  4. Ku-Band Data-Communication Adapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadelbauer, Steve

    1995-01-01

    Data-communication adapter circuit on single printed-circuit board serves as general-purpose interface between personal computer and satellite communication system. Designed as direct interface with Ku-band data-communication system for payloads on space shuttle, also used with any radio-frequency transmission systems. Readily installed in almost any personal computer via widely used Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) bus.

  5. Staggered broad-band reflecting multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavens, O S; Liddell, H M

    1966-03-01

    Considerable broadening of the reflectance band of a multilayer stack may be obtained by staggering the layer thicknesses in such a way that they form either an arithmetic or geometric progression. Results are shown for asymmetric and symmetric filters of 15, 25, and 35 layers. The presence of the narrowband transmission peaks exhibited by the symmetric filters is explained, and the advantages of the use of this type of filter as an interference filter is discussed.

  6. ''Identical'' bands in normally-deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, J.D.; Baktash, C.; Yu, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma-ray transitions energies in neighboring odd- and even-mass nuclei for normally-deformed nuclear configurations are analyzed in a manner similar to recent analyses for superdeformed states. The moment of inertia is shown to depend on pair correlations and the aligned angular momentum of the odd nucleon. The implications of this analysis for ''identical'' super-deformed bands are discussed. 26 refs., 9 figs

  7. Prompt and delayed spectroscopy of At203 : Observation of a shears band and a 29/2+ isomeric state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auranen, K.; Uusitalo, J.; Juutinen, S.; Badran, H.; Defranchi Bisso, F.; Cox, D.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Herzáň, A.; Jakobsson, U.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Leino, M.; Lightfoot, A.; Mallaburn, M. J.; Neuvonen, O.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Partanen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Wang, Y. K.

    2018-02-01

    Using fusion-evaporation reactions, a gas-filled recoil separator, recoil-gating technique and recoil-isomer decay tagging technique we have extended the level scheme of At-203 (N = 118) significantly. We have observed an isomeric [tau = 14.1(3) mu s] state with a spin and parity of 29/2(+). The isomeric state is suggested to originate from the pi(h(9/2)) circle times |Po-202; 11(-)> coupling, and it is depopulated through 286 keV E2 and 366 keV E3 transitions. In addition, we have observed a cascade of magnetic-dipole transitions which is suggested to be generated by the shears mechanism.

  8. COMPARISON OF C-BAND AND X-BAND POLARIMETRIC SAR DATA FOR RIVER ICE CLASSIFICATION ON THE PEACE RIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Łoś

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, synthetic aperture radar (SAR data from TerraSAR-X were compared with RADARSAT-2 data to evaluate their effectiveness for river ice monitoring on the Peace River. For several years RADARSAT-2 data have been successfully used for river ice observation. However, it is important to take into account data from other satellites as they may provide solutions when it is not possible to obtain images from the preferred system (e.g., in the case of acquisition priority conflicts. In this study we compared three TerraSAR-X (X-band and three RADARSAT-2 (C-band datasets acquired in December 2013 on a section of the Peace River, Canada. For selected classes (open water, skim ice, juxtaposed skim ice, agglomerated skim ice, frazil run and consolidated ice we compared backscattering values in HH and VV polarisation and performed Wishart supervised classification. Covariance matrices that were previously filtered using a refined Lee filter were used as input data for classification. For all data sets the overall accuracy was higher than 80%. Similar errors associated with classification output were observed for data from both satellite systems.

  9. Surface band structures on Nb(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, B.; Lo, W.; Chien, T.; Leung, T.C.; Lue, C.Y.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    We report the joint studies of experimental and theoretical surface band structures of Nb(001). Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine surface-state dispersions along three high-symmetry axes bar Γ bar M, bar Γ bar X, and bar M bar X in the surface Brillouin zone. Ten surface bands have been identified. The experimental data are compared to self-consistent pseudopotential calculations for the 11-layer Nb(001) slabs that are either bulk terminated or fully relaxed (with a 12% contraction for the first interlayer spacing). The band calculations for a 12% surface-contracted slab are in better agreement with the experimental results than those for a bulk-terminated slab, except for a surface resonance near the Fermi level, which is related to the spin-orbit interaction. The charge profiles for all surface states or resonances have been calculated. Surface contraction effects on the charge-density distribution and the energy position of surface states and resonances will also be discussed

  10. Topological transitions in multi-band superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Continentino, Mucio A., E-mail: mucio@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Deus, Fernanda, E-mail: fernanda@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Padilha, Igor T., E-mail: igorfis@ufam.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Campus Capital, 69077-070, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Caldas, Heron, E-mail: hcaldas@ufsj.edu.br [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João Del Rei, 36301-000, São João Del Rei, MG (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    The search for Majorana fermions has been concentrated in topological insulators or superconductors. In general, the existence of these modes requires the presence of spin–orbit interactions and of an external magnetic field. The former implies in having systems with broken inversion symmetry, while the latter breaks time reversal invariance. In a recent paper, we have shown that a two-band metal with an attractive inter-band interaction has non-trivial superconducting properties, if the k-dependent hybridization is anti-symmetric in the wave-vector. This is the case, if the crystalline potential mixes states with different parities as for orbitals with angular momentum l and l+1. In this paper we take into account the effect of an external magnetic field, not considered in the previous investigation, in a two-band metal and show how it modifies the topological properties of its superconducting state. We also discuss the conditions for the appearance of Majorana fermions in this system.

  11. Frequency Arrangement For 700 MHz Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancans G.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The 694-790 MHz (700 MHz band was allocated by the 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12 in ITU Region 1 (Europe included, to the mobile service on a co-primary basis with other services to which this band was allocated on the primary basis and identified for the International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT. At the same time, the countries of Region 1 will be able also to continue using these frequencies for their broadcasting services if necessary. This allocation will be effective immediately after 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15. In order to make the best possible use of this frequency band for mobile service, a worldwide harmonized frequency arrangement is to be prepared to allow for large economies of scale and international roaming as well as utilizing the available spectrum in the best possible way, minimizing possible interference between services, facilitating deployment and cross-border coordination. The authors analyze different possible frequency arrangements and conclude on the frequency arrangement most suitable for Europe.

  12. On the persistence of adiabatic shear bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassim M.N.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed that the initiation and development of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs are manifestations of damage in metallic materials subjected to high strain rates and large strains as those due to impact in a Hopkinson Bar system. Models for evolution of these bands have been described in the literature. One question that has not received attention is how persistent these bands are and whether their presence and effect can be reversed or eliminated by using a process of thermal (heat treatment or thermo-mechanical treatment that would relieve the material from the high strain associated with ASBs and their role as precursors to crack initiation and subsequent failure. Since ASBs are more prevalent and more defined in BCC metals including steels, a study was conducted to investigate the best conditions of generating ASBs in a heat treatable steel, followed by determining the best conditions for heat treatment of specimens already damaged by the presence of ASBs in order to relieve the strains due to ASBs and restore the material to an apparent microstructure without the “scars” due to the previous presence of ASBs. It was found that heat treatment achieves the curing from ASBs. This presentation documents the process undertaken to achieve this objective.

  13. Wakefield Band Partitioning in LINAC Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Roger M

    2003-01-01

    In the NLC project multiple bunches of electrons and positrons will be accelerated initially to a centre of mass of 500 GeV and later to 1 TeV or more. In the process of accelerating 192 bunches within a pulse train, wakefields are excited which kick the trailing bunches off axis and can cause luminosity dilution and BBU (Beam Break Up). Several structures to damp the wakefield have been designed and tested at SLAC and KEK and these have been found to successfully damp the wakefield [1]. However, these 2π/3 structures suffered from electrical breakdown and this has prompted us to explore lower group velocity structures operating at higher fundamental mode phase advances. The wakefield partitioning amongst the bands has been found to change markedly with increased phase advance. Here we report on general trends in the kick factor and associated wakefield band partitioning in dipole bands as a function of phase advance of the synchronous mode in linacs. These results are applicable to both TW (travelling wave) and SW (standing wave) structures

  14. Band structure engineering for ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The energy band structure fundamentally influences the physical properties of a periodic system. It may give rise to highly exotic phenomena in yet uncharted physical regimes. Ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices provide an ideal playground for the investigation of a large variety of such intriguing effects. Experiments presented here address several issues that require the systematic manipulation of energy band structures in optical lattices with diverse geometries. These artificial crystals of light, generated by interfering laser beams, allow for an unprecedented degree of control over a wide range of parameters. A major part of this thesis employs time-periodic driving to engineer tunneling matrix elements and, thus, the dispersion relation for bosonic quantum gases in optical lattices. Resonances emerging in the excitation spectrum due to the particularly strong forcing can be attributed to multi-photon transitions that are investigated systematically. By changing the sign of the tunneling, antiferromagnetic spin-spin interactions can be emulated. In a triangular lattice this leads to geometrical frustration with a doubly degenerate ground state as the simultaneous minimization of competing interactions is inhibited. Moreover, complex-valued tunneling matrix elements can be generated with a suitable breaking of time-reversal symmetry in the driving scheme. The associated Peierls phases mimic the presence of an electromagnetic vector gauge potential acting on charged particles. First proof-of-principle experiments reveal an excellent agreement with theoretical calculations. In the weakly interacting superfluid regime, these artificial gauge fields give rise to an Ising-XY model with tunable staggered magnetic fluxes and a complex interplay between discrete and continuous symmetries. A thermal phase transition from an ordered ferromagnetic- to an unordered paramagnetic state could be observed. In the opposite hard-core boson limit of strong interactions

  15. Spectral band selection for classification of soil organic matter content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Tracey L.; Szilagyi, Andrea; Baumgardner, Marion F.; Chen, Chih-Chien Thomas; Landgrebe, David A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the spectral-band-selection (SBS) algorithm of Chen and Landgrebe (1987, 1988, and 1989) and uses the algorithm to classify the organic matter content in the earth's surface soil. The effectiveness of the algorithm was evaluated comparing the results of classification of the soil organic matter using SBS bands with those obtained using Landsat MSS bands and TM bands, showing that the algorithm was successful in finding important spectral bands for classification of organic matter content. Using the calculated bands, the probabilities of correct classification for climate-stratified data were found to range from 0.910 to 0.980.

  16. Risk factors for band-induced ulcer bleeding after prophylactic and therapeutic endoscopic variceal band ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Marie; Vaughan, Rhys; Angus, Peter W; Gow, Paul J; Parker, Frank; Hey, Penelope; Efthymiou, Marios

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVBL) aims to eradicate high-risk oesophageal varices. There is a small risk of precipitating bleeding from EVBL-induced oesophageal ulceration, which is associated with significant mortality. We explore the risk factors and outcome of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding. Retrospective review of our endoscopy database between 2007 and 2012 identified upper endoscopies during which EVBL was performed. Patient demographics, biochemistry and endoscopic findings were recorded as were the complications of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding and death. A total of 749 episodes of EVBL were performed in 347 patients with a mean Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of 15.8. In all, 609 procedures were performed for prophylaxis and 140 for acute haemorrhage. There were 21 episodes (2.8% of procedures) of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding in 18 patients, five of whom subsequently died (28%). On multivariable analysis, acute variceal haemorrhage was the only significant predictor of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding [odds ratio (OR) 6.25 (2.57-15.14), Pulcer bleeding rate was 1.5%, with 22% mortality. In this group, higher MELD score and reflux oesophagitis were associated significantly with EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding [OR 25.53 (2.14-303.26), P=0.010 and OR 1.07 (1.01-1.13), P=0.019, respectively]. Our EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding rate was low, but associated with significant mortality. Highest rates were observed following EVBL for acute variceal haemorrhage, for which EVBL is unavoidable. The incidence was lower following prophylactic EVBL, with the MELD score being the predominant risk factor. Reflux oesophagitis requires further investigation as a potentially modifiable risk factor for EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding.

  17. C/NOFS Satellite Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Plasma Instabilities Below the Equatorial F-Peak -- Evidence for Approximately 500 km-Scale Spread-F "Precursor" Waves Driven by Zonal Shear Flow and km-Scale, Narrow-Banded Irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.; Valladares, C.

    2011-01-01

    As solar activity has increased, the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated on numerous occasions above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400km. In particular, during the month of April, 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set (to our knowledge): The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second new result (for C/NOFS) is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is below the F -peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field component of these waves is strongest in the zonal direction. These waves are strongly correlated with simultaneous observations of plasma density oscillations and appear both with, and without, evidence of larger-scale spread-F depletions. These km-scale, quasi-coherent waves strongly resemble the bottomside, sinusoidal irregularities reported in the Atmosphere Explorer satellite data set by Valladares et al. [JGR, 88, 8025, 1983

  18. Molecularly based criteria for shear banding in transient flow of entangled polymeric fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohagheghi, Mouge; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-06-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of polymeric melts in a start-up of shear flow as a function of ramp time to its steady state value is studied. Herein, we report the molecular findings showing the effect of ramp time on the formation of shear banded structures and chain relaxation behavior. Specifically, it is shown that shear banding emerges at a rapid start-up; however, homogeneous shear prevails when the deformation rate ramp time is sufficiently slow. This finding is in full consistency with prior continuum level linear stability analysis of shear banding in start-up of shear flows as well as experimental observations of entangled DNA and polymer solutions. Further, it has been revealed that the ratio of the longest chain orientation relaxation time to that of the time for the imposed deformation rate to reach its steady state value plays a central role in determining whether local strain inhomogeneities that lead to the formation of shear banded flow structures are created. In addition, we have shown that the gradient of the number of entanglements along the velocity gradient direction should reach a critical value for the creation of localized strain inhomogeneity. Moreover, the relation between the local process leading to shear banded flows and the relaxation mechanism of the chain is discussed. Overall, a molecular picture for the interrelation between the longest chain orientation and stress relaxation time, local inhomogeneities, and shear banding has been proposed and corroborated with extensive analysis.

  19. A note on anomalous band-gap variations in semiconductors with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, P. K.; Mondal, B. N.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt is made to theoretically study the band-gap variations (ΔEg) in semiconductors with temperature following the works, did by Fan and O'Donnell et al. based on thermodynamic functions. The semiconductor band-gap reflects the bonding energy. An increase in temperature changes the chemical bondings, and electrons are promoted from valence band to conduction band. In their analyses, they made several approximations with respect to temperature and other fitting parameters leading to real values of band-gap variations with linear temperature dependences. In the present communication, we have tried to re-analyse the works, specially did by Fan, and derived an analytical model for ΔEg(T). Because, it was based on the second-order perturbation technique of thermodynamic functions. Our analyses are made without any approximations with respect to temperatures and other fitting parameters mentioned in the text, leading to a complex functions followed by an oscillating nature of the variations of ΔEg. In support of the existence of the oscillating energy band-gap variations with temperature in a semiconductor, possible physical explanations are provided to justify the experimental observation for various materials.

  20. Amniotic band syndrome and/or limb body wall complex: split or lump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Halder

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ashutosh HalderDepartment of Reproductive Biology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, IndiaAbstract: Six cases of amniotic band syndrome/limb body wall complex were studied in respect to clinicopathologic characteristics. The diagnosis was based on two out of three of the following manifestations: cranio facial clefts; limb body wall defects and amniotic band attachment. Four cases were stillborn and associated with internal defects, including central nervous system. Two cases had facial and limb defects and were live born (3–5 years old at examination. Phenotypic features of the stillborn cases were craniofacial clefting, thoracoabdominoschisis, amputation, ring constriction, amniotic band adhesion, placental adhesions, and internal malformations. Histology of bands revealed fibroconnective tissue as well as flattened epithelial cells together with neuroectodermal elements. Umbilical cord section revealed an abnormal number of vessels. When analyzing the observed data in relation to their etiology, it was found that amniotic disruption, vascular disruption or genetic disruption could explain the amniotic band syndrome/limb body wall complexes, alone or in combinations. A brief review of literature in search of pathogenesis is offered along with an etiopathogenetic model.Keywords: amniotic band syndrome, limb body wall complex and pathogenesis

  1. Effect of band gap engineering in anionic-doped TiO2 photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2017-01-01

    A simple yet promising strategy to modify TiO2 band gap was achieved via dopants incorporation which influences the photo-responsiveness of the photocatalyst. The mesoporous TiO2 was successfully mono-doped and co-doped with nitrogen and fluorine dopants. The results indicate that band gap engineering does not necessarily requires oxygen substitution with nitrogen or/and fluorine, but from the formation of additional mid band and Ti3+ impurities states. The formation of oxygen vacancies as a result of modified color centres and Ti3+ ions facilitates solar light absorption and influences the transfer, migration and trapping of the photo-excited charge carriers. The synergy of dopants in co-doped TiO2 shows better optical properties relative to single N and F doped TiO2 with c.a 0.95 eV band gap reduction. Evidenced from XPS, the synergy between N and F in the co-doped TiO2 uplifts the valence band towards the conduction band. However, the photoluminescence data reveals poorer electrons and holes separation as compared to F-doped TiO2. This observation suggests that efficient solar light harvesting was achievable via N and F co-doping, but excessive defects could act as charge carriers trapping sites.

  2. Results from Two Years of Ka-Band Propagation Characterization at Svalbard, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessel, James A.; Morse, Jacquelynne Rose; Zemba, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Over the several years, NASA plans to launch several earth science missions which are expected to achieve data throughputs of 5-40 terabits per day transmitted from low earth orbiting spacecraft to ground stations. The current S-band and X-band frequency allocations in use by NASA, however, are incapable of supporting the data rates required to meet this demand. As such, NASA is in the planning stages to upgrade its existing Near Earth Network (NEN) Polar ground stations to support Ka-band (25.5-27 GHz) operations. Consequently, it becomes imperative that characterization of propagation effects at these NEN sites is conducted to determine expected system performance, particularly at low elevation angles ((is) less than 10 deg) where spacecraft signal acquisition typically occurs. Since May 2011, NASA Glenn Research Center has installed and operated a Ka-band radiometer at the NEN site located in Svalbard, Norway. The Ka-band radiometer monitors the water vapor line, as well as 6 frequencies around 26.5 GHz at multiple elevation angles: 45 deg, 20 deg, and 10 deg. Two year data collection results indicate comparable performance to previously characterized northern latitude sites in the United States, i.e., Fairbanks, Alaska. It is observed that cloud cover at the Svalbard site remains the dominant loss mechanism for Ka-band links, resulting in a margin requirement of 4.1 dB to maintain link availability of 99% at 10 deg elevation.

  3. First-order superconducting transition in the inter-band model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes da Silva, M. [Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Departamento de Física, 3000, Japiim, 69077-00 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia do Amazonas, Av. 7 de Setembro, 1975 - Centro, Manaus, AM 69020-120 (Brazil); Dinóla Neto, F., E-mail: dinola@ufam.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Departamento de Física, 3000, Japiim, 69077-00 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Padilha, I.T. [Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Departamento de Física, 3000, Japiim, 69077-00 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Ricardo de Sousa, J. [Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Departamento de Física, 3000, Japiim, 69077-00 Manaus, AM (Brazil); National Institute of Science and Technology for Complex Systems, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000, Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Continentino, M.A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    The comprehension about the theoretical features of superconductivity is an interesting and fundamental topic in condensed matter physics. Several theoretical proposals were considered to describe the new classes of superconducting compounds and alloys. In this work we propose to study a non-conventional superconducting system where the Cooper pairs are formed by fermions from different bands described via two band model with hybridization. In this inter-band scenario we find a first-order phase transition at low temperatures and we observe a tricritical point in the phase diagram. In our description, the control parameter is the hybridization that can be tuned by external pressure. This fact indicates the possibility to observe discontinuities in the SC gap amplitude through applying pressure on the system.

  4. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Léna, Pierre; Lebrun, François; Mignard, François; Pelat, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This is the updated, widely revised, restructured and expanded third edition of Léna et al.'s successful work Observational Astrophysics. It presents a synthesis on tools and methods of observational astrophysics of the early 21st century. Written specifically for astrophysicists and graduate students, this textbook focuses on fundamental and sometimes practical limitations on the ultimate performance that an astronomical system may reach, rather than presenting particular systems in detail. In little more than a decade there has been extraordinary progress in imaging and detection technologies, in the fields of adaptive optics, optical interferometry, in the sub-millimetre waveband, observation of neutrinos, discovery of exoplanets, to name but a few examples. The work deals with ground-based and space-based astronomy and their respective fields. And it also presents the ambitious concepts behind space missions aimed for the next decades. Avoiding particulars, it covers the whole of the electromagnetic spec...

  5. Observable supertranslations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousso, Raphael; Porrati, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    We show that large gauge transformations in asymptotically flat spacetime can be implemented by sandwiching a shell containing the ingoing hard particles between two finite-width shells of soft gauge excitations. Integration of the graviton Dirac bracket implies that our observable soft degrees of freedom obey the algebra imposed by Strominger et al. on unobservable boundary degrees of freedom. Thus, we provide both a derivation and an observable realization of this algebra. We recently showed that soft charges fail to constrain the hard scattering problem, and so cannot be relevant to the black hole information paradox. By expressing the Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) algebra in terms of observable quantities, the present work shows that this conclusion was not an artifact of working with strictly zero frequency soft modes. The conservation laws associated with asymptotic symmetries are seen to arise physically from free propagation of infrared modes.

  6. A simple microwave kit to convert an X,-band ESR spectrometer for k-band operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagat, V.R.; Venkataraman, Balu

    1977-01-01

    A kit for the conversion of an X-band ESR spectrometer for K-band operation is described and its performance has been tested with p-benzosemiquinone, vanadyl acetyl acetonate and 2, 5-ditertiary butyl semiquinone. The easy conversion of the X-band spectrometer to K-band operation enables to distinguish between magnetic field dependent and field independent parameters. A varactor harmonic generator is used as a frequency doubler driving the fundamental power from the existing X-band source to give a power output at K-band without having to modify the electronic circuit; the modification of the microwave circuitry is proposed. (author)

  7. Effect of Sandblasting and Type of Cement on the Bond Strength of Molar Bands on Stainless Steel Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawazir, Omar A; Elaraby, Alaa; Alshamrani, Hamed; Salama, Fouad S

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) compare the bond strength of molar bands cemented to stainless steel crowns (SSCs) using glass ionomer cement (GIC), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), or polycarboxylate cement (PXC); and (2) assess the influence of sandblasting molar bands on the mean bond strength between the band and the SSC. Sixty SSCs and 60 molar bands were used. The inner surfaces of 30 molar bands were roughened by sandblasting prior to cementation. The bond strength was measured after dislodging the SSC using a push-out test. In the nonsandblasted group, a significant difference was observed between PXC and RMGIC (P >.04). In the sandblasted group, a significant difference was observed between PXC and RMGIC (P >.02), while there was only a marginal difference between GIC and RMGIC (P >.05). The sandblasted group exhibited superior bond strength overall. However, the only significant improvement was observed for GIC (P >.03). PXC showed the highest bond strength of molar bands to SSCs, while RMGIC showed the lowest. Sandblasting the inner surface of bands enhanced the bond strength of different cements.

  8. X-band Cube Satellite Communication System Demonstration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work will develop, test and demonstrate an end-to-end innovative, compact, efficient and low cost S-band uplink and X-band downlink CubeSat Communication System...

  9. Design of a dual band metamaterial absorber for Wi-Fi bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkurt, Fatih Özkan; Baǧmancı, Mehmet; Karaaslan, Muharrem; Bakır, Mehmet; Altıntaş, Olcay; Karadaǧ, Faruk; Akgöl, Oǧuzhan; Ünal, Emin

    2018-02-01

    The goal of this work is to design and fabrication of a dual band metamaterial based absorber for Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) bands. Wi-Fi has two different operating frequencies such as 2.45 GHz and 5 GHz. A dual band absorber is proposed and the proposed structure consists of two layered unit cells, and different sized square split ring (SSR) resonators located on each layers. Copper is used for metal layer and resonator structure, FR-4 is used as substrate layer in the proposed structure. This designed dual band metamaterial absorber is used in the wireless frequency bands which has two center frequencies such as 2.45 GHz and 5 GHz. Finite Integration Technique (FIT) based simulation software used and according to FIT based simulation results, the absorption peak in the 2.45 GHz is about 90% and the another frequency 5 GHz has absorption peak near 99%. In addition, this proposed structure has a potential for energy harvesting applications in future works.

  10. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-01

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the "CVBs interaction" that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  11. Elastic Bands as a Component of Periodized Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Jordan M; Lowery, Ryan P; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; Wilson, Jacob M

    2016-08-01

    Joy, JM, Lowery, RP, Oliveira de Souza, E, and Wilson, JM. Elastic bands as a component of periodized resistance training. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2100-2106, 2016-Variable resistance training (VRT) has recently become a component of strength and conditioning programs. Prior research has demonstrated increases in power and/or strength using low loads of variable resistance. However, no study has examined using high loads of variable resistance as a part of a periodized training protocol to examine VRT within the context of a periodized training program and to examine a greater load of variable resistance than has been examined in prior research. Fourteen National Collegiate Athletic Association division II male basketball players were recruited for this study. Athletes were divided equally into either a variable resistance or control group. The variable resistance group added 30% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM) as band tension to their prescribed weight 1 session per week. Rate of power development (RPD), peak power, strength, body composition, and vertical jump height were measured pretreatment and posttreatment. No baseline differences were observed between groups for any measurement of strength, power, or body composition. A significant group by time interaction was observed for RPD, in which RPD was greater in VRT posttraining than in the control group. Significant time effects were observed for all other variables including squat 1RM, bench press 1RM, deadlift 1RM, clean 3RM, vertical jump, and lean mass. Although there were no significant group ×-time interactions, the VRT group's percent changes and effect sizes indicate a larger treatment effect in the squat and bench press 1RM values and the vertical jump performed on the force plate and vertec. These results suggest that when using variable resistance as a component of a periodized training program, power and strength can be enhanced. Therefore, athletes who add variable resistance to 1 training

  12. A 3D Convective Model for the Jovian Wind Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Chan, K. L.

    2004-01-01

    In an earlier paper, we proposed that Jupiter's alternating wind bands are a manifestation of the global interaction between rotation and convection in a shallow layer. The model, however, was obtained from linearization of the 2D equations of motions. At HKUST/Hong Kong, we are now trying to study this problem by rigorous numerical simulation. Using a three-dimensional spectral numerical code, we compute models for the outermost layer of Jupiter's convective envelope. Two cases have been studied. In one the atmospheric pressure varies from 1 to 23 bar, and in the other from 1 to 115 bar. The physical parameters (internal energy flux, rotation rate) are chosen to be close to those expected, but solar heating, chemistry, as well as dynamical influences from deeper layers are ignored. The models generate wind field patterns that contain alternating jet streams with resemblance to the Jovian bands. Instantaneous values of the mean zonal flow at the equator reach 80 m/sec. Yet the mean meridional flows are less than 1% of such value. The meridional temperature profile at the cloud top level also shows a double hump structure of a few degrees (as observed) in the subtropics. Though there is not complete quantitative agreement (caused perhaps by neglected effects like solar radiation), these models demonstrate, in principle, the feasibility of generating a Jovian type wind pattern through the interaction of fast rotation and convection in a thin shell.

  13. Photonic-band-gap gyrotron amplifier with picosecond pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Emilio A; Jawla, Sudheer; Lewis, Samantha M; Shapiro, Michael A; Temkin, Richard J

    2017-12-04

    We report the amplification of 250 GHz pulses as short as 260 ps without observation of pulse broadening using a photonic-band-gap circuit gyrotron traveling-wave-amplifier. The gyrotron amplifier operates with a device gain of 38 dB and an instantaneous bandwidth of 8 GHz. The operational bandwidth of the amplifier can be tuned over 16 GHz by adjusting the operating voltage of the electron beam and the magnetic field. The amplifier uses a 30 cm long photonic-band-gap interaction circuit to confine the desired TE 03 -like operating mode while suppressing lower order modes which can result in undesired oscillations. The circuit gain is >55 dB for a beam voltage of 23 kV and a current of 700 mA. These results demonstrate the wide bandwidths and a high gain achievable with gyrotron amplifiers. The amplification of picosecond pulses of variable lengths, 260-800 ps, shows good agreement with the theory using the coupled dispersion relation and the gain-spectrum of the amplifier as measured with quasi-CW input pulses.

  14. A Low Profile Ultrawide Band Monopole Antenna for Wearable Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Doddipalli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A low profile pentagonal shaped monopole antenna is designed and presented for wearable applications. The main objective of this paper is to design a miniaturized ultrawide band monopole planar antenna which can work efficiently in free space but also on the surface of the human body. The impact of human tissues on antenna performance is explained using the proposed pentagonal monopole antenna. The antenna is designed with a pentagonal radiator and a matched feed line of 50 ohm and square slots are integrated on defected ground of FR4 substrate with a size of 15 mm × 25 mm to achieve ultrawide band (UWB performance in free space and human proximity. This overall design will enhance the antenna performance with wide bandwidth ranging from 2.9 GHz to 11 GHz. Specific absorption rate (SAR of the proposed antenna on dispersive phantom model is also measured to observe the exposure of electromagnetic energy on human tissues. The simulated and measured results of the proposed antenna exhibit wide bandwidth and radiation characteristics in both free space and human proximity.

  15. Optical processes in different types of photonic band gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Mengqin; Ullah, Zakir; Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-06-01

    For the first time, we investigate the photonic band gap (PBG) structure in the static and moving electromagnetically induced grating (EIG) through scanning the frequency detunings of the probe field, dressing field and coupling field. Especially, the suppression and enhancement of the four wave mixing band gap signal (FWM BGS) and the probe transmission signal (PTS) can be observed when we scan the dressing field frequency detuning in the FWM BGS system. It is worth noting that the PBG structure and FWM BGS appear at the right of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) position in the case of scanning the frequency detuning of the coupling field in the FWM BGS system, while the PBG structure and FWM BGS appears at the left of the EIT position on the condition of scanning the probe field frequency detuning. Moreover, in the moving PBG structure, we can obtain the nonreciprocity of FWM BGS. Furthermore, we can modulate the intensity, width, location of the FWM BGS and PTS through changing the frequency detunings and intensities of the probe field, dressing field and coupling field, sample length and the frequency difference of coupling fields in EIG. Such scheme could have potential applications in optical diodes, amplifiers and quantum information processing.

  16. Photonic-band-gap gyrotron amplifier with picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Jawla, Sudheer; Lewis, Samantha M.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2017-12-01

    We report the amplification of 250 GHz pulses as short as 260 ps without observation of pulse broadening using a photonic-band-gap circuit gyrotron traveling-wave-amplifier. The gyrotron amplifier operates with a device gain of 38 dB and an instantaneous bandwidth of 8 GHz. The operational bandwidth of the amplifier can be tuned over 16 GHz by adjusting the operating voltage of the electron beam and the magnetic field. The amplifier uses a 30 cm long photonic-band-gap interaction circuit to confine the desired TE03-like operating mode while suppressing lower order modes which can result in undesired oscillations. The circuit gain is >55 dB for a beam voltage of 23 kV and a current of 700 mA. These results demonstrate the wide bandwidths and a high gain achievable with gyrotron amplifiers. The amplification of picosecond pulses of variable lengths, 260-800 ps, shows good agreement with the theory using the coupled dispersion relation and the gain-spectrum of the amplifier as measured with quasi-CW input pulses.

  17. Band gap engineering and optical properties of tungsten trioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Yuan; Li, Yan; Rocca, Dario; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2012-02-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is a good photoanode material for water oxidation but it is not an efficient absorber of sunlight because of its large band gap (2.6 eV). Recently, stable clathrates of WO3 with interstitial N2 molecules were synthesized [1], which are isostructural to monoclinic WO3 but have a substantially smaller bang gap, 1.8 eV. We have studied the structural, electronic, an vibrational properties of N2-WO3 clathrates using ab-initio calculations and analyzed the physical origin of their gap reduction. We also studied the effect of atomic dopants, in particular rare gases. Substantial band gap reduction has been observed, especially in the case of doping with Xe, due to both electronic and structural effects. Absorption spectra have been computed by solving the Bethe-Salpeter Equation [2] to gain a thourough insight into the optical properties of pure and doped tungsten trioxide. [1] Q. Mi, Y. Ping, Y. Li., B.S. Brunschwig, G. Galli, H B. Gray, N S. Lewis (preprint) [2]D. Rocca, D. Lu and G. Galli, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164109 (2010)

  18. Wide band gap gallium arsenide nanoparticles fabricated using plasma method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, D., E-mail: dvjainnov@gmail.com [Physics Department, Banasthali Vidyapith, Rajasthan-304022 (India); Mangla, O. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India); Physics Department, Hindu College, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India); Roy, S. [Physics Department, Daulat Ram College, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India)

    2016-05-23

    In this paper, we have reported the fabrication of gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanoparticles on quartz placed at distance of 4.0 cm, 5.0 cm and 6.0 cm, respectively from top of anode. The fabrication has been carried out by highly energetic and high fluence ions of GaAs produced by hot, dense and extremely non-equilibrium plasma in a modified dense plasma focus device. GaAs nanoparticles have mean size of about 23 nm, 16 nm and 14 nm for deposition at a distance of 4.0 cm, 5.0 cm and 6.0 cm, respectively. The nanoparticles are crystalline in nature as evident from X-ray diffraction patterns. The band gap of nanoparticles is found to increase from 1.425 eV to 5.37 eV at 4.0 cm distance, which further increases as distance increases. The wide band gap observed for fabricated GaAs nanoparticles suggest the possible applications of nanoparticles in laser systems.

  19. Impact of MODIS SWIR Band Calibration Improvements on Level-3 Atmospheric Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Andrew; Levy, Robert; Angal, Amit; Geng, Xu; Xiong, Jack; Hoffman, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The spectral reflectance measured by the MODIS reflective solar bands (RSB) is used for retrieving many atmospheric science products. The accuracy of these products depends on the accuracy of the calibration of the RSB. To this end, the RSB of the MODIS instruments are primarily calibrated on-orbit using regular solar diffuser (SD) observations. For lambda 0.94 microns, the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) developed, in MODIS Collection 6 (C6), a time-dependent correction using observations from pseudo-invariant earth-scene targets. This correction has been implemented in C6 for the Terra MODIS 1.24 micron band over the entire mission, and for the 1.375 micron band in the forward processing. As the instruments continue to operate beyond their design lifetime of six years, a similar correction is planned for other short-wave infrared (SWIR) bands as well. MODIS SWIR bands are used in deriving atmosphere products, including aerosol optical thickness, atmospheric total column water vapor, cloud fraction and cloud optical depth. The SD degradation correction in Terra bands 5 and 26 impact the spectral radiance and therefore the retrieval of these atmosphere products. Here, we describe the corrections to Bands 5 (1.24 microns) and 26 (1.375 microns), and produce three sets (B5, B26 correction on/on, on/off, and off/off) of Terra-MODIS Level 1B (calibrated radiance product) data. By comparing products derived from these corrected and uncorrected Terra MODIS Level 1B (L1B) calibrations, dozens of L3 atmosphere products are surveyed for changes caused by the corrections, and representative results are presented. Aerosol and water vapor products show only small local changes, while some cloud products can change locally by > 10%, which is a large change.

  20. Investigation and Mitigation of the Crosstalk Effect in Terra MODIS Band 30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqiang Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been previously reported that thermal emissive bands (TEB 27–29 in the Terra (T- MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS have been significantly affected by electronic crosstalk. Successful linear theory of the electronic crosstalk effect was formulated, and it successfully characterized the effect via the use of lunar observations as viable inputs. In this paper, we report the successful characterization and mitigation of the electronic crosstalk for T-MODIS band 30 using the same characterization methodology. Though the phenomena of the electronic crosstalk have been well documented in previous works, the novel for band 30 is the need to also apply electronic crosstalk correction to the non-linear term in the calibration coefficient. The lack of this necessity in early works thus demonstrates the distinct difference of band 30, and, yet, in the same instances, the overall correctness of the characterization formulation. For proper result, the crosstalk correction is applied to the band 30 calibration coefficients including the non-linear term, and also to the earth view radiance. We demonstrate that the crosstalk correction achieves a long-term radiometric correction of approximately 1.5 K for desert targets and 1.0 K for ocean scenes. Significant striping removal in the Baja Peninsula earth view imagery is also demonstrated due to the successful amelioration of detector differences caused by the crosstalk effect. Similarly significant improvement in detector difference is shown for the selected ocean and desert targets over the entire mission history. In particular, band 30 detector 8, which has been flagged as “out of family” is restored by the removal of the crosstalk contamination. With the correction achieved, the science applications based on band 30 can be significantly improved. The linear formulation, the characterization methodology, and the crosstalk effect correction coefficients derived using lunar