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Sample records for balapan site sts

  1. Estimation of radioactive contamination of soils from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" technical areas of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evseeva, T; Belykh, E; Geras'kin, S; Majstrenko, T

    2012-07-01

    In spite of the long history of the research, radioactive contamination of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (SNTS) in the Republic of Kazakhstan has not been adequately characterized. Our cartographic investigation has demonstrated highly variable radioactive contamination of the SNTS. The Cs-137, Sr-90, Eu-152, Eu-154, Co-60, and Am-241 activity concentrations in soil samples from the "Balapan" site were 42.6-17646, 96-18250, 1.05-11222, 0.6-4865, 0.23-4893, and 1.2-1037 Bq kg(-1), correspondingly. Cs-137 and Sr-90 activity concentrations in soil samples from the "Experimental field" site were varied from 87 up to 400 and from 94 up to 1000 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Activity concentrations of Co-60, Eu-152, and Eu-154 were lower than the minimum detectable activity of the method used. Concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (K-40, Ra-226, U-238, and Th-232) in the majority of soil samples from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" sites did not exceed typical for surrounding of the SNTS areas levels. Estimation of risks associated with radioactive contamination based on the IAEA clearance levels for a number of key radionuclides in solid materials shows that soils sampled from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" sites might be considered as radioactive wastes. Decrease in specific activity of soil from the sites studied up to safety levels due to Co-60, Cs-137, Sr-90, Eu-152, Eu-154 radioactive decay and Am-241 accumulation-decay will occur not earlier than 100 years. In contrast, soils from the "Experimental field" and the "Balapan" sites (except 0.5-2.5 km distance from the "Chagan" explosion point) cannot be regarded as the radioactive wastes according safety norms valid in Russia and Kazakhstan. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Distribution of Pu isotopes and {sup 137}Cs in and around the former soviet union`s Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi [Kanazawa Univ., Tatsunokuchi, Ishikawa (Japan). Low Level Radioactivity Laboratory; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Tsukatani, Tsuneo; Sekerbaev, A.Kh.; Busev, B.I.

    1999-03-01

    This paper is a report on our survey of residual radioactivity, Pu isotopes and {sup 137}Cs, within and without the territory of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site. Soil samples within the test site were collected at approximately 30 sites along the roads connecting Kurchatov City, ground zero for the first USSR nuclear test, Balapan, Degelen Mountain and Salzhal settlement. Furthermore, outside the test site, the soil was sampled at about 20 sites, including some settlements (Mostik, Dolon, Tchagan, etc.), forest and pasture areas, along the roads from Semipalatinsk City to Kurchatov City and north Korosteli settlement. The contamination levels of long-lived radionuclides, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239,240}Pu as well as {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic ratio in the soil were determined by non-destructive {gamma}-spectrometric method and radiochemical separation followed by {alpha}-spectrometric and/or ICP-MS methods, respectively. The results showed that although {sup 137}Cs was within typical environmental levels except for an areas near ground zero and Balapan, {sup 239,240}Pu was elevated levels contaminated with weapons-grade plutonium in all area we visited. From the stepwise leaching of Pu from the soil, 50-80% of total {sup 239,240}Pu in most samples was found to be tightly incorporated into the soil components which might have been melted at time of detonation. (author)

  3. Tritium in well waters, streams and atomic lakes in the East Kazakhstan Oblast of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Peter I [Department of Experimental Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Vintro, Luis Leon [Department of Experimental Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Omarova, Aigul [Department of Experimental Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Burkitbayev, Mukhambetkali [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Napoles, Humberto Jimenez [Department of Experimental Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Priest, Nicholas D [School of Health and Social Sciences, Middlesex University, Enfield EN3 4SA (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-01

    The concentration of tritium has been determined in well waters, streams and atomic lakes in the Sarzhal, Tel'kem, Balapan and Degelen Mountains areas of the Semipalatinsk Test Site. The data show that levels of tritium in domestic well waters within the settlement of Sarzhal are extremely low at the present time with a median value of 4.4 Bq dm{sup -3} (95% confidence interval: 4.1-4.7 Bq dm{sup -3}). These levels are only marginally above the background tritium content in surface waters globally. Levels in the atomic craters at Tel'kem 1 and Tel'kem 2 are between one and two orders of magnitude higher, while the level in Lake Balapan is approximately 12 600 Bq dm{sup -3}. Significantly, levels in streams and test-tunnel waters sourced in the Degelen Mountains, the site of approximately 215 underground nuclear tests, are a further order of magnitude higher, being in the range 133 000-235 500 Bq dm{sup -3}. No evidence was adduced which indicates that domestic wells in Sarzhal are contaminated by tritium-rich waters sourced in the Degelen massif, suggesting that the latter are not connected hydrologically to the near-surface groundwater recharging the Sarzhal wells. Annual doses to humans arising from the ingestion of tritium in these well waters are very low at the present time and are of no radiological significance.

  4. Forecasting the weather at the TAL sites during STS-40 using the grid point forecast output from the NMC MRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafele, Gene M.

    1992-01-01

    The NOAA's Spaceflight Meteorology Group has used the point forecast output from the Global Profile Archive and Global Profile Archive since 1990, and found this product to allow forecasters to examine the MRF model in a vertical profile, and thereby determine how different model parameters behave over time. Attention is presently given to the use of these resources in the illustrative case of the STS-40 mission, over northwestern Spain.

  5. Introduktion til STS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Introduktion til STS er den første danske grundbog om dette nye felt. Bogen giver en pædagogisk introduktion til STS-studier og den forskelligartede og ofte vanskelige primærlitteratur, der kendetegner feltet. Forfatterne præsenterer blandt andet socialkonstruktivistiske tilgange til videnskab og...

  6. STS-121 Insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The STS-121 patch depicts the Space Shuttle docked with the International Space Station (ISS) in the foreground, overlaying the astronaut symbol with three gold columns and a gold star. The ISS is shown in the configuration that it was during the STS-121 mission. The background shows the nighttime Earth with a dawn breaking over the horizon. STS-121, ISS mission ULF1.1, was the final Shuttle Return to Flight test mission. This utilization and logistics flight delivered a multipurpose logistics module (MPLM) to the ISS with several thousand pounds of new supplies and experiments. In addition, some new orbital replacement units (ORUs) were delivered and stowed externally on the ISS on a special pallet. These ORUs are spares for critical machinery located on the outside of the ISS. During this mission the crew also carried out testing of Shuttle inspection and repair hardware, as well as evaluated operational techniques and concepts for conducting on-orbit inspection and repair.

  7. L-Area STS MTR/NRU/NRX Grapple Assembly Closure Mechanics Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizenga, D. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS)

    2016-06-08

    A review of the closure mechanics associated with the Shielded Transfer System (STS) MTR/NRU/NRX grapple assembly utilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was performed. This review was prompted by an operational event which occurred at the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) utilizing a DTS-XL grapple assembly which is essentially identical to the STS MTR/NRU/NRX grapple assembly used at the SRS. The CNL operational event occurred when a NRU/NRX fuel basket containing spent nuclear fuel assemblies was inadvertently released by the DTS-XL grapple assembly during a transfer. The SM review of the STS MTR/NRU/NRX grapple assembly will examine the operational aspects of the STS and the engineered features of the STS which prevent such an event at the SRS. The design requirements for the STS NRU/NRX modifications and the overall layout of the STS are provided in other documents.

  8. STS-47 Crew Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The crew of STS-47, Commander Robert L. Gibson, Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Payload Commander Mark C. Lee, Mission Specialists N. Jan Davis, Jay Apt, and Mae C. Jemison, and Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri answer questions from the press about the upcoming Endeavour mission and the crew's personal views of the mission.

  9. STS-8 Mission Insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The eighth flight of the United States Space Transportation System (STS) is represented by eight stars of the constellation Aquila, The Eagle. The Space Shuttle Challenger is pictured affixed the external tank while leaving Earth's atmosphere. Surrounding the outside boder are the names of the crew members.

  10. Former astronaut Armstrong witnesses STS-83 launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Apollo l1 Commander Neil A. Armstrong and his wife, Carol, were among the many special NASA STS-83 launch guests who witnessed the liftoff of the Space Shuttle Columbia April 4 at the Banana Creek VIP Viewing Site at KSC. Columbia took off from Launch Pad 39A at 2:20:32 p.m. EST to begin the 16-day Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission.

  11. The Floating Ampersand: STS Past and STS to Come

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Jasanoff

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available STS has become a discipline in the sense that it offers new ways to read and make sense of the world. It remains an amalgam, however, of two linked yet separate lines of inquiry, both abbreviated as STS. Science and technology studies refers to the investigation of S&T as social institutions; science, technology and society, by contrast, analyzes the external relations of S&T with other institutions, such as law or politics. This essay reflects on the implications of this ambiguity for institutionalizing STS as a field of its own, drawing on the author’s experiences in building STS at two universities.

  12. STS-83 Mission Insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The crew patch for NASA's STS-83 mission depicts the Space Shuttle Columbia launching into space for the first Microgravity Sciences Laboratory 1 (MSL-1) mission. MSL-1 investigated materials science, fluid dynamics, biotechnology, and combustion science in the microgravity environment of space, experiments that were conducted in the Spacelab Module in the Space Shuttle Columbia's cargo bay. The center circle symbolizes a free liquid under microgravity conditions representing various fluid and materials science experiments. Symbolic of the combustion experiments is the surrounding starburst of a blue flame burning in space. The 3-lobed shape of the outermost starburst ring traces the dot pattern of a transmission Laue photograph typical of biotechnology experiments. The numerical designation for the mission is shown at bottom center. As a forerunner to missions involving International Space Station (ISS), STS-83 represented the hope that scientific results and knowledge gained during the flight will be applied to solving problems on Earth for the benefit and advancement of humankind.

  13. Situating STS and Thinking Ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele E. Clarke

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay sketches some of the broader sociopolitical and academic conditions of possibility at the time of the founding of the SKAT Section of the American sociological Association, noting the diversity of concerned groups and the affordances of epistemological diversity. I situate my own development as an early STS scholar, and discuss the growing salience of (postcolonial STS and concerns regarding current STS training and publishing.

  14. STS-3 medical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The medical operations report for STS-3, which includes a review of the health of the crew before, during, and immediately after the third Shuttle orbital flight is presented. Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical 'kit' carried in flight, tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results, hematology and immunology analyses, medical microbiology, food and nutrition, potable water, shuttle toxicology, radiological health, and cabin acoustic noise. Environmental effects of shuttle launch and landing medical information management, and management, planning, and implementation of the medical program are also dicussed.

  15. STS-65 Mission Insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Designed by the mission crew members, the STS-65 insignia features the International Microgravity Lab (IML)-2 mission and its Spacelab module which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. IML-2 is reflected in the emblem by two gold stars shooting toward the heavens behind the IML lettering. The Space Shuttle Columbia is depicted orbiting the logo and reaching off into space, with Spacelab on an international quest for a better understanding of the effects of space flight on materials processing and life sciences.

  16. STS as science or politics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Harry; Evans, Robert; Weinel, Martin

    2017-08-01

    In a recent editorial for this journal, Sergio Sismondo makes two claims. First, he states that STS bears no responsibility for the emergence of post-truth politics. Second, he claims that debates about the nature of expertise that take place within STS are irrelevant in this context. In contrast, we argue that, whether or not STS had a causal influence on the emergence of post-truth politics, there is a clear resonance between the two positions and that the current political climate makes the empirically informed and scientific analysis of expertise and the form of life of science more important than ever. We argue that treating the contribution of STS to these matters as essentially political rather than scientific surrenders any special role we have as experts on the organization and values of science and leaves STS as just one political actor among others.

  17. STS 128 - Christer Fuglesang

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    STS-128 (ISS assembly flight 17A) is the next space shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS), planned for August 25, 2009. It is expected to use Space Shuttle Discovery. The primary payload will be the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The mission is scheduled to include three spacewalks to remove and replace a materials processing experiment outside ESA's Columbus module and return an empty ammonia tank assembly As a graduate student, Fuglesang worked at CERN (the European Research Center on Particle Physics) in Geneva on the UA5 experiment, which studied proton-antiproton collisions. In 1988 he became a Fellow of CERN, where he worked on the CPLEAR experiment studying the subtle CP-violation of kaon particles. After a year he became a Senior Fellow and head of the particle identification subdetector........

  18. STS-121 Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew launched at 2:38 p.m. (EDT) to begin the two-day journey to the International Space Station (ISS) on the historic Return to Flight STS-121 mission. The shuttle made history as it was the first human-occupying spacecraft to launch on Independence Day. During its 12-day mission, this utilization and logistics flight delivered a multipurpose logistics module (MPLM) to the ISS with several thousand pounds of new supplies and experiments. In addition, some new orbital replacement units (ORUs) were delivered and stowed externally on the ISS on a special pallet. These ORUs are spares for critical machinery located on the outside of the ISS. During this mission the crew also carried out testing of Shuttle inspection and repair hardware, as well as evaluated operational techniques and concepts for conducting on-orbit inspection and repair.

  19. STS-40 Mission Insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The STS-40 patch makes a contemporary statement focusing on human beings living and working in space. Against a background of the universe, seven silver stars, interspersed about the orbital path of Columbia, represent the seven crew members. The orbiter's flight path forms a double-helix, designed to represent the DNA molecule common to all living creatures. In the words of a crew spokesman, ...(the helix) affirms the ceaseless expansion of human life and American involvement in space while simultaneously emphasizing the medical and biological studies to which this flight is dedicated. Above Columbia, the phrase Spacelab Life Sciences 1 defines both the Shuttle mission and its payload. Leonardo Da Vinci's Vitruvian man, silhouetted against the blue darkness of the heavens, is in the upper center portion of the patch. With one foot on Earth and arms extended to touch Shuttle's orbit, the crew feels, he serves as a powerful embodiment of the extension of human inquiry from the boundaries of Earth to the limitless laboratory of space. Sturdily poised amid the stars, he serves to link scentists on Earth to the scientists in space asserting the harmony of efforts which produce meaningful scientific spaceflight missions. A brilliant red and yellow Earth limb (center) links Earth to space as it radiates from a native American symbol for the sun. At the frontier of space, the traditional symbol for the sun vividly links America's past to America's future, the crew states. Beneath the orbiting Shuttle, darkness of night rests peacefully over the United States. Drawn by artist Sean Collins, the STS 40 Space Shuttle patch was designed by the crewmembers for the flight.

