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Sample records for balloon injury model

  1. Rosuvastatin reduces neointima formation in a rat model of balloon injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preusch MR

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Processes of restenosis, following arterial injury, are complex involving different cell types producing various cytokines and enzymes. Among those enzymes, smooth muscle cell-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are thought to take part in cell migration, degrading of extracellular matrix, and neointima formation. MMP-9, also known as gelatinase B, is expressed immediately after vascular injury and its expression and activity can be inhibited by statins. Using an established in vivo model of vascular injury, we investigated the effect of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin on MMP-9 expression and neointima formation. Materials and methods 14-week old male Sprague Dawley rats underwent balloon injury of the common carotid artery. Half of the animals received rosuvastatin (20 mg/kg body weight/day via oral gavage, beginning 3 days prior to injury. Gelatinase activity and neointima formation were analyzed 3 days and 14 days after balloon injury, respectively. 14 days after vascular injury, proliferative activity was assessed by staining for Ki67. Results After 14 days, animals in the rosuvastatin group showed a decrease in total neointima formation (0.194 ± 0.01 mm2 versus 0.124 ± 0.02 mm2, p Conclusions Rosuvastatin attenuates neointima formation without affecting early MMP-9 activity in a rat model of vascular injury.

  2. Unintended Thermal Injuries from Radiofrequency Ablation: Organ Protection with an Angioplasty Balloon Catheter in an Animal Model

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    Martha-Grace Knuttinen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate a novel approach of using a balloon catheter as a protective device to separate liver from the diaphragm or nearby bowel during radiofrequency ablation (RFA of hepatic dome tumors in an animal model. Materials and Methods: All experimental procedures were approved by animal Institutional Review Board. Using a 3 cm RF needle electrode, 70 hepatic ablation zones were created using ultrasound in 7 pigs. 50 lesions were created using balloon interposition between liver and diaphragm; 20 lesions were created using the balloon device interposed posteriorly between liver and bowel. Additional 21 control lesions were performed. Animals were sacrificed immediately; diaphragm and bowel were then visually inspected and sectioned. Diaphragmatic and bowel injury was then classified according to the depth of thickness. Results: Control lesions caused full thickness injury, either to diaphragm or bowel. During ablation of lesions with balloon interposition, there was significantly less diaphragmatic injury, P < 0.001 and less bowel injury, P < 0.01. Conclusion: Using balloon interposition as a protective device has advantages over previous saline infusion or CO 2 insufflation, providing a safe way to expand percutaneous RFA of liver tumors located on the undersurface of the diaphragm. In addition, this method may be used in protection of other organs adjacent to areas being ablated.

  3. A comparison of balloon injury models of endovascular lesions in rat arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.E.E. Gabeler; R. van Hillegersberg (Richard); R.G. Statius van Eps (Randolph); W. Sluiter (Wim); E.J. Gussenhoven (Elma); H. van Urk (Hero); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Balloon injury (BI) of the rat carotid artery (CCA) is widely used to study intimal hyperplasia (IH) and decrease in lumen diameter (LD), but CCA's small diameter impedes the evaluation of endovascular therapies. Therefore, we validated BI in the aorta (AA)

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonists suppress tissue factor overexpression in rat balloon injury model with paclitaxel infusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Bean Park

    Full Text Available The role and underlying mechanisms of rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ agonist, on myocardial infarction are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of this PPAR-γ agonist on the expression of tissue factor (TF, a primary molecule for thrombosis, and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. The PPAR-γ agonist inhibited TF expression in response to TNF-α in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, human monocytic leukemia cell line, and human umbilical arterial smooth muscle cells. The overexpression of TF was mediated by increased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, which was blocked by the PPAR-γ agonist. The effective MAPK differed depending on each cell type. Luciferase and ChIP assays showed that transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1, was a pivotal target of the PPAR-γ agonist to lower TF transcription. Intriguingly, two main drugs for drug-eluting stent, paclitaxel or rapamycin, significantly exaggerated thrombin-induced TF expression, which was also effectively blocked by the PPAR-γ agonist in all cell types. This PPAR-γ agonist did not impair TF pathway inhibitor (TFPI in three cell types. In rat balloon injury model (Sprague-Dawley rats, n = 10/group with continuous paclitaxel infusion, the PPAR-γ agonist attenuated TF expression by 70±5% (n = 4; P<0.0001 in injured vasculature. Taken together, rosiglitazone reduced TF expression in three critical cell types involved in vascular thrombus formation via MAPK and AP-1 inhibitions. Also, this PPAR-γ agonist reversed the paclitaxel-induced aggravation of TF expression, which suggests a possibility that the benefits might outweigh its risks in a group of patients with paclitaxel-eluting stent implanted.

  5. NK1 receptor blockade is ineffective in improving outcome following a balloon compression model of spinal cord injury.

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    Anna Victoria Leonard

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide substance P (SP is a well-known mediator of neurogenic inflammation following a variety of CNS disorders. Indeed, inhibition of SP through antagonism of its receptor, the tachykinin NK1 receptor, has been shown to be beneficial following both traumatic brain injury and stroke. Such studies demonstrated that administration of an NK1 receptor antagonist reduced blood-brain-barrier permeability, edema development and improved functional outcome. Furthermore, our recent studies have demonstrated a potential role for SP in mediating neurogenic inflammation following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI. Accordingly, the present study investigates whether inhibition of SP may similarly play a neuroprotective role following traumatic SCI. A closed balloon compression injury was induced at T10 in New Zealand White rabbits. At 30 minutes post-injury an NK1 receptor antagonist was administered intravenously. Animals were thereafter assessed for blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB permeability, spinal water content (edema, intrathecal pressure (ITP, and histological and functional outcome from 5 hours to 2 weeks post-SCI. Administration of an NK1 receptor antagonist was not effective in reducing BSCB permeability, edema, ITP, or functional deficits following SCI. We conclude that SP mediated neurogenic inflammation does not seem to play a major role in BSCB disruption, edema development and consequential tissue damage seen in acute traumatic SCI. Rather it is likely that the severe primary insult and subsequent hemorrhage may be the key contributing factors to ongoing SCI injury.

  6. The Effect Of Supraphysiologic Blood Pressure on Traumatic Brain Injury and Proximal Tissue Beds During Resuscitative Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta and Variable Aortic Control in a Porcine Model (Sus scrofa) of Polytrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-27

    Supraphysiologic Blood Pressure On Traumatic Brain Injury And Proximal Tissue Beds During Resuscitative Balloon Occlusion Of The Aorta And Variable Aortic...combined effects of increased proximal mean arterial pressure (pMAP), carotid blood flow (Qcarotid), and intracranial pressure (ICP) from REBOA would...Mandatory) The Effect of REBOA, Partial Aortic Occlusion and Aggressive Blood Transfusion on Traumatic Brain Injury in a Swine Polytrauma Model

  7. Cilostazol activates function of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cell for re-endothelialization in a carotid balloon injury model.

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    Rie Kawabe-Yako

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cilostazol(CLZ has been used as a vasodilating anti-platelet drug clinically and demonstrated to inhibit proliferation of smooth muscle cells and effect on endothelial cells. However, the effect of CLZ on re-endothelialization including bone marrow (BM-derived endothelial progenitor cell (EPC contribution is unclear. We have investigated the hypothesis that CLZ might accelerate re-endothelialization with EPCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Balloon carotid denudation was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats. CLZ group was given CLZ mixed feed from 2 weeks before carotid injury. Control group was fed normal diet. CLZ accelerated re-endothelialization at 2 weeks after surgery and resulted in a significant reduction of neointima formation 4 weeks after surgery compared with that in control group. CLZ also increased the number of circulating EPCs throughout the time course. We examined the contribution of BM-derived EPCs to re-endothelialization by BM transplantation from Tie2/lacZ mice to nude rats. The number of Tie2-regulated X-gal positive cells on injured arterial luminal surface was increased at 2 weeks after surgery in CLZ group compared with that in control group. In vitro, CLZ enhanced proliferation, adhesion and migration activity, and differentiation with mRNA upregulation of adhesion molecule integrin αvβ3, chemokine receptor CXCR4 and growth factor VEGF assessed by real-time RT-PCR in rat BM-derived cultured EPCs. In addition, CLZ markedly increased the expression of SDF-1α that is a ligand of CXCR4 receptor in EPCs, in the media following vascular injury. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CLZ promotes EPC mobilization from BM and EPC recruitment to sites of arterial injury, and thereby inhibited neointima formation with acceleration of re-endothelialization with EPCs as well as pre-existing endothelial cells in a rat carotid balloon injury model. CLZ could be not only an anti-platelet agent but also a promising tool for

  8. Effect of anti-ApoA-I antibody-coating of stents on neointima formation in a rabbit balloon-injury model.

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    Aart C Strang

    Full Text Available Since high-density lipoprotein (HDL has pro-endothelial and anti-thrombotic effects, a HDL recruiting stent may prevent restenosis. In the present study we address the functional characteristics of an apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I antibody coating in vitro. Subsequently, we tested its biological performance applied on stents in vivo in rabbits.The impact of anti ApoA-I- versus apoB-antibody coated stainless steel discs were evaluated in vitro for endothelial cell adhesion, thrombin generation and platelet adhesion. In vivo, response to injury in the iliac artery of New Zealand white rabbits was used as read out comparing apoA-I-coated versus bare metal stents.ApoA-I antibody coated metal discs showed increased endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation and decreased thrombin generation and platelet adhesion, compared to control discs. In vivo, no difference was observed between ApoA-I and BMS stents in lumen stenosis (23.3±13.8% versus 23.3±11.3%, p=0.77 or intima surface area (0.81±0.62 mm2 vs 0.84±0.55 mm2, p=0.85. Immunohistochemistry also revealed no differences in cell proliferation, fibrin deposition, inflammation and endothelialization.ApoA-I antibody coating has potent pro-endothelial and anti-thrombotic effects in vitro, but failed to enhance stent performance in a balloon injury rabbit model in vivo.

  9. Effect of anti-ApoA-I antibody-coating of stents on neointima formation in a rabbit balloon-injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Aart C; Knetsch, Menno L W; Koole, Leo H; de Winter, Robbert J; van der Wal, Allard C; de Vries, Carlie J M; Tak, Paul P; Bisoendial, Radjesh J; Stroes, Erik S G; Rotmans, Joris I

    2015-01-01

    Since high-density lipoprotein (HDL) has pro-endothelial and anti-thrombotic effects, a HDL recruiting stent may prevent restenosis. In the present study we address the functional characteristics of an apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) antibody coating in vitro. Subsequently, we tested its biological performance applied on stents in vivo in rabbits. The impact of anti ApoA-I- versus apoB-antibody coated stainless steel discs were evaluated in vitro for endothelial cell adhesion, thrombin generation and platelet adhesion. In vivo, response to injury in the iliac artery of New Zealand white rabbits was used as read out comparing apoA-I-coated versus bare metal stents. ApoA-I antibody coated metal discs showed increased endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation and decreased thrombin generation and platelet adhesion, compared to control discs. In vivo, no difference was observed between ApoA-I and BMS stents in lumen stenosis (23.3±13.8% versus 23.3±11.3%, p=0.77) or intima surface area (0.81±0.62 mm2 vs 0.84±0.55 mm2, p=0.85). Immunohistochemistry also revealed no differences in cell proliferation, fibrin deposition, inflammation and endothelialization. ApoA-I antibody coating has potent pro-endothelial and anti-thrombotic effects in vitro, but failed to enhance stent performance in a balloon injury rabbit model in vivo.

  10. Epothilones Suppress Neointimal Thickening in the Rat Carotid Balloon-Injury Model by Inducing Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis through p53-Dependent Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Dong Ju; Jung, Jae Chul; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule stabilizing agents (MTSA) are known to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration, and effectively reduce neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis. Epothilones (EPOs), non-taxane MTSA, have been found to be effective in the inhibition of VSMC proliferation and neointimal formation by cell cycle arrest. However, effect of EPOs on apoptosis in hyper-proliferated VSMCs as a possible way to reduce neointimal formation and its action mechanism related to VSMC viability has not been suited yet. Thus, the purposes of the present study was to investigate whether EPOs are able to inhibit neointimal formation by inducing apoptosis within the region of neointimal hyperplasia in balloon-injured rat carotid artery, as well as underlying action mechanism. Treatment of EPO-B and EPO-D significantly induced apoptotic cell death and mitotic catastrophe in hyper-proliferated VSMCs, resulting in cell growth inhibition. Further, EPOs significantly suppressed VSMC proliferation and induced apoptosis by activation of p53-dependent apoptotic signaling pathway, Bax/cytochrome c/caspase-3. We further demonstrated that the local treatment of carotid arteries with EPOs potently inhibited neointimal lesion formation by induction of apoptosis in rat carotid injury model. Our findings demonstrate a potent anti-neointimal hyperplasia property of EPOs by inducing p53-depedent apoptosis in hyper-proliferated VSMCs.

  11. [Flavonoids extracts from Inula britannica inhibit oxidative stress in vessel after balloon injury].

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    Zhang, Hongbing; Han, Mei; Wen, Jinkun

    2009-03-01

    To observe the inhibition of flavonoids extract (FE) from Inula britannica on oxidative stress in rat aorta after balloon injury. The model of vascular intimal hyperplasia was established by balloon injury. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, model, FE and captopril (CAP, positive control). The FE group was treated by intragastric administration with FE in dose of 12.5, 25, 50 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1). The level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in serum were detected by thiobarbituric acid (TAB) method and xanthine oxidase method respectively, and superoxide anion (O2-) in vessel was detected by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining. The histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to observe the changes of appearance and SOD expression in vascular tissues after balloon injury. The best concentration of FE to rats was 50 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1). The neointima thickness in the model group was significantly higher than that in the FE group (50 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) and control group at 14 days after balloon injury (P < 0.01). The lever of MDA in serum of FE group was decreased (P < 0.01) and SOD was increased (P < 0.05) in both serum and vascular tissues. The level of O2*- in the drug group was lower than that in the model group. FE can enhance the antioxidation capacities of vessel tissues by suppressing the formation of O2- induced by injury, by which FE inhibites neointima formation after balloon injury in rat.

  12. Delivery of TFPI-2 using ultrasound with a microbubble agent (SonoVue) inhibits intimal hyperplasia after balloon injury in a rabbit carotid artery model.

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    Zhou, Jie; Wang, Yuxue; Xiong, Yufang; Wang, Hongxing; Feng, Youmei; Chen, Juan

    2010-11-01

    Here we report a new, simple and efficient method by using ultrasound and a microbubble agent (SonoVue) for delivering a gene to balloon-injured carotid arteries for restenosis prophylaxis. The tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) has been shown to inhibit the postinjury intimae hyperplasia in atherosclerotic vessels. New Zealand white rabbits were divided into 4 groups with 14 in each, a treatment control for balloon injury, a gene vehicle control, a gene delivery of TFPI-2 without using ultrasound and a gene delivery of TFPI-2 using ultrasound. After four weeks, the injured artery neointimal proliferation was significantly lower in the TFPI-2 group with ultrasound than the control groups (p < 0.01) according to the measurement of the mean luminal diameters by B-mode ultrasonography. The ratio of intimal/media area and the stenosis rate in the gene delivery facilitated by ultrasound were significantly lower than those of the nonultrasound gene delivering method (p < 0.01). Copyright © 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. All rights reserved.

  13. Numerical Modelling Of Pumpkin Balloon Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, D.

    Tensys have been involved in the numerical formfinding and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures for 15 years. They have recently broadened this range of activities into the `lighter than air' field with significant involvement in aerostat and heavy-lift hybrid airship design. Since early 2004 they have been investigating pumpkin balloon instability on behalf of the NASA ULDB programme. These studies are undertaken using inTENS, an in-house finite element program suite based upon the Dynamic Relaxation solution method and developed especially for the non-linear analysis and patterning of membrane structures. The paper describes the current state of an investigation that started with a numerical simulation of the lobed cylinder problem first studied by Calladine. The influence of material properties and local geometric deformation on stability is demonstrated. A number of models of complete pumpkin balloons have then been established, including a 64-gore balloon with geometry based upon Julian Nott's Endeavour. This latter clefted dramatically upon initial inflation, a phenomenon that has been reproduced in the numerical model. Ongoing investigations include the introduction of membrane contact modelling into inTENS and correlation studies with the series of large-scale ULDB models currently in preparation.

  14. Titan Balloon Convection Model, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative research effort is directed at determining, quantitatively, the convective heat transfer coefficients applicable to a Montgolfiere balloon operating...

  15. Could a burst toy balloon cause a major ocular injury like cataract in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ocular injuries in children remain a largely preventable phenomenon, and the resulting morbidity may be life-long. A variety of objects have been implicated as causes of ocular injuries in children, but that resulting from a burst balloon on the face is rare, as this toy may not be recognised as potentially hazardous, especially ...

  16. Effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin II antagonist receptor on neointima hyperplasia after vascular balloon injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yeling; Zhao Lihua

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (captopril) and angiotensin II antagonist receptor (valsartan) on neointima hyperplasia after vascular balloon injury. Methods: Thirty-six rabbit models were randomly divided into three groups: injuried group, captopril group and valsartan group. Captopril (2 mg·kg -1 ·d -1 po) and valsartan (10 mg·kg -1 ·d -1 po) were given to twelve rabbits respectively from 1 day before the right carotidarteries were injuried by 2.0 mm ballon cathether to 14 days after injury in captopil group and valsartan group. The medicine was not administered in the injuried group. The tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), plaminogen activor inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) antigen level and plasma endothelin (ET) levels were measured before injury, and 7, 14 days after vascular injury. The pathomorphoiogical examination were carried out 14 days after angioplasty. Results: The levels of plasma PAI-1 and ET in captopril group and valsartan group were significantly lower than those in the injuried group (P<0.05). The intimal thickness and extent of lumen stenosis in captopril and valsartan groups were significantly lower than those in the injuried group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Captopril and valsartan can inhibit neointima hyperplasia after vascular ballon injury. (authors)

  17. Dynamic expressions of monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 and CC chamomile receptor 2 after balloon injury and their effects in intimal proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhigang; Li, Yuebing; Niu, Lili; Xiao, Yang; Pu, Xiaodong; Zheng, Hairong; Qian, Ming

    2015-06-11

    The dynamic expressions of monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and CC chamomile receptor 2 (CCR2) after balloon injury and their effects in intimal proliferation were discussed. In this study, the expression of MCP-1 and its receptor during the intimal proliferation in rat artery after balloon injury were studied. Using the model of balloon injury of rats' arteries, the changes of intimal proliferation were observed with optical microscopy and the expressions of MCP-1 and CCR2 at different times were examined with the methods of RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of MCP-1 and CCR2 in the arterial tissues were detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and analyzed by semi-quantitative method. The expressions of MCP-1 and CCR2 mRNA began to gradually increase after balloon injury. The MCP-1 reached to the peak on the first day, but decreased gradually later on. Expressions of CCR2 mRNA began to increase on the first day and reached to the peak on the 7th day, but then started to decrease gradually until 28th day when we can still detect it. The expressions of MCP-1 proteins began to increase gradually after balloon injury and were obviously detected in the VSMC on the 4th and 7th day, until 14th day when we can still detect it clearly in the proliferating intima. The dynamic expressions of MCP-1, MCP-1 proteins and CCR2 mRNA after balloon injury were shown to play an important role in intimal proliferation.

  18. Sensor System for Super-Pressure Balloon Performance Modeling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-duration balloon flights are an exciting new area of scientific ballooning, enabled by the development of large super-pressure balloons. As these balloons...

  19. A cooled water-irrigated intraesophageal balloon to prevent thermal injury during cardiac ablation: experimental study based on an agar phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lequerica, Juan L; Berjano, Enrique J; Herrero, Maria; Melecio, Lemuel; Hornero, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    A great deal of current research is directed to finding a way to minimize thermal injury in the esophagus during radiofrequency catheter ablation of the atrium. A recent clinical study employing a cooling intraesophageal balloon reported a reduction of the temperature in the esophageal lumen. However, it could not be determined whether the deeper muscular layer of the esophagus was cooled enough to prevent injury. We built a model based on an agar phantom in order to experimentally study the thermal behavior of this balloon by measuring the temperature not only on the balloon, but also at a hypothetical point between the esophageal lumen and myocardium (2 mm distant). Controlled temperature (55 0 C) ablations were conducted for 120 s. The results showed that (1) the cooling balloon provides a reduction in the final temperature reached, both on the balloon surface and at a distance of 2 mm; (2) coolant temperature has a significant effect on the temperature measured at 2 mm from the esophageal lumen (it has a less effect on the temperature measured on the balloon surface) and (3) the pre-cooling period has a significant effect on the temperature measured on the balloon surface (the effect on the temperature measured 2 mm away is small). The results were in good agreement with those obtained in a previous clinical study. The study suggests that the cooling balloon gives thermal protection to the esophagus when a minimum pre-cooling period of 2 min is programmed at a coolant temperature of 5 deg. C or less. (note)

  20. A cooled intraesophageal balloon to prevent thermal injury during endocardial surgical radiofrequency ablation of the left atrium: a finite element study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berjano, Enrique J [Center for Research and Innovation on Bioengineering, Valencia Polytechnic University, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Hornero, Fernando [Cardiac Surgery Department, Valencia University General Hospital, Avd Tres Cruces s/n, 46014, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-10-21

    Recent clinical studies on intraoperative monopolar radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation have reported some cases of injury to the esophagus. The aim of this study was to perform computer simulations using three-dimensional finite element models in order to investigate the feasibility of a cooled intraesophageal balloon appropriately placed to prevent injury. The models included atrial tissue and a fragment of esophagus and lung linked by connective tissue. The lesion depth in the esophagus was assessed using a 50 deg. C isotherm and expressed as a percentage of thickness of the esophageal wall. The results are as follows: (1) chilling the esophagus by means of a cooled balloon placed in the lumen minimizes the lesion in the esophageal wall compared to the cases in which no balloon is used (a collapsed esophagus) and with a non-cooled balloon; (2) the temperature of the cooling fluid has a more significant effect on the minimization of the lesion than the rate of cooling (the thermal transfer coefficient for forced convection); and (3) pre-cooling periods previous to RF ablation do not represent a significant improvement. Finally, the results also suggest that the use of a cooled balloon could affect the transmurality of the atrial lesion, especially in the cases where the atrium is of considerable thickness. (note)

  1. Systemic depletion of macrophages by liposomal bisphosphonates reduces neointimal formation following balloon-injury in the rat carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danenberg, Haim D; Fishbein, Ilia; Epstein, Hila; Waltenberger, Johannes; Moerman, Evgeny; Mönkkönen, Jukka; Gao, Jianchuan; Gathi, Irith; Reichi, Reuven; Golomb, Gershon

    2003-11-01

    Macrophage depletion by liposomal clodronate inhibits neointimal formation after balloon-injury. The present study examined bisphosphonates (BPs) potency-effect relationship and the role of systemic versus local monocytes in vascular repair. Liposomal preparations of clodronate, pamidronate, alendronate, and ISA-13-1 inhibited RAW-264 macrophages growth in a dose-response manner. Administration to balloon-injured rats suppressed neointimal growth. Neointima to media ratio (N/M) at 14 days was reduced from 1.35 +/- 0.22 (control) to 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.9 +/- 0.17 by liposomal alendronate (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) and liposomal ISA-13-1 (15 mg/kg), respectively (n = 8-10, P < 0.05). Suppression of neointimal formation was preserved at 30 days. Subcutaneous administration of liposomal BP (LBP) was also effective in suppressing neointimal formation, while short local intraluminal application had no effect. Immunostaining for ED-1 and ED-2 revealed no resident macrophages in the arterial wall, and reduced macrophage infiltration in LBP-treated animals. Arterial PDGF-B chain and PDGF-beta receptor activation were reduced in LBP-treated animals and up-regulation of the PDGF receptor was noted. Systemic transient inactivation of monocytes and macrophages by LBPs reduced macrophage infiltration and neointimal formation in the rat carotid injury model. The findings demonstrate a BP potency-effect relationship, and highlight the role of circulating monocytes in vascular injury and repair.

  2. A Sensitivity Analysis of fMRI Balloon Model

    KAUST Repository

    Zayane, Chadia

    2015-04-22

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows the mapping of the brain activation through measurements of the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast. The characterization of the pathway from the input stimulus to the output BOLD signal requires the selection of an adequate hemodynamic model and the satisfaction of some specific conditions while conducting the experiment and calibrating the model. This paper, focuses on the identifiability of the Balloon hemodynamic model. By identifiability, we mean the ability to estimate accurately the model parameters given the input and the output measurement. Previous studies of the Balloon model have somehow added knowledge either by choosing prior distributions for the parameters, freezing some of them, or looking for the solution as a projection on a natural basis of some vector space. In these studies, the identification was generally assessed using event-related paradigms. This paper justifies the reasons behind the need of adding knowledge, choosing certain paradigms, and completing the few existing identifiability studies through a global sensitivity analysis of the Balloon model in the case of blocked design experiment.

  3. Experimental characterization and numerical modelling of polymeric film damage, constituting the stratospheric super pressurized balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabane, Makram; Chaabane, Makram; Dalverny, Olivier; Deramecourt, Arnaud; Mistou, Sébastien

    The super-pressure balloons developed by CNES are a great challenge in scientific ballooning. Whatever the balloon type considered (spherical, pumpkin...), it is necessary to have good knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the envelope regarding to the flight level and the lifespan of the balloon. It appears during the working stages of the super pressure balloons that these last can exploded prematurely in the course of the first hours of flight. For this reason CNES and LGP are carrying out research programs about experimentations and modelling in order to predict a good stability of the balloons flight and guarantee a life time in adequacy with the technical requirement. This study deals with multilayered polymeric film damage which induce balloons failure. These experimental and numerical study aims, are a better understanding and predicting of the damage mechanisms bringing the premature explosion of balloons. The following damages phenomena have different origins. The firsts are simple and triple wrinkles owed during the process and the stocking stages of the balloons. The second damage phenomenon is associated to the creep of the polymeric film during the flight of the balloon. The first experimental results we present in this paper, concern the mechanical characterization of three different damage phenomena. The severe damage induced by the wrinkles of the film involves a significant loss of mechanical properties. In a second part the theoretical study, concerns the choice and the development of a non linear viscoelastic coupled damage behavior model in a finite element code.

  4. Design optimization of stent and its dilatation balloon using kriging surrogate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongxia; Liu, Tao; Wang, Minjie; Zhao, Danyang; Qiao, Aike; Wang, Xue; Gu, Junfeng; Li, Zheng; Zhu, Bao

    2017-01-11

    Although stents have great success of treating cardiovascular disease, it actually undermined by the in-stent restenosis and their long-term fatigue failure. The geometry of stent affects its service performance and ultimately affects its fatigue life. Besides, improper length of balloon leads to transient mechanical injury to the vessel wall and in-stent restenosis. Conventional optimization method of stent and its dilatation balloon by comparing several designs and choosing the best one as the optimal design cannot find the global optimal design in the design space. In this study, an adaptive optimization method based on Kriging surrogate model was proposed to optimize the structure of stent and the length of stent dilatation balloon so as to prolong stent service life and improve the performance of stent. A finite element simulation based optimization method combing with Kriging surrogate model is proposed to optimize geometries of stent and length of stent dilatation balloon step by step. Kriging surrogate model coupled with design of experiment method is employed to construct the approximate functional relationship between optimization objectives and design variables. Modified rectangular grid is used to select initial training samples in the design space. Expected improvement function is used to balance the local and global searches to find the global optimal result. Finite element method is adopted to simulate the free expansion of balloon-expandable stent and the expansion of stent in stenotic artery. The well-known Goodman diagram was used for the fatigue life prediction of stent, while dogboning effect was used for stent expansion performance measurement. As the real design cases, diamond-shaped stent and sv-shaped stent were studied to demonstrate how the proposed method can be harnessed to design and refine stent fatigue life and expansion performance computationally. The fatigue life and expansion performance of both the diamond-shaped stent and sv

  5. Detecting DNA synthesis of neointimal formation after catheter balloon injury in GK and in Wistar rats: using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Jingsheng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neointimal formation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of coronary restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus. Recently, some studies have shown that 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU incorporation can serve as a novel alternative to the 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU antibody detection method for detection of DNA synthesis in regenerating avian cochlea, chick embryo and the adult nervous system. However, few studies have been performed to assess the suitability of EdU for detecting DNA synthesis in vascular neointima. Methods The carotid artery balloon injury model was established in Goto-Kakizaki (GK and Wistar rats. A Cell-LightTM EdU Kit was used to detect EdU-labeled cell nuclei of common carotid arteries at day 7 after catheter balloon injury. Different methods of injecting EdU were tested. The protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and p-Akt (Ser473, as well as the mRNA levels of PCNA were evaluated by Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR, respectively. Immunohistochemical staining was also employed to visualize PCNA-positive cells. Results At day 7 after catheter balloon injury, far more EdU-positive and PCNA-positive cells were observed in GK rats. When comparing groups that received different EdU doses, it was found that the percentage of EdU-positive cells at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight was than at doses of 25 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg. The number of positive cells was significantly higher in the repeated injection group compared to the single injection group. Further, after balloon injury DNA synthesis in GK rats was more notable than in Wistar rats. Neointimal formation in GK rats was more obvious than in Wistar rats. The protein levels of PCNA and p-Akt (Ser473 and the mRNA levels of PCNA were increased in injured rats as compared to uninjured rats, and were significantly higher in GK rats than in Wistar rats

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 attenuates vascular remodeling following balloon injury in rat carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulis, D A; Durante, W; Peyton, K J; Evans, A J; Schafer, A I

    2001-03-01

    The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) system of heme catabolism has been proposed to exert protective actions upon the cardiovascular system. This investigation examined the influence of HO-1 induction on vascular remodeling following arterial injury. Rats were subjected to left carotid artery (LCA) balloon injury following pre-treatment with either vehicle, the HO-1 inducer hemin (50 mg/kg, SC), or concomitant treatment with hemin and the HO-1 inhibitor tin-protoporphyrin IX (SnPP-IX; 50 micromol/kg, IP). Animals were injected daily for 14 days post-injury, after which animals were sacrificed and tissues obtained. Western blot analyses revealed vascular HO-1 induction after 2 and 16 days of hemin treatment. Positive immunostaining for HO-1 was detected in the endothelial and adventitial layers following 48 h of hemin treatment and positive medial staining for HO-1 after 16 days of hemin treatment. The injured LCA of hemin-treated animals demonstrated significantly attenuated neointimal (NI) area (-57%), NI thickness (-58%), and NI area/medial wall area ratio (-40%) compared to the injured LCA of vehicle controls. The cross-sectional medial wall areas of both LCA and uninjured RCA were also significantly reduced in the hemin-treated animals. SnPP-IX treatment, however, completely restored the NI area, NI thickness, NI area/medial wall area ratio, and partially restored the medial wall area towards control levels. These results directly implicate HO-1 and the products of heme catabolism in attenuating the arterial response to injury and ensuing vascular wall remodeling.

  7. Bringing Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) Closer to the Point of Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasley, Jason D; Teeter, William A; Gamble, William B; Wasick, Philip; Romagnoli, Anna N; Pasley, Amelia M; Scalea, Thomas M; Brenner, Megan L

    2018-01-01

    The management of noncompressible torso hemorrhage remains a significant issue at the point of injury. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) has been used in the hospital to control bleeding and bridge patients to definitive surgery. Smaller delivery systems and wirefree devices may be used more easily at the point of injury by nonphysician providers. We investigated whether independent duty military medical technicians (IDMTs) could learn and perform REBOA correctly and rapidly as assessed by simulation. US Air Force IDMTs without prior endovascular experience were included. All participants received didactic instruction and evaluation of technical skills. Procedural times and pretest/posttest examinations were administered after completion of all trials. The Likert scale was used to subjectively assess confidence before and after instruction. Eleven IDMTs were enrolled. There was a significant decrease in procedural times from trials 1 to 6. Overall procedural time (± standard deviation) decreased from 147.7 ± 27.4 seconds to 64 ± 8.9 seconds (ρ < .001). There was a mean improvement of 83.7 ± 24.6 seconds from the first to sixth trial (ρ < .001). All participants demonstrated correct placement of the sheath, measurement and placement of the catheter, and inflation of the balloon throughout all trials (100%). There was significant improvement in comprehension and knowledge between the pretest and posttest; average performance improved significantly from 36.4.6% ± 12.3% to 71.1% ± 8.5% (ρ < .001). Subjectively, all 11 participants noted significant improvement in confidence from 1.2 to 4.1 out of 5 on the Likert scale (ρ < .001). Technology for aortic occlusion has advanced to provide smaller, wirefree devices, making field deployment more feasible. IDMTs can learn the steps required for REBOA and perform the procedure accurately and rapidly, as assessed by simulation. Arterial access is a challenge in the ability to perform

  8. Numerical modeling of the 2017 active seismic infrasound balloon experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Q.; Komjathy, A.; Garcia, R.; Cutts, J. A.; Pauken, M.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Mimoun, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Lai, V. H.; Kedar, S.; Levillain, E.

    2017-12-01

    We have developed a numerical tool to propagate acoustic and gravity waves in a coupled solid-fluid medium with topography. It is a hybrid method between a continuous Galerkin and a discontinuous Galerkin method that accounts for non-linear atmospheric waves, visco-elastic waves and topography. We apply this method to a recent experiment that took place in the Nevada desert to study acoustic waves from seismic events. This experiment, developed by JPL and its partners, wants to demonstrate the viability of a new approach to probe seismic-induced acoustic waves from a balloon platform. To the best of our knowledge, this could be the only way, for planetary missions, to perform tomography when one faces challenging surface conditions, with high pressure and temperature (e.g. Venus), and thus when it is impossible to use conventional electronics routinely employed on Earth. To fully demonstrate the effectiveness of such a technique one should also be able to reconstruct the observed signals from numerical modeling. To model the seismic hammer experiment and the subsequent acoustic wave propagation, we rely on a subsurface seismic model constructed from the seismometers measurements during the 2017 Nevada experiment and an atmospheric model built from meteorological data. The source is considered as a Gaussian point source located at the surface. Comparison between the numerical modeling and the experimental data could help future mission designs and provide great insights into the planet's interior structure.

  9. A Simple Radiological Technique for Demonstration of Incorrect Positioning of a Foley Catheter with Balloon Inflated in the Urethra of a Male Spinal Cord Injury Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a male patient with cervical spinal cord injury, the urinary bladder may go into spasm when a urethral catheter is removed and a new Foley catheter is inserted. Before the balloon is inflated, the spastic bladder may push the Foley catheter out or the catheter may slip out of a small-capacity bladder. An inexperienced health professional may inflate the balloon of a Foley catheter in the urethra without realizing that the balloon segment of the catheter is lying in the urethra instead of the urinary bladder. When a Foley balloon is inflated in the urethra, a tetraplegic patient is likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia. This is a medical emergency and requires urgent treatment. Before the incorrectly placed Foley catheter is removed, it is important to document whether the balloon has been inflated in the urinary bladder or not. The clinician should first use the always available tools of observation and palpation at the bedside without delays of transportation. A misplaced balloon will often be evident by a long catheter sign, indicating excessive catheter remaining outside the patient. Radiological diagnosis is not frequently required and, when needed, should employ the technique most readily available, which might be a body and pelvic CT without intravenous contrast. An alternative radiological technique to demonstrate the position of the balloon of the Foley catheter is described. Three milliliters of nonionic X-ray contrast medium, Ioversol (OPTIRAY 300, is injected through the side channel of the Foley catheter, which is used for inflating the balloon. Then, with a catheter-tip syringe, 30 ml of sterile Ioversol is injected through the main lumen of the Foley catheter. Immediately thereafter, an X-ray of the pelvis (including perineum is taken. By this technique, both the urinary bladder and balloon of the Foley catheter are visualized by the X-ray contrast medium. When a Foley catheter has been inserted correctly, the balloon of the

  10. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    spinal cord impactor and sustained balloon compression. 2. Keywords Spinal cord injury, spine trauma , burst fracture, large animal model 3...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b. GRANT

  11. Modeling the ascent of sounding balloons: derivation of the vertical air motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gallice

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A new model to describe the ascent of sounding balloons in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (up to ∼30–35 km altitude is presented. Contrary to previous models, detailed account is taken of both the variation of the drag coefficient with altitude and the heat imbalance between the balloon and the atmosphere. To compensate for the lack of data on the drag coefficient of sounding balloons, a reference curve for the relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number is derived from a dataset of flights launched during the Lindenberg Upper Air Methods Intercomparisons (LUAMI campaign. The transfer of heat from the surrounding air into the balloon is accounted for by solving the radial heat diffusion equation inside the balloon. In its present state, the model does not account for solar radiation, i.e. it is only able to describe the ascent of balloons during the night. It could however be adapted to also represent daytime soundings, with solar radiation modeled as a diffusive process. The potential applications of the model include the forecast of the trajectory of sounding balloons, which can be used to increase the accuracy of the match technique, and the derivation of the air vertical velocity. The latter is obtained by subtracting the ascent rate of the balloon in still air calculated by the model from the actual ascent rate. This technique is shown to provide an approximation for the vertical air motion with an uncertainty error of 0.5 m s−1 in the troposphere and 0.2 m s−1 in the stratosphere. An example of extraction of the air vertical velocity is provided in this paper. We show that the air vertical velocities derived from the balloon soundings in this paper are in general agreement with small-scale atmospheric velocity fluctuations related to gravity waves, mechanical turbulence, or other small-scale air motions measured during the SUCCESS campaign (Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects

  12. Generalized math model for simulation of high-altitude balloon systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, N. J.; Elkouh, A. F.; Hinton, D. E.; Yang, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Balloon systems have proved to be a cost-effective means for conducting research experiments (e.g., infrared astronomy) in the earth's atmosphere. The purpose of this paper is to present a generalized mathematical model that can be used to simulate the motion of these systems once they have attained float altitude. The resulting form of the model is such that the pendulation and spin motions of the system are uncoupled and can be analyzed independently. The model is evaluated by comparing the simulation results with data obtained from an actual balloon system flown by NASA.

  13. The protective effect of bergamot oil extract on lecitine-like oxyLDL receptor-1 expression in balloon injury-related neointima formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollace, Vincenzo; Ragusa, Salvatore; Sacco, Iolanda; Muscoli, Carolina; Sculco, Francesca; Visalli, Valeria; Palma, Ernesto; Muscoli, Saverio; Mondello, Luigi; Dugo, Paola; Rotiroti, Domenicantonio; Romeo, Francesco

    2008-06-01

    Lectin-like oxyLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) has recently been suggested to be involved in smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and neointima formation in injured blood vessels. This study evaluates the effect of the nonvolatile fraction (NVF), the antioxidant component of bergamot essential oil (BEO), on LOX-1 expression and free radical generation in a model of rat angioplasty. Common carotid arteries injured by balloon angioplasty were removed after 14 days for histopathological, biochemical, and immunohistochemical studies. Balloon injury led to a significant restenosis with SMC proliferation and neointima formation, accompanied by increased expression of LOX-1 receptor, malondialdehyde and superoxide formation, and nitrotyrosine staining. Pretreatment of rats with BEO-NVF reduced the neointima proliferation together with free radical formation and LOX-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that natural antioxidants may be relevant in the treatment of vascular disorders in which proliferation of SMCs and oxyLDL-related endothelial cell dysfunction are involved.

  14. Effect of a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitor, des-fluoro-sitagliptin, on neointimal formation after balloon injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, it has been suggested that enhancement of incretin effect improves cardiac function. We investigated the effect of a DPP-IV inhibitor, des-fluoro-sitagliptin, in reducing occurrence of restenosis in carotid artery in response to balloon injury and the related mechanisms. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats were grouped into four: control (normal saline and sitagliptin 100, 250 and 500 mg/kg per day (n = 10 per group. Sitagliptin or normal saline were given orally from 1 week before to 2 weeks after carotid injury. After 3 weeks of treatment, sitagliptin treatment caused a significant and dose-dependent reduction in intima-media ratio (IMR in obese diabetic rats. This effect was accompanied by improved glucose homeostasis, decreased circulating levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP and increased adiponectin level. Moreover, decreased IMR was correlated significantly with reduced hsCRP, tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity. In vitro evidence with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs demonstrated that proliferation and migration were decreased significantly after sitagliptin treatment. In addition, sitagliptin increased caspase-3 activity and decreased monocyte adhesion and NFκB activation in VSMCs. CONCLUSIONS: Sitagliptin has protective properties against restenosis after carotid injury and therapeutic implications for treating macrovascular complications of diabetes.

  15. Observation and nursing of complications due to high re-perfusion injury occurring after balloon angioplasty for diabetic vascular diseases of lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lingling; Zhu Yueqi; Mou Ling

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the symptomatic nursing in treating the complications caused by high re-perfusion which develops after balloon angioplasty for the treatment of diabetic vascular diseases of lower extremity. Methods: Eighteen patients with lower limb ischemia caused by diabetes mellitus developed high re-perfusion injury complications after receiving balloon angioplasty. The patients were randomly and equally divided into study group and control group. The special nursing measures designed by the author's department, including raising the diseased lower limb, enforcing the flexion and extension movement of the leg, cold compress, wound exposure, etc. were carried out for patients of study group, while no special nursing measures were adopted for patients of control group. The clinical results, such as limb pain, swelling and subcutaneous petechia after re-perfusion injury, were evaluated and compared between two groups. Results: After the treatment, the limb pain, swelling and subcutaneous petechia due to high re-perfusion injury in study group were relieved more markedly than that in control group, the difference in evaluation score between two groups was statistically significant (P<0.01). Conclusion: The special symptomatic nursing measures are very effective in relieving the high re-perfusion injury after balloon angioplasty for the treatment of diabetic lower limb ischemia. (authors)

  16. A Novel Fluoroscopy-free, Resuscitative Endovascular Aortic Balloon Occlusion System in a Model of Hemorrhagic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A novel fluoroscopy -free, resuscitative endovascular aortic balloon occlusion system in a model of hemorrhagic shock Daniel J. Scott, MD, Jonathan L...hemorrhagic shock. However, emergent use of REBOA is limited by existing technology, which requires large sheath arterial access and fluoroscopy - guided...balloon positioning. The objectives of this study were to describe a new, fluoroscopy -free REBOA system and to compare its efficacy to existing technology

  17. Overuse Injury Assessment Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stuhmiller, James H; Shen, Weixin; Sih, Bryant

    2005-01-01

    ... bone stresses and strains from kinematic and ground reaction force measures. We broaden the work to address not only the overuse injuries, but the performance enhancement and metabolic demands associated with training...

  18. Clefting in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, F.; Schur, W.

    NASA's effort to develop a large payload, high altitude, long duration balloon, the Ultra Long Duration Balloon, focuses on a pumpkin shape super-pressure design. It has been observed that a pumpkin balloon may be unable to pressurize into the desired cyclically symmetric equilibrium configuration, settling into a distorted, undesired stable state instead. Hoop stress considerations in the pumpkin design leads to choosing the lowest possible bulge radius, while robust deployment is favored by a large bulge radius. Some qualitative understanding of design aspects on undesired equilibria in pumpkin balloons has been obtained via small-scale balloon testing. Poorly deploying balloons have clefts, but most gores away from the cleft deploy uniformly. In this paper, we present models for pumpkin balloons with clefts. Long term success of the pumpkin balloon for NASA requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon of multiple stable equilibria and means for quantitative assessment of measures that prevent their occurrence. This paper attempts to determine numerical thresholds of design parameters that distinguish between properly deploying designs and improperly deploying designs by analytically investigating designs in the vicinity of criticality. Design elements which may trigger the onset undesired equilibria and remedial measures that ensure deployment are discussed.

  19. Interleukin-1/toll-like receptor-induced nuclear factor kappa B signaling participates in intima hyperplasia after carotid artery balloon injury in goto-kakizaki rats: a potential target therapy pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotian Zhang

    Full Text Available The value of restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI is recognized worldwide, especially for diabetic patients. Interleukin-1/Toll-like receptor (IL-1/TLR signaling is involved in innate and adaptive immune responses, but whether and how the IL-1/TLR-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB pathway plays key roles in intimal formation is unclear. The underlying mechanism of intima hyperplasia was investigated with a model of carotid balloon injury in Goto-Kakizaki (GK and Wistar rats and with lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. Elastic-van Gieson staining showed the medial area peakedon Day 3 post-injury and decreased by Day 7 post-injury in both GK and Wistar rats. The N/M at Day 7 in GK rats was significantly higher than in Wistar rats (p<0.001. The percent of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU staining-positive cells on Day 3 post-injury was greater than seen on Day 7 post-injury in GK and Wistar rats. The percent of EdU-positive cells on Days 3 and 7 post-injury in Wistar rats was less than that found in GK rats (p<0.01; p<0.05. NFκBp65 immunostaining had increased by Day 7 post-injury. Agilent Whole Genome Oligo Microarray verified that the IL-1/TLR-induced NFκB pathway was activated by carotid balloon injury. TLR4, IL-1 receptor associated kinase, inhibitors α of NFκB, human antigen R, c-Myc (Proto-Oncogene Proteins, EGF-like module-containing mucin-like hormone receptor-like 1 and Interleukin-6 were up-regulated or down-regulated according to immunochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting and Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Overall, we conclude that the IL-1/TLR-induced NFκB pathway participates in the intimal hyperplasia after carotid injury in GK and Wistar rats and that GK rats respond more intensely to the inflammation than Wistar rats.

  20. The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer: Balloon-Borne Measurements, Satellite Observations and Modeling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, T. D.; Vernier, J.-P.; Natarajan, M.; Deshler, Terry; Liu, H.; Wegner, T.; Baker, N.; Gadhavi, H.; Jayaraman, A.; Pandit, A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Satellite observations and numerical modeling studies have demonstrated that the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) can provide a conduit for gas-phase pollutants in south Asia to reach the lower stratosphere. Now, observations from the CALIPSO satellite have revealed the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL), a summertime accumulation of aerosols associated with ASM anticyclone, in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The ATAL has potential implications for regional cloud properties, climate, and chemical processes in the UTLS. Here, we show in situ measurements from balloon-borne instrumentation, aircraft and satellite observations, combined with trajectory and chemical transport model (CTM) simulations to explore the origin, composition, physical and optical properties of aerosols in the ATAL. In particular, we show balloon-based observations from our BATAL-2015 field campaign to India and Saudi Arabia in summer 2015, including in situ backscatter measurements from COBALD instruments, and some of the first observations of size and volatility of aerosols in the ATAL layer using optical particle counters (OPCs). Back trajectory calculations initialized from CALIPSO observations point to deep convection over North India as a principal source of ATAL aerosols. Available aircraft observations suggest significant sulfur and carbonaceous contributions to the ATAL, which is supported by simulations using the GEOS-Chem CTM. Source elimination studies conducted with the GEOS-Chem indicate that 80-90% of ATAL aerosols originate from south Asian sources, in contrast with some earlier studies.

  1. Overuse Injury Assessment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Training and Doctrine Command) personnel. Research User: Interested in performance and injury outcomes from the individual level to the group...576. Nonaka, K., Fukuda , S., Aoki, K., Yoshida, T., & Ohya, K. (2006). "Regional distinctions in cortical bone mineral density measured by pQCT can

  2. Direct Observation of Long-Range Transport Using Continuously Sounding Balloons and Near-Real-Time Trajectory Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, P. B.; Zaveri, R. A.; Berkowitz, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    Controlled Meteorological (CMET) balloons have been used in several recent studies to measure long-range transport over periods as long as 30 hours and distances up to 1000 kilometers. By repeatedly performing shallow soundings as they drift, CMET balloons can quantify evolving atmospheric structure, mixing events, shear advection, and dispersion during transport. In addition, the quasi-Lagrangian wind profiles can be used to drive a multi-layer trajectory model in which the advected air parcels follow the underlying terrain, or are constrained by altitude, potential temperature, or tracer concentration. Data from a coordinated balloon-aircraft study of long range transport over Texas (SETTS 2005) show that the reconstructed trajectories accurately track residual-layer urban outflow (and at times even its fine-scale structure) over distances of many hundreds of kilometers. The reconstructed trajectories and evolving profile visualizations are increasingly being made available in near-real time during balloon flights, supporting data-driven flight planning and sophisticated process studies relevant to atmospheric chemistry and climate. Multilayer trajectories (black grids) derived from CMET balloon flight paths (grey lines) for a transport event across Texas in 2005.

  3. A Model-Based Study of On-Board Data Processing Architecture for Balloon-Borne Aurora Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chester

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses an application of ISAAC design methodology to a balloon-borne payload electronic system for aurora observation. The methodology is composed of two phases, high level design and low level implementation, the focus of this paper is on the high level design. This paper puts the system architecture in the context of a balloon based application but it can be generalized to any airborne/space-borne application. The system architecture includes a front-end detector, its corresponding data processing unit, and a controller. VisualSim has been used to perform modeling and simulations to explore the entire design space, finding optimal solutions that meet system requirements.

  4. Overuse Injury Assessment Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stuhmiller, James H; Shen, Weixin; Sih, Bryant

    2005-01-01

    .... Previously, we developed a preliminary model that predicted the stress fracture rate and used biomechanical modeling, nonlinear optimization for muscle force, and bone structural analysis to estimate...

  5. ELMs and constraints on the H-mode pedestal: A model based on peeling-ballooning modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, P.B.; Ferron, J.R.; Wilson, H.R.

    2003-01-01

    We propose a model for Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and pedestal constraint based upon theoretical analysis of instabilities which can limit the pedestal height and drive ELMs. The sharp pressure gradients, and resulting bootstrap current, in the pedestal region provide free energy to drive peeling and ballooning modes. The interaction of peeling-ballooning coupling, ballooning mode second stability, and finite-Larmor-radius effects results in coupled peeling-ballooning modes of intermediate wavelength generally being the limiting instability. A highly efficient new MHD code, ELITE, is used to calculate quantitative stability constraints on the pedestal, including con straits on the pedestal height. Because of the impact of collisionality on the bootstrap current, these pedestal constraints are dependant on the density and temperature separately, rather than simply on the pressure. A model of various ELM types is developed, and quantitatively compared to data. A number of observations agree with predictions, including ELM onset times, ELM depth and variation in pedestal height with collisionality and discharge shape. Stability analysis of series of model equilibria are used both o predict and interpret pedestal trends in existing experiments and to project pedestal constraints for future burning plasma tokamak designs. (author)

  6. Impact of balloon inflation pressure on cell viability with single and multi lumen catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, N; Schwalbach, D B; Plourde, B D; Kohler, R E; Dana, D; Abraham, J P

    2014-12-01

    Infusion catheters, when used in combination with balloons, are subjected to pressure created by inflation of the balloon. The compression can reduce the catheter flow area and cause elevated shear stresses in the fluid. A model and experiments were developed with a range of applied balloon pressures to investigate whether such situations may cause cell lysis during stem-cell infusion through single-lumen catheters. It was found that for balloon inflation pressures in excess of ~7 atm, it is possible for cell injury to occur, although the critical pressure depends on the fluid viscosity. The study was then applied to a multi-lumen catheter which was designed to resist compression. That device was able to handle very elevated balloon pressures and flow rates before cell lysis became a concern.

  7. Balloon-augmented carotid artery sacrifice with Onyx: a proof of concept study in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiotta, Alejandro M; Sivapatham, Thinesh; Teng, Qingshan; Moskowitz, Shaye I; Hui, Ferdinand K

    2011-12-01

    Carotid sacrifice remains a valuable tool in the treatment of select vascular lesions. Neurointerventionalists have relied on coil embolization as their primary means of carotid sacrifice, a procedure that can be lengthy and expensive with long fluoroscopy times. We investigated a novel technique for carotid sacrifice in a swine model using temporary balloon occlusion to achieve proximal flow arrest in the carotid artery while embolizing the vessel with a liquid embolic agent. A total of 10 common carotid artery sacrifices were performed in pigs under fluoroscopic guidance. Various balloons were employed to achieve near total proximal flow arrest to allow an Onyx cast to accumulate in the target vessel. The technique for sacrifice was modified during the experiment with the final procedures yielding successful sacrifice using Onyx through a dimethylsulfoxide-tolerant catheter (Echelon 14) with the assistance of two fibered coils and a 5 mm × 30 mm Hyperglide balloon resulting in a 2.5 cm long cast. Carotid artery sacrifice using commercially available non-adhesive liquid embolic agents is feasible with balloon assistance, allowing for reduced radiation and material costs. Coils may be beneficial in providing an anchor point for liquid embolic deposition, as well as reducing the volume of liquid embolysate required to achieve vessel occlusion.

  8. A simplified cervix model in response to induction balloon in pre-labour

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Induction of labour is poorly understood even though it is performed in 20% of births in the United States. One method of induction, the balloon dilator applied with traction to the interior os of the cervix, engages a softening process, permitting dilation and effacement to proceed until the beginning of active labour. The purpose of this work is to develop a simple model capable of reproducing the dilation and effacement effect in the presence of a balloon. Methods The cervix, anchored by the uterus and the endopelvic fascia was modelled in pre-labour. The spring-loaded, double sliding-joint, double pin-joint mechanism model was developed with a Modelica-compatible system, MapleSoft MapleSim 6.1, with a stiff Rosenbrock solver and 1E-4 absolute and relative tolerances. Total simulation time for pre-labour was seven hours and simulations ended at 4.50 cm dilation diameter and 2.25 cm effacement. Results Three spring configurations were tested: one pin joint, one sliding joint and combined pin-joint-sliding-joint. Feedback, based on dilation speed modulated the spring values, permitting controlled dilation. Dilation diameter speed was maintained at 0.692 cm·hr-1 over the majority of the simulation time. In the sliding-joint-only mode the maximum spring constant value was 23800 N·m-1. In pin-joint-only the maximum spring constant value was 0.41 N·m·rad-1. With a sliding-joint-pin-joint pair the maximum spring constants are 2000 N·m-1 and 0.41 N·m·rad-1, respectively. Conclusions The model, a simplified one-quarter version of the cervix, is capable of maintaining near-constant dilation rates, similar to published clinical observations for pre-labour. Lowest spring constant values are achieved when two springs are used, but nearly identical tracking of dilation speed can be achieved with only a pin joint spring. Initial and final values for effacement and dilation also match published clinical observations. These results provide a framework for

  9. Balloon-Borne Electric-Field Observations Relevant to Models for Sprites and Jets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beasley, William

    1999-01-01

    We designed and built a new balloon-borne electric-field-change instrument and launched five of them into thunderstorms to observe changes in the vertical component of electric field caused by lightning...

  10. Cleft formation in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Frank E.; Brakke, Kenneth A.; Schur, Willi W.

    NASA’s development of a large payload, high altitude, long duration balloon, the Ultra Long Duration Balloon, centers on a pumpkin shape super-pressure design. Under certain circumstances, it has been observed that a pumpkin balloon may be unable to pressurize into the desired cyclically symmetric equilibrium configuration, settling into a distorted, undesired state instead. Success of the pumpkin balloon for NASA requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon of multiple stable equilibria and developing of means for the quantitative assessment of design measures that prevent the occurrence of undesired equilibrium. In this paper, we will use the concept of stability to classify cyclically symmetric equilibrium states at full inflation and pressurization. Our mathematical model for a strained equilibrium balloon, when applied to a shape that mimics the Phase IV-A balloon of Flight 517, predicts instability at float. Launched in Spring 2003, this pumpkin balloon failed to deploy properly. Observations on pumpkin shape type super-pressure balloons that date back to the 1980s suggest that within a narrowly defined design class of pumpkin shape super-pressure balloons where individual designs are fully described by the number of gores ng and by a single measure of the bulging gore shape, the designs tend to become more vulnerable with the growing number of gores and with the diminishing size of the bulge radius rB Weight efficiency considerations favor a small bulge radius, while robust deployment into the desired cyclically symmetrical configuration becomes more likely with an increased bulge radius. In an effort to quantify this dependency, we will explore the stability of a family of balloon shapes parametrized by (ng, rB) which includes a design that is very similar, but not identical, to the balloon of Flight 517. In addition, we carry out a number of simulations that demonstrate other aspects related to multiple equilibria of pumpkin balloons.

  11. Resveratrol Attenuates Oxidative Stress Induced by Balloon Injury in the Rat Carotid Artery Through Actions on the ERK1/2 and NF-Kappa B Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Oxidative stress plays a critical role in pathogenesis of the neointimal arterial hyperplasia. The aim of the study was to evaluate effects of resveratrol (RSV on the vascular hyperplasia stimulated by oxidative damage. Methods: Balloon vascular injury was induced in rats that were intraperitonealy exposed to resveratrol (1 mg/kg on 7 or 14 days after surgical procedure. Animals were euthanized on 7 or 14 days after operation. The blood level of 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, arterial morphology as well as expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and interleukin-6 in carotid wall were measured. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs were isolated from the thoracic aorta. Cellular proliferation and migration assays, reactive oxygen species (ROS, superoxide dismutase (SOD and NADPH oxidative activity, protein level of β-actin, histone H3, NF-ĸB p65, IĸB, ERK1/2, phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-p38 as well as NF-ĸB transcription activity were evaluated in-vitro after angiotensin II stimulation and resveratrol (50-200 µmol/L treatment. Results: Significant decreases in neointimal/medial area, serum prostaglandin level and genes expression were found in rats treated with resveratrol, when compared to the control group. Significant changes were also revealed for proliferation and migration rates, ROS level, as well as SOD, NADPH oxidase, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and NF-ĸB transcriptional activity in cell cultures exposed to highest dose of resveratrol. Insignificant changes were observed for NF-kappaB p65 translocation and IĸB degradation, p38 phosphorylation in MAPK pathway. Conclusion: Resveratrol significantly suppressed the neointimal hyperplasia after balloon injury through inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammation by blocking the ERK1/2/NF-kappa B pathway.

  12. A new high temperature deformation model for Zircaloy clad ballooning under hypothetical LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzoska, B.; Cheliotis, G.; Kunick, A.; Senski, G.

    1977-01-01

    Assuming Zircaloy clad ballooning occurs predominantly by thermal activated secondary creep, generally a power law is applied to describe the creep rate analytically. According to Norton the creep rate is taken as a power function of the cladding hoop stress multiplied by a numerical constant which is determined by the cladding structural properties and a Boltzmann factor including the creep activation energy, the gas constant and the cladding temperature, respectively. As is well known, the stress exponent is not a constant value in the total range of LOCA stresses, but increases steadily with stress. This difficulty is avoided by introducing into the Norton law a plastic flow-factor including a limiting stress, which was derived by G. Senski using plastic crack models from Dugdale and Irwin. For LOCA applications the limiting stress is identified with the burst stress, which is experimentally determined. A total number of about 290 directly heated KWU burst tests including two types of experiments: (1) controlled temperature transient tests, (ii) creep rupture tests, are used to fit the burst stress of KWU Zircaloy tubes simulating the whole range of LOCA temperatures, heating rates and creep times. (Auth.)

  13. Protective effects of indomethacin and dexamethasone in a goat model with intrauterine balloon aortic valvuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kaiyu; Wu, Gang; Li, Yifei; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Rong; Zhu, Qi; Huang, Xupei; Mu, Dezhi; Hua, Yimin

    2012-08-13

    Intrauterine balloon aortic valvuloplasty (IUBAV) has been used for critical aortic stenosis. However, it is necessary to determine the fetal impairments such as preterm birth after this approach and to find a way to prevent or reduce them. In the present study, we evaluated the therapeutic value of indomethacin (IDM) and dexamethasone (DXS) on reducing the preterm birth rate in experimental goats after IUBAV. Our results indicated that the administration of IDM/DXS significantly reduced the rate of premature birth. IDM/DXS treatment led to preservation of myocardial ultrastructure with less damage, and amelioration of the fetal and placental circulation. Furthermore, we found that norepinephrine (NE) level was positively associated with the degree of myocardial damage. IDM/DXS administration led to a significant decrease of operation-induced increase of NE levels, which may be associated with the protective effects of IDM/DXS. Lastly, we found that the administration of IDM/DXS did not induce the risk of ductus arteriosus closure or slow down fetal growth. Our results indicate that IDM/DXS promotes a better gestational outcome at least partially by reducing stress response during and after the operation of IUBAV in the goat model. IDM/DXS may be a useful application in human patients during IUBAV intervention.

  14. Protective effects of indomethacin and dexamethasone in a goat model with intrauterine balloon aortic valvuloplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kaiyu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrauterine balloon aortic valvuloplasty (IUBAV has been used for critical aortic stenosis. However, it is necessary to determine the fetal impairments such as preterm birth after this approach and to find a way to prevent or reduce them. Methods In the present study, we evaluated the therapeutic value of indomethacin (IDM and dexamethasone (DXS on reducing the preterm birth rate in experimental goats after IUBAV. Results Our results indicated that the administration of IDM/DXS significantly reduced the rate of premature birth. IDM/DXS treatment led to preservation of myocardial ultrastructure with less damage, and amelioration of the fetal and placental circulation. Furthermore, we found that norepinephrine (NE level was positively associated with the degree of myocardial damage. IDM/DXS administration led to a significant decrease of operation-induced increase of NE levels, which may be associated with the protective effects of IDM/DXS. Lastly, we found that the administration of IDM/DXS did not induce the risk of ductus arteriosus closure or slow down fetal growth. Conclusions Our results indicate that IDM/DXS promotes a better gestational outcome at least partially by reducing stress response during and after the operation of IUBAV in the goat model. IDM/DXS may be a useful application in human patients during IUBAV intervention.

  15. Feasibility of Endovascular Radiation Therapy Using Holmium-166 Filled Balloon Catheter in a Swine Hemodialysis Fistula Model: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myoung Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Byung Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Internal Medicine, EwhaWoman' s University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Jung [Dept. of Internal Medicine, EwhaWoman' s University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    To describe how to make a swine hemodialysis fistula model and report our initial experience to test the feasibility of endovascular radiation therapy with Holmium-166 filled balloon catheters. The surgical formation of arterio-venous fistula (AVF) was performed by end-to-side anastomosis of the bilateral jugular vein and carotid artery of 6 pigs. After 4 weeks, angiograms were taken and endovascular radiation was delivered to the venous side of AVF with Holmium-166 filled balloon catheters. Pigs were sacrificed 4 weeks after the radiation and AVFs were harvested for histological examination. All animals survived without any morbidity during the experimental periods. The formation of fistula on the sides of necks was successful in 11 of the 12 pigs (92%). One AVF failed from the small jugular vein. On angiograms, 4 of the 11 AVFs showed total occlusion or significant stenosis and therefore, endovascular radiation could not be performed. Of 7 eligible AVFs, five underwent successful endovascular radiation and two AVFs did not undergo radiation for the control. Upon histologic analysis, one non-radiated AVF showed total occlusion and others showed intimal thickening from the neointimal hyperplasia. Formation of the swine carotid artery-jugular vein hemodialysis fistula model was successful. Endovascular radiation using a Holmium-166 filled balloon catheter was safe and feasible.

  16. Multimodal investigation of fMRI and fNIRS derived breath hold BOLD signals with an expanded balloon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emir, U E; Ozturk, C; Akin, A

    2008-01-01

    Multimodal investigation of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals, using both functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), may give further insight to the underlying physiological principles and the detailed transient dynamics of the vascular response. Utilizing a breath hold task (BHT), we measured deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) and oxy-hemoglobin (HbO) changes via fNIRS and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) changes by fMRI. Measurements were taken in four volunteers asynchronously and carefully aligned for comparative analysis. In order to describe the main stimulus in BHT, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO 2 ) parameter was integrated into the balloon model as the driving function of cerebral blood flow (CBF) which led to the development of an expanded balloon model (EBM). During BHT, the increase in HbR was observed later than the BOLD peak and coincided temporally with its post-stimulus undershoot. Further investigation of these transients with a PaCO 2 integrated balloon model suggests that post-stimulus undershoot measured by fMRI is dominated by slow return of cerebral blood volume (CBV). This was confirmed by fNIRS measurements. In addition, the BOLD signal decreased with the increase of the initial level of PaCO 2 derived from EBM, indicating an effect of basal CBF level on the BOLD signal. In conclusion, a multimodal approach with an appropriate biophysical model gave a comprehensive description of the hemodynamic response during BHT

  17. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living Consumer ... Information Network The University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information Network ...

  18. Fixed-Distance Model for Balloon Placement During Fluoroscopy-Free Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta in a Civilian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezy, Pierre; Flaris, Alexandros N; Prat, Nicolas J; Cotton, François; Lundberg, Peter W; Caillot, Jean-Louis; David, Jean-Stéphane; Voiglio, Eric J

    2017-04-01

    Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) is an innovative procedure in the treatment of noncompressible truncal hemorrhage. However, readily available fluoroscopy remains a limiting factor in its widespread implementation. Several methods have been proposed to perform REBOA without fluoroscopic guidance, and these methods were adapted predominantly from the military theater. To develop a method for performing REBOA in a civilian population using a standardized distance from a set point of entry. A retrospective study of whole-body computed tomographic (CT) scans from a cohort of 280 consecutive civilian trauma patients from University Hospitals of Lyon, France, was used to calculate the endovascular distances from both femoral arteries at the level of the upper border of the symphysis pubis to aortic zone I (descending thoracic aorta) and zone III (infrarenal aorta). These whole-body CT scans were performed between 2013 and 2015. Data were analyzed from July 16 to December 7, 2015. Two segments (1 per zone) common to all CT scans were isolated, and their location, length, prevalence in the cohort, and predicted prevalence in the general population were calculated by inverting 99% certainty tolerance limits. Among the 280 trauma patients (140 men and 140 women) in this study, the mean (SD) height was 170.7 (8.7) cm, and the mean (SD) age was 38.8 (16.5) years. The common segment in zone I (414-474 mm) existed in all CT scans. The common segment in zone III (236-256 mm) existed in 99.6% and 97.9% of CT scans from the right and left femoral arteries, respectively. These segments are expected to exist in 98.7% (zone I) and 94.9% (zone III) of the general population. Target distances for blind placement of REBOA exist with more than 94% prevalence in a civilian population. These findings support the expanded use of REBOA in emergency department and prehospital settings. Validation for safety and efficacy on cadaveric and clinical models is

  19. Computational Model of Drug-Coated Balloon Delivery in a Patient-Specific Arterial Vessel with Heterogeneous Tissue Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Prashanta K; Sarifuddin; Kolachalama, Vijaya B

    2016-12-01

    Balloon angioplasty followed by local delivery of antiproliferative drugs to target tissue is increasingly being considered for the treatment of obstructive arterial disease, and yet there is much to appreciate regarding pharmacokinetics in arteries of non-uniform disease. We developed a computational model capable of simulating drug-coated balloon delivery to arteries of heterogeneous tissue composition comprising healthy tissue, as well as regions of fibrous, fibro-fatty, calcified and necrotic core lesions. Image processing using an unsupervised clustering technique was used to reconstruct an arterial geometry from a single, patient-specific color image obtained from intravascular ultrasound-derived virtual histology. Transport of free drug was modeled using a time-dependent reaction-diffusion model and the bound, immobilized drug using the time-dependent reaction equation. The governing equations representing the transport of free as well as bound drug along with a set of initial settings and boundary conditions were solved numerically using an explicit finite difference scheme that satisfied the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability criterion. Our results support previous findings related to the transport and binding of drug in arteries where tissue retention is strongly dependent on local pharmacologic properties. Additionally, modeling results indicate that non-uniform disease composition leads to heterogeneous arterial drug distribution patterns, although further validation using animal studies is required to fully appreciate pharmacokinetics in disease-laden arteries.

  20. Characterizing the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL) Using Satellite Observations, Balloon Measurements and a Chemical Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, T. D.; Vernier, J.-P.; Liu, H.; Deshler, T.; Natarajan, M.; Bedka, K.; Wegner, T.; Baker, N.; Gadhavi, H.; Ratnam, M. V.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Satellite observations and numerical modeling studies have demonstrated that the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) provide a conduit for gas-phase pollutants in south Asia to reach the lower stratosphere. Now, observations from the CALIPSO satellite have revealed the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL), a summertime accumulation of aerosols in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), associated with the ASM anticyclone. The ATAL has potential implications for regional cloud properties, climate, and chemical processes in the UTLS. Here, we show in situ measurements from balloon-borne instruments, aircraft, and satellite observations, together with trajectory and chemical transport model (CTM) simulations to explore the origin, composition, physical, and optical properties of aerosols in the ATAL. In particular, we show balloon-data from our BATAL-2015 field campaign to India and Saudi Arabia in summer 2015, which includes in situ backscatter measurements from COBALD instruments, and the first observations of size and volatility of aerosols in the ATAL layer using optical particle counters (OPCs). Back trajectory calculations initialized from CALIPSO observations point to deep convection over North India as a principal source of ATAL aerosols. Available aircraft observations suggest significant sulfur and carbonaceous components to the ATAL, which is supported by simulations using the GEOS-Chem CTM. Source elimination studies conducted with the GEOS-Chem indicate that ATAL aerosols originate primary from south Asian sources, in contrast with some earlier studies.

  1. Modeling correlation indices between bladder and Foley′s catheter balloon dose with CT-based planning using limited CT slices in intracavitary brachytherapy for carcinoma of cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oinam Arun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To derive and validate an index to correlate the bladder dose with the catheter balloon dose using limited computed tomography (CT slices. Materials and Methods: Applicator geometry reconstructed from orthogonal radiographs were back-projected on CT images of the same patients for anatomy-based dosimetric evaluation. The correlation indices derived using power function of the catheter balloon dose and the bladder volume dose were validated in 31 patients with cervical cancer. Results: There was significant correlation between International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU-38 balloon reference dose (Dr and the dose received by 25% bladder volume (D 25 (P < 0.0001. Significant correlation was also found between the reference dose of mid-balloon point (D rm and the dose to D 25 (P < 0.0001. Average percentage difference [100 x (observed index - expected index / expected index] of observed value of I′ 25 (index for the dose to D25 bladder with respect to mid-balloon reference point from that of expected value was 0.52%, when the index was modeled with reference dose alone. Similarly the average percentage difference for I′10cc (index for the dose to 10 cc volume of bladder with respect to mid balloon point was 0.84%. When this index was modeled with absolute bladder volume and reference dose, standard deviation of the percentage difference between observed and expected index for D rm reduced by approximately 2% when compared to D r . Conclusion: For clinical applications, correlation index modeled with reference dose and volume predicts dose to absolute volume of bladder. Correlation index modeled with reference dose gives a good estimate of dose to relative bladder volume. From our study, we found D rm to be a better indicator of bladder dose than D r .

  2. Brachytherapy model with sodium pertechnetate-99mTc balloon (Na99mTcO4-) for breast cancer: evaluation of dosimetry and cell response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Carla Flavia de

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer that affects more women worldwide. Among various treatment options, radiotherapy which is often used as a treatment for locoregional recurrences control or to decrease tumor size. In patients with breast cancer at an early stage, a booster dose (boost) in the primary tumor area can be applied after conventional radiation therapy. There are several drawbacks to applying this technique. In this work we aimed to perform a dosimetric analysis in a breast model, where it put a balloon filled with sodium pertechnetate- 99m Tc (Na 99m TcO 4 - ) which in future could be used in preference to other possible therapies. The methodology involved the development of dosimetry in water based on radiochromic films and in a computational voxel thorax model. Calibration protocol achieved a mathematical relation between absorbed dose versus optical density (OD) measured at a set of radiochromic sample films placed at the surface of the balloon plus 1 cm up to 10 cm far, in which theoretical dose values were provided by MCNP modeling, reproducing the water equivalent physical simulator. A voxel model of a female thorax, developed at the SISCODES/MCNP codes, received a filled balloon inside. Spatial dose distribution was generated, illustrating the dose received in the chest wall, glandular tissue, breast skin and lung. The dosimetric findings contribute to present the Na 99m TcO 4 - balloon modality which provides a suitable spatial dose distribution in the tumor bed preserving adjacent health tissues. We also studied the radiobiological response radio resistant mammary adenocarcinoma cells (MDAMB231) by exposure of these cells to Na 99m TcO 4 - balloon. The findings include the presence of apoptotic cells in the balloon around point out a favorable response. In conclusion, the balloon may represent a viable option in the supplementary therapy of breast cancer in patients who have appropriate indication. Irradiation with Na 99m TcO 4

  3. Simulation of balloon angioplasty in residually stressed blood vessels-Application of a gradient-enhanced fibre damage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polindara, César; Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Menzel, Andreas

    2016-08-16

    In this contribution we study the balloon angioplasty in a residually stressed artery by means of a non-local gradient-enhanced fibre damage model. The balloon angioplasty is a common surgical intervention used to extend or reopen narrowed blood vessels in order to restore the continuous blood flow in, for instance, atherosclerotic arteries. Inelastic, i.e. predominantly damage-related and elastoplastic processes are induced in the artery during its inflation resulting in an irreversible deformation. As a beneficial consequence, provided that the inelastic deformations do not exceed a specific limit, higher deformations can be obtained within the same pressure level and a continuous blood flow can be guaranteed. In order to study the mechanical response of the artery in this scenario, we make use of the non-local gradient-enhanced model proposed in Waffenschmidt et al. (2014). In this contribution, we extend this model to make use of an incompressible format in connection with a Q1Q1P0 finite element implementation. The residual stresses in the artery are also taken into account following the framework presented in Waffenschmidt (2015). From the results it becomes apparent that, when the artery is subjected to radial stresses beyond the physiological range, damage evolution is triggered in the collagen fibres. The impact of the residual stresses on the structural response and on the circumferential stress distribution along the thickness of the arterial wall is also studied. It is observed that the residual stresses have a beneficial effect on the mechanical response of the arterial wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A new zebrafish bone crush injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Sousa

    2012-07-01

    While mammals have a limited capacity to repair bone fractures, zebrafish can completely regenerate amputated bony fin rays. Fin regeneration in teleosts has been studied after partial amputation of the caudal fin, which is not ideal to model human bone fractures because it involves substantial tissue removal, rather than local tissue injury. In this work, we have established a bone crush injury model in zebrafish adult caudal fin, which consists of the precise crush of bony rays with no tissue amputation. Comparing these two injury models, we show that the initial stages of injury response are the same regarding the activation of wound healing molecular markers. However, in the crush assay the expression of the blastema marker msxb appears later than during regeneration after amputation. Following the same trend, bone cells deposition and expression of genes involved in skeletogenesis are also delayed. We further show that bone and blood vessel patterning is also affected. Moreover, analysis of osteopontin and Tenascin-C reveals that they are expressed at later stages in crushed tissue, suggesting that in this case bone repair is prolonged for longer than in the case of regeneration after amputation. Due to the nature of the trauma inflicted, the crush injury model seems more similar to fracture bone repair in mammals than bony ray amputation. Therefore, the new model that we present here may help to identify the key processes that regulate bone fracture and contribute to improve bone repair in humans.

  5. Balloon dilation of the eustachian tube in a cadaver model: technical considerations, learning curve, and potential barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoul, Edward D; Singh, Ameet; Anand, Vijay K; Tabaee, Abtin

    2012-04-01

    The surgical management options for eustachian tube dysfunction have historically been limited. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the technical considerations, learning curve, and potential barriers for balloon dilation of the eustachian tube (BDET) as an alternative treatment modality. Prospective preclinical trial of BDET in a cadaver model. A novel balloon catheter device was used for eustachian tube dilation. Twenty-four BDET procedures were performed by three independent rhinologists with no prior experience with the procedure (eight procedures per surgeon). The duration and number of attempts of the individual steps and overall procedure were recorded. Endoscopic examination of the eustachian tube was performed after each procedure, and the surgeon was asked to rate the subjective difficulty on a five-point scale. Successful completion of the procedure occurred in each case. The overall mean duration of the procedure was 284 seconds, and a mean number of 1.15 attempts were necessary to perform the individual steps. The mean subjective procedure difficulty was noted as somewhat easy. Statistically shorter duration and subjectively easier procedure were noted in the second compared to the first half of the series, indicating a favorable learning curve. Linear fissuring within the eustachian tube lumen without submucosal disruption (nine procedures, 37%) and with submucosal disruption (five procedures, 21%) were noted. The significance of these physical findings is unclear. Preclinical testing of BDET is associated with favorable duration, learning curve, and overall ease of completion. Clinical trials are necessary to evaluate safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Simulation of the Beating Heart Based on Physically Modeling aDeformable Balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohmer, Damien; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-07-18

    The motion of the beating heart is complex and createsartifacts in SPECT and x-ray CT images. Phantoms such as the JaszczakDynamic Cardiac Phantom are used to simulate cardiac motion forevaluationof acquisition and data processing protocols used for cardiacimaging. Two concentric elastic membranes filled with water are connectedto tubing and pump apparatus for creating fluid flow in and out of theinner volume to simulate motion of the heart. In the present report, themovement of two concentric balloons is solved numerically in order tocreate a computer simulation of the motion of the moving membranes in theJaszczak Dynamic Cardiac Phantom. A system of differential equations,based on the physical properties, determine the motion. Two methods aretested for solving the system of differential equations. The results ofboth methods are similar providing a final shape that does not convergeto a trivial circular profile. Finally,a tomographic imaging simulationis performed by acquiring static projections of the moving shape andreconstructing the result to observe motion artifacts. Two cases aretaken into account: in one case each projection angle is sampled for ashort time interval and the other case is sampled for a longer timeinterval. The longer sampling acquisition shows a clear improvement indecreasing the tomographic streaking artifacts.

  7. Lifetime injury prevention: the sport profile model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webborn, Nick

    2012-03-01

    Participation in sporting activities carries an injury risk. Conversely, the increased awareness that physical inactivity is a major risk factor for disease has led government agencies and the medical community to encourage increased levels of physical activity. Many people will achieve this through participation in sport. Injury inevitably leads to a reduction in participation on a temporary or permanent basis, but the injury experience may also influence the lifelong physical activity behaviour. Few studies adequately examine the possible long-term consequences of sport participation after the competitive period has been completed, but by understanding the patterns of injuries in different sports one test can develop strategies to prevent and better manage the conditions that occur and promote lifelong physical activity. There is a need to develop models of understanding of injury risk at different life phases and levels of participation in a specific sport. The risk assessment of sport participation has to be relevant to a particular sport, the level of participation, skill, age and potential future health consequences. This article describes a sport-specific model which will improve guidance for coaches and healthcare professionals. It poses questions for sports physicians, healthcare providers, educators and for governing bodies of sports to address in a systematic fashion. Additionally the governing body, as an employer, will need to meet the requirements for risk assessment for professional sport and its ethical responsibility to the athlete.

  8. Incremental balloon deflation following complete resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta results in steep inflection of flow and rapid reperfusion in a large animal model of hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Anders J; Russo, Rachel M; Ferencz, Sarah-Ashley E; Cannon, Jeremy W; Rasmussen, Todd E; Neff, Lucas P; Johnson, M Austin; Williams, Timothy K

    2017-07-01

    To avoid potential cardiovascular collapse after resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA), current guidelines recommend methodically deflating the balloon for 5 minutes to gradually reperfuse distal tissue beds. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that this approach may still result in unpredictable aortic flow rates and hemodynamic instability. We sought to characterize aortic flow dynamics following REBOA as the balloon is deflated in accordance with current practice guidelines. Eight Yorkshire-cross swine were splenectomized, instrumented, and subjected to rapid 25% total blood volume hemorrhage. After 30 minutes of shock, animals received 60 minutes of Zone 1 REBOA with a low-profile REBOA catheter. During subsequent resuscitation with shed blood, the aortic occlusion balloon was gradually deflated in stepwise fashion at the rate of 0.5 mL every 30 seconds until completely deflated. Aortic flow rate and proximal mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured continuously over the period of balloon deflation. Graded balloon deflation resulted in variable initial return of aortic flow (median, 78 seconds; interquartile range [IQR], 68-105 seconds). A rapid increase in aortic flow during a single-balloon deflation step was observed in all animals (median, 819 mL/min; IQR, 664-1241 mL/min) and corresponded with an immediate decrease in proximal MAP (median, 30 mm Hg; IQR, 14.5-37 mm Hg). Total balloon volume and time to return of flow demonstrated no correlation (r = 0.016). This study is the first to characterize aortic flow during balloon deflation following REBOA. A steep inflection point occurs during balloon deflation that results in an abrupt increase in aortic flow and a concomitant decrease in MAP. Furthermore, the onset of distal aortic flow was inconsistent across study animals and did not correlate with initial balloon volume or relative deflation volume. Future studies to define the factors that affect aortic flow during balloon

  9. Dynamic myocardial perfusion in a porcine balloon-induced ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Levi, Jacob; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-03-01

    Myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging is an application that should greatly benefit from spectral CT through the significant reduction of beam hardening (BH) artifacts using mono-energetic (monoE) image reconstructions. We used a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare) and developed advanced processing tools (registration, segmentation, and deconvolution-based flow estimation) for quantitative myocardial CTP in a porcine ischemia model with different degrees of coronary occlusion using a balloon catheter. The occlusion severity was adjusted with fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. The SDCT scanner is a single source, dual-layer detector system, which allows simultaneous acquisitions of low and high energy projections, hence enabling accurate projection-based material decomposition and effective reduction of BH-artifacts. In addition, the SDCT scanner eliminates partial scan artifacts with fast (0.27s), full gantry rotation acquisitions. We acquired CTP data under different hemodynamic conditions and reconstructed conventional 120kVp images and projection-based monoenergetic (monoE) images for energies ranging from 55keV-to-120keV. We computed and compared myocardial blood flow (MBF) between different reconstructions. With balloon completely deflated (FFR=1), we compared the mean attenuation in a myocardial region of interest before iodine arrival and at peak iodine enhancement in the left ventricle (LV), and we found that monoE images at 70keV effectively minimized the difference in attenuation, due to BH, to less than 1 HU compared to 14 HU with conventional 120kVp images. Flow maps under baseline condition (FFR=1) were more uniform throughout the myocardial wall at 70keV, whereas with 120kVp data about 12% reduction in blood flow was noticed on BH-hypoattenuated areas compared to other myocardial regions. We compared MBF maps at different keVs under an ischemic condition (FFR < 0.7), and we found that flow

  10. A Simulation Model for Drift Resistive Ballooning Turbulence Examining the Influence of Self-consistent Zonal Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce; Umansky, Maxim; Joseph, Ilon

    2015-11-01

    Progress is reported on including self-consistent zonal flows in simulations of drift-resistive ballooning turbulence using the BOUT + + framework. Previous published work addressed the simulation of L-mode edge turbulence in realistic single-null tokamak geometry using the BOUT three-dimensional fluid code that solves Braginskii-based fluid equations. The effects of imposed sheared ExB poloidal rotation were included, with a static radial electric field fitted to experimental data. In new work our goal is to include the self-consistent effects on the radial electric field driven by the microturbulence, which contributes to the sheared ExB poloidal rotation (zonal flow generation). We describe a model for including self-consistent zonal flows and an algorithm for maintaining underlying plasma profiles to enable the simulation of steady-state turbulence. We examine the role of Braginskii viscous forces in providing necessary dissipation when including axisymmetric perturbations. We also report on some of the numerical difficulties associated with including the axisymmetric component of the fluctuating fields. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL-ABS-674950).

  11. Experimentation, modelling and simulation of water droplets impact on ballooned sheath of PWR core fuel assemblies in a LOCA situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelong, Franck

    2010-01-01

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR), during a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), liquid water evaporates and the fuel assemblies are not cooled anymore; as a consequence, the temperature rises to such an extent that some parts of the fuel assemblies can be deformed resulting in 'ballooned regions'. When reflooding occurs, the cooling of these partially blocked parts of the fuel assemblies will depend on the coolant flow that is a mixture of overheated vapour and under-saturated droplets. The aim of this thesis is to study the heat transfer between droplets and hot walls of the fuel rods. In this purpose, an experimental device has been designed in accordance with droplets and wall features (droplet velocity and diameter, wall temperature) representative of LOCA conditions. The cooling of a hot Nickel disk, previously heated by induction, is cooled down by a stream of monodispersed droplet. The rear face temperature profiles are measured by infrared thermography. Then, the estimation of wall heat flux is performed by an inverse conduction technique from these infrared images. The effect of droplet dynamical properties (diameter, velocity) on the heat flux is studied. These experimental data allow us to validate an analytical model of heat exchange between droplet and hot slab. This model is based on combined dynamical and thermal considerations. On the one hand, the droplet dynamics is considered through a spring analogy in order to evaluate the evolution of droplet features such as the spreading diameter when the droplet is squeezed over the hot surface. On the other hand, thermal parameters, such as the thickness of the vapour cushion beneath the droplet, are determined from an energy balance. In the short term, this model will be integrated in a CFD code (named NEPTUNE-CFD) to simulate the cooling of a reactor core during a LOCA, taking into account the droplet/wall heat exchange. (author)

  12. Balloon Command-Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-07

    Continuo on reverse side Ii nocosom7’ and identify by block numnber) P cientific Balloons; Balloon flights; Telemetry; Balloon Control; plight Termination... improvements in the ground station which should result in a truly simplified operation. The final modification to the decoder board which appears... improve the sweep range nnd sweep rate, however, the wave shape is still not as good as achieved using an exter..al sine wave oscillator manually

  13. PDGF-D contributes to neointimal hyperplasia in rat model of vessel injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jingzhou; Han Yu; Lin Chunxia; Zhen Yisong; Song Xiaodong; Teng Siyong; Chen Chen; Chen Yu; Zhang Yinhui; Hui Rutai

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we determined the role of PDGF-D, a new member of the PDGF family, in a rat model of balloon injured artery made with a 2F catheter in Sprague-Dawley male rats. PDGF-D expression was studied in the injured and control segments of abdominal aorta. The function of PDGF-D was evaluated in rat vascular smooth muscle cells stably transfected with PDGF-D gene. We found that in normal abdominal aorta, PDGF-D was highly expressed in adventia, moderate in endothelia, and unidentified in media. Stable transfection of PDGF-D gene into vascular smooth muscle cells increased the cell migration by 2.2-fold, and the proliferation by 2.3-fold, respectively, and MMP-2 production and activity as well. These results support the fact that PDGF-D is involved in the formation of neointimal hyperplasia induced by balloon catheter injury and may serve as a target in preventing vascular restenosis after coronary angioplasty

  14. Weather Balloon Ascent Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The physics of a weather balloon is analyzed. The surprising aspect of the motion of these balloons is that they ascend to great altitudes (typically 35 km) at a more or less constant rate. Such behavior is not surprising near the ground—say for a helium-filled party balloon rising from street level to the top of the Empire State building—but it is unexpected for a balloon that rises to altitudes where the air is rarefied. We show from elementary physical laws why the ascent rate is approximately constant.

  15. Human models of acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair G. Proudfoot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a syndrome that is characterised by acute inflammation and tissue injury that affects normal gas exchange in the lungs. Hallmarks of ALI include dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary membrane resulting in increased vascular permeability, an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung and a local pro-coagulant state. Patients with ALI present with severe hypoxaemia and radiological evidence of bilateral pulmonary oedema. The syndrome has a mortality rate of approximately 35% and usually requires invasive mechanical ventilation. ALI can follow direct pulmonary insults, such as pneumonia, or occur indirectly as a result of blood-borne insults, commonly severe bacterial sepsis. Although animal models of ALI have been developed, none of them fully recapitulate the human disease. The differences between the human syndrome and the phenotype observed in animal models might, in part, explain why interventions that are successful in models have failed to translate into novel therapies. Improved animal models and the development of human in vivo and ex vivo models are therefore required. In this article, we consider the clinical features of ALI, discuss the limitations of current animal models and highlight how emerging human models of ALI might help to answer outstanding questions about this syndrome.

  16. Laser Transmission Model, Balloon Experiment, and Satellite Remote Sensing for Thin Cirrus to Support ABL

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liou, K. N; Ou, S. C; Takano, Y

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) model has been developed for the transmission and backscattering of a high-energy laser beam through inhomogeneous high-level clouds in plane-parallel and spherical geometries...

  17. Accuracy of Modelled Stratospheric Temperatures in the Winter Arctic Vortex from Infra Red Montgolfier Long Duration Balloon Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommereau, J.-P.; Garnier, A.; Knudson, B. M.; Letrenne, G.; Durand, M.; Cseresnjes, M.; Nunes-Pinharanda, M.; Denis, L.; Newman, P. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The temperature of the stratosphere has been measured in the Arctic vortex every 9-10 minutes along the trajectory of four Infra Red Montgolfier long duration balloons flown for 7 to 22 days during the winters of 1997 and 1999. From a number of comparisons to independent sensors, the accuracy of the measurements is demonstrated to be plus or minus 0.5 K during nighttime and at altitude below 28 km (10 hPa). The performances of the analyses of global meteorological models, European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 31 and 50 levels, United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO), Data Assimilation Office (DAO), National Climatic Prediction Center (NCEP) and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, used in photochemical simulations of ozone destruction and interpretation of satellite data, are evaluated by comparison to this large (3500 data points) and homogeneous experimental data set. Most of models, except ECMWF31 in 1999, do show a smal1 average warm bias of between 0 and 1.6 K, with deviations particularly large, up to 20 K at high altitude (5hPa) in stratospheric warming conditions in 1999. Particularly wrong was ECMWF 31 levels near its top level at 10 hPa in 1999 where temperature 25 K colder than the real atmosphere were reported. The average dispersion between models and measurements varies from plus or minus 1.0 to plus or minus 3.0 K depending on the model and the year. It is shown to be the result of three contributions. The largest is a long wave modulation likely caused by the displacement of the temperature field in the analyses compared to real atmosphere. The second is the overestimation of the vertical gradient of temperature particularly in warming conditions, which explains the increase of dispersion from 1997 to 1999. Unexpectedly, the third and smallest (plus or minus 0.6-0.7 K) is the contribution of meso and subgrid scale vertical and horizontal features associated to the vertical propagation of orographic or gravity waves. Compared to other

  18. Anatomical risk models for paravalvular leak and landing zone complications for balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condado, Jose F; Corrigan, Frank E; Lerakis, Stamatios; Parastatidis, Ioannis; Stillman, Arthur E; Binongo, Jose N; Stewart, James; Mavromatis, Kreton; Devireddy, Chandan; Leshnower, Bradley; Guyton, Robert; Forcillo, Jessica; Patel, Ateet; Thourani, Vinod H; Block, Peter C; Babaliaros, Vasilis

    2017-10-01

    Though several anatomical characteristics have been reported separately as risk factors for paravalvular leak (PVL) and landing zone (LZ) complications after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), multivariate risk models are needed. Patients that underwent balloon-expandable TAVR with multidetector cardiac computed tomography (MDCT) sizing were studied. MDCT images were analyzed and the association between anatomical factors and ≥mild PVL, ≥moderate PVL, and LZ complications (annular rupture, requirement of new permanent pacemaker, and coronary obstruction) was determined, and subsequently competing predictive models were developed and validated. A total of 316 consecutive TAVR patients were included. Median age was 82.0 years (74.0-87.0) and STS score was 8.3% (5.4-10.9). Factors associated with ≥mild PVL included TAVR with Sapien/Sapien XT vs. Sapien 3 (OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.24-5.07), LVOT nontubularity (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.01-1.04), LZ calcification (OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 1.00-1.01), and low cover index (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.91-0.96). Factors associated with LZ complications included LZ calcification (OR = 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.01), leaflet asymmetry (OR = 1.01, 95% CI 1.01-1.02), and cover index (OR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.03-1.14). Predictive models for ≥mild PVL (AUC = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.66-0.77), ≥moderate PVL (AUC = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.65-0.84), and LZ complications (AUC = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.67-0.87) were created using procedural details and anatomical data from the MDCT. Clinical variables were not included as they were poorly correlated with the occurrence of PVL and LZ complications. For each outcome, the area under the curve (AUC) of the multivariate model was superior to the model consisting only of individual factors. A model using procedural/anatomical characteristics derived from MDCT predicts ≥mild PVL, ≥moderate PVL, and LZ complications post-TAVR. Incorporation of

  19. Dose reduction assessment in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine balloon-induced-ischemia model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the use of an advanced hybrid iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose4, Philips Health- care) for low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging. A porcine model was created to mimic coronary stenosis through partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a balloon catheter. The severity of LAD occlusion was adjusted with FFR measurements. Dynamic CT images were acquired at end-systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Various corrections were applied to the acquired scans to reduce motion and imaging artifacts. Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) was computed with a deconvolution-based approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). We compared a high and a low dose radiation protocol corresponding to two different tube-voltage/tube-current combinations (80kV p/100mAs and 120kV p/150mAs). The corresponding radiation doses for these protocols are 7.8mSv and 34.3mSV , respectively. The images were reconstructed using conventional FBP and three noise-reduction strengths of the IR method, iDose. Flow contrast-to-noise ratio, CNRf, as obtained from MBF maps, was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of reconstruction on contrast between normal and ischemic myocardial tissue. Preliminary results showed that the use of iDose to reconstruct low dose images provide better or comparable CNRf to that of high dose images reconstructed with FBP, suggesting significant dose savings. CNRf was improved with the three used levels of iDose compared to FBP for both protocols. When using the entire 4D dynamic sequence for MBF computation, a 77% dose reduction was achieved, while considering only half the scans (i.e., every other heart cycle) allowed even further dose reduction while maintaining relatively higher CNRf.

  20. The Effect of Infrarenal Aortic Balloon Occlusion on Weaning from Supraceliac Aortic Balloon Occlusion in a Porcine Model (Sus scrofa) of Hemorrhagic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-15

    all animals , and continued for six hours. Half of the animals were randomly assigned to Zone-3 REBOA for an additional 45 minutes following Zone-1...concentration or resuscitation requirements.Conclusion: In an animal model of hemorrhagic shock and Zone-1 REBOA, subsequent Zone-3 aortic occlusion did not add

  1. Coping with injury in powerlifting : stress-injury model perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Pavelic, Marina

    2017-01-01

    A need to evaluate psychological antecedents to injury in strength-based sports is evident. Powerlifting especially has seen a rise in participation rates (International Paralympic Committee; Powerlifting Australia Ltd.; British Weight Lifting), also resulting in an increase in weightlifting-related injuries (Metzger et al., 2012). While much literature exists on mental stressors and coping mechanisms athletes encounter in the sport context, minimal research has attempted to understand how at...

  2. The Japanese Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, J.

    The Japanese scientific ballooning program has been organized by ISAS since the institute was founded in mid 1960s. Since then, the balloon group of ISAS has been engaged in the development of the balloon technologies and scientific observations in collaboration with scientists and engineers in other universities and organizations. Here, I describe several subjects of recent activities, the details of some items will also be reported in the separate papers in this meeting.Preparation of a new mobile receiving station.Balloons of made of the EVAL (Ethylene-Vinyl-Alcohol) films. EVAL film has specific Infra-red absorption bands, and is expected to be useful for saving the ballast for a long duration flight.A high altitude balloon with thin polyethylene films achieving at an altitude of above 50km. Further improvement of this type of balloons is continued by inventing how to extrude thin films less than 5 microns of thickness.Recent achievement of Antarctica Flights under the collaboration of ISAS and National Polar Institute.Other new efforts to long duration flights such as satellite link boomerang balloon systems and others.New balloon borne scientific instrumentation for observations of high energy electrons and Anti-protons in cosmic-rays.

  3. Modified Hydrogen Balloon Explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Stephen S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the technique of exploding an oxygen-hydrogen balloon using two balloons and having students observe the formation of water droplets. Suggests that the Socratic Method can be used to start discussions related to stochiometry, states of matter, and gas laws. (DDR)

  4. Integrated Medical Model – Chest Injury Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) developed the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) to forecast the resources...

  5. In vitro analysis of balloon cuffing phenomenon: inherent biophysical properties of catheter material or mechanics of catheter balloon deflation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eric; So, Karina

    2012-06-01

    To investigates the different methods of balloon deflation, types of urinary catheters and exposure to urine media in catheter balloon cuffing. Bardex®, Bard-Lubri-Sil®, Argyle®, Releen® and Biocath® were tested in sterile and E.Coli inoculated urine at 0, 14 and 28 days. Catheter deflation was performed with active deflation; passive deflation; passive auto-deflation; and excision of the balloon inflow channel. Balloon cuffing was assessed objectively by running the deflated balloon over a plate of agar and subjectively by 3 independent observers. Bardex®, Argyle® and Biocath® showed greater degree of catheter balloon cuffing (p deflation was the worst method (p 0.05). Linear regression model analysis confirmed time as the most significant factor. The duration of catheters exposure, different deflation methods and types of catheters tested contributed significantly to catheter balloon cuffing (p < 0.01).

  6. A comparison of ballon injury models of endovascular lesions in rat arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.E.E. Gabeler; R. van Hillegersberg (Richard); R.G. Statius van Eps (Randolph); W.J. Sluiter (Wim); E.J. Gussenhoven (Elma); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); H. van Urk (Hero)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Balloon injury (BI) of the rat carotid artery (CCA) is widely used to study intimal hyperplasia (IH) and decrease in lumen diameter (LD), but CCA's small diameter impedes the evaluation of endovascular therapies. Therefore, we validated BI in the aorta (AA) and iliac artery

  7. Rodent model of direct cranial blast injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Reed; Simard, Philippe F; Driscoll, Ian; Keledjian, Kaspar; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tosun, Cigdem; Williams, Alicia; Bochicchio, Grant; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury resulting from an explosive blast is one of the most serious wounds suffered by warfighters, yet the effects of explosive blast overpressure directly impacting the head are poorly understood. We developed a rodent model of direct cranial blast injury (dcBI), in which a blast overpressure could be delivered exclusively to the head, precluding indirect brain injury via thoracic transmission of the blast wave. We constructed and validated a Cranium Only Blast Injury Apparatus (COBIA) to deliver blast overpressures generated by detonating .22 caliber cartridges of smokeless powder. Blast waveforms generated by COBIA replicated those recorded within armored vehicles penetrated by munitions. Lethal dcBI (LD(50) ∼ 515 kPa) was associated with: (1) apparent brainstem failure, characterized by immediate opisthotonus and apnea leading to cardiac arrest that could not be overcome by cardiopulmonary resuscitation; (2) widespread subarachnoid hemorrhages without cortical contusions or intracerebral or intraventricular hemorrhages; and (3) no pulmonary abnormalities. Sub-lethal dcBI was associated with: (1) apnea lasting up to 15 sec, with transient abnormalities in oxygen saturation; (2) very few delayed deaths; (3) subarachnoid hemorrhages, especially in the path of the blast wave; (4) abnormal immunolabeling for IgG, cleaved caspase-3, and β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP), and staining for Fluoro-Jade C, all in deep brain regions away from the subarachnoid hemorrhages, but in the path of the blast wave; and (5) abnormalities on the accelerating Rotarod that persisted for the 1 week period of observation. We conclude that exposure of the head alone to severe explosive blast predisposes to significant neurological dysfunction.

  8. Viscoelastic behaviour of pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    2008-11-01

    The lobes of the NASA ULDB pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloons are made of a thin polymeric film that shows considerable time-dependent behaviour. A nonlinear viscoelastic model based on experimental measurements has been recently established for this film. This paper presents a simulation of the viscoelastic behaviour of ULDB balloons with the finite element software ABAQUS. First, the standard viscoelastic modelling capabilities available in ABAQUS are examined, but are found of limited accuracy even for the case of simple uniaxial creep tests on ULDB films. Then, a nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model is implemented by means of a user-defined subroutine. This approach is verified by means of biaxial creep experiments on pressurized cylinders and is found to be accurate provided that the film anisotropy is also included in the model. A preliminary set of predictions for a single lobe of a ULDB is presented at the end of the paper. It indicates that time-dependent effects in a balloon structure can lead to significant stress redistribution and large increases in the transverse strains in the lobes.

  9. Experimental spinal cord trauma: a review of mechanically induced spinal cord injury in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Dauda; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; Mohamad, Masro; Aziz, Izzuddin; Sanusi, Junedah

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that animal spinal cord compression (using methods such as clips, balloons, spinal cord strapping, or calibrated forceps) mimics the persistent spinal canal occlusion that is common in human spinal cord injury (SCI). These methods can be used to investigate the effects of compression or to know the optimal timing of decompression (as duration of compression can affect the outcome of pathology) in acute SCI. Compression models involve prolonged cord compression and are distinct from contusion models, which apply only transient force to inflict an acute injury to the spinal cord. While the use of forceps to compress the spinal cord is a common choice due to it being inexpensive, it has not been critically assessed against the other methods to determine whether it is the best method to use. To date, there is no available review specifically focused on the current compression methods of inducing SCI in rats; thus, we performed a systematic and comprehensive publication search to identify studies on experimental spinalization in rat models, and this review discusses the advantages and limitations of each method.

  10. A new and reliable animal model for optic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hua; Li, Fengling; Zhang, Linlin

    2012-10-01

    To create an animal (rat) model of force percussion injury (FPI) to the optic nerve for clinical and experimental research. Seventy-one healthy female Wister rats, with no ocular disorders, were used in this study. Sixty-six rats were subjected to bilateral blunt trauma to the eyes via FPI; five rats were not subjected to trauma. According to the degree of optic nerve injury, injured eyes were divided into two groups: severe optic nerve injury group, with beat pressures of 699.14 ± 60.79 kPa and mild optic nerve injury group, with beat pressures of 243.18 ± 20.26 kPa. Eight rats were examined using flash visual-evoked potential (F-VEP) monitoring and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before, 1 and 3 days, and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after optic nerve injury. Fifty-six rats were examined by histopathology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis at 1 and 3 days, and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after optic nerve injury. Two rats were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) 4 and 8 weeks after optic nerve injury. The presence or absence of optic nerve injury was evaluated in all trauma eyes. Latency was prolonged in the severe injury group compared with controls 1 day after optic nerve injury (p nerve injury (p .05). Latency was prolonged in the mild optic nerve injury group compared with controls 1 day after optic nerve injury (p injury and then stabilized (p > .05). As measured by MRI, an abnormally high signal was seen 1 day after injury and remained significantly high 8 weeks after injury. A ruptured capillary was detected in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) 1 day after injury. Acellular regions in the ganglion cell layer were observed 4 weeks after optic nerve injury. TUNEL-positive cells were present in each layer of the retina 3 days after injury. The number of TUNEL-positive cells began to increase 1-2 weeks after injury, and then gradually decreased 4 weeks after injury (p nerve injury using

  11. Novel paclitaxel-coated angioplasty balloon catheter based on cetylpyridinium salicylate: Preparation, characterization and simulated use in an in vitro vessel model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Svea, E-mail: svea.petersen@uni-rostock.de [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University of Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Straße 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Kaule, Sebastian [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University of Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Straße 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Stein, Florian [Institute for Chemistry, Analytical and Technical Chemistry University of Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Straße 3a, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Minrath, Ingo; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University of Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Straße 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Kragl, Udo [Institute for Chemistry, Analytical and Technical Chemistry University of Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Straße 3a, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Sternberg, Katrin [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University of Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Straße 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Drug-coated balloons (DCB), which have emerged as therapeutic alternative to drug-eluting stents in percutaneous cardiovascular intervention, are well described with regard to clinical efficiency and safety within a number of clinical studies. In vitro studies elucidating the correlation of coating method and composition with DCB performance are however rare but considered important for the understanding of DCB requirements and the improvement of established DCB. In this context, we evaluated the applicability of a pipetting, dip-coating, and spray-coating process for the establishment of DCB based on paclitaxel (PTX) and the ionic liquid cetylpyridinium salicylate (Cetpyrsal) as novel innovative additive in three different compositions. Among tested methods and compositions, the pipetting process with 50 wt.% PTX resulted in most promising coatings as drug load was less controllable by the other processes and higher PTX contents led to considerable drug crystallization, as visualized by electron microscopy, accelerating PTX loss during short-term elution. Applying these conditions, homogeneous coatings could be applied on balloon catheter, whose simulated use in an in vitro vessel model revealed percental drug losses of 36 and 28% during transit and percental drug transfers of 12 and 40% under expansion for coatings applied in expanded and folded balloon condition, respectively. In comparison to literature values, these results support the high potential of Cetpyrsal as novel DCB matrix regarding low drug loss and efficient drug transfer. - Highlights: • We provide detailed in vitro data for definition of DCB coating requirements. • An in vitro vessel model for evaluating drug delivery from DCB is presented. • Innovative ionic liquid-based coatings for DCB are developed. • The coating shows low drug loss and efficient drug transfer.

  12. Novel paclitaxel-coated angioplasty balloon catheter based on cetylpyridinium salicylate: Preparation, characterization and simulated use in an in vitro vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Svea; Kaule, Sebastian; Stein, Florian; Minrath, Ingo; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Kragl, Udo; Sternberg, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Drug-coated balloons (DCB), which have emerged as therapeutic alternative to drug-eluting stents in percutaneous cardiovascular intervention, are well described with regard to clinical efficiency and safety within a number of clinical studies. In vitro studies elucidating the correlation of coating method and composition with DCB performance are however rare but considered important for the understanding of DCB requirements and the improvement of established DCB. In this context, we evaluated the applicability of a pipetting, dip-coating, and spray-coating process for the establishment of DCB based on paclitaxel (PTX) and the ionic liquid cetylpyridinium salicylate (Cetpyrsal) as novel innovative additive in three different compositions. Among tested methods and compositions, the pipetting process with 50 wt.% PTX resulted in most promising coatings as drug load was less controllable by the other processes and higher PTX contents led to considerable drug crystallization, as visualized by electron microscopy, accelerating PTX loss during short-term elution. Applying these conditions, homogeneous coatings could be applied on balloon catheter, whose simulated use in an in vitro vessel model revealed percental drug losses of 36 and 28% during transit and percental drug transfers of 12 and 40% under expansion for coatings applied in expanded and folded balloon condition, respectively. In comparison to literature values, these results support the high potential of Cetpyrsal as novel DCB matrix regarding low drug loss and efficient drug transfer. - Highlights: • We provide detailed in vitro data for definition of DCB coating requirements. • An in vitro vessel model for evaluating drug delivery from DCB is presented. • Innovative ionic liquid-based coatings for DCB are developed. • The coating shows low drug loss and efficient drug transfer

  13. Head Injury, from Men to Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. van den Brink (Willem Aart)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn well developed countries, injury is the leading cause of death and disability among young adults. In less developed countries the incidence of injury is high and rapidly increasing, but the relative mortality due to injuries is overshadowed by other causes, such as infections and

  14. An ovine model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Saul; Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley O; Miller, John W; Reddy, Chandan G; Safayi, Sina; Fredericks, Douglas C; Jeffery, Nicholas D; DeVries-Watson, Nicole A; Shivapour, Sara K; Viljoen, Stephanus; Dalm, Brian D; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Johnson, Michael D; Gillies, George T; Howard, Matthew A

    2017-05-01

    To develop a large animal model of spinal cord injury (SCI), for use in translational studies of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in the treatment of spasticity. We seek to establish thresholds for the SCS parameters associated with reduction of post-SCI spasticity in the pelvic limbs, with implications for patients. The weight-drop method was used to create a moderate SCI in adult sheep, leading to mild spasticity in the pelvic limbs. Electrodes for electromyography (EMG) and an epidural spinal cord stimulator were then implanted. Behavioral and electrophysiological data were taken during treadmill ambulation in six animals, and in one animal with and without SCS at 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.9 V. All surgical procedures were carried out at the University of Iowa. The gait measurements were made at Iowa State University. Nine adult female sheep were used in these institutionally approved protocols. Six of them were trained in treadmill ambulation prior to SCI surgeries, and underwent gait analysis pre- and post-SCI. Stretch reflex and H-reflex measurements were also made in conscious animals. Gait analysis revealed repeatable quantitative differences in 20% of the key kinematic parameters of the sheep, pre- and post-SCI. Hock joint angular velocity increased toward the normal pre-injury baseline in the animal with SCS at 0.9 V. The ovine model is workable as a large animal surrogate suitable for translational studies of novel SCS therapies aimed at relieving spasticity in patients with SCI.

  15. Statistical modelling for recurrent events: an application to sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Shahid; Gabbett, Tim J; Finch, Caroline F

    2014-09-01

    Injuries are often recurrent, with subsequent injuries influenced by previous occurrences and hence correlation between events needs to be taken into account when analysing such data. This paper compares five different survival models (Cox proportional hazards (CoxPH) model and the following generalisations to recurrent event data: Andersen-Gill (A-G), frailty, Wei-Lin-Weissfeld total time (WLW-TT) marginal, Prentice-Williams-Peterson gap time (PWP-GT) conditional models) for the analysis of recurrent injury data. Empirical evaluation and comparison of different models were performed using model selection criteria and goodness-of-fit statistics. Simulation studies assessed the size and power of each model fit. The modelling approach is demonstrated through direct application to Australian National Rugby League recurrent injury data collected over the 2008 playing season. Of the 35 players analysed, 14 (40%) players had more than 1 injury and 47 contact injuries were sustained over 29 matches. The CoxPH model provided the poorest fit to the recurrent sports injury data. The fit was improved with the A-G and frailty models, compared to WLW-TT and PWP-GT models. Despite little difference in model fit between the A-G and frailty models, in the interest of fewer statistical assumptions it is recommended that, where relevant, future studies involving modelling of recurrent sports injury data use the frailty model in preference to the CoxPH model or its other generalisations. The paper provides a rationale for future statistical modelling approaches for recurrent sports injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Lifetime injury prevention: The sport profile model*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-04

    Jan 4, 2012 ... A behaviorist perspective. Adv Psychosom Med 2011;30:8–21. 7. Podlog L, Dimmock J, Miller J. A review of return to sport concerns following injury rehabilitation: practitioner strategies for enhancing recovery outcomes. Phys Ther Sport. 2011;12:36-42. 8. Bianco T, Malo S, Orlick T. Sport injury and illness: ...

  17. Launching Garbage-Bag Balloons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hy

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modification of a procedure for making and launching hot air balloons made out of garbage bags. Student instructions for balloon construction, launching instructions, and scale diagrams are included. (DDR)

  18. Venus Altitude Cycling Balloon Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ISTAR Group ( IG) and team mate Thin Red Line Aerospace (TRLA) propose a Venus altitude cycling balloon (Venus ACB), an innovative superpressure balloon...

  19. Injury Based on Its Study in Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mendes-Braz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the numerous experimental models used to study the complexity of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Although experimental models of hepatic I/R injury represent a compromise between the clinical reality and experimental simplification, the clinical transfer of experimental results is problematic because of anatomical and physiological differences and the inevitable simplification of experimental work. In this review, the strengths and limitations of the various models of hepatic I/R are discussed. Several strategies to protect the liver from I/R injury have been developed in animal models and, some of these, might find their way into clinical practice. We also attempt to highlight the fact that the mechanisms responsible for hepatic I/R injury depend on the experimental model used, and therefore the therapeutic strategies also differ according to the model used. Thus, the choice of model must therefore be adapted to the clinical question being answered.

  20. Therapeutic balloon-assisted enteroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Aktas (Huseyin); P.B.F. Mensink (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSince the introduction of the first balloon-based enteroscopic technique in 2001, therapeutic balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE) using either the single or double balloon enteroscopy technique (respectively SBE and DBE) has evolved rapidly. Argon plasma coagulation (APC), polypectomy,

  1. Model for predicting the injury severity score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Shuichi; Oshima, Kiyohiro; Murata, Masato; Kaneko, Minoru; Aoki, Makoto; Kanbe, Masahiko; Nakamura, Takuro; Ohyama, Yoshio; Tamura, Jun'ichi

    2015-07-01

    To determine the formula that predicts the injury severity score from parameters that are obtained in the emergency department at arrival. We reviewed the medical records of trauma patients who were transferred to the emergency department of Gunma University Hospital between January 2010 and December 2010. The injury severity score, age, mean blood pressure, heart rate, Glasgow coma scale, hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell count, platelet count, fibrinogen, international normalized ratio of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrin degradation products, were examined in those patients on arrival. To determine the formula that predicts the injury severity score, multiple linear regression analysis was carried out. The injury severity score was set as the dependent variable, and the other parameters were set as candidate objective variables. IBM spss Statistics 20 was used for the statistical analysis. Statistical significance was set at P  Watson ratio was 2.200. A formula for predicting the injury severity score in trauma patients was developed with ordinary parameters such as fibrin degradation products and mean blood pressure. This formula is useful because we can predict the injury severity score easily in the emergency department.

  2. Adjustable continence balloons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Line; Fode, Mikkel; Nørgaard, Nis

    2012-01-01

    . Fourteen patients (12%) ended up with an artificial sphincter or a urethral sling. Sixty patients (63%) experienced no discomfort and 58 (61%) reported being dry or markedly improved. Overall, 50 patients (53%) reported being very or predominantly satisfied. Conclusions. Adjustable continence balloons seem...

  3. Injury prevention risk communication: A mental models approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Laurel Cecelia; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2012-01-01

    Individuals' decisions and behaviour can play a critical role in determining both the probability and severity of injury. Behavioural decision research studies peoples' decision-making processes in terms comparable to scientific models of optimal choices, providing a basis for focusing...... interventions on the most critical opportunities to reduce risks. That research often seeks to identify the ‘mental models’ that underlie individuals' interpretations of their circumstances and the outcomes of possible actions. In the context of injury prevention, a mental models approach would ask why people...... and uses examples to discuss how the approach can be used to develop scientifically validated context-sensitive injury risk communications....

  4. Changes in excursion and strain in the rat sciatic nerve under cauda equina compression induced by epidural balloon inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Ta-Wei; Su, Fong-Chin; Chien, Jui-Teng; Lee, Jung-Shun; Huang, Yi-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-02-01

    Healthy nerves are able to stretch and glide as responses to normal physiological movement. Injury to the nerve may alter the nerve's mechanical properties and result in neuropathy. Whether cauda equina compression alters the mechanical properties of the sciatic nerve is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the changes in excursions and strains of the sciatic nerve in vivo after acute cauda equina compression was induced by epidural balloon compression. An animal comparative study with induced cauda equina compression was designed for in situ measurements of nerve properties. Twenty-six adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. The balloon group (n=10) underwent epidural compression induced by inflation of an embolectomy balloon catheter that was inserted through an L6 laminotomy. The control group (n=10) underwent laminotomy but without compression. The normal group (n=6) received no back surgery. This model of neuropathy was confirmed with electrophysiological examination. The excursions and strains of the sciatic nerve in response to the modified straight leg-raising (SLR) test were measured in situ and analyzed. The scales of the excursions were lower in the balloon group than in the other two groups, in both 90° flexion and extension of the knee. The balloon group was more sensitive to positional changes. The strain was significantly higher under the condition of epidural balloon compression. We concluded that cauda equina compression decreased the excursion and increased the strain of the sciatic nerve in response to a modified SLR test. These findings might indicate one of the mechanisms of the pain provoked by the SLR test and also possibly contribute to an understanding of the pathogenesis of the neuropathy in the lower limbs of patients with cauda equina compression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Viscoresistive g-modes and ballooning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagazian, R.Y.; Paris, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    The resistive G-mode and its particular form, the resistive ballooning mode, are treated as limits of a single simple model. MHD theory including parallel and perpendicular viscosity, finite shear, and finite beta is employed to study their linear stability

  6. Blunt cerebrovascular injury is poorly predicted by modeling with other injuries: analysis of NTDB data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Alan; Osler, Turner; Gaudet, Matthew; Berne, John; Norwood, Scott

    2011-07-01

    Traumatic blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) may portend catastrophic complications if untreated. Who should be screened for BCVI is controversial. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a prediction score (pBCVI) to identify those at sufficient risk to warrant dedicated screening. We conducted a cohort study using data for years 2002-2007 from the National Trauma Data Bank. Blunt trauma patients aged 16 years and older were randomly divided into two groups for score creation and validation. Final prediction model included age, sex, Trauma Mortality Prediction Model p(death), traumatic intracranial hemorrhage, cerebellar/brain stem injury, malar/maxillary fracture, mandible fracture, cervical spine fracture, cervical spinal cord injury, thoracic spinal cord injury, and chest Abbreviated Injury Scale ≥3. pBCVI was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve area and the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic. The Youden Index estimated an optimal cut-point (J) of the pBCVI. The cohort numbered 1,398,310 patients, including 2,125 with BCVI. The overall incidence of BCVI was 0.15%. Cervical spine fracture had the strongest association with BCVI (odds ratio 4.82, p < 0.001). The receiver operating characteristic curve for pBCVI was 0.93 and the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic was 206.3, p < 0.01. The optimal cut-point (J) of pBCVI was 0.0013 (sensitivity 0.91, specificity 0.82) and would miss 186 (8.8%) injuries in our cohort. To identify all BCVI using this model, an unrealistic 96% of the cohort would require screening. A model based on a pattern of other injuries cannot be used as a stand-alone instrument to determine screening for BCVI. "Optimal" model cut-points are not ideal for all injuries. Clinical suspicion that integrates energy of mechanism and associated injuries remains essential to effectively screen for BCVI and minimize patient risk for a catastrophic missed injury.

  7. An Updated Subsequent Injury Categorisation Model (SIC-2.0): Data-Driven Categorisation of Subsequent Injuries in Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Liam A; Drew, Michael K; Fortington, Lauren V; Finch, Caroline F; Cook, Jill L

    2018-03-03

    Accounting for subsequent injuries is critical for sports injury epidemiology. The subsequent injury categorisation (SIC-1.0) model was developed to create a framework for accurate categorisation of subsequent injuries but its operationalisation has been challenging. The objective of this study was to update the subsequent injury categorisation (SIC-1.0 to SIC-2.0) model to improve its utility and application to sports injury datasets, and to test its applicability to a sports injury dataset. The SIC-1.0 model was expanded to include two levels of categorisation describing how previous injuries relate to subsequent events. A data-driven classification level was established containing eight discrete injury categories identifiable without clinical input. A sequential classification level that sub-categorised the data-driven categories according to their level of clinical relatedness has 16 distinct subsequent injury types. Manual and automated SIC-2.0 model categorisation were applied to a prospective injury dataset collected for elite rugby sevens players over a 2-year period. Absolute agreement between the two coding methods was assessed. An automated script for automatic data-driven categorisation and a flowchart for manual coding were developed for the SIC-2.0 model. The SIC-2.0 model was applied to 246 injuries sustained by 55 players (median four injuries, range 1-12), 46 (83.6%) of whom experienced more than one injury. The majority of subsequent injuries (78.7%) were sustained to a different site and were of a different nature. Absolute agreement between the manual coding and automated statistical script category allocation was 100%. The updated SIC-2.0 model provides a simple flowchart and automated electronic script to allow both an accurate and efficient method of categorising subsequent injury data in sport.

  8. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Nakae

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of pathology. However, results can be easily misunderstood and falsely interpreted. Therefore, it is important to fully understand the symptoms of human spinal cord injury, as well as the various spinal cord injury models and the possible pathologies. The present paper summarizes results from animal models of spinal cord injury, as well as the most effective use of these models.

  9. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Aya; Nakai, Kunihiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of pathology. However, results can be easily misunderstood and falsely interpreted. Therefore, it is important to fully understand the symptoms of human spinal cord injury, as well as the various spinal cord injury models and the possible pathologies. The present paper summarizes results from animal models of spinal cord injury, as well as the most effective use of these models. PMID:21436995

  10. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nakae, Aya; Nakai, Kunihiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of patholo...

  11. Assessment of rat spinal cord injury models

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a complicated and devastating condition, causing different extents of motor, sensory and autonomic dysfunctions. In addition, there is a risk for secondary complications after SCI including posttraumatic syringomyelia (PTS) that can cause further functional loss. Since there is no available effective treatment, tremendous efforts have been made to develop new therapeutic strategies to promote functional recovery after SCI. In experimental r...

  12. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    OpenAIRE

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approache...

  13. Reproduction of an animal model of landmine blast injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen ZHANG

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce an animal model of landmine blast injuries for studying its mechanism and characteristics. Methods Fifteen healthy New Zealand white rabbits (body weight 1.9-2.4 kg were prepared as experimental animals. Punctiform burster was used to simulate the landmine, and it was electrically detonated far away to produce landmine blast injuries on unilateral hind limb of rabbits in upright state. The vital signs before and 5min, 15min, 30min, 45min, 1h, 2h, 3h, 6h, 9h and 12h after injuries were recorded. Autopsy of dead animals was performed immediately and the survivors were sacrificed for pathological examination 6h and 12h after the injury. Macroscopic and microscopic changes in the injured limb and distant organs were observed. Fifteen random adult body weights were generated by random number table, and the explosive energy of M14 landmine (about 29g TNT explosive energy was simulated, to compare the ratio of explosive force equivalent to weight calculated between experimental animals and randomly selected adults. Results No significant change in blood pressure was observed at different time points before and after injuries. A broom-like change was found in the injured limb by the general observation. The subareas and pathological changes of injured limb coincided with the typical limb injuries produced by landmine explosion. Damage in different degrees was found in distant organs, and the wound characteristics and injury of major organs were in accordance with the reports of relevant literature. The ratio of explosive equivalent to weight of experimental animals (0.50±0.04g TNT/kg was similar to that of randomly selected adults (0.51±0.05g TNT/kg. Conclusion The present animal model could simulate the landmine explosive injuries, and may be used in research of landmine explosive injuries. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.01.14

  14. Graph-Based Path-Planning for Titan Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Lars James; Fathpour, Nanaz; Elfes, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    A document describes a graph-based path-planning algorithm for balloons with vertical control authority and little or no horizontal control authority. The balloons are designed to explore celestial bodies with atmospheres, such as Titan, a moon of Saturn. The algorithm discussed enables the balloon to achieve horizontal motion using the local horizontal winds. The approach is novel because it enables the balloons to use arbitrary wind field models. This is in contrast to prior approaches that used highly simplified wind field models, such as linear, or binary, winds. This new approach works by discretizing the space in which the balloon operates, and representing the possible states of the balloon as a graph whose arcs represent the time taken to move from one node to another. The approach works with arbitrary wind fields, by looking up the wind strength and direction at every node in the graph from an arbitrary wind model. Having generated the graph, search techniques such as Dijkstra s algorithm are then used to find the set of vertical actuation commands that takes the balloon from the start to the goal in minimum time. In addition, the set of reachable locations on the moon or planet can be determined.

  15. Ballooning modes or Fourier modes in a toroidal plasma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Taylor, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between two different descriptions of eigenmodes in a torus is investigated. In one the eigenmodes are similar to Fourier modes in a cylinder and are highly localized near a particular rational surface. In the other they are the so-called ballooning modes that extend over many rational surfaces. Using a model that represents both drift waves and resistive interchanges the transition from one of these structures to the other is investigated. In this simplified model the transition depends on a single parameter which embodies the competition between toroidal coupling of Fourier modes (which enhances ballooning) and variation in frequency of Fourier modes from one rational surface to another (which diminishes ballooning). As the coupling is increased each Fourier mode acquires a sideband on an adjacent rational surface and these sidebands then expand across the radius to form the extended mode described by the conventional ballooning mode approximation. This analysis shows that the ballooning approximation is appropriate for drift waves in a tokamak but not for resistive interchanges in a pinch. In the latter the conventional ballooning effect is negligible but they may nevertheless show a ballooning feature. This is localized near the same rational surface as the primary Fourier mode and so does not lead to a radially extended structure

  16. A low-cost uterine balloon tamponade for management of postpartum hemorrhage: modeling the potential impact on maternal mortality and morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Tara; Mvundura, Mercy; Burke, Thomas F; Abu-Haydar, Elizabeth

    2017-11-13

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal deaths worldwide. This study sought to quantify the potential health impact (morbidity and mortality reductions) that a low-cost uterine balloon tamponade (UBT) could have on women suffering from uncontrolled PPH due to uterine atony in sub-Saharan Africa. The Maternal and Neonatal Directed Assessment of Technology (MANDATE) model was used to estimate maternal deaths, surgeries averted, and cases of severe anemia prevented through UBT use among women with PPH who receive a uterotonic drug but fail this therapy in a health facility. Estimates were generated for the year 2018. The main outcome measures were lives saved, surgeries averted, and severe anemia prevented. The base case model estimated that widespread use of a low-cost UBT in clinics and hospitals could save 6547 lives (an 11% reduction in maternal deaths), avert 10,823 surgeries, and prevent 634 severe anemia cases in sub-Saharan Africa annually. A low-cost UBT has a strong potential to save lives and reduce morbidity. It can also potentially reduce costly downstream interventions for women who give birth in a health care facility. This technology may be especially useful for meeting global targets for reducing maternal mortality as identified in Sustainable Development Goal 3.

  17. Evaluating alternate discrete outcome frameworks for modeling crash injury severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Shamsunnahar; Eluru, Naveen

    2013-10-01

    This paper focuses on the relevance of alternate discrete outcome frameworks for modeling driver injury severity. The study empirically compares the ordered response and unordered response models in the context of driver injury severity in traffic crashes. The alternative modeling approaches considered for the comparison exercise include: for the ordered response framework-ordered logit (OL), generalized ordered logit (GOL), mixed generalized ordered logit (MGOL) and for the unordered response framework-multinomial logit (MNL), nested logit (NL), ordered generalized extreme value logit (OGEV) and mixed multinomial logit (MMNL) model. A host of comparison metrics are computed to evaluate the performance of these alternative models. The study provides a comprehensive comparison exercise of the performance of ordered and unordered response models for examining the impact of exogenous factors on driver injury severity. The research also explores the effect of potential underreporting on alternative frameworks by artificially creating an underreported data sample from the driver injury severity sample. The empirical analysis is based on the 2010 General Estimates System (GES) data base-a nationally representative sample of road crashes collected and compiled from about 60 jurisdictions across the United States. The performance of the alternative frameworks are examined in the context of model estimation and validation (at the aggregate and disaggregate level). Further, the performance of the model frameworks in the presence of underreporting is explored, with and without corrections to the estimates. The results from these extensive analyses point toward the emergence of the GOL framework (MGOL) as a strong competitor to the MMNL model in modeling driver injury severity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. VVER ballooning experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoeri, Cs.; Hozer, Z.; Maroti, L.; Matus, L.

    1998-01-01

    A series of ballooning experiments was performed at the KFKI-AEKI in order to compare the mechanical behaviour and strength of Zircaloy-4 and Zr1%Nb claddings. The effects of temperature, oxidation and iodine absorption on deformation and burst pressure was investigated in almost 100 biaxial tests. Numerical post-test analyses have also been performed with the stand-alone fuel module of the French CATHARE code and the US fuel behaviour code FRAP-T6. Comparing the experimental and the analytical results, relevant differences of high temperature strength due to different α-β phase transition temperature were revealed between the investigated cladding materials. (author)

  19. Constructing Model of Relationship among Behaviors and Injuries to Products Based on Large Scale Text Data on Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomori, Koji; Kitamura, Koji; Motomura, Yoichi; Nishida, Yoshifumi; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiro; Komatsubara, Akinori

    In Japan, childhood injury prevention is urgent issue. Safety measures through creating knowledge of injury data are essential for preventing childhood injuries. Especially the injury prevention approach by product modification is very important. The risk assessment is one of the most fundamental methods to design safety products. The conventional risk assessment has been carried out subjectively because product makers have poor data on injuries. This paper deals with evidence-based risk assessment, in which artificial intelligence technologies are strongly needed. This paper describes a new method of foreseeing usage of products, which is the first step of the evidence-based risk assessment, and presents a retrieval system of injury data. The system enables a product designer to foresee how children use a product and which types of injuries occur due to the product in daily environment. The developed system consists of large scale injury data, text mining technology and probabilistic modeling technology. Large scale text data on childhood injuries was collected from medical institutions by an injury surveillance system. Types of behaviors to a product were derived from the injury text data using text mining technology. The relationship among products, types of behaviors, types of injuries and characteristics of children was modeled by Bayesian Network. The fundamental functions of the developed system and examples of new findings obtained by the system are reported in this paper.

  20. Aerodynamics of a Party Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that a party balloon can be made to fly erratically across a room, but it can also be used for quantitative measurements of other aspects of aerodynamics. Since a balloon is light and has a large surface area, even relatively weak aerodynamic forces can be readily demonstrated or measured in the classroom. Accurate measurements…

  1. Novel swine model of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Osamu; Iijima, Takehiko; Kohira, Takahiro; Teranishi, Mai; Kawasaki, Shin; Saito, Akira; Mikami, Yu; Sugiura, Asuka; Hashimoto, Shiho; Shimada, Eiko; Uchikawa, Makoto; Matsuhashi, Mika; Tsuno, Nelson H; Tanaka, Minoru; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Nagase, Takahide; Tadokoro, Kenji; Takahashi, Koki

    2014-12-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening complication of blood transfusion. Antibodies against human leukocyte antigens in donors' plasma are the major causes of TRALI. Several animal models of TRALI have been developed, and the mechanism underlying TRALI development has been extensively investigated using rodent models. Although sheep models of nonimmune TRALI have been developed, large-animal models of antibody-mediated TRALI are not yet available. To develop a swine model of TRALI, male Clawn strain miniature pigs were used. A monoclonal antibody (MoAb) against swine leukocyte antigens (SLAs) Class I (4G8, 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg body weight [BW]) and a control antibody (1.0 mg/kg BW) were injected into the peripheral vein after priming with or without 1 μg/kg BW lipopolysaccharide (LPS; n = 3 each). Lung injury was assessed using PaO2 /FiO2 (P/F) ratio and by chest X-ray imaging. Histopathologic analysis was also conducted. Lung injury could be induced by injecting 4G8 at an amount of 1.0 mg/kg BW, after LPS. The P/F ratio 90 minutes after the administration of 4G8 significantly decreased (p Lung injury was confirmed by histopathologic analysis. Lung injury in pigs was successfully induced by anti-SLA MoAb. Priming with LPS is a prerequisite for inducing lung injury and the amount of the antibody is a critical condition. © 2014 AABB.

  2. Vessel Ultrasound Sonographic Assessment of Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Efficacy in a Rat Balloon Injury Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Tae, DVM, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Sonograph results are consistent with those obtained from histology; that is, sRAGE produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells has significantly higher efficacy than insect cell-originated sRAGE cells.

  3. The development and application of an injury prediction model for noncontact, soft-tissue injuries in elite collision sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2010-10-01

    Limited information exists on the training dose-response relationship in elite collision sport athletes. In addition, no study has developed an injury prediction model for collision sport athletes. The purpose of this study was to develop an injury prediction model for noncontact, soft-tissue injuries in elite collision sport athletes. Ninety-one professional rugby league players participated in this 4-year prospective study. This study was conducted in 2 phases. Firstly, training load and injury data were prospectively recorded over 2 competitive seasons in elite collision sport athletes. Training load and injury data were modeled using a logistic regression model with a binomial distribution (injury vs. no injury) and logit link function. Secondly, training load and injury data were prospectively recorded over a further 2 competitive seasons in the same cohort of elite collision sport athletes. An injury prediction model based on planned and actual training loads was developed and implemented to determine if noncontact, soft-tissue injuries could be predicted and therefore prevented in elite collision sport athletes. Players were 50-80% likely to sustain a preseason injury within the training load range of 3,000-5,000 units. These training load 'thresholds' were considerably reduced (1,700-3,000 units) in the late-competition phase of the season. A total of 159 noncontact, soft-tissue injuries were sustained over the latter 2 seasons. The percentage of true positive predictions was 62.3% (n = 121), whereas the total number of false positive and false negative predictions was 20 and 18, respectively. Players that exceeded the training load threshold were 70 times more likely to test positive for noncontact, soft-tissue injury, whereas players that did not exceed the training load threshold were injured 1/10 as often. These findings provide information on the training dose-response relationship and a scientific method of monitoring and regulating training load in

  4. Injury representation against ballistic threats using three novel numerical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, Johno; Fryer, R; Pope, D; Clasper, J

    2017-06-01

    Injury modelling of ballistic threats is a valuable tool for informing policy on personal protective equipment and other injury mitigation methods. Currently, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) and Centre for Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI) are focusing on the development of three interlinking numerical models, each of a different fidelity, to answer specific questions on current threats. High-fidelity models simulate the physical events most realistically, and will be used in the future to test the medical effectiveness of personal armour systems. They are however generally computationally intensive, slow running and much of the experimental data to base their algorithms on do not yet exist. Medium fidelity models, such as the personnel vulnerability simulation (PVS), generally use algorithms based on physical or engineering estimations of interaction. This enables a reasonable representation of reality and greatly speeds up runtime allowing full assessments of the entire body area to be undertaken. Low-fidelity models such as the human injury predictor (HIP) tool generally use simplistic algorithms to make injury predictions. Individual scenarios can be run very quickly and hence enable statistical casualty assessments of large groups, where significant uncertainty concerning the threat and affected population exist. HIP is used to simulate the blast and penetrative fragmentation effects of a terrorist detonation of an improvised explosive device within crowds of people in metropolitan environments. This paper describes the collaboration between MoD and CPNI using an example of all three fidelities of injury model and to highlight future areas of research that are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Updates to Blast Injury Criteria Models for Nuclear Casualty Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    based Casualty Assessment (ORCA) software package contains models which track penetrating fragments and determine the likelihood of injury caused by the...pedestrian and bicycle accidents,” The Institute of Traffic Accident Investigators. Proceedings of the 5th Interantional Conference: 17th and 18th

  6. Podocyte Injury and Albuminuria in Experimental Hyperuricemic Model Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Asakawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although hyperuricemia is shown to accelerate chronic kidney disease, the mechanisms remain unclear. Accumulating studies also indicate that uric acid has both pro- and antioxidant properties. We postulated that hyperuricemia impairs the function of glomerular podocytes, resulting in albuminuria. Hyperuricemic model was induced by oral administration of 2% oxonic acid, a uricase inhibitor. Oxonic acid caused a twofold increase in serum uric acid levels at 8 weeks when compared to control animals. Hyperuricemia in this model was associated with the increase in blood pressure and the wall-thickening of afferent arterioles as well as arcuate arteries. Notably, hyperuricemic rats showed significant albuminuria, and the podocyte injury marker, desmin, was upregulated in the glomeruli. Conversely, podocin, the key component of podocyte slit diaphragm, was downregulated. Structural analysis using transmission electron microscopy confirmed podocyte injury in this model. We found that urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine levels were significantly increased and correlated with albuminuria and podocytopathy. Interestingly, although the superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol, ameliorated the vascular changes and the hypertension, it failed to reduce albuminuria, suggesting that vascular remodeling and podocyte injury in this model are mediated through different mechanisms. In conclusion, vasculopathy and podocytopathy may distinctly contribute to the kidney injury in a hyperuricemic state.

  7. Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories balloon operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaher, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    The establishment and functions of the AFCRL balloon operations facility are discussed. The types of research work conducted by the facility are defined. The facilities which support the balloon programs are described. The free balloon and tethered balloon capabilities are analyzed.

  8. 21 CFR 874.4100 - Epistaxis balloon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Epistaxis balloon. 874.4100 Section 874.4100 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4100 Epistaxis balloon. (a) Identification. An epistaxis balloon is a device consisting of an inflatable balloon intended to control internal...

  9. Stabilization of ballooning modes with sheared toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Waelbroeck, F.L.; Hassam, A.B.; Waltz, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes by sheared toroidal rotation is demonstrated using a shifted circle equilibrium model. A generalized ballooning mode representation is used to eliminate the fast Alfven wave, and an initial value code solves the resulting equations. The s-α diagram (magnetic shear versus pressure gradient) of ballooning mode theory is extended to include rotational shear. In the ballooning representation, the modes shift periodically along the field line to the next point of unfavorable curvature. The shift frequency (dΩ/dq, where Ω is the angular toroidal velocity and q is the safety factor) is proportional to the rotation shear and inversely proportional to the magnetic shear. Stability improves with increasing shift frequency and direct stable access to the second stability regime occurs when this frequency is approximately one-quarter to one-half the Alfven frequency, ω A =V A /qR. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  10. Ballooning stability analysis of JET H-mode discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, D.P.; Galvao, R.; Keilhacker, M.; Lazzaro, E.; Watkins, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of the stability of a large aspect ratio model equilibrium to ideal MHD ballooning modes have shown that across the bulk of the plasma there exist two marginally stable values of the pressure gradient parameter α. These define an unstable zone which separates the first (small α) stable region from the second (large α) stable region. Close to the separatrix, however, the first and second regions can coalesce when the surface averaged current density, Λ, exceeds a critical value. The plasma in this region is then stable to ballooning modes at all values of the pressure gradient. In this paper we extend these results to JET H-mode equilibria using a finite aspect ratio ballooning formalism, and assess the relevance of ideal ballooning stability in these discharges. In particular we analyse shot 15894 at time 56 sec. which is 1.3 s into the H-phase. (author) 4 refs., 4 figs

  11. Shock wave therapy effectively attenuates inflammation in rat carotid artery following endothelial denudation by balloon catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Pei-Lin; Chiu, Chaw-Chi; Yuen, Chun-Man; Chua, Sarah; Chang, Li-Teh; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Wang, Ching-Jen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave (ECSW) in ameliorating inflammatory mediator expression and neointimal formation in a rat model of vascular injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with left carotid artery (LCA) injury induced by balloon dilatation (BD; group 1) were compared with group 2 [LCA injury plus ECSW-181 (defined as 181 total shocks given in LCA at 0.011 mJ/mm(2)) on day 2 post-LCA injury], and group 3 (normal controls). The rats in each group were further divided into 3 subgroups (n = 6, each) that were sacrificed on postoperative day 3, 7 and 14, respectively. The results demonstrated that, compared to groups 2 and 3, group 1 had significantly increased cellular expression of CD40, interleukin-18, and connexin 43 at each analyzed time point (all p LCA neointimal proliferation and media thickness were markedly higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3 on days 7 and 14 post-BD (all p injury model.

  12. Expanding pedestrian injury risk to the body region level: how to model passive safety systems in pedestrian injury risk functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebuhr, Tobias; Junge, Mirko; Achmus, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the effectiveness of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) plays a crucial role in accident research. A common way to evaluate the effectiveness of new systems is to determine the potentials for injury severity reduction. Because injury risk functions describe the probability of an injury of a given severity conditional on a technical accident severity (closing speed, delta V, barrier equivalent speed, etc.), they are predestined for such evaluations. Recent work has stated an approach on how to model the pedestrian injury risk in pedestrian-to-passenger car accidents as a family of functions. This approach gave explicit and easily interpretable formulae for the injury risk conditional on the closing speed of the car. These results are extended to injury risk functions for pedestrian body regions. Starting with a double-checked German In-depth Accident Study (GIDAS) pedestrian-to-car accident data set (N = 444) and a functional-anatomical definition of the body regions, investigations on the influence of specific body regions on the overall injury severity will be presented. As the measure of injury severity, the ISSx, a rescaled version of the well-known Injury Severity Score (ISS), was used. Though traditional ISS is computed by summation of the squares of the 3 most severe injured body regions, ISSx is computed by the summation of the exponentials of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) severities of the 3 most severely injured body regions. The exponentials used are scaled to fit the ISS range of values between 0 and 75. Three body regions (head/face/neck, thorax, hip/legs) clearly dominated abdominal and upper extremity injuries; that is, the latter 2 body regions had no influence at all on the overall injury risk over the range of technical accident severities. Thus, the ISSx is well described by use of the injury codes from the same body regions for any pedestrian injury severity. As a mathematical consequence, the ISSx becomes explicitly

  13. Investigation of Management Models in Elite Athlete Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Kai Chen

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study investigated management models among elite athletes participating in sports including baseball, basketball, soccer, volleyball, tennis, softball, football, handball, track and field, swimming, judo, tae-kwon-do, gymnastics, archery, and weight lifting at the Tsoying National Sport Training Center. Data were collected by questionnaire. Of the 393 athletes investigated, 56% were male and 44% were female, with an average age of 20.9 years and average length of athletic experience of 9.8 years. At the time of the survey, 74.8% had sporting injuries and were being treated with Chinese and/or Western medicine. Among injured athletes, 14.5% chose Western treatment, 8.1% chose Chinese medicine, and 75.4% received combined treatment. There were various reasons for choosing the management model. Most athletes had ordinary self-recognition of sports injury prevention. Their qualified ability for sports injury prevention was 70%. This ability was significantly correlated with age, education, and sports experience. Within Taiwan's current medical and social environment, elite athletes prefer a combination of Eastern and Western treatments for sports injuries. Each of the medical approaches are widely accepted by elite athletes and their coaches. Doctors trained in Western medicine should learn these alternative treatment methods and apply them effectively in athletes, so that a better medical network can be established.

  14. Experimental models of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Brian M; Looney, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  16. Longitudinal Examination of Resilience After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwitz, Jennifer H; Sima, Adam P; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S; Dreer, Laura E; Bergquist, Thomas F; Zafonte, Ross; Johnson-Greene, Douglas; Felix, Elizabeth R

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate (1) the trajectory of resilience during the first year after a moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); (2) factors associated with resilience at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury; and (3) changing relationships over time between resilience and other factors. Longitudinal analysis of an observational cohort. Five inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients with TBI (N=195) enrolled in the resilience module of the TBI Model Systems study with data collected at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Not applicable. Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Initially, resilience levels appeared to be stable during the first year postinjury. Individual growth curve models were used to examine resilience over time in relation to demographic, psychosocial, and injury characteristics. After adjusting for these characteristics, resilience actually declined over time. Higher levels of resilience were related to nonminority status, absence of preinjury substance abuse, lower anxiety and disability level, and greater life satisfaction. Resilience is a construct that is relevant to understanding brain injury outcomes and has potential value in planning clinical interventions. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. US Air Force Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Worksheets containing pilot balloon data computed from releases at Air Force stations in the western United States. Elevation and azimuth angles are used to compute...

  18. US Daily Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pilot Balloon observational forms for the United States. Taken by Weather Bureau and U.S. Army observers. Period of record 1918-1960. Records scanned from the NCDC...

  19. Retrieving Balloon Data in Flight

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) program will soon make flights lasting up to 100 days. Some flights may generate high data rates and retrieving this data...

  20. US Monthly Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly winds aloft summary forms summarizing Pilot Balloon observational data for the United States. Generally labeled as Form 1114, and then transitioning to Form...

  1. Superpressure Tow Balloon for Extending Durations and Modifying Trajectories of High Altitude Balloon Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation involves the concept of using a Superpressure Tow Balloon (STB) with existing NASA high altitude balloon designs to form a tandem balloon...

  2. Skin injury model classification based on shape vector analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrich, Emil; Thali, Michael; Schweitzer, Wolf

    2012-11-06

    Skin injuries can be crucial in judicial decision making. Forensic experts base their classification on subjective opinions. This study investigates whether known classes of simulated skin injuries are correctly classified statistically based on 3D surface models and derived numerical shape descriptors. Skin injury surface characteristics are simulated with plasticine. Six injury classes - abrasions, incised wounds, gunshot entry wounds, smooth and textured strangulation marks as well as patterned injuries - with 18 instances each are used for a k-fold cross validation with six partitions. Deformed plasticine models are captured with a 3D surface scanner. Mean curvature is estimated for each polygon surface vertex. Subsequently, distance distributions and derived aspect ratios, convex hulls, concentric spheres, hyperbolic points and Fourier transforms are used to generate 1284-dimensional shape vectors. Subsequent descriptor reduction maximizing SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) result in an average of 41 descriptors (varying across k-folds). With non-normal multivariate distribution of heteroskedastic data, requirements for LDA (linear discriminant analysis) are not met. Thus, shrinkage parameters of RDA (regularized discriminant analysis) are optimized yielding a best performance with λ = 0.99 and γ = 0.001. Receiver Operating Characteristic of a descriptive RDA yields an ideal Area Under the Curve of 1.0 for all six categories. Predictive RDA results in an average CRR (correct recognition rate) of 97,22% under a 6 partition k-fold. Adding uniform noise within the range of one standard deviation degrades the average CRR to 71,3%. Digitized 3D surface shape data can be used to automatically classify idealized shape models of simulated skin injuries. Deriving some well established descriptors such as histograms, saddle shape of hyperbolic points or convex hulls with subsequent reduction of dimensionality while maximizing SNR seem to work well for the data at hand, as

  3. Ballooning Stability of the Compact Quasiaxially Symmetric Stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redi, M.H.; Canik, J.; Dewar, R.L.; Johnson, J.L.; Klasky, S.; Cooper, W.A.; Kerbichler, W.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning stability of a compact, quasiaxially symmetric stellarator (QAS), expected to achieve good stability and particle confinement is examined with a method that can lead to estimates of global stability. Making use of fully 3D, ideal-MHD stability codes, the QAS beta is predicted to be limited above 4% by ballooning and high-n kink modes. Here MHD stability is analyzed through the calculation and examination of the ballooning mode eigenvalue isosurfaces in the 3-space [s, alpha, theta(subscript ''k'')]; s is the edge normalized toroidal flux, alpha is the field line variable, and theta(subscript ''k'') is the perpendicular wave vector or ballooning parameter. Broken symmetry, i.e., deviations from axisymmetry, in the stellarator magnetic field geometry causes localization of the ballooning mode eigenfunction, with new types of nonsymmetric, eigenvalue isosurfaces in both the stable and unstable spectrum. The isosurfaces around the most unstable points i n parameter space (well above marginal) are topologically spherical. In such cases, attempts to use ray tracing to construct global ballooning modes lead to a k-space runaway. Introduction of a reflecting cutoff in k(perpendicular) to model numerical truncation or finite Larmor radius (FLR) yields chaotic ray paths ergodically filling the allowed phase space, indicating that the global spectrum must be described using the language of quantum chaos theory. However, the isosurface for marginal stability in the cases studied are found to have a more complex topology, making estimation of FLR stabilization more difficult

  4. Pioneering Space Research with Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. V.

    NASA s Scientific Ballooning Planning Team has concluded that ballooning enables significant scientific discoveries while providing test beds for space instruments and training for young scientists Circumpolar flights around Antarctica have been spectacularly successful with fight durations up to 42 days Demand for participation in this Long-Duration Balloon LDB program a partnership with the U S National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs is greater than the current capacity of two flights per campaign Given appropriate international agreements LDB flights in the Northern Hemisphere would be competitive with Antarctic flights and super-pressure balloons would allow comparable flights at any latitude The Balloon Planning Team made several recommendations for LDB flights provide a reliable funding source for sophisticated payloads extend the Antarctic capability to three flights per year and develop a comparable capability in the Arctic provide aircraft for intact-payload recovery develop a modest trajectory modification capability to enable longer flights and enhance super-pressure balloons to carry 1-ton payloads to 38 km Implementation of these recommendations would facilitate frequent access to near-space for cutting-edge research and technology development for a wide range of investigations

  5. Cardiopulmonary Circuit Models for Predicting Injury to the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Richard; Wing, Sarah; Bassingthwaighte, James; Neal, Maxwell

    2004-11-01

    Circuit models have been used extensively in physiology to describe cardiopulmonary function. Such models are being used in the DARPA Virtual Soldier (VS) Project* to predict the response to injury or physiological stress. The most complex model consists of systemic circulation, pulmonary circulation, and a four-chamber heart sub-model. This model also includes baroreceptor feedback, airway mechanics, gas exchange, and pleural pressure influence on the circulation. As part of the VS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been evaluating various cardiopulmonary circuit models for predicting the effects of injury to the heart. We describe, from a physicist's perspective, the concept of building circuit models, discuss both unstressed and stressed models, and show how the stressed models are used to predict effects of specific wounds. *This work was supported by a grant from the DARPA, executed by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command/TATRC Cooperative Agreement, Contract # W81XWH-04-2-0012. The submitted manuscript has been authored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed for the U.S. DOE by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purpose.

  6. Animal models for radiation injury, protection and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Alison Deckhut; Gondré-Lewis, Timothy; McBride, William; Miller, Lara; Pellmar, Terry C; Rockwell, Sara

    2005-07-01

    Current events throughout the world underscore the growing threat of different forms of terrorism, including radiological or nuclear attack. Pharmaceutical products and other approaches are needed to protect the civilian population from radiation and to treat those with radiation-induced injuries. In the event of an attack, radiation exposures will be heterogeneous in terms of both dose and quality, depending on the type of device used and each victim's location relative to the radiation source. Therefore, methods are needed to protect against and treat a wide range of early and slowly developing radiation-induced injuries. Equally important is the development of rapid and accurate biodosimetry methods for estimating radiation doses to individuals and guiding clinical treatment decisions. Acute effects of high-dose radiation include hematopoietic cell loss, immune suppression, mucosal damage (gastrointestinal and oral), and potential injury to other sites such as the lung, kidney and central nervous system (CNS). Long-term effects, as a result of both high- and low-dose radiation, include dysfunction or fibrosis in a wide range of organs and tissues and cancer. The availability of appropriate types of animal models, as well as adequate numbers of animals, is likely to be a major bottleneck in the development of new or improved radioprotectors, mitigators and therapeutic agents to prevent or treat radiation injuries and of biodosimetry methods to measure radiation doses to individuals.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Postconditioning Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, D; Cummings, L J

    2017-11-01

    Reperfusion (restoration of blood flow) after a period of ischemia (interruption of blood flow) can paradoxically place tissues at risk of further injury: so-called ischemia-reperfusion injury or IR injury. Recent studies have shown that postconditioning (intermittent periods of further ischemia applied during reperfusion) can reduce IR injury. We develop a mathematical model to describe the reperfusion and postconditioning process following an ischemic insult, treating the blood vessel as a two-dimensional channel, lined with a monolayer of endothelial cells that interact (respiration and mechanotransduction) with the blood flow. We investigate how postconditioning affects the total cell density within the endothelial layer, by varying the frequency of the pulsatile flow and the oxygen concentration at the inflow boundary. We find that, in the scenarios we consider, the pulsatile flow should be of high frequency to minimize cellular damage, while oxygen concentration at the inflow boundary should be held constant, or subject to only low-frequency variations, to maximize cell proliferation.

  8. Central nervous system radiation injury in small animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogel, A.J. van der

    1991-01-01

    Experimental studies on radiation injury in the central nervous system have been carried out in many species ranging from mouse to monkey. This review is restricted to studies in rodents irradiated with low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. In this paper, the various rodent models of brain and spinal cord injury are described with particular emphasis on the pathology of different types of lesions and theories of their pathogenesis. Many of the initial studies were limited to relatively high single doses, but in later work more clinically relevant fractionated irradiation schemes were employed. This has led to the recognition of various types of early and late delayed injury that are analogous to the syndromes observed in humans. Two main pathways have been suggested for the pathogenesis, one involving predominantly the progressive loss of glial cells and the other involving vascular injury. The relative importance of both mechanisms will be discussed with respect to treatment conditions and to dose level in particular. An hypothesis is presented concerning the possible role of different cell types in the development of specific syndromes

  9. Representativeness of the Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems National Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, Jessica M; Cuthbert, Jeffrey P; Deutsch, Anne; Chen, Yuying; Charlifue, Susan; Chen, David; Dijkers, Marcel P; Graham, James E; Heinemann, Allen W; Lammertse, Daniel P; Whiteneck, Gale G

    2018-02-01

    Secondary analysis of prospectively collected observational data. To assess the representativeness of the Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems National Database (SCIMS-NDB) of all adults aged 18 years or older receiving inpatient rehabilitation in the United States (US) for new onset traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). Inpatient rehabilitation centers in the US. We compared demographic, functional status, and injury characteristics (nine categorical variables comprising of 46 categories and two continuous variables) between the SCIMS-NDB (N = 5969) and UDS-PRO/eRehabData (N = 99,142) cases discharged from inpatient rehabilitation in 2000-2010. There are negligible differences (exist for age categories, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, FIM Motor score, and time from injury to rehabilitation admission. Important differences (>10%) exist in mean age and preinjury occupational status; the SCIMS-NDB sample was younger and included a higher percentage of individuals who were employed (62.7 vs. 41.7%) and fewer who were retired (10.2 vs. 36.1%). Adults in the SCIMS-NDB are largely representative of the population of adults receiving inpatient rehabilitation for new onset TSCI in the US. However, users of the SCIMS-NDB may need to adjust statistically for differences in age and preinjury occupational status to improve generalizability of findings.

  10. Anchoring barbs and balloon expandable stents: what is the risk of perforation and failed stent deployment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, M J; Harrison, G J; How, T V; Brennan, J A; Fisher, R K; Vallabhaneni, S R; McWilliams, R G

    2012-09-01

    Balloon expandable stents may on occasion be deployed in close proximity to the anchoring barbs of endovascular grafts. The aim of this study was to determine the risk and effect of balloon perforation by anchoring barbs and to assess whether these risks are different if the balloon is protected by a covered stent mounted upon it. A bench-top model was developed to mimic the penetration of anchoring barbs into the lumen of medium sized blood vessels. The model allowed variation of angle and depth of vessel penetration. Both bare balloons and those with covered stents mounted upon them were tested in the model to determine whether there was a risk of perforation and which factors increased or decreased this risk. All combinations of barb angle and depth caused balloon perforation but this was most marked when the barb was placed perpendicular to the long axis of the balloon. When the deployment of covered stents was attempted balloon perforation occurred in some cases but full stent deployment was achieved in all cases where the perforation was in the portion of the balloon covered by the stent. The only situation in which stent deployment failed was where the barb was intentionally placed in the uncovered portion of the balloon. This resulted in only partial deployment of the stent. Balloon rupture is a distinct possibility when deploying balloon-expandable stents in close proximity to anchoring barbs. Care should be taken in this circumstance to ensure that the barb is well away from the uncovered portion of the balloon. Copyright © 2012 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Paraquat-induced injury of type II alveolar cells. An in vitro model of oxidant injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skillrud, D.M.; Martin, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Paraquat, a widely used herbicide, causes severe, often fatal lung damage. In vivo studies suggest the alveolar epithelial cells (types I and II) are specific targets of paraquat toxicity. This study used 51 Cr-labeled type II cells to demonstrate that paraquat (10-5 M) resulted in type II cell injury in vitro, independent of interacting immune effector agents. With 51 Cr release expressed as the cytotoxic index (Cl), type II cell injury was found to accelerate with increasing paraquat concentrations (10(-5) M, 10(-4) M, and 10(-3) M, resulting in a Cl of 12.5 +/- 2.2, 22.8 +/- 1.8, and 35.1 +/- 1.9, respectively). Paraquat-induced cytotoxicity (10(-4) M, with a Cl of 22.8 +/- 1.8) was effectively reduced by catalase 1,100 U/ml (Cl 8.0 +/- 3.2, p less than 0.001), superoxide dismutase, 300 U/ml (Cl 17.4 +/- 1.7, p less than 0.05), alpha tocopherol, 10 micrograms/ml (Cl 17.8 +/- 1.6, p less than 0.05). Paraquat toxicity (10(-3) M) was potentiated in the presence of 95% O2 with an increase in Cl from 31.1 +/- 1.7 to 36.4 +/- 2.3 (p less than 0.05). Paraquat-induced type II cell injury was noted as early as 4 h incubation by electron microscopic evidence of swelling of mitochondrial cristae and dispersion of nuclear chromatin. Thus, this in vitro model indicates that paraquat-induced type II cell injury can be quantified, confirmed by morphologic ultrastructural changes, significantly reduced by antioxidants, and potentiated by hyperoxia

  12. Experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirelles, Rafael Panisi de Campos [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Hochman, Bernardo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Cirurgia; Helene Junior, Americo; Fraga, Murillo Francisco Pires [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia. Divisao de Cirurgia Plastica; Lellis, Rute [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Divisao de Patologia; Ferreira, Lydia Masako, E-mail: rpcmeirelles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: lydia.dcir@epm.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Divisao de Cirugia Plastica

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: to describe an experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. Methods: on this study eight six-month-old New Zealand male rabbits, with an average weight of 2.5kg were used. They were distributed in four groups (n=2 per group). The control group did not receive radiotherapy and the others received one radiotherapy session of 2000, 3000 and 4500 cGy, respectively. Photographic analysis and histopathological evaluation of the irradiated areas were carried out. Results: after 30 days, the animals from the control group had all their hair grown. In spite of that, the animals from group 2000 cGy had a 60-day alopecia and from group 3000 cGy, a 90-day alopecia. After the 30th day, the 3000cGy group demonstrated 90-day cutaneous radiation injuries, graded 3 and 4. One of the animals from group 4500 cGy died on the 7th day with visceral necrosis. The other from the same group had total skin necrosis. A progressive reduction of glands and blood vessels count and an increase on collagen deposition was observed. Conclusion: The proposed experimental model is reproducible. This study suggests that the dosage 4500cGy is excessive and the 3000 cGy is the most effective for this experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. (author)

  13. Guinea pigs as an animal model for sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Abu Rafee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overwhelming use of rat models in nerve regeneration studies is likely to induce skewness in treatment outcomes. To address the problem, this study was conducted in 8 adult guinea pigs of either sex to investigate the suitability of guinea pig as an alternative model for nerve regeneration studies. A crush injury was inflicted to the sciatic nerve of the left limb, which led to significant decrease in the pain perception and neurorecovery up to the 4th weak. Lengthening of foot print and shortening of toe spread were observed in the paw after nerve injury. A 3.49 ± 0.35 fold increase in expression of neuropilin 1 (NRP1 gene and 2.09 ± 0.51 fold increase in neuropilin 2 (NRP2 gene were recorded 1 week after nerve injury as compared to the normal nerve. Ratios of gastrocnemius muscle weight and volume of the experimental limb to control limb showed more than 50% decrease on the 30th day. Histopathologically, vacuolated appearance of the nerve was observed with presence of degenerated myelin debris in digestion chambers. Gastrocnemius muscle also showed degenerative changes. Scanning electron microscopy revealed loose and rough arrangement of connective tissue fibrils and presence of large spherical globules in crushed sciatic nerve. The findings suggest that guinea pigs could be used as an alternative animal model for nerve regeneration studies and might be preferred over rats due to their cooperative nature while recording different parameters.

  14. Experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirelles, Rafael Panisi de Campos; Hochman, Bernardo; Helene Junior, Americo; Fraga, Murillo Francisco Pires; Lellis, Rute; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: to describe an experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. Methods: on this study eight six-month-old New Zealand male rabbits, with an average weight of 2.5kg were used. They were distributed in four groups (n=2 per group). The control group did not receive radiotherapy and the others received one radiotherapy session of 2000, 3000 and 4500 cGy, respectively. Photographic analysis and histopathological evaluation of the irradiated areas were carried out. Results: after 30 days, the animals from the control group had all their hair grown. In spite of that, the animals from group 2000 cGy had a 60-day alopecia and from group 3000 cGy, a 90-day alopecia. After the 30th day, the 3000cGy group demonstrated 90-day cutaneous radiation injuries, graded 3 and 4. One of the animals from group 4500 cGy died on the 7th day with visceral necrosis. The other from the same group had total skin necrosis. A progressive reduction of glands and blood vessels count and an increase on collagen deposition was observed. Conclusion: The proposed experimental model is reproducible. This study suggests that the dosage 4500cGy is excessive and the 3000 cGy is the most effective for this experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. (author)

  15. Modeling crash injury severity by road feature to improve safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penmetsa, Praveena; Pulugurtha, Srinivas S

    2018-01-02

    The objective of this research is 2-fold: to (a) model and identify critical road features (or locations) based on crash injury severity and compare it with crash frequency and (b) model and identify drivers who are more likely to contribute to crashes by road feature. Crash data from 2011 to 2013 were obtained from the Highway Safety Information System (HSIS) for the state of North Carolina. Twenty-three different road features were considered, analyzed, and compared with each other as well as no road feature. A multinomial logit (MNL) model was developed and odds ratios were estimated to investigate the effect of road features on crash injury severity. Among the many road features, underpass, end or beginning of a divided highway, and on-ramp terminal on crossroad are the top 3 critical road features. Intersection crashes are frequent but are not highly likely to result in severe injuries compared to critical road features. Roundabouts are least likely to result in both severe and moderate injuries. Female drivers are more likely to be involved in crashes at intersections (4-way and T) compared to male drivers. Adult drivers are more likely to be involved in crashes at underpasses. Older drivers are 1.6 times more likely to be involved in a crash at the end or beginning of a divided highway. The findings from this research help to identify critical road features that need to be given priority. As an example, additional advanced warning signs and providing enlarged or highly retroreflective signs that grab the attention of older drivers may help in making locations such as end or beginning of a divided highway much safer. Educating drivers about the necessary skill sets required at critical road features in addition to engineering solutions may further help them adopt safe driving behaviors on the road.

  16. Wave power absorption by a submerged balloon fixed to the sea bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurniawan, Adi; Greaves, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of absorbing wave energy using a submerged balloon fixed to the sea bed is investigated. The balloon is in the form of a fabric encased within an array of meridional tendons which terminate at a point at the top of the balloon and at some radius at the bottom. The expansion...... and contraction of the balloon in waves pump air via a turbine into and out of a chamber of constant volume. A more refined model than that used by Kurniawan and Greaves [Proc. 2nd Offshore Energy and Storage Symposium , 2015] predicts a similarly broad-banded response, but the maximum absorption is less than...

  17. Management of intra-aortic balloon pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Christopher A-J; Weyker, Paul D; Flynn, Brigid C

    2015-06-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs) continue to be the most widely used cardiac support devices with an annual estimate of 200 000 IABPs placed worldwide. IABPs enhance myocardial function by maximizing oxygen supply and minimizing oxygen demand. The use of IABPs is not without risk, with major vascular injury, ischemia, and infection being the most common complications, especially in high-risk patients. While recent studies have questioned the use of IABPs in patients with cardiogenic shock secondary to myocardial infarction, these studies have limitations making it difficult to formulate definitive conclusions. This review will focus on the mechanisms of counterpulsation, the management of IABPs and the evidence supporting this ventricular support therapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Mathematical model of normal tissue injury in telegammatherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, S.A.; Lyass, F.M.; Mamin, R.G.; Minakova, E.I.; Raevskaya, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    A model of normal tissue injury as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation is based on an assumption that the degree of tissue injury is determined by the degree of destruction by certain critical cells. The dependence of the number of lethal injuriies on a single dose is expressed by a trinomial - linear and quadratic parts and a constant, obtained as a result of the processing of experimental data. Quantitative correlations have been obtained for the skin and brain. They have been tested using clinical and experimental material. The results of the testing point out to the absence of time dependence on a single up to 6-week irradiation cources. Correlation with an irradiation field has been obtained for the skin. A conclusion has been made that the concept of isoefficacy of irradiation cources is conditional. Spatial-time fractionation is a promising direction in the development of radiation therapy

  19. Balloon sizing and transcatheter closure of acute atrial septal defects guided by magnetic resonance fluoroscopy: assessment and validation in a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalla, Simon; Saeed, Maythem; Higgins, Charles B; Weber, Oliver; Martin, Alastair; Moore, Phillip

    2005-03-01

    To quantitatively assess atrial septal defects (ASDs) with small shunts using MRI followed by transcatheter closure monitored by MR fluoroscopy. Acute ASDs were created in 14 pigs under x-ray fluoroscopy. Six animals were studied in order to select MR-compatible delivery systems and imaging strategies. ASDs in eight animals were examined with balloon sizing under MR fluoroscopy, flow measurements, and contrast media injections, after which transcatheter closure was performed under MR fluoroscopy. The delivery system was assembled from commercially available materials. The ratio of pulmonary to systemic flow (Qp/Qs) was reduced from 1.23 +/- 0.15 before ASD closure to 1.07 +/- 0.11 after ASD closure (P animals Qp/Qs was close to 1.0 before closure despite the presence of defects >15 mm. The ASDs were measurable with MR balloon sizing in all of the animals. Balloon sizing was identical with MR (16.9 +/- 2.3 mm) and x-ray fluoroscopy (17.1 +/- 1.3 mm). The in-house-assembled delivery system allowed successful placement of closure devices under MR guidance. Assessment and closure of small shunts with MR fluoroscopy is feasible. A barrier to the rapid implementation of transcatheter closure in patients is uncertainty about the MR safety of guidewires and device delivery systems. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Internet and Social Media Use After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Sparr, Christina; Hart, Tessa; Bergquist, Thomas; Bogner, Jennifer; Dreer, Laura; Juengst, Shannon; Mellick, David; OʼNeil-Pirozzi, Therese M; Sander, Angelle M; Whiteneck, Gale G

    To characterize Internet and social media use among adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to compare demographic and socioeconomic factors associated with Internet use between those with and without TBI. Ten Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems centers. Persons with moderate to severe TBI (N = 337) enrolled in the TBI Model Systems National Database and eligible for follow-up from April 1, 2014, to March 31, 2015. Prospective cross-sectional observational cohort study. Internet usage survey. The proportion of Internet users with TBI was high (74%) but significantly lower than those in the general population (84%). Smartphones were the most prevalent means of Internet access for persons with TBI. The majority of Internet users with TBI had a profile account on a social networking site (79%), with more than half of the sample reporting multiplatform use of 2 or more social networking sites. Despite the prevalence of Internet use among persons with TBI, technological disparities remain in comparison with the general population. The extent of social media use among persons with TBI demonstrates the potential of these platforms for social engagement and other purposes. However, further research examining the quality of online activities and identifying potential risk factors of problematic use is recommended.

  1. Suppressive activities and mechanisms of ugonin J on vascular smooth muscle cells and balloon angioplasty-induced neointimal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chun-Hsu; Li, Pei-Chuan; Chien, Yi-Chung; Yeh, Wan-Ting; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Sheu, Ming-Jyh; Wu, Chieh-Hsi

    2018-02-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia (or restenosis) is primarily attributed to excessive proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects and mechanisms of ugonin J on VSMC proliferation and migration as well as neointimal formation. Cell viability and the cell-cycle distribution were, respectively, analyzed using an MTT assay and flow cytometry. Cell migration was examined using a wound-healing analysis and a transwell assay. Protein expressions and gelatinase activities were, respectively, measured using Western blot and gelatin zymography. Balloon angioplasty-induced neointimal formation was induced in a rat carotid artery model and then examined using immunohistochemical staining. Ugonin J induced cell-cycle arrest at the G 0 /G 1 phase and apoptosis to inhibit VSMC growth. Ugonin J also exhibited marked suppressive activity on VSMC migration. Ugonin J significantly reduced activations of focal adhesion kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 proteins. Moreover, ugonin J obviously reduced expressions and activity levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9. In vivo data indicated that ugonin J prevented balloon angioplasty-induced neointimal hyperplasia. Our study suggested that ugonin J has the potential for application in the prevention of balloon injury-induced neointimal formation. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Behavioral and social sciences theories and models: are they used in unintentional injury prevention research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, L B; Gielen, A C; Sleet, D A; Hopkins, K

    2005-06-01

    Behavioral and social sciences theories and models have the potential to enhance efforts to reduce unintentional injuries. The authors reviewed the published literature on behavioral and social science theory applications to unintentional injury problems to enumerate and categorize the ways different theories and models are used in injury prevention research. The authors conducted a systematic review to evaluate the published literature from 1980 to 2001 on behavioral and social science theory applications to unintentional injury prevention and control. Electronic database searches in PubMed and PsycINFO identified articles that combined behavioral and social sciences theories and models and injury causes. The authors identified some articles that examined behavioral and social science theories and models and unintentional injury topics, but found that several important theories have never been applied to unintentional injury prevention. Among the articles identified, the PRECEDE PROCEED Model was cited most frequently, followed by the Theory of Reasoned Action/Theory of Planned Behavior and Health Belief Model. When behavioral and social sciences theories and models were applied to unintentional injury topics, they were most frequently used to guide program design, implementation or develop evaluation measures; few examples of theory testing were found. Results suggest that the use of behavioral and social sciences theories and models in unintentional injury prevention research is only marginally represented in the mainstream, peer-reviewed literature. Both the fields of injury prevention and behavioral and social sciences could benefit from greater collaborative research to enhance behavioral approaches to injury control.

  3. Status of the NASA Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, H. C.; Nock, R. S.; Bawcom, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Balloon Program (BP) is examined in an overview of design philosophy, R&D activities, flight testing, and the development of a long-duration balloon for Antarctic use. The Balloon Recovery Program was developed to qualify the use of existing films and to design improved materials and seals. Balloon flights are described for studying the supernova SN1987a, and systems were developed to enhance balloon campaigns including mobile launch vehicles and tracking/data-acquisition systems. The technical approach to long-duration ballooning is reviewed which allows the use of payloads of up to 1350 kg for two to three weeks. The BP is responsible for the development of several candidate polyethylene balloon films as well as design/performance standards for candidate balloons. Specific progress is noted in reliability and in R&D with respect to optimization of structural design, resin blending, and extrusion.

  4. Acoustic Detection from Aerial Balloon Platform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reiff, C; Pham, T; Scanlon, M; Noble, J; Van Landuyt, A; Petek, J; Ratches, J

    2004-01-01

    ... such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and balloons. Our most immediate collaboration focuses on the use of acoustic sensors on small balloons and/or aerostats at several elevations and on the ground with the primary goals...

  5. Mars Solar Balloon Lander, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Solar Balloon Lander (MSBL) is a novel concept which utilizes the capability of solar-heated hot air balloons to perform soft landings of scientific...

  6. Structure variations of pumpkin balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, N.; Izutsu, N.; Honda, H.

    2004-01-01

    A lobed pumpkin balloon by 3-D gore design concept is recognized as a basic form for a super-pressure balloon. This paper deals with extensions of this design concept for other large pressurized membrane structures, such as a stratospheric airship and a balloon of which volume is controllable. The structural modifications are performed by means of additional ropes, belts or a strut. When the original pumpkin shape is modified by these systems, the superior characteristics of the 3-D gore design, incorporating large bulges with a small local radius and unidirectional film tension, should be maintained. Improved design methods which are adequate for the above subjects will be discussed in detail. Application for ground structures are also mentioned.

  7. Concussion, microvascular injury, and early tauopathy in young athletes after impact head injury and an impact concussion mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagge, Chad A; Fisher, Andrew M; Minaeva, Olga V; Gaudreau-Balderrama, Amanda; Moncaster, Juliet A; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Wojnarowicz, Mark W; Casey, Noel; Lu, Haiyan; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Saman, Sudad; Ericsson, Maria; Onos, Kristen D; Veksler, Ronel; Senatorov, Vladimir V; Kondo, Asami; Zhou, Xiao Z; Miry, Omid; Vose, Linnea R; Gopaul, Katisha R; Upreti, Chirag; Nowinski, Christopher J; Cantu, Robert C; Alvarez, Victor E; Hildebrandt, Audrey M; Franz, Erich S; Konrad, Janusz; Hamilton, James A; Hua, Ning; Tripodis, Yorghos; Anderson, Andrew T; Howell, Gareth R; Kaufer, Daniela; Hall, Garth F; Lu, Kun P; Ransohoff, Richard M; Cleveland, Robin O; Kowall, Neil W; Stein, Thor D; Lamb, Bruce T; Huber, Bertrand R; Moss, William C; Friedman, Alon; Stanton, Patric K; McKee, Ann C; Goldstein, Lee E

    2018-02-01

    The mechanisms underpinning concussion, traumatic brain injury, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and the relationships between these disorders, are poorly understood. We examined post-mortem brains from teenage athletes in the acute-subacute period after mild closed-head impact injury and found astrocytosis, myelinated axonopathy, microvascular injury, perivascular neuroinflammation, and phosphorylated tau protein pathology. To investigate causal mechanisms, we developed a mouse model of lateral closed-head impact injury that uses momentum transfer to induce traumatic head acceleration. Unanaesthetized mice subjected to unilateral impact exhibited abrupt onset, transient course, and rapid resolution of a concussion-like syndrome characterized by altered arousal, contralateral hemiparesis, truncal ataxia, locomotor and balance impairments, and neurobehavioural deficits. Experimental impact injury was associated with axonopathy, blood-brain barrier disruption, astrocytosis, microgliosis (with activation of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells, TREM2), monocyte infiltration, and phosphorylated tauopathy in cerebral cortex ipsilateral and subjacent to impact. Phosphorylated tauopathy was detected in ipsilateral axons by 24 h, bilateral axons and soma by 2 weeks, and distant cortex bilaterally at 5.5 months post-injury. Impact pathologies co-localized with serum albumin extravasation in the brain that was diagnostically detectable in living mice by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These pathologies were also accompanied by early, persistent, and bilateral impairment in axonal conduction velocity in the hippocampus and defective long-term potentiation of synaptic neurotransmission in the medial prefrontal cortex, brain regions distant from acute brain injury. Surprisingly, acute neurobehavioural deficits at the time of injury did not correlate with blood-brain barrier disruption, microgliosis, neuroinflammation, phosphorylated tauopathy, or

  8. Robust human body model injury prediction in simulated side impact crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golman, Adam J; Danelson, Kerry A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    This study developed a parametric methodology to robustly predict occupant injuries sustained in real-world crashes using a finite element (FE) human body model (HBM). One hundred and twenty near-side impact motor vehicle crashes were simulated over a range of parameters using a Toyota RAV4 (bullet vehicle), Ford Taurus (struck vehicle) FE models and a validated human body model (HBM) Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS). Three bullet vehicle crash parameters (speed, location and angle) and two occupant parameters (seat position and age) were varied using a Latin hypercube design of Experiments. Four injury metrics (head injury criterion, half deflection, thoracic trauma index and pelvic force) were used to calculate injury risk. Rib fracture prediction and lung strain metrics were also analysed. As hypothesized, bullet speed had the greatest effect on each injury measure. Injury risk was reduced when bullet location was further from the B-pillar or when the bullet angle was more oblique. Age had strong correlation to rib fractures frequency and lung strain severity. The injuries from a real-world crash were predicted using two different methods by (1) subsampling the injury predictors from the 12 best crush profile matching simulations and (2) using regression models. Both injury prediction methods successfully predicted the case occupant's low risk for pelvic injury, high risk for thoracic injury, rib fractures and high lung strains with tight confidence intervals. This parametric methodology was successfully used to explore crash parameter interactions and to robustly predict real-world injuries.

  9. Impact of Paclitaxel Dose on Tissue Pharmacokinetics and Vascular Healing: A Comparative Drug-Coated Balloon Study in the Familial Hypercholesterolemic Swine Model of Superficial Femoral In-Stent Restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Carlos A; Shibuya, Masahiko; Wessler, Jeffrey D; McGregor, Jenn; Tellez, Armando; Cheng, Yanping; Conditt, Gerard B; Kaluza, Greg L; Granada, Juan F

    2015-07-01

    This study sought to compare the effect of paclitaxel-coated balloon (PCB) concentration on tissue levels and vascular healing using 3 different PCB technologies (In.Pact Pacific = 3 μg/mm(2), Lutonix = 2 μg/mm(2) and Ranger = 2 μg/mm(2)) in the experimental setting. The optimal therapeutic dose for PCB use has not been determined yet. Paclitaxel tissue levels were measured up to 60 days following PCB inflation (Ranger and In.Pact Pacific) in the superficial femoral artery of healthy swine (18 swine, 36 vessels). The familial hypercholesterolemic swine model of superficial femoral artery in-stent restenosis (6 swine, 24 vessels) was used in the efficacy study. Two weeks following bare-metal stent implantation, each in-stent restenosis site was randomly treated with a PCB or an uncoated control balloon (Sterling). Quantitative vascular analysis and histology evaluation was performed 28 days following PCB treatment. All PCB technologies displayed comparable paclitaxel tissue levels 4 h following balloon inflation. At 28 days, all PCB had achieved therapeutic tissue levels; however, the In.Pact PCB resulted in higher tissue concentrations than did the other PCB groups at all time points. Neointimal inhibition by histology was decreased in all PCB groups compared with the control group, with a greater decrease in the In.Pact group. However, the neointima was more mature and contained less peri-strut fibrin deposits in both 2-μg/mm(2) PCB groups. Compared with the clinically established PCB dose, lower-dose PCB technologies achieve lower long-term tissue levels but comparable degrees of neointimal inhibition and fewer fibrin deposits. The impact of these findings in restenosis reduction and clinical outcomes needs to be further investigated. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Complications of balloon packing in epistaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeeren, Lenka; Derks, Wynia; Fokkens, Wytske; Menger, Dirk Jan

    2015-01-01

    Although balloon packing appears to be efficient to control epistaxis, severe local complications can occur. We describe four patients with local lesions after balloon packing. Prolonged balloon packing can cause damage to nasal mucosa, septum and alar skin (nasal mucosa, the cartilaginous skeleton

  11. Manipulation of nitric oxide in an animal model of acute liver injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated the impact of altering nitric oxide release on acute liver injury, the associated gut injury and bacterial translocation, at different time intervals. Methods: An acute rat liver injury model induced by D-galactosamine was used. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four main groups: normal control, acute liver ...

  12. Parental combat injury and early child development: a conceptual model for differentiating effects of visible and invisible injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Lisa A; Fitzgerald, Hiram E; Blow, Adrian J

    2010-03-01

    The injuries (physical and emotional) sustained by service members during combat influence all members of a family system. This review used a systemic framework to conceptualize the direct and indirect effects of a service member's injury on family functioning, with a specific focus on young children. Using a meta-ethnographic approach to synthesize the health research literature from a variety of disciplines, this review makes relevant linkages to health care professionals working with injured veterans. Studies were included that examined how family functioning (psychological and physical) is impacted by parental illness; parental injury; and posttraumatic stress disorder. The synthesis of literature led to the development of a heuristic model that illustrates both direct and indirect effects of parental injury on family functioning and the development of young children. It further illustrates the contextual factors or moderating variables that buffer detrimental effects and promote family resilience. This model can be a foundation for future research, intervention, and policy.

  13. Probabilistic Modeling and Evaluation of Surf Zone Injury Occurrence along the Delaware Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doelp, M.; Puleo, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Beebe Healthcare in Lewes, DE collected along the DE coast surf zone injury (SZI) data for seven summer seasons from 2010 through 2016. Data include, but are not limited to, time of injury, gender, age, and activity. Over 2000 injuries were recorded over the seven year period, including 116 spinal injuries and three fatalities. These injuries are predominantly wave related incidents including wading (41%), bodysurfing (26%), and body-boarding (20%). Despite the large number of injuries, beach associated hazards do not receive the same level of awareness that rip currents receive. Injury population statistics revealed those between the ages of 11 and 15 years old suffered the greatest proportion of injuries (18.8%). Male water users were twice as likely to sustain injury as their female counterparts. Also, non-locals were roughly six times more likely to sustain injury than locals. In 2016, five or more injuries occurred for 18.5% of the days sampled, and no injuries occurred for 31.4% of the sample days. The episodic nature of injury occurrence and population statistics indicate the importance of environmental conditions and human behavior on surf zone injuries. Higher order statistics are necessary to effectively assess SZI cause and likelihood of occurrence on a particular day. A Bayesian network using Netica software (Norsys) was constructed to model SZI and predict changes in injury likelihood on an hourly basis. The network incorporates environmental data collected by weather stations, NDBC buoy #44009, USACE buoy at Bethany Beach, and by researcher personnel on the beach. The Bayesian model includes prior (e.g., historic) information to infer relationships between provided parameters. Sensitivity analysis determined the most influential variables to injury likelihood are population, water temperature, nearshore wave height, beach slope, and the day of the week. Forecasting during the 2017 summer season will test model ability to predict injury likelihood.

  14. Resistive G-modes and ballooning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagazian, R.Y.; Mondt, J.P.; Paris, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    A unified theory of the linear stability of the Roberts and Taylor type of resistive interchange and ballooning is presented. The effects of both parallel and perpendicular viscosity as well as of finite shear and finite β are included in a MHD treatment of the problem. Kinetic effects are also studied. The hybrid kinetic model with Vlasov ions and guiding center electrons has been appropriately generalized to allow for electron-ion collisions. The geometry is that of a plane slab with magnetic shear

  15. Time-dependent strains and stresses in a pumpkin balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    This paper presents a study of pumpkin-shaped superpressure balloons consisting of gores made from a thin polymeric film attached to high stiffness meridional tendons This type of design is being used for the NASA ULDB balloons The gore film shows considerable time-dependent stress relaxation whereas the behaviour of the tendons is essentially time-independent Upon inflation and pressurization the instantaneous i e linear-elastic strain and stress distributions in the film show significantly higher values in the meridional direction However over time and due to the biaxial visco-elastic stress relaxation of the the gore material the em hoop strains increase and the em meridional stresses decrease whereas the em remaining strain and stress components remain substantially unchanged These results are important for a correct assessment of the structural integrity of a pumpkin balloon in a long-duration mission both in terms of the material performance and the overall stability of the shape of the balloon An experimental investigation of the time dependence of the biaxial strain distribution in the film of a 4 m diameter 48 gore pumpkin balloon is presented The inflated shape of selected gores has been measured using photogrammetry and the time variation in strain components at some particular points of these gores has been measured under constant pressure and temperature The results show good correlation with a numerical study using the ABAQUS finite-element package that includes a widely used model of

  16. Exploration of the molecular basis of blast injury in a biofidelic model of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielen, P.; Mehoke, T.; Gleason, J.; Iwaskiw, A.; Paulson, J.; Merkle, A.; Wester, B.; Dymond, J.

    2018-01-01

    Biological response to blast overpressure is complex and results in various and potentially non-concomitant acute and long-term deficits to exposed individuals. Clinical links between blast severity and injury outcomes remain elusive and have yet to be fully described, resulting in a critical inability to develop associated protection and mitigation strategies. Further, experimental models frequently fail to reproduce observed physiological phenomena and/or introduce artifacts that confound analysis and reproducibility. New models are required that employ consistent mechanical inputs, scale with biological analogs and known clinical data, and permit high-throughput examination of biological responses for a range of environmental and battlefield- relevant exposures. Here we describe a novel, biofidelic headform capable of integrating complex biological samples for blast exposure studies. We additionally demonstrate its utility in detecting acute transcriptional responses in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans after exposure to blast overpressure. This approach enables correlation between mechanical exposure and biological outcome, permitting both the enhancement of existing surrogate and computational models and the high-throughput biofidelic testing of current and future protection systems.

  17. Simulating clefts in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Frank; Brakke, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The geometry of a large axisymmetric balloon with positive differential pressure, such as a sphere, leads to very high film stresses. These stresses can be significantly reduced by using a tendon re-enforced lobed pumpkin-like shape. A number of schemes have been proposed to achieve a cyclically symmetric pumpkin shape, including the constant bulge angle (CBA) design, the constant bulge radius (CBR) design, CBA/CBR hybrids, and NASA’s recent constant stress (CS) design. Utilizing a hybrid CBA/CBR pumpkin design, Flight 555-NT in June 2006 formed an S-cleft and was unable to fully deploy. In order to better understand the S-cleft phenomenon, a series of inflation tests involving four 27-m diameter 200-gore pumpkin balloons were conducted in 2007. One of the test vehicles was a 1/3-scale mockup of the Flight 555-NT balloon. Using an inflation procedure intended to mimic ascent, the 1/3-scale mockup developed an S-cleft feature strikingly similar to the one observed in Flight 555-NT. Our analysis of the 1/3-scale mockup found it to be unstable. We compute asymmetric equilibrium configurations of this balloon, including shapes with an S-cleft feature.

  18. Development of Experimental Tissue Models for Blast Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Benjamin; Bo, Chiara; Williams, Alun; Jardine, Andy; Brown, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    There is a pressing need to better understand the relationship between the intensity of a blast wave and the clinical consequences for victims of an explosion. In order to quantitatively study how these factors correlate with one another, blast injury tissue models are being developed. Sections of larynx, trachea and pulmonary tissue were excised from a recently sacrificed pig and maintained on ice prior to testing. The samples were subjected to strain rates of between 0.001 s-1 and 1000 s-1 in the laboratory by using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar and quasi-static testing apparatus. During high strain rate testing, samples were housed in a polycarbonate chamber which permitted experimentation on tissue held in fluid. Data were analysed using 1, 2 and 3 wave analysis software in Matlab to yield information about the material properties of both undamaged and damaged tissues. In addition, macroscopic changes in tissue organization were also visualized using histopathological techniques. This work is being extended to cellular and animal models to derive more detailed information about the underlying molecular changes relating to blast-induced damage and repair. The Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies.

  19. Stability of the pumpkin balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Frank

    A large axisymmetric balloon with positive differential pressure, e.g., a sphere, leads to high film stresses. These can be significantly reduced by using a lobed pumpkin-like shape re-enforced with tendons. A number of schemes have been proposed to achieve a cyclically symmetric pumpkin-shape at full inflation, including the constant bulge angle (CBA) design and the constant bulge radius (CBR) design. The authors and others have carried out stability studies of CBA and CBR designs and found instabilities under various conditions. While stability seems to be a good indicator of deployment problems for large balloons under normal ascent conditions, one cannot conclude that a stable design will deploy reliably. Nevertheless, stability analysis allows one to quantify certain deployment characteristics. Ongoing research by NASA's Balloon Program Office utilizes a new design approach developed by Rodger Farley, NASA/GSFC, that takes into account film and tendon strain. We refer to such a balloon as a constant stress (CS) pumpkin design. In June 2006, the Flight 555-NT balloon (based on a hybrid CBR/CBA design) developed an S-cleft and did not deploy. In order to understand the S-cleft phenomena and study a number of aspects related to the CS-design, a series of inflation tests were conducted at TCOM, Elizabeth City, NC in 2007. The test vehicles were 27 meter diameter pumpkins distinguished by their respective equatorial bulge angles (BA). For example, BA98 indicates an equatorial bulge angle of 98° . BA90, BA55, and BA00 are similarly defined. BA98 was essentially a one-third scale version of of the Flight 555 balloon (i.e., 12 micron film instead of 38.1 micron, mini-tendons, etc.). BA90 and BA55 were Farley CS-designs. BA00 was derived from the BA55 design so that a flat chord spanned adjacent tendons. In this paper, we will carry out stability studies of BA98, BA90, BA55, and BA00. We discuss the deployment problem of pumpkin balloons in light of 2007 inflation

  20. Predictive models for acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirjian, Sevag; Schold, Jesse D; Navia, Jose; Mastracci, Tara M; Paganini, Emil P; Yared, Jean-Pierre; Bashour, Charles A

    2012-03-01

    Accurate prediction of cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) would improve clinical decision making and facilitate timely diagnosis and treatment. The aim of the study was to develop predictive models for cardiac surgery-associated AKI using presurgical and combined pre- and intrasurgical variables. Prospective observational cohort. 25,898 patients who underwent cardiac surgery at Cleveland Clinic in 2000-2008. Presurgical and combined pre- and intrasurgical variables were used to develop predictive models. Dialysis therapy and a composite of doubling of serum creatinine level or dialysis therapy within 2 weeks (or discharge if sooner) after cardiac surgery. Incidences of dialysis therapy and the composite of doubling of serum creatinine level or dialysis therapy were 1.7% and 4.3%, respectively. Kidney function parameters were strong independent predictors in all 4 models. Surgical complexity reflected by type and history of previous cardiac surgery were robust predictors in models based on presurgical variables. However, the inclusion of intrasurgical variables accounted for all explained variance by procedure-related information. Models predictive of dialysis therapy showed good calibration and superb discrimination; a combined (pre- and intrasurgical) model performed better than the presurgical model alone (C statistics, 0.910 and 0.875, respectively). Models predictive of the composite end point also had excellent discrimination with both presurgical and combined (pre- and intrasurgical) variables (C statistics, 0.797 and 0.825, respectively). However, the presurgical model predictive of the composite end point showed suboptimal calibration (P predictive models in other cohorts is required before wide-scale application. We developed and internally validated 4 new models that accurately predict cardiac surgery-associated AKI. These models are based on readily available clinical information and can be used for patient counseling, clinical

  1. Popping balloons: formation of a crack network in rubber membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulinet, Sebastien; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Equipe Morphogenèse et phénomènes multi-échelle Team

    2015-03-01

    Everyone can make the observation: a rubber balloon inflated until it spontaneously pop breaks into a large number of shreds. In contrast, a balloon pierced with a needle at an early stage of its inflation breaks into two large pieces. Using model latex balloons, we have experimentally investigated the transition between these two breaking regimes. We have showed that, above a threshold stress in the latex membrane, a single crack become unstable and separates into two new cracks. Then, a cascade of tip-splitting generates a network of cracks that eventually form a large number of fragments. We have observed that the instability of the crack occurs when it reaches a limit velocity that could the speed of sound. By studying the energy balance during the explosion, we can determine the intrinsic fracture energy of rubber, a measurement difficult to achieve with usual tensile testing.

  2. Scientific ballooning: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. Vernon

    2013-02-01

    Balloons have been used for scientific research since they were invented in France more than 200 years ago. Cosmic rays were discovered 100 years ago with an experiment flown on a manned balloon. A major change in balloon design occurred in 1950 with the introduction of the socalled natural shape balloon with integral load tapes. This basic design has been used with more or less continuously improved materials for scientific balloon flights for the past half century, including long-duration balloon (LDB) flights around Antarctica for the past two decades. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently developing a super-pressure balloon that would enable extended duration missions above 99.5% of the Earth's atmosphere at any latitude. Ultra-long-duration balloon (ULDB) flights enabled by constant-volume balloons should result in an even greater sea change in scientific ballooning than the inauguration of long-duration balloon (LDB) flights in Antarctica during the 1990-91 austral summer.

  3. In vitro Models of Laser Induced Injury: Pathophysiology and Cytoprotection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bowman, Phillip D; Schuschereba, Steven T

    2007-01-01

    ...). This damage is generally due to thermal injury. Of particular concern is thermal laser injury to the macular region of the retina, which may result in a blinding trauma that produces an immediate...

  4. Relevance of the Kübler-Ross model to the post-injury responses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relevance of the Kübler-Ross model to the post-injury responses of competitive athletes. J van der Poel, P Nel. Abstract. Attempts to explain and/or predict the post-injury responses of competitive athletes have relied upon current models of grief. Kübler-Ross's stage model (1969) has been particularly popular among sports ...

  5. Neuroprotective effect corilagin in spinal cord injury rat model by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neurological functions get altered in a patient suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). Present study evaluates the neuroprotective effect of corilagin in spinal cord injury rats by inhibiting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inflammatory mediators and apoptosis. Materials and method: Spinal cord injury was ...

  6. Growth Mixture Modeling of Depression Symptoms Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapson Gomez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Growth Mixture Modeling (GMM was used to investigate the longitudinal trajectory of groups (classes of depression symptoms, and how these groups were predicted by the covariates of age, sex, severity, and length of hospitalization following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI in a group of 1074 individuals (696 males, and 378 females from the Royal Hobart Hospital, who sustained a TBI. The study began in late December 2003 and recruitment continued until early 2007. Ages ranged from 14 to 90 years, with a mean of 35.96 years (SD = 16.61. The study also examined the associations between the groups and causes of TBI. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale within 3 weeks of injury, and at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months post-injury. The results revealed three groups: low, high, and delayed depression. In the low group depression scores remained below the clinical cut-off at all assessment points during the 24-months post-TBI, and in the high group, depression scores were above the clinical cut-off at all assessment points. The delayed group showed an increase in depression symptoms to 12 months after injury, followed by a return to initial assessment level during the following 12 months. Covariates were found to be differentially associated with the three groups. For example, relative to the low group, the high depression group was associated with more severe TBI, being female, and a shorter period of hospitalization. The delayed group also had a shorter period of hospitalization, were younger, and sustained less severe TBI. Our findings show considerable fluctuation of depression over time, and that a non-clinical level of depression at any one point in time does not necessarily mean that the person will continue to have non-clinical levels in the future. As we used GMM, we were able to show new findings and also bring clarity to contradictory past findings on depression and TBI. Consequently, we recommend the use

  7. Experimental study of a closed-chest pulmonary embolism-reperfusion injury canine model by means of Swan-Ganz catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Na; Zhai Renyou Jiang Tao; Wang Yajie; Zheng Juan; Wang Chen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To establish a closed-chest pulmonary embolism-reperfusion animal model by Swan-Ganz catheter and to explore the mechanisms of pulmonary embolism (PE)-reperfusion injury (RI). Methods: Experiments were made on 14 mongrel dogs, ranging in weight from 15 to 18 kg, anesthetized with 3% pentobarbital sodium. The dogs were intubated with I. D. 7 endotracheal tubes. Under sterile conditions, a 7 F Swan-Ganz catheter via the external jugular vein was positioned in the unilateral pulmonary diaphragmatic lobe (DL) artery. Occlusion/reperfusion of the DL artery was controlled with 1.2 ml diluted contrast agent filled into/drawn from the balloon. After the 24 h PE, the balloon was deflated to result in 4 h reperfusion of the DL. Measurements of blood gases and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)were made at normal condition, at 24 h PE and at 4 h reperfusion. Thin-section CT scans were performed at normal condition, 24 h PE, 30 rain, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h reperfusion, respectively. At the end of each experiment, tissue specimens of bilateral diaphragmatic lobes were obtained for both wet/dry (W/D) weight ratio and for pathological study. Results: Reperfusion pulmonary edema (RPE) was an acute, mixed, noncardiogenic edema that was observed in all 14 dogs who had been successfully established as PE/RI animal models. RPE demonstrated heterogeneous ground-glass opacifications that predominated in the areas distal to the recanalized vessels. It manifested pathologically as an edematous lung infihrated by inflammatory cells. The mean of PaO 2 and TNF-α of 4 h reperfusion was (81 ± 4) mm Hg( 1 mm Hg =0.133 kPa) and (16.0 ± 2.5)pg/ml, which were significantly different (P<0.05) from normal value [(96 ± 6)mm Hg and (13.9 ± 2.0) pg/ml]. The W/D of the injured lung (6.3 ± 1.2) was significantly greater (P<0.01) than that of the contralateral lung (4.5 ± 1.2), suggesting that the increase in the lung water was due to reperfusion injury. Conclusion: The closed-chest canine model

  8. Bone healing models in rat tibia after different injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussar, P; Piirsoo, A; Märtson, A; Toom, A; Haviko, T; Hussar, U

    2001-01-01

    Gradual elaboration of an adequate and efficient multistage method for experimental remodelling of specific wound healing process--bone repair. Comparison of clinical characteristics with the results of microanatomy, histology, electronmicroscopy and computer morphometry. An investigation of posttraumatic bone repair after internal fracture, excision and cortical perforation was carried out on 142 young adult male Wistar rats. The repair was studied in normal and affected animals (exercises, immobilization, isolation of periost) at 1-42 days after operation. The posttraumatic bone callus development and the related soft tissue repair, likewise the continuous remodelling, is an ordinary process of osteohisto- and organogenese. In trained rats the blood supply and bone formation is increased, whereas in immobilized animals it is inhibited and destroyed (osteoporose, pseudoarthrosis). After the injury some characteristics of bone repair histogenese will be became evident (after the perforation the primary endosteal and secondary periosteal ossification, inhibition of endosteal bone repair after the isolation of periost etc.). The posttraumatic bone healing, like embryohistogenese, has similar repair stages in all models of the experiments as well as similar tissue and cell responses (callus formation, its replacement, bone remodelling, etc.). However, the repair process in general (order of chondrous and/or bone callus stages, etc.) is variable and dependent on the mode and degree of injury. The use of bone cortex perforation in wound healing study is more recommendable as compared to internal fracture and excision (possibility of in situ study the periost and callus tissue compartments in bone repair machinery separately).

  9. Local and Remote Postconditioning Decrease Intestinal Injury in a Rabbit Ischemia/Reperfusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury is a significant problem that is associated with high morbidity and mortality in critical settings. This injury may be ameliorated using postconditioning protocol. In our study, we created a rabbit intestinal I/R injury model to analyze the effects of local ischemia postconditioning (LIPo and remote ischemia postconditioning (RIPo on intestinal I/R injury. We concluded that LIPo affords protection in intestinal I/R injury in a comparable fashion with RIPo by decreasing oxidative stress, neutrophil activation, and apoptosis.

  10. Development of scientific ballooning in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Jun

    On the occasion of the 50th Anniversary Celebration of COSPAR of this year of 2008, it is worthwhile to summarize the results of the Scientific ballooning in early days in connection with the recent developments in various countries. Nishina Laboratories, Riken, had started the observations of cosmic rays with rubber balloons as early as 1942. However it was interrupted soon by the war II. After the war, new research group started in collaboration with several universities with nuclear emulsions put on the rubber balloons in 1950, and then soon after the group manufactured by themselves and launched the first plastic balloon in 1953. Based on additional technologies during a few years developed by these group, the Institute of Nuclear Study, INS, the University of Tokyo, organized the large campaign of 14 emulsion chambers and a pellicle stack with 8 plastic balloons in 1956. It is to be noted that the project was one of the largest in the world standard in those days. By the experience of this campaign, the importance of the balloon technologies was more recognized, and INS organized the group to study the balloon technologies, and had established some developments. The systematic study of scientific ballooning has started, when the scientific ballooning laboratory was founded in 1965, in the new Institute of ISAS, the University of Tokyo. The permanent balloon base of "Sanriku Balloon Center" was founded in 1971. This group has expended all efforts for the scientific ballooning, launching 10-20 balloons in each year with new inventions such as the studies of; Technologies to manufacture the reliable plastic balloons, New Balloon materials, New instrumentations for scientific ballooning, Systems of long duration flights including Antarctica flights, International collaboratiom, etc. Up to now almost 600 plastic balloons were launched during past 50 years. Then the scientific balloonings have played important and indispensable roles for the development of space

  11. Temporary Percutaneous Aortic Balloon Occlusion to Enhance Fluid Resuscitation Prior to Definitive Embolization of Post-Traumatic Liver Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Shin; Uchiyama, Katsuhiro; Shima, Hideki; Ohishi, Sonomi; Nojiri, Yoko; Ogata, Hitoshi

    2001-01-01

    We successfully stabilized severe hemorrhagic shock following traumatic liver injury by percutaneous transcarotid supraceliac aortic occlusion with a 5 Fr balloon catheter. Then we were able to perform transfemoral embolization therapy of the hepatic arterial bleeding source. Transient aortic occlusion using a balloon catheter appears to be a useful adjunct in select cases where stabilization of the patient is necessary to allow successful selective embolization of the bleeding source

  12. Establishment of a head injury by club model in rabbits and experimental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yunxing; Xi Huanjiu; Zhang Jing; Li Hongwei; Yin Zhiyong; Zhao Hui

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish an animal model to replicate the injury by club in forensic medicine. Methods: Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were divided into control group (n=4), minor injury group (n=10), and severe injury group (n=10). Based on the BIM-Ⅱ Horizontal Bio-impact Machine, a self-designed iron bar was used to produce head injury by club. Six hours after injury, all the rabbits were subjected to a CT examination and dissected to observe the injury morphology and undergo routine pathological examination. Four control, six minor and severe rabbits were given moisture content examination. Results: Varying degrees of positive signs of the nervous system were observed in all the injured rabbits within 6 hours. The mortality rate was 1/10 in the minor injury group and 6/10 in the severe injury group. The morphological changes consisted of different levels of scalp hematoma, skull fracture, epidural hematoma, subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain injury. The difference in moisture content between the three groups was of statistical significance. Conclusion: Under the rigidly-controlled experimental condition, this animal model produces good reproducibility and stable results. Meanwhile, it can simulate the morphology of injury by club and be used to study the mechanism of injury by club in forensic medicine. (authors)

  13. PEBS - Positron Electron Balloon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    von Doetinchem, P.; Kirn, T.; Yearwood, G.Roper; Schael, S.

    2007-01-01

    The best measurement of the cosmic ray positron flux available today was performed by the HEAT balloon experiment more than 10 years ago. Given the limitations in weight and power consumption for balloon experiments, a novel approach was needed to design a detector which could increase the existing data by more than a factor of 100. Using silicon photomultipliers for the readout of a scintillating fiber tracker and of an imaging electromagnetic calorimeter, the PEBS detector features a large geometrical acceptance of 2500 cm^2 sr for positrons, a total weight of 1500 kg and a power consumption of 600 W. The experiment is intended to measure cosmic ray particle spectra for a period of up to 20 days at an altitude of 40 km circulating the North or South Pole. A full Geant 4 simulation of the detector concept has been developed and key elements have been verified in a testbeam in October 2006 at CERN.

  14. Left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, N.; Tai, J.; Soofi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of obstructive epicardial coronary disease. Although the syndrome has been reported in Japan since 1990, it is rare in other regions. Rapid recognition of the syndrome can modify the diagnostic and therapeutic attitude i.e. avoiding thrombolysis and performing catheterization in the acute phase. (author)

  15. Spectrum of the ballooning Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The ballooning Schroedinger equation (BSE) is a model equation for investigating global modes that can, when approximated by a Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) ansatz, be described by a ballooning formalism locally to a field line. This second order differential equation with coefficients periodic in the independent variable θ k is assumed to apply even in cases where simple WKB quantization conditions break down, thus providing an alternative to semiclassical quantization. Also, it provides a test bed for developing more advanced WKB methods: e.g. the apparent discontinuity between quantization formulae for open-quotes trappedclose quotes and open-quotes passingclose quotes modes, whose ray paths have different topologies, is removed by extending the WKB method to include the phenomena of tunnelling and reflection. The BSE is applied to instabilities with shear in the real part of the local frequency, so that the dispersion relation is inherently complex. As the frequency shear is increased, it is found that trapped modes go over to passing modes, reducing the maximum growth rate by averaging over θ k

  16. Ballooning stability of JET discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huysmans, G.T.A.; Goedbloed, J.P.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Lazzaro, E.; Smeulders, P.

    1989-01-01

    Conditions under which ballooning modes are expected to be excited have recently been obtained in two different types of discharges in JET. In the first type, extremely large pressure gradients have been produced in the plasma core through pellet injections in the current rise phase followed by strong additional heating. In the second type, the total pressure of the discharge is approaching the Troyon limit. The stability of these discharges with respect to the ideal MHD ballooning modes has been studied with the stability code HBT. The equilibria are reconstructed with the IDENTC code using the external magnetic measurements and the experimental pressure profile. The results show that the evaluated high beta discharge is unstable in the central region of the plasma. This instability is related to the low shear and not to a large pressure gradient, as expected at the Troyon limit. In the pellet discharges the regions with the large pressure gradients are unstable to ballooning modes at the time of the beta decay, which ends the period of enhanced performance. The maximum pressure gradient in these discharges is limited by the boundary of the first region of stability. The observed phenomena at the beta decay are similar to those observed at the beta limit in DIII-D and TFTR. (author)

  17. Behavioral and Social Sciences Theories and Models: Are They Used in Unintentional Injury Prevention Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, L. B.; Gielen, A. C.; Sleet, D. A.; Hopkins, K.

    2005-01-01

    Behavioral and social sciences theories and models have the potential to enhance efforts to reduce unintentional injuries. The authors reviewed the published literature on behavioral and social science theory applications to unintentional injury problems to enumerate and categorize the ways different theories and models are used in injury…

  18. Innovative technologies for SFA occlusions: drug coated balloons in SFA lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minar, E; Schillinger, M

    2012-08-01

    The concept of using a balloon catheter to directly deliver an antiproliferative drug at the site of injury has become one of the most interesting technological developments in endovascular therapy. There have been important advances in knowledge concerning balloon-based drug delivery technologies during the last years, and different methods have been developed by different companies to coat the balloon with the antiproliferative agent. Currently there is a rapidly increasing clinical study program using drug coated balloons (DCB) in different locations and indications. There are four already finished randomized studies in patients with superficial femoral artery lesions investigating the efficacy of paclitaxel release by DCB, and all demonstrated significantly improved patency rates compared to balloon angioplasty with non coated balloons. DCB offer several advantages compared to drug eluting stents, since any stentless technology for improvement of longterm patency is preferable to overcome the drawbacks of stenting. This technology has demonstrated the capacity to have a significant impact on the practice of percutaneous cardiovascular interventions in the future.

  19. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minmin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and cyclooxygenase- (COX- 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models.

  20. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models.

  1. Rat models of spinal cord injury: from pathology to potential therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Kjell

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A long-standing goal of spinal cord injury research is to develop effective spinal cord repair strategies for the clinic. Rat models of spinal cord injury provide an important mammalian model in which to evaluate treatment strategies and to understand the pathological basis of spinal cord injuries. These models have facilitated the development of robust tests for assessing the recovery of locomotor and sensory functions. Rat models have also allowed us to understand how neuronal circuitry changes following spinal cord injury and how recovery could be promoted by enhancing spontaneous regenerative mechanisms and by counteracting intrinsic inhibitory factors. Rat studies have also revealed possible routes to rescuing circuitry and cells in the acute stage of injury. Spatiotemporal and functional studies in these models highlight the therapeutic potential of manipulating inflammation, scarring and myelination. In addition, potential replacement therapies for spinal cord injury, including grafts and bridges, stem primarily from rat studies. Here, we discuss advantages and disadvantages of rat experimental spinal cord injury models and summarize knowledge gained from these models. We also discuss how an emerging understanding of different forms of injury, their pathology and degree of recovery has inspired numerous treatment strategies, some of which have led to clinical trials.

  2. Rat models of spinal cord injury: from pathology to potential therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A long-standing goal of spinal cord injury research is to develop effective spinal cord repair strategies for the clinic. Rat models of spinal cord injury provide an important mammalian model in which to evaluate treatment strategies and to understand the pathological basis of spinal cord injuries. These models have facilitated the development of robust tests for assessing the recovery of locomotor and sensory functions. Rat models have also allowed us to understand how neuronal circuitry changes following spinal cord injury and how recovery could be promoted by enhancing spontaneous regenerative mechanisms and by counteracting intrinsic inhibitory factors. Rat studies have also revealed possible routes to rescuing circuitry and cells in the acute stage of injury. Spatiotemporal and functional studies in these models highlight the therapeutic potential of manipulating inflammation, scarring and myelination. In addition, potential replacement therapies for spinal cord injury, including grafts and bridges, stem primarily from rat studies. Here, we discuss advantages and disadvantages of rat experimental spinal cord injury models and summarize knowledge gained from these models. We also discuss how an emerging understanding of different forms of injury, their pathology and degree of recovery has inspired numerous treatment strategies, some of which have led to clinical trials. PMID:27736748

  3. [The Application of Internal Iliac Artery Balloon Occlusion in Pernicious Placenta Previa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Rong; Liu, Xing-Hui; You, Yong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhou, Rong; Xing, Ai-Yun; Zhang, Li; Ning, Gang; Zhao, Fu-Min; Li, Kai-Ming

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the clinical application value of internal iliac artery balloon occlusion in pernicious placenta previa. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of the patients of pernicious placenta previa in a single center from Jan, 2010 to Jan, 2015. The patients were divided into two groups, internal iliac artery balloon occlusion group and the control group without endovascular intervention. Blood loss in operation, volume of transfused blood products, caesarean hysterectomy, operating time, hospital days after operation and postoperative morbidity were compared between the two groups. The balloon occlusion group had significantly less blood loss, the volume of transfused blood products, caesarean hysterectomy, hospital day after operation than the control group had. There was no statistical difference in operating time, intensive care units (ICU), hypotension, infection, hypoxemia, bladder injury, bowel obstruction, neonatal asphyxia between the two groups. The balloon occlusion group had significantly higher rate in coagulopathy, hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte imbalance. Among the patients whose uterus were preserved, the blood loss was not significantly difference between the two groups. Among the patients with the complication of placenta accreta, caesarean hysterectomy was less in balloon group, and blood loss between the two groups was not significantly different. Among the patients without placenta accrete, the blood loss was less in balloon group, and caesarean hysterectomy between the two groups was not significantly different. The risk of hysterectomy in balloon group was related to placenta accreta, uterine arteries engorgement, placental invasive serosa, taking placenta by hand, placental invasive bladder, barrel-shaped thickening of lower uterine segment, unable to remove placenta. Internal iliac artery balloon occlusion is an effective treatment for pernicious placenta previa.

  4. Gene Expression Analysis to Assess the Relevance of Rodent Models to Human Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Timothy E; Lofgren, Shane; Khatri, Purvesh; Rogers, Angela J

    2017-08-01

    The relevance of animal models to human diseases is an area of intense scientific debate. The degree to which mouse models of lung injury recapitulate human lung injury has never been assessed. Integrating data from both human and animal expression studies allows for increased statistical power and identification of conserved differential gene expression across organisms and conditions. We sought comprehensive integration of gene expression data in experimental acute lung injury (ALI) in rodents compared with humans. We performed two separate gene expression multicohort analyses to determine differential gene expression in experimental animal and human lung injury. We used correlational and pathway analyses combined with external in vitro gene expression data to identify both potential drivers of underlying inflammation and therapeutic drug candidates. We identified 21 animal lung tissue datasets and three human lung injury bronchoalveolar lavage datasets. We show that the metasignatures of animal and human experimental ALI are significantly correlated despite these widely varying experimental conditions. The gene expression changes among mice and rats across diverse injury models (ozone, ventilator-induced lung injury, LPS) are significantly correlated with human models of lung injury (Pearson r = 0.33-0.45, P human lung injury. Predicted therapeutic targets, peptide ligand signatures, and pathway analyses are also all highly overlapping. Gene expression changes are similar in animal and human experimental ALI, and provide several physiologic and therapeutic insights to the disease.

  5. Current trends of balloon laryngoplasty in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moungthong, Greetha; Bunbanjerdsuk, Sacarin; Wright, Nida; Sathavornmanee, Thanakrit; Setabutr, Dhave

    2017-06-01

    To describe the current trend in balloon laryngoplasty usage and experience by practicing otolaryngologists in Thailand. Anonymous 11 question online and paper survey of otolaryngologists on their current balloon laryngoplasty practices. Current practices and experience in balloon laryngoplasty were queried with multiple choice and open-ended questions. Laser use is the most commonly utilized instrument to treat airway stenosis in Thailand. 86% of respondents do not have experience with balloon dilatation; yet, almost half (47.6%) report they perform a minimum of five airway surgeries per year. Most respondents had been in practice for less than 6 years (41%) and reported that they did not have exposure to balloon use during residency training. The largest barrier reported for the use of balloon instrumentation in the airway is inexperience (44.4%) followed by cost (38.3%), yet most feel that treatment in airway stenosis could benefit by usage of balloons (95.5%). Most otolaryngologists in Thailand do not have experience with the use of balloon dilatation and lack of exposure remains the largest barrier to its use. Otolaryngologists in Thailand feel that increased usage of balloons in the airway could improve airway stenosis treatment in the country.

  6. Considerations for the optimization of induced white matter injury preclinical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Shafique Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The white matter injury in relation to acute neurologic conditions, especially stroke, has remained obscure until recently. Current advances in the imaging technologies in the field of stroke have confirmed that white matter injury plays an important role in the prognosis of stroke and suggest that white matter protection is essential for functional recovery and post-stroke rehabilitation. However, due to the lack of a reproducible animal model of white matter injury, the pathophysiology and mechanisms of this injury are not well studied. Moreover, producing selective white matter injury in animals, especially in rodents, has proven to be challenging. Problems associated with inducing selective white matter ischemic injury in the rodent derive from differences in the architecture of the brain, most particularly the ratio of white matter to gray matter in rodents compared to humans, the agents used to induce the injury, and the location of the injury. Aging, gender differences, and comorbidities further add to this complexity. This review provides a brief account of the techniques commonly used to induce general white matter injury in animal models (stroke and non-stroke related and highlights relevance, optimization issues, and translational potentials associated with this particular form of injury.

  7. Reduction in Temporary and Permanent Audiological Injury Through Internal Jugular Vein Compression in a Rodent Blast Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, Brian; Shinners, Michael; Sherman, Sydney; Erickson, Kristine; Patel, Vimal; Kubilis, Paul; Finan, John D; Bailes, Julian E

    2017-09-01

    Internal jugular vein (IJV) compression influences not only intracranial but also intracochlear physiology and has demonstrated preclinical effectiveness in reducing acute audiological injury in a rodent blast model. However, the long-term effects in this model are unknown. Blast wave-induced audiological injury from an improvised explosive device is a leading cause of morbidity among service members in theater but there are limitations to the current protective measures. For this study, we exposed 20 Sprague Dawley rats to a 16.8 ± 0.3 PSI (195.3 dB SPL) right-sided shock wave in which 10 had application of a custom IJV compression collar in place at the time of injury. IJV compression at the time of injury was shown acutely to significantly reduce the incidence of tympanic membrane rupture and the initial temporary threshold shift on otoacoustic emissions in both the right and left ears of animals who had collar application immediately after and 7 days post injury. At 28 days from injury, collared animals demonstrated a return to baseline of otoacoustic emission values while the noncollared animals had persistent threshold shifts, signifying the presence of a permanent threshold shift only in those animals without collar application. IJV compression was also found to significantly reduce hair cell loss at the base of the cochlea secondary to mechanical trauma from the blast wind. Previously observed acute protective effects of IJV compression are sustained at chronic time points. IJV compression can potentially be used to reduce long-term permanent morbidity from blast-induced audiological trauma.

  8. Blast wave injury prediction models for complex scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teland, J.A.; Doormaal, J.C.A.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Blast waves from explosions can cause lethal injuries to humans. Development of injury criteria has been ongoing for many years, but with the main focus on free field conditions. However, with terrorist actions as a new threat, explosions in urban areas have become of much more interest. Urban areas

  9. Functional and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Traumatic Peripheral Nerve-Muscle Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Renate; Gey, Manuel; Abaei, Alireza; Warnecke, Daniela; de Roy, Luisa; Dürselen, Lutz; Rasche, Volker; Knöll, Bernd

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic injuries to human peripheral nerves are frequently associated with damage to nerve surrounding tissues including muscles and blood vessels. Currently, most rodent models of peripheral nerve injuries (e.g., facial or sciatic nerve) employ surgical nerve transection with scissors or scalpels. However, such an isolated surgical nerve injury only mildly damages neighboring tissues and weakly activates an immune response. In order to provide a rodent nerve injury model accounting for such nerve-associated tissue damage and immune cell activation, we developed a drop tower-based facial nerve trauma model in mice. We compare nerve regeneration in this novel peripheral nerve trauma model with the established surgical nerve injury along several parameters. These include gene expression, histological and functional facial motoneuron (FMN) regeneration, facial nerve degeneration, immune cell activation and muscle damage. Regeneration-associated genes (RAGs; e.g., Atf3) were strongly induced in FMNs subjected to traumatic and surgical injury. Regeneration of FMNs and functional recovery of whisker movement were faster in traumatic versus complete surgical injury, thus cutting down experimentation time. Wallerian degeneration of distal nerve stumps was readily observed in this novel trauma injury model. Importantly, drop tower-inflicted facial nerve injury resulted in muscle damage, activation of muscle satellite cell markers (PAX7) and pronounced infiltration of immune cells to the injury site only in this model but not upon surgical nerve transection. Thus, we provide a novel rodent PNS trauma model that can be easily adopted to other PNS nerves such as the sciatic nerve. Since this nerve trauma model replicates multiple tissue damage frequently encountered in clinical routine, it will be well suited to identify molecular and cellular mechanisms of PNS nerve repair in wild-type and genetically modified rodents.

  10. Long-Duration Altitude-Controlled Balloons for Venus: A Feasibility Study Informed by Balloon Flights in Remote Environments on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, P. B.; Nott, J.; Cutts, J. A.; Hall, J. L.; Beauchamp, P. M.; Limaye, S. S.; Baines, K. H.; Hole, L. R.

    2013-12-01

    In situ exploration of the upper atmosphere of Venus, approximately 65-77 km altitude, could answer many important questions (Limaye 2013, Crisp 2013). This region contains a time-variable UV absorber of unknown composition that controls many aspects of the heat balance on Venus. Understanding the composition and dynamics of this unknown absorber is an important science goal; in situ optical and chemical measurements are needed. However, conventional approaches do not provide access to this altitude range, repeated traverses, and a mission lifetime of several months needed to effectively carry out the science. This paper examines concepts for altitude-controlled balloons not previously flown on planetary missions that could potentially provide the desired measurements. The concepts take advantage of the fact that at 60 km altitude, for example, the atmospheric density on Venus is about 40% of the sea-level density on earth and the temperature is a moderate 230 K. The solar flux is approximately double that on earth, creating some thermal challenges, but making photovoltaic power highly effective. Using a steady-state thermodynamic model and flight data from Earth, we evaluate the suitability of two types of altitude-controlled balloons for a potential mission on Venus. Such balloons could repeatedly measure profiles, avoid diurnal temperature extremes, and navigate using wind shear. The first balloon design uses air ballast (AB) whereby ambient air can be compressed into or released from a constant-volume balloon, causing it to descend or ascend accordingly. The second design uses lift-gas compression (LGC) to change the volume of a zero-pressure balloon, thereby changing its effective density and altitude. For an altitude range of 60-75 km on Venus, we find that the superpressure volume for a LGC balloon is about 5% of that needed for an AB balloon while the maximum pressurization is the same for both systems. The compressor work per km descent of the LGC balloon

  11. Balloon Occlusion Types in the Treatment of Coronary Perforation during Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangfei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery perforation is an uncommon complication in patients with coronary heart disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. However, pericardial tamponade following coronary artery perforation may be lethal, and prompt treatment is crucial in managing such patients. Balloon occlusion and the reversal of anticoagulant activity are the common methods used to prevent cardiac tamponade by reducing the amount of bleeding. Herein, we discuss the pros and cons of currently used occlusion types for coronary perforation. Optimal balloon occlusion methods should reduce the amount of bleeding and ameliorate subsequent myocardial ischemia injury, even during cardiac surgery.

  12. Culturally relevant model program to prevent and reduce agricultural injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helitzer, D L; Hathorn, G; Benally, J; Ortega, C

    2014-07-01

    Limited research has explored pesticide injury prevention among American Indian farmers. In a five-year agricultural intervention, a university-community partnership, including the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, New Mexico State University, Shiprock Area Cooperative Extension Service, and Navajo Nation communities, used a culturally relevant model to introduce and maintain safe use of integrated pest management techniques. We applied the Diffusion of Innovations theory and community-based approaches to tailor health promotion strategies for our intervention. In a longitudinal study with repeated measures, we trained six "model farmers" to be crop management experts in pesticide safety, application, and control. Subsequently, these model farmers worked with 120 farm families randomized into two groups: intervention (Group 1) and delayed intervention (Group 2). Measurements included a walk-through analysis, test of knowledge and attitudes, and yield analysis. Both groups demonstrated improvements in pesticide storage behaviors after training. Test scores regarding safety practices improved significantly: from 57.3 to 72.4 for Group 1 and from 52.6 to 76.3 for Group 2. Group 1 maintained their knowledge and safety practices after the intervention. Attitudes about pesticides and communication of viewpoints changed across the study years. With pesticides and fertilizer, the number of corn ears increased by 56.3% and yield (kg m(-2)) of alfalfa increased by 41.2%. The study combined traditional farming practices with culturally relevant approaches and behavior change theory to affect knowledge, safety practices, attitudes, communication channels, and crop yield. Storage behaviors, use of pesticides and safety and application equipment, and safety practice knowledge changed significantly, as did attitudes about social networking, social support, and the compatibility and relative advantage of pesticides for farms.

  13. Posterior urethral injuries associated with pelvic injuries in young adults: computerized finite element model creation and application to improve knowledge and prevention of these lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréaud, J; Baqué, P; Loeffler, J; Colomb, F; Brunet, C; Thollon, L

    2012-05-01

    Young adult males involved in motorcycle accidents are particularly at risk for posterior urethral injury whenever pelvic injury occurs. Posterior urethral injuries remain problematic because their diagnosis may be missed, and during the initial treatment response the urethral injury can be aggravated by urethral catheterization. Few anatomical and clinical tools exist that establish a correlation between injuries and fractures of the pelvic ring and the risk of posterior urethral injury. Based on experience with traffic accident modeling, a computerized finite element model was conceived integrating the specific anatomic structures concerned. This model was extrapolated from a CAT scan of a young adult. The anatomic structures concerned in urethral and pelvic ring trauma (PRT) were isolated, placed in 3D and given biomechanical properties. The model was verified according to available experiments on PRT. To apply the model, we recreated a lateral impact mechanism on the pelvic ring. Stretching between the prostatic and membranous portions of the urethra (before and after visualization of a pelvic fracture) as well as timing of injury was studied. The model's application permitted us to analyze precisely the link between lateral impact trauma of the pelvic ring and lesions of the posterior urethra and to identify an urethra stretching prior to visualization of a pelvic fracture. Utilization of the model with other mechanisms of injury should allow for better comprehension of this associated trauma, improved prevention, iatrogenic aggravation of, and care for, these serious injuries. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  14. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-04-15

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used.

  15. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De

    1990-01-01

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used

  16. Early cyclosporin A treatment retards axonal degeneration in an experimental peripheral nerve injection injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Erkutlu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury to peripheral nerves during injections of therapeutic agents such as penicillin G potassium is common in developing countries. It has been shown that cyclosporin A, a powerful immunosuppressive agent, can retard Wallerian degeneration after peripheral nerve crush injury. However, few studies are reported on the effects of cyclosporin A on peripheral nerve drug injection injury. This study aimed to assess the time-dependent efficacy of cyclosporine-A as an immunosuppressant therapy in an experimental rat nerve injection injury model established by penicillin G potassium injection. The rats were randomly divided into three groups based on the length of time after nerve injury induced by penicillin G potassium administration (30 minutes, 8 or 24 hours. The compound muscle action potentials were recorded pre-injury, early post-injury (within 1 hour and 4 weeks after injury and compared statistically. Tissue samples were taken from each animal for histological analysis. Compared to the control group, a significant improvement of the compound muscle action potential amplitude value was observed only when cyclosporine-A was administered within 30 minutes of the injection injury (P < 0.05; at 8 or 24 hours after cyclosporine-A administration, compound muscle action potential amplitude was not changed compared with the control group. Thus, early immunosuppressant drug therapy may be a good alternative neuroprotective therapy option in experimental nerve injection injury induced by penicillin G potassium injection.

  17. Predictable pollution: an assessment of weather balloons and associated impacts on the marine environment--an example for the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Owen R; Hamann, Mark; Smith, Walter; Taylor, Heidi

    2014-02-15

    Efforts to curb pollution in the marine environment are covered by national and international legislation, yet weather balloons are released into the environment with no salvage agenda. Here, we assess impacts associated with weather balloons in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA). We use modeling to assess the probability of ocean endpoints for released weather balloons and predict pathways post-release. In addition, we use 21 months of data from beach cleanup events to validate our results and assess the abundance and frequency of weather balloon fragments in the GBRWHA. We found between 65% and 70% of balloons land in the ocean and ocean currents largely determine final endpoints. Beach cleanup data revealed 2460 weather balloon fragments were recovered from 24 sites within the GBRWHA. This is the first attempt to quantify this problem and these data will add support to a much-needed mitigation strategy for weather balloon waste. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulation of stratospheric balloon environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sable, C.

    1974-01-01

    The behavior of materials used for the construction of stratospheric balloons is studied at DERTS by means of irradiations performed in reals time and simulating the exact flight environment. Two chambers were designed in the laboratory and are described together with the experimental procedure. In order to reduce cost and save time, it is worth accelerating the simulation when only a preliminary evaluation of the sample's properties is required. For this reason, a systematic study was undertaken in order to evaluate the respective effects of different parameters on the material degradation. The results of this study are given [fr

  19. Bacterial translocation and intestinal injury in experimental necrotizing enterocolitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, I; Ozdemir, M; Aktan, M; Aslan, K

    2012-01-01

    To study the occurrence of bacterial translocation and to assess the impact of breastfeeding on bacterial translocation in the animal model of necrotizing enterocolitis. A total of 20 neonate Sprague-Dawley rats were enrolled in the study. Rats were randomly allocated into either control or study group just after birth. Ten newborn rats in the control group were left with their mother to be breast-fed. In contrary, necrotizing enterocolitis group consisted of neonates that were separated from their mothers, housed in an incubator and were gavaged with a special rodent formula three times daily. Survival rates, weight changes, and morphologic scoring obtained after microscopic evaluation were determined as microbiologic evaluation criteria. All the rats in the control group survived, while 1 (10 %) rat died in the necrotizing enterocolitis group. Mortality rates of the two groups were similar. All the formula-fed animals in the necrotizing enterocolitis group had significant weight loss compared to the breast milk-fed rats in the control group (pmicrorganisms in the bowel pass through the intestinal barrier and reach the liver and the spleen via the hematogenous route. This condition is closely related to the impairment of physiological and functional features of the intestinal barrier and is independent from the degree of intestinal injury. Bacterial translocation should be remembered in cases suspected of necrotizing enterocolitis, and a rapid and effective treatment algorithm should be applied in such circumstances (Tab. 3, Fig. 3, Ref. 21). Full Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  20. Social psychological aspects of ACL injury prevention and rehabilitation: An integrated model for behavioral adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Derwin King Chung; Lee, Alfred Sing Yeung; Hagger, Martin S; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang

    2017-10-01

    Managing rehabilitation for ACL injury is dependent on uptake of, and compliance with, medical and safety recommendations. In this paper, we propose a multi-theory model that integrates self-determination theory and the theory of planned behavior to identify the motivational determinants ACL injury prevention and management behaviors and the processes involved.

  1. Social psychological aspects of ACL injury prevention and rehabilitation: An integrated model for behavioral adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Derwin King Chung Chan; Alfred Sing Yeung Lee; Martin S. Hagger; Kam-Ming Mok; Patrick Shu-Hang Yung

    2017-01-01

    Managing rehabilitation for ACL injury is dependent on uptake of, and compliance with, medical and safety recommendations. In this paper, we propose a multi-theory model that integrates self-determination theory and the theory of planned behavior to identify the motivational determinants ACL injury prevention and management behaviors and the processes involved.

  2. Nebulized anticoagulants limit pulmonary coagulopathy, but not inflammation, in a model of experimental lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, Jorrit J; Vlaar, Alexander P; Cornet, Alexander D; Dixon, Barry; Roelofs, Joris J; Choi, Goda; van der Poll, Tom; Levi, Marcel; Schultz, Marcus J

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary coagulopathy may contribute to an adverse outcome in lung injury. We assessed the effects of local anticoagulant therapy on bronchoalveolar and systemic haemostasis in a rat model of endotoxemia-induced lung injury. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously

  3. Social psychological aspects of ACL injury prevention and rehabilitation: An integrated model for behavioral adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derwin King Chung Chan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Managing rehabilitation for ACL injury is dependent on uptake of, and compliance with, medical and safety recommendations. In this paper, we propose a multi-theory model that integrates self-determination theory and the theory of planned behavior to identify the motivational determinants ACL injury prevention and management behaviors and the processes involved.

  4. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Breda HF

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC. The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group. This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ. Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The

  5. Balloon dilatation of iatrogenic urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acunas, B.; Acunas, G.; Gokmen, E.; Celik, L.

    1988-01-01

    Balloon dilatation of the urethra was performed in five patients with iatrogenic urethral strictures. The urethral strictures were successfully negotiated and dilated in all patients. Redilatation became necessary in a period ranging from 3 to 10 months. The authors believe that balloon dilatation of the urethra can be safely and successfully performed; the procedure produces minimal trauma and immediate relief of symptoms. (orig.)

  6. Percutaneous balloon dilatation for benign hepaticojejunostomy strictures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P. M.; van Beek, E. J.; Smits, N. J.; Rauws, E. A.; Gouma, D. J.; Reeders, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Percutaneous balloon dilatation of biliary tract strictures is generally accepted as a safe and inexpensive procedure. The effectiveness in selected groups of patients remains under discussion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of percutaneous balloon dilatation in

  7. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclo...

  8. Methylprednisolone fails to attenuate lung injury in a mouse model of transfusion related acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Marcella C. A.; Tuinman, Pieter R.; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F.; Boon, Louis; Roelofs, Joris J.; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2014-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Anecdotally, TRALI patients have been treated with corticosteroids. However, evidence for its therapeutic rationale in TRALI is lacking. We determined the effects of corticosteroids on

  9. Microcontroller uses in Long-Duration Ballooning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joseph

    This paper discusses how microcontrollers are being utilized to fulfill the demands of long duration ballooning (LDB) and the advantages of doing so. The Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) offers the service of launching high altitude balloons (120k ft) which provide an over the horizon telemetry system and platform for scientific research payloads to collect data. CSBF has utilized microcontrollers to address multiple tasks and functions which were previously performed by more complex systems. A microcontroller system has been recently developed and programmed in house to replace our previous backup navigation system which is used on all LDB flights. A similar microcontroller system was developed to be independently launched in Antarctica before the actual scientific payload. This system's function is to transmit its GPS position and a small housekeeping packet so that we can confirm the upper level float winds are as predicted from satellite derived models. Microcontrollers have also been used to create test equipment to functionally check out the flight hardware used in our telemetry systems. One test system which was developed can be used to quickly determine if our communication link we are providing for the science payloads is functioning properly. Another system was developed to provide us with the ability to easily determine the status of one of our over the horizon communication links through a closed loop system. This test system has given us the capability to provide more field support to science groups than we were able to in years past. The trend of utilizing microcontrollers has taken place for a number of reasons. By using microcontrollers to fill these needs, it has given us the ability to quickly design and implement systems which meet flight critical needs, as well as perform many of the everyday tasks in LDB. This route has also allowed us to reduce the amount of time required for personnel to perform a number of the tasks required

  10. Generalised ballooning theory of two-dimensional tokamak modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoul, P. A.; Dickinson, D.; Roach, C. M.; Wilson, H. R.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, using solutions from a local gyrokinetic flux-tube code combined with higher order ballooning theory, a new analytical approach is developed to reconstruct the global linear mode structure with associated global mode frequency. In addition to the isolated mode (IM), which usually peaks on the outboard mid-plane, the higher order ballooning theory has also captured other types of less unstable global modes: (a) the weakly asymmetric ballooning theory (WABT) predicts a mixed mode (MM) that undergoes a small poloidal shift away from the outboard mid-plane, (b) a relatively more stable general mode (GM) balloons on the top (or bottom) of the tokamak plasma. In this paper, an analytic approach is developed to combine these disconnected analytical limits into a single generalised ballooning theory. This is used to investigate how an IM behaves under the effect of sheared toroidal flow. For small values of flow an IM initially converts into a MM where the results of WABT are recaptured, and eventually, as the flow increases, the mode asymptotically becomes a GM on the top (or bottom) of the plasma. This may be an ingredient in models for understanding why in some experimental scenarios, instead of large edge localised modes (ELMs), small ELMs are observed. Finally, our theory can have other important consequences, especially for calculations involving Reynolds stress driven intrinsic rotation through the radial asymmetry in the global mode structures. Understanding the intrinsic rotation is significant because external torque in a plasma the size of ITER is expected to be relatively low.

  11. Early Cosmic Ray Research with Balloons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Michael, E-mail: michael.walter@desy.de

    2013-06-15

    The discovery of cosmic rays by Victor Hess during a balloon flight in 1912 at an altitude of 5350 m would not have been possible without the more than one hundred years development of scientific ballooning. The discovery of hot air and hydrogen balloons and their first flights in Europe is shortly described. Scientific ballooning was mainly connected with activities of meteorologists. It was also the geologist and meteorologist Franz Linke, who probably observed first indications of a penetrating radiation whose intensity seemed to increase with the altitude. Karl Bergwitz and Albert Gockel were the first physicists studying the penetrating radiation during balloon flights. The main part of the article deals with the discovery of the extraterrestrial radiation by V. Hess and the confirmation by Werner Kolhörster.

  12. Wallerian degeneration in the optic nerve stretch-injury model of traumatic brain injury: a stereological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, William L; Bartlett, Emma; Morgan, Hanna

    2015-06-01

    Patients with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) show loss of central white matter, central gray matter, and cortical gray matter with increasing post-traumatic survival. The majority of experimental studies using animals have, however, discussed only the ultrastructural pathophysiology of injured central white matter leading to secondary axotomy and the formation of axonal terminal bulbs. Using the stretch-injured optic nerve model in adult guinea pigs, the present study provides novel quantitative data concerning Wallerian degeneration of disconnected axonal fragments following secondary axotomy out to 12 weeks after injury to an optic nerve. The time course of Wallerian degeneration at the level of an individual nerve fiber is comparable to that reported in earlier studies over 48 h to two weeks after secondary axotomy. But only a relatively small proportion of nerve fibers within the optic tract degenerate via Wallerian degeneration during the first two weeks. Rather, examples of each of the three stages of Wallerian degeneration-acute axonal degeneration, latency of the distal axonal segment, and granular fragmentation-occur within the optic tract across the entire experimental survival of 12 weeks used in the present study. This data suggests that some nerve fibers initiate Wallerian degeneration days and weeks after the initial time of mechanical injury to an optic nerve. The number of intact nerve fibers continues to fall over at least three months after injury in the stretch-injury model of traumatic axonal injury. It is suggested that these novel findings relate to the mechanism(s) whereby central white matter volume decreases over months and years in CTE patients.

  13. Using process control concepts to model conditions required for sudden-onset occupational injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyserling, W Monroe; Smith, Gordon S

    2007-07-01

    Sudden-onset injury results from a momentary energy exchange between an agent and host, producing immediately discernible tissue damage. These injuries are common in both occupational and nonoccupational settings; typical causes include falls, mechanical contact/crushing, exposure to temperature extremes, and exposure to electrical current. We review epidemiologic and engineering approaches to injury prevention and propose a process control model for describing risk-of-exposure to injury agents during the Pre-event phase of sudden-onset injury. Process control is a proactive approach to quality engineering that is based on the premise of preventing defective products from being manufactured in the first place, instead of relying on reactive inspections to detect defects at the end of the manufacturing process. Principles of process control can be applied by occupational health and safety professionals to prevent workplace injury. The proposed model describes how work activities (process inputs) cause risk-of-exposure to injury agents to fluctuate over the course of a work shift. Risk-of-exposure is a complex function with many input factors including: the nature/magnitude of hazards, the presence and effectiveness of engineering controls, safety climate, management attitudes and practices, the surrounding work environment, the physical and mental states of the worker, and the quality and quantity of supervision and training. Injury can occur only when this function crosses a certain threshold and the host is exposed to injurious energy via physical contact. Certain factors that contribute to risk-of-exposure are stable for extended time periods (weeks, months, years), whereas other factors are transient (durations of minutes or seconds). The model extends classical work by Haddon and others, provides preliminary insights to designing epidemiologic studies and developing fault-tolerant work systems, and illustrates how interdisciplinary approaches can improve our

  14. Integrating Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Data into the Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research Informatics Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Research Informatics Systems PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cynthia Harrison-Felix, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Craig Hospital Englewood, CO 80113...Traumatic Brain Injury Research Informatics Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0564 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Research (FITBIR) Informatics System. Local IRB approval and HRPO approval has been obtained for the TBI Model System (TBIMS) National Data and

  15. Assessing the Hemodynamic Effects of Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) in Traumatic Cardiac Arrest When Closed Chest Compressions are Augmented by Directing the Area of Maximal Compression Over the Left Ventricle in a Swine Model (sus scrofa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Assessing the hemodynamic effects of Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) in traumatic cardiac arrest when closed...Principal Investigator (PI): Name Rank Date of IACUC Training Branch of Service / Corps Staff Resident Fellow Civilian Department / Office

  16. Progesterone treatment shows benefit in a pediatric model of moderate to severe bilateral brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastafa I Geddes

    Full Text Available Controlled cortical impact (CCI models in adult and aged Sprague-Dawley (SD rats have been used extensively to study medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC injury and the effects of post-injury progesterone treatment, but the hormone's effects after traumatic brain injury (TBI in juvenile animals have not been determined. In the present proof-of-concept study we investigated whether progesterone had neuroprotective effects in a pediatric model of moderate to severe bilateral brain injury.Twenty-eight-day old (PND 28 male Sprague Dawley rats received sham (n = 24 or CCI (n = 47 injury and were given progesterone (4, 8, or 16 mg/kg per 100 g body weight or vehicle injections on post-injury days (PID 1-7, subjected to behavioral testing from PID 9-27, and analyzed for lesion size at PID 28.The 8 and 16 mg/kg doses of progesterone were observed to be most beneficial in reducing the effect of CCI on lesion size and behavior in PND 28 male SD rats.Our findings suggest that a midline CCI injury to the frontal cortex will reliably produce a moderate TBI comparable to what is seen in the adult male rat and that progesterone can ameliorate the injury-induced deficits.

  17. Bone marrow mesenchymal cells improve muscle function in a skeletal muscle re-injury model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M Andrade

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle injury is the most common problem in orthopedic and sports medicine, and severe injury leads to fibrosis and muscle dysfunction. Conventional treatment for successive muscle injury is currently controversial, although new therapies, like cell therapy, seem to be promise. We developed a model of successive injuries in rat to evaluate the therapeutic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMC injected directly into the injured muscle. Functional and histological assays were performed 14 and 28 days after the injury protocol by isometric tension recording and picrosirius/Hematoxilin & Eosin staining, respectively. We also evaluated the presence and the fate of BMMC on treated muscles; and muscle fiber regeneration. BMMC treatment increased maximal skeletal muscle contraction 14 and 28 days after muscle injury compared to non-treated group (4.5 ± 1.7 vs 2.5 ± 0.98 N/cm2, p<0.05 and 8.4 ± 2.3 vs. 5.7 ± 1.3 N/cm2, p<0.05 respectively. Furthermore, BMMC treatment increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and the presence of mature muscle fiber 28 days after muscle injury. However, there was no difference in collagen deposition between groups. Immunoassays for cytoskeleton markers of skeletal and smooth muscle cells revealed an apparent integration of the BMMC within the muscle. These data suggest that BMMC transplantation accelerates and improves muscle function recovery in our extensive muscle re-injury model.

  18. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound: A Novel Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    Berry A, Capone F, Giorgio M, Pelicci P, de Kloet E, et al . 2007. Deletion of the life span determinant p66Shc prevents age-dependent increases in...in humans. Limitations to animal research must be recognized as well. Shanks et al (78) argue that animal models are not predictive of responses in...brain injury in animals to model mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) in humans. Wahab et al (95) reported that HIFU can impair neural axonal

  19. [Experimental model of severe local radiation injuries of the skin after X-rays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotenko, K V; Moroz, B B; Nasonova, T A; Dobrynina, O A; LIpengolz, A A; Gimadova, T I; Deshevoy, Yu B; Lebedev, V G; Lyrschikova, A V; Eremin, I I

    2013-01-01

    The experimental model of severe local radiation injuries skin under the influence of a relatively soft X-rays on a modified device RAP 100-10 produced by "Diagnostica-M" (Russia) was proposed. The model can be used as pre-clinical studies in small experimental animals in order to improve the treatment of local radiation injuries, especially in the conditions of application of cellular therapy.

  20. The characteristics of mine explosion injury of wading in shoal: A study on an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen ZHANG

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the characteristics and mechanism of mine blast injury that wading in shoal of different depths through an animal model. Methods Ninety-six healthy adult New Zealand white rabbits weighing 2.19±0.12kg were randomly divided into land group (n=16, limb wading group (n=16, the water depth reaching up the middle of the thighs of rabbits, and chest wading group (n=16, the water depth reaching up the thoracic xiphoid, stress test group (n=30, fake injury group (n=18. Punctiform burster was used to simulate landmine. Electric ignited the simulated mine away, causing landmine explosion injury to rabbits' one-sided hind limbs in upright state. High-speed photography was used to observe the movement of water accompanying the simulated mine explosion. Arterial blood serum markers of myocardial injury (CK-MB, cTnI and nerve injury (MBP, NSE were detected before injury, and 3, 6 and 12h after injury, and echocardiography, electrocardiography, CT, DSA and other examinations were implemented at the same time. Survival animals were killed 12h after injury for anatomy to record their injuries to the limbs and distant organs. The histopathological examination was done to define the injury characteristics further. Results Feet and distal tibia were broken, and closed femoral fractures and arterial damage were often found away from the stump in limb wading group. This type of injury was different from the mop-like tearing tissue in the land group. Chest, abdominal organs and the brain, spinal cord injury in wading group were more severe than those in land group. There were higher incidences of chest, abdominal organs and spinal cord injury in chest wading Group. Conclusion The energy transfer of underwater explosion is affected by water depth and limbs or trunk mutually, which is an important mechanism of the complex and serious injuries in the wading group. The wading depth is an important factor affecting severity of the injury. Based on

  1. Trajectory Control For High Altitude Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, K.; Nock, K.; Heun, M.; Wyszkowski, C.

    We will discuss the continuing development of the StratoSailTM Balloon Trajectory Control System presented at the 33rd COSPAR in 2000. A vertical wing suspended on a 15-km tether from a high altitude balloon uses the difference in wind velocity between the altitude of the balloon and the altitude of the wing to create an aerodynamic sideforce. This sideforce, transmitted to the balloon gondola via the tether, causes the balloon to move laterally. Although the balloon's resultant drift velocity is quite small (a few meters per second), the effect becomes significant over long periods of time (hours to days). Recently, a full-scale wing, rudder and boom assembly has been fabricated, a winch system testbed has been completed, and a lightweight tether with reduced susceptibility to ultraviolet damage has been developed. The development effort for this invention, with pending international patents, has been funded by the NASA/SBIR program in support of the Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) program.

  2. 14 CFR 61.115 - Balloon rating: Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Balloon rating: Limitations. 61.115 Section... rating: Limitations. (a) If a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with a balloon rating... operate a gas balloon. (b) If a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with a balloon rating...

  3. Accurate Determination of the Volume of an Irregular Helium Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Bradvica, Rafaela; Karl, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    In a recent paper, Zable described an experiment with a near-spherical balloon filled with impure helium. Measuring the temperature and the pressure inside and outside the balloon, the lift of the balloon, and the mass of the balloon materials, he described how to use the ideal gas laws and Archimedes' principal to compute the average molecular…

  4. Abdominal cavity balloon for preventing a patient's bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, E.E.H.; Rutten, H.J.T.; Jakimowicz, J.J.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Moes, C.C.M.; Buzink, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to an abdominal cavity balloon for preventing a haemorrhage in a patient's pelvic region, comprising an inflatable balloon, wherein the balloon is pro vided with a smooth surface and with a strip that is flex- urally stiff and formed to follow the balloon's shape for po

  5. Asymptotic stability boundaries of ballooning modes in circular tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; Bondeson, A.; Chance, M.S.

    1987-06-01

    The model ballooning mode equation of Connor, Hastie, and Taylor for large-aspect-ratio circular tokamaks is analyzed in the limit of large pressure gradient, and corresponding expressions for stability boundaries are derived. In particular, it is found that for a fixed radial wave number, there exists an infinite sequence of unstable bands, and that minimizing over the radial wave numbers leads to asymptotic merging between the neighboring bands

  6. An ex vivo spinal cord injury model to study ependymal cells in adult mouse tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Zafra, Teresa; Codeluppi, Simone; Uhlén, Per

    2017-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is characterized by an initial cell loss that is followed by a concerted cellular response in an attempt to restore the damaged tissue. Nevertheless, little is known about the signaling mechanisms governing the cellular response to injury. Here, we have established an adult ex vivo system that exhibits multiple hallmarks of spinal cord injury and allows the study of complex processes that are difficult to address using animal models. We have characterized the ependymal cell response to injury in this model system and found that ependymal cells can become activated, proliferate, migrate out of the central canal lining and differentiate in a manner resembling the in vivo situation. Moreover, we show that these cells respond to external adenosine triphosphate and exhibit spontaneous Ca 2+ activity, processes that may play a significant role in the regulation of their response to spinal cord injury. This model provides an attractive tool to deepen our understanding of the ependymal cell response after spinal cord injury, which may contribute to the development of new treatment options for spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuregulin-1 protects against acute optic nerve injury in rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Liu, Tao-Tao; Song, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Yan; Li, Zhao-Hui; Hao, Qian; Cui, Zhi-Hua; Liu, Hong Lei; Lei, Chun Ling; Liu, Jun

    2015-10-15

    In this study, we employed a rat model and examined the expression pattern of neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) in optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in response to optic nerve injury to understand the role of NRG-1 in conferring protection against acute optic nerve injury. Forty-eight male rats were randomly divided into two groups, the sham-operation group (n=24) and optic nerve injury group (n=24). Flash visual evoked potentials (FVEP) and fundography images were acquired at different time points following optic nerve injury (2h, 1d, 2d, 7d, 14d and 28d). Semi-quantitative analysis of NGR-1 expression pattern was performed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. In a related experiment, 100 male rats were randomly divided into NGR-1 treatment group (n=60) (treated with increasing dose of NGR-1 at 0.5μg, 1μg and 3μg), normal saline (NS) group (n=20) and negative control group (n=20). Optic nerve injury was induced in all the animals and in situ cell death was measured by detecting the apoptosis rates using TUNEL assay. Fundus photography results revealed no detectable differences between the sham-operation group and optic nerve injury group at 2h, 1d, 2d and 7d. However at 2weeks, the optic discs turned pale in all animals in the optic nerve injury group. NRG-1 expression increased significantly at all time points in the optic nerve injury group (Pnerve injury and sham-operation group (Ptime points and the reduction was statistically significant in 3μg NRG-1 treatment group at 7d, 14d and 28d (all Pnerve function and is essential for tissue repair following optic nerve injury. Thus, NRG-1 expression confers protection against acute optic nerve injury in a dose-dependent manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Looners: Inside the world of balloon fetishism

    OpenAIRE

    McIntyre, Karen E

    2011-01-01

    In the spring of 1997, Shaun had just broken up with a boyfriend, and his roommate had moved out. Living alone for the first time and relieved of the fear that someone might walk in the door, he was finally able to indulge his fantasy. The young man sat on his couch and started blowing up balloons. Shaun had loved playing with balloons since he was a child. When he hit puberty, he felt his first orgasm rubbing against a balloon. It was then that his relationship with the object took ...

  9. A new model to produce sagittal plane rotational induced diffuse axonal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan eDavidsson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new in vivo animal model that produces diffuse brain injuries (DBI in sagittal plane rearward rotational acceleration has been developed. In this model, the skull of an anesthetized adult rat is tightly secured to a rotating bar. During trauma, the bar is impacted by a striker that causes the bar and the animal head to rotate rearward; the acceleration phase last 0.4 ms and is followed by a rotation at constant speed and a gentle deceleration when the bar makes contact with a padded stop. The total head angle change is less than 30 degrees. By adjusting the air pressure in the rifle used to accelerate the striker, resulting rotational acceleration between 0.3 and 2.1 Mrad/s2 can be produced.Numerous combinations of trauma levels, post-trauma survival times, brain and serum retrieval and tissue preparation techniques were adopted to characterise this new model. The trauma caused subdural bleedings in animals exposed to severe trauma. Staining brain tissue with β-Amyloid Precursor Protein antibodies and FD Neurosilver that detect degenerating axons revealed wide spread axonal injuries (AI in the corpus callosum, the border between the corpus callosum and cortex and in tracts in the brain stem. The observed AI:s were apparent only when the rotational acceleration level was moderate and above. On the contrary, only limited signs of contusion injuries were observed following trauma. S100 serum analyses indicate that blood vessel and glia cell injuries occur following moderate levels of trauma despite the absence of obvious BBB injuries. We conclude that this rotational trauma model is capable of producing graded axonal injury, is repeatable and produces limited other types of traumatic brain injuries (TBI and as such is useful in the study of injury biomechanics, diagnostics and treatment strategies following diffuse axonal injury (DAI.

  10. A new model to produce sagittal plane rotational induced diffuse axonal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Johan; Risling, Marten

    2011-01-01

    A new in vivo animal model that produces diffuse brain injuries in sagittal plane rearward rotational acceleration has been developed. In this model, the skull of an anesthetized adult rat is tightly secured to a rotating bar. During trauma, the bar is impacted by a striker that causes the bar and the animal head to rotate rearward; the acceleration phase last 0.4 ms and is followed by a rotation at constant speed and a gentle deceleration when the bar makes contact with a padded stop. The total head angle change is less than 30°. By adjusting the air pressure in the rifle used to accelerate the striker, resulting rotational acceleration between 0.3 and 2.1 Mrad/s(2) can be produced. Numerous combinations of trauma levels, post-trauma survival times, brain and serum retrieval, and tissue preparation techniques were adopted to characterize this new model. The trauma caused subdural bleedings in animals exposed to severe trauma. Staining brain tissue with β-Amyloid Precursor Protein antibodies and FD Neurosilver that detect degenerating axons revealed wide spread axonal injuries (AI) in the corpus callosum, the border between the corpus callosum and cortex and in tracts in the brain stem. The observed AIs were apparent only when the rotational acceleration level was moderate and above. On the contrary, only limited signs of contusion injuries were observed following trauma. Macrophage invasions, glial fibrillary acidic protein redistribution or hypertrophy, and blood brain barrier (BBB) changes were unusual. S100 serum analyses indicate that blood vessel and glia cell injuries occur following moderate levels of trauma despite the absence of obvious BBB injuries. We conclude that this rotational trauma model is capable of producing graded axonal injury, is repeatable and produces limited other types of traumatic brain injuries and as such is useful in the study of injury biomechanics, diagnostics, and treatment strategies following diffuse axonal injury.

  11. A comparative study of internally and externally capped balloons using small scale test balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Douglas P.

    1994-01-01

    Caps have been used to structurally reinforce scientific research balloons since the late 1950's. The scientific research balloons used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) use internal caps. A NASA cap placement specification does not exist since no empirical information exisits concerning cap placement. To develop a cap placement specification, NASA has completed two in-hangar inflation tests comparing the structural contributions of internal caps and external caps. The tests used small scale test balloons designed to develop the highest possible stresses within the constraints of the hangar and balloon materials. An externally capped test balloon and an internally capped test balloon were designed, built, inflated and simulated to determine the structural contributions and benefits of each. The results of the tests and simulations are presented.

  12. Opioid Abuse after Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    compulsive buying and the burden perceived by caregivers after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury. Psychopathology. 2011;44:158-164. Rochat L...well as the progression from abuse to compulsive drug taking and addiction (Coluzzi and Pappagallo, 2005; Koob and Volkow, 2010). Physical dependence

  13. Opioid Abuse After Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodet Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    impulsivity relates to compulsive buying and the burden perceived by caregivers after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury. Psychopathology...mechanism for the continued misuse/abuse of opioid drugs as well as the progression from abuse to compulsive drug taking and addiction (Coluzzi and

  14. Lifetime injury prevention: The sport profile model | Webborn | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participation in sporting activities carries an injury risk. Conversely, the increased awareness that physical inactivity is a major risk factor for disease has led government agencies and the medical community to encourage increased levels of physical activity. Many people will achieve this through participation in sport.

  15. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Khalin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI.

  16. The percentage of macrophage numbers in rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satrio Wicaksono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Excessive accumulation of macrophages in sciatic nerve fascicles inhibits regeneration of peripheral nerves. The aim of this study is to determine the percentage of the macrophages inside and outside of the fascicles at the proximal, at the site of injury and at the distal segment of rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury. Thirty male 3 months age Wistar rats of 200-230 g were divided into sham-operation group and crush injury group. Termination was performed on day 3, 7, and 14 after crush injury. Immunohistochemical examination was done using anti CD68 antibody. Counting of immunopositive and immunonegative cells was done on three representative fields for extrafascicular and intrafascicular area of proximal, injury and distal segments. The data was presented as percentage of immunopositive cells. The percentage of the macrophages was significantly increased in crush injury group compared to the sham-operated group in all segments of the peripheral nerves. While the percentage of macrophages outside fascicle in all segments of sciatic nerve and within the fascicle in the proximal segment reached its peak on day 3, the percentage of macrophages within the fascicles at the site of injury and distal segments reached the peak later at day 7. In conclusions, accumulation of macrophages outside the nerve fascicles occurs at the beginning of the injury, and then followed later by the accumulation of macrophages within nerve fascicles

  17. Recent Developments in Balloon Support Instrumentation at TIFR Balloon Facility, Hyderabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rajagopalan

    2012-07-01

    The Balloon Facility of Tata Institute of Fundamental Research has been conducting stratospheric balloon flights regularly for various experiments in Space Astronomy and Atmospheric Sciences. A continuous improvement in Balloon flight Support instrumentation by the Control Instrumentation Group to keep in space with the growing complexities of the scientific payloads have contributed to the total success of balloon flights conducted recently. Recent improvements in display of Balloon position during balloon flight by showing on real time the balloon GPS position against Google TM maps is of immense help in selecting the right spot for payload landing and safe recovery . For further speeding up the payload recovery process, a new GPS-GSM payload system has been developed which gives SMS of the payload position information to the recovery team on their cell phones. On parallel footing, a new GPS- VHF system has been developed using GPS and Radio Modems for Balloon Tracking and also for obtaining the payload impact point. On the Telecommand side, a single board Telecommand/ Timer weighing less than 2 Kg has been specially developed for use in the mesosphere balloon test flight. The interference on the existing Short Range Telemetry System has been eliminated by introducing a Band Pass Filter and LNA in the Receiving system of the modules, thereby enhancing its reliability. In this paper , we present the details of the above mentioned developments.

  18. In vivo imaging of spinal cord in contusion injury model mice by multi-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Y.; Horiuchi, H.; Ogata, T.; Hikita, A.; Miura, H.; Imamura, T.

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent imaging technique is a promising method and has been developed for in vivo applications in cellular biology. In particular, nonlinear optical imaging technique, multi-photon microscopy has make it possible to analyze deep portion of tissues in living animals such as axons of spinal code. Traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are usually caused by contusion damages. Therefore, observation of spinal cord tissue after the contusion injury is necessary for understanding cellular dynamics in response to traumatic SCI and development of the treatment for traumatic SCI. Our goal is elucidation of mechanism for degeneration of axons after contusion injuries by establishing SCI model and chronic observation of injured axons in the living animals. Firstly we generated and observed acute SCI model by contusion injury. By using a multi-photon microscope, axons in dorsal cord were visualized approximately 140 micron in depth from the surface. Immediately after injury, minimal morphological change of spinal cord was observed. At 3 days after injury, spinal cord was swelling and the axons seem to be fragmented. At 7 days after injury, increased degradation of axons could be observed, although the image was blurred due to accumulation of the connective tissue. In the present study, we successfully observed axon degeneration after the contusion SCI in a living animal in vivo. Our final goal is to understand molecular mechanisms and cellular dynamics in response to traumatic SCIs in acute and chronic stage.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of liver ischemia reperfusion injury: Insights from transgenic knockout models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Gourab; Fuller, Barry J; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury is a major obstacle in liver resection and liver transplantation surgery. Understanding the mechanisms of liver ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) and developing strategies to counteract this injury will therefore reduce acute complications in hepatic resection and transplantation, as well as expanding the potential pool of usable donor grafts. The initial liver injury is initiated by reactive oxygen species which cause direct cellular injury and also activate a cascade of molecular mediators leading to microvascular changes, increased apoptosis and acute inflammatory changes with increased hepatocyte necrosis. Some adaptive pathways are activated during reperfusion that reduce the reperfusion injury. IRI involves a complex interplay between neutrophils, natural killer T-cells cells, CD4+ T cell subtypes, cytokines, nitric oxide synthases, haem oxygenase-1, survival kinases such as the signal transducer and activator of transcription, Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases/Akt and nuclear factor κβ pathways. Transgenic animals, particularly genetic knockout models, have become a powerful tool at elucidating mechanisms of liver ischaemia reperfusion injury and are complementary to pharmacological studies. Targeted disruption of the protein at the genetic level is more specific and maintained than pharmacological inhibitors or stimulants of the same protein. This article reviews the evidence from knockout models of liver IRI about the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying liver IRI. PMID:23555157

  20. The application of a mathematical model linking structural and functional connectomes in severe brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kuceyeski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following severe injuries that result in disorders of consciousness, recovery can occur over many months or years post-injury. While post-injury synaptogenesis, axonal sprouting and functional reorganization are known to occur, the network-level processes underlying recovery are poorly understood. Here, we test a network-level functional rerouting hypothesis in recovery of patients with disorders of consciousness following severe brain injury. This hypothesis states that the brain recovers from injury by restoring normal functional connections via alternate structural pathways that circumvent impaired white matter connections. The so-called network diffusion model, which relates an individual's structural and functional connectomes by assuming that functional activation diffuses along structural pathways, is used here to capture this functional rerouting. We jointly examined functional and structural connectomes extracted from MRIs of 12 healthy and 16 brain-injured subjects. Connectome properties were quantified via graph theoretic measures and network diffusion model parameters. While a few graph metrics showed groupwise differences, they did not correlate with patients' level of consciousness as measured by the Coma Recovery Scale — Revised. There was, however, a strong and significant partial Pearson's correlation (accounting for age and years post-injury between level of consciousness and network diffusion model propagation time (r = 0.76, p < 0.05, corrected, i.e. the time functional activation spends traversing the structural network. We concluded that functional rerouting via alternate (and less efficient pathways leads to increases in network diffusion model propagation time. Simulations of injury and recovery in healthy connectomes confirmed these results. This work establishes the feasibility for using the network diffusion model to capture network-level mechanisms in recovery of consciousness after severe brain injury.

  1. The Brazilian Football Association (CBF model for epidemiological studies on professional soccer player injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Goncalves Arliani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aims to establish a national methodological model for epidemiological studies on professional soccer player injuries and to describe the numerous relevant studies previously published on this topic. INTRODUCTION: The risk of injury in professional soccer is high. However, previous studies of injury risk in Brazil and other countries have been characterized by large variations in study design and data collection methods as well as definitions of injury, standardized diagnostic criteria, and recovery times. METHODS: A system developed by the Union of European Football for epidemiological studies on professional soccer players is being used as a starting point to create a methodological model for the Brazilian Football Association. To describe the existing studies on professional soccer player injuries, we developed a search strategy to identify relevant epidemiological studies. We included the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences and Medline databases in our study. RESULTS: We considered 60 studies from Medline and 16 studies from the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences in the final analysis. Twelve studies were selected for final inclusion in this review: seven from the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences and five from Medline. We identified a lack of uniformity in the study design, data collection methods, injury definitions, standardized diagnostic criteria, and the definition of recovery time. Based on the information contained within these articles, we developed a model for epidemiological studies for the Brazilian Football Association. CONCLUSIONS: There is no uniform model for epidemiological studies of professional soccer injuries. Here, we propose a novel model to be applied for epidemiological studies of professional soccer player injuries in Brazil and throughout the world.

  2. The Brazilian Football Association (CBF) model for epidemiological studies on professional soccer player injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Runco, Jose Luiz; Cohen, Moisés

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to establish a national methodological model for epidemiological studies on professional soccer player injuries and to describe the numerous relevant studies previously published on this topic. The risk of injury in professional soccer is high. However, previous studies of injury risk in Brazil and other countries have been characterized by large variations in study design and data collection methods as well as definitions of injury, standardized diagnostic criteria, and recovery times. A system developed by the Union of European Football for epidemiological studies on professional soccer players is being used as a starting point to create a methodological model for the Brazilian Football Association. To describe the existing studies on professional soccer player injuries, we developed a search strategy to identify relevant epidemiological studies. We included the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences and Medline databases in our study. We considered 60 studies from Medline and 16 studies from the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences in the final analysis. Twelve studies were selected for final inclusion in this review: seven from the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences and five from Medline. We identified a lack of uniformity in the study design, data collection methods, injury definitions, standardized diagnostic criteria, and the definition of recovery time. Based on the information contained within these articles, we developed a model for epidemiological studies for the Brazilian Football Association. There is no uniform model for epidemiological studies of professional soccer injuries. Here, we propose a novel model to be applied for epidemiological studies of professional soccer player injuries in Brazil and throughout the world.

  3. Material properties of the brain in injury-relevant conditions - Experiments and computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Choate, Bryan; Ji, Songbai

    2018-04-01

    Material properties of the brain have been extensively studied but remain poorly characterized. The vast variations in constitutive models and material constants are well documented. However, no study exists to translate the variations into disparities in impact-induced brain strains most relevant to brain injury. Here, we reviewed a subset of injury-relevant brain material properties either characterized in experiments or adopted in recent head injury models. To highlight how variations in measured brain material properties manifested in simulated brain strains, we selected six experiments that have provided a complete set of brain material model and constants to implement a common head injury model. Responses resulting from two extreme events representing a high-rate cadaveric head impact and a low-rate in vivo head rotation, respectively, varied substantially. We hypothesized, and further confirmed, that the time-varying shear moduli at the appropriate time scales (e.g., ~5 ms and ~40 ms corresponding to the impulse durations of the major acceleration peaks for the two impacts, respectively), rather than the initial or long-term shear moduli, were the most indicative of impact-induced brain strains. These results underscored the need to implement measured brain material properties into an actual head injury model for evaluation. They may also provide guidelines to better characterize brain material properties in future experiments and head injury models. Finally, our finding provided a practical solution to satisfy head injury model validation requirements at both ends of the impact severity spectrum. This would improve the confidence in model simulation performance across a range of time scales relevant to concussion and sub-concussion in the real-world. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta in brain injury induced by myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Gao, Wen-Wei; Liu, Ya-Jing; Jiang, Meng; Liu, Lian; Yuan, Quan; Hou, Jia-Bao; Xia, Zhong-Yuan

    2017-10-01

    Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury can lead to severe brain injury. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta is known to be involved in myo-cardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and diabetes mellitus. However, the precise role of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury-induced brain injury is unclear. In this study, we observed the effects of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta on brain injury induced by myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in diabetic rats. Rat models of diabetes mellitus were generated via intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Models of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury were generated by occluding the anterior descending branch of the left coronary artery. Post-conditioning comprised three cycles of ischemia/reperfusion. Immunohistochemical staining and western blot assays demonstrated that after 48 hours of reperfusion, the structure of the brain was seriously damaged in the experimental rats compared with normal controls. Expression of Bax, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, and cleaved caspase-3 in the brain was significantly increased, while expression of Bcl-2, interleukin-10, and phospho-glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta was decreased. Diabetes mellitus can aggravate inflammatory reactions and apoptosis. Ischemic post-conditioning with glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta inhibitor lithium chloride can effectively reverse these changes. Our results showed that myocardial ischemic post-conditioning attenuated myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury-induced brain injury by activating glyco-gen synthase kinase 3 beta. According to these results, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta appears to be an important factor in brain injury induced by myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  5. Kaempferol Attenuates Myocardial Ischemic Injury via Inhibition of MAPK Signaling Pathway in Experimental Model of Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchal, Kapil; Malik, Salma; Gamad, Nanda; Malhotra, Rajiv Kumar; Goyal, Sameer N.; Chaudhary, Uma; Bhatia, Jagriti; Ojha, Shreesh; Arya, Dharamvir Singh

    2016-01-01

    Kaempferol (KMP), a dietary flavonoid, has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects. Hence, we investigated the effect of KMP in ischemia-reperfusion (IR) model of myocardial injury in rats. We studied male albino Wistar rats that were divided into sham, IR-control, KMP-20 + IR, and KMP 20 per se groups. KMP (20 mg/kg; i.p.) was administered daily to rats for the period of 15 days, and, on the 15th day, ischemia was produced by one-stage ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery for 45 min followed by reperfusion for 60 min. After completion of surgery, rats were sacrificed; heart was removed and processed for biochemical, morphological, and molecular studies. KMP pretreatment significantly ameliorated IR injury by maintaining cardiac function, normalizing oxidative stress, and preserving morphological alterations. Furthermore, there was a decrease in the level of inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-6, and NFκB), inhibition of active JNK and p38 proteins, and activation of ERK1/ERK2, a prosurvival kinase. Additionally, it also attenuated apoptosis by reducing the expression of proapoptotic proteins (Bax and Caspase-3), TUNEL positive cells, and increased level of antiapoptotic proteins (Bcl-2). In conclusion, KMP protected against IR injury by attenuating inflammation and apoptosis through the modulation of MAPK pathway. PMID:27087891

  6. Kaempferol Attenuates Myocardial Ischemic Injury via Inhibition of MAPK Signaling Pathway in Experimental Model of Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Suchal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaempferol (KMP, a dietary flavonoid, has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects. Hence, we investigated the effect of KMP in ischemia-reperfusion (IR model of myocardial injury in rats. We studied male albino Wistar rats that were divided into sham, IR-control, KMP-20 + IR, and KMP 20 per se groups. KMP (20 mg/kg; i.p. was administered daily to rats for the period of 15 days, and, on the 15th day, ischemia was produced by one-stage ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery for 45 min followed by reperfusion for 60 min. After completion of surgery, rats were sacrificed; heart was removed and processed for biochemical, morphological, and molecular studies. KMP pretreatment significantly ameliorated IR injury by maintaining cardiac function, normalizing oxidative stress, and preserving morphological alterations. Furthermore, there was a decrease in the level of inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-6, and NFκB, inhibition of active JNK and p38 proteins, and activation of ERK1/ERK2, a prosurvival kinase. Additionally, it also attenuated apoptosis by reducing the expression of proapoptotic proteins (Bax and Caspase-3, TUNEL positive cells, and increased level of antiapoptotic proteins (Bcl-2. In conclusion, KMP protected against IR injury by attenuating inflammation and apoptosis through the modulation of MAPK pathway.

  7. Curcumin and dexmedetomidine prevents oxidative stress and renal injury in hind limb ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, M A; Yalcin, S; Aydogan, H; Büyükfirat, E; Kücük, A; Kocarslan, S; Yüce, H H; Taskın, A; Aksoy, N

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin and dexmedetomidine have been shown to have protective effects in ischemia-reperfusion injury on various organs. However, their protective effects on kidney tissue against ischemia-reperfusion injury remain unclear. We aimed to determine whether curcumin or dexmedetomidine prevents renal tissue from injury that was induced by hind limb ischemia-reperfusion in rats. Fifty rats were divided into five groups: sham, control, curcumin (CUR) group (200 mg/kg curcumin, n = 10), dexmedetomidine (DEX) group (25 μg/kg dexmedetomidine, n = 10), and curcumin-dexmedetomidine (CUR-DEX) group (200 mg/kg curcumin and 25 μg/kg dexmedetomidine). Curcumin and dexmedetomidine were administered intraperitoneally immediately after the end of 4 h ischemia, just 5 min before reperfusion. The extremity re-perfused for 2 h and then blood samples were taken and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidative status (TOS) levels, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were measured, and renal tissue samples were histopathologically examined. The TAC activity levels in blood samples were significantly lower in the control than the other groups (p OSI were found to be significantly increased in the control group compared to others groups (p model.

  8. Overcoming the organization-practice barrier in sports injury prevention: A nonhierarchical organizational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlström, Ö; Jacobsson, J; Timpka, T

    2015-08-01

    The organization of sports at the national level has seldom been included in scientific discussions of sports injury prevention. The aim of this study was to develop a model for organization of sports that supports prevention of overuse injuries. The quality function deployment technique was applied in seminars over a two-season period to develop a national organizational structure for athletics in Sweden that facilitates prevention of overuse injuries. Three central features of the resulting model for organization of sports at the national level are (a) diminishment of the organizational hierarchy: participatory safety policy design is introduced through annual meetings where actors from different sectors of the sporting community discuss training, injury prevention, and sports safety policy; (b) introduction of a safety surveillance system: a ubiquitous system for routine collection of injury and illness data; and (c) an open forum for discussion of safety issues: maintenance of a safety forum for participants from different sectors of the sport. A nonhierarchical model for organization of sports at the national level - facilitated by modern information technology - adapted for the prevention of overuse injuries has been developed. Further research is warranted to evaluate the new organizational model in prospective effectiveness studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  10. Magnetometer for Balloons and UAVs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR project will investigate a new, low-cost approach to atomic magnetometry that is suited for operation from UAVs and research balloons. Atomic...

  11. Solid State Inflation Balloon Active Deorbiter

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Solid State Inflation Balloon (SSIB) is a simple, reliable, low-cost, non-propulsive system for deliberate deorbit and control of downrange point-of-impact that...

  12. Shielded Mars Balloon Launcher (SMBL) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences, along with its partner Vertigo Industries, proposes a novel approach to deployment of balloon-based payloads into the Martian atmosphere....

  13. Comparative Study of Injury Models for Studying Muscle Regeneration in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hardy

    Full Text Available A longstanding goal in regenerative medicine is to reconstitute functional tissues or organs after injury or disease. Attention has focused on the identification and relative contribution of tissue specific stem cells to the regeneration process. Relatively little is known about how the physiological process is regulated by other tissue constituents. Numerous injury models are used to investigate tissue regeneration, however, these models are often poorly understood. Specifically, for skeletal muscle regeneration several models are reported in the literature, yet the relative impact on muscle physiology and the distinct cells types have not been extensively characterised.We have used transgenic Tg:Pax7nGFP and Flk1GFP/+ mouse models to respectively count the number of muscle stem (satellite cells (SC and number/shape of vessels by confocal microscopy. We performed histological and immunostainings to assess the differences in the key regeneration steps. Infiltration of immune cells, chemokines and cytokines production was assessed in vivo by Luminex®.We compared the 4 most commonly used injury models i.e. freeze injury (FI, barium chloride (BaCl2, notexin (NTX and cardiotoxin (CTX. The FI was the most damaging. In this model, up to 96% of the SCs are destroyed with their surrounding environment (basal lamina and vasculature leaving a "dead zone" devoid of viable cells. The regeneration process itself is fulfilled in all 4 models with virtually no fibrosis 28 days post-injury, except in the FI model. Inflammatory cells return to basal levels in the CTX, BaCl2 but still significantly high 1-month post-injury in the FI and NTX models. Interestingly the number of SC returned to normal only in the FI, 1-month post-injury, with SCs that are still cycling up to 3-months after the induction of the injury in the other models.Our studies show that the nature of the injury model should be chosen carefully depending on the experimental design and desired

  14. The Effects of Exercise on Cognitive Recovery after Acquired Brain Injury in Animal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, Elise; Rytter, Hana Malá; Mogensen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to review the current status of exercise as a tool to promote cognitive rehabilitation after acquired brain injury (ABI) in animal model-based research. Searches were conducted on the PubMed, Scopus, and psycINFO databases in February 2014. Search strings used...... were: exercise (and) animal model (or) rodent (or) rat (and) traumatic brain injury (or) cerebral ischemia (or) brain irradiation. Studies were selected if they were (1) in English, (2) used adult animals subjected to acquired brain injury, (3) used exercise as an intervention tool after inflicted...... injury, (4) used exercise paradigms demanding movement of all extremities, (5) had exercise intervention effects that could be distinguished from other potential intervention effects, and (6) contained at least one measure of cognitive and/or emotional function. Out of 2308 hits, 22 publications...

  15. Test ventilation with smoke, bubbles, and balloons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, P.L.; Cucchiara, A.L.; McAtee, J.L.; Gonzales, M.

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of smoke, bubbles, and helium-filled balloons was videotaped to demonstrate the mixing of air in the plutonium chemistry laboratories, a plutonium facility. The air-distribution patterns, as indicated by each method, were compared. Helium-filled balloons proved more useful than bubbles or smoke in the visualization of airflow patterns. The replay of various segments of the videotape proved useful in evaluating the different techniques and in identifying airflow trends responsible for air mixing. 6 refs

  16. Significance of balloon pressure recording during angioplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zollikofer, C.L.; Salomonowitz, E.; Frick, M.P.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Amplatz, K.; Bruehlmann, W.F.

    1985-05-01

    During angioplasty of artificial stenoses, atherosclerotic human cadaver arteries, and normal canine arteries, pressure and volume of the dilatation balloons were continuously recorded. We found that a sudden yield of a lesion corresponded to a sudden drop in the pressure curve and an increase of the balloon volume. Volume monitoring was insensitive, but pressure recording was very precise. Continuous pressure recording, using a non-compliant inflation system, correctly demonstrated small breaks and ruptures of atherosclerotic vessels, changes not seen on fluoroscopy.

  17. Modeling Skin Injury from Hot Rice Porridge Spills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgrim Log

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work analyzes skin burns from spills of hot rice and milk products. The traditional Norwegian rice porridge serves as an example. By testing spills on objects emulating an arm, it was concluded that spills were seldom thinner than 3 mm, and stayed in place due to the viscosity of the porridge for more than one minute. The Pennes bioheat equation was solved numerically for such spills, including heat conduction to the skin and convective heat losses from the porridge surface. Temperatures were analyzed in the porridge and skin layers, and the resulting skin injury was calculated based on the basal layer temperature. Parameters influencing burn severity, such as porridge layer thickness, porridge temperature, removal of the porridge and thermal effects of post scald tempered (15 °C water cooling were analyzed. The spilled porridge resulted in a prolonged heat supply to the skin, and the skin injury developed significantly with time. The porridge temperature turned out to be the most important injury parameter. A 70 °C porridge temperature could develop superficial partial-thickness burns. Porridge temperatures at processing temperatures nearly instantly developed severe burns. It was demonstrated that prompt removal of the hot porridge significantly reduced the injury development. The general advice is to avoid serving porridge and similar products at temperatures above 65 °C and, if spilled on the skin, to remove it quickly. After such scald incidents, it is advised to cool the injured area by tempered water for a prolonged period to stimulate healing.

  18. A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage

    OpenAIRE

    Hines-Beard, Jessica; Marchetta, Jeffrey; Gordon, Sarah; Chaum, Edward; Geisert, Eldon E.; Rex, Tonia S.

    2012-01-01

    We developed and characterized a mouse model of primary ocular blast injury. The device consists of: a pressurized air tank attached to a regulated paintball gun with a machined barrel; a chamber that protects the mouse from direct injury and recoil, while exposing the eye; and a secure platform that enables fine, controlled movement of the chamber in relation to the barrel. Expected pressures were calculated and the optimal pressure transducer, based on the predicted pressures, was positione...

  19. Diffuse and Focal Brain Injury in a Large Animal Model of PTE: Mechanisms Underlying Epileptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: A) Contusion injury validation and neuropathology B) Grid electrode development and testing C) Wireless Large Animal Custom Enclosure...In addition, we will test the NF-L and GFAP immunoassay to begin quantification of this biomarkers, as well as collecting serum from the animals pre...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0675 TITLE: Diffuse and Focal Brain Injury in a Large Animal Model of PTE: Mechanisms Underlying Epileptogenesis

  20. Predictors of cardiogenic shock in cardiac surgery patients receiving intra-aortic balloon pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Amit; Kwon, Oh Jin; Bailey, Katherine L; Ashfaq, Adeel; Abdelkarim, Ayman; Shemin, Richard J; Benharash, Peyman

    2018-02-01

    Cardiogenic shock after cardiac surgery leads to severely increased mortality. Intra-aortic balloon pumps may be used during the preoperative period to increase coronary perfusion. The purpose of this study was to characterize predictors of postoperative cardiogenic shock in cardiac surgery patients with and without intra-aortic balloon pumps support. We performed a retrospective analysis of our institutional database of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons for patients operated between January 2008 to July 2015. Multivariable logistic regression was used to model postoperative cardiogenic shock in both the intra-aortic balloon pumps and matched control cohorts. Overall, 4,741 cardiac surgery patients were identified during the study period, of whom 192 (4%) received a preoperative intra-aortic balloon pump. Intra-aortic balloon pumps patients had a greater prevalence of diabetes, previous cardiac surgery, congestive heart failure, and an urgent/emergent status (P pumps patients also had greater 30-day mortality and more postoperative cardiogenic shock (9% vs 3%, P pumps cohort, only sex, previous percutaneous coronary intervention and preoperative arrhythmia remained significant on multivariable analysis (all P pumps and those who do not. Further analysis of the effects of prophylactic intra-aortic balloon pumps support is warranted. (Surgery 2017;160:XXX-XXX.). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment and prediction of road accident injuries trend using time-series models in Kurdistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvareh, Maryam; Karimi, Asrin; Rezaei, Satar; Woldemichael, Abraha; Nili, Sairan; Nouri, Bijan; Nasab, Nader Esmail

    2018-01-01

    Road traffic accidents are commonly encountered incidents that can cause high-intensity injuries to the victims and have direct impacts on the members of the society. Iran has one of the highest incident rates of road traffic accidents. The objective of this study was to model the patterns of road traffic accidents leading to injury in Kurdistan province, Iran. A time-series analysis was conducted to characterize and predict the frequency of road traffic accidents that lead to injury in Kurdistan province. The injuries were categorized into three separate groups which were related to the car occupants, motorcyclists and pedestrian road traffic accident injuries. The Box-Jenkins time-series analysis was used to model the injury observations applying autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) and seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) from March 2009 to February 2015 and to predict the accidents up to 24 months later (February 2017). The analysis was carried out using R-3.4.2 statistical software package. A total of 5199 pedestrians, 9015 motorcyclists, and 28,906 car occupants' accidents were observed. The mean (SD) number of car occupant, motorcyclist and pedestrian accident injuries observed were 401.01 (SD 32.78), 123.70 (SD 30.18) and 71.19 (SD 17.92) per year, respectively. The best models for the pattern of car occupant, motorcyclist, and pedestrian injuries were the ARIMA (1, 0, 0), SARIMA (1, 0, 2) (1, 0, 0) 12 , and SARIMA (1, 1, 1) (0, 0, 1) 12 , respectively. The motorcyclist and pedestrian injuries showed a seasonal pattern and the peak was during summer (August). The minimum frequency for the motorcyclist and pedestrian injuries were observed during the late autumn and early winter (December and January). Our findings revealed that the observed motorcyclist and pedestrian injuries had a seasonal pattern that was explained by air temperature changes overtime. These findings call the need for close monitoring of the

  2. Brain injury and discrimination: Two competing models-perceptions of responsibility and dangerousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Lynette A; Leathem, Janet M; Humphries, Steve

    2016-01-01

    (1) To examine whether the willingness of people to socialize with adolescents with brain injury is influenced by gender, visibility of injury and/or knowing how to interact with people with brain injury; and (2) To consider two models: the responsibility model (attributions about the cause of a condition) and the danger appraisal model (perceptions of dangerousness due to anger/aggression) for their effect on willingness to socialize and to understand how these perceptions lead to avoidant behaviour. Participants were recruited either by personal approach or via Facebook advertising and completed a survey after reading a brief vignette and seeing a photo of an adolescent male or female, with or without a head scar. Vignettes for some participants were varied to represent perceptions of responsibility and dangerousness Main outcomes and results: ANOVAs and structural equation modelling revealed that participants were more willing to socialize with the adolescents with a scar than with no scar. Knowledge about how to interact with survivors impacted willingness to socialize, but familiarity did not. The full danger appraisal model was supported, but only some aspects of the responsibility model were supported. The results provide useful information for rehabilitation health professionals working with survivors of brain injury. The implications of these findings are discussed with regards to assisting adolescents' re-entry into society post-injury.

  3. Gondola development for CNES stratospheric balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, A.; Audoubert, J.; Cau, M.; Evrard, J.; Verdier, N.

    The CNES has been supporting scientific ballooning since its establishment in 1962. The two main parts of the balloon system or aerostat are the balloon itself and the flight train, comprising the house-keeping gondola, for the control of balloon flight (localization and operational telemetry & telecommand - TM/TC), and the scientific gondola with its dedicated telecommunication system. For zero pressure balloon, the development of new TM/TC system for the housekeeping and science data transmission are going on from 1999. The main concepts are : - for balloon house-keeping and low rate scientific telemetry, the ELITE system, which is based on single I2C bus standardizing communication between the different components of the system : trajectography, balloon control, power supply, scientific TM/TC, .... In this concept, Radio Frequency links are developed between the house keeping gondola and the components of the aerostat (balloon valve, ballast machine, balloon gas temperature measurements, ...). The main objectives are to simplify the flight train preparation in term of gondola testing before flight, and also by reducing the number of long electrical cables integrated in the balloon and the flight train; - for high rate scientific telemetry, the use of functional interconnection Internet Protocol (IP) in interface with the Radio Frequency link. The main idea is to use off-the-shelf IP hardware products (routers, industrial PC, ...) and IP software (Telnet, FTP, Web-HTTP, ...) to reduce the development costs; - for safety increase, the adding, in the flight train, of a totally independent house keeping gondola based on the satellite Inmarsat M and Iridium telecommunication systems, which permits to get real time communications between the on-board data mobile and the ground station, reduced to a PC computer with modem connected to the phone network. These GEO and LEO telecommunication systems give also the capability to operate balloon flights over longer distance

  4. Recovery of renal function after administration of adipose-tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction in rat model of acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chunwoo; Jang, Myoung Jin; Kim, Bo Hyun; Park, Jin Young; You, Dalsan; Jeong, In Gab; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2017-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major challenge in critical care medicine. The purpose of this study is to determine the therapeutic effects of the adipose-tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and the optimal route for SVF delivery in a rat model of AKI induced by I/R injury. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (10 animals per group): sham, nephrectomy control, I/R injury control, renal arterial SVF infusion and subcapsular SVF injection. To induce AKI by I/R injury, the left renal artery was clamped with a nontraumatic vascular clamp for 40 min, and the right kidney was removed. Rats receiving renal arterial infusion of SVF had a significantly reduced increase in serum creatinine compared with the I/R injury control group at 4 days after I/R injury. The glomerular filtration rate of the renal arterial SVF infusion group was maintained at a level similar to that of the sham and nephrectomy control groups at 14 days after I/R injury. Masson's trichrome staining showed significantly less fibrosis in the renal arterial SVF infusion group compared with that in the I/R injury control group in the outer stripe (P renal arterial SVF infusion and subcapsular SVF injection groups compared with the I/R injury control group in the outer stripe (P renal function is effectively rescued from AKI induced by I/R injury through the renal arterial administration of SVF in a rat model.

  5. Combined Strategy for a Reliable Evaluation of Spinal Cord Injury Using an in vivo Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rosa M; Ghotme, Kemel; Nino, Jackeline J; Quiroz-Padilla, Maria; Vargas, Daniela; Dominguez, Andy R; Barreto, George E; Sanchez, Magdy Y

    2018-01-26

    A complete neurological exam contributes in establishing spinal cord injury severity and its extent by identifying the damage to the sensory and motor pathways involved in order to address a more case-specific and precise pharmacological therapy. However, assessment of neurologic function in spinal cord injury models is usually reported by using sensory or motor tests independently. A reliable integral method is needed to precisely evaluate location and severity of the injury at baseline and, in further assessments, to establish the degree of spontaneous recovery. A combination of sensation-based tests and motor-based tests was used to evaluate impaired neurologic function after spinal cord injury and the degree of spontaneous recovery, in different stages, on an in vivo model. Combined neurologic evaluation was useful to establish location and severity of the injury in all animals and also to detect degrees of spontaneous recovery at different stages after the injury. Comparisons of neurological function were assessed in time-days and groups between BBB motor score, latency maintenance of posture, locomotion and latency presentation of grooming before and after the injury. Our results suggest that a combined assessment strategy, including sensory and motor tests, can lead to better evaluation of spinal cord injury severity and location, and documentation of the extent of spontaneous recovery following SCI and identify specific motor and sensory pathway integrity. In conclusion, a combined assessment strategy provides a concise method for evaluating the impact of interventions in experimental models of SCI. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Effect of anti-ApoA-I antibody-coating of stents on neointima formation in a rabbit balloon-injury model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strang, Aart C.; Knetsch, Menno L. W.; Koole, Leo H.; de Winter, Robbert J.; van der Wal, Allard C.; de Vries, Carlie J. M.; Tak, Paul P.; Bisoendial, Radjesh J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2015-01-01

    Since high-density lipoprotein (HDL) has pro-endothelial and anti-thrombotic effects, a HDL recruiting stent may prevent restenosis. In the present study we address the functional characteristics of an apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) antibody coating in vitro. Subsequently, we tested its biological

  7. Effect of Anti-ApoA-I Antibody-Coating of Stents on Neointima Formation in a Rabbit Balloon-Injury Model

    OpenAIRE

    Strang, Aart C.; Knetsch, Menno L. W.; Koole, Leo H.; de Winter, Robbert J.; van der Wal, Allard C.; de Vries, Carlie J. M.; Tak, Paul P.; Bisoendial, Radjesh J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Since high-density lipoprotein (HDL) has pro-endothelial and anti-thrombotic effects, a HDL recruiting stent may prevent restenosis. In the present study we address the functional characteristics of an apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) antibody coating in vitro. Subsequently, we tested its biological performance applied on stents in vivo in rabbits. Materials and Methods The impact of anti ApoA-I- versus apoB-antibody coated stainless steel discs were evaluated in vitro for endo...

  8. Animal models of ischemia-reperfusion-induced intestinal injury: progress and promise for translational research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Liara M.; Moeser, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Research in the field of ischemia-reperfusion injury continues to be plagued by the inability to translate research findings to clinically useful therapies. This may in part relate to the complexity of disease processes that result in intestinal ischemia but may also result from inappropriate research model selection. Research animal models have been integral to the study of ischemia-reperfusion-induced intestinal injury. However, the clinical conditions that compromise intestinal blood flow in clinical patients ranges widely from primary intestinal disease to processes secondary to distant organ failure and generalized systemic disease. Thus models that closely resemble human pathology in clinical conditions as disparate as volvulus, shock, and necrotizing enterocolitis are likely to give the greatest opportunity to understand mechanisms of ischemia that may ultimately translate to patient care. Furthermore, conditions that result in varying levels of ischemia may be further complicated by the reperfusion of blood to tissues that, in some cases, further exacerbates injury. This review assesses animal models of ischemia-reperfusion injury as well as the knowledge that has been derived from each to aid selection of appropriate research models. In addition, a discussion of the future of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion research is provided to place some context on the areas likely to provide the greatest benefit from continued research of ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25414098

  9. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro de Campos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods: Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice.

  10. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between {sup 99m}Tc and HDR {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with {sup 99m}Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and methods: simulations of implants with {sup 99m}Tc-filled and HDR {sup 192}Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: the {sup 99m}Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1} and 0.190 cGyh{sup -1} at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1}, respectively, for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the {sup 99m}Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: temporary {sup 99m}Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. (author)

  11. Brachytherapy model with sodium pertechnetate-{sup 99m}Tc balloon (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) for breast cancer: evaluation of dosimetry and cell response; Modelo de braquiterapia com balao de pertecnetato de sodio-{sup 99m}Tc (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) para cancer de mama: avaliacao da dosimetria e resposta celular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Carla Flavia de

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer that affects more women worldwide. Among various treatment options, radiotherapy which is often used as a treatment for locoregional recurrences control or to decrease tumor size. In patients with breast cancer at an early stage, a booster dose (boost) in the primary tumor area can be applied after conventional radiation therapy. There are several drawbacks to applying this technique. In this work we aimed to perform a dosimetric analysis in a breast model, where it put a balloon filled with sodium pertechnetate-{sup 99m}Tc (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) which in future could be used in preference to other possible therapies. The methodology involved the development of dosimetry in water based on radiochromic films and in a computational voxel thorax model. Calibration protocol achieved a mathematical relation between absorbed dose versus optical density (OD) measured at a set of radiochromic sample films placed at the surface of the balloon plus 1 cm up to 10 cm far, in which theoretical dose values were provided by MCNP modeling, reproducing the water equivalent physical simulator. A voxel model of a female thorax, developed at the SISCODES/MCNP codes, received a filled balloon inside. Spatial dose distribution was generated, illustrating the dose received in the chest wall, glandular tissue, breast skin and lung. The dosimetric findings contribute to present the Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} balloon modality which provides a suitable spatial dose distribution in the tumor bed preserving adjacent health tissues. We also studied the radiobiological response radio resistant mammary adenocarcinoma cells (MDAMB231) by exposure of these cells to Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} balloon. The findings include the presence of apoptotic cells in the balloon around point out a favorable response. In conclusion, the balloon may represent a viable option in the supplementary therapy of breast cancer in patients who have appropriate

  12. Onyx HD-500 embolization of intracranial aneurysms: modified technique using continuous balloon inflation under conscious sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahme, Ralph; Grande, Andrew; Jimenez, Lincoln; Abruzzo, Todd A; Ringer, Andrew J

    2014-08-01

    The conventional technique of intracranial aneurysm embolization using Onyx HD-500 (ev3 Neurovascular, Irvine, CA, USA) involves repetitive balloon inflation-deflation cycles under general anesthesia. By limiting parent artery occlusion to 5 minutes, this cyclic technique is thought to minimize cerebral ischemia. However, intermittent balloon deflation may lengthen procedure time and allow balloon migration, resulting in intimal injury or Onyx leakage. We report our experience using a modified technique of uninterrupted Onyx injection with continuous balloon occlusion under conscious sedation. All Onyx embolization procedures for unruptured aneurysms performed by the senior author (A.J.R.) between September 2008 and April 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic, clinical, angiographic, and procedural data were recorded. Twenty-four embolization procedures were performed in 21 patients with 23 aneurysms, including four recurrences. Twenty aneurysms (87%) involved the paraclinoid or proximal supraclinoid internal carotid artery. Size ranged from 2.5 to 24mm and neck diameter from 2 to 8mm. The modified technique was employed in 19 cases. All but one patient (94.4%) tolerated continuous balloon inflation. Complete occlusion was achieved in 20 aneurysms (83.3%) and subtotal occlusion in three (12.5%). Stable angiographic results were seen in 85%, 94%, 94%, and 100% of patients at 6, 12, 24, and 36months, respectively. There were no deaths. Permanent non-disabling neurological morbidity occurred in one patient (4.2%). Minor, transient, and/or angiographic complications were seen in three patients (12.5%), none related to the technique itself. Onyx embolization of unruptured intracranial aneurysms can be safely and effectively performed using continuous balloon inflation under conscious sedation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Coronary angioplasty using double balloon in artery of large calibre (hugging balloons)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centemero, M P; Cano, M N; Maldonado, G; de Almeida, J D; Sousa, A G; Sousa, J E

    1993-07-01

    In this case report the transluminal coronary angioplasty was performed in a oversized right coronary artery with a severe lesion with thrombus inside, using the Hugging balloon technique (two dilatation balloon catheters used simultaneously). This technique achieved minimal residual lesion and had a favorable clinical outcome of the patient.

  14. Cervical Spine Injuries: A Whole-Body Musculoskeletal Model for the Analysis of Spinal Loading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Cazzola

    Full Text Available Cervical spine trauma from sport or traffic collisions can have devastating consequences for individuals and a high societal cost. The precise mechanisms of such injuries are still unknown as investigation is hampered by the difficulty in experimentally replicating the conditions under which these injuries occur. We harness the benefits of computer simulation to report on the creation and validation of i a generic musculoskeletal model (MASI for the analyses of cervical spine loading in healthy subjects, and ii a population-specific version of the model (Rugby Model, for investigating cervical spine injury mechanisms during rugby activities. The musculoskeletal models were created in OpenSim, and validated against in vivo data of a healthy subject and a rugby player performing neck and upper limb movements. The novel aspects of the Rugby Model comprise i population-specific inertial properties and muscle parameters representing rugby forward players, and ii a custom scapula-clavicular joint that allows the application of multiple external loads. We confirm the utility of the developed generic and population-specific models via verification steps and validation of kinematics, joint moments and neuromuscular activations during rugby scrummaging and neck functional movements, which achieve results comparable with in vivo and in vitro data. The Rugby Model was validated and used for the first time to provide insight into anatomical loading and cervical spine injury mechanisms related to rugby, whilst the MASI introduces a new computational tool to allow investigation of spinal injuries arising from other sporting activities, transport, and ergonomic applications. The models used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and allow to integrate in silico analyses with experimental approaches in injury prevention.

  15. Temporal evolution of gene expression in rat carotid artery following balloon angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Xueqing; Nelson, Peter R; Odgren, Paul R; Nelson, Janice D; Vasiliu, Calin; Park, Jane; Morris, Marvin; Lian, Jane; Cutler, Bruce S; Newburger, Peter E

    2007-05-15

    The success of vascular intervention including angioplasty, stenting, and arterial bypass remains limited by negative remodeling resulted in lumen restenosis. This study was to characterize the global transcription profile reflecting concurrent events along arterial remodeling and neointima formation in a rat carotid artery balloon-injury model. Expression profiling of injured and control common carotid arteries on days 4, 7, 14 post-injury that mark the major pathohistological progression stages of neointimal formation were recorded on high-density oligonucleotide arrays. A subset of genes from microarray-based data was further studied using quantitative real time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization with sequential arterial samples from days 1 to 28 post-injury. The gene-encoded proteins were validated with Western blot. Besides temporal induction of a large cluster of genes over-represented by cell proliferation and macromolecule metabolism gene ontology categories, a fast-evolving inflammation could be demonstrated by the induction of Tgfb and other anti-inflammatory genes (e.g., C1qtnf3 (C1q and tumor necrosis factor related protein 3 (predicted))) and a shift from type 1 to 2 helper T cell response. The most significant signature of the induced neointimal profile is enrichment of genes functionally related to angiogenesis and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling (e.g., Spp1 (secreted phosphoprotein 1), CD44 (CD44 antigen), and Cxcl12 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (stromal cell-derived factor 1)). Some of the genes represent stress-responsive mesenchymal stromal cell cytokines. This study highlighted mesenchymal stromal cell cytokines-driven inflammatory extracellular matrix remodeling, as target processes for potential clinical therapeutic intervention.

  16. Effect of administration of antibodies against nerve growth factor in a rat model of muscle injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Takane; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Although muscle injury is a common source of pain, the mechanism causing such pain is not completely known. We have previously reported nerve growth factor (NGF) as a proinflammatory mediator involved in acute pain, and clinical trials have shown the effectiveness of anti-NGF antibodies for management of low back pain. Here, we aim to examine the effects of anti-NGF antibodies on muscle-derived pain by studying their effects on sensory innervation in a rat muscle injury model. A nervous system tracer, Fluoro-Gold, was applied to both gastrocnemius muscles of 24 male Sprague Dawley rats to stain the sensory nerves. Then, the drop-mass method was used to damage the right gastrocnemius muscle of the posterior limb. Anti-NGF antibodies (50μL) were injected into the injured muscles in 12 rats. Tissues were evaluated 1, 3, and 7 days post-injury by performing haematoxylin-and-eosin (HE) staining. The percentage of the total number of FG-positive cells that were also positive for a pain-related neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), was determined for the bilateral dorsal root ganglia from L1 to L6 7 days post-injury. HE staining showed active inflammation, indicated by increased basophil and eosinophil accumulation, at the injury site 1 and 3 days post-injury, as well as scar tissue formation 7 days post-injury. Injection of anti-NGF reduced muscle necrosis 1 and 3 days post-injury, and resulted in replacement of granulation tissue and muscle fibre regeneration 7 days post-injury. Anti-NGF also significantly inhibited CGRP among FG-positive cells (treatment group 38.2%, control group 49.6%; Pinjury. Anti-NGF antibodies successfully suppressed the pain mediator NGF and inhibited inflammation, suggesting NGF as a target for control in pain management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Occupational risk perception, safety training, and injury prevention: testing a model in the Italian printing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Michael P; Zanaletti, William; Argentero, Piergiorgio

    2009-01-01

    This study examined occupational risk perception in relation to safety training and injuries. In a printing industry, 350 workers from 6 departments completed a survey. Data analysis showed significant differences in risk perceptions among departments. Differences in risk perception reflected the type of work and the injury incidents in the departments. A structural equation analysis confirmed a model of risk perception on the basis of employees' evaluation of the prevalence and lethalness of hazards as well as the control over hazards they gain from training. The number of injuries sustained was positively related to the perception of risk exposure and negatively related to evaluations about the safety training. The results highlight the importance of training interventions in increasing workers' adoption of safety procedures and prevention of injuries.

  18. SCI with Brain Injury: Bedside-to-Bench Modeling for Developing Treatment and Rehabilitation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    used for pain management), baclofen (used for spasticity control), and topiramate (used for controlling seizures), all identified as common treatment ...Modeling for Developing Treatment and Rehabilitation Strategies PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael S. Beattie, Ph.D...September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SCI with Brain Injury: Bedside To Bench Modeling For Developing Treatment And Rehabilitation Strategies 5a

  19. Side impact injury prediction with fe simulations of the new advanced world sid fe dummy models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Zhu, F.; Wang, Z.; Ratingen, M.R. van

    2007-01-01

    Two new World SID (50th and 5th) FE models were developed for providing virtual tools of predicting occupant injuries during vehicle side collisions. The virtual dummy models have been verified with their physical counterparts in aspects of lab certification tests, bio-fidelity and sled tests. Many

  20. Neurobehavioral Assessments in a Mouse Model of Neonatal Hypoxic-ischemic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MinGi; Yu, Ji Hea; Seo, Jung Hwa; Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Wi, Soohyun; Baek, Ahreum; Song, Suk-Young; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2017-11-24

    We performed unilateral carotid artery occlusion on CD-1 mice to create a neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) model and investigated the effects of neonatal HI brain injury by studying neurobehavioral functions in these mice compared to non-operated (i.e., normal) mice. During the study, Rice-Vannucci's method was used to induce neonatal HI brain damage in postnatal day 7-10 (P7-10) mice. The HI operation was performed on the pups by unilateral carotid artery ligation and exposure to hypoxia (8% O2 and 92% N2 for 90 min). One week after the operation, the damaged brains were evaluated with the naked eye through the semi-transparent skull and were categorized into subgroups based on the absence ("no cortical injury" group) or presence ("cortical injury" group) of cortical injury, such as a lesion in the right hemisphere. On week 6, the following neurobehavioral tests were performed to evaluate the cognitive and motor functions: passive avoidance task (PAT), ladder walking test, and grip strength test. These behavioral tests are helpful in determining the effects of neonatal HI brain injury and are used in other mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, neonatal HI brain injury mice showed motor deficits that corresponded to right hemisphere damage. The behavioral test results are relevant to the deficits observed in human neonatal HI patients, such as cerebral palsy or neonatal stroke patients. In this study, a mouse model of neonatal HI brain injury was established and showed different degrees of motor deficits and cognitive impairment compared to non-operated mice. This work provides basic information on the HI mouse model. MRI images demonstrate the different phenotypes, separated according to the severity of brain damage by motor and cognitive tests.

  1. Cyclist activity and injury risk analysis at signalized intersections: a Bayesian modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jillian; Miranda-Moreno, Luis F; Morency, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    This study proposes a two-equation Bayesian modelling approach to simultaneously study cyclist injury occurrence and bicycle activity at signalized intersections as joint outcomes. This approach deals with the potential presence of endogeneity and unobserved heterogeneities and is used to identify factors associated with both cyclist injuries and volumes. Its application to identify high-risk corridors is also illustrated. Montreal, Quebec, Canada is the application environment, using an extensive inventory of a large sample of signalized intersections containing disaggregate motor-vehicle traffic volumes and bicycle flows, geometric design, traffic control and built environment characteristics in the vicinity of the intersections. Cyclist injury data for the period of 2003-2008 is used in this study. Also, manual bicycle counts were standardized using temporal and weather adjustment factors to obtain average annual daily volumes. Results confirm and quantify the effects of both bicycle and motor-vehicle flows on cyclist injury occurrence. Accordingly, more cyclists at an intersection translate into more cyclist injuries but lower injury rates due to the non-linear association between bicycle volume and injury occurrence. Furthermore, the results emphasize the importance of turning motor-vehicle movements. The presence of bus stops and total crosswalk length increase cyclist injury occurrence whereas the presence of a raised median has the opposite effect. Bicycle activity through intersections was found to increase as employment, number of metro stations, land use mix, area of commercial land use type, length of bicycle facilities and the presence of schools within 50-800 m of the intersection increase. Intersections with three approaches are expected to have fewer cyclists than those with four. Using Bayesian analysis, expected injury frequency and injury rates were estimated for each intersection and used to rank corridors. Corridors with high bicycle volumes

  2. Budi Iman Santoso Assessment (BISA: a model for predicting levator ani injury after vaginal delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi I. Santoso

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: There have been no attempts or studies to integrate various risk factors that can be utilized to predict levator ani injury caused by vaginal delivery. This study was aimed to establish an index measurement system by using various risk factors for predicting levator ani injury in vaginal delivery.Methods: A prospective cohort was conducted at two hospitals in Jakarta between 2010 and 2011. The subjects were nulipara pregnant women without levator ani injury during pregnancy and vaginal birth. Levator ani injury was evaluated using 4D USG during pregnancy and three months after delivery. The variables studied were age, body mass index, mode of delivery, fetal birth weight, episiotomy, perineum rupture and duration of second stage labor. Prediction model was analyzed using logistic regression analysis.Results: There were 182 recruited subjects of which 124 subjects were eligible and only 104 subjects could be analyzed. Incidence of levator ani injury at three months after delivery was 15.4% (95% CI: 8.6-23%. Two prediction models were obtained. The first consisted of fetal birth weight (OR= 5.36, 95% CI: 1.08-26.59, episiotomy (OR= 5.41, 95% CI: 0.94-31.18, and duration of second stage labor (OR= 15.27, 95% CI: 3.15-73.96. The second model consisted of duration of second stage labor (OR= 9.51, 95% CI: 1.23-68.10 and perineum rupture (OR= 142.70, 95% CI: 14.13-1440.78.Conclusion: Fetal birth weight, episiotomy and duration of second stage labor could predict levator ani injury for model 1; while the variables of prediction for model 2 were duration of second stage labor and perineum rupture. (Med J Indones. 2012;21:102-7Keywords: Levator ani, prediction model

  3. A numerical model for blast injury of human thorax based on digitized visible human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Fang; Kuang, Jiang-Ming; Nie, Si-Bing; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Jin; Liu, Yi-He

    2017-12-04

    Knowledge of the pressure distribution around human thorax in blast help to understand the injury mechanisms and their assessment. To investigate the transmission mechanism of the pressure on human thorax in blast, a three dimension surface model of human thorax was constructed in this work. To increase the precious of this model, tetrahedron element division method was applied to transfer the rough 3D surface model to hexahedral elements model. Using this model, the high pressure duration was computationally solved using numerical simulation of the hexahedral elements. Simulation results showed that the apex of lungs was subjected to the largest stress in a blast. In order to verify this result, an animal experiment was performed on a dog. The animal experimental results was shown to have a same variation tendency with the calculation results based on our numerical model of human thorax, which made this model reliable for the blast injury research.

  4. Pharmacological Attenuation of Myocardial Reperfusion Injury in a Closed-Chest Porcine Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekeløf, Sarah; Rosenberg, Jacob; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2014-01-01

    effective in clinically relevant experimental studies before initiation of human studies. The closed-chest porcine model is a promising experimental model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. The purpose of this systematic review was to describe the pharmacological treatments evaluated in the closed......Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury is a clinical challenge in interventional cardiology, and at the moment, no pharmacological agent is universally accepted in the prevention. In order to prevent inappropriate clinical trials, a potential pharmacological agent should be proved reproducibly...

  5. Internal vacuum-assisted closure device in the swine model of severe liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett Christopher B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives The authors present a novel approach to nonresectional therapy in major hepatic trauma utilizing intraabdominal perihepatic vacuum assisted closure (VAC therapy in the porcine model of Grade V liver injury. Methods A Grade V injury was created in the right lobe of the liver in a healthy pig. A Pringle maneuver was applied (4.5 minutes total clamp time and a vacuum assisted closure device was placed over the injured lobe and connected to suction. The device consisted of a perforated plastic bag placed over the liver, followed by a 15 cm by 15cm VAC sponge covered with a nonperforated plastic bag. The abdomen was closed temporarily. Blood loss, cardiopulmonary parameters and bladder pressures were measured over a one-hour period. The device was then removed and the animal was euthanized. Results Feasibility of device placement was demonstrated by maintenance of adequate vacuum suction pressures and seal. VAC placement presented no major technical challenges. Successful control of ongoing liver hemorrhage was achieved with the VAC. Total blood loss was 625 ml (20ml/kg. This corresponds to class II hemorrhagic shock in humans and compares favorably to previously reported estimated blood losses with similar grade liver injuries in the swine model. No post-injury cardiopulmonary compromise or elevated abdominal compartment pressures were encountered, while hepatic parenchymal perfusion was maintained. Conclusion These data demonstrate the feasibility and utility of a perihepatic negative pressure device for the treatment of hemorrhage from severe liver injury in the porcine model.

  6. Decision model support of severity of injury traffic accident victims care by SAMU 192

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rackynelly Alves Sarmento Soares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic accidents produce high morbidity and mortality in several countries, including Brazil. The initial care to victims of accidents, by a specialized team, has tools for evaluating the severity of trauma, which guide the priorities. This study aimed to develop a decision model applied to pre-hospital care, using the Abbreviated Injury Scale, to define the severity of the injury caused by the AT, as well to describe the features of accidents and their victims, occurred in Joao Pessoa, Paraiba. This is a descriptive epidemiological investigation, sectional, which analyzed all victims of traffic accidents attended by the SAMU 192, João Pessoa-PB, in January, April and June 2010. Data were collected in the medical regulation sheets of SAMU 192. Most of victims were male (76%, aged between 20 and 39 years (60%. Most injuries were classified as AIS1 (62.5%. The model of decision support implemented was the decision tree that managed to correctly classify 95.98% of the severity of injuries. By this model, it was possible to extract 29 rules of gravity classification of injury, which may be used for decision-making teams of the SAMU 192.

  7. Eosinophil-induced liver injury: an experimental model using IL-5 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, K; Maeda, T; Tominaga, A; Watanabe, Y; Miyazaki, E; Enzan, H; Akisawa, N; Iwasaki, S; Saibara, T; Onishi, S

    2001-02-01

    In certain liver diseases, activated eosinophils are considered to be important effector cells in addition to T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. No experimental model, however, has been developed for in vivo analysis of the cytotoxic mechanisms. Interleukin-5 (IL-5) transgenic mice (C3H/HeN-TgN(IL-5)Imeg), which exhibit marked eosinophilia without liver injury, were injected once with 25 microg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneally. The mice were sacrificed weekly and eosinophilic injuries were assessed microscopically. To clarify the role of Kupffer cells and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the liver injury, gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) and anti-TNF-alpha neutralizing antibody were administrated before the LPS injection. Two weeks after injection, transgenic mice exhibited marked infiltration of eosinophils and extensive lobular necrosis. Transmigration of eosinophils through vascular endothelium and degranulation of eosinophil cytotoxic granules in inflamed areas were observed. These eosinophilic injuries were transient, but liver-specific. Pre-administration of GdCl3 and anti-TNF-alpha markedly reduced the hepatic inflammation, suggesting that LPS-activated Kupffer cells play a key role in producing the cytotoxicity of eosinophils by releasing TNF-alpha. We have established an experimental model of eosinophil-induced liver injury using IL-5 transgenic mice. Since this model is simple and highly reproducible, it will be useful for analysis of in vivo cytotoxic mechanisms of eosinophils.

  8. A neonatal mouse spinal cord injury model for assessing post-injury adaptive plasticity and human stem cell integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Boulland

    Full Text Available Despite limited regeneration capacity, partial injuries to the adult mammalian spinal cord can elicit variable degrees of functional recovery, mediated at least in part by reorganization of neuronal circuitry. Underlying mechanisms are believed to include synaptic plasticity and collateral sprouting of spared axons. Because plasticity is higher in young animals, we developed a spinal cord compression (SCC injury model in the neonatal mouse to gain insight into the potential for reorganization during early life. The model provides a platform for high-throughput assessment of functional synaptic connectivity that is also suitable for testing the functional integration of human stem and progenitor cell-derived neurons being considered for clinical cell replacement strategies. SCC was generated at T9-T11 and functional recovery was assessed using an integrated approach including video kinematics, histology, tract tracing, electrophysiology, and high-throughput optical recording of descending inputs to identified spinal neurons. Dramatic degeneration of axons and synaptic contacts was evident within 24 hours of SCC, and loss of neurons in the injured segment was evident for at least a month thereafter. Initial hindlimb paralysis was paralleled by a loss of descending inputs to lumbar motoneurons. Within 4 days of SCC and progressively thereafter, hindlimb motility began to be restored and descending inputs reappeared, but with examples of atypical synaptic connections indicating a reorganization of circuitry. One to two weeks after SCC, hindlimb motility approached sham control levels, and weight-bearing locomotion was virtually indistinguishable in SCC and sham control mice. Genetically labeled human fetal neural progenitor cells injected into the injured spinal cord survived for at least a month, integrated into the host tissue and began to differentiate morphologically. This integrative neonatal mouse model provides opportunities to explore early

  9. Development of Predictive Models of Injury for the Lower Extremity, Lumbar, and Thoracic Spine after Discharge from Physical Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    prediction models will vary by age and sex . Hypothesis 3: A multi-factorial prediction model that accurately predicts risk of new and recurring injuries...members for injury risk after they have been cleared to return to duty from an injury is of great importance. The purpose of this project is to determine...additional training sessions for the new research staff by the end of the 2016 year. The key investigators of this team presented a 2-hour educational

  10. Temporary balloon occlusion as therapy for uncontrollable arterial hemorrhage in multiply injured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieger, J.; Linsenmaier, U.; Rock, C.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Euler, E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Presentation of temporary balloon occlusion as an interventional radiological method for managing hemorrhage in multiply injured patients with uncontrollable loss of blood. Method: Temporary, non-selective arterial occlusion by introduction of a balloon catheter contralaterally to the source of bleeding has been performed since 1992 on 7 patients with multiple injuries, hemorrhagic shock requiring reanimation, and angiographic demonstration of an arterial hemorrhage in the supply region of the internal iliac artery with complex pelvic fracture. In each case a PTA balloon catheter was introduced transfemorally, non-selectively positioned proximal to the bleeding source, and left in place for 24-48 h under manometric control. Control angiographies were performed prior to catheter removal. Results: The bleeding was stopped immediately in all 7 patients. The hemodynamic stability made transport and thus further surgical management and/or a short-term treatment in the intensive-care station possible. Control angiographies confirmed that the bleeding had stopped in all patients. Conclusions: We recommend temporary balloon occlusion as a rapid and effective method for the management of bleeding in otherwise uncontrollable traumatic hemorrhages in the supply region of the internal iliac artery. (orig.) [de

  11. Advanced Onboard Energy Storage Solution for Balloons, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Balloon Programs at NASA are looking for a potential 100 day missions at mid-altitudes. These balloons would be powered by solar panels to take advantage of...

  12. Crash in Australian outback ends NASA ballooning season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret

    2010-06-01

    NASA has temporarily suspended all its scientific balloon launches after the balloon-borne Nuclear Compton Tele scope (NCT) crashed during take-off, scattering a trail of debris across the remote launch site and overturning a nearby parked car.

  13. Computational modelling of traumatic brain injury predicts the location of chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajari, Mazdak; Hellyer, Peter J; Sharp, David J

    2017-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury can lead to the neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy. This condition has a clear neuropathological definition but the relationship between the initial head impact and the pattern of progressive brain pathology is poorly understood. We test the hypothesis that mechanical strain and strain rate are greatest in sulci, where neuropathology is prominently seen in chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and whether human neuroimaging observations converge with computational predictions. Three distinct types of injury were simulated. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy can occur after sporting injuries, so we studied a helmet-to-helmet impact in an American football game. In addition, we investigated an occipital head impact due to a fall from ground level and a helmeted head impact in a road traffic accident involving a motorcycle and a car. A high fidelity 3D computational model of brain injury biomechanics was developed and the contours of strain and strain rate at the grey matter-white matter boundary were mapped. Diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities in a cohort of 97 traumatic brain injury patients were also mapped at the grey matter-white matter boundary. Fifty-one healthy subjects served as controls. The computational models predicted large strain most prominent at the depths of sulci. The volume fraction of sulcal regions exceeding brain injury thresholds were significantly larger than that of gyral regions. Strain and strain rates were highest for the road traffic accident and sporting injury. Strain was greater in the sulci for all injury types, but strain rate was greater only in the road traffic and sporting injuries. Diffusion tensor imaging showed converging imaging abnormalities within sulcal regions with a significant decrease in fractional anisotropy in the patient group compared to controls within the sulci. Our results show that brain tissue deformation induced by head impact loading is greatest in sulcal locations

  14. Relationship of mechanical impact magnitude to neurologic dysfunction severity in a rat traumatic brain injury model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsun Hsieh

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major brain injury type commonly caused by traffic accidents, falls, violence, or sports injuries. To obtain mechanistic insights about TBI, experimental animal models such as weight-drop-induced TBI in rats have been developed to mimic closed-head injury in humans. However, the relationship between the mechanical impact level and neurological severity following weight-drop-induced TBI remains uncertain. In this study, we comprehensively investigated the relationship between physical impact and graded severity at various weight-drop heights.The acceleration, impact force, and displacement during the impact were accurately measured using an accelerometer, a pressure sensor, and a high-speed camera, respectively. In addition, the longitudinal changes in neurological deficits and balance function were investigated at 1, 4, and 7 days post TBI lesion. The inflammatory expression markers tested by Western blot analysis, including glial fibrillary acidic protein, beta-amyloid precursor protein, and bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene in chromosome X, in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and corpus callosum were investigated at 1 and 7 days post-lesion.Gradations in impact pressure produced progressive degrees of injury severity in the neurological score and balance function. Western blot analysis demonstrated that all inflammatory expression markers were increased at 1 and 7 days post-impact injury when compared to the sham control rats. The severity of neurologic dysfunction and induction in inflammatory markers strongly correlated with the graded mechanical impact levels.We conclude that the weight-drop-induced TBI model can produce graded brain injury and induction of neurobehavioral deficits and may have translational relevance to developing therapeutic strategies for TBI.

  15. Optimization of a simplified automobile finite element model using time varying injury metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaewsky, James P; Danelson, Kerry A; Weaver, Caitlin M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, frontal crashes resulted in 55% of passenger car injuries with 10,277 fatalities and 866,000 injuries in the United States. To better understand frontal crash injury mechanisms, human body finite element models (FEMs) can be used to reconstruct Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) cases. A limitation of this method is the paucity of vehicle FEMs; therefore, we developed a functionally equivalent simplified vehicle model. The New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) data for our selected vehicle was from a frontal collision with Hybrid III (H3) Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) occupant. From NCAP test reports, the vehicle geometry was created and the H3 ATD was positioned. The material and component properties optimized using a variation study process were: steering column shear bolt fracture force and stroke resistance, seatbelt pretensioner force, frontal and knee bolster airbag stiffness, and belt friction through the D-ring. These parameters were varied using three successive Latin Hypercube Designs of Experiments with 130-200 simulations each. The H3 injury response was compared to the reported NCAP frontal test results for the head, chest and pelvis accelerations, and seat belt and femur forces. The phase, magnitude, and comprehensive error factors, from a Sprague and Geers analysis were calculated for each injury metric and then combined to determine the simulations with the best match to the crash test. The Sprague and Geers analyses typically yield error factors ranging from 0 to 1 with lower scores being more optimized. The total body injury response error factor for the most optimized simulation from each round of the variation study decreased from 0.466 to 0.395 to 0.360. This procedure to optimize vehicle FEMs is a valuable tool to conduct future CIREN case reconstructions in a variety of vehicles.

  16. Spectrum of ballooning instabilities in a stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.A.; Singleton, D.B.; Dewar, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The recent revival of interest in the application of the 'ballooning formalism' to low-frequency plasma instabilities has prompted a comparison of the Wentzel-Brillouin-Kramers (WKB) ballooning approximation with an (in principle) exact normal mode calculation for a three-dimensional plasma equilibrium. Semiclassical quantization, using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning eigenvalue to provide a local dispersion relation, is applied to a ten-field period stellarator test case. Excellent qualitative agreement, and good quantitative agreement is found with predictions from the TERPSICHORE code for toroidal mode numbers from 1 to 14 and radial mode numbers from 0 to 2. The continuum bands predicted from three-dimensional WKB theory are too narrow to resolve. (author) 3 figs., 24 refs

  17. [Intraaortic balloon pumping( IABP) in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Tomoyuki; Tanoue, Yoshihisa; Tominaga, Ryuji

    2014-07-01

    The intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) is the most widely used circulatory assist device. IABP increases coronary perfusion in diastolic phase by the inflation of the balloon in the descending aorta (diastolic augmentation) and reduces afterload in systolic phase by the deflation of the balloon( systolic unloading). IABP improves the hemodynamic condition of patients who fall into acute heart failure and/or cardiogenic shock. Six-type IABP system can be used in Japan. The IABP-SHOCK II trial shows that there is no significant difference in mortality between optimal medical treatment with IABP and without IABP in addition to early revascularization. Clinical backgrounds in Japan are different from those in IABP-SHOCK II trial, and the further prospective studies of IABP in Japan thus called for.

  18. A comparison of Selective Aortic Arch Perfusion and Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta for the management of hemorrhage-induced traumatic cardiac arrest: A translational model in large swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed B G Barnard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Survival rates remain low after hemorrhage-induced traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA. Noncompressible torso hemorrhage (NCTH is a major cause of potentially survivable trauma death. Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA at the thoracic aorta (Zone 1 can limit subdiaphragmatic blood loss and allow for IV fluid resuscitation when intrinsic cardiac activity is still present. Selective Aortic Arch Perfusion (SAAP combines thoracic aortic balloon hemorrhage control with intra-aortic oxygenated perfusion to achieve return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC when cardiac arrest has occurred.Male Yorkshire Landrace cross swine (80.0 ± 6.0 kg underwent anesthesia, instrumentation for monitoring, and splenectomy. TCA was induced by laparoscopic liver lobe resection combined with arterial catheter blood withdrawal to achieve a sustained systolic blood pressure <10 mmHg, cardiac arrest. After 3 min of arrest, swine were allocated to one of three interventions: (1 REBOA plus 4 units of IV fresh whole blood (FWB, (2 SAAP with oxygenated lactated Ringer's (LR, 1,600 mL/2 min, or (3 SAAP with oxygenated FWB 1,600 mL/2 min. Primary endpoint was survival to the end of 60 min of resuscitation, a simulated prehospital phase. Thirty animals were allocated to 3 groups (10 per group-5 protocol exclusions resulted in a total of 35 animals being used. Baseline measurements and time to cardiac arrest were not different amongst groups. ROSC was achieved in 0/10 (0%, 95% CI 0.00-30.9 REBOA, 6/10 (60%, 95% CI 26.2-87.8 SAAP-LR and 10/10 (100%, 95% CI 69.2-100.0 SAAP-FWB animals, p < 0.001. Survival to end of simulated 60-minute prehospital resuscitation was 0/10 (0%, 95% CI 0.00-30.9 for REBOA, 1/10 (10%, 95% CI 0.25-44.5 for SAAP-LR and 9/10 (90%, 95% CI 55.5-99.7 for SAAP-FWB, p < 0.001. Total FWB infusion volume was similar for REBOA (2,452 ± 0 mL and SAAP-FWB (2,250 ± 594 mL. This study was undertaken in laboratory conditions, and as such may have

  19. Poisson regression approach for modeling fatal injury rates amongst Malaysian workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarulzaman Ibrahim; Heng Khai Theng

    2005-01-01

    Many safety studies are based on the analysis carried out on injury surveillance data. The injury surveillance data gathered for the analysis include information on number of employees at risk of injury in each of several strata where the strata are defined in terms of a series of important predictor variables. Further insight into the relationship between fatal injury rates and predictor variables may be obtained by the poisson regression approach. Poisson regression is widely used in analyzing count data. In this study, poisson regression is used to model the relationship between fatal injury rates and predictor variables which are year (1995-2002), gender, recording system and industry type. Data for the analysis were obtained from PERKESO and Jabatan Perangkaan Malaysia. It is found that the assumption that the data follow poisson distribution has been violated. After correction for the problem of over dispersion, the predictor variables that are found to be significant in the model are gender, system of recording, industry type, two interaction effects (interaction between recording system and industry type and between year and industry type). Introduction Regression analysis is one of the most popular

  20. A spatial generalized ordered response model to examine highway crash injury severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marisol; Paleti, Rajesh; Bhat, Chandra R

    2013-03-01

    This paper proposes a flexible econometric structure for injury severity analysis at the level of individual crashes that recognizes the ordinal nature of injury severity categories, allows unobserved heterogeneity in the effects of contributing factors, as well as accommodates spatial dependencies in the injury severity levels experienced in crashes that occur close to one another in space. The modeling framework is applied to analyze the injury severity sustained in crashes occurring on highway road segments in Austin, Texas. The sample is drawn from the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) crash incident files from 2009 and includes a variety of crash characteristics, highway design attributes, driver and vehicle characteristics, and environmental factors. The results from our analysis underscore the value of our proposed model for data fit purposes as well as to accurately estimate variable effects. The most important determinants of injury severity on highways, according to our results, are (1) whether any vehicle occupant is ejected, (2) whether collision type is head-on, (3) whether any vehicle involved in the crash overturned, (4) whether any vehicle occupant is unrestrained by a seat-belt, and (5) whether a commercial truck is involved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MALDI Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Lipids in Rat Brain Injury Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Joseph A.; Farias, Santiago; Barkley, Robert M.; Heidenreich, Kim; Frey, Lauren C.; Hamazaki, Kei; Kim, Hee-Yong; Murphy, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) with a time-of-flight analyzer was used to characterize the distribution of lipid molecular species in the brain of rats in two injury models. Ischemia/reperfusion injury of the rat brain after bilateral occlusion of the carotid artery altered appearance of the phospholipids present in the hippocampal region, specifically the CA1 region. These brain regions also had a large increase in the ion abundance at m/z 548.5 and collisional activation supported identification of this ion as arising from ceramide (d18:1/18:0), a lipid known to be associated with cellular apoptosis. Traumatic brain injury model in the rat was examined by MALDI IMS and the area of damage also showed an increase in ceramide (d18:1/18:0) and a remarkable loss of signal for the potassium adduct of the most abundant phosphocholine molecular species 16:0/18:1 (PC) with a corresponding increase in the sodium adduct ion. This change in PC alkali attachment ion was suggested to be a result of edema and influx of extracellular fluid likely through a loss of Na/K-ATPase caused by the injury. These studies reveal the value of MALDI IMS to examine tissues for changes in lipid biochemistry and will provide data needed to eventually understand the biochemical mechanisms relevant to tissue injury. PMID:21953042

  2. Performance of the EUSO-Balloon electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrillon, P.; Dagoret, S.; Miyamoto, H.; Moretto, C.; Bacholle, S.; Blaksley, C; Gorodetzky, P.; Jung, A.; Prévôt, G.; Prat, P.; Bayer, J.; Blin, S.; Taille, C. De La; Cafagna, F.; Fornaro, C.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Tanco, G. Medina; Osteria, G.; Perfetto, F.; Park, I.

    2016-01-01

    The 24th of August 2014, the EUSO-Balloon instrument went for a night flight for several hours, 40 km above Timmins (Canada) balloon launching site, concretizing the hard work of an important part of the JEM-EUSO collaboration started 3 years before. This instrument consists of a telescope made of two lenses and a complex electronic chain divided in two main sub-systems: the PDM (Photo Detector Module) and the DP (Data Processor). Each of them is made of several innovative elements developed and tested in a short time. This paper presents their performances before and during the flight

  3. Exponential Growth of Nonlinear Ballooning Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, P.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory predicts that a perturbation evolving from a linear ballooning instability will continue to grow exponentially in the intermediate nonlinear phase at the same linear growth rate. This prediction is confirmed in ideal MHD simulations. When the Lagrangian compression, a measure of the ballooning nonlinearity, becomes of the order of unity, the intermediate nonlinear phase is entered, during which the maximum plasma displacement amplitude as well as the total kinetic energy continues to grow exponentially at the rate of the corresponding linear phase.

  4. Is current brain injury rehabilitation enhancing the biopsychosocial model?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Chalotte; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Thomsen, Ane Søndergaard

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To synthesize the best available evidence regarding the impact of non-surgical interventions on persistent symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Data sources: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (2001–2012) with terms including ‘rehabilitation’. Inclusion criteria we...... that early reassuring educational information is beneficial after MTBI. Well-designed intervention studies are required in order to develop effective treatments and improve outcomes for adults and children at risk for persistent symptoms after MTBI....... original, peer-reviewed research published in English and other languages. References were also identified from the bibliographies of eligible articles. Study selection: Controlled trials and cohort and case-control studies were selected according to pre-defined criteria. Studies had to have a minimum......, only two of seven studies related to non-surgical interventions were found to have a low risk of bias. One studied the effect of a scheduled telephone intervention offering counselling and education on outcome and found a significantly better outcome for symptoms (6.6 differences in adjusted mean...

  5. Ballooning behavior in the golden orbweb spider Nephilapilipes (Araneae: Nephilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa M.J. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ballooning, a mode of aerial dispersal in spiders, is an innate behavior that requires appropriate physiological and meteorological conditions. Although only rarely reported in the golden orbweb spiders, family Nephilidae, the large geographic distributions of most nephilids—in particular of Nephila species—would imply that these spiders likely routinely disperse by ballooning in spite of giant female sizes. Here we study ballooning behavior in the golden orbweb spider Nephila pilipes (Fabricius, 1793. Specifically, we test for the propensity of spiderlings to deploy ballooning as a dispersal mechanism. We subjected a total of 59 first-instar spiderlings to a wind experiment at two wind speeds (2.17 ± 0.02 m s-1 and 3.17 ± 0.02 m s-1 under laboratory conditions. Under an average wind speed of 3.17 m s-1, none of the spiderlings exhibited pre-ballooning or ballooning behavior. However, at an average wind speed of 2.17 m s-1, 53 (89.8% spiderlings showed pre-ballooning behavior, and 17 (32.1% of the pre-ballooners ultimately ballooned. Our results concur with prior reports on spiderlings of other families that pre-ballooning behavior is a requirement for ballooning to occur. Furthermore, although we cannot rule out other dispersal mechanisms such as synanthropic spread, our findings suggest that the widespread N. pilipes uses ballooning to colonize remote oceanic islands.

  6. Outcomes of intragastric balloon placements in a private practice setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.; Alders, Peter R. H.; Chuttani, Ram; Scherpenisse, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Intragastric balloons are used as a treatment for obesity. Much of the data collected on balloons has been in the context of clinical trials in academic medical centers or as a bridge to bariatric surgery in obesity centers. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of balloon

  7. 21 CFR 884.5050 - Metreurynter-balloon abortion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. 884.5050... Devices § 884.5050 Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. (a) Identification. A metreurynter-balloon abortion system is a device used to induce abortion. The device is inserted into the uterine cavity...

  8. A mixed generalized ordered response model for examining pedestrian and bicyclist injury severity level in traffic crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluru, Naveen; Bhat, Chandra R; Hensher, David A

    2008-05-01

    This paper proposes an econometric structure for injury severity analysis at the level of individual accidents that recognizes the ordinal nature of the categories in which injury severity are recorded, while also allowing flexibility in capturing the effects of explanatory variables on each ordinal category and allowing heterogeneity in the effects of contributing factors due to the moderating influence of unobserved factors. The model developed here, referred to as the mixed generalized ordered response logit (MGORL) model, generalizes the standard ordered response models used in the extant literature for injury severity analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first such formulation to be proposed and applied in the econometric literature in general, and in the safety analysis literature in particular. The MGORL model is applied to examine non-motorist injury severity in accidents in the USA, using the 2004 General Estimates System (GES) database. The empirical findings emphasize the inconsistent results obtained from the standard ordered response model. An important policy result from our analysis is that the general pattern and relative magnitude of elasticity effects of injury severity determinants are similar for pedestrians and bicyclists. The analysis also suggests that the most important variables influencing non-motorist injury severity are the age of the individual (the elderly are more injury-prone), the speed limit on the roadway (higher speed limits lead to higher injury severity levels), location of crashes (those at signalized intersections are less severe than those elsewhere), and time-of-day (darker periods lead to higher injury severity).

  9. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF AGING AND IL-6 ON THE HEPATIC INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE IN TWO MODELS OF SYSTEMIC INJURY: SCALD INJURY VERSUS I.P. LPS ADMINISTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Christian R.; Nomellini, Vanessa; Baila, Horea; Oshima, Kiyoko; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of age, a marked elevation in circulating IL-6 levels correlates with increased mortality after injury or an inflammatory challenge. We previously reported that aged IL-6 knockout mice given LPS have improved survival and reduced inflammatory response than LPS-treated aged wild type (WT) mice. Herein, we analyzed the effects of aging and IL-6 on the hepatic inflammatory response in two models of systemic injury: dorsal scald (burn) injury versus intraperitoneal LPS administration. At 24 h after burn injury, circulating alanine aminotransferase and hepatic neutrophil accumulation were comparable regardless of age or IL-6 deficiency. However, at this same time point, these indicators of liver damage, in addition to hepatic levels of KC, a neutrophil chemoattractant, were increased in aged WT mice given LPS relative to young WT mice given LPS. The hepatic injury was drastically reduced in aged IL-6 knockout mice given LPS as compared with LPS-exposed aged WT mice. Our results suggest that the nature of the insult will determine the degree of remote injury in aged animals. In addition, the role of IL-6 as a contributing factor of tissue injury may be insult specific. PMID:18636046

  10. A device for performing automated balloon catheter inflation ischemia studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J; Ledkins, Whitley; Rocic, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Coronary collateral growth (arteriogenesis) is a physiological adaptive response to transient and repetitive occlusion of major coronary arteries in which small arterioles (native collaterals) with minimal to no blood flow remodel into larger conduit arteries capable of supplying adequate perfusion to tissue distal to the site of occlusion. The ability to reliably and reproducibly mimic transient, repetitive coronary artery occlusion (ischemia) in animal models is critical to the development of therapies to restore coronary collateral development in type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Current animal models for repetitive coronary artery occlusion implement a pneumatic occluder (balloon) that is secured onto the surface of the heart with the suture, which is inflated manually, via a catheter connected to syringe, to effect occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). This method, although effective, presents complications in terms of reproducibility and practicality. To address these limitations, we have designed a device for automated, transient inflation of balloon catheters in coronary artery occlusion models. This device allows repeated, consistent inflation (to either specified pressure or volume) and the capability for implementing very complex, month-long protocols. This system has significantly increased the reproducibility of coronary collateral growth studies in our laboratory, resulting in a significant decrease in the numbers of animals needed to complete each study while relieving laboratory personnel from the burden of extra working hours and enabling us to continue studies over periods when we previously could not. In this paper, we present all details necessary for construction and operation of the inflator. In addition, all of the components for this device are commercially available and economical (Table S1). It is our hope that the adoption of automated balloon catheter inflation protocols will improve the experimental

  11. A device for performing automated balloon catheter inflation ischemia studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silas J Leavesley

    Full Text Available Coronary collateral growth (arteriogenesis is a physiological adaptive response to transient and repetitive occlusion of major coronary arteries in which small arterioles (native collaterals with minimal to no blood flow remodel into larger conduit arteries capable of supplying adequate perfusion to tissue distal to the site of occlusion. The ability to reliably and reproducibly mimic transient, repetitive coronary artery occlusion (ischemia in animal models is critical to the development of therapies to restore coronary collateral development in type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Current animal models for repetitive coronary artery occlusion implement a pneumatic occluder (balloon that is secured onto the surface of the heart with the suture, which is inflated manually, via a catheter connected to syringe, to effect occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD. This method, although effective, presents complications in terms of reproducibility and practicality. To address these limitations, we have designed a device for automated, transient inflation of balloon catheters in coronary artery occlusion models. This device allows repeated, consistent inflation (to either specified pressure or volume and the capability for implementing very complex, month-long protocols. This system has significantly increased the reproducibility of coronary collateral growth studies in our laboratory, resulting in a significant decrease in the numbers of animals needed to complete each study while relieving laboratory personnel from the burden of extra working hours and enabling us to continue studies over periods when we previously could not. In this paper, we present all details necessary for construction and operation of the inflator. In addition, all of the components for this device are commercially available and economical (Table S1. It is our hope that the adoption of automated balloon catheter inflation protocols will improve the

  12. Complement inhibition accelerates regeneration in a model of peripheral nerve injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaglia, Valeria; Tannemaat, Martijn Rudolf; de Kok, Maryla; Wolterman, Ruud; Vigar, Miriam Ann; King, Rosalind Helen Mary; Morgan, Bryan Paul; Baas, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Complement (C) activation is a crucial event in peripheral nerve degeneration but its effect on the subsequent regeneration is unknown. Here we show that genetic deficiency of the sixth C component, C6, accelerates axonal regeneration and recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury. Foot-flick

  13. Model for muscle regeneration around fibrotic lesions in recurrent strain injuries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefte, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to establish an in vivo model for muscle regeneration after strain injury in the presence of a fibrotic discontinuity. METHODS: The musculus soleus of 5-wk-old male rats was exposed, completely lacerated, and sutured together with or without a collagen scaffold

  14. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-long Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery.

  15. Virtual testing of driver OOP scenarios: effect of modeling detail on injury response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch-Rekveldt, M.G.C.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the relevance of certain parameters for virtual testing of the driver's side OOP problem and attempts to answer the following questions: Which level of detail is needed in the airbag models to assess occupants' injury values for OOP scenarios? What is the influence of the

  16. Establishing a Reproducible Hypertrophic Scar following Thermal Injury: A Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. Rapp, MD

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: Deep partial-thickness thermal injury to the back of domestic swine produces an immature hypertrophic scar by 10 weeks following burn with thickness appearing to coincide with the location along the dorsal axis. With minimal pig to pig variation, we describe our technique to provide a testable immature scar model.

  17. Reproduction and evaluation of a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-fan LIU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce and evaluate a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog. Methods The smog composition was analyzed and a rat model of inhalation lung injury was reproduced. Forty two healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control (NC group and 1h, 2h, 6h, 24h, 48h and 96h after inhalation group (n=6. The arterial blood gas, wet to dry weight ratio (W/D of lung, leukocyte count, and protein concentration in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF were determined. Macroscopic and microscopic changes in lung tissue were observed. Results The composition of black gunpowder smog was composed mainly of CO2 and CO, and their concentrations remained stable within 12 minutes. Smog inhalation caused a significant hypoxemia, the concentration of blood COHb reached a peak value 1h, and the W/D of lung reached peak value 2h after inhalation (P<0.05. The amount of leukocytes and content of protein in BALF increased significantly within 24h after inhalation (P<0.05. Histopathological observation showed diffuse hemorrhage, edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in lung tissue as manifestations of acute lung injury, and the injury did not recover at 96h after inhalation. Conclusion The rat model of inhalation lung injury can be reproduced using black gunpowder smog, and it has the advantages of its readiness for reproduction, reliability and stability, and it could be used for the experiment of inhalation injury in a battlefield environment.

  18. Antegrade deligation of iatrogenic distal ureteric obstruction utilising a high pressure balloon dilatation technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Iatrogenic trauma is the leading cause of ureteric injury with an incidence in abdominal and pelvic surgery varying between 0.4 and 2.5%. CASE: We report a case of ureteric obstruction caused by a haemostatic clip. There was associated rupture of the ureter proximal to the clip with intra-peritoneal leakage of urine. The patient was unfit for surgery and was managed by a novel procedure of endoluminal balloon deligation. CONCLUSION: Ureteric injuries are rare but potentially serious complications. They require prompt diagnosis and management depends on the patients\\' clinical condition, extent of injury and interval from injury to diagnosis. We have successfully demonstrated a new technique to treat ureteric obstruction caused by a haemostatic clip with associated ureteral rupture in a patient unfit for surgery.

  19. Predictors of work injury in underground mines - an application of a logistic regression model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.S. Paul [Indian School of Mines University, Dhanbad (India). Department of Mining Engineering

    2009-05-15

    Mine accidents and injuries are complex and generally characterized by several factors starting from personal to technical, and technical to social characteristics. In this study, an attempt has been made to identify the various factors responsible for work related injuries in mines and to estimate the risk of work injury to mine workers. The prediction of work injury in mines was done by a step-by-step multivariate logistic regression modeling with an application to case study mines in India. In total, 18 variables were considered in this study. Most of the variables are not directly quantifiable. Instruments were developed to quantify them through a questionnaire type survey. Underground mine workers were randomly selected for the survey. Responses from 300 participants were used for the analysis. Four variables, age, negative affectivity, job dissatisfaction, and physical hazards bear significant discriminating power for risk of injury to the workers, comparing between cases and controls in a multivariate situation while controlling all the personal and socio-technical variables. The analysis reveals that negatively affected workers are 2.54 times more prone to injuries than the less negatively affected workers and this factor is a more important risk factor for the case-study mines. Long term planning through identification of the negative individuals, proper counseling regarding the adverse effects of negative behaviors and special training is urgently required. Care should be taken for the aged and experienced workers in terms of their job responsibility and training requirements. Management should provide a friendly atmosphere during work to increase the confidence of the injury prone miners. 44 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. A threshold regression model to predict return to work after traumatic limb injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Lee, Mei-Ling Ting

    2016-02-01

    The study aims to examine the severity of initial impairment and recovery rate of return-to-work (RTW) predictors among workers with traumatic limb injury. This 2-year prospective cohort study recruited 1124 workers with traumatic limb injury during the first 2 weeks of hospital admission. Baseline data were obtained by questionnaire and chart review. Patient follow-up occurred at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post injury. The primary outcome was the time of first RTW. The impact of potential predictors on initial impairment and rate of recovery towards RTW was estimated by threshold regression (TR). A total of 846 (75.27%) participants returned to work during the follow-up period. Our model revealed that the initial impairment level in elderly workers and lower limb injuries were 33% and 35% greater than their counterparts, respectively. Workers with >12 years of education, part-time job, and moderate and higher self-efficacy were less impaired at initial injury compared with their counterparts. In terms of the rate of recovery leading to RTW, workers with older age, part-time jobs, lower limbs, or combined injuries had a significantly slower recovery rate, while workers with 9-12 years of education and >12 years of education had a significantly faster recovery rate. Our study provides researchers and clinicians with evidence to understand the baseline impairment and rate of recovery towards RTW by explaining the predictors of RTW among workers with traumatic limb injuries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of MAP2 kinases and p38 kinase in acute murine liver injury models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Min, Robert W M; Le, Khanh; Zhou, Sheng; Aghajan, Mariam; Than, Tin A; Win, Sanda; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2017-01-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mediates hepatotoxicity through interaction of its phospho-activated form with a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, Sh3bp5 or Sab, leading to dephosphorylation of intermembrane Src and consequent impaired mitochondrial respiration and enhanced ROS release. ROS production from mitochondria activates MAP3 kinases, such as MLK3 and ASK1, which continue to activate a pathway to sustain JNK activation, and amplifies the toxic effect of acetaminophen (APAP) and TNF/galactosamine (TNF/GalN). Downstream of MAP3K, in various contexts MKK4 activates both JNK and p38 kinases and MKK7 activates only JNK. The relative role of MKK4 versus 7 in liver injury is largely unexplored, as is the potential role of p38 kinase, which might be a key mediator of toxicity in addition to JNK. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) to MKK4, MKK7 and p38 (versus scrambled control) were used for in vivo knockdown, and in some experiments PMH were used after in vivo knockdown. Mice were treated with APAP or TNF/GalN and injury assessed. MKK4 and MKK7 were expressed in liver and each was efficiently knocked down with two different ASOs. Massive liver injury and ALT elevation were abrogated by MKK4 but not MKK7 ASO pretreatment in both injury models. The protection was confirmed in PMH. Knockdown of MKK4 completely inhibited basal P-p38 in both cytoplasm and mitochondria. However, ALT levels and histologic injury in APAP-treated mice were not altered with p38 knockdown versus scrambled control. p38 knockdown significantly increased P-JNK levels in cytoplasm but not mitochondria after APAP treatment. In conclusion, MKK4 is the major MAP2K, which activates JNK in acute liver injury. p38, the other downstream target of MKK4, does not contribute to liver injury from APAP or TNF/galactosamine. PMID:28661486

  2. Thymoquinone attenuates brain injury via an antioxidative pathway in a status epilepticus rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Yi-ye

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus (SE results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which contribute to seizure-induced brain injury. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE. Thymoquinone (TQ is a bioactive monomer extracted from black cumin (Nigella sativa seed oil that has anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and antioxidant activity in various diseases. This study evaluated the protective effects of TQ on brain injury in a lithium-pilocarpine rat model of SE and investigated the underlying mechanism related to antioxidative pathway.

  3. The Development of a Machine Learning Inpatient Acute Kidney Injury Prediction Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyner, Jay L; Carey, Kyle A; Edelson, Dana P; Churpek, Matthew M

    2018-03-28

    To develop an acute kidney injury risk prediction model using electronic health record data for longitudinal use in hospitalized patients. Observational cohort study. Tertiary, urban, academic medical center from November 2008 to January 2016. All adult inpatients without pre-existing renal failure at admission, defined as first serum creatinine greater than or equal to 3.0 mg/dL, International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, code for chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher or having received renal replacement therapy within 48 hours of first serum creatinine measurement. None. Demographics, vital signs, diagnostics, and interventions were used in a Gradient Boosting Machine algorithm to predict serum creatinine-based Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes stage 2 acute kidney injury, with 60% of the data used for derivation and 40% for validation. Area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated in the validation cohort, and subgroup analyses were conducted across admission serum creatinine, acute kidney injury severity, and hospital location. Among the 121,158 included patients, 17,482 (14.4%) developed any Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes acute kidney injury, with 4,251 (3.5%) developing stage 2. The AUC (95% CI) was 0.90 (0.90-0.90) for predicting stage 2 acute kidney injury within 24 hours and 0.87 (0.87-0.87) within 48 hours. The AUC was 0.96 (0.96-0.96) for receipt of renal replacement therapy (n = 821) in the next 48 hours. Accuracy was similar across hospital settings (ICU, wards, and emergency department) and admitting serum creatinine groupings. At a probability threshold of greater than or equal to 0.022, the algorithm had a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85% for stage 2 acute kidney injury and predicted the development of stage 2 a median of 41 hours (interquartile range, 12-141 hr) prior to the development of stage 2 acute kidney injury. Readily available electronic health record data can be used

  4. Afferent Innervation, Muscle Spindles, and Contractures Following Neonatal Brachial Plexus Injury in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-10-01

    We used an established mouse model of elbow flexion contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) to test the hypothesis that preservation of afferent innervation protects against contractures and is associated with preservation of muscle spindles and ErbB signaling. A model of preganglionic C5 through C7 NBPI was first tested in mice with fluorescent axons using confocal imaging to confirm preserved afferent innervation of spindles despite motor end plate denervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were then created in wild-type mice. Four weeks later, we assessed total and afferent denervation of the elbow flexors by musculocutaneous nerve immunohistochemistry. Biceps muscle volume and cross-sectional area were measured by micro computed tomography. An observer who was blinded to the study protocol measured elbow flexion contractures. Biceps spindle and muscle fiber morphology and ErbB signaling pathway activity were assessed histologically and immunohistochemically. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries caused similar total denervation and biceps muscle atrophy. However, after preganglionic injuries, afferent innervation was partially preserved and elbow flexion contractures were significantly less severe. Spindles degenerated after postganglionic injury but were preserved after preganglionic injury. ErbB signaling was inactivated in denervated spindles after postganglionic injury but ErbB signaling activity was preserved in spindles after preganglionic injury with retained afferent innervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were associated with upregulation of ErbB signaling in extrafusal muscle fibers. Contractures after NBPI are associated with muscle spindle degeneration and loss of spindle ErbB signaling activity. Preservation of afferent innervation maintained spindle development and ErbB signaling activity, and protected against contractures. Pharmacologic modulation of ErbB signaling, which is being investigated as a

  5. A multiscale approach to blast neurotrauma modeling:Part II: Methodology for inducing blast injury to in vitro models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwen B. Effgen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prominent role of improvised explosive devices (IEDs in wounding patterns of U.S. war-fighters in Iraq and Afghanistan, blast injury has risen to a new level of importance and is recognized to be a major cause of injuries to the brain. However, an injury risk-function for microscopic, macroscopic, behavioral, and neurological deficits has yet to be defined. While operational blast injuries can be very complex and thus difficult to analyze, a simplified blast injury model would facilitate studies correlating biological outcomes with blast biomechanics to define tolerance criteria. Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI results from the translation of a shock wave in air, such as that produced by an IED, into a pressure wave within the skull-brain complex. Our blast injury methodology recapitulates this phenomenon in vitro, allowing for control of the injury biomechanics via a compressed-gas shock tube used in conjunction with a custom-designed, fluid-filled receiver that contains the living culture. The receiver converts the air shock wave into a fast-rising pressure transient with minimal reflections, mimicking the intracranial pressure history in blast. We have developed an organotypic hippocampal slice culture model that exhibits cell death when exposed to a 530  17.7 kPa peak overpressure with a 1.026 ± 0.017 ms duration and 190 ± 10.7 kPa-ms impulse in-air. We have also injured a simplified in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier, which exhibits disrupted integrity immediately following exposure to 581  10.0 kPa peak overpressure with a 1.067 ms ± 0.006 ms duration and 222 ± 6.9 kPa-ms impulse in-air. To better prevent and treat bTBI, both the initiating biomechanics and the ensuing pathobiology must be understood in greater detail. A well-characterized, in vitro model of bTBI, in conjunction with animal models, will be a powerful tool for developing strategies to mitigate the risks of bTBI.

  6. Fasting and meal-suppressed ghrelin levels before and after intragastric balloons and balloon-induced weight loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.; Eichenberger, R. I.

    2014-01-01

    Intragastric balloons may be an option for obese patients with weight loss failure. Its mode of action remains enigmatic. We hypothesised depressed fasting ghrelin concentrations and enhanced meal suppression of ghrelin secretion by the gastric fundus through balloon contact and balloon-induced

  7. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods:Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group, sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3 and macrophages (CD68 in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly  decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site.

  8. NF-kB activation as a biomarker of light injury using a transgenic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Ginger M.; Boretsky, Adam; Wang, Heuy-Ching; Golden, Dallas; Gupta, Praveena; Vargas, Gracie; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2012-03-01

    The spatial and temporal activation of NF-kB (p65) was monitored in the retina of a transgenic mouse model (cis-NFkB-EGFP) in vivo after receiving varying grades of laser induced thermal injury in one eye. Baseline images of the retinas from 26 mice were collected prior to injury and up to five months post-exposure using a Heidelberg Spectralis HRA confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) with a spectral domain optical coherence tomographer (SDOCT). Injured and control eyes were enucleated at discrete time points following laser exposure for cryosectioning to determine localization of NF-kB dependent enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene expression within the retina using fluorescence microscopy. In addition, EGFP basal expression in brain and retinal tissue from the cis-NFkB-EGFP was characterized using two-photon imaging. Regions of the retina exposed to threshold and supra-threshold laser damage evaluated using fluorescence cSLO showed increased EGFP fluorescence localized to the exposed region for a duration that was dependent upon the degree of injury. Fluorescence microscopy of threshold damage revealed EGFP localized to the outer nuclear region and retinal pigment epithelial layer. Basal expression of EGFP imaged using two-photon microscopy was heterogeneously distributed throughout brain tissue and confined to the inner retina. Results show cis-NF-kB-EGFP reporter mouse can be used for in vivo studies of light induced injury to the retina and possibly brain injury.

  9. Model System for Live Imaging of Neuronal Responses to Injury and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gravel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been well established that induction of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43 during development coincides with axonal outgrowth and early synapse formation, the existence of neuronal plasticity and neurite outgrowth in the adult central nervous system after injuries is more controversial. To visualize the processes of neuronal injury and repair in living animals, we generated reporter mice for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging bearing the luc (luciferase and gfp (green fluorescent protein reporter genes under the control of the murine GAP-43 promoter. Reporter functionality was first observed during the development of transgenic embryos. Using in vivo bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging, we visualized induction of the GAP-43 signals from live embryos starting at E10.5, as well as neuronal responses to brain and peripheral nerve injuries (the signals peaked at 14 days postinjury. Moreover, three-dimensional analysis of the GAP-43 bioluminescent signal confirmed that it originated from brain structures affected by ischemic injury. The analysis of fluorescence signal at cellular level revealed colocalization between endogenous protein and the GAP-43-driven gfp transgene. Taken together, our results suggest that the GAP-43-luc/gfp reporter mouse represents a valid model system for real-time analysis of neurite outgrowth and the capacity of the adult nervous system to regenerate after injuries.

  10. Computational modeling of blast induced whole-body injury: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Arnab; Callaway, Christian

    2018-02-01

    Blast injuries affect millions of lives across the globe due to its traumatic after effects on the brain and the whole body. To date, military grade armour materials are designed to mitigate ballistic and shrapnel attacks but are less effective in resisting blast impacts. In order to improve blast absorption characteristics of armours, the first key step is thoroughly understands the effects of blasts on the human body itself. In the last decade, a plethora of experimental and computational work has been carried out to investigate the mechanics and pathophysiology of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). However, very few attempts have been made so far to study the effect of blasts on the various other parts of the body such as the sensory organs (eyes and ears), nervous system, thorax, extremities, internal organs (such as the lungs) and the skeletal system. While an experimental evaluation of blast effects on such physiological systems is difficult, developing finite element (FE) models could allow the recreation of realistic blast scenarios on full scale human models and simulate the effects. The current article reviews the state-of-the-art in computational research in blast induced whole-body injury modelling, which would not only help in identifying the areas in which further research is required, but would also be indispensable for understanding body location specific armour design criteria for improved blast injury mitigation.

  11. Behavioral models of pain states evoked by physical injury to the peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Linda S; Yaksh, Tony L

    2009-10-01

    Physical injury or compression of the root, dorsal root ganglion, or peripheral sensory axon leads to well-defined changes in biology and function. Behaviorally, humans report ongoing painful dysesthesias and aberrations in function, such that an otherwise innocuous stimulus will yield a pain report. These behavioral reports are believed to reflect the underlying changes in nerve function after injury, wherein increased spontaneous activity arises from the neuroma and dorsal root ganglion and spinal changes increase the response of spinal projection neurons. These pain states are distinct from those associated with tissue injury and pose particular problems in management. To provide for developing an understanding of the underlying mechanisms of these pain states and to promote development of therapeutic agents, preclinical models involving section, compression, and constriction of the peripheral nerve or compression of the dorsal root ganglion have been developed. These models give rise to behaviors, which parallel those observed in the human after nerve injury. The present review considers these models and their application.

  12. Treatment of tuberculous bronchostenosis: balloon bronchoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Joong Mo; Im, Jung Gi; Han, Joon Koo; Park, Jae Hyung

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the balloon bronchoplasty in the treatment of the tuberculous bronchostenosis. Balloon bronchoplasty was performed in thirteen patients with stenosis of the left main bronchus (two with combined left upper and lower lobar bronchostenosis) using a inflatable balloon catheter under a fluoroscopic guide. We analysed the changes in the severity of dyspnea and wheezing, serial FEV1/FVC as a parameter of the airflow obstruction, and bronchial diameter and lung volume on chest radiographs. The extent of pulmonary tuberculosis was correlated with the improvement of FEV1/ FVC. There was an improvement of dyspnea in 69% (9/13), decrease of wheezing in 69% (9/13), significant increase of FEV1/FVC in 18% (2/11). The increase of the bronchial diameter and lung volume were seen in 84% (11/13) and 53% (7/13), respectively. The significant increase of FEV1/FVC was seen in 28% (2/7) of the patients with lung involvement of tuberculous less than one third of left upper lobe, whereas there was no increase in those of more than one third. The was no complication except transient leukocytosis, fever and blood-tinged sputum. In conclusion, balloon bronchoplasty is effective in the treatment of medically intractable tuberculous bronchostenosis, and can be considered as an initial method of treatment

  13. Low dose intravaginal misoprostol versus intracervical balloon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:The efficacy and safety of low dose misoprostol as a ripening agent compared to the widely used balloon catheter in developing countries is undetermined. Objective:To compare the safety and efficacy of a low dose intravaginal misoprostol and intracervical Foley's catheter for cervical ripening. Design:A ...

  14. Double-balloon endoscopy: Who needs it?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendel, J.W.; Vilmann, P.; Jensen, T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) made the small bowel accessible to inspection and therapy in its entirety. However, DBE is a time-consuming procedure that requires a highly skilled endoscopist, several nurses and - more often than not - anesthesiological support. This makes the selection...

  15. Effects of Photobiomodulation Therapy on Oxidative Stress in Muscle Injury Animal Models: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    dos Santos, Solange Almeida; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Stancker, Tatiane Garcia; Simões, Maíra Cecília Brandão; dos Santos Vieira, Marcia Ataíze; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar; Prokic, Marko; Vasconsuelo, Andrea; Santos, Simone Silva; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2017-01-01

    This systematic review was performed to identify the role of photobiomodulation therapy on experimental muscle injury models linked to induce oxidative stress. EMBASE, PubMed, and CINAHL were searched for studies published from January 2006 to January 2016 in the areas of laser and oxidative stress. Any animal model using photobiomodulation therapy to modulate oxidative stress was included in analysis. Eight studies were selected from 68 original articles targeted on laser irradiation and oxi...

  16. Effects of chronic constriction injury and spared nerve injury, two models of neuropathic pain, on the numbers of neurons and glia in the rostral ventromedial medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Mai Lan; Speltz, Rebecca; Wessendorf, Martin

    2016-03-23

    In previous studies we have reported that spinal nerve ligation (SNL), a model of neuropathic pain, results in the loss of over 20% of neurons in the rostral portion of the ventromedial medulla (RVM) in rats, 10 days after SNL. The RVM is involved in pain modulation and we have proposed that loss of pain inhibition from the RVM, including loss of RVM serotonin neurons, contributes to the increased hypersensitivity observed after SNL. In the present study we examined whether RVM neuronal loss occurs in two other models of neuropathic pain, chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spared nerve injury (SNI). We found no evidence for neuronal loss 10 days after either nerve injury, a time when robust tactile hypersensitivity is present in both CCI and SNI. We conclude that loss of RVM neurons appears not to be required for expression of tactile hypersensitivity in these models of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical properties of ANTRIX balloon film and fabrication of single cap large volume balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneel Kumar, B.; Sreenivasan, S.; Subba Rao, J. V.; Manchanda, R. K.

    2008-11-01

    The zero pressure plastic balloons used for high altitude studies are generally made from polyethylene material. Tensile properties of the thin film polymer are the key parameters for material selection due to extremely low temperature of -90 °C encountered by the balloons in the tropopause region during the ascent at equatorial latitudes. The physical and structural properties of the material determine the uniformity of the stress distribution over the entire shell. Load stresses from the suspended load propagate via load tapes heat sealed along with the gore seals as per the balloon design. A balance between this heat seal strength and the film strength is a desirable property of the basic resin in terms of the bubble strength, gauge uniformity, and long-term storage properties. In addition, the design of the top shell of the balloon and its stress distribution play an important role since only a fraction of the balloon is deployed during the filling operation and the ascent. In this paper we describe the mechanical properties of the 'ANTRIX' film developed by us and the optimized design of single cap balloons, which have been successfully used in our experiments over the past 5 years.

  18. NASA balloon design and flight - Philosophy and criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I. S., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA philosophy and criteria for the design and flight of scientific balloons are set forth and discussed. The thickness of balloon films is standardized at 20.3 microns to isolate potential film problems, and design equations are given for specific balloon parameters. Expressions are given for: flight-stress index, total required thickness, cap length, load-tape rating, and venting-duct area. The balloon design criteria were used in the design of scientific balloons under NASA auspices since 1986, and the resulting designs are shown to be 95 percent effective. These results represent a significant increase in the effectiveness of the balloons and therefore indicate that the design criteria are valuable. The criteria are applicable to four balloon volume classes in combination with seven payload ranges.

  19. A new model of traumatic axonal injury to determine the effects of strain and displacement rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anita; Lu, Ying; Chen, Chaoyang; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Cavanaugh, John M

    2006-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) continues to be a major health problem, with over 500,000 cases per year with a societal cost of approximately $85 billion in the US. Motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of such injuries. In many cases of TBI widespread disruption of the axons occurs through a process known as diffuse axonal injury (DAI) or traumatic axonal injury (TAI). In the current study, an in vivo TAI model was developed using spinal nerve roots of adult rats. This model was used to determine functional and structural responses of axons to various strains and displacement rates. Fifty-six L5 dorsal nerve roots were each subjected to a predetermined strain range (20%) at a specified displacement rate (0.01 mm/sec and 15 mm/sec) only once. Image analysis was used to determine actual strains on the roots during the pull. Neurophysiologic recordings were performed on the nerve root before and after stretch to determine functional changes in response to stretch, including conduction velocity (CV) and area of the evoked compound action potential (CAP). Structural changes including vascular injury, axotomy, and impaired axoplasmic transport (IAT) were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin, Palmgren silver impregnation and beta-APP staining techniques, respectively. Results showed that CV and the area of the CAP decreased as strain and displacement rate increased. Also, threshold strains for complete nerve conduction loss were 16% and 9% at 0.01 mm/sec and 15 mm/sec rate, respectively. These threshold values indicate the rate dependency of functional injury and indicate that axons tolerate slow loading rates better than higher loading rates. Histological studies revealed increased spacing, tearing of axons, IAT and occurrence of hemorrhage to be strain and displacement rate dependent. Linear relationships existed between the increasing strain and the occurrence rate of axonal injury as evidenced by multiple indicators (IAT, hemorrhage, torn fibers or primary

  20. Female Leaders: Injurious or Inspiring Role Models for Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Crystal L.; Simon, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    The impact of female role models on women's leadership aspirations and self-perceptions after a leadership task were assessed across two laboratory studies. These studies tested the prediction that upward social comparisons to high-level female leaders will have a relatively detrimental impact on women's self-perceptions and leadership aspirations…

  1. Models in injury biomechanics for improved passive vehicle safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Thorough knowledge of the characteristics of the human body and its behaviour under extreme loading conditions is essential in order to prevent the serious consequences of road and other accidents. In order to study the human body response five type of models for the human body can be distinguished:

  2. Modelling biomechanical performance and injuries for sport applications in MADYMO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Wolski, S.; Cappon, H.; Ruimmerman, R.; Rodarius, C.

    2007-01-01

    MADYMO is the worldwide standard software for the design and analyses of safety devices that protect occupants in car crashes, such as seatbelts and airbags. It features generic multibody and finite element capabilities, a full range of predictive and efficient occupant models (both crash dummies

  3. Development of a 3D matrix for modeling mammalian spinal cord injury in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Felipe Diaz Quiroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury affects millions of people around the world, however, limited therapies are available to improve the quality of life of these patients. Spinal cord injury is usually modeled in rats and mice using contusion or complete transection models and this has led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular complexities of the injury. However, it has not to date led to development of successful novel therapies, this is in part due to the complexity of the injury and the difficulty of deciphering the exact roles and interactions of different cells within this complex environment. Here we developed a collagen matrix that can be molded into the 3D tubular shape with a lumen and can hence support cell interactions in a similar architecture to a spinal cord. We show that astrocytes can be successfully grown on this matrix in vitro and when injured, the cells respond as they do in vivo and undergo reactive gliosis, one of the steps that lead to formation of a glial scar, the main barrier to spinal cord regeneration. In the future, this system can be used to quickly assess the effect of drugs on glial scar protein activity or to perform live imaging of labeled cells after exposure to drugs.

  4. Thymoquinone protects end organs from abdominal aorta ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Salih Aydin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous studies have demonstrated that thymoquinone has protective effects against ischemia reperfusion injury to various organs like lungs, kidneys and liver in different experimental models. Objective: We aimed to determine whether thymoquinone has favorable effects on lung, renal, heart tissues and oxidative stress in abdominal aorta ischemia-reperfusion injury. Methods: Thirty rats were divided into three groups as sham (n=10, control (n=10 and thymoquinone (TQ treatment group (n=10. Control and TQ-treatment groups underwent abdominal aorta ischemia for 45 minutes followed by a 120-min period of reperfusion. In the TQ-treatment group, thymoquinone was given 5 minutes. before reperfusion at a dose of 20 mg/kg via an intraperitoneal route. Total antioxidant capacity, total oxidative status (TOS, and oxidative stress index (OSI in blood serum were measured and lung, kidney, and heart tissue histopathology were evaluated with light microscopy. Results: Total oxidative status and oxidative stress index activity in blood samples were statistically higher in the control group compared to the sham and TQ-treatment groups (P<0.001 for TOS and OSI. Control group injury scores were statistically higher compared to sham and TQ-treatment groups (P<0.001 for all comparisons. Conclusion: Thymoquinone administered intraperitoneally was effective in reducing oxidative stress and histopathologic injury in an acute abdominal aorta ischemia-reperfusion rat model.

  5. Simple canine model of arterial thrombosis with endothelial injury suitable for investigation of thrombolytic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badylak, S.F.; Poehlman, E.; Williams, C.; Klabunde, R.E.; Turek, J.; Schoenlein, W.

    1988-01-01

    Three separate studies were done to evaluate a new canine model of arterial thrombosis with endothelial injury. Endothelial injury was produced by exposing the luminal surface of a 2-cm segment of femoral artery to 100 degrees C saline for 5 min. There was no disruption of proximal or distal blood flow with this model, and thrombolysis was continuously monitored by measuring 125 I-labelled fibrin gamma emissions from the thrombus. Study No. 1 showed that complete endothelial denudation was achieved with this model. Study No. 2 demonstrated 1) adherence of the experimentally induced thrombus to subendothelial connective tissue, and 2) endogenous thrombolysis of approximately 9% during the initial 2 h after thrombus formation. Study No. 3 tested the usefulness of the model for evaluating the thrombolytic efficacy of urokinase. Urokinase (30,000 U/Kg, bolus IV injection) caused 38 +/- 5.4% thrombolysis within 90 min of drug administration versus 5.9 +/- 2.4% for a saline-treated control group. We conclude that this model provides a technically simple and reproducible method for the laboratory investigation of thrombosis and thrombolysis in arteries with endothelial injury

  6. Modeling and Optimization of Airbag Helmets for Preventing Head Injuries in Bicycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Mehmet; Laksari, Kaveh; Kuo, Calvin; Grant, Gerald A; Camarillo, David B

    2017-04-01

    Bicycling is the leading cause of sports-related traumatic brain injury. Most of the current bike helmets are made of expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam and ultimately designed to prevent blunt trauma, e.g., skull fracture. However, these helmets have limited effectiveness in preventing brain injuries. With the availability of high-rate micro-electrical-mechanical systems sensors and high energy density batteries, a new class of helmets, i.e., expandable helmets, can sense an impending collision and expand to protect the head. By allowing softer liner medium and larger helmet sizes, this novel approach in helmet design provides the opportunity to achieve much lower acceleration levels during collision and may reduce the risk of brain injury. In this study, we first develop theoretical frameworks to investigate impact dynamics of current EPS helmets and airbag helmets-as a form of expandable helmet design. We compared our theoretical models with anthropomorphic test dummy drop test experiments. Peak accelerations obtained from these experiments with airbag helmets achieve up to an 8-fold reduction in the risk of concussion compared to standard EPS helmets. Furthermore, we construct an optimization framework for airbag helmets to minimize concussion and severe head injury risks at different impact velocities, while avoiding excessive deformation and bottoming-out. An optimized airbag helmet with 0.12 m thickness at 72 ± 8 kPa reduces the head injury criterion (HIC) value to 190 ± 25 at 6.2 m/s head impact velocity compared to a HIC of 1300 with a standard EPS helmet. Based on a correlation with previously reported HIC values in the literature, this airbag helmet design substantially reduces the risks of severe head injury up to 9 m/s.

  7. Comparison of stability in the operative treatment of pelvic injuries in a finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzay, Tamás; Flóris, István; Váradi, Károly

    2011-10-01

    The comparison of the stability of four surgical methods for the treatment of vertically and rotationally unstable type C pelvic ring injuries. We produced a type C pelvic ring injury (type Denis II fracture of the sacrum and symphysiolysis) on a finite element model, in the case of standing on both feet. We stabilized the symphysiolysis with a five-hole reconstruction plate; the sacrum fracture was fixed in the first experiment with two, two-hole reconstruction plates on the ventral surface, in the second one we applied dorsally the transsacral, narrow DC plate, in the third one with KFI-H plate, and in the last one with iliosacral screw. Finite element modeling was performed by the use of the ALGOR software. Not only bones and joints, but joints and mechanically important ligaments were modeled as well. We measured the shift between the two surfaces of the fracture gap, compared to the results of measurements accomplished on cadaver models. Larger shift could be elicited after transsacral plating than after direct plating. These results correspond to those of the parallel investigation of the bony ligamentous cadaver pelvis specimens. The shift values after KFI-H plating and iliosacral screw fixation are larger than after direct plating, but smaller than after transsacral plating. The tension created in the implants is less than the allowed values; therefore, the choice of operation should depend on the type of injury. The finite element model may be utilized for the comparison of different methods of osteosynthesis for the treatment of injuries described above. Due to several difficulties in investigations performed on cadaver specimens, this model has undoubted utility.

  8. A mouse model of alcoholic liver fibrosis-associated acute kidney injury identifies key molecular pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Shinji; Chappell, Grace A.; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Takeki; Kato, Yuki; Kono, Hiroshi; Bataller, Ramon; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical data strongly indicate that acute kidney injury (AKI) is a critical complication in alcoholic hepatitis, an acute-on-chronic form of liver failure in patients with advanced alcoholic fibrosis. Development of targeted therapies for AKI in this setting is hampered by the lack of an animal model. To enable research into molecular drivers and novel therapies for fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI, we aimed to combine carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 )-induced fibrosis with chronic intra-gastric alcohol feeding. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered a low dose of CCl 4 (0.2 ml/kg 2 × week/6 weeks) followed by alcohol intragastrically (up to 25 g/kg/day for 3 weeks) and with continued CCl 4 . We observed that combined treatment with CCl 4 and alcohol resulted in severe liver injury, more pronounced than using each treatment alone. Importantly, severe kidney injury was evident only in the combined treatment group. This mouse model reproduced distinct pathological features consistent with AKI in human alcoholic hepatitis. Transcriptomic analysis of kidneys revealed profound effects in the combined treatment group, with enrichment for damage-associated pathways, such as apoptosis, inflammation, immune-response and hypoxia. Interestingly, Havcr1 and Lcn2, biomarkers of AKI, were markedly up-regulated. Overall, this study established a novel mouse model of fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI and identified key mechanistic pathways. - Highlights: • Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a critical complication in alcoholic hepatitis • We developed a novel mouse model of fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI • This model reproduces key molecular and pathological features of human AKI • This animal model can help identify new targeted therapies for alcoholic hepatitis

  9. Influence of acidosis and hypoxia on liver ischemia and reperfusion injury in an in vivo rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, Bob H. M.; Elkhaloufi, Yasser; Straatsburg, Irene H.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    The contribution of acidosis to the development of reperfusion injury is controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of respiratory acidosis and hypoxia in a frequently used in vivo liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury rat model. Rats were anesthetized with intraperitoneal

  10. Occupant-level injury severity analyses for taxis in Hong Kong: A Bayesian space-time logistic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanyu; Xu, Pengpeng; Wong, S C; Huang, Helai; Li, Y C

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to identify the factors affecting the crash-related severity level of injuries in taxis and quantify the associations between these factors and taxi occupant injury severity. Casualties resulting from taxi crashes from 2004 to 2013 in Hong Kong were divided into four categories: taxi drivers, taxi passengers, private car drivers and private car passengers. To avoid any biased interpretation caused by unobserved spatial and temporal effects, a Bayesian hierarchical logistic modeling approach with conditional autoregressive priors was applied, and four different model forms were tested. For taxi drivers and passengers, the model with space-time interaction was proven to most properly address the unobserved heterogeneity effects. The results indicated that time of week, number of vehicles involved, weather, point of impact and driver age were closely associated with taxi drivers' injury severity level in a crash. For taxi passengers' injury severity an additional factor, taxi service area, was influential. To investigate the differences between taxis and other traffic, similar models were established for private car drivers and passengers. The results revealed that although location in the network and driver gender significantly influenced private car drivers' injury severity, they did not influence taxi drivers' injury severity. Compared with taxi passengers, the injury severity of private car passengers was more sensitive to average speed and whether seat belts were worn. Older drivers, urban taxis and fatigued driving were identified as factors that increased taxi occupant injury severity in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of injury on S1 dorsal root ganglia in an experimental model of neuropathic faecal incontinence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Peirce, C

    2011-08-01

    An experimental model of neuropathic faecal incontinence has recently been established. This study aimed to quantify and compare the effect of crush and compression injury on first-order sensory neurones of the inferior rectal nerve (IRN) using a nuclear marker of axonal injury, activating transcription factor (ATF) 3.

  12. Fresh Frozen Plasma Modulates Brain Gene Expression in a Swine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury and Shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resuscitation with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) decreases brain lesion size and swelling in a swine model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock. We hypothesized that brain gene expression profiles after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock would be modulated by FFP resu...

  13. Two-vehicle injury severity models based on integration of pavement management and traffic engineering factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ximiao; Huang, Baoshan; Yan, Xuedong; Zaretzki, Russell L; Richards, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    The severity of traffic-related injuries has been studied by many researchers in recent decades. However, the evaluation of many factors is still in dispute and, until this point, few studies have taken into account pavement management factors as points of interest. The objective of this article is to evaluate the combined influences of pavement management factors and traditional traffic engineering factors on the injury severity of 2-vehicle crashes. This study examines 2-vehicle rear-end, sideswipe, and angle collisions that occurred on Tennessee state routes from 2004 to 2008. Both the traditional ordered probit (OP) model and Bayesian ordered probit (BOP) model with weak informative prior were fitted for each collision type. The performances of these models were evaluated based on the parameter estimates and deviances. The results indicated that pavement management factors played identical roles in all 3 collision types. Pavement serviceability produces significant positive effects on the severity of injuries. The pavement distress index (PDI), rutting depth (RD), and rutting depth difference between right and left wheels (RD_df) were not significant in any of these 3 collision types. The effects of traffic engineering factors varied across collision types, except that a few were consistently significant in all 3 collision types, such as annual average daily traffic (AADT), rural-urban location, speed limit, peaking hour, and light condition. The findings of this study indicated that improved pavement quality does not necessarily lessen the severity of injuries when a 2-vehicle crash occurs. The effects of traffic engineering factors are not universal but vary by the type of crash. The study also found that the BOP model with a weak informative prior can be used as an alternative but was not superior to the traditional OP model in terms of overall performance.

  14. Ballooning for Biologists: Mission Essentials for Flying Experiments on Large NASA Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David J.; Sowa, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Despite centuries of scientific balloon flights, only a handful of experiments have produced biologically-relevant results. Yet unlike orbital spaceflight, it is much faster and cheaper to conduct biology research with balloons, sending specimens to the near space environment of Earths stratosphere. Samples can be loaded the morning of a launch and sometimes returned to the laboratory within one day after flying. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) flies large, unmanned scientific balloons from all over the globe, with missions ranging from hours to weeks in duration. A payload in the middle portion of the stratosphere (approx. 35 km above sea level) will be exposed to an environment similar to the surface of Mars: temperatures generally around -36 C, atmospheric pressure at a thin 1 kPa, relative humidity levels <1%, and a harsh illumination of ultraviolet (UV) and cosmic radiation levels (about 100 W/sq m and 0.1 mGy/d, respectively) that can be obtained nowhere else on the surface of the Earth, including environmental chambers and particle accelerator facilities attempting to simulate space radiation effects. Considering the operational advantages of ballooning and the fidelity of space-like stressors in the stratosphere, researchers in aerobiology, astrobiology, and space biology can benefit from balloon flight experiments as an intermediary step on the extraterrestrial continuum (ground, low Earth orbit, and deep space studies). Our presentation targets biologists with no background or experience in scientific ballooning. We will provide an overview of large balloon operations, biology topics that can be uniquely addressed in the stratosphere, and a roadmap for developing payloads to fly with NASA.

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  16. Establishment of a rat model of craniocerebral blast injury induced by cabin explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-teng LI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish a rat model of craniocerebral blast injury caused by the shock wave of cabin explosion. Methods Fifty male adult Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (10 each: 3g, 5g, 8g TNT with vest groups, 5g TNT without vest group and control group. Uncased explosives of different equivalent were suspended in the cabin center. After anesthesia, with exception of control group, the rats were placed in prone position about 31 cm below the explosive, facing the explosive with or without vest. After the explosion, the survived rats were observed, serological and pathological examinations were performed at 3h, 1d and 3d after the explosion. Results In terms of tissue damage and mortality, compared with the control group, no obvious injury formed in rats of the 3g TNT with vest group, and all of them survived; Rats in 5g TNT with vest group showed mild lung injury, brain tissue edema, enlarged blood vessel, patchy hemorrhage on the brain surface, and with a mortality of 30%; Rats in 8g TNT with vest group showed serious organ damage with a mortality of 80%; Rats in 5g TNT without vest group suffered from severe lung injury, almost all died right after the explosion. Therefore, rats in 5g TNT with vest group were more in line with the experimental needs. Further serum and pathologic examinations showed that the brain water content increased, the serum neuron specific enolase (NSE and S-100β protein also increased markedly, and necrotic or apoptotic changes happened in the cortex and hippocampus neurons. Conclusion A stable animal model of craniocerebral blast injury may be established with rats in the case of chest and abdomen protected and then exposed to 5g TNT explosion in cabin. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.09.13

  17. Vismodegib suppresses TRAIL-mediated liver injury in a mouse model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hirsova

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling pathway activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of NASH. Despite this concept, hedgehog pathway inhibitors have not been explored. Thus, we examined the effect of vismodegib, a hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor, in a diet-induced model of NASH. C57BL/6 mice were placed on 3-month chow or FFC (high saturated fats, fructose, and cholesterol diet. One week prior to sacrifice, mice were treated with vismodegib or vehicle. Mice fed the FFC diet developed significant steatosis, which was unchanged by vismodegib therapy. In contrast, vismodegib significantly attenuated FFC-induced liver injury as manifested by reduced serum ALT and hepatic TUNEL-positive cells. In line with the decreased apoptosis, vismodegib prevented FFC-induced strong upregulation of death receptor DR5 and its ligand TRAIL. In addition, FFC-fed mice, but not chow-fed animals, underwent significant liver injury and apoptosis following treatment with a DR5 agonist; however, this injury was prevented by pre-treatment with vismodegib. Consistent with a reduction in liver injury, vismodegib normalized FFC-induced markers of inflammation including mRNA for TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and a variety of macrophage markers. Furthermore, vismodegib in FFC-fed mice abrogated indices of hepatic fibrogenesis. In conclusion, inhibition of hedgehog signaling with vismodegib appears to reduce TRAIL-mediated liver injury in a nutrient excess model of NASH, thereby attenuating hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. We speculate that hedgehog signaling inhibition may be salutary in human NASH.

  18. A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines-Beard, Jessica; Marchetta, Jeffrey; Gordon, Sarah; Chaum, Edward; Geisert, Eldon E; Rex, Tonia S

    2012-06-01

    We developed and characterized a mouse model of primary ocular blast injury. The device consists of: a pressurized air tank attached to a regulated paintball gun with a machined barrel; a chamber that protects the mouse from direct injury and recoil, while exposing the eye; and a secure platform that enables fine, controlled movement of the chamber in relation to the barrel. Expected pressures were calculated and the optimal pressure transducer, based on the predicted pressures, was positioned to measure output pressures at the location where the mouse eye would be placed. Mice were exposed to one of three blast pressures (23.6, 26.4, or 30.4 psi). Gross pathology, intraocular pressure, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity were assessed 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after exposure. Contralateral eyes and non-blast exposed mice were used as controls. We detected increased damage with increased pressures and a shift in the damage profile over time. Gross pathology included corneal edema, corneal abrasions, and optic nerve avulsion. Retinal damage was detected by optical coherence tomography and a deficit in visual acuity was detected by optokinetics. Our findings are comparable to those identified in Veterans of the recent wars with closed eye injuries as a result of blast exposure. In summary, this is a relatively simple system that creates injuries with features similar to those seen in patients with ocular blast trauma. This is an important new model for testing the short-term and long-term spectrum of closed globe blast injuries and potential therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Novel Model of Surgical Injury in Adult Rat Kidney: A “Pouch Model”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litbarg, Natalia O.; Vujicic, Snezana; Setty, Suman; Sethupathi, Periannan; Dunea, George; Arruda, Jose A.; Singh, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative mechanisms after surgical injury have been studied in many organs but not in the kidney. Studying surgical injury may provide new insights into mechanisms of kidney regeneration. In rodent models, extrarenal tissues adhere to surgical kidney wound and interfere with healing. We hypothesized that this can be prevented by wrapping injured kidney in a plastic pouch. Adult rats tolerated 5/6 nephrectomy with pouch application well. Histological analysis demonstrates that application of the pouch effectively prevented formation of adhesions and induced characteristic wound healing manifested by formation of granulation tissue. Additionally, selected tubules of the wounded kidney extended into the granulation tissue forming branching tubular epithelial outgrowths (TEOs) without terminal differentiation. Tubular regeneration outside of renal parenchyma was not previously observed, and suggests previously unrecognized capacity for regeneration. Our model provides a novel approach to study kidney wound healing. PMID:24100472

  20. From the Rodent Spinal Cord Injury Model to Human Application: Promises and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Volker; Schwab, Martin E

    2017-05-01

    Repair of the spinal cord and improvement of mobility after injury has been a matter of basic and clinical research for several decades. A number of repair approaches were performed in animals, mainly rodent models of spinal cord injury (SCI). Some of these experimental therapies resulted in significant regeneration of tract fibers, formation of new connections and circuits, and associated improvement of mobility. Some clinical trials aiming at translating these approaches to the human condition of an SCI are currently on-going. The present therapy, however, remains rehabiliation: Mobility of patients with an SCI can be improved to a limited extent by the exploition of neuroplasticity. In this article the present state of the art in the field of SCI research will be discussed. Studies dealing with the promotion of spinal cord repair and those directed to improve mobility by exploition of neuroplasticity will be summarized. The promises and challenges of translational basic research in rodent SCI models will be presented.

  1. Therapeutic Effectiveness of Anti-RAGE Antibody Administration in a Rat Model of Crush Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hisatake; Matsumoto, Naoya; Shimazaki, Junya; Nakagawa, Junichiro; Imamura, Yukio; Yamakawa, Kazuma; Yamada, Tomoki; Ikeda, Mitsunori; Hiraike, Hiroko; Ogura, Hiroshi; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2017-09-25

    Crush injury patients often have systemic inflammatory response syndrome that leads to multiple organ failure. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) functions as a pattern recognition receptor that regulates inflammation. We evaluated the effects of anti-RAGE antibody in a crush injury model. Pressure was applied to both hindlimbs of rats for 6 h by 3.0-kg blocks and then released. Animals were randomly divided into the sham (RAGE-Sh) group, crush (RAGE-Ctrl) group or anti-RAGE antibody-treated crush (RAGE-Tx) group. Samples were collected at 3, 6 and 24 h after releasing pressure. In the RAGE-Ctrl group, fluorescent immunostaining in the lung showed upregulated RAGE expression at 3 h. The serum soluble RAGE (sRAGE) level, which reflects the amount of RAGE expression in systemic tissue, increased at 6 h. Serum interleukin 6 (IL-6; systemic inflammation marker) increased immediately at 3 h. Histological analysis revealed lung injury at 6 and 24 h. Administration of anti-RAGE antibody before releasing compression inhibited upregulated RAGE expression in the lung alveoli, suppressed RAGE-associated mediators sRAGE and IL6, attenuated the lung damage and improved the 7-day survival rate. Collectively, our results indicated that the use of anti-RAGE antibody before releasing compression is associated with a favourable prognosis following crush injury.

  2. All-trans-retinoic acid attenuates intestinal injury in a neonatal rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ramazan; Yurttutan, Sadık; Sari, Fatma Nur; Oncel, Mehmet Yekta; Erdeve, Omer; Unverdi, Hatice Germen; Uysal, Bülent; Dilmen, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion-induced intestinal injury is mediated by reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators. This study was designed to evaluate whether all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) administration can attenuate intestinal injury and to analyze the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of ATRA in a neonatal rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Twenty-nine Wistar albino rat pups were randomly divided into 3 groups: group 1 = control, group 2 = NEC and saline, and group 3 = NEC and ATRA treatment. NEC was induced by hyperosmolar enteral formula feeding and exposure to hypoxia after cold stress at +4°C and oxygen. Pups in group 3 were injected intraperitoneally with ATRA (0.5 mg/kg body weight) once a day prior to each NEC procedure, beginning on postnatal day 1 and daily through postnatal day 4. The pups were killed on the 4th day and their intestinal tissues were harvested for biochemical and histopathological analysis. Mucosal injury scores and intestinal malondialdehyde levels in group 2 were found to be significantly higher than other groups (p Intestinal superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities in group 3 were significantly higher than group 2 (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). Intestinal tissue tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly reduced with ATRA treatment in group 3 compared to group 2 (p intestinal injury through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Evolution of scientific ballooning and its impact on astrophysics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William Vernon

    2014-05-01

    As we celebrate the centennial year of the discovery of cosmic rays on a manned balloon, it seems appropriate to reflect on the evolution of ballooning and its scientific impact. Balloons have been used for scientific research since they were invented in France more than 200 years ago. Ballooning was revolutionized in 1950 with the introduction of the so-called natural shape balloon with integral load tapes. This basic design has been used with more or less continuously improved materials for scientific balloon flights for more than a half century, including long-duration balloon (LDB) flights around Antarctica for the past two decades. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently developing the next generation super-pressure balloon that would enable extended duration missions above 99.5% of the Earth's atmosphere at any latitude. The Astro2010 Decadal Survey report supports super-pressure balloon development and the giant step forward it offers with ultra-long-duration balloon (ULDB) flights at constant altitudes for about 100 days.

  4. The efficacy of hemostatic techniques in the sheep model of carotid artery injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Rowan; Boase, Sam; Jervis-Bardy, Josh; Dones Cabral, Jay-Dee; Robinson, Simon; Wormald, Peter-John

    2011-01-01

    The most dramatic complication in endonasal surgery is inadvertent injury to the internal carotid artery (ICA) with massive bleeding. Nasal packing is the favored technique for control; however, this often causes complete carotid occlusion or carotid stenosis, contributing to the morbidity and mortality of the patient. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of endoscopically applied hemostatic techniques that maintain vascular flow in an animal model of carotid artery injury. A total of 20 sheep underwent ICA dissection/isolation followed by the placement of the artery within a modified "sinus model otorhino neuro trainer" (SIMONT) model. A standardized 4-mm carotid artery injury was created endoscopically. Randomization of sheep to receive 1 of 5 hemostatic techniques was performed (Floseal, oxidized regenerated cellulose, Chitosan gel, muscle patch, or the U-Clip anastomotic device). Specific outcome measures were time to hemostasis, duration of time mean arterial pressure (MAP) was >55 mmHg, blood loss, and survival time. Muscle patch hemostasis and the U-Clip anastomotic device were significantly more effective at achieving primary hemostasis rapidly, reducing total blood loss, and increasing survival time and time MAP was >55 mmHg more than Floseal, oxidized regenerated cellulose, and Chitosan gel (p sheep achieved primary hemostasis and reached the endpoint of observation, while maintaining vascular patency. Floseal and oxidized regenerated cellulose failed to achieve hemostasis in any animal, with all animals exsanguinating prematurely. In the sheep model of endoscopic ICA injury, the muscle patch and U-Clip anastomotic device significantly improved survival, reduced blood loss, and achieved primary hemostasis while maintaining vascular patency. Copyright © 2011 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  5. Developing better mouse models to study cisplatin-induced kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Cierra N; Siskind, Leah J

    2017-10-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic used for the treatment of many types of cancer. However, its dose-limiting side effect is nephrotoxicity leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). Patients who develop AKI have an increased risk of mortality and are more likely to develop chronic kidney disease (CKD). Unfortunately, there are no therapeutic interventions for the treatment of AKI. It has been suggested that the lack of therapies is due in part to the fact that the established mouse model used to study cisplatin-induced AKI does not recapitulate the cisplatin dosing regimen patients receive. In recent years, work has been done to develop more clinically relevant models of cisplatin-induced kidney injury, with much work focusing on incorporation of multiple low doses of cisplatin administered over a period of weeks. These models can be used to recapitulate the development of CKD after AKI and, by doing so, increase the likelihood of identifying novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Retrograde prostatic urethroplasty with balloon catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, F.; Reddy, P.; Hulbert, J.; Letourneau, J.G.; Hunter, D.W.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Amplatz, K.

    1987-01-01

    The authors performed retrograde prostatic urethroplasty in 18 patients using a 25-mm urethroplasty balloon catheter. The procedure was performed on an outpatient basis under local anesthesia. Voiding cystourethrography, retrograde urethrography, rectal US, and MRE imaging were performed before and immediately after the procedure and at 2 weeks and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Long-term results at 18 months and possible clinical implications are discussed

  7. Salubrinal reduces oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and impulsive-like behavior in a rodent model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, Aric F; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Nguyen, Linda; Matsumoto, Rae R; Turner, Ryan C; Rosen, Charles L; Huber, Jason D

    2016-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of trauma related morbidity in the developed world. TBI has been shown to trigger secondary injury cascades including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation. The link between secondary injury cascades and behavioral outcome following TBI is poorly understood warranting further investigation. Using our validated rodent blast TBI model, we examined the interaction of secondary injury cascades following single injury and how these interactions may contribute to impulsive-like behavior after a clinically relevant repetitive TBI paradigm. We targeted these secondary pathways acutely following single injury with the cellular stress modulator, salubrinal (SAL). We examined the neuroprotective effects of SAL administration on significantly reducing ER stress: janus-N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and C/EBP homology protein (CHOP), oxidative stress: superoxide and carbonyls, and neuroinflammation: nuclear factor kappa beta (NFκB) activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression, and pro-inflammatory cytokines at 24h post-TBI. We then used the more clinically relevant repeat injury paradigm and observed elevated NFκB and iNOS activity. These injury cascades were associated with impulsive-like behavior measured on the elevated plus maze. SAL administration attenuated secondary iNOS activity at 72h following repetitive TBI, and most importantly prevented impulsive-like behavior. Overall, these results suggest a link between secondary injury cascades and impulsive-like behavior that can be modulated by SAL administration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Balloon sinuplasty: a new concept in the endoscopic nasal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira Júnior, João Flávio

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sinus diseases affect millions of people annually. Clinical treatment is effective in most patients, but in case of failure of this therapy the functional endoscopic surgery is currently the treatment choice for surgical treatment. The objective of the functional endoscopic surgery is to increase the aeration and drainage of the involved paranasal sinuses, which allows for the adequate functioning of the nasal mucosa mucociliary clearance. However, this method still has some limitations, mainly because it removes the nasal mucosa and bone tissue, and it may lead to physiologic alterations of the nasosinusal mucosa and cicatricial fibrosis. Many of these patients could be benefited from less invasive methods, with larger nasal mucosa preservation. Since 2006, an even less invasive procedure was remarked in our specialty: the balloon dilatation of the paranasal sinus ostia. Objective: The objective of this article is to define the concept of sinuplasty, its action mechanism, and present the necessary material for the procedures performance; to describe the techniques with the equipment in a nasosinusal endoscopic surgery simulator model and review the current literature about the indications, complications, results, and follow-up of patients submitted to this procedure. Balloon sinuplasty is safe and appears to be effective in the improvement of the quality of life of patients not responsive to conventional clinical therapy. New applications and indications for this equipment should be described and researched.

  9. Development of a Finite Element Head Model for the Study of Impact Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at developing a high quality, validated finite element (FE human head model for traumatic brain injuries (TBI prediction and prevention during vehicle collisions. The geometry of the FE model was based on computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans of a volunteer close to the anthropometry of a 50th percentile male. The material and structural properties were selected based on a synthesis of current knowledge of the constitutive models for each tissue. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was simulated explicitly as a hydrostatic fluid by using a surface-based fluid modeling method. The model was validated in the loading condition observed in frontal impact vehicle collision. These validations include the intracranial pressure (ICP, brain motion, impact force and intracranial acceleration response, maximum von Mises stress in the brain, and maximum principal stress in the skull. Overall results obtained in the validation indicated improved biofidelity relative to previous FE models, and the change in the maximum von Mises in the brain is mainly caused by the improvement of the CSF simulation. The model may be used for improving the current injury criteria of the brain and anthropometric test devices.

  10. Development of a finite element head model for the study of impact head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Tse, Kwong-Ming; Chen, Ning; Tan, Long-Bin; Zheng, Qing-Qian; Yang, Hui-Min; Hu, Min; Pan, Gang; Lee, Heow-Pueh

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at developing a high quality, validated finite element (FE) human head model for traumatic brain injuries (TBI) prediction and prevention during vehicle collisions. The geometry of the FE model was based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of a volunteer close to the anthropometry of a 50th percentile male. The material and structural properties were selected based on a synthesis of current knowledge of the constitutive models for each tissue. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was simulated explicitly as a hydrostatic fluid by using a surface-based fluid modeling method. The model was validated in the loading condition observed in frontal impact vehicle collision. These validations include the intracranial pressure (ICP), brain motion, impact force and intracranial acceleration response, maximum von Mises stress in the brain, and maximum principal stress in the skull. Overall results obtained in the validation indicated improved biofidelity relative to previous FE models, and the change in the maximum von Mises in the brain is mainly caused by the improvement of the CSF simulation. The model may be used for improving the current injury criteria of the brain and anthropometric test devices.

  11. Epidemiology of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage: Focusing Predictive Models for Neurosurgical Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Alessandro; Levy, A Stewart; Carrick, Matthew M; Tanner, Allen; Mains, Charles W; Bar-Or, David

    2017-11-01

    To outline differences in neurosurgical intervention (NI) rates between intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) types in mild traumatic brain injuries and help identify which ICH types are most likely to benefit from creation of predictive models for NI. A multicenter retrospective study of adult patients spanning 3 years at 4 U.S. trauma centers was performed. Patients were included if they presented with mild traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale score 13-15) with head CT scan positive for ICH. Patients were excluded for skull fractures, "unspecified hemorrhage," or coagulopathy. Primary outcome was NI. Stepwise multivariable logistic regression models were built to analyze the independent association between ICH variables and outcome measures. The study comprised 1876 patients. NI rate was 6.7%. There was a significant difference in rate of NI by ICH type. Subdural hematomas had the highest rate of NI (15.5%) and accounted for 78% of all NIs. Isolated subarachnoid hemorrhages had the lowest, nonzero, NI rate (0.19%). Logistic regression models identified ICH type as the most influential independent variable when examining NI. A model predicting NI for isolated subarachnoid hemorrhages would require 26,928 patients, but a model predicting NI for isolated subdural hematomas would require only 328 patients. This study highlighted disparate NI rates among ICH types in patients with mild traumatic brain injury and identified mild, isolated subdural hematomas as most appropriate for construction of predictive NI models. Increased health care efficiency will be driven by accurate understanding of risk, which can come only from accurate predictive models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute kidney injuries induced by various irrigation pressures in rat models of mild and severe hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhixiu; Yu, Weimin; Li, Wei; Cheng, Fan; Xia, Yue; Rao, Ting; Yao, Xiaobing; Zhang, Xiaobin; Larré, Stéphane

    2013-12-01

    To clarify whether tolerance to irrigation pressure could be modified over varying degrees of kidney obstruction during the endoscopic treatment of kidney stones in a rat model. A total of 126 rats were randomly allocated into 2 experimental groups and a control group. The experimental groups underwent a surgical procedure to induce mild (group M, n = 60) or severe (group S, n = 60) hydronephrosis. In each group, the rats were then randomly allocated into 4 subgroups (M0 to M3 and S0 to S3) of respectively 6, 18, 18, and 18 rats. Groups 0 to 3 were respectively perfused with 0 (no irrigation), 20, 60, and 100 mm Hg pressure fluid. The control group underwent no surgical procedures and was only perfused with 100 mm Hg pressure fluid. Acute kidney injuries were assessed by analyzing the kidney microstructure, tubular cell apoptosis, kidney injury molecule-1, and cysteine-rich 61 (Cyr61/CCN1) expression using immunohistochemistry. No abnormalities were observed for the control group, groups 0, or 1. In group 2, abnormalities were observed only in the S group, whereas all kidneys in group 3 suffered acute kidneys injuries, along with occurrence of tubular cells necrosis, increased apoptosis, and increased expression of kidney injury molecule-1 and Cyr61. Rats with severely obstructed kidneys were more likely to suffer acute kidney injuries than those with less obstructed kidneys when exposed to higher kidney irrigation pressures. This suggests that the pressure should be controlled and reduced when performing endourologic procedures in the context of kidney obstruction. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Microwave and magnetic (M2 proteomics of a mouse model of mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa M. Evans

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Short-term increases in oxidative stress and decreases in motor function, including debilitating effects on balance and motor control, can occur following primary mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI. However, the long-term effects on motor unit impairment and integrity as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying secondary injuries are poorly understood. We hypothesized that changes in central nervous system-specific protein (CSP expression might correlate to these long-term effects. To test our hypothesis, we longitudinally assessed a closed-skull mTBI mouse model, vs. sham control, at 1, 7, 30, and 120 days post-injury. Motor impairment was determined by rotarod and grip strength performance measures, while motor unit integrity was determined using electromyography. Relative protein expression was determined by microwave and magnetic (M2 proteomics of ipsilateral brain tissue, as previously described. Isoprostane measurements were performed to confirm a primary oxidative stress response. Decoding the relative expression of 476 ± 56 top-ranked proteins for each specimen revealed statistically significant changes in the expression of two well-known CSPs at 1, 7 and 30 days post-injury: P < 0.001 for myelin basic protein (MBP and p < 0.05 for myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG. This was confirmed by Western blot. Moreover, MAG, αII-spectrin (SPNA2 and neurofilament light (NEFL expression at 30 days post-injury were directly related to grip strength (p < 0.05. While higher-powered studies of larger cohorts merit further investigation, this study supports the proof-of-concept that M2 proteomics is a rapid method to quantify putative protein biomarkers and therapeutic targets of mTBI and suggests the feasibility of CSP expression correlations to long-term effects on motor impairment.

  14. Validating myelin water imaging with transmission electron microscopy in a rat spinal cord injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Henry Szu-Meng; Holmes, Nathan; Liu, Jie; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Kozlowski, Piotr

    2017-06-01

    Myelin content is an important marker for neuropathology and MRI generated myelin water fraction (MWF) has been shown to correlate well with myelin content. However, because MWF is based on the amount of signal from myelin water, that is, the water trapped between the myelin lipid bilayers, the reading may depend heavily on myelin morphology. This is of special concern when there is a mix of intact myelin and myelin debris, as in the case of injury. To investigate what MWF measures in the presence of debris, we compared MWF to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) derived myelin fraction that measures the amount of compact appearing myelin. A rat spinal cord injury model was used with time points at normal (normal myelin), 3 weeks post-injury (myelin debris), and 8 weeks post-injury (myelin debris, partially cleared). The myelin period between normal and 3 or 8 weeks post-injury cords did not differ significantly, suggesting that as long as the bilayer structure is intact, myelin debris has the same water content as intact myelin. The MWF also correlated strongly with the TEM-derived myelin fraction, suggesting that MWF measures the amount of compact appearing myelin in both intact myelin and myelin debris. From the TEM images, it appears that as myelin degenerates, it tends to form large watery spaces within the myelin sheaths that are not classified as myelin water. The results presented in this study improve our understanding and allows for better interpretation of MWF in the presence of myelin debris. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Long Duration Balloon Charge Controller Stack Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Kyle

    NASA and the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility are interested in updating the design of the charge controller on their long duration balloon (LDB) in order to enable the charge controllers to be directly interfaced via RS232 serial communication by a ground testing computers and the balloon's flight computer without the need to have an external electronics stack. The design involves creating a board that will interface with the existing boards in the charge controller in order to receive telemetry from and send commands to those boards, and interface with a computer through serial communication. The inputs to the board are digital status inputs indicating things like whether the photovoltaic panels are connected or disconnected; and analog inputs with information such as the battery voltage and temperature. The outputs of the board are 100ms duration command pulses that will switch relays that do things like connect the photovoltaic panels. The main component of this design is a PIC microcontroller which translates the outputs of the existing charge controller into serial data when interrogated by a ground testing or flight computer. Other components involved in the design are an AD7888 12-bit analog to digital converter, a MAX3232 serial transceiver, various other ICs, capacitors, resistors, and connectors.

  16. Intragastric balloon for treatment-resistant obesity: safety, tolerance, and efficacy of 1-year balloon treatment followed by a 1-year balloon-free follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.; Tytgat, Guido N. J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Prior efforts to treat obesity with intragastric balloons were thwarted by high complication rates. Therefore, fundamental requirements for optimal balloon designs were defined. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness, the safety; and the tolerance of a new

  17. Stochastic modeling of economic injury levels with respect to yearly trends in price commodity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damos, Petros

    2014-05-01

    The economic injury level (EIL) concept integrates economics and biology and uses chemical applications in crop protection only when economic loss by pests is anticipated. The EIL is defined by five primary variables: the cost of management tactic per production unit, the price of commodity, the injury units per pest, the damage per unit injury, and the proportionate reduction of injury averted by the application of a tactic. The above variables are related according to the formula EIL = C/VIDK. The observable dynamic alteration of the EIL due to its different parameters is a major characteristic of its concept. In this study, the yearly effect of the economic variables is assessed, and in particular the influence of the parameter commodity value on the shape of the EIL function. In addition, to predict the effects of the economic variables on the EIL level, yearly commodity values were incorporated in the EIL formula and the generated outcomes were further modelled with stochastic linear autoregressive models having different orders. According to the AR(1) model, forecasts for the five-year period of 2010-2015 ranged from 2.33 to 2.41 specimens per sampling unit. These values represent a threshold that is in reasonable limits to justify future control actions. Management actions as related to productivity and price commodity significantly affect costs of crop production and thus define the adoption of IPM and sustainable crop production systems at local and international levels. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  18. A multinomial logit model-Bayesian network hybrid approach for driver injury severity analyses in rear-end crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Guohui; Tarefder, Rafiqul; Ma, Jianming; Wei, Heng; Guan, Hongzhi

    2015-07-01

    Rear-end crash is one of the most common types of traffic crashes in the U.S. A good understanding of its characteristics and contributing factors is of practical importance. Previously, both multinomial Logit models and Bayesian network methods have been used in crash modeling and analysis, respectively, although each of them has its own application restrictions and limitations. In this study, a hybrid approach is developed to combine multinomial logit models and Bayesian network methods for comprehensively analyzing driver injury severities in rear-end crashes based on state-wide crash data collected in New Mexico from 2010 to 2011. A multinomial logit model is developed to investigate and identify significant contributing factors for rear-end crash driver injury severities classified into three categories: no injury, injury, and fatality. Then, the identified significant factors are utilized to establish a Bayesian network to explicitly formulate statistical associations between injury severity outcomes and explanatory attributes, including driver behavior, demographic features, vehicle factors, geometric and environmental characteristics, etc. The test results demonstrate that the proposed hybrid approach performs reasonably well. The Bayesian network reference analyses indicate that the factors including truck-involvement, inferior lighting conditions, windy weather conditions, the number of vehicles involved, etc. could significantly increase driver injury severities in rear-end crashes. The developed methodology and estimation results provide insights for developing effective countermeasures to reduce rear-end crash injury severities and improve traffic system safety performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nephron Deficiency and Predisposition to Renal Injury in a Novel One-Kidney Genetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuexiang; Johnson, Ashley C; Williams, Jan M; White, Tiffani; Chade, Alejandro R; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Ruisheng; Roman, Richard J; Lee, Jonathan W; Kyle, Patrick B; Solberg-Woods, Leah; Garrett, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    Some studies have reported up to 40% of patients born with a single kidney develop hypertension, proteinuria, and in some cases renal failure. The increased susceptibility to renal injury may be due, in part, to reduced nephron numbers. Notably, children who undergo nephrectomy or adults who serve as kidney donors exhibit little difference in renal function compared with persons who have two kidneys. However, the difference in risk between being born with a single kidney versus being born with two kidneys and then undergoing nephrectomy are unclear. Animal models used previously to investigate this question are not ideal because they require invasive methods to model congenital solitary kidney. In this study, we describe a new genetic animal model, the heterogeneous stock-derived model of unilateral renal agenesis (HSRA) rat, which demonstrates 50%-75% spontaneous incidence of a single kidney. The HSRA model is characterized by reduced nephron number (more than would be expected by loss of one kidney), early kidney/glomerular hypertrophy, and progressive renal injury, which culminates in reduced renal function. Long-term studies of temporal relationships among BP, renal hemodynamics, and renal function demonstrate that spontaneous single-kidney HSRA rats are more likely than uninephrectomized normal littermates to exhibit renal impairment because of the combination of reduced nephron numbers and prolonged exposure to renal compensatory mechanisms (i.e., hyperfiltration). Future studies with this novel animal model may provide additional insight into the genetic contributions to kidney development and agenesis and the factors influencing susceptibility to renal injury in individuals with congenital solitary kidney. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Forecasting mortality of road traffic injuries in China using seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xujun; Pang, Yuanyuan; Cui, Mengjing; Stallones, Lorann; Xiang, Huiyun

    2015-02-01

    Road traffic injuries have become a major public health problem in China. This study aimed to develop statistical models for predicting road traffic deaths and to analyze seasonality of deaths in China. A seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model was used to fit the data from 2000 to 2011. Akaike Information Criterion, Bayesian Information Criterion, and mean absolute percentage error were used to evaluate the constructed models. Autocorrelation function and partial autocorrelation function of residuals and Ljung-Box test were used to compare the goodness-of-fit between the different models. The SARIMA model was used to forecast monthly road traffic deaths in 2012. The seasonal pattern of road traffic mortality data was statistically significant in China. SARIMA (1, 1, 1) (0, 1, 1)12 model was the best fitting model among various candidate models; the Akaike Information Criterion, Bayesian Information Criterion, and mean absolute percentage error were -483.679, -475.053, and 4.937, respectively. Goodness-of-fit testing showed nonautocorrelations in the residuals of the model (Ljung-Box test, Q = 4.86, P = .993). The fitted deaths using the SARIMA (1, 1, 1) (0, 1, 1)12 model for years 2000 to 2011 closely followed the observed number of road traffic deaths for the same years. The predicted and observed deaths were also very close for 2012. This study suggests that accurate forecasting of road traffic death incidence is possible using SARIMA model. The SARIMA model applied to historical road traffic deaths data could provide important evidence of burden of road traffic injuries in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Regional mechanical properties of human brain tissue for computational models of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finan, John D; Sundaresh, Sowmya N; Elkin, Benjamin S; McKhann, Guy M; Morrison, Barclay

    2017-06-01

    To determine viscoelastic shear moduli, stress relaxation indentation tests were performed on samples of human brain tissue resected in the course of epilepsy surgery. Through the use of a 500µm diameter indenter, regional mechanical properties were measured in cortical grey and white matter and subregions of the hippocampus. All regions were highly viscoelastic. Cortical grey matter was significantly more compliant than the white matter or hippocampus which were similar in modulus. Although shear modulus was not correlated with the age of the donor, cortex from male donors was significantly stiffer than from female donors. The presented material properties will help to populate finite element models of the brain as they become more anatomically detailed. We present the first mechanical characterization of fresh, post-operative human brain tissue using an indentation loading mode. Indentation generates highly localized data, allowing structure-specific mechanical properties to be determined from small tissue samples resected during surgery. It also avoids pitfalls of cadaveric tissue and allows data to be collected before degenerative processes alter mechanical properties. To correctly predict traumatic brain injury, finite element models must calculate intracranial deformation during head impact. The functional consequences of injury depend on the anatomical structures injured. Therefore, morbidity depends on the distribution of deformation across structures. Accurate prediction of structure-specific deformation requires structure-specific mechanical properties. This data will facilitate deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms that lead to traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of Multivariate Modeling for Radiation Injury Assessment: A Proof of Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Bolduc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate radiation injury estimation algorithms were formulated for estimating severe hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS injury (i.e., response category three or RC3 in a rhesus monkey total-body irradiation (TBI model. Classical CBC and serum chemistry blood parameters were examined prior to irradiation (d 0 and on d 7, 10, 14, 21, and 25 after irradiation involving 24 nonhuman primates (NHP (Macaca mulatta given 6.5-Gy 60Co Υ-rays (0.4 Gy min−1 TBI. A correlation matrix was formulated with the RC3 severity level designated as the “dependent variable” and independent variables down selected based on their radioresponsiveness and relatively low multicollinearity using stepwise-linear regression analyses. Final candidate independent variables included CBC counts (absolute number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and platelets in formulating the “CBC” RC3 estimation algorithm. Additionally, the formulation of a diagnostic CBC and serum chemistry “CBC-SCHEM” RC3 algorithm expanded upon the CBC algorithm model with the addition of hematocrit and the serum enzyme levels of aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. Both algorithms estimated RC3 with over 90% predictive power. Only the CBC-SCHEM RC3 algorithm, however, met the critical three assumptions of linear least squares demonstrating slightly greater precision for radiation injury estimation, but with significantly decreased prediction error indicating increased statistical robustness.

  3. Prostaglandin E1 Preconditioning Attenuates Liver Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in a Rat Model of Extrahepatic Cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Xiaolin; Wang, Chao; Dai, Chaoliu

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the hepatoprotective effect of intraportal prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) on liver ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury using an extrahepatic cholestatic model, observing oxidative stress markers, proinflammatory factors, apoptotic marker proteins, and an adhesion molecule. The extrahepatic cholestatic model was induced by common bile duct ligation. After seven days, rats were subjected to ischemia by Pringle maneuver for 15 min, followed by 1, 6, or 24 h of reperfusion. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE group) or normal saline (NS group) was continuously infused from 15 min before liver ischemia to 1 h after reperfusion. After reperfusion, histopathological evaluation of the liver was performed, as were measurements of bilirubin, biochemical enzymes, oxidative stress markers (GSH and MDA), proinflammatory factors (MPO, TNF- α , and IL-1 β ), apoptotic marker proteins (Bcl-2 and Bax), and the adhesion molecule (ICAM-1). PGE1 pretreatment attenuated IR injury in extrahepatic cholestatic liver probably by suppressing MDA, MPO, TNF- α , IL-1 β , ICAM-1, and Bax levels and improving GSH and Bcl-2 levels. In conclusion, PGE1 protects extrahepatic cholestatic liver from IR injury by improving hepatic microcirculation and reducing oxidative stress damage, intrahepatic neutrophil infiltration, and hepatocyte apoptosis.

  4. Prostaglandin E1 Preconditioning Attenuates Liver Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in a Rat Model of Extrahepatic Cholestasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the hepatoprotective effect of intraportal prostaglandin E1 (PGE1 on liver ischemia reperfusion (IR injury using an extrahepatic cholestatic model, observing oxidative stress markers, proinflammatory factors, apoptotic marker proteins, and an adhesion molecule. The extrahepatic cholestatic model was induced by common bile duct ligation. After seven days, rats were subjected to ischemia by Pringle maneuver for 15 min, followed by 1, 6, or 24 h of reperfusion. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE group or normal saline (NS group was continuously infused from 15 min before liver ischemia to 1 h after reperfusion. After reperfusion, histopathological evaluation of the liver was performed, as were measurements of bilirubin, biochemical enzymes, oxidative stress markers (GSH and MDA, proinflammatory factors (MPO, TNF-α, and IL-1β, apoptotic marker proteins (Bcl-2 and Bax, and the adhesion molecule (ICAM-1. PGE1 pretreatment attenuated IR injury in extrahepatic cholestatic liver probably by suppressing MDA, MPO, TNF-α, IL-1β, ICAM-1, and Bax levels and improving GSH and Bcl-2 levels. In conclusion, PGE1 protects extrahepatic cholestatic liver from IR injury by improving hepatic microcirculation and reducing oxidative stress damage, intrahepatic neutrophil infiltration, and hepatocyte apoptosis.

  5. Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    prevention programs, including pressure relief regimes and selection of support surfaces , to optimize tissue heath during initial rehabilitation. Study...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0618 TITLE: Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury...Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  6. FireStem2D — A two-dimensional heat transfer model for simulating tree stem injury in fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthalia K. Chatziefstratiou; Gil Bohrer; Anthony S. Bova; Ravishankar Subramanian; Renato P.M. Frasson; Amy Scherzer; Bret W. Butler; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2013-01-01

    FireStem2D, a software tool for predicting tree stem heating and injury in forest fires, is a physically-based, two-dimensional model of stem thermodynamics that results from heating at the bark surface. It builds on an earlier one-dimensional model (FireStem) and provides improved capabilities for predicting fire-induced mortality and injury before a fire occurs by...

  7. Regulation of EGF and Prostaglandin Expression during Neonatal Gastrointestinal Injury in a Non-Human Primate Explant Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    Neonatal Gastrointestinal Injury in a Non- Human Primate Explant Model presented at/published to Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, San Francisco CA...Prostaglandin Expression During Neonatal Gastrointestinal Injury in a Non- Human Primate Explant Model AUTHORS: Steven J. Acevedo, MOl, Nicholas B. Alana2...Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas’ 2Department of Biology , Trinity University, San Antonio, Texas’ JDepartment of Pediatrics/Division of Neonatology

  8. Anatomical landmarks for safely implementing resuscitative balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) in zone 1 without fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yohei; Narumiya, Hiromichi; Ishi, Wataru; Iiduka, Ryoji

    2017-07-03

    Resuscitative balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) can maintain hemodynamic stability during hemorrhagic shock after a following torso injury, although inappropriate balloon placement may induce brain or visceral organ ischemia. External anatomical landmarks [the suprasternal notch (SSN) and xiphoid process (Xi)] are empirically used to implement REBOA in zone 1. We aimed to confirm if these landmarks were useful for determining a balloon catheter length for safe implementation of REBOA in zone 1 without using fluoroscopy. We selected 25 successive adult blunt trauma cases requiring contrast-enhanced chest/abdominal computed tomography (CT) treated at our emergency department (in an urban area of Kyoto city, Japan) between October 1, 2016 and January 31, 2017. We retrospectively evaluated anonymized CT images. We used three-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions to measure the length along the aorta's central axis, from the bilateral common femoral arteries (FA) to the celiac trunk (CeT) (FA-CeT) and to the origin of the left subclavian artery (LSCA) (FA-LSCA). Volume-rendering reconstruction images were used to measure the external distance from common FAs to SSN (FA-SSN) and to Xi (FA-Xi). FA-LSCA was significantly longer than FA-SSN. FA-CeT was significantly shorter than FA-Xi. Based on these results, the REBOA balloon catheter should be shorter than FA-SSN, and longer than FA-Xi to avoid placement outside zone 1. The advantages of this method are that it can rapidly and easily predict a safe balloon catheter length, and it reflects each patient's individual torso height. To safely implement REBOA, the balloon catheter length should be shorter than FA-SSN and longer than FA-Xi. We believe that these anatomical landmarks are good references for safe implementation of REBOA in zone 1 without radiographic guidance.

  9. Percutaneous treatment of extrahepatic bile duct stones assisted by balloon sphincteroplasty and occlusion balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Sung; Kim, Ji Hyung; Choi, Young Woo; Lee, Tae Hee; Hwang, Cheol Mog; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Keum Won [Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    To describe the technical feasibility and usefulness of extrahepatic biliary stone removal by balloon sphincteroplasty and occlusion balloon pushing. Fifteen patients with extrahepatic bile duct stones were included in this study. Endoscopic stone removal was not successful in 13 patients, and two patients refused the procedure due to endoscopy phobia. At first, all patients underwent percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). A few days later, through the PTBD route, balloon assisted dilatation for common bile duct (CBD) sphincter was performed, and then the stones were pushed into the duodenum using an 11.5 mm occlusion balloon. Success rate, reason for failure, and complications associated with the procedure were evaluated. Eight patients had one stone, five patients had two stones, and two patients had more than five stones. The procedure was successful in 13 patients (13/15). In 12 of the patients, all stones were removed in the first trial. In one patients, residual stones were discovered on follow-up cholangiography, and were subsequently removed in the second trial. Technical failure occurred in two patients. Both of these patients had severely dilated CBD and multiple stones with various sizes. Ten patients complained of pain in the right upper quadrant and epigastrium of the abdomen immediately following the procedure, but there were no significant procedure-related complications such as bleeding or pancreatitis. Percutaneous extrahepatic biliary stone removal by balloon sphincteroplasty and subsequent stone pushing with occlusion balloon is an effective, safe, and technically feasible procedure which can be used as an alternative method in patients when endoscopic extrahepatic biliary stone removal was not successful.

  10. Percutaneous treatment of extrahepatic bile duct stones assisted by balloon sphincteroplasty and occlusion balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Sung; Kim, Ji Hyung; Choi, Young Woo; Lee, Tae Hee; Hwang, Cheol Mog; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Keum Won

    2005-01-01

    To describe the technical feasibility and usefulness of extrahepatic biliary stone removal by balloon sphincteroplasty and occlusion balloon pushing. Fifteen patients with extrahepatic bile duct stones were included in this study. Endoscopic stone removal was not successful in 13 patients, and two patients refused the procedure due to endoscopy phobia. At first, all patients underwent percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). A few days later, through the PTBD route, balloon assisted dilatation for common bile duct (CBD) sphincter was performed, and then the stones were pushed into the duodenum using an 11.5 mm occlusion balloon. Success rate, reason for failure, and complications associated with the procedure were evaluated. Eight patients had one stone, five patients had two stones, and two patients had more than five stones. The procedure was successful in 13 patients (13/15). In 12 of the patients, all stones were removed in the first trial. In one patients, residual stones were discovered on follow-up cholangiography, and were subsequently removed in the second trial. Technical failure occurred in two patients. Both of these patients had severely dilated CBD and multiple stones with various sizes. Ten patients complained of pain in the right upper quadrant and epigastrium of the abdomen immediately following the procedure, but there were no significant procedure-related complications such as bleeding or pancreatitis. Percutaneous extrahepatic biliary stone removal by balloon sphincteroplasty and subsequent stone pushing with occlusion balloon is an effective, safe, and technically feasible procedure which can be used as an alternative method in patients when endoscopic extrahepatic biliary stone removal was not successful

  11. A model to guide the rehabilitation of high-functioning employees after mild brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Matthew B

    2010-01-01

    Impairment in executive functioning can occur after mild stroke, mild Traumatic Brain Injury, and neurodegenerative disease, and this can have deleterious effects on employment outcomes, occupational functioning, and general quality of life. What is not as well identified is the symbiotic relationship between executive functioning and other important psychosocial constructs inherent in successful employees ("Employee Performance Enablers"), and how various aspects of the employment environment can enable or inhibit the success of the employee with executive functioning deficits in meeting their essential job functions ("Workplace Ecology"). From an extensive review of the literature and the author's practice experience, a clinical model was developed to elucidate these two critical variables, as well as to provide guidance for organizing, planning, and implementing interventions that will address both employee enablers and workplace ecology to affect positive return to work outcomes for individuals with mild brain injury.

  12. An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model of Acquired Brain Injury Patient Impairments and Caregiver Psychosocial Functioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrin, Paul B; Norup, Anne; Caracuel, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    . METHOD: A sample of 968 individuals with ABI and their caregivers (n = 1,936) from 4 countries completed the European Brain Injury Questionnaire, a measure of ABI impairments and caregiver psychosocial functioning in the context of providing care for the person with ABI. RESULTS: An APIM with all......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to use actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM) to examine the simultaneous effects of both acquired brain injury (ABI) patient and caregiver ratings of patient impairments on both patient and caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction...... adequate or good fit indices found that patient ratings of their own impairments in the domains of social disadaptation and depression were uniquely and positively associated with patient ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction, yet none of the patient ratings of their own impairments were uniquely...

  13. Superpressure Balloon Design Using Nonlinear Viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, James; Rand, James; Wakefield, David

    Stratospheric balloon platforms are used extensively by scientists for a variety of purposes. The typical balloon used today is the zero pressure natural shape fabricated from a thin film of linear low density polyethylene. This material has been found to possess a variety of desirable characteristics suitable to this environment. This film will remain ductile at very low temperatures which will permit it to develop large strains if necessary to satisfy equilibrium considerations. However, in order to achieve long duration flight without significant changes in altitude, the balloon should be pressurized to the extent necessary to maintain constant volume during typical variations in temperature. In the past, pressurized balloons were fabricated from other materials in order to achieve significant increases in strength. Thin films of polyester or polyimide have been used to make relatively small spheres capable of long duration flight. Unfortunately, these materials do not have the ductility of polyethylene at low temperature and are somewhat more fragile and subject to damage. In recent years various organizations have attempted to use the characteristic shape of a pumpkin to limit the stresses in a balloon envelope to that which can be accommodated by laminated fabric materials. While developing the design, analysis and construction techniques for this type of system, the use of polyethylene has been successfully demonstrated to provide a reliable envelope. This shape is achieved by using high strength members in the meridional direction to carry the very high loads generated by the pressure. These so called "tendons" have very low elongation and serve to limit the deformation of the film in that direction. However, earlier designs attempted to limit the stresses in the circumferential direction by using a lobe angle to control the stress. Unfortunately this has led to a number of stability problems with this type of balloon. In order to control the stability of

  14. The effect of whole-body resonance vibration in a porcine model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H T; Chak, Jason; Dressler, Dan; Manouchehri, Neda; Okon, Elena B; Anderson, Lisa M; Melnyk, Angela D; Cripton, Peter A; Kwon, Brian K

    2015-06-15

    Whole-body vibration has been identified as a potential stressor to spinal cord injury (SCI) patients during pre-hospital transportation. However, the effect that such vibration has on the acutely injured spinal cord is largely unknown, particularly in the frequency domain of 5 Hz in which resonance of the spine occurs. The objective of the study was to investigate the consequences of resonance vibration on the injured spinal cord. Using our previously characterized porcine model of SCI, we subjected animals to resonance vibration (5.7±0.46 Hz) or no vibration for a period of 1.5 or 3.0 h. Locomotor function was assessed weekly and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected to assess different inflammatory and injury severity markers. Spinal cords were evaluated histologically to quantify preserved white and gray matter. No significant differences were found between groups for CSF levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and lL-8. Glial fibrillary acidic protein levels were lower in the resonance vibration group, compared with the non-vibrated control group. Spared white matter tissue was increased within the vibrated group at 7 d post-injury but this difference was not apparent at the 12-week time-point. No significant difference was observed in locomotor recovery following resonance vibration of the spine. Here, we demonstrate that exposure to resonance vibration for 1.5 or 3 h following SCI in our porcine model is not detrimental to the functional or histological outcomes. Our observation that a 3.0-h period of vibration at resonance frequency induces modest histological improvement at one week post-injury warrants further study.

  15. The oxidative response in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Edward C T H; Bahrami, Soheyl; Kozlov, Andrey V; Kurvers, Harry A J M; Ter Laak, Henk J; Nohl, Hans; Redl, Heinz; Goris, R Jan A

    2009-03-01

    In the chronic constriction injury model of rat neuropathic pain, oxidative stress as well as antioxidants superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione (GSH) are important determinants of neuropathological and behavioral consequences. Studies of the chronic constriction injury model observed (indirect) signs of inflammation. We, therefore, investigated the level of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes in skeletal muscle tissue of the rat hind paw and (jugular vein) plasma at d 7 after nerve injury. The level of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) was determined as a measure of oxidative stress. Reduced GSH levels and the ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio were determined as measures of overall antioxidant activity. RONS and overall antioxidant activity were measured in skeletal muscle tissue of the hind paw and jugular vein plasma. The level of RONS in muscle was determined using spin trapping combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we also determined plasma levels of transferrin and ceruloplasmin. GSH levels were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. In skeletal muscle tissue, the level of RONS was lower in nerve-injured hind paws than in controls. The plasma level (jugular vein) of RONS did not differ between nerve-injured and control rats. In skeletal muscle tissue, the level of GSH was higher in nerve-injured hind paws than in controls. The ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio tended to be higher in (jugular vein) plasma of nerve-injured rats as compared to controls. This study shows that, at d 7 after nerve injury, oxidative stress-induced changes are present also in skeletal muscle tissue of the rat hind paw. Our findings of a decreased level of RONS in combination with an increased level of the antioxidant GSH suggest that an overshoot of antioxidant activity overrules initial oxidative stress.

  16. Specific microbiome changes in a mouse model of parenteral nutrition associated liver injury and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J Kirk; El Kasmi, Karim C; Anderson, Aimee L; Devereaux, Michael W; Fillon, Sophie A; Robertson, Charles E; Wagner, Brandie D; Stevens, Mark J; Pace, Norman R; Sokol, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) has been a life-saving treatment in infants intolerant of enteral feedings. However, PN is associated with liver injury (PN Associated Liver Injury: PNALI) in a significant number of PN-dependent infants. We have previously reported a novel PNALI mouse model in which PN infusion combined with intestinal injury results in liver injury. In this model, lipopolysaccharide activation of toll-like receptor 4 signaling, soy oil-derived plant sterols, and pro-inflammatory activation of Kupffer cells (KCs) played key roles. The objective of this study was to explore changes in the intestinal microbiome associated with PNALI. Microbiome analysis in the PNALI mouse identified specific alterations within colonic microbiota associated with PNALI and further association of these communities with the lipid composition of the PN solution. Intestinal inflammation or soy oil-based PN infusion alone (in the absence of enteral feeds) caused shifts within the gut microbiota. However, the combination resulted in accumulation of a specific taxon, Erysipelotrichaceae (23.8% vs. 1.7% in saline infused controls), in PNALI mice. Moreover, PNALI was markedly attenuated by enteral antibiotic treatment, which also was associated with significant reduction of Erysipelotrichaceae (0.6%) and a Gram-negative constituent, the S24-7 lineage of Bacteroidetes (53.5% in PNALI vs. 0.8%). Importantly, removal of soy oil based-lipid emulsion from the PN solution resulted in significant reduction of Erysipelotrichaceae as well as attenuation of PNALI. Finally, addition of soy-derived plant sterol (stigmasterol) to fish oil-based PN restored Erysipelotrichaceae abundance and PNALI. Soy oil-derived plant sterols and the associated specific bacterial groups in the colonic microbiota are associated with PNALI. Products from these bacteria may directly trigger activation of KCs and promote PNALI. Furthermore, the results indicate that lipid modification of PN solutions may alter

  17. Experimental chronic kidney disease attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury in an ex vivo rat lung model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Kan Peng

    Full Text Available Lung ischemia reperfusion injury (LIRI is one of important complications following lung transplant and cardiopulmonary bypass. Although patients on hemodialysis are still excluded as lung transplant donors because of the possible effects of renal failure on the lungs, increased organ demand has led us to evaluate the influence of chronic kidney disease (CKD on LIRI. A CKD model was induced by feeding Sprague-Dawley rats an adenine-rich (0.75% diet for 2, 4 and 6 weeks, and an isolated rat lung in situ model was used to evaluate ischemia reperfusion (IR-induced acute lung injury. The clinicopathological parameters of LIRI, including pulmonary edema, lipid peroxidation, histopathological changes, immunohistochemistry changes, chemokine CXCL1, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, heat shock protein expression, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation were determined. Our results indicated that adenine-fed rats developed CKD as characterized by increased blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and the deposition of crystals in the renal tubules and interstitium. IR induced a significant increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure, lung edema, lung injury scores, the expression of CXCL1 mRNA, iNOS level, and protein concentration of the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF. The tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the BALF and perfusate; the interleukin-10 level in the perfusate; and the malondialdehyde levels in the lung tissue and perfusate were also significantly increased by LIRI. Counterintuitively, adenine-induced CKD significantly attenuated the severity of lung injury induced by IR. CKD rats exhibited increased heat shock protein 70 expression and decreased activation of NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, adenine-induced CKD attenuated LIRI by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway.

  18. Subtle paranodal injury slows impulse conduction in a mathematical model of myelinated axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F Babbs

    Full Text Available This study explores in detail the functional consequences of subtle retraction and detachment of myelin around the nodes of Ranvier following mild-to-moderate crush or stretch mediated injury. An equivalent electrical circuit model for a series of equally spaced nodes of Ranvier was created incorporating extracellular and axonal resistances, paranodal resistances, nodal capacitances, time varying sodium and potassium currents, and realistic resting and threshold membrane potentials in a myelinated axon segment of 21 successive nodes. Differential equations describing membrane potentials at each nodal region were solved numerically. Subtle injury was simulated by increasing the width of exposed nodal membrane in nodes 8 through 20 of the model. Such injury diminishes action potential amplitude and slows conduction velocity from 19.1 m/sec in the normal region to 7.8 m/sec in the crushed region. Detachment of paranodal myelin, exposing juxtaparanodal potassium channels, decreases conduction velocity further to 6.6 m/sec, an effect that is partially reversible with potassium ion channel blockade. Conduction velocity decreases as node width increases or as paranodal resistance falls. The calculated changes in conduction velocity with subtle paranodal injury agree with experimental observations. Nodes of Ranvier are highly effective but somewhat fragile devices for increasing nerve conduction velocity and decreasing reaction time in vertebrate animals. Their fundamental design limitation is that even small mechanical retractions of myelin from very narrow nodes or slight loosening of paranodal myelin, which are difficult to notice at the light microscopic level of observation, can cause large changes in myelinated nerve conduction velocity.

  19. A Finite Element Model of the Foot/Ankle to Evaluate Injury Risk in Various Postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Chris; Quenneville, Cheryl E

    2017-08-01

    The foot/ankle complex is frequently injured in many types of debilitating events, such as car crashes. Numerical models used to assess injury risk are typically minimally validated and do not account for ankle posture variations that frequently occur during these events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a finite element model of the foot and ankle accounting for these positional changes. A model was constructed from computed tomography scans of a male cadaveric lower leg and was evaluated by comparing simulated bone positions and strain responses to experimental results at five postures in which fractures are commonly reported. The bone positions showed agreement typically within 6° or less in all anatomical directions, and strain matching was consistent with the range of errors observed in similar studies (typically within 50% of the average strains). Fracture thresholds and locations in each posture were also estimated to be similar to those reported in the literature (ranging from 6.3 kN in the neutral posture to 3.9 kN in combined eversion and external rotation). The least vulnerable posture was neutral, and all other postures had lower fracture thresholds, indicating that examination of the fracture threshold of the lower limb in the neutral posture alone may be an underestimation. This work presents an important step forward in the modeling of lower limb injury risk in altered ankle postures. Potential clinical applications of the model include the development of postural guidelines to minimize injury, as well as the evaluation of new protective systems.

  20. [Balloon cell nevi of the conjunctiva (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlageter, P E; Daicker, B

    1975-06-01

    The clinical and histological features of three cases of conjunctival balloon cell nevi are described. This peculiar form of nevus is very rare in the conjunctiva. The findings are compared with the descriptions in the literature of dermal balloon cell nevi. They demonstrate, that the conjunctival and dermal tumours are of idential histological structure. The proliferations of the conjunctival epithelium often found in conjunctival nevi do not modify the balloon cell nevi. These can not be diagnosed clinically. The problems of the pathogenesis of the balloon cell nevi are discussed.

  1. Advanced Li batteries for terrestrial balloons, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For future advanced terrestrial balloon missions, NASA requires energy dense and power dense energy storage solutions significantly exceeding the performance of...

  2. Hyperspectral Polarimeter for Monitoring Balloon Strain, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's latest generation of superpressure, ultra long duration balloons (ULDB) extend the flight time for stratospheric experiments to levels previously unattainable...

  3. Deflation of gastric band balloon in pregnancy for improving outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, Amanda E; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Draycott, Tim; Akande, Valentine A; Fox, Robert

    2013-04-30

    In line with the rise in the prevalence of obesity, an increasing number of women of childbearing age are undergoing laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), resulting in an increasing number of pregnancies with a band in place. Currently, there is no consensus on optimal band management in pregnancy. Some clinicians advocate leaving the band balloon inflated to reduce gestational weight gain and associated adverse perinatal outcomes. However, there are concerns that maintaining balloon inflation during pregnancy might increase the risk of band complications and adversely affect fetal development and/or growth as a result of reduced nutritional intake. To compare maternal and perinatal outcomes for elective gastric band balloon deflation versus intention to maintain balloon inflation during pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 September 2012) and the Web of Science database (1940 to September 2012). Randomised-controlled trials comparing elective deflation of the gastric band balloon with intention to maintain balloon inflation in pregnant women who have undergone LAGB. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion. No studies met the criteria for inclusion in the review. To date no randomised controlled trials exist that compare elective deflation of the gastric band balloon in pregnancy versus intention to maintain balloon inflation. Further research is needed to define the optimum management of the gastric band balloon in pregnancy.

  4. An Overview of Current and Future Stratospheric Balloon Mission Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael

    The modern stratospheric balloon has been used for a variety of missions since the late 1940's. Capabilities of these vehicles to carry larger payloads, fly to higher altitudes, and fly for longer periods of time have increased dramatically over this time. In addition to these basic performance metrics, reliability statistics for balloons have reached unprecedented levels in recent years. Balloon technology developed in the United States in the last decade has the potential to open a new era in economical space science using balloons. As always, the advantage of the balloon platform is the fact that missions can be carried out at a fraction of the cost and schedule of orbital missions. A secondary advantage is the fact that instruments can be re-flown numerous times while upgrading sensor and data processing technologies from year to year. New mission capabilities now have the potential for enabling ground breaking observations using balloons as the primary platform as opposed to a stepping stone to eventual orbital observatories. The limit of very high altitude balloon missions will be explored with respect to the current state of the art of balloon materials and fabrication. The same technological enablers will also be applied to possibilities for long duration missions at mid latitudes with payloads of several tons. The balloon types and their corresponding mission profiles will be presented in a performance matrix that will be useful for potential scientific users in planning future research programs.

  5. Establishing the ferret as a gyrencephalic animal model of traumatic brain injury: Optimization of controlled cortical impact procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerin, Susan C; Hutchinson, Elizabeth B; Radomski, Kryslaine L; Ngalula, Kapinga P; Pierpaoli, Carlo M; Juliano, Sharon L

    2017-06-15

    Although rodent TBI studies provide valuable information regarding the effects of injury and recovery, an animal model with neuroanatomical characteristics closer to humans may provide a more meaningful basis for clinical translation. The ferret has a high white/gray matter ratio, gyrencephalic neocortex, and ventral hippocampal location. Furthermore, ferrets are amenable to behavioral training, have a body size compatible with pre-clinical MRI, and are cost-effective. We optimized the surgical procedure for controlled cortical impact (CCI) using 9 adult male ferrets. We used subject-specific brain/skull morphometric data from anatomical MRIs to overcome across-subject variability for lesion placement. We also reflected the temporalis muscle, closed the craniotomy, and used antibiotics. We then gathered MRI, behavioral, and immunohistochemical data from 6 additional animals using the optimized surgical protocol: 1 control, 3 mild, and 1 severely injured animals (surviving one week) and 1 moderately injured animal surviving sixteen weeks. The optimized surgical protocol resulted in consistent injury placement. Astrocytic reactivity increased with injury severity showing progressively greater numbers of astrocytes within the white matter. The density and morphological changes of microglia amplified with injury severity or time after injury. Motor and cognitive impairments scaled with injury severity. The optimized surgical methods differ from those used in the rodent, and are integral to success using a ferret model. We optimized ferret CCI surgery for consistent injury placement. The ferret is an excellent animal model to investigate pathophysiological and behavioral changes associated with TBI. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. The Use of Model Matching Video Analysis and Computational Simulation to Study the Ankle Sprain Injury Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tik-Pui Fong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lateral ankle sprains continue to be the most common injury sustained by athletes and create an annual healthcare burden of over $4 billion in the U.S. alone. Foot inversion is suspected in these cases, but the mechanism of injury remains unclear. While kinematics and kinetics data are crucial in understanding the injury mechanisms, ligament behaviour measures – such as ligament strains – are viewed as the potential causal factors of ankle sprains. This review article demonstrates a novel methodology that integrates model matching video analyses with computational simulations in order to investigate injury-producing events for a better understanding of such injury mechanisms. In particular, ankle joint kinematics from actual injury incidents were deduced by model matching video analyses and then input into a generic computational model based on rigid bone surfaces and deformable ligaments of the ankle so as to investigate the ligament strains that accompany these sprain injuries. These techniques may have the potential for guiding ankle sprain prevention strategies and targeted rehabilitation therapies.

  7. A Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion Injury Model in Non-Human Primates (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salegio, Ernesto A.; Sparrey, Carolyn J.; Camisa, William; Fischer, Jason; Leasure, Jeremi; Buckley, Jennifer; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S.; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Moseanko, Rod; Strand, Sarah; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Lemoy, Marie-Josee; Haefeli, Jenny; Ma, Xiaokui; Nielson, Jessica L.; Edgerton, V.R.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The development of a non-human primate (NHP) model of spinal cord injury (SCI) based on mechanical and computational modeling is described. We scaled up from a rodent model to a larger primate model using a highly controllable, friction-free, electronically-driven actuator to generate unilateral C6-C7 spinal cord injuries. Graded contusion lesions with varying degrees of functional recovery, depending upon pre-set impact parameters, were produced in nine NHPs. Protocols and pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to optimize the predictability of outcomes by matching impact protocols to the size of each animal's spinal canal, cord, and cerebrospinal fluid space. Post-operative MRI confirmed lesion placement and provided information on lesion volume and spread for comparison with histological measures. We evaluated the relationships between impact parameters, lesion measures, and behavioral outcomes, and confirmed that these relationships were consistent with our previous studies in the rat. In addition to providing multiple univariate outcome measures, we also developed an integrated outcome metric describing the multivariate cervical SCI syndrome. Impacts at the higher ranges of peak force produced highly lateralized and enduring deficits in multiple measures of forelimb and hand function, while lower energy impacts produced early weakness followed by substantial recovery but enduring deficits in fine digital control (e.g., pincer grasp). This model provides a clinically relevant system in which to evaluate the safety and, potentially, the efficacy of candidate translational therapies. PMID:26788611

  8. AUTOPERFUSION BALLOON CATHETER FOR COMPLICATED CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY - A PROSPECTIVE-STUDY WITH RETROSPECTIVE CONTROLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMUINCK, ED; VANDIJK, RB; DENHEIJER, P; MEEDER, JG; LIE, KI

    1992-01-01

    Prolonged angioplasty balloon inflation with an autoperfusion balloon for failed conventional coronary angioplasty, was compared with emergency surgery for this condition. Restenosis was assessed 6 weeks after successful intervention with the autoperfusion balloon. Forty consecutive patients with

  9. The use of recombinant nAG protein In spinal cord crush injury in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qattan, M.M.; Al-Motairi, M.; Ah-Habib, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic properties of nAG protein during the recovery following acute spinal cord injuries in the rat. Study Design: An experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from September 2014 to September 2015. Methodology: Eight rats were studied (4 control rats and 4 experimental rats; and hence 50% were controls and 50% were experimental). All rats were subjected to an acute spinal cord injury using the aneurysmal clip injury model. Immediately after the injury, a single intra-dural injection of either normal saline (in the control group) or the nAG protein (in the experimental group) was done. Assessment of both groups was done over a 6-week period with regard to weight maintenance, motor recovery scores, MRI and histopathology of the injury site. Results: Weight maintenance was seen in the experimental and not in the control rats. Starting at 3 weeks after injury, the motor recovery was significantly (p<0.05) better in the experimental group. MRI assessment at 6 weeks showed better maintenance of cord continuity and less fluid accumulation at the injury site in the nAG-treated group. Just proximal to the injury site, there was less gliosis in the experimental group compared to the control group. At the crush injury site, there was less tissue architecture distortion, less vacuole formation, and less granulation tissue formation in the experimental group. Conclusion: The local injection nAG protein enhances neuro-restoration, reduces gliosis, and reduces vacuole/ granulation tissue formation following acute spinal cord crush injury in the rat aneurysmal clip animal model. (author)

  10. The Emulsified PFC Oxycyte®Improved Oxygen Content and Lung Injury Score in a Swine Model of Oleic Acid Lung Injury (OALI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Ashraful; Scultetus, Anke H; Arnaud, Francoise; Dickson, Leonora J; Chun, Steve; McNamee, George; Auker, Charles R; McCarron, Richard M; Mahon, Richard T

    2016-12-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) can transport 50 times more oxygen than human plasma. Their properties may be advantageous in preservation of tissue viability in oxygen-deprived states, such as in acute lung injury. We hypothesized that an intravenous dose of the PFC emulsion Oxycyte ® would improve tissue oxygenation and thereby mitigate the effects of acute lung injury. Intravenous oleic acid (OA) was used to induce lung injury in anesthetized and instrumented Yorkshire swine assigned to three experimental groups: (1) PFC post-OA received Oxycyte ® (5 ml/kg) 45 min after oleic acid-induced lung injury (OALI); (2) PFC pre-OA received Oxycyte ® 45 min before OALI; and (3) Controls which received equivalent dose of normal saline. Animals were observed for 3 h after OALI began, and then euthanized. The median survival times for PFC post-OA, PFC pre-OA, and control were 240, 87.5, and 240 min, respectively (p = 0.001). Mean arterial pressure and mean pulmonary arterial pressure were both higher in the PFC post-OA (p lung injury indicated that edema and congestion was significantly less severe in the PFC post-OA compared to control (p = 0.001). The intravenous PFC Oxycyte ® improves blood oxygen content and lung histology when used as a treatment after OALI, while Oxycyte ® used prior to OALI was associated with increased mortality. Further exploration in other injury models is indicated.

  11. An Automated System for Measuring Microphysical and Radiative Cloud Characteristics from a Tethered Balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Paul Lawson

    2004-03-15

    OAK-B135 The rate of climate change in polar regions is now felt to be a harbinger of possible global warming. Long-lived, relatively thin stratus clouds play a predominant role in transmitting solar radiation and trapping long wave radiation emitted from open water and melt ponds. In situ measurements of microphysical and radiative properties of Arctic and Antarctic stratus clouds are needed to validate retrievals from remote measurements and simulations using numerical models. While research aircraft can collect comprehensive microphysical and radiative data in clouds, the duration of these aircraft is relatively short (up to about 12 hours). During the course of the Phase II research, a tethered balloon system was developed that supports miniaturized meteorological, microphysical and radiation sensors that can collect data in stratus clouds for days at a time. The tethered balloon system uses a 43 cubic meter balloon to loft a 17 kg sensor package to altitudes u p to 2 km. Power is supplied to the instrument package via two copper conductors in the custom tether. Meteorological, microphysical and radiation data are recorded by the sensor package. Meteorological measurements include pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction. Radiation measurements are made using a 4-pi radiometer that measures actinic flux at 500 and 800 nm. Position is recorded using a GPS receiver. Microphysical data are obtained using a miniaturized version of an airborne cloud particle imager (CPI). The miniaturized CPI measures the size distribution of water drops and ice crystals from 9 microns to 1.4 mm. Data are recorded onboard the sensor package and also telemetered via a 802.11b wireless communications link. Command signals can also be sent to the computer in the sensor package via the wireless link. In the event of a broken tether, a GMRS radio link to the balloon package is used to heat a wire that burns 15 cm opening in the top of the balloon. The balloon and

  12. Early biomarkers of doxorubicin-induced heart injury in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Varsha G., E-mail: varsha.desai@fda.hhs.gov [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Kwekel, Joshua C.; Vijay, Vikrant; Moland, Carrie L. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Herman, Eugene H. [Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch, Developmental Therapeutics Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, The National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850-9734 (United States); Lee, Taewon [Department of Mathematics, Korea University, Sejong, Chungnam 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Tao [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lewis, Sherry M. [Office of Scientific Coordination, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Davis, Kelly J.; Muskhelishvili, Levan [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Kerr, Susan [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, AR 72211 (United States); Fuscoe, James C. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac troponins, which are used as myocardial injury markers, are released in plasma only after tissue damage has occurred. Therefore, there is a need for identification of biomarkers of earlier events in cardiac injury to limit the extent of damage. To accomplish this, expression profiling of 1179 unique microRNAs (miRNAs) was performed in a chronic cardiotoxicity mouse model developed in our laboratory. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were injected intravenously with 3 mg/kg doxorubicin (DOX; an anti-cancer drug), or saline once a week for 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were euthanized a week after the last dose. Cardiac injury was evidenced in mice exposed to 18 mg/kg and higher cumulative DOX dose whereas examination of hearts by light microscopy revealed cardiac lesions at 24 mg/kg DOX. Also, 24 miRNAs were differentially expressed in mouse hearts, with the expression of 1, 1, 2, 8, and 21 miRNAs altered at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg DOX, respectively. A pro-apoptotic miR-34a was the only miRNA that was up-regulated at all cumulative DOX doses and showed a significant dose-related response. Up-regulation of miR-34a at 6 mg/kg DOX may suggest apoptosis as an early molecular change in the hearts of DOX-treated mice. At 12 mg/kg DOX, up-regulation of miR-34a was associated with down-regulation of hypertrophy-related miR-150; changes observed before cardiac injury. These findings may lead to the development of biomarkers of earlier events in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity that occur before the release of cardiac troponins. - Highlights: • Upregulation of miR-34a before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury • Apoptosis might be an early event in mouse heart during doxorubicin treatment. • Expression of miR-150 declined before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury.

  13. A novel two-hit rodent model of postoperative acute lung injury: priming the immune system leads to an exaggerated injury after pneumonectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert G; Ndunge, Oscar B A; Naidu, Babu

    2013-06-01

    Postoperative acute lung injury (PALI) is a rare, poorly understood, usually fatal condition, accounting for the majority of deaths following lung resection. Its low frequency and unpredictable development make the identification of the mechanisms of injury from clinical studies alone almost impossible. Multiple validated 'two-hit models' exist for ALI secondary to other causes. We describe a novel rodent 'two-hit' model of PALI: a low-grade immune stimulus, such as sepsis, greatly aggravates the injury in the remaining lung observed following pneumonectomy. Under general anaesthesia, rats received either low-dose intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (IT-LPS) challenge (10 μg for 1 h) followed by left posterolateral thoracotomy, one-lung ventilation (OLV), pneumonectomy and 3 h of ventilation; 500 μl IT 0.9% saline followed by the same surgery or IT-LPS followed by sham surgery and ventilation. All other conditions were constant. Lung injury is heralded by neutrophil accumulation, which was determined by right lung bronchoalveolar lavage cell count. Data are presented as mean ± standard error of the mean. The T-test was used to compare normally distributed groups with correction for multiple comparisons. A dose-response curve identified the clinically relevant 'low dose' of LPS to be used in further studies. Ventilatory parameters were standardized to reflect clinical practice (volume-control, tidal volume of 6 ml/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure of 2 cmH2O, maximum airway pressure of model with retest validity. OLV and pneumonectomy alone produced a small lung injury (65.1 ± 5), as did 10 µg intratracheal LPS alone (50.7 ± 6.9). However, when OLV, pneumonectomy and 10 µg LPS were combined, an exaggerated injury occurred (161.4 ± 10.3), P = 0.007. Early results show that a two-hit model of PALI is viable and that sepsis aggravates the response to pneumonectomy. The model is now being further characterized. Once established, this model will offer the chance

  14. The Use of a Vehicle Acceleration Exposure Limit Model and a Finite Element Crash Test Dummy Model to Evaluate the Risk of Injuries During Orion Crew Module Landings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Charles; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Tabiei, Ala; Brinkley, James W.; Shemwell, David M.

    2008-01-01

    A review of astronaut whole body impact tolerance is discussed for land or water landings of the next generation manned space capsule named Orion. LS-DYNA simulations of Orion capsule landings are performed to produce a low, moderate, and high probability of injury. The paper evaluates finite element (FE) seat and occupant simulations for assessing injury risk for the Orion crew and compares these simulations to whole body injury models commonly referred to as the Brinkley criteria. The FE seat and crash dummy models allow for varying the occupant restraint systems, cushion materials, side constraints, flailing of limbs, and detailed seat/occupant interactions to minimize landing injuries to the crew. The FE crash test dummies used in conjunction with the Brinkley criteria provides a useful set of tools for predicting potential crew injuries during vehicle landings.

  15. Ductular and proliferative response of esophageal submucosal glands in a porcine model of esophageal injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Leandi; Gonzalez, Liara M; Pridgen, Tiffany A; McCall, Shannon J; von Furstenberg, Richard J; Harnden, Ivan; Carnighan, Gwendolyn E; Cox, Abigail M; Blikslager, Anthony T; Garman, Katherine S

    2017-09-01

    Esophageal injury is a risk factor for diseases such as Barrett's esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma. To improve understanding of signaling pathways associated with both normal and abnormal repair, animal models are needed. Traditional rodent models of esophageal repair are limited by the absence of esophageal submucosal glands (ESMGs), which are present in the human esophagus. Previously, we identified acinar ductal metaplasia in human ESMGs in association with both esophageal injury and cancer. In addition, the SOX9 transcription factor has been associated with generation of columnar epithelium and the pathogenesis of BE and is present in ESMGs. To test our hypothesis that ESMGs activate after esophageal injury with an increase in proliferation, generation of a ductal phenotype, and expression of SOX9, we developed a porcine model of esophageal injury and repair using radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The porcine esophagus contains ESMGs, and RFA produces a consistent and reproducible mucosal injury in the esophagus. Here we present a temporal assessment of this model of esophageal repair. Porcine esophagus was evaluated at 0, 6, 18, 24, 48, and 72 h and 5 and 7 days following RFA and compared with control uninjured esophagus. Following RFA, ESMGs demonstrated an increase in ductal phenotype, echoing our prior studies in humans. Proliferation increased in both squamous epithelium and ESMGs postinjury with a prominent population of SOX9-positive cells in ESMGs postinjury. This model promises to be useful in future experiments evaluating mechanisms of esophageal repair. NEW & NOTEWORTHY A novel porcine model of injury and repair using radiofrequency ablation has been developed, allowing for reproducible injury to the esophagus to study repair in an animal model with esophageal submucosal glands, a key anatomical feature and missing in rodent models but possibly harboring progenitor cells. There is a strong translational component to this porcine model given

  16. Sequential Structural and Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Balloon-Expandable Coronary Stents: A Multivariable Statistical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David; Boyle, Fergal

    2015-09-01

    Several clinical studies have identified a strong correlation between neointimal hyperplasia following coronary stent deployment and both stent-induced arterial injury and altered vessel hemodynamics. As such, the sequential structural and fluid dynamics analysis of balloon-expandable stent deployment should provide a comprehensive indication of stent performance. Despite this observation, very few numerical studies of balloon-expandable coronary stents have considered both the mechanical and hemodynamic impact of stent deployment. Furthermore, in the few studies that have considered both phenomena, only a small number of stents have been considered. In this study, a sequential structural and fluid dynamics analysis methodology was employed to compare both the mechanical and hemodynamic impact of six balloon-expandable coronary stents. To investigate the relationship between stent design and performance, several common stent design properties were then identified and the dependence between these properties and both the mechanical and hemodynamic variables of interest was evaluated using statistical measures of correlation. Following the completion of the numerical analyses, stent strut thickness was identified as the only common design property that demonstrated a strong dependence with either the mean equivalent stress predicted in the artery wall or the mean relative residence time predicted on the luminal surface of the artery. These results corroborate the findings of the large-scale ISAR-STEREO clinical studies and highlight the crucial role of strut thickness in coronary stent design. The sequential structural and fluid dynamics analysis methodology and the multivariable statistical treatment of the results described in this study should prove useful in the design of future balloon-expandable coronary stents.

  17. Quantitative angiographic comparison of elastic recoil after coronary excimer laser-assisted balloon angioplasty and balloon angioplasty alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikwerda, S; van Swijndregt, E M; Melkert, R; Serruys, P W

    1995-02-01

    Coronary lumen changes during and after excimer laser-assisted balloon angioplasty were measured by quantitative coronary angiography, and the results were compared with the effects of balloon angioplasty alone. Reduction of atherosclerotic tissue mass by laser ablation in the treatment of coronary artery disease may be more effective in enlarging the lumen than balloon angioplasty alone. A series of 57 consecutive coronary lesions successfully treated by xenon chloride excimer laser-assisted balloon angioplasty were individually matched with 57 coronary artery lesions successfully treated by balloon angioplasty alone. The following variables were measured by quantitative coronary analysis: 1) ablation by laser, 2) stretch by balloon dilation, 3) elastic recoil, and 4) acute gain. Matching by stenosis location, reference diameter and minimal lumen diameter resulted in two comparable groups of 57 lesions with identical baseline stenosis characteristics. Minimal lumen diameter before excimer laser-assisted balloon angioplasty and balloon angioplasty alone were (mean +/- SD) 0.73 +/- 0.44 and 0.74 +/- 0.43 mm, respectively. Laser ablation significantly improved minimal lumen diameter by 0.56 +/- 0.44 mm before adjunctive balloon dilation. In both treatment groups, similar-sized balloon catheters (2.59 +/- 0.35 and 2.56 +/- 0.40 mm, respectively) were used. After laser-assisted balloon angioplasty, elastic recoil was 0.84 +/- 0.30 mm (32% of balloon size), which was identical to that after balloon angioplasty alone, namely, 0.82 +/- 0.32 mm (32%). Consequently, both interventions resulted in similar acute gains of 1.02 +/- 0.52 and 1.00 +/- 0.56 mm, respectively. Minimal lumen diameter after intervention was equal in both groups: 1.75 +/- 0.35 and 1.75 +/- 0.34 mm, respectively. The statistical power of this study in which a 25% difference in elastic recoil (0.2 mm) between groups was considered clinically important was 95%. In matched groups of successfully treated

  18. Rat monocytes in a model of combined injury express the OX8 antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaffenberger, W.; Gruber, D.F.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1987-09-01

    We have analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cell preparations from a rat model of combined injury (CI) (whole-body irradiation (500 cGy /sup 60/Co) followed by a thermal injury (20% body surface area, dorsal, scald burn)) for the expression of OX8 antigens. Ficoll-separated mononuclear fractions were labeled with monoclonal antibodies MRC OX8, MRC OX19, W3/13 HLK, or W3/25 for flow cytometric analysis. Combined-injury trauma resulted in decreased mononuclear cells to 6% of normal. This effect was due to the rapid decrease in radiosensitive lymphocytes from 83% to 10%. The relative numbers of monocytes increased from a normal 13% to 70% at day 4 after CI. Labeling of cells with OX8 after CI shifted to a population which was significantly larger in volume than normal lymphocytes. At the same time the mean fluorescence intensity of OX8-positive cells was considerably reduced. With the use of a F(ab) fragment of OX8 as a probe, these results could be partially explained as unspecific binding of the whole molecule of OX8 to Fc receptors expressed by activated monocytes. But, double-labeling and cell-sorting experiments also revealed the expression of OX8 antigens by a subset of OX8+/OX19- monocytes after CI.

  19. Structural plasticity in the dentate gyrus- revisiting a classic injury model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia V. Perederiy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The adult brain is in a continuous state of remodeling. This is nowhere more true than in the dentate gyrus, where competing forces such as neurodegeneration and neurogenesis dynamically modify neuronal connectivity, and can occur simultaneously. This plasticity of the adult nervous system is particularly important in the context of traumatic brain injury or deafferentation. In this review, we summarize a classic injury model, lesioning of the perforant path, which removes the main extrahippocampal input to the dentate gyrus. Early studies revealed that in response to deafferentation, axons of remaining fiber systems and dendrites of mature granule cells undergo lamina-specific changes, providing one of the first examples of structural plasticity in the adult brain. Given the increasing role of adult-generated new neurons in the function of the dentate gyrus, we also compare the response of newborn and mature granule cells following lesioning of the perforant path. These studies provide insights not only to plasticity in the dentate gyrus, but also to the response of neural circuits to brain injury.

  20. Thermal injury of skin and subcutaneous tissues: A review of experimental approaches and numerical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hanglin; De, Suvranu

    2017-08-01

    Thermal injury to skin and subcutaneous tissue is common in both civilian and combat scenarios. Understanding the change in tissue morphologies and properties and the underlying mechanisms of thermal injury are of vital importance to clinical determination of the degree of burn and treatment approach. This review aims at summarizing the research involving experimental and numerical studies of skin and subcutaneous tissue subjected to thermal injury. The review consists of two parts. The first part deals with experimental studies including burn protocols and prevailing imaging approaches. The second part deals with existing numerical models for burns of tissue and related computational simulations. Based on this review, we conclude that though there is literature contributing to the knowledge of the pathology and pathogenesis of tissue burn, there is scant quantitative information regarding changes in tissue properties including mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties as a result of burns that are linked to altered tissue morphology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Thymoquinone protects end organs from abdominal aorta ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Mehmet Salih; Kocarslan, Aydemir; Kocarslan, Sezen; Kucuk, Ahmet; Eser, İrfan; Sezen, Hatice; Buyukfirat, Evren; Hazar, Abdussemet

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that thymoquinone has protective effects against ischemia reperfusion injury to various organs like lungs, kidneys and liver in different experimental models. We aimed to determine whether thymoquinone has favorable effects on lung, renal, heart tissues and oxidative stress in abdominal aorta ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thirty rats were divided into three groups as sham (n=10), control (n=10) and thymoquinone (TQ) treatment group (n=10). Control and TQ-treatment groups underwent abdominal aorta ischemia for 45 minutes followed by a 120-min period of reperfusion. In the TQ-treatment group, thymoquinone was given 5 minutes. before reperfusion at a dose of 20 mg/kg via an intraperitoneal route. Total antioxidant capacity, total oxidative status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) in blood serum were measured and lung, kidney, and heart tissue histopathology were evaluated with light microscopy. Total oxidative status and oxidative stress index activity in blood samples were statistically higher in the control group compared to the sham and TQ-treatment groups (POSI). Control group injury scores were statistically higher compared to sham and TQ-treatment groups (Pmodel.

  2. Estimating Memory Deterioration Rates Following Neurodegeneration and Traumatic Brain Injuries in a Hopfield Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Weber

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injuries (TBI are among the main causes of cognitive dysfunction in humans. At a neuronal network level, they both extensively exhibit focal axonal swellings (FAS, which in turn, compromise the information encoded in spike trains and lead to potentially severe functional deficits. There are currently no satisfactory quantitative predictors of decline in memory-encoding neuronal networks based on the impact and statistics of FAS. Some of the challenges of this translational approach include our inability to access small scale injuries with non-invasive methods, the overall complexity of neuronal pathologies, and our limited knowledge of how networks process biological signals. The purpose of this computational study is three-fold: (i to extend Hopfield's model for associative memory to account for the effects of FAS, (ii to calibrate FAS parameters from biophysical observations of their statistical distribution and size, and (iii to systematically evaluate deterioration rates for different memory-recall tasks as a function of FAS injury. We calculate deterioration rates for a face-recognition task to account for highly correlated memories and also for a discrimination task of random, uncorrelated memories with a size at the capacity limit of the Hopfield network. While it is expected that the performance of any injured network should decrease with injury, our results link, for the first time, the memory recall ability to observed FAS statistics. This allows for plausible estimates of cognitive decline for different stages of brain disorders within neuronal networks, bridging experimental observations following neurodegeneration and TBI with compromised memory recall. The work lends new insights to help close the gap between theory and experiment on how biological signals are processed in damaged, high-dimensional functional networks, and towards positing new diagnostic tools to measure cognitive

  3. Estimating Memory Deterioration Rates Following Neurodegeneration and Traumatic Brain Injuries in a Hopfield Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Melanie; Maia, Pedro D.; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are among the main causes of cognitive dysfunction in humans. At a neuronal network level, they both extensively exhibit focal axonal swellings (FAS), which in turn, compromise the information encoded in spike trains and lead to potentially severe functional deficits. There are currently no satisfactory quantitative predictors of decline in memory-encoding neuronal networks based on the impact and statistics of FAS. Some of the challenges of this translational approach include our inability to access small scale injuries with non-invasive methods, the overall complexity of neuronal pathologies, and our limited knowledge of how networks process biological signals. The purpose of this computational study is three-fold: (i) to extend Hopfield's model for associative memory to account for the effects of FAS, (ii) to calibrate FAS parameters from biophysical observations of their statistical distribution and size, and (iii) to systematically evaluate deterioration rates for different memory-recall tasks as a function of FAS injury. We calculate deterioration rates for a face-recognition task to account for highly correlated memories and also for a discrimination task of random, uncorrelated memories with a size at the capacity limit of the Hopfield network. While it is expected that the performance of any injured network should decrease with injury, our results link, for the first time, the memory recall ability to observed FAS statistics. This allows for plausible estimates of cognitive decline for different stages of brain disorders within neuronal networks, bridging experimental observations following neurodegeneration and TBI with compromised memory recall. The work lends new insights to help close the gap between theory and experiment on how biological signals are processed in damaged, high-dimensional functional networks, and towards positing new diagnostic tools to measure cognitive deficits. PMID

  4. Eccentric Contraction-Induced Muscle Injury: Reproducible, Quantitative, Physiological Models to Impair Skeletal Muscle’s Capacity to Generate Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Jarrod A.; Lowe, Dawn A.

    2018-01-01

    In order to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of muscle regeneration an experimental injury model is required. Advantages of eccentric contraction-induced injury are that it is a controllable, reproducible, and physiologically relevant model to cause muscle injury, with injury being defined as a loss of force generating capacity. While eccentric contractions can be incorporated into conscious animal study designs such as downhill treadmill running, electrophysiological approaches to elicit eccentric contractions and examine muscle contractility, for example before and after the injurious eccentric contractions, allows researchers to circumvent common issues in determining muscle function in a conscious animal (e.g., unwillingness to participate). Herein, we describe in vitro and in vivo methods that are reliable, repeatable, and truly maximal because the muscle contractions are evoked in a controlled, quantifiable manner independent of subject motivation. Both methods can be used to initiate eccentric contraction-induced injury and are suitable for monitoring functional muscle regeneration hours to days to weeks post-injury. PMID:27492161

  5. Eccentric Contraction-Induced Muscle Injury: Reproducible, Quantitative, Physiological Models to Impair Skeletal Muscle's Capacity to Generate Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Jarrod A; Lowe, Dawn A

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of muscle regeneration an experimental injury model is required. Advantages of eccentric contraction-induced injury are that it is a controllable, reproducible, and physiologically relevant model to cause muscle injury, with injury being defined as a loss of force generating capacity. While eccentric contractions can be incorporated into conscious animal study designs such as downhill treadmill running, electrophysiological approaches to elicit eccentric contractions and examine muscle contractility, for example before and after the injurious eccentric contractions, allows researchers to circumvent common issues in determining muscle function in a conscious animal (e.g., unwillingness to participate). Herein, we describe in vitro and in vivo methods that are reliable, repeatable, and truly maximal because the muscle contractions are evoked in a controlled, quantifiable manner independent of subject motivation. Both methods can be used to initiate eccentric contraction-induced injury and are suitable for monitoring functional muscle regeneration hours to days to weeks post-injury.

  6. Planetary Science with Balloon-Borne Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremic, Tibor; Cheng, Andy; Hibbitts, Karl; Young, Eliot

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the planetary science community have recently been exploring the potential contributions of stratospheric balloons to the planetary science field. A study that was recently concluded explored the roughly 200 or so science questions raised in the Planetary Decadal Survey report and found that about 45 of those questions are suited to stratospheric balloon based observations. In September of 2014, a stratospheric balloon mission called BOPPS (which stands for Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science) was flown out of Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The mission had two main objectives, first, to observe a number of planetary targets including one or more Oort cloud comets and second, to demonstrate the applicability and performance of the platform, instruments, and subsystems for making scientific measurements in support planetary science objectives. BOPPS carried two science instruments, BIRC and UVVis. BIRC is a cryogenic infrared multispectral imager which can image in the.6-5 m range using an HgCdTe detector. Narrow band filters were used to allow detection of water and CO2 emission features of the observed targets. The UVVis is an imager with the science range of 300 to 600 nm. A main feature of the UVVis instrument is the incorporation of a guide camera and a Fine Steering Mirror (FSM) system to reduce image jitter to less than 100 milliarcseconds. The BIRC instrument was used to image targets including Oort cloud comets Siding Spring and Jacques, and the dwarf planet 1 Ceres. BOPPS achieved the first ever earth based CO2 observation of a comet and the first images of water and CO2 of an Oort cloud comet (Jacques). It also made the first ever measurement of 1Ceres at 2.73 m to refine the shape of the infrared water absorption feature on that body. The UVVis instrument, mounted on its own optics bench, demonstrated the capability for image correction both from atmospheric disturbances as well as some

  7. Validation of Finite Element Crash Test Dummy Models for Predicting Orion Crew Member Injuries During a Simulated Vehicle Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabiei, Al; Lawrence, Charles; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2009-01-01

    A series of crash tests were conducted with dummies during simulated Orion crew module landings at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. These tests consisted of several crew configurations with and without astronaut suits. Some test results were collected and are presented. In addition, finite element models of the tests were developed and are presented. The finite element models were validated using the experimental data, and the test responses were compared with the computed results. Occupant crash data, such as forces, moments, and accelerations, were collected from the simulations and compared with injury criteria to assess occupant survivability and injury. Some of the injury criteria published in the literature is summarized for completeness. These criteria were used to determine potential injury during crew impact events.

  8. Pneumothorax, music and balloons: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiferaw Dejene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe two cases of spontaneous pneumothorax in young healthy adults with no underlying structural lung disease. The onset of pneumothorax was following physical activity including playing musical instruments and blowing of balloons. There is sparse data evaluating the pathophysiology of primary spontaneous pneumothorax in relation to increased mouth pressures. These cases highlight the possible physical effect of valsalva manoeuvre on transpulmonary pressures, and the potential risk of developing pneumothorax in otherwise healthy individuals. This aspect of pneumothorax development is worthy of further exploration, to better elucidate the mechanism and enhance our understanding of this common respiratory presentation.

  9. Retrograde transurethral balloon dilation of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, F.; Reddy, P.; Wasserman, N.F.; Lund, G.; Hulbert, J.; Hunter, D.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    A series of patients with documented benign prostatic hypertrophy evaluated by urodynamic studies, voiding cystourethrography, retrograde urethrography, and MR imaging underwent dilation performed using a retrograde transurethral approach with 25-mm balloon dilators inflated at a pressure of 3-4 atm for 10 minutes. Immediately after the procedure, retrograde and voiding cystourethrography as well as MR imaging were performed. A Foley catheter was left in place for 24 hours. Complete relief of symptoms has occurred in all of the patients during the follow-up period. No significant complications other than transient hematuria resulted from the procedure. Results of the comparison studies and of MR imaging are discussed

  10. Modeling community integration in workers with delayed recovery from mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollayeva, T.; Shapiro, C. M.; Mollayeva, S.

    2015-01-01

    -related, and clinical variables. In the multivariable regression analysis, several covariates accounted for 36.4 % of the CIQ variance in the final fully adjusted model. Discussion: This study evaluated CI in workers with mTBI, and analyzed its associated variables. Analysis revealed insomnia, head or neck pain, being...... married or in a relationship, time since injury, and a diagnosis of possible/probable malingering were independently associated with limited CI. Conclusions: Workers with delayed recovery from mTBI experience difficulty with CI. Insomnia is a particularly relevant covariate, explaining the greater part...

  11. Initial Results from the ANITA 2006-2007 Balloon Flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorham, P.W.; /Hawaii U.; Allison, P.; /Hawaii U.; Barwick, S.W.; /UC, Irvine; Beatty, J.J.; /Ohio State U.; Besson, D.Z.; /Kansas U.; Binns, W.R.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Chen, C.; /SLAC; Chen, P.; /SLAC; Clem, J.M.; /Delaware U.; Connolly, A.; /University Coll. London; Dowkontt, P.F.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DuVernois, M.A.; /Minnesota U.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC; Goldstein, D.; /UC, Irvine; Goodhue, A.; /UCLA; Hast, C.; /SLAC; Hebert, C.L.; /Hawaii U.; Hoover, S.; /UCLA; Israel, M.H.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Kowalski, J.; /Hawaii U.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /UC, Irvine

    2011-11-16

    We report initial results of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos. ANITA flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses that might be due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. In our initial high-threshold robust analysis, no neutrino candidates are seen, with no physics background. In a non-signal horizontal-polarization channel, we do detect 6 events consistent with radio impulses from extensive air showers, which helps to validate the effectiveness of our method. Upper limits derived from our analysis now begin to eliminate the highest cosmogenic neutrino models.

  12. Pseudo-MHD ballooning modes in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1996-08-01

    The MHD description of a plasma is extended to allow electrons to have both fluid-like and adiabatic-regime responses within an instability eigenmode. In the resultant open-quotes pseudo-MHDclose quotes model, magnetic field line bending is reduced in the adiabatic electron regime. This makes possible a new class of ballooning-type, long parallel extent, MHD-like instabilities in tokamak plasmas for α > s 2 (2 7/3 /9) (r p /R 0 ) or-d√Β/dr > (2 1/6 /3)(s/ R 0q ), which is well below the ideal-MHD stability boundary. The marginally stable pressure profile is similar in both magnitude and shape to that observed in ohmically heated tokamak plasmas

  13. Endoscopic Papillary Balloon Dilation with Large Balloon after Limited Sphincterotomy for Retrieval of Choledocholithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Seungmin; Kim, Myoung Hwan; Park, Jeong Youp; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young

    2006-01-01

    Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation (EBD) for choledocholithiasis is known to be comparable to endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) especially in cases of small stones. With larger stones, EBD with conventional balloon, which have a diameter of 6-8 mm, was reported as less effective for extraction of stones. We evaluated the efficacy and complications of EBD with large balloons (10-15 mm) after limited EST for retrieval of choledocholithiasis. From February 2005, we have performed EBD with limited EST for retrieval of common bile duct (CBD) stones. The patients who admitted with hyperamylasemia and gallstone pancreatitis were excluded. In cases without CBD dilation, EPBD with 12 mm for 40 seconds was performed. And in cases with CBD dilation, we dilated the sphincters with 15 mm sized balloon for 40 seconds. Total 22 patients (11 of male) were performed EBD with limited EST for retrieval of CBD stones. The median diameter of the stones was 10 mm (5-25 mm). Ten cases had multiple stones and 6 cases periampullary diverticuli. Successful stone removal in the initial session of ERCP with EBD was accomplished in 16 patients (72.7%). And complete retrieval of bile duct stones was achieved in all patients with repeated ERCP. In the aspect of complications, any episodes of perforation, bleeding was not developed. Only one case of mild grade of post-procedural pancreatitis was noted. However, post-procedural hyperamylasemia was developed in 16 cases (68.2%). EBD with larger balloon seems to be a feasible and safe alternative technique for conventional EST in CBD stone extraction. PMID:17191309

  14. Simultaneous stent expansion/balloon deflation technique to salvage failed balloon remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Travis R; He, Lucy; Davis, Brandon J; Froehler, Michael T; Mocco, J

    2016-04-01

    Herniation, with possible embolization, of coils into the parent vessel following aneurysm coiling remains a frequent challenge. For this reason, balloon or stent assisted embolization remains an important technique. Despite the use of balloon remodeling, there are occasions where, on deflation of the balloon, some coils, or even the entire coil mass, may migrate. We report the successful use of a simultaneous adjacent stent deployment bailout technique in order to salvage coil prolapse during balloon remodeling in three patients. Case No 1 was a wide neck left internal carotid artery bifurcation aneurysm, measuring 9 mm×7.9 mm×6 mm with a 5 mm neck. Case No 2 was a complex left superior hypophyseal artery aneurysm, measuring 5.3 mm×4 mm×5 mm with a 2.9 mm neck. Case No 3 was a ruptured right posterior communicating artery aneurysm, measuring 4 mm×4 mm×4.5 mm with a 4 mm neck. This technique successfully returned the prolapsed coil mass into the aneurysm sac in all cases without procedural complications. The closed cell design of the Enterprise VRD (Codman and Shurtleff Inc, Raynham, Massachusetts, USA) makes it ideal for this bailout technique, by allowing the use of an 0.021 inch delivery catheter (necessary for simultaneous access) and by avoiding the possibility of an open cell strut getting caught on the deflated balloon. We hope this technique will prove useful to readers who may find themselves in a similar predicament. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. DJ-1 based peptide, ND-13, promote functional recovery in mouse model of focal ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molcho, Lior; Ben-Zur, Tali; Barhum, Yael; Offen, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide and inflicts serious long-term damage and disability. The vasoconstrictor Endothelin-1, presenting long-term neurological deficits associated with excitotoxicity and oxidative stress is being increasingly used to induce focal ischemic injury as a model of stroke. A DJ-1 based peptide named ND-13 was shown to protect against glutamate toxicity, neurotoxic insults and oxidative stress in various animal models. Here we focus on the benefits of treatment with ND-13 on the functional outcome of focal ischemic injury. Wild type C57BL/6 mice treated with ND-13, after ischemic induction in this model, showed significant improvement in motor function, including improved body balance and motor coordination, and decreased motor asymmetry. We found that DJ-1 knockout mice are more sensitive to Endothelin-1 ischemic insult than wild type mice, contributing thereby additional evidence to the widely reported relevance of DJ-1 in neuroprotection. Furthermore, treatment of DJ-1 knockout mice with ND-13, following Endothelin-1 induced ischemia, resulted in significant improvement in motor functions, suggesting that ND-13 provides compensation for DJ-1 deficits. These preliminary results demonstrate a possible basis for clinical application of the ND-13 peptide to enhance neuroprotection in stroke patients.

  16. Antifibrotic Effect of Lactulose on a Methotrexate-Induced Liver Injury Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Taskin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The most severe side effect of prolonged MTX treatment is hepatotoxicity. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of lactulose treatment on MTX-induced hepatotoxicity in a rat model. Twenty-four male rats were included in the study. Sixteen rats were given a single dose of 20 mg/kg MTX to induce liver injury. Eight rats were given no drugs. 16 MTX-given rats were divided into two equal groups. Group 1 subjects were given lactulose 5 g/kg/day, and group 2 subjects were given saline 1 ml/kg/day for 10 days. The rats were then sacrificed to harvest blood and liver tissue samples in order to determine blood and tissue MDA, serum ALT, plasma TNF-α, TGF-β, and PTX3 levels. Histological specimens were examined via light microscopy. Exposure to MTX caused structural and functional hepatotoxicity, as evidenced by relatively worse histopathological scores and increased biochemical marker levels. Lactulose treatment significantly reduced the liver enzyme ALT, plasma TNF-α, TGF-β, PTX3, and MDA levels and also decreased histological changes in the liver tissue with MTX-induced hepatotoxicity in the rat model. We suggest that lactulose has anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects on an MTX-induced liver injury model. These effects can be due to the impact of intestinal microbiome.

  17. Predicting motorcycle crash injury severity using weather data and alternative Bayesian multivariate crash frequency models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen; Gill, Gurdiljot Singh; Sakrani, Taha; Dasu, Mohan; Zhou, Jiao

    2017-11-01

    Motorcycle crashes constitute a very high proportion of the overall motor vehicle fatalities in the United States, and many studies have examined the influential factors under various conditions. However, research on the impact of weather conditions on the motorcycle crash severity is not well documented. In this study, we examined the impact of weather conditions on motorcycle crash injuries at four different severity levels using San Francisco motorcycle crash injury data. Five models were developed using Full Bayesian formulation accounting for different correlations commonly seen in crash data and then compared for fitness and performance. Results indicate that the models with serial and severity variations of parameters had superior fit, and the capability of accurate crash prediction. The inferences from the parameter estimates from the five models were: an increase in the air temperature reduced the possibility of a fatal crash but had a reverse impact on crashes of other severity levels; humidity in air was not observed to have a predictable or strong impact on crashes; the occurrence of rainfall decreased the possibility of crashes for all severity levels. Transportation agencies might benefit from the research results to improve road safety by providing motorcyclists with information regarding the risk of certain crash severity levels for special weather conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Premedication with meloxicam exacerbates intracranial hemorrhage in an immature swine model of non-impact inertial head injury

    OpenAIRE

    Friess, SH; Naim, MY; Kilbaugh, TJ; Ralston, J; Margulies, SS

    2012-01-01

    Meloxicam is a cyclo-oxgenase-2 preferential non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug with very effective analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in swine. Previous reports in piglets have demonstrated that meloxicam also inhibits cyclo-oxgenase-1 and reduces production of thromboxane significantly. We use pre-injury analgesia in our immature swine (3–5 day old piglets) model of brain injury using rapid head rotations without impact. In 23 consecutive subjects we found that premedication with melox...

  19. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation of the Inflation Test of Latex Balloons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Bustos

    Full Text Available Abstract Experiments and modeling aimed at assessing the mechanical response of latex balloons in the inflation test are presented. To this end, the hyperelastic Yeoh material model is firstly characterized via tensile test and, then, used to numerically simulate via finite elements the stress-strain evolution during the inflation test. The numerical pressure-displacement curves are validated with those obtained experimentally. Moreover, this analysis is extended to a biomedical problem of an eyeball under glaucoma conditions.

  20. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation of the Inflation Test of Latex Balloons

    OpenAIRE

    Bustos, Claudio; Herrera, Claudio García; Celentano, Diego; Chen, Daming; Cruchaga, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Experiments and modeling aimed at assessing the mechanical response of latex balloons in the inflation test are presented. To this end, the hyperelastic Yeoh material model is firstly characterized via tensile test and, then, used to numerically simulate via finite elements the stress-strain evolution during the inflation test. The numerical pressure-displacement curves are validated with those obtained experimentally. Moreover, this analysis is extended to a biomedical problem of an...

  1. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, Laura A; Franzi, Lisa M; Linderholm, Angela L; Last, Jerold A; Adams, Jason Y; Harper, Richart W; Kenyon, Nicholas J

    2017-01-01

    Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation. 5-12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85) were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg) or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg) with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers. Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation. Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours) and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs). Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points. Dynamic compliance can be used guide the frequency

  2. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Cagle

    Full Text Available Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury.To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation.5-12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85 were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers.Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation.Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points. Dynamic compliance can be used guide

  3. The Evaluation of Endoscopic Balloon Dilation Treatment for

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokri-Shirvani Javad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Balloon dilatation of stricture is one of the new treatment methods among patients with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO. However, the prevalence and underlying etiologies of GOO in various populations are different. The goal of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of endoscopic balloon dilatation and factors that would affect its success rate patients with benign etiology for GOO. Forty-five patients with the symptoms of benign GOO were randomly selected. Gastric outlet was delineated using double channel videoendoscopy. The information of initial balloon dilation was collected from recorded files. Balloon dilatation was repeated during the mean follow up of 9.9 ± 5.8 months. The severity of gastric pain was measured immediately before balloon dilatation and one month after procedure and was rated on a 10 cm visual analogue scale. The mean age of patients was 43.7 ± 18.1 years and 86.7% of them were men. Furthermore, 71.1% were H pylori positive. Response rate to endoscopic balloon dilatation was 80% and 8 patients underwent surgical resection. Weight loss was more frequent in non-responding group. The pain severity was significantly reduced more in responding subjects. No meaningful relationships were found between the responses to balloon dilatation and positive H pylori and cigarette smoking. Endoscopic balloon dilation is safe and effective for most patients with benign gastric outlet obstruction and has favorable long-term outcome.

  4. The Balloon Foot ; A Rare Presentation Of Congenital Constricting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case of a rare manifestation of congenital constricting annular band (CAB) in the lower extremity resulting in a severe excessive swelling of the foot which we have termed Balloon foot. The ballooned foot is caused by a progressive deepening of the circumferential constriction into the soft tissue of the lower ...

  5. Scientific ballooning in the 20 th century; a historical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, J.

    Hess discovered the cosmic rays in 1912. Using a manned balloon, he found the altitude variation of the radiation. After this discovery, many balloon experiments were performed to explore the most mysterious radiation coming from outside of the earth during the 1920's to the 1930's. At the end of the 1940's, balloon systems were revolutionized by the use of new plastic films and telemetry systems. At almost the same time, highly sensitive nuclear emulsions were developed. Balloon exposures of emulsions brought us new discoveries of the heavy primaries in cosmic rays. Extensive studies with nuclear emulsions discovered high-energy phenomena and new particles between the end of 1940's to the 1960's. At the same time, in various countries, experiments with more sophisticated electronic devices were begun together with ingenious work on balloon technology. Inventions were made in the areas of designing, manufacturing, materials, telemetry systems for balloons and long duration flight systems etc. Several permanent launching stations were established in various countries in the 1960's Here, I review the development of essential technologies in scientific ballooning, and their value in contributing to the growth of space physics. As the future prospect, I stress the point that scientific ballooning is indispensable and a most cost-effective way to explore space astrophysics and Earth science, in addition to the preparation of satellite and the space station experiments.

  6. Coronary artery angioplasty with a helical autoperfusion balloon catheter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurbel, PA; Anderson, RD; vanBoven, AJ; denHeijer, P

    The initial in-hospital and long-term clinical experience with a helical autoperfusion balloon catheter in the treatment of coronary artery disease is reported, This new catheter design allows blood to flow passively around the inflated balloon through a protected helical channel molded into the

  7. External caps: An approach to stress reduction in balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlewood, K. H.

    Recent findings of the catastrophic balloon failures investigation in the U.S.A. indicate that very large gross inflations, in balloons using present design philosophy, over-stress currently available materials. External caps are proposed as an economic approach to reducting those stresses to an acceptable level.

  8. Evaluation of adenosine preconditioning with 99mTc-His10-annexin V in a porcine model of myocardium ischemia and reperfusion injury: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Fei; Fang Wei; Wang Feng; Hua Zichun; Wang Zizheng; Yang Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of 99m Tc-His 10 -annexin V for the detection of acute myocardial cell death and to assess the effect of adenosine preconditioning in a porcine model of myocardium ischemia and reperfusion injury (RI). Materials and Methods: 99m Tc-His 10 -annexin V was prepared by one-step direct labeling, and RCP and radiostability were tested. The binding of 99m Tc-His 10 -annexin V to apoptosis was validated in vitro using camptothecin-induced Jurkat cells. In vivo biodistribution was determined in mice by the dissection method. Ischemia of 20-30 min was induced by balloon occlusion of the epicardial coronary artery of the porcine model (n=14). Adenosine was infused intravenously in six pigs before coronary occlusion. 99m Tc-His 10 -annexin V (n=12) was injected intravenously at 1 h after reperfusion. SPECT/CT was acquired at 3 h postinjection. Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with 99m Tc-MIBI was also performed 1 day after His 10 -annexin V imaging. Cardiac tissues were analyzed postmortem using hematoxylin-and-eosin and TUNEL staining. Caspase-3 activity was measured to confirm the presence of apoptosis. Results: 99m Tc-His 10 -annexin V had a RCP >98% and high stability 2 h after radiolabeling; it could bind to apoptotic cells with high affinity. Biodistribution of 99m Tc-His 10 -annexin V showed a predominant uptake in the kidney and relatively low uptake in the myocardium, liver and gastrointestinal tract; rapid clearance from blood and kidney was observed. In the untreated group, intense uptake of His 10 -annexin V was visualized in the defect which was shown in MPI, whereas in the adenosine group a mild uptake of 99m Tc-His 10 -annexin was found in the risk area which showed no defects in the 99m Tc-MIBI image. TUNEL staining and activated caspase-3 confirmed the ongoing apoptosis in RI. Adenosine preconditioning significantly diminished the level of apoptosis. Uptake of His 10 -annexin V in RI correlated

  9. Assessment of coagulopathy, endothelial injury, and inflammation after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhage in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Rasmussen, Lars S; Jin, Guang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) can be associated with coagulopathy and inflammation, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that a combination of TBI and HS would disturb coagulation, damage the endothelium, and activate inflammatory...... at baseline, 3 minutes and 15 minutes after injury, as well as following 2 hours of hypotension. Markers of coagulation, anticoagulation, endothelial activation/glycocalyx shedding, inflammation, complement, and sympathoadrenal function were measured. RESULTS: The TBI + HS group demonstrated an immediate (3...... inflammation (tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α], 81.1 pg/mL vs. 50.8 pg/mL, p = 0.03) and activation of the protein C system (activated protein C, 56.7 ng/mL vs. 26.1 ng/mL, p = 0.01) were evident following the 2-hour hypotension phase. CONCLUSION: The combination of TBI and shock results in an immediate...

  10. The Accuracy and Applicability of 3D Modeling and Printing Blunt Force Cranial Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Julie; Rogers, Tracy

    2017-08-23

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors affecting the accuracy of 3D models and 3D prints of cranial blunt force trauma, to evaluate the applicability and limitations of modeling such injuries. Three types of cranial blunt force lesions were documented (hinge, depressed, and comminuted) using three forms of surface scanning (laser, structured light scanner, and photogrammetry) at two different quality settings (standard and high). 3D printed models of the lesions were produced using two different materials (a gypsum-like composite powder called VisiJet ® PXL and an acrylic engineered composite plastic called VisiJet ® M3 in crystal colour). The results of these analyzes indicate the prints in this study exhibit some statistically significant differences from the actual bone lesions, but details of the lesions can be reproduced to within 2 mm accuracy. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Quantitative Relationship between Axonal Injury and Mechanical Response in a Rodent Head Impact Acceleration Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A modified Marmarou impact acceleration model was developed to study the mechanical responses induced by this model and their correlation to traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was induced in 31 anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 g) by a custom-made 450-g impactor from heights of 1.25 m or 2.25 m. An accelerometer and angular rate sensor measured the linear and angular responses of the head, while the impact event was captured by a high-speed video camera. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction, as well as across the left and right hemispheres, was determined using β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry, and detailed TAI injury maps were constructed for the entire corpus callosum. Peak linear acceleration 1.25 m and 2.25 m impacts were 666±165 g and 907±501 g, respectively. Peak angular velocities were 95±24 rad/sec and 124±48 rad/sec, respectively. Compared to the 2.25-m group, the observed TAI counts in the 1.25-m impact group were significantly lower. Average linear acceleration, peak angular velocity, average angular acceleration, and surface righting time were also significantly different between the two groups. A positive correlation was observed between normalized total TAI counts and average linear acceleration (R2=0.612, pacceleration response of the rat head during impact, not necessarily the drop height. PMID:21895482

  12. Non-terminal animal model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis induced by acute joint injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, M K; Trumble, T N; Carlson, C S; Groschen, D M; Merritt, K A; Brown, M P

    2013-05-01

    Develop a non-terminal animal model of acute joint injury that demonstrates clinical and morphological evidence of early post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). An osteochondral (OC) fragment was created arthroscopically in one metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint of 11 horses and the contralateral joint was sham operated. Eleven additional horses served as unoperated controls. Every 2 weeks, force plate analysis, flexion response, joint circumference, and synovial effusion scores were recorded. At weeks 0 and 16, radiographs (all horses) and arthroscopic videos (OC injured and sham joints) were graded. At week 16, synovium and cartilage biopsies were taken arthroscopically from OC injured and sham joints for histologic evaluation and the OC fragment was removed. OC fragments were successfully created and horses were free of clinical lameness after fragment removal. Forelimb gait asymmetry was observed at week 2 (P = 0.0012), while joint circumference (P < 0.0001) and effusion scores (P < 0.0001) were increased in injured limbs compared to baseline from weeks 2 to 16. Positive flexion response of injured limbs was noted at multiple time points. Capsular enthesophytes were seen radiographically in injured limbs. Articular cartilage damage was demonstrated arthroscopically as mild wear-lines and histologically as superficial zone chondrocyte death accompanied by mild proliferation. Synovial hyperemia and fibrosis were present at the site of OC injury. Acute OC injury to the MCP joint resulted in clinical, imaging, and histologic changes in cartilage and synovium characteristic of early PTOA. This model will be useful for defining biomarkers of early osteoarthritis and for monitoring response to therapy and surgery. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of sevoflurane on ventilator induced lung injury in a healthy lung experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, A; Moreno, A; García, J; Sánchez, C; Santos, M; García, J

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) causes a systemic inflammatory response in tissues, with an increase in IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α in blood and tissues. Cytoprotective effects of sevoflurane in different experimental models are well known, and this protective effect can also be observed in VILI. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of sevoflurane in VILI. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was designed. Twenty female rats were studied. The animals were mechanically ventilated, without sevoflurane in the control group and sevoflurane 3% in the treated group (SEV group). VILI was induced applying a maximal inspiratory pressure of 35 cmH2O for 20 min without any positive end-expiratory pressure for 20 min (INJURY time). The animals were then ventilated 30 min with a maximal inspiratory pressure of 12 cmH2O and 3 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure (time 30 min POST-INJURY), at which time the animals were euthanized and pathological and biomarkers studies were performed. Heart rate, invasive blood pressure, pH, PaO2, and PaCO2 were recorded. The lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was used as an index of lung edema. No differences were found in the blood gas analysis parameters or heart rate between the 2 groups. Blood pressure was statistically higher in the control group, but still within the normal clinical range. The percentage of pulmonary edema and concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 in lung tissue in the SEV group were lower than in the control group. Sevoflurane attenuates VILI in a previous healthy lung in an experimental subclinical model in rats. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The ballooning of fuel cladding tubes: theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewfelt, R.S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Under some conditions, fuel clad ballooning can result in considerable strain before rupture. If ballooning were to occur during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), the resulting substantial blockage of the sub-channel would restrict emergency core cooling. However, circumferential temperature gradients that would occur during a LOCA may significantly limit the average strain at failure. Understandably, the factors that control ballooning and rupture of fuel clad are required for the analysis of a LOCA. Considerable international effort has been spent on studying the deformation of Zircaloy fuel cladding under conditions that would occur during a LOCA. This effort has established a reasonable understanding of the factors that control the ballooning, failure time, and average failure strain of fuel cladding. In this paper, both the experimental and theoretical studies of the fuel clad ballooning are reviewed. (author)

  15. Acute kidney injury following liver transplantation: a systematic review of published predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caragata, R; Wyssusek, K H; Kruger, P

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent postoperative complication amongst liver transplant recipients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This systematic review analysed the existing predictive models, in order to solidify current understanding. Articles were selected for inclusion if they described the primary development of a clinical prediction model (either an algorithm or risk score) to predict AKI post liver transplantation. The database search yielded a total of seven studies describing the primary development of a prediction model or risk score for the development of AKI following liver transplantation. The models span thirteen years of clinical research and highlight a gradual change in the definitions of AKI, emphasising the need to employ standardised definitions for subsequent studies. Collectively, the models identify a diverse range of predictive factors with several common trends. They emphasise the impact of preoperative renal dysfunction, liver disease severity and aetiology, metabolic risk factors as well as intraoperative variables including measures of haemodynamic instability and graft quality. Although several of the models address postoperative parameters, their utility in predictive modelling seems to be of questionable relevance. The common risk factors identified within this systematic review provide a minimum list of variables, which future studies should address. Research in this area would benefit from prospective, multi-site studies with larger cohorts as well as the subsequent internal and external validation of predictive models. Ultimately, the ability to identify patients at high risk of post-transplant AKI may enable early intervention and perhaps prevention.

  16. THE KISSING BALLOON TECHNIQUE WITH 2 OVER-THE-WIRE BALLOON CATHETERS THROUGH A SINGLE 8-FRENCH GUIDING CATHETER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENHEIJER, P; BERNINK, PJLM; VANDIJK, RB; TWISK, SPM; LIE, KI

    Some of the newer over-the-wire coronary angioplasty catheters have shaft sizes of 3.0 French (F) or less. The inner diameter of modern 8-F guiding catheters is large enough to accommodate two of such balloon catheters. We report a kissing balloon procedure with two over-the-wire catheters through a

  17. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Are Activated in Placental Injury in Rat Model of Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Teng; Yu, Jia; Wang, Wei-Xing; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Chen, Chen; Deng, Wen-Hong; He, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Peng; Shi, Qiao; Guo, Wen-Yi

    2016-07-01

    To establish a rat model of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy (APIP) and evaluate its general presentations, assess placental injury, and discuss possible mechanisms. The APIP rat model was induced by sodium taurocholate in Sprague-Dawley rats of later gestation. Normal and sham-operated (SO) rats in later gestation were set as controls, 3 time points were set in SO and APIP groups to determine optimal modeling time. Histological changes of pancreas and placenta were assessed. Placental injury was determined by immunohistochemistry stain of caspase-3. Serum levels of amylase, lipase, and Ca; proinflammatory cytokines as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; mitogen-activated protein kinases and their phosphorylated forms by Western blotting. Pancreatic necrotizing and placental injury occurred in time-dependent patterns. Serum levels of amylase and lipase significantly increased but Ca decreased; tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 were all increased in the APIP group; c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38, and ERK1/2 were activated but with different distributing patterns in the placenta. Placental injury is involved in the rat model of APIP, and a modeling time of 6 hours is optimal and conducive to further studies; c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 may play important roles in placental injury during APIP.

  18. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  19. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury

  20. Three-dimensional dose-response models of risk for radiation injury carcinogenesis