  20. STS-107 Master Experiment List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    A master list of the various experiments conducted aboard the STS-107 Space Mission is presented. The topics include: 1) Biology; 2) Earth and Space Sciences; 3) Physical Sciences; 4) Space Product Development; and 6) Technology Development.

  1. STS-31: APU Controller Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The launch April 10 of the STS-31 was scrubbed at T-4 minutes due to a faulty valve in auxiliary power unit (APU) number one. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. This video shows the removal of the STS-31's auxiliary power unit (APU).

  2. STS-99 Crew Insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-99 crew members designed the flight insignia for the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), the most ambitious Earth mapping mission to date. Two radar anternas, one located in the Shuttle bay and the other located on the end of a 60-meter deployable mast, was used during the mission to map Earth's features. The goal was to provide a 3-dimensional topographic map of the world's surface up to the Arctic and Antarctic Circles. In the patch, the clear portion of Earth illustrates the radar beams penetrating its cloudy atmosphere and the unique understanding of the home planet that is provided by space travel. The grid on Earth reflects the mapping character of the SRTM mission. The patch depicts the Space Shuttle Endeavour orbiting Earth in a star spangled universe. The rainbow along Earth's horizon resembles an orbital sunrise. The crew deems the bright colors of the rainbow as symbolic of the bright future ahead because of human beings' venturing into space. The crew of six launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor on February 11, 2000 and completed 222 hours of around the clock radar mapping gathering enough information to fill more than 20,000 CDs.

  3. STS-61 Space Shuttle mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Robert W., Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The STS-61 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report summarizes the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission as well as the Orbiter, External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), and the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) systems performance during the fifty-ninth flight of the Space Shuttle Program and fifth flight of the Orbiter vehicle Endeavour (OV-105). In addition to the Orbiter, the flight vehicle consisted of an ET designated as ET-60; three SSME's which were designated as serial numbers 2019, 2033, and 2017 in positions 1, 2, and 3, respectively; and two SRB's which were designated BI-063. The RSRM's that were installed in each SRB were designated as 360L023A (lightweight) for the left SRB, and 360L023B (lightweight) for the right SRB. This STS-61 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report fulfills the Space Shuttle Program requirement as documented in NSTS 07700, Volume 8, Appendix E. That document requires that each major organizational element supporting the Program report the results of its hardware evaluation and mission performance plus identify all related in-flight anomalies. The primary objective of the STS-61 mission was to perform the first on-orbit servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope. The servicing tasks included the installation of new solar arrays, replacement of the Wide Field/Planetary Camera I (WF/PC I) with WF/PC II, replacement of the High Speed Photometer (HSP) with the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR), replacement of rate sensing units (RSU's) and electronic control units (ECU's), installation of new magnetic sensing systems and fuse plugs, and the repair of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrometer (GHRS). Secondary objectives were to perform the requirements of the IMAX Cargo Bay Camera (ICBC), the IMAX Camera, and the Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS) Calibration Test.

  4. STS-62 Space Shuttle mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Robert W., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    The STS-62 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report summarizes the Payload activities as well as the Orbiter, External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), and the Space Shuttle main engine (SSHE) systems performance during the sixty-first flight of the Space Shuttle Program and sixteenth flight of the Orbiter vehicle Columbia (OV-102). In addition to the Orbiter, the flight vehicle consisted of an ET designated as ET-62; three SSME's which were designated as serial numbers 2031, 2109, and 2029 in positions 1, 2, and 3, respectively; and two SRB's which were designated BI-064. The RSRM's that were installed in each SRB were designated as 360L036A (lightweight) for the left SRB, and 36OWO36B (welterweight) for the right SRB. This STS-62 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report fulfills the Space Shuttle Program requirement as documented in NSTS 07700, Volume 8, Appendix E. That document requires that each major organizational element supporting the Program report the results of its hardware evaluation and mission performance plus identify all related in-flight anomalies. The primary objectives of the STS-62 mission were to perform the operations of the United States Microgravity Payload-2 (USMP-2) and the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology-2 (OAST-2) payload. The secondary objectives of this flight were to perform the operations of the Dexterous End Effector (DEE), the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet/A (SSBUV/A), the Limited Duration Space Environment Candidate Material Exposure (LDCE), the Advanced Protein Crystal Growth (APCG), the Physiological Systems Experiments (PSE), the Commercial Protein Crystal Growth (CPCG), the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA), the Middeck Zero-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE), the Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS), the Air Force Maui Optical Site Calibration Test (AMOS), and the Auroral Photography Experiment (APE-B).

  5. STS-78 Mission Insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The STS-78 patch links past with present to tell the story of its mission and science through a design imbued with the strength and vitality of the 2-dimensional art of North America's northwest coast Indians. Central to the design is the space Shuttle whose bold lines and curves evoke the Indian image for the eagle, a native American symbol of power and prestige as well as the national symbol of the United States. The wings of the Shuttle suggest the wings of the eagle whose feathers, indicative of peace and friendship in Indian tradition, are captured by the U forms, a characteristic feature of Northwest coast Indian art. The nose of the Shuttle is the strong downward curve of the eagle's beak, and the Shuttle's forward windows, the eagle's eyes, represented through the tapered S forms again typical of this Indian art form. The basic black and red atoms orbiting the mission number recall the original NASA emblem while beneath, utilizing Indian ovoid forms, the major mission scientific experiment package LMS (Life and Materials Sciences) housed in the Shuttle's cargo bay is depicted in a manner reminiscent of totem-pole art. This image of a bird poised for flight, so common to Indian art, is counterpointed by an equally familiar Tsimshian Indian symbol, a pulsating sun with long hyperbolic rays, the symbol of life. Within each of these rays are now encased crystals, the products of this mission's 3 major, high-temperature materials processing furnaces. And as the sky in Indian lore is a lovely open country, home of the Sun Chief and accessible to travelers through a hole in the western horizon, so too, space is a vast and beckoning landscape for explorers launched beyond the horizon. Beneath the Tsimshian sun, the colors of the earth limb are appropriately enclosed by a red border representing life to the Northwest coast Indians. The Indian colors of red, navy blue, white, and black pervade the STS-78 path. To the right of the Shuttle-eagle, the constellation

  6. Positioning the Field: STS Futures (INTRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Epstein

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The thematic collection entitled “Positioning the Field: STS Futures” consists of seven short articles that had their origins in a conference organized by the Science, Knowledge, and Technology Section of the American Sociological Association. These position papers blend autobiography, history, and STS analysis to advocate for specific future directions in STS scholarship.

  7. STS and Researcher Intervention Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Martin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available When I learned about a concerted campaign against Australian vaccination critics, I decided to intervene in the debate. As a result, some proponents of vaccination turned on me, making abusive comments and complaining to university officials. At several points in this experience, I had to make choices about how to intervene or respond. STS perspectives offered valuable insights for understanding the dynamics of the controversy but provided little guidance for making decisions. Some reasons are offered for why STS lacks tools for guiding practical action in such situations.

  8. STS Interventions: Preparing, Defending, Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Martin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intervening in the Australian vaccination debate, I found that STS perspectives helped me understand the controversy but gave little guidance on how to defend against attacks. Max Liboiron comments that preparation, including support networks, should precede interventions. I was well supported in my involvement in the vaccination debate, but those who openly advocate a stigmatized view may have difficulty gaining support. Teun Zuiderent-Jerak asks what is being learned when interventions reinforce existing categories. Controversy participants can learn by being exposed to STS perspectives; controversy researchers, when attacked, can gain new information and develop new research ideas.

  9. STS-54 Physics of Toys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Greg Vogt, NASA Headquarters Education Specialist, and Carolyn Sumners, Houston Museum of Natural Science, give an overview of the spaceborne experiments that will take place on the STS-54 Endeavour mission. Mr. Vogt discusses the objectives and procedures of the experiments, which are structured around using toys to show the effects of microgravity. Mr. Vogt and Ms. Sumners then answer questions from the press.

  10. Game Design as STS Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Dumit

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Game design offers a powerful pedagogical paradigm for engaging students in thinking and researching sociotechnical systems. Using the example of designing a game around fracking, this paper describes how game design grapples with emergent dynamic processes, and how students are drawn into becoming STS researchers.

  11. Apollo 11 Cmdr Neil Armstrong watches STS-83 launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Apollo 11 Commander Neil A. Armstrong and his wife, Carol, were among the many special NASA STS-83 launch guests who witnessed the liftoff of the Space Shuttle Columbia April 4 at the Banana Creek VIP Viewing Site at KSC. Columbia took off from Launch Pad 39A at 2:20:32 p.m. EST to begin the 16-day Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission.

  12. X-linked ichthyosis without STS deficiency: Clinical, genetical, and molecular studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robledo, R.; Melis, P.; Schillinger, E.; Siniscalco, M. [Istituto di Genetica Molecolare del, Trieste (Italy)] [and others

    1995-11-06

    We report on a Sardinian pedigree with congenital ichthyosis associated with normal levels of steroid sulfatase and a normal molecular pattern, as detectable with a cDNA probe for the steroid sulfatase (STS) gene. Though the pattern of transmission of the disease is consistent with X-linked recessive inheritance, this form of ichthyosis was found to segregate independently of genetic polymorphisms detected by probes of the region Xp22.3, where the STS locus has been mapped. The search for close genetic linkages with other polymorphic markers scattered along the entire X chromosome has so far been fruitless. For the time being, the main conclusion derived from these data is that STS deficiency is not a sine qua non for X-linked ichthyosis which may also result from a mutational event at an X-chromosomal site genetically unlinked to the STS locus. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Encountering social work through STS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Rasmus

    Encountering social work through STS: Marginalization, materials and knowledge In this presentation, I attempt to produce an encounter between STS and social work. Concretely, I focus on the subset of social work called “local community work”, which in Denmark is used to intervene on marginalized...... and their inhabitants. Local community work derives from this assemblage of policy and knowledge as the “social” intervention commonly deployed. Based on an ethnographic field work, I examine how local community practices attempt to interpellate specific futures for individuals and their local environments. I do...... this by examining the materials and types of knowledge that participate in shaping local community work practices and encounters between local community workers and residents in marginalized housing areas. Through this analysis, I argue that social work research can benefit from orienting itself more concretely...

  14. STS-53 Launch and Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Footage of various stages of the STS-53 Discovery launch is shown, including shots of the crew at breakfast, getting suited up, and departing to board the Orbiter. The launch is seen from many vantage points, as is the landing. On-orbit activities show the crew performing several medical experiments, such as taking a picture of the retina and measuring the pressure on the eyeball. One crewmember demonstrates how to use the rowing machine in an antigravity environment.

  15. STS-69 Clears the tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    A pack of astronauts that run under the banner Dog Crew II heads for the stars. Liftoff of the Space Shuttle Endeavour from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 11:09:00.052 a.m. EDT, Sept. 7, 1995. 'Every dog has its day and today is your day,' KSC Orbiter Test Conductor Roger Gillette pledged to STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker, Pilot Kenneth D. Cockrell, Payload Commander James S. Voss and Mission Specialists Michael L. Gernhardt and James H. Newman prior to launch. The STS-69 astronaut crew developed a strong sense of comaraderie as they went through their flight training, and dubbed themselves the Dog Crew II to carry on a tradition that arose during an earlier Shuttle flight -- STS-53 -- to which both Voss and Walker were assigned. Each crew member adopted a dog-theme name: Walker is Red Dog; Cockrell, Cujo; Voss, Dogface; Newman, Pluto; and Gernhardt, the only space rookie, Underdog. A special patch, featuring a bulldog in a doghouse shaped like the Space Shuttle, was designed for the astronauts and other flight team members to wear. The Dog Crew II is embarking on an 11-day multifaceted mission featuring two free-flying scientific research spacecraft as well as a host of experiments in both the payload bay and the middeck. Also scheduled is an extravehicular activity, or spacewalk.

  16. STS-111 Crew Training Clip

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    The STS-111 Crew is in training for space flight. The crew consists of Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Paul Lockhart, Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin. The crew training begins with Post Insertion Operations with the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT). Franklin Chang-Diaz, Philippe Perrin and Paul Lockhart are shown in training for airlock and Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) activities. Bailout in Crew Compartment Training (CCT) with Expedition Five is also shown. The crew also gets experience with photography, television, and habitation equipment.

  17. STS-109 Crew Interviews - Carey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 pilot Duane G. Carey is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, as well as an extended description of his role in the Orbiter's return landing. As its primary objective, this mission has the maintenance of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Following the Columbia Orbiter's rendezvous with the telescope, extravehicular activities (EVA) will focus on repairs to and augmentation of the HST.

  18. STS-109 Crew Interviews - Carey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 pilot Duane G. Carey is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, as well as an extended description of his role in the Orbiter's return landing. As its primary objective, this mission has the maintenance of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Following the Columbia Orbiter's rendezvous with the telescope, extravehicular activities (EVA) will focus on repairs to and augmentation of the HST.

  19. STS-31 Space Shuttle mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, David W.; Germany, D. M.; Nicholson, Leonard S.

    1990-01-01

    The STS-31 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report contains a summary of the vehicle subsystem activities on this thirty-fifth flight of the Space Shuttle and the tenth flight of the Orbiter Vehicle Discovery (OV-103). In addition to the Discovery vehicle, the flight vehicle consisted of an External Tank (ET) (designated as ET-34/LWT-27), three Space Shuttle main engines (SSME's) (serial numbers 2011, 2031, and 2107), and two Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) (designated as BI-037). The primary objective of the mission was to place the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) into a 330 nmi. circular orbit having an inclination of 28.45 degrees. The secondary objectives were to perform all operations necessary to support the requirements of the Protein Crystal Growth (PCG), Investigations into Polymer Membrane Processing (IPMP), Radiation Monitoring Equipment (RME), Ascent Particle Monitor (APM), IMAX Cargo Bay Camera (ICBC), Air Force Maui Optical Site Calibration Test (AMOS), IMAX Crew Compartment Camera, and Ion Arc payloads. In addition, 12 development test objectives (DTO's) and 10 detailed supplementary objectives (DSO's) were assigned to the flight. The sequence of events for this mission is shown. The significant problems that occurred in the Space Shuttle Orbiter subsystems during the mission are summarized, and the official problem tracking list is presented. In addition, each of the Space Shuttle Orbiter problems is cited in the subsystem discussion.

  20. Global Warming and Ozone Layer Depletion: STS Issues for Social Studies Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, James A.; Strong, Donna D.; Rubba, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the inclusion of science-technology-society (STS) education in social studies. Provides background information on global warming and the depletion of the ozone layer. Focuses on reasons for teaching global climate change in the social studies classroom and includes teaching suggestions. Offers a list of Web sites about global climate…

  1. Global Warming and Ozone Layer Depletion: STS Issues for Social Studies Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, James A.; Strong, Donna D.; Rubba, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the inclusion of science-technology-society (STS) education in social studies. Provides background information on global warming and the depletion of the ozone layer. Focuses on reasons for teaching global climate change in the social studies classroom and includes teaching suggestions. Offers a list of Web sites about global climate…

  2. STS-114: Discovery L-1 Countdown Status Briefing STS-114/Discovery L-2 Countdown Status Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Bruce Buckingham from NASA Public Affairs introduces Jeff Spaulding, NASA Test Director and Kathy Winters, Shuttle Weather Officer in this L-2 countdown status briefing. Spaulding gives the Space Shuttle launch countdown status before lift-off on July 26th. He expresses that vehicle launch and ground systems are performing well and that there are no significant issues in preparation for the launch. The crew arrival time to the launching pad and the launch window for Discovery is also discussed. He ends his countdown status by expressing that the Discovery Orbiter is the safest Shuttle to date. Kathy Winters gives her weather forecast for the launch day. She presents a satellite picture of tropical storm Franklin and charts showing the STS-114 Tanking Forecast, Launch Forecast, Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) recovery, Continental United States (CONUS) launch, Transoceanic Abort Landing (TAL) launch, 24 and 48 Hour Delay, CONUS 24 and 48 hour delay, and TAL 24 and 48 hr delay. Questions from the news media about the mood of the test engineers as launch day is approached are answered. Jessica Rye from NASA Public Affairs introduces Pete Nikolento, NASA Test Director; Scott Higgenbotham, STS-114 Payload Mission Manager; and Kathy Winters, Space Shuttle Weather Officer in this L-1 Countdown Status Briefing. Nikolento expresses that the completion of the main engine system check-outs and servicing of on-board fuel-cell reactants have been completed. He also talks about pad closeouts and external cryogenic loads prior to launch. Scott Higgenbotham gives the payload status and Kathy Winters talks about her weather forecast for launch. Questions about the ecosensors, TAL sites, weather forecast and thoughts about return to flight are addressed.

  3. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Ashby

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Commander Jeffrey Ashby is seen during this preflight interview, answering questions about his inspiration in becoming an astronaut and his career path and provides an overview of the mission. Ashby outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S1 truss) and the importance that the S1 truss will have in the development of the International Space Station (ISS). Ashby discusses the delivery and installation of the S1 truss scheduled to be done in the planned EVAs in some detail. He touches on the use and operation of the Canadarm 2 robotic arm in this process and outlines what supplies will be exchanged with the resident crew of the ISS during transfer activities. He ends with his thoughts on the value of the ISS in fostering international cooperation.

  4. Caring for Participation in STS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen Dam

    2015-01-01

    In this short report from the EASST Conference 2014, I sketch a handful of presentations that engaged with ‘participation’. Two tracks, in particular, offered interesting analyses and conceptual experiments. The first track contained primarily empirically driven studies of ‘technologies of partic......In this short report from the EASST Conference 2014, I sketch a handful of presentations that engaged with ‘participation’. Two tracks, in particular, offered interesting analyses and conceptual experiments. The first track contained primarily empirically driven studies of ‘technologies...... of participation’ in (health) care and provided illustrations of the conceptual ambiguities and empirical implications that continue to make participation a problematic, yet highly relevant and intriguing STS-topic. The second track featured presentations that more explicitly contributed new analytical tools...

  5. STS-112 Crew Interviews - Magnus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Specialist 2 Sandra H. Magnus is seen during a prelaunch interview. She answers questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. She gives details on the mission's goals, the most significant of which will be the installation of the S-1 truss structure on the International Space Station (ISS). The installation, one in a series of truss extending missions, will be complicated and will require the use of the robotic arm as well as extravehicular activity (EVA) by astronauts. Magnus also describes her function in the performance of transfer operations. Brief descriptions are given of experiments on board the ISS as well as on board the Shuttle.

  6. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Yurchikhin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A preflight interview with mission specialist Fyodor Yurchikhin is presented. He worked for a long time in Energia in the Russian Mission Control Center (MCC). Yurchikhin discusses the main goal of the STS-112 flight, which is to install the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss) on the International Space Station. He also talks about the three space walks required to install the S1. After the installation of S1, work with the bolts and cameras are performed. Yurchikhin is involved in working with nitrogen and ammonia jumpers. He expresses the complexity of his work, but says that he and the other crew members are ready for the challenge.

  7. An Evaluation of Installation Methods for STS-1 Seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, L. Gary; Hutt, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This report documents the results of a series of experiments conducted by the authors at the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASl) during the spring and summer of 1991; the object of these experiments was to obtain and document quantitative performance comparisons of three methods of installing STS-1 seismometers. Historically, ASL has installed STS-1 sensors by cementing their thick glass base plates to the concrete floor of the vault (see Peterson and Tilgner, 1985, p 44 and Figure 31, p 51 for the details of this installation technique). This installation technique proved to be fairly satisfactory for the China Digital Seismic Network and for several sets of STS-1 sensors installed in other locations since that time. However, the cementing operation is rather labor intensive and the concrete requires a lengthy (about 1 week) curing time during which the sensor installed on it is noisy. In addition it is difficult to assure that all air bubbles have been removed from the interface between the cement and the glass base plate. If air bubbles are present beneath the plate, horizontal sensors can be unacceptably noisy. Moving a sensor installed in this manner requires the purchase of a new glass base plate because the old plate normally can not be removed without breakage. Therefore, this study was undertaken with the aim of developing an improved method of installing STS-1's. The goals were to develop a method which requires less field site labor during the installation and assures a higher quality installation when finished. In addition, the improved installation technique should promote portability. Two alternate installation techniques were evaluated in this study. One method replaces the cement between the base plate and the vault floor with sand. This method has been used in the French Geoscope program and in several IRIS/IDA installations made by the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) and possibly others. It is easily implemented in

  8. STS-97 Pilot Bloomfield DEPARTs for Houston

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    After a night's rest and a brief press conference at KSC, STS-97 Pilot Michael Bloomfield heads for the plane at the Shuttle Landing Facility. With him are his wife (right) and daughter (left). They and other crew members and their families are returning to Houston. Mission STS-97 ended on Dec. 11, 2000, with a landing at KSC at 6:04 p.m. EST.

  9. Turning to ontology in STS? Turning to STS through ‘ontology’?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heur, B.; Leydesdorff, L.; Wyatt, S.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the evidence for the claim of an ‘ontological turn’ in science and technology studies (STS). Despite an increase in references to ‘ontology’ in STS since 1989, we show that there has not so much been an ontological turn as multiple discussions deploying the language of ontology, consistin

  10. Turning to Ontology in STS? Turning to STS through ‘Ontology’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heur, B.; Leydesdorff, L.; Wyatt, S.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the evidence for the claim of an ‘ontological turn’ in science and technology studies (STS). Despite an increase in references to ‘ontology’ in STS since 1989, we show that there has not so much been an ontological turn as multiple discussions deploying the language of ontology, consistin

  11. STS-90 Day 14 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this fourteenth day of the STS-90 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Richard A. Searfoss, Pilot Scott D. Altman, and Mission Specialists Richard M. Linnehan, Dafydd Rhys Williams and Kathryn P. Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay C. Buckey and James A. Pawelczyk focus on the efforts of Neurolab's Neuronal Plasticity Team to better understand how the adult nervous system adapts to the new environment of space. Columbia's science crew -- Mission Specialists Rick Linnehan and Dave Williams and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey and Jim Pawelczyk -- perform the second and final in-flight dissections of the adult male rats on board. The crew euthanizes and dissects nine rats and remove the vestibular or balance organs of the inner ear; the cerebellum, the part of the brain critical for maintaining balance and for processing information from the limbs so they can be moved smoothly; and the cerebrum, one part of which controls automatic functions such as body temperature regulation and the body's internal clock, and the cortical region that controls cognitive functions such as thinking. The first dissection, which was performed on the second day of the flight, went extremely well, according to Neurolab scientists.

  12. STS-90 Day 04 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this forth day of the STS-90 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Richard A. Searfoss, Pilot Scott D. Altman, and Mission Specialists Richard M. Linnehan, Dafydd Rhys Williams and Kathryn P. Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay C. Buckey and James A. Pawelczyk continue work with the Escher Staircase Behavior Testing of Adult Rats experiment. This is the first of two behavior testing sessions with the adult rats being used for this experiment. The rats will have a 'hyper drive' unit placed on their head which has recording electrodes made of microscopic wires that are positioned in the brain to record activity in the hippocampus. The hippocampus is that portion of the brain used to develop spatial maps to help us navigate from one place to the other. With the 'hyper drive' units in place, the rats will then be put through a maze or on a track. While the rat is maneuvering on the maze or track, the cell activity of the hippocampus will be measured and recorded.

  13. STS-70 Post Flight Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Glen (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    In this post-flight overview, the flight crew of the STS-70 mission, Tom Henricks (Cmdr.), Kevin Kregel (Pilot), Major Nancy Currie (MS), Dr. Mary Ellen Weber (MS), and Dr. Don Thomas (MS), discuss their mission and accompanying experiments. Pre-flight, launch, and orbital footage is followed by the in-orbit deployment of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) and a discussion of the following spaceborne experiments: a microgravity bioreactor experiment to grow 3D body-like tissue; pregnant rat muscular changes in microgravity; embryonic development in microgravity; Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX); terrain surface imagery using the HERCULES camera; and a range of other physiological tests, including an eye and vision test. Views of Earth include: tropical storm Chantal; the Nile River and Red Sea; lightning over Brazil. A three planet view (Earth, Mars, and Venus) was taken right before sunrise. The end footage shows shuttle pre-landing checkout, entry, and landing, along with a slide presentation of the flight.

  14. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Sellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Piers Sellers is an Astronaut from Crowborough, UK. His Bachelor of Science degree is in Ecological science from Scotland's University of Edinburgh and his doctorate is in biometeorology from Leeds University in the UK. After two years of intense training, Sellers's first assignment as a Mission Specialist is on Flight 111 STS-112. The goal of this flight is to continue building the International Space Station. Sellers, accompanied by five astronauts, will install the S1 truss of the space station which will take three EVA's, or Extra Vehicular Activities to complete. In EVA 1, the highest priority, the S1 truss will be attached to the space station. EVA 2, the electrical work, will set up the radiator and cooling equipment for the station. EVA 3, the final process of the flight, will prepare the station for the next mission. The primary reason for installing the truss is to change the center of gravity of the station so when the next truss is installed, it will be at a symmetrical point.

  15. STS, symmetry and post-truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael

    2017-08-01

    This essay takes up a series of questions about the connection between 'symmetry' in Science and Technology Studies (STS) and 'post-truth' in contemporary politics. A recent editorial in this journal by Sergio Sismondo argues that current discussions of 'post-truth' have little to do with conceptions of 'symmetry' or with concerns about 'epistemic democracy' in STS, while others, such as Steve Fuller and Harry Collins, insist that there are such connections. The present essay discusses a series of questions about the meaning of 'post-truth' and 'symmetry', and the connections of those concepts to each other and to 'epistemic democracy'. The essay ends with a series of other questions about STS and contemporary politics, and an invitation to further discussions.

  16. STS-104 Crew Interview: Steve Lindsey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-104 Commander Steve Lindsey is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, its payload (the Joint Airlock and the external gas tanks), and the usefulness of the newly installed Canadian Robotic Arm (installed by STS-100 crew). Lindsey describes his role in the rendezvous, docking, undocking, and flyaround of the Atlantis Orbiter and the International Space Station (ISS) and discusses the mission's planned spacewalks.

  17. Live Worms Found Amid STS-107 Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    NASA Project Manager Fred Ahmay holds a Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) container in which C. elegans nemotodes (round worms) were found. The container was part of a middeck experiment that was among Columbia's debris recovered in East Texas. The worms were found alive after flying on Columbia's last mission, STS-107. The experiment was designed to verify a new synthetic nutrient solution for an International Space Station 'model' specimen planned to be used extensively for ISS gene expression studies and was sponsored by the NASA Ames Research Center. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation

  18. STS-110 Commander Bloomfield arrives for TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-110 Commander Michael Bloomfield waves as he gets ready to depart KSC for Houston. He and the rest of the crew were at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that included payload familiarization and a simulated launch countdown. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day STS-110 mission will feature Space Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  19. STS-86 Pilot Mike Bloomfield speaks at TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield speaks to media representatives and other onlookers during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. This will be his first spaceflight. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25.

  20. Pharmaceutical experiment aboard STS-67 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut William G. Gregory, pilot, works with a pharmaceutical experiment on the middeck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour during the STS-67 mission. Commercial Materials Dispersion Apparatus Instruments Technology Associates Experiments (CMIX-03) includes not only pharmaceutical, but also biotechnology, cell biology, fluids, and crystal growth investigation

  1. STS-107 Flight Day 5 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The fifth day of the STS-107 space mission begins with a presentation of The Six Space Technology and Research Students (STARS) program experiments aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Students from Australia, China, Israel, Japan, Lichtenstein and The United States send scientific experiments into space. The video includes the progress of experiments with various insects including silkworms, carpenter bees, ants, fish, and spiders.

  2. STS-98 Crew Interview: Bob Curbeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The STS-98 Mission Specialist Bob Curbeam is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his training. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, and the payload and hardware it brings to the International Space Station (ISS). Mr. Curbeam discusses his role in the mission's spacewalks and activities.

  3. STS-98 Crew Interview: Tom Jones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The STS-98 Mission Specialist Tom Jones is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his training. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, and the payload and hardware it brings to the International Space Station (ISS). Mr. Jones discusses his role in the mission's spacewalks and activities.

  4. STS Motion Control Using Humanoid Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Bazli Bahar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the development of Sit to Stand (STS motion control method. The main challenge in STS is in addressing the lift-off from chair problem. In solving the problem, the main components of the humanoid STS motion system involved are the (1 phase and trajectory planning and (2 motion control. These components should be designed so that the Zero Moment Point (ZMP, Centre of Pressure (CoP and Centre of Mass (CoM is always in the support polygon. Basically, in STS motion control there are two components, 1. Action selector and 2. Tracking controller. The STS motion control should able to operate in real time and continuously able to adapt any change in between the motion. In this way, the accuracy of the controller to rectify the motion error shall increase. The overall proposed method to perform the STS motion is designed to have two main phases. (1 CoM transferring that implements Alexander STS technique and (2 Stabilization Strategy that used IF-THEN rules and proportional velocity controller. This study focuses on the presentation of the development of second phase which are 1. The development of the IF-THEN rules as the action selector that operates in real time to assists the proportional controller in making the best decision and, 2. The development of Proportional Gain Identification for the proportional velocity controller that is capable to change the gain implementation by referring to the define region that represent the motion condition. The validation of the proposed method is done experimentally using NAO robot as the test platform. The coefficient of the gain identification for the proportional controller was tuned using NAO robot that was initially set at sitting position on a wooden chair. The inclination of the body from a frame perpendicular with the ground, angle y is observed. Coefficient that gives the lowest RMSE of angle y trajectory is taken as a constant. Results show the proposed control method has reduce

  5. STS-29 Landing Approach at Edwards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery mission approaches for a landing at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards AFB, California, early Saturday morning, 18 March 1989. Touchdown was at 6:35:49 a.m. PST and wheel stop was at 6:36:40 a.m. on runway 22. Controllers chose the concrete runway for the landing in order to make tests of braking and nosewheel steering. The STS-29 mission was very successful, completing the launch a Tracking and Data Relay communications satellite, as well as a range of scientific experiments. Discovery's five man crew was led by Commander Michael L. Coats, and included pilot John E. Blaha and mission specialists James P. Bagian, Robert C. Springer, and James F. Buchli. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload

  6. The impact of a dedicated Science-Technology-Society (STS) course on student knowledge of STS content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Paul E.

    In the last half century, public awareness of issues such as population growth, environmental pollution and the threat of nuclear war has pressured science education to reform to increase student social responsibility. The emerging Science-Technology-Society (STS) movement addressed these concerns by developing numerous strategies and curricula. Considerable diagnostic research has been conducted on student knowledge of the nature of science, but not on the wider scope of STS content (e.g., the nature of science and technology and their interactions with society). However, researchers have not widely studied the impact of comprehensive STS curricula on students' knowledge of STS content nor the nature of STS teaching practice that influenced this knowledge gain. This study examined student success and teacher performance in a special STS course in Ontario, Canada. Research questions focused on the STS content knowledge gain by students completing this course and the impact of the STS teachers' teaching practices on this knowledge gain. Student data were collected using pre-course and post-course assessments of students' STS content knowledge. Teacher data were obtained using semi-structured interviews, classroom observations and videotapes. Statistical analysis indicated that, after completing the STS course, students significantly increased their STS content knowledge as measured by the Views on Science Technology Society instrument. Gender and academic achievement had no significant impact on this knowledge gain, implying that this course, as taught by these teachers, could appeal to a wide range of students as a general education course. The second part of the study indicated that detailed research is needed on the relationship between STS teaching practice and student STS content knowledge gain. The small sample size prevents generalizations but initial indications show that factors such constructivist teaching practices and strong teacher STS content knowledge

  7. STS-110 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    On Flight Day 8 of the STS-110 mission, the combined members of the Atlantis STS-110 crew and the International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 4 crew, Commanders Michael J. Bloomfield and Yury I. Onufrienko, respectively, answer questions posed to them by press members on the ground. Topics covered include: challenges of long term space habitation, adequacy of training for the on-orbit construction of the space station, details on the Mobile Transporter (MT) railcar system. Footage of the MT directly precedes and follows the extended question and answer portion of the video. The MT is seen from a variety of angles, as it slowly moves from Workstation 4 to Workstation 5 in order to test its ability to grapple to a fixed point along the track. The MT will eventually be used as a base for the robot arm in order to perform maintenance and assembly tasks on the ISS.

  8. STS flight operations - Concept versus reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) has the responsibility for planning, training, and implementing of flight operations in support of the National Space Transportation System (STS) Program. In this role, MOD has responsibility for the operational interface with customers and the translation of customer requirements into operating plans to satisfy their objectives. The basic objectives of flight operations are to maximize mission success, to minimize risks to the Orbiter and the crew, to decrease operating costs, and to achieve an effective balance in the application of all operational resources. In the National STS Program, to date, 20 missions have been flown and the process for planning, training, and flight operations has been thoroughly exercised. In this paper, MOD's performance is assessed, and those areas in which our initial operating concepts have been successful as well as those in which significant additional work is required are identified.

  9. STS-100 Crew Interview: Jeff Ashby

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Pilot Jeff Ashby is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Ashby then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  10. STS-64 SAFER Assembly development team members

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system, to be tested on the STS-64 flight, is surrounded by the team members who have spent a number of recent man hours in preparation for the system's first test-flight. In front are (left to right) Russell L. Flack and Bob Lowe. In the back row are (left to right) Jack D. Humphreys, Chuck Deason, Bill Wood and James Brown.

  11. STS-47 Astronaut Crew Training Clip

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The crew of STS-47, Commander Robert L. Gibson, Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Payload Commander Mark C. Lee, Mission Specialists N. Jan Davis, Jay Apt, and Mae C. Jemison, and Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri, is seen during various parts of their training, including SAREX training in the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT), firefighting training. A familiarization flight in the KC-135, a food tasting, photo training in the Crew Compartment Trainer, and bailout training in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) are also shown.

  12. STS-86 Pilot Michael Bloomfield suits up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield relaxes for a moment while donning his launch and entry suit with the assistance of a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building. This will be Bloomfields first spaceflight. He and the six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir.

  13. STS-96 Astronauts Adjust Unity Hatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), astronauts Rick D. Husband and Tamara E. Jernigan adjust the hatch for the U.S. built Unity node. The task was part of an overall effort of seven crew members to prepare the existing portion of the International Space Station (ISS). Launched on May 27, 1999, aboard the Orbiter Discovery, the STS-96 mission was the second ISS assembly flight and the first shuttle mission to dock with the station.

  14. STS-100 Crew Interview: John Phillips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist John Phillips is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Phillips then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  15. STS-69 Clears the tower (side view)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    A pack of astronauts that run under the banner Dog Crew II heads for the stars. Liftoff of the Space Shuttle Endeavour from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 11:09:00.052 a.m. EDT, Sept. 7, 1995. 'Every dog has its day and today is your day,' KSC Orbiter Test Conductor Roger Gillette pledged to STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker, Pilot Kenneth D. Cockrell, Payload Commander James S. Voss and Mission Specialists Michael L. Gernhardt and James H. Newman prior to launch. The STS-69 astronaut crew developed a strong sense of comaraderie as they went through their flight training, and dubbed themselves the Dog Crew II to carry on a tradition that arose during an earlier Shuttle flight -- STS-53 -- to which both Voss and Walker were assigned. Each crew member adopted a dog-theme name: Walker is Red Dog; Cockrell, Cujo; Voss, Dogface; Newman, Pluto; and Gernhardt, the only space rookie, Underdog. A special patch, featuring a bulldog in a doghouse shaped like the Space Shuttle, was designed for the astronauts and other flight team members to wear. The Dog Crew II is embarking on an 11-day multifaceted mission featuring two free-flying scientific research spacecraft as well as a host of experiments in both the payload bay and the middeck. Also scheduled is an extravehicular activity, or spacewalk.

  16. Astronaut Sellers Performs STS-112 EVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three sessions of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). Its primary mission was to install the Starboard Side Integrated Truss Structure (S1) and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the International Space Station (ISS). The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space Station's railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts. In this photograph, Astronaut Piers J. Sellers uses both a handrail on the Destiny Laboratory and a foot restraint on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System or Canadarm2 to remain stationary while performing work at the end of the STS-112 mission's second space walk. A cloud-covered Earth provides the backdrop for the scene.

  17. STS-111 M.S. Chang-Diaz arrives at KSC for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-111 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz is happy to be returning to KSC to prepare for launch. Mission STS-111, known as Utilization Flight 2, is carrying supplies and equipment to the International Space Station. The payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to 'inchworm' from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Also on board will be Expedition 5, traveling to the Station on Space Shuttle Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

  18. STS-112 Commander Ashby during post landing news conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-112 Commander Jeffrey Ashby is shown during the crew's post-landing briefing for the media. Mission STS-112 was the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, installing the S1 truss. The landing was the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  19. STS-129 shuttle crew visits Stennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the STS-129 space shuttle crew visited NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center on Jan. 19 to share details of their November visit to the International Space Station. During their 11-day mission aboard shuttle Atlantis, crew members delivered equipment, supplies and spare parts to the ISS. Following their mission report, astronauts visited with Stennis employees during a brief reception. Astronauts visiting Stennis were Pilot Barry Wilmore, Mission Specialist Randy Bresnik, Commander Charles Hobaugh and Mission Specialists Mike Foreman and Robert Satcher.

  20. Atmospheric Environment for Space Shuttle (STS-28) Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary is presented of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-28 launch time on August 8, 1989. STS-28 carried a Department of Defense payload and the flight azimuth is denoted by a reference flight azimuth, since the actual flight azimuth is not known. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-28 vehicle ascent was constructed and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to 400,000 ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-28 vehicle. The STS-28 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  1. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-36) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-36 launch time on February 28, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida was presented. STS-36 carried a Department of Defense payload and the flight azimuth is not known. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-36 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-36 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represent the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000 feet altitude that was traversed by the STS-36 vehicle.

  2. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-33) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary is presented of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-33 at launch time. STS-33 carried a DOD payload and the flight azimuth is denoted by a reference flight azimuth, since the actual flight azimuth is not known. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-33 vehicle ascent, was constructed. The STS-33 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by NASA-Marshall to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimates of the launch environment to the 400,000 ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-33 vehicle.

  3. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-38) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-38 launch time on November 15, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center is presented. STS-38 carried a Department of Defense payload and the flight azimuth in this report will be denoted by a reference flight azimuth, since the actual flight azimuth is not known. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observation (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is presented. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-38 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-38 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000-ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-38 vehicle.

  4. Transferability of STS markers in studying genetic relationships of marvel grass (Dichanthium annulatum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Raghvendra; Chandra, Amaresh

    2011-11-01

    Transferability of sequence-tagged-sites (STS) markers was assessed for genetic relationships study among accessions of marvel grass (Dichanthium annulatum Forsk.). In total, 17 STS primers of Stylosanthes origin were tested for their reactivity with thirty accessions of Dichanthium annulatum. Of these, 14 (82.4%) reacted and a total 106 (84 polymorphic) bands were scored. The number of bands generated by individual primer pairs ranged from 4 to 11 with an average of 7.57 bands, whereas polymorphic bands ranged from 4 to 9 with an average of 6.0 bands accounts to an average polymorphism of 80.1%. Polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.222 to 0.499 and marker index (MI) from 1.33 to 4.49. Utilizing Dice coefficient of genetic similarity dendrogram was generated through un-weighted pairgroup method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) algorithm. Further, clustering through sequential agglomerative hierarchical and nested (SAHN) method resulted three main clusters constituted all accessions except IGBANG-D-2. Though there was intermixing of few accessions of one agro-climatic region to another, largely groupings of accessions were with their regions of collections. Bootstrap analysis at 1000 scale also showed large number of nodes (11 to 17) having strong clustering (> 50). Thus, results demonstrate the utility of STS markers of Stylosanthes in studying the genetic relationships among accessions of Dichanthium.

  5. STS-84 oxygen generator for Mir installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    McDonnell Douglas-SPACEHAB technicians strap in place a Russian- made oxygen generator on the floor of a SPACEHAB Double Module, being prepared for flight in the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility. From left, are Mark Halavin and Marc Tuttle. The oxygen generator, manufactured in Russia by RSC Energia, will be carried aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis on Mission STS-84 for the Shuttles scheduled docking with the Russian Space Station Mir next month. The nearly 300-pound generator will replace one of two Mir units that have been malfunctioning recently. The generator functions by electrolysis, which separates water into its oxygen and hydrogen components. The hydrogen is vented and the oxygen is used for breathing by the Mir crew. The generator is 4.2 feet in length and 1.4 feet in diameter. STS-84, which is planned to include a Mir crew exchange of astronaut C. Michael Foale for Jerry M. Linenger, is targeted for a May 15 liftoff. It will be the sixth Shuttle-Mir docking.

  6. STS-41 Space Shuttle mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, David W.; Germany, D. M.; Nicholson, Leonard S.

    1990-01-01

    The STS-41 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report contains a summary of the vehicle subsystem activities on this thirty-sixth flight of the Space Shuttle and the eleventh flight of the Orbiter vehicle, Discovery (OV-103). In addition to the Discovery vehicle, the flight vehicle consisted of an External Tank (ET) (designated as ET-39/LWT-32), three Space Shuttle main engines (SSME's) (serial numbers 2011, 2031, and 2107), and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's), designated as BI-040. The primary objective of the STS-41 mission was to successfully deploy the Ulysses/inertial upper stage (IUS)/payload assist module (PAM-S) spacecraft. The secondary objectives were to perform all operations necessary to support the requirements of the Shuttle Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) Spectrometer, Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE), Space Life Sciences Training Program Chromosome and Plant Cell Division in Space (CHROMEX), Voice Command System (VCS), Physiological Systems Experiment (PSE), Radiation Monitoring Experiment - 3 (RME-3), Investigations into Polymer Membrane Processing (IPMP), Air Force Maui Optical Calibration Test (AMOS), and Intelsat Solar Array Coupon (ISAC) payloads. The sequence of events for this mission is shown in tabular form. Summarized are the significant problems that occurred in the Orbiter subsystems during the mission. The official problem tracking list is presented. In addition, each Orbiter problem is cited in the subsystem discussion.

  7. Transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to horse and sheep milk and meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semioshkina, N.; Voigt, G.; Savinkov, A.; Mukusheva, M. [GSF-Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg, (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Over a period of 40 years the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (STS) located in the Republic of Kazakhstan was the most important site for testing atomic bombs and other civil and military nuclear devices of the former Soviet Union resulting in a total of 456 nuclear tests. Until 1989 access to the STS was restricted and the area was not used for agriculture, but since closure of the test site agricultural activities have restarted. Herds of sheep and horses belonging to collective farms around the STS are grazing without any restriction including the areas of Ground Zero, Lake Balapan and the Degelen mountains identified as potential high contaminated sites. In the literature there is no information available on the transfer of radionuclides from vegetation to meat and milk of horses, representing a major component of the diet of the local population of the STS. As a consequence, the transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to horse meat and milk has been studied in the laboratory and under field conditions representative for the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan by us to be included in site specific dose calculation models for dose estimates. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to sheep has been well investigated and quantified in the consequence of the Chernobyl accident and many laboratory studies mainly in the EC. However, few information on the behaviour on these radionuclides in non-European environments is available. In order to better and more reliable predict doses received by the local population of the STS experimental transfer studies in the field and in laboratory have been conducted. In this contribution the results of experiments on site-specific transfer behaviour of two important radionuclides to major diet components (sheep and horse milk and meat) to the local population in Kazakhstan is presented. It has been realized in this work for the first time under field and laboratory conditions. (author)

  8. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-26) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Johnson, D. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-26 launch time on September 29, 1988, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida is given. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-26 vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-26 ascent atmospheric data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  9. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-8) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Turner, R. E.; Batts, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-8 launch time on August 30, 1983, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. Also presented are wind and thermodynamic parameters representative of surface and aloft conditions in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-8 vehicle ascent and SRB descent/impact were constructed. The STS-8 ascent meteorological data tape was constructed.

  10. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-51A) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Jasper, G.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-51A launch time on November 8, 1984, are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is reported. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-51A vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-51A ascent atmospheric data tape is constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments.

  11. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-51D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near the space shuttle STS-51D launch time on April 12, 1985, at Kennedy Space Center Florida is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-51D vehicle ascent is constructed. The STS-51D ascent atmospheric data tape is compiled by Marshall Space Flight Center's Atmospheric Sciences Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  12. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-51L) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Johnson, D. L.; Alexander, M.; Fichtl, G. H.; Batts, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    A summary is given of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-51L launch time on January 28, 1986, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-51L vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-51L ascent atmospheric data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Atmospheric Sciences Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post flight performance assessments.

  13. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-51C) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G.; Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-51C launch time on January 24, 1985, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles are presented. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-51C vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-51C ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments.

  14. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-51B) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-51B launch time on April 29, 1985, at Kennedy Space Center Florida is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-51B vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-51B ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Atmospheric Sciences Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post flight performance assessments.

  15. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-9) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-9 launch time on November 28, 1983, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. The final meteorological tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-9 vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-9 ascent meteorological data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to Shuttle task agreement No. 561-81-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  16. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-3) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.; Batts, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-3 launch time on March 22, 1982, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prlaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles and the wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in the SRB descent/impact ocean area are presented. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-3 vehicle ascent and SRB descent were constructed. The STS-3 ascent meteorological data tape is constructed.

  17. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-2) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-2 launch time on November 12, 1981, or Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. Wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in the SRB descent/impact ocean area are also presented. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-2 vehicle ascent and SRB descent have been constructed. The STS-2 ascent meteorological data tape was constructed.

  18. STS-69 flight day 6 highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    After being awakened by the Beatles song, 'A Hard Days Night', the flightcrew of the STS-69 mission, Cmdr. Dave Walker, Pilot Ken Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Jim Voss, Jim Newman, and Mike Gernhardt, began their sixth day in orbit by monitoring the free orbiting Wake Shield Facility (WSF). Later Cmdr. Walker conducted an interview with television reporters from Atlanta and Boston, answering questions about the mission and general questions about NASA's space program. The crew filmed a video fo themselves performing daily routines (eating, shaving, exercising), as well as some of the physiological experiments, and shuttle equipment maintenance and checkout. One of the secondary experiments included the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus-7 (CGBA-7), which served as an incubator and experiment station for a variety of tests (agricultural, pharmaceutical, biomedical, and environmental). Earth views included some cloud cover, the Gulf of Mexico, Texas, and the Atlantic Ocean.

  19. STS-110 Crew Interviews: Steve Smith

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission Specialist Steve Smith is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Smith outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Smith discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  20. STS-110 Crew Interview: Jerry Ross

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission Specialist Jerry Ross is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Ross outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Ross discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  1. STS-107 Flight Day 9 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This video shows the activities of the STS-107 crew (Rick Husband, Commander; William McCool, Pilot; Kalpana Chawla, David Brown, Michael Anderson, Laurel Clark, Mission Specialists; Ilan Ramon, Payload Specialist) during flight day 9 of the Columbia orbiter's final flight. The primary activities of flight day 9 are spaceborne experiments. The video shows a commercial experiment on roses, a partial view of Africa from Libya to the Horn of Africa through the MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment), and the FAST (Facility for Absorption and Surface Tension) experiment. The STARS (Space Technology and Research Students) international student experiments are shown. The preliminary results of these experiments on the effects of microgravity on silkworms, spiders, crystal growth, fish embryos, carpenter bees, and ants are discussed. The video includes a view of southern Spain and the Mediterranean Sea.

  2. STS-69 flight day 9 highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The song, 'He's A Tramp', from the Walt Disney cartoon movie, 'Lady and the Tramp', awakened the astronauts, Cmdr. Dave Walker, Pilot Ken Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Jim Voss, Jim Newman, and Mike Gernhardt, on the ninth day of the STS-69 mission. The Wake Shield Facility (WSF) was again unberthed from the shuttle cargo bay and , using the shuttle's robot arm, held over the side of the shuttle for five hours where it collected data on the electrical field build-up around the spacecraft as part of the Charging Hazards and Wake Studies Experiment (CHAWS). Voss and Gernhardt rehearsed their Extravehicular Activity (EVA) spacewalk, which was planned for the next day. Earth views included cloud cover, a hurricane, and its eye.

  3. STS-97 Crew Interviews: Michael J. Bloomfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield is shown. The interview addresses many different questions including why Bloomfield became interested in the space program, the events and people that influence him and ultimately led to his interest, and his vigorous training in the astronaut program. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses are the main goals of the STS-97 mission, its scheduled docking with the new International Space Station (ISS), and its delivery of the first set of U.S.-provided solar arrays, batteries, and radiators. Bloomfield briefly discusses his responsibilities during the much-anticipated docking as well as during the scheduled space-walks.

  4. STS-110 Crew Interview: Mike Bloomfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Commander Mike Bloomfield is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Bloomfield outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Bloomfield discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  5. STS-114: Discovery Launch Readiness Press Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This press conference, attended by representatives from the national, Florida, and aerospace media, addresses launch, weather, and safety issues related to Space Shuttle Discovery prior to its launch on the STS-114 Return to Flight mission. The Master of Ceremonies is George Diller from NASA Public Affairs, and the panelists are: Space Shuttle Program Manager Bill Parsons, ISS Program Manager (JSC) Bill Gerstenmaier, Space Shuttle Deputy Program Manager Wayne Hale, Director of Shuttle Processing Mike Wetmore, ISS Program Manager (JAXA) Dr. Kuniaki Shiraki, and Launch Weather Officer (USAF) Mindy Chavez. Questions included the following topics: predicted weather conditions at launch, contingency rescue plans, countdown procedures, and risk management, as well as implications of the Return to Flight for the International Space Station (ISS).

  6. STS-114: Discovery Launch Postponement Press Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This press briefing addresses the problem that occurred prior to the launch of the STS-114. Dean Acosta, Deputy Assistant Administrator of Public Affairs, introduces the panel which consists of Dr. Michael Griffin, NASA Administrator, William Readdy, Associate Administrator for Space Operations, Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Deputy Manager, Steve Poulas, Orbiter Project Manager, Mike Leinbach, NASA Launch Director, and Bill Parsons, Space Shuttle Program Manager. Wayne Hale expresses that a problem occurred with one of the low level sensors in the hydrogen tank and that the cause of the problem must be identified and rectified. Steve Poulos talks about establishing a troubleshooting plan as a part of the scrub effort and Mike Leinbach describes the process of draining the external tank. Wayne Hale answers questions about the sensors and if the Space Shuttle Discovery is safe to fly and Steve Poulos answers questions about the possible suspects for this problem.

  7. STS-121 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Astronaut Michael E. Fossum, STS-121 mission specialist, used a digital still camera to expose a photo of his helmet visor during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the International Space Station (ISS). Also visible in the visor reflections are fellow space walker Piers J. Sellers, mission specialist, Earth's horizon, and a station solar array. During its 12-day mission, this utilization and logistics flight delivered a multipurpose logistics module (MPLM) to the ISS with several thousand pounds of new supplies and experiments. In addition, some new orbital replacement units (ORUs) were delivered and stowed externally on the ISS on a special pallet. These ORUs are spares for critical machinery located on the outside of the ISS. During this mission the crew also carried out testing of Shuttle inspection and repair hardware, as well as evaluated operational techniques and concepts for conducting on-orbit inspection and repair.

  8. Fluid Dynamic Verification Experiments on STS-70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J.

    1996-01-01

    Fluid dynamic experiments were flown on STS-70 as phase two of the engineering evaluation of the first bioreactor Engineering Development Unit (EDU#1). The phase one experiments were comparative cell cultures in identical units on earth and onboard STS-70. In phase two, two types of fluid dynamic experiments were performed. Qualitative comparisons of the basic flow patterns were evaluated with the use of 'dye' streaklines formed from alternate injections of either a mild acid or base solution into the external flow loop that was then perfused into the vessel. The presence of Bromothymol Blue in the fluid then caused color changes from yellow to blue or vice versa, indicating the basic fluid motions. This reversible change could be repeated as desired. In the absence of significant density differences in the fluid, the flow patterns in space should be the same as on earth. Video tape records of the flow patterns for a wide range of operating conditions were obtained. The second type of fluid dynamic experiment was the quantitative evaluation of the trajectories of solid beads of various densities and sizes. The beads were introduced into the vessel and the paths recorded on video tape, with the vessel operated at various rotation rates and flow perfusion rates. Because of space limitations, the video camera was placed as close as possible to the vessel, resulting in significant optical distortion. This report describes the analysis methods to obtain comparisons between the in-flight fluid dynamics and numerical models of the flow field. The methods include optical corrections to the video images and calculation of the bead trajectories for given operating conditions and initial bead locations.

  9. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-35) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    A summary is given of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-35 launch time on December 2, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-35 vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-35 ascent atmospheric data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000-ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-35 vehicle.

  10. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-37) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-37 launch time on 5 Apr. 1991 at KSC is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-37 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-37 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000 ft. altitude that was traversed by the STS-37 vehicle.

  11. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-32) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-32 launch time on January 9, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is also presented. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-32 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-32 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment that was traversed by the STS-32 vehicle.

  12. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-43) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-43) launch time on August 2, 1991, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric profile, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-43 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-43 ascent atmospheric data profile was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consisted data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000-ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-43 vehicle.

  13. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-39) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle Atlantis STS-39 launch time on 28 April 1991, at Kennedy Space Center, FL. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-39 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-39 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by NASA-Marshall to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000 ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-39 vehicle.

  14. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-41G) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Jasper, G.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions that were observed near Space Shuttle STS-41G launch time on October 5, 1984 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual obsrvations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape consisting of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude for STS-41G vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-41G ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed. The STS-41G ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Atmospheric Sciences Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post flight performance assessments.

  15. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-41) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-41 launch time on October 6, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-41 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-41 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000 ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-41 vehicle.

  16. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-27) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Johnson, D. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    Selected articles on atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-27 launch time on December 2, 1988, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. STS-27 carried a Department of Defense payload and the flight azimuth in this report will be denoted by reference flight azimuth, since the actual flight azimuth is not known. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-27 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-27 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  17. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-40) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-40) launch time on 5 Jun. 1991, at KSC is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observation (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-40 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-40 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed by MSFC's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represents the best estimate of the launch environment to the 400,000-ft altitude that was traversed by the STS-40 vehicle.

  18. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-31) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-31 launch time on April 24, 1990, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is also presented. The final atmospheric tape, which consists if wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-31 vehicle ascent was constructed. The STS-31 ascent atmospheric data tape was constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in postflight performance assessments and represent the best estimated of the launch environment to the 400,000 feet altitude that was traversed by the STS-31 vehicle.

  19. The development of STS payload environmental engineering standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangs, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    The presently reported effort to provide a single set of standards for the design, analysis and testing of Space Transportation System (STS) payloads throughout the NASA organization must be viewed as essentially experimental, since the concept of incorporating the diverse opinions and experiences of several separate field research centers may in retrospect be judged too ambitious or perhaps even naive. While each STS payload may have unique characteristics, and the project should formulate its own criteria for environmental design, testing and evaluation, a reference source document providing coordinated standards is expected to minimize the duplication of effort and limit random divergence of practices among the various NASA payload programs. These standards would provide useful information to all potential STS users, and offer a degree of standardization to STS users outside the NASA organization.

  20. STS-65 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, crew insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, crew insignia (logo), the Official insignia of the NASA STS-65 International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission. Designed by the crewmembers, the STS-65 insignia features the IML-2 mission and its Spacelab module which will fly aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. IML-2 is reflected in the emblem by two gold stars shooting toward the heavens behind the IML lettering. The Space Shuttle Columbia is depicted orbiting the logo and reaching off into space, with Spacelab on an international quest for a better understanding of the effects of space flight on materials processing and life sciences. The STS-65 flight crewmembers are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot James D. Halsell, Jr, Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Richard J. Hieb, MS Carl E. Walz, MS Leroy Chiao, MS Donald A. Thomas, and Japanese Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai.

  1. STS-9 commander John Young gets help adjusting headwear

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Preparing for a training session is Astronaut John Young, commander of STS-9 Young gets help with his Snoopy cap or headwear housing communications gear, while one of his five fellow crewmembers, Dr. Ulf Merbold, looks on in the background.

  2. Some possible causes of and corrections for STS-1 response changes in the Global Seismographic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutt, C.R.; Ringler, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) (Figure 1) plays a key role in providing seismic data for global earthquake monitoring (e.g., Benz et al. 2005), earthquake science (e.g., Tsai et al. 2005), and studies of Earth structure (e.g., Dalton et al. 2008). One of the key GSN design goals is to "provide high fidelity digital recordings of all teleseismic ground motions (adequate to resolve at or near ambient noise up to the largest teleseismic signals over the bandwidth from free oscillations (10-4 Hz) to teleseismic body waves (up to approximately 15 Hz))" (GSN ad hoc Design Goals Subcommittee 2002). To help meet this goal, Streckeisen STS-1 seismometers were deployed at 80 GSN stations. Some of the GSN sensors have been deployed for more than 25 years. Several recent studies (Davis et al. 2005; Ekström et al. 2006; Davis and Berger 2007) have examined the question of overall calibration of the GSN. Ekström et al. (2006) indicated that a number of sites showed anomalous responses and suggested a gradual decay in the sensitivity. We have investigated the anomalous responses at several GSN sites. At least some of the problems observed by Ekström et al. (2006) may be attributed to humid air leaking into the feedback electronics of the STS-1 seismometers, which produces lower than normal sensitivities near the long-period corner of the instrument (360 seconds period). It appears that even though the feedback electronics boxes are designed to be sealed, water vapor can penetrate their interior after they have been exposed to highly humid seismometer vault air for extended periods. Highly humid air was also found to be present inside some STS-1 bell-jars (especially horizontal instruments) after loss of vacuum, resulting in corrosion and leakage between electrical conductors in connectors.

  3. STS-107 Columbia sits inside an protective tent in VAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Columbia sits inside an protective tent used to keep out moisture. The orbiter is next scheduled to fly on mission STS-107 no earlier than Nov. 29. STS-107 is a research mission. The payload includes the Hitchhiker Bridge, a carrier for the Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research (FREESTAR) that incorporates eight high priority secondary attached shuttle experiments, plus the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM), also known as SPACEHAB.

  4. STS-73 Mission Specialist Catherine Coleman suits up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    STS-73 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman is assisted by a suit technician as she dons her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. STS-73 will be the first trip into space for Coleman, who will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits lift off during a window opening at 9:41 a.m. EDT, Oct. 7.

  5. Data on acute toxicity of the progestin STS 557.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillesheim, H G; Hoffmann, H

    1983-02-01

    In mice and rabbits of both sexes the acute toxicity of STS 557 (17 alpha-cyanomethyl-17 beta-hydroxy-estra-4, 9-dien-3-one) was determined after its oral or parenteral (i.p., s.c.) administration. In rabbits increasing lethality was observed following STS 557 suspended in tylose solution at the dose range of 1.0 to 3.0 g/kg p.o. or i.p. The approximate LD50-values were 1.0 to 1.5 g/kg for the i.p. route and 1.0 to 2.0 g/kg for the oral route. Levonorgestrel injected i.p. did not cause any lethality up to the dose of 3.0 g/kg. After oral or s.c. administration to mice, doses of 4.0 g/kg STS 557 were well tolerated. A dose-related toxicity occurred only after i.p. doses between 0.5 and 1.0 g/kg (STS 557), and between 2.0 and 4.0 g/kg (levonorgestrel), respectively. Using an oily vehicle for the oral route in mice, the lethal threshold dose for STS 557 was lowered to about 2.0 g/kg. In conclusion, a low oral acute toxicity was determined for STS 557 corresponding to that of other progestagens like levonorgestrel or norethisterone.

  6. STS-107 Flight Day 13 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This video shows the activities of the STS-107 crew on flight day 13 of the Columbia orbiter's final mission. The crew members include: Rick Husband, Commander; William McCool, Pilot; Kalpana Chawla, David Brown, Michael Anderson, Laurel Clark, Mission Specialists; Ilan Ramon, Payload Specialist. The primary activities of flight day 13 are spaceborne experiments, including troubleshooting undertaken by Mission Specialist Chawla on the Water Mist Fire Suppression (MIST) experiment. Chawla performs troubleshooting tasks relayed to her by Mission Control. She shows Mission Control the location of air and water in a transparent hose that is part of the atomizer on the exterior of the combustion module. She also changes the atomizer head. All six Space Technology and Research Students (STARS) experiments are profiled in the video. These experiments are on ants, crystal growth in a chemical garden, fish embryos, carpenter bees, spiders, and silkworms. The video also includes a view of the southeast Texas coast near Houston, and a view of Portugal, Spain, Gibraltar, Morocco, and the Sahara Desert. The video ends with an explanation of roses at Mission Control which commemorate astronauts who have died on missions.

  7. STS-52 Space Shuttle mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Robert W., Jr.

    1992-12-01

    The STS-52 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report provides a summary of the Orbiter, External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster/Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (SRB/RSRM), and the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) subsystem performance during the fifty-first flight of the Space Shuttle Program, and the thirteenth flight of the Orbiter vehicle Columbia (OV-102). In addition to the Orbiter, the flight vehicle consisted of the following: an ET (designated as ET-55/LWT-48); three SSME's, which were serial numbers 2030, 2015, and 2034 in positions 1, 2, and 3, respectively; and two SRB's, which were designated BI-054. The lightweight RSRM's that were installed in each SRB were designated 360L027A for the left SRB and 360Q027B for the right SRB. The primary objectives of this flight were to successfully deploy the Laser Geodynamic Satellite (LAGEOS-2) and to perform operations of the United States Microgravity Payload-1 (USMP-1). The secondary objectives of this flight were to perform the operations of the Attitude Sensor Package (ASP), the Canadian Experiments-2 (CANEX-2), the Crystals by Vapor Transport Experiment (CVTE), the Heat Pipe Performance Experiment (HPP), the Commercial Materials Dispersion Apparatus Instrumentation Technology Associates Experiments (CMIX), the Physiological System Experiment (PSE), the Commercial Protein Crystal Growth (CPCG-Block 2), the Shuttle Plume Impingement Experiment (SPIE), and the Tank Pressure Control Experiment (TPCE) payloads.

  8. STS-107 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This video shows the activities of the STS-107 crew (Rick Husband, Commander; William McCool, Pilot; Kalpana Chawla, David Brown, Michael Anderson, Laurel Clark, Mission Specialists, Ilan Ramon, Payload Specialist) during flight day 8 of the Columbia orbiter's final flight. The primary activities of flight day 8 are spaceborne experiments. Some background information is given on the SOFBALL (Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-Number) microgravity experiment as footage of the flame balls is shown. The video also shows the MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) calibrating on the Moon. The six STARS (Space Technology and Research Students) international student experiments are profiled, including experiments on carpenter bees (Liechtenstein), spiders (Australia), silkworms (China), ants (United States), crystal growth (Israel), and fish embryos (Japan). A commercial experiment on roses is also profiled. Astronaut Clark gives a tour of the SpaceHab RDM (Research Double Module), in the space shuttle's payload bay. Astronauts McCool and Ramon take turns on an exercise machine. The video includes a partly cloudy view of the Pacific Ocean.

  9. Nonlinear Simulation Studies of Tokamaks and STs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Park; J. Breslau; J. Chen; G.Y. Fu; S.C. Jardin; S. Klasky; J. Menard; A. Pletzer; B.C. Stratton; D. Stutman; H.R. Strauss; L.E. Sugiyama

    2003-07-07

    The multilevel physics, massively parallel plasma simulation code, M3D, has been used to study spherical tori (STs) and tokamaks. The magnitude of outboard shift of density profiles relative to electron temperature profiles seen in NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] under strong toroidal flow is explained. Internal reconnection events in ST discharges can be classified depending on the crash mechanism, just as in tokamak discharges; a sawtooth crash, disruption due to stochasticity, or high-beta disruption. Toroidal shear flow can reduce linear growth of internal kink. It has a strong stabilizing effect nonlinearly and causes mode saturation if its profile is maintained, e.g., through a fast momentum source. Normally, however, the flow profile itself flattens during the reconnection process, allowing a complete reconnection to occur. In some cases, the maximum density and pressure spontaneously occur inside the island and cause mode saturation. Gyrokinetic hot particle/MHD hybrid studies of NSTX show the effects of fluid compression on a fast-ion-driven n = 1 mode. MHD studies of recent tokamak experiments with a central current hole indicate that the current clamping is due to sawtooth-like crashes, but with n = 0.

  10. STS-47 Post Flight Press Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The flight crew of the STS-47 Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour Cmdr. Robert L. Gibson, Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Payload Cmdr. Mark C. Lee, Mission Specialists, N. Jan Davis, Jay Apt, Mae C. Jemison, and Payload Specialist, Mamoru Mohri, present an overview of their mission. This the 50th Shuttle flight marks the first NASA mission devoted primarily to Japan. Endeavour carries into Earth orbit Spacelab-J (SL-J), a 23-foot long pressurized laboratory built by the European Space Agency specifically for conducting experiments in a shirt-sleeve environment. SL-J contains 43 experiments, 34 provided by Japan, 7 from the United States and 2 joint experiments. Jemison becomes the first African American woman to fly in space and Mohri first Japanese to fly in space. Video footage includes the following: prelaunch and launch activities; various experiments including protein crystal growth, electronic materials, fluids, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and the effects of microgravity on plants and animals; earth views of Japan, Tokyo Harbor, and Hurricane Bonnie; and the re-entry and landing of the orbiter.

  11. STS-68 Space Shuttle mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Robert W., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The STS-68 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report summarizes the Payload activities as well as the Orbiter, External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), and the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) systems performance during the sixty-fifth flight of the Space Shuttle Program and the seventh flight of the Orbiter vehicle Endeavour (OV-105). In addition to the Orbiter, the flight vehicle consisted of an ET that was designated ET-65; three SSMEs that were designated as serial numbers 2028, 2033, and 2026 in positions 1, 2, and 3, respectively; and two SRBs that were designated BI-067. The RSRMs that were installed in each SRB were designated as 360W040A for the left SRB and 360W040B for the right SRB. The primary objective of this flight was to successfully perform the operations of the Space Radar Laboratory-2 (SRL-2). The secondary objectives of the flight were to perform the operations of the Chromosome and Plant Cell Division in Space (CHROMEX), the Commercial Protein Crystal Growth (CPCG), the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC), the Cosmic Radiation Effects and Activation Monitor (CREAM), the Military Application of Ship Tracks (MAST), and five Get-Away Special (GAS) payloads.

  12. STS-114 Flight Day 6 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Day 6 is a relatively quiet day for the STS-114 crew. The main responsibility for crew members of Space Shuttle Discovery (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda) and the Expedition 11 crew of the International Space Station (ISS) (Commander Sergei Krikalev and NASA ISS Science Officer and Flight Engineer John Phillips) is to unload supplies from the shuttle payload bay and from the Raffaello Multipurpose Logistics Module onto the ISS. Several of the astronauts answer interview questions from the news media, with an emphasis on the significance of their mission for the Return to Flight, shuttle damage and repair, and the future of the shuttle program. Thomas announces the winners of an essay contest for Australian students about the importance of science and mathematics education. The video includes the installation of a stowage rack for the Human Research Facility onboard the ISS, a brief description of the ISS modules, and an inverted view of the Nile Delta.

  13. STS-41-D Crew Enjoying Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Crewmembers of NASA's 41-D mission take a group shot displaying their fun moments in space aboard the orbiter Discovery. Crewmembers are (counter-clockwise from center) crew commander Henry W. Harsfield Jr., pilot Michael L. Coats, mission specialist Steven A. Hawley, mission specialist Judith A. Resnik, payload specialist Charles D. Walker, and mission specialist Richard M. Mullane. Dr. Judith Resnik is shown enjoying the weightlessness of space during her first mission. Born on April 5, 1949 in Akron, Ohio, she received a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1970, and a Doctorate in Electrical Engineering from University of Maryland in 1977. Dr. Resnik joined NASA in 1978 as a senior systems engineer in product development with Xerox Corporation at El Segundo, California. NASA later selected her as an astronaut candidate in January 1978; she completed a 1-year training and evaluation period in August 1979. Dr. Resnik died on January 28, 1986 on her second mission, during the failed launch of Challenger STS-51 L.

  14. STS-114: Post Launch MMT Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Bill Parsons, Space Shuttle Program Manager, and Wayne Hill, Deputy Manager of the Space Shuttle Program, and Chair of the Mission Management Team talks about the flight day 2 of the Discovery. Bill noted that flight operations are extremely going on well. He also explained an unexpected debris event on a power ramp little ways down where LH2 ramp begins. Before flight and based from technical data, slight modifications were done on the power ramp to ensure safety of return to flight. Bill also noted that STS-114 is a test flight; all data collected and brought back by the crew will be analyzed to ensure that all information needed is sufficient to work on faults and defects and to make appropriate repairs. Wayne discussed on flight safety. He emphasized the need to thoroughly inspect the thermal protection system of the Orbiter to ensure safe entry. Inspection of still photographs from the ISS and the boom sensor system scan are the primary means to understand engineering data in terms of the immediate flight safety. He also reported accomplishments for the day such as survey of the Orbiter boom system, all the wing leading edge, RCC panels and the nose cap, to make sure these are in good shape and working well, and re-emphasized that these are primary methods to clear the thermal protection system of the Orbiter to prove that it is safe to come home on this flight.

  15. Evaluation of Installation Methods for STS-2 Seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer-Schnidrig, R.; Kurrle, D.; Wielandt, E.

    2007-12-01

    In the course of the upgrade of the Gräfenberg Array (GRF) from Streckeisen STS-1 seismometers with 20 sec free period to STS-2 seismometers with 120 sec free period the question of how best to install the sensors was reconsidered. It was understood early on that the Streckeisen STS-1 seismometers need elaborate shielding in order to reach their full potential. Because some of the experience gained with the shielding of the STS-1 entered the design of the casing of the STS-2, it was not clear what kind of additional shielding was needed for getting best results with the STS-2. Since the first deployments of STS-2s starting with the German Regional Seismic Network (GRSN) in 1991, different types of insulations have been tried and it became apparent that the data quality at low frequencies can be markedly improved by extensive shielding of the sensors. In contrast to the STS-1 the STS-2 has a sealed casing such that variable air pressure should not lead to any buoyancy forces on the sensor masses. However, since the warp free design of the sensor does not completely remove pressure induced tilt, Wielandt proposed to install the STS-2 in a sealed container consisting of a thick gabbro base plate and an upside down stainless steel pot as cover (Stuttgart shielding). The German Regional Seismic Network (GRSN) and the Gräfenberg Array (GRF) are so far the only networks which have adopted this shielding. Its principal benefits are three fold: it reduces pressure fluctuations by approximately a factor of 30, reduces temperature fluctuations and keeps the sensor dry. We inspect two types of signals to make inferences about the STS-2 shielding used by different networks: Horizontal free mode spectra from the 2004 Sumatra earthquake and vertical component noise spectra tuned for the detection of the permanently excited background free oscillations (hum). The networks considered here are the GRSN, the GEOFON network of the GFZ Potsdam, the Swiss SDSnet and the Japanese F

  16. STS-74 Space Shuttle Mission Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Robert W., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The STS-74 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report summarizes the Payload activities as well as the Orbiter, External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), and the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) systems performance during the seventy-third flight of the Space Shuttle Program, the forty-eighth flight since the return-to-flight, and the fifteenth flight of the Orbiter Atlantis (OV-104). In addition to the Orbiter, the flight vehicle consisted of an ET that was designated ET-74; three Phase 11 SSME's that were designated as serial numbers 2012, 2026, and 2032 in positions 1, 2, and 3, respectively; and two SRB's that were designated BI-076. The RSRM's, designated RSRM-51, were installed in each SRB and the individual RSRM's were designated as 360TO51 A for the left SRB, and 360TO51 B for the right SRB. The primary objectives of this flight were to rendezvous and dock with the Mir Space Station and perform life sciences investigations. The Russian Docking Module (DM) was berthed onto the Orbiter Docking System (ODS) using the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), and the Orbiter docked to the Mir with the DM. When separating from the Mir, the Orbiter undocked, leaving the DM attached to the Mir. The two solar arrays, mounted on the DM, were delivered for future Russian installation to the Mir. The secondary objectives of the flight were to perform the operations necessary to fulfill the requirements of the GLO experiment (GLO-4)/Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment Payload (PASDE) (GPP), the IMAX Cargo Bay Camera (ICBC), and the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment-2 (SAREX-2). Appendix A lists the sources of data, both formal and informal, that were used to prepare this report. Appendix B provides the definition of acronyms and abbreviations used throughout the report. All times during the flight are given in Greenwich mean time (GMT)) and mission elapsed time (MET).

  17. STS-46 Space Shuttle mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Robert W.

    1992-10-01

    The STS-46 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report contains a summary of the Orbiter, External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster/Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (SRB/RSRM), and the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) subsystem performance during the forty-ninth flight of the Space Shuttle Program, and the twelfth flight of the Orbiter vehicle Atlantis (OV-104). In addition to the Atlantis vehicle, the flight vehicle consisted of the following: an ET, designated ET-48 (LWT-41); three SSME's, which were serial numbers 2032, 2033, and 2027 in positions 1, 2, and 3, respectively; and two SRB's which were designated BI-052. The lightweight/redesigned SRM's that were installed in each SRB were designated 360W025A for the left RSRM and 360L025B for the right RSRM. The primary objective of this flight was to successfully deploy the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) payload and perform the operations of the Tethered Satellite System-1 (TSS-1) and the Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Material 3/Thermal Energy Management Processes 2A-3 (EOIM-3/TEMP 2A-3). The secondary objectives of this flight were to perform the operations of the IMAX Cargo Bay Camera (ICBC), Consortium for Material Development in Space Complex Autonomous Payload-2 and 3 (CONCAP-2 and CONCAP-3), Limited Duration Space Environment Candidate Materials Exposure (LDCE), Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Function (PHCF), and Ultraviolet Plume Instrumentation (UVPI). In addition to summarizing subsystem performance, this report also discusses each Orbiter, ET, SSME, SRB, and RSRM in-flight anomaly in the applicable section of the report. Also included in the discussion is a reference to the assigned tracking number as published on the Problem Tracking List. All times are given in Greenwich mean time (G.m.t.) as well as mission elapsed time (MET).

  18. STS-54 Space Shuttle mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Robert W., Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The STS-54 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report is a summary of the Orbiter, External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster/Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (SRB/RSRM), and the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) subsystems performance during this fifty-third flight of the Space Shuttle Program, and the third flight of the Orbiter vehicle Endeavour (OV-105). In addition to the Orbiter, the flight vehicle consisted of an ET, which was designated ET-51; three SSME's, which were serial numbers 2019, 2033, and 2018 in positions 1, 2, and 3, respectively; and two retrievable and reusable SRB's which were designated BI-056. The lightweight RSRM's that were installed in each SRB were designated 360L029A for the left SRB, and 360L029B for the right SRB. The primary objectives of this flight were to perform the operations to deploy the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-F/Inertial Upper Stage payload and to fulfill the requirements of the Diffuse X-Ray Spectrometer (DXS) payload. The secondary objective was to fly the Chromosome and Plant Cell Division in Space (CHROMEX), Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA), Physiological and Anatomical Rodent Experiment (PARE), and the Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE). In addition to presenting a summary of subsystem performance, this report also discusses each Orbiter, ET, SSME, SRB, and RSRM in-flight anomaly in the applicable section of the report. The official tracking number for each in-flight anomaly, assigned by the cognizant project, is also shown. All times are given in Greenwich mean time (G.m.t.) and mission elapsed time (MET).

  19. STS-112 Flight Day 4 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    On the fourth day of STS-112, its crew (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Mission Specialist; Piers Sellers, Mission Specialist; Sandra Magnus, Mission Specialist; Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialist) onboard Atlantis and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) are seen preparing for the installation of the S1 truss structure. Inside the Destiny Laboratory Module, Korzun and other crewmembers are seen as they busily prepare for the work of the day. Sellers dons an oxygen mask and uses an exercise machine in order to purge the nitrogen from his bloodstream, in preparation for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Whitson uses the ISS's Canadarm 2 robotic arm to grapple the S1 truss and remove it from Atlantis' payload bay, with the assistance of Magnus. Using the robotic arm, Whitson slowly maneuvers the 15 ton truss structure into alignment with its attachment point on the starboard side of the S0 truss structure, where the carefully orchestrated mating procedures take place. There is video footage of the entire truss being rotated and positioned by the arm, and ammonia tank assembly on the structure is visible, with Earth in the background. Following the completion of the second stage capture, the robotic arm is ungrappled from truss. Sellers and Wolf are shown exiting the the Quest airlock hatch to begin their EVA. They are shown performing a variety of tasks on the now attached S1 truss structure, including work on the Crew Equipment Translation Cart (CETA), the S-band Antenna Assembly, and umbilical cables that provide power and remote operation capability to cameras. During their EVA, they are shown using a foot platform on the robotic arm. Significant portions of their activities are shown from the vantage of helmet mounted video cameras. The video closes with a final shot of the ISS and its new S1 truss.

  20. STS-92 - Landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery glides in for landing at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California at the conclusion of mission STS-92 on October 24, 2000. STS-92 was the 100th mission since the fleet of four Space Shuttles began flying in 1981. (Due to schedule changes, missions are not always launched in the order that was originally planned.) The almost 13-day mission was the last construction mission for the International Space Station prior to the first scientists taking up residency in the orbiting space laboratory the following month. The seven-member crew on STS-92 included mission specialists Koichi Wakata, Michael Lopez-Alegria, Jeff Wisoff, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao, pilot Pam Melroy and mission commander Brian Duffy.

  1. STS-93 Pilot Ashby suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparations for the third time, STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby pulls on his glove, part of his launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen Collins, Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission.

  2. STS-93 Pilot Ashby arrives at SLF for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby lands at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. 'Cady' Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. STS-93 is Ashby's inaugural Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes.

  3. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-5) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents a summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-5 launch time on November 11, 1982, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. Also presented are the wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in he SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-5 vehicle ascent and SRB descent have been constructed. The STS-5 ascent meteorological data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to Shuttle task agreement No. 936-53-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  4. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-41D) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Jasper, G.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-41D launch time on August 30, 1984, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given as well as wind and thermodynamic parameters representative of surface and aloft conditions in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final atmospheric tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-41D vehicle ascent and SRB descent/impact were constructed. The STS-41D ascent meteorological data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Atmospheric Science Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post flight performance assessments.

  5. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-30) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents a summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-30 launch time on May 4, 1989, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-30 vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-30 ascent atmospheric data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  6. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-7) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-7 launch time on June 18, 1983, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. Also presented are wind and thermodynamic parameters representative of surface and aloft conditions in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-7 vehicle ascent and Acoustic/SRB descent have been constructed. The STS-7 ascent meteorological data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to Shuttle task agreement No. 936-53-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  7. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-34) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    A summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-34 launch time on October 18, 1989, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida is presented. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (clouds), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters vs. altitude, for STS-34 vehicle ascent was constructed to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments. It represents the best estimates of the launch environment to the 400,000 feet altitude that was traversed by the STS-34 vehicle.

  8. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-6) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-6 launch time on April 4, 1983, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. Also presented are the wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-6 veicle ascent and SRB descent were constructed. The STS-6 ascent meteorological data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to Shuttle task agreement No. 936-53-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  9. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-29) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, G. L.; Batts, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents a summary of selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-29 launch time on March 13, 1989, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of pre-launch Jimsphere-measured vertical wind profiles is given in this report. The final atmospheric tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-29 vehicle ascent has been constructed. The STS-29 ascent atmospheric data tape has been constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center's Earth Science and Applications Division to provide an internally consistent data set for use in post-flight performance assessments.

  10. STS-97 Pilot Bloomfield arrives at KSC for TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    STS-97 Pilot Mike Bloomfield arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He and the rest of the crew are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include emergency egress training, familiarization with the payload, and a simulated launch countdown. The other crew members are Commander Brent Jett, and Mission Specialists Joe Tanner, Carlos Noriega and Marc Garneau, who is with the Canadian Space Agency. Mission STS-97is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at 10:05 p.m. EST.

  11. STS-49 Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 Orbiter Endeavour landed at Edwards Air Force Base on May 16, 1992 The drogue chute precedes the main chute in NASA's first exercise of its detailed test objective on the drag chute system. STS-49 ended its successful nine day mission dedicated to the retrieval, repair, and redeployment of the the INTELSAT VI (F-3) satellite. The communication satellite for the International Telecommunication Satellite organization had been stranded in an unusable orbit since its launch aboard the Titan rocket in March 1990. The mission marked the first time 3 astronauts worked simultaneously outside the space craft.

  12. STS-100 Pilot Ashby arrives at KSC before launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-100 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby arrives at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft to get ready for launch. The 11-day mission to the International Space Station will deliver and integrate the Spacelab Logistics Pallet/Launch Deployment Assembly, which includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator system and the UHF Antenna, and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello. Liftoff on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19.

  13. STS-112 Commander Ashby suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-112 Commander Jeffrey Ashby finishes suiting up for launch. STS-112 is the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss to the Station. Launch is scheduled for 3:46 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B.

  14. STS-95 Pilot Steve Lindsey in white room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the environmental chamber known as the white room, STS-95 Pilot Steven W. Lindsey is prepared by white room crew members Dave Law(left), Danny Wyatt and Travis Thompson (right) for entry into the Space Shuttle Discovery for his second flight into space. The STS-95 mission, targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7.

  15. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-4) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near space shuttle STS-4 launch time on June 27, 1982, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given as well as the wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological tapes, which consist of wind descent were constructed. The STS-4 ascent meteorological data tape was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to shuttle task agreement No. 989-13-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  16. Atmospheric environment for Space Shuttle (STS-11) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-11 launch time on February 3, 1984, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles are reported. Wind and thermodynamic parameters representative of surface and aloft conditions in the SRB descent/impact ocean area are presented. Meteorological tapes, which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters vesus altitude, for STS-11 vehicle ascent and SRB descent/impact were constructed.

  17. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-1) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Jasper, G.; Brown, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions near space shuttle STS-1 launch time on April, 12, 1981, at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are reported. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is presented. Also presented are the wind and thermodynamic parameters measured at the surface and aloft in the SRB descent/impact ocean area. Final meteorological data tapes for STS-1 vehicle ascent, and SRB descent have been constructed which consist of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude.

  18. Atmospheric environment for space shuttle (STS-13) launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Hill, C. K.; Jasper, G.; Batts, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Selected atmospheric conditions observed near Space Shuttle STS-13 launch time on April 6, 1984, at Kennedy Space Center Florida are summarized. Values of ambient pressure, temperature, moisture, ground winds, visual observations (cloud), and winds aloft are included. The sequence of prelaunch Jimsphere measured vertical wind profiles is given. The final meteorological tape, which consists of wind and thermodynamic parameters versus altitude, for STS-13 vehicle ascent was constructed by Marshall Space Flight Center in response to shuttle task agreement No. 561-81-22-368 with Johnson Space Center.

  19. sY116, a human -linked polymorphic STS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. Mustafa Saifi; Reiner Veitia; Houssein Khodjet El Khil; Sandrine Barbaux; Preetha Tilak; I. Manorama Thomas; Marc Fellous

    2000-04-01

    During a study of deletions of Y-chromosomal DNA in infertile males, sY116, a Y-linked STS, showed different electrophoretic mobilities in three males, two infertile and one fertile. A study of this STS among 35 other normal males showed that this locus is polymorphic. sY116 has a poly A-rich stretch whose instability appears to be the most likely cause of this polymorphism. The possible usefulness of sY116 polymorphism in the detection of subtle genome-wide instabilities in some types of cancer is discussed.

  20. STS-based education in non-majors college biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Phyllis Lee

    The study explored the effect of the science-technology-society (STS) and traditional teaching methods in non-majors biology classes at a community college. It investigated the efficacy of the two methods in developing cognitive abilities at Bloom's first three levels of learning. It compared retention rates in classes taught in the two methods. Changes in student attitude relating to anxiety, fear, and interest in biology were explored. The effect of each method on grade attainment among men and women was investigated. The effect of each method on grade attainment among older and younger students was examined. Results of the study indicated that no significant differences, relating to retention or student attitude, existed in classes taught in the two methods. The study found no significant cognitive gains at Bloom's first three levels in classes taught in the traditional format. In the STS classes no significant gains were uncovered at Bloom's first level of cognition. Statistically significant gains were found in the STS classes at Bloom's second and third levels of cognition. In the classes taught in the traditional format no difference was identified in grade attainment between males and females. In the STS-based classes a small correlational difference between males and females was found with males receiving lower grades than expected. No difference in grade attainment was found between older and younger students taught in the traditional format. In the STS-based classes a small statistically significant difference in grade attainment was uncovered between older and younger students with older students receiving more A's and fewer C's than expected. This study found no difference in the grades of older, female students as compared to all other students in the traditionally taught classes. A weak statistically significant difference was discovered between grade attainment of older, female students and all other students in the STS classes with older, female

  1. STS-112 M.S. Magnus suits up before launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-112 Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus finishes suiting up before launch. STS-112 is the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss to the Station. Launch is scheduled for 3:46 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B.

  2. STS-100 MS Phillips is fully suited up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-100 Mission Specialist John L. Phillips is fully suited for launch. The 11-day mission to the International Space Station will deliver and integrate the Spacelab Logistics Pallet/Launch Deployment Assembly, which includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator system and the UHF Antenna, and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello. The mission includes two planned spacewalks for installation of the SSRMS. The mission is also the inaugural flight of Raffaello, carrying resupply stowage racks and resupply/return stowage platforms. Liftoff on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19.

  3. STS-100 MS Phillips arrives at KSC before launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-100 Mission Specialist John L. Phillips arrives at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T- 38 jet aircraft to get ready for launch. The 11-day mission to the International Space Station will deliver and integrate the Spacelab Logistics Pallet/Launch Deployment Assembly, which includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator system and the UHF Antenna, and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello. Liftoff on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19.

  4. Post STS-135 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA design engineers submitted witness materials from the solid rocket booster (SRB) main flame deflector for evaluation after the launch of STS-135. The following items were submitted for analysis: HY-80 steel witnes rods, 304 sta inles steel caps, and tungsten pistons. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-135. The submitted samples were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the HY-80 witness rod metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch.

  5. Post STS-134 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA design engineers submitted witness materials from the solid rocket booster (SRB) main flame deflector for evaluation after the launch of STS-134. The following items were submitted for analysis: 1018 steel witness rods 304 stainless steel caps, tungsten pistons, and A-286 piston sleeves. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-134. All of the items were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the 1018 witness rod metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch

  6. STS-112 M.S. Sellers suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During suitup for launch, STS-112 Mission Specialist Piers Sellers smiles in anticipation of his first Shuttle flight. STS-112 is the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss to the Station. Launch is scheduled for 3:46 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B.

  7. Current concentration of artificial radionuclides and estimated radiation doses from 137Cs around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site, and in Nagasaki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yasuyuki; Hayashida, Naomi; Brahmanandhan, Gopalganapathi M; Nagayama, Yuji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takahashi, Jumpei; Gutevitc, Alexander; Kazlovsky, Alexander; Urazalin, Marat; Takamura, Noboru

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate current environmental contamination and contributions from internal and external exposure due to the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) and nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site (SNTS), concentrations of artificial radionuclides in edible mushrooms, soils and stones from each area were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Annual effective doses were calculated for each area from the cesium contamination. Calculated internal effective doses of (137)Cs due to ingestion of mushrooms were 1.8 × 10(-1) mSv/year (y) in Gomel city (around CNPP), 1.7 × 10(-1) mSv/y in Korosten city (around CNPP), 2.8 × 10(-4) mSv/y in Semipalatinsk city, and 1.3 × 10(-4) mSv/y in Nagasaki. Calculated external effective doses of (137)Cs were 3.4 × 10(-2) mSv/y in Gomel city, 6.2 × 10(-2) mSv/y in Korosten city, 2.0 × 10(-4) mSv/y in Semipalatinsk city, and 1.3 × 10(-4) mSv/y in Nagasaki. Distribution of radionuclides in stones collected beside Lake Balapan (in SNTS) were (241)Am (49.4 ± 1.4 Bq/kg), (137)Cs (406.3 ± 1.7 Bq/kg), (58)Co (3.2 ± 0.5 Bq/kg), and (60)Co (125.9 ± 1.1 and 126.1 ± 1.1 Bq/kg). The present study revealed that dose rates from internal and external exposure around CNPP were not sufficiently low and radiation exposure potency still exists even though current levels are below the public dose limit of 1 mSv/y (ICRP1991). Moreover, parts of the SNTS area may be still contaminated by artificial radionuclides derived from nuclear tests. Long-term follow-up of environmental monitoring around CNPP and SNTS, as well as evaluation of health effects in the population residing around these areas, may contribute to radiation safety with a reduction of unnecessary exposure of residents.

  8. Systematic Treatment Selection (STS): A Review and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tam T.; Bertoni, Matteo; Charvat, Mylea; Gheytanchi, Anahita; Beutler, Larry E.

    2007-01-01

    Systematic Treatment Selection (STS) is a form of technical eclectism that develops and plans treatments using empirically founded principles of psychotherapy. It is a model that provides systematic guidelines for the utilization of different psychotherapeutic strategies based on patient qualities and problem characteristics. Historically, it…

  9. STS-93 Pilot Ashby takes part in emergency egress training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby pauses for the photographer before climbing into an M-113 armored personnel carrier at the launch pad to take part in emergency egress training. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Others in the crew are Commander Eileen M. Collins and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B.

  10. Katz model prediction of Caenorhabditis elegans mutagenesis on STS-42

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Katz, Robert; Badhwar, Gautam D.

    1992-01-01

    Response parameters that describe the production of recessive lethal mutations in C. elegans from ionizing radiation are obtained with the Katz track structure model. The authors used models of the space radiation environment and radiation transport to predict and discuss mutation rates for C. elegans on the IML-1 experiment aboard STS-42.

  11. Beyond the Triple Helix: Framing STS in the Developmental Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Sulfikar; Nugroho, Yanuar

    2013-01-01

    For the past three decades or so, the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) has shed light on the interrelationship between modern science and technology, on one side, and contemporary society, on the other. A majority of this knowledge and insights are situated in the context of Western societies, or more precisely, in economically and…

  12. STS-86 crew members Bloomfield and Chretien in white room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    While a white room closeout crew member looks on, STS-86 Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, at right, gets some assistance from fellow crew member, Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, before entering the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A.

  13. STS-112 M.S. Magnus suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --STS-112 Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus dons her space helmet for a final fit check in preparation for her launch to the International Space Station aboard Atlantis. Launch is scheduled for Oct. 2 between 2 and 6 p.m. EDT.

  14. STS-69 Crew members display 'Dog Crew' patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Following their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the five astronauts assigned to Space Shuttle Mission STS-69 display the unofficial crew patch for their upcoming spaceflight: the Dog Crew II patch. Mission Commander David M. Walker (center) and Payload Commander James S. Voss (second from right) previously flew together on Mission STS-53, the final dedicated Department of Defense flight on the Space Shuttle. A close comradery formed among Walker, Voss and the rest of the crew, and they dubbed themselves the 'dogs of war', with each of the STS-53 'Dog Crew' members assigned a 'dog tag' or nickname. When the STS-69 astronauts also became good buddies, they decided it was time for the Dog Crew II to be named. Walker's dog tag is Red Dog, Voss's is Dogface, Pilot Kenneth D. Cockrell (second from left) is Cujo, space rookie and Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt (left) is Under Dog, and Mission Specialist James H. Newman (right) is Pluato. The Dog Crew II patch features a bulldog peering out from a doghouse shaped like the Space Shuttle and lists the five crew member's dog names. The five astronauts are scheduled to lift off on the fifth Shuttle flight of the year at 11:04 a.m. EDT, August 31, aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour.

  15. STS-27 Atlantis, OV-104, solid rocket booster (SRB) inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Engineers, kneeling inside a hollow solid rocket booster (SRB), closely inspect the SRB segments and seams in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) rotation and processing facility. The SRB will be used on STS-27 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. The booster segments were transported via rail car from Morton Thiokol's Utah manufacturing plant. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-492.

  16. STS 41-D mission specialist Judith Resnik reivews headset interfac

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    STS 41-D mission specialist Judith Resnik and trainer review the headset interface units of the communication kit assemblies to be used during mission. Resnick is wearing the headset interface unit and headset and is examing the documentation attached to the equipment.

  17. STS-88 crew goes through Crew Equipment Interface Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists (left to right) Jerry L. Ross; Sergei Krikalev, a cosmonaut from Russia; and James H. Newman examine equipment that will be on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during their upcoming flight. Launch of Mission STS-88 is targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Other crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow and Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability.

  18. Mission Operations Control Room Activities during STS-2 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) activities during STS-2 mission. Overall view of the MOCR in the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center. At far right is Eugene F. Kranz, Deputy Director of Flight Operations. At the flight director console in front of Kranz's FOD console are Flight Directors M.P. Frank, Neil B. Hutchinson and Donald R. Puddy as well as others (39506); Wide-angle view of flight controllers in the MOCR. Clifford E. Charlesworth, JSC Deputy Director, huddles with several flight directors for STS-2 at the flight director console. Kranz, is at far right of frame (39507); Dr. Christopher C. Kraft, Jr., JSC Director, center, celebrates successful flight and landing of STS-2 with a cigar in the MOCR. He is flanked by Dr. Maxime A Faget, left, Director of Engineering and Development, and Thomas L. Moser, of the Structures and Mechanics Division (39508); Flight Director Donald R. Puddy, near right, holds replica of the STS-2 insignia. Insignias on the opposite wall

  19. Bridgework: STS, Sociology, and the “Dark Matters” of Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rodríguez-Muñiz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This short essay reflects on intellectual bridges that scholars have built, are building, and could build to connect critical sociologies of race and STS. Whereas much work in these respective fields have rarely intersected, greater exchange could help scholars better account for ways in which race shapes and stratifies contemporary societies. To this end, the essay begins with a recent example of bridgework—research on race and genetics. Next, I use my own research on ethnoracial statistics to describe how bridgework happening elsewhere can indirectly create openings for connections across the divide. Finally, I propose that research on the broader sociotechnical materiality of race and racial domination represents an important site for further bridgework.

  20. STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega in white room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew.

  1. Site Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  2. STS-93 Pilot Ashby signs autographs after mission presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby signs autographs after a mission presentation for KSC employees. The five-day mission primarily released the Chandra X-ray Observatory, allowing scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. STS-93 was also the first mission to have a woman, Eileen M. Collins, serving as Shuttle commander.

  3. STS-100 Pilot Ashby suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-100 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby gives a silent greeting to his wife, Paige, during suitup for launch in the Operations and Checkout Building. The 11-day mission to the International Space Station will deliver and integrate the Spacelab Logistics Pallet/Launch Deployment Assembly, which includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator system and the UHF Antenna. The mission includes two planned spacewalks for installation of the SSRMS, which will be performed by Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski and Chris A. Hadfield. The mission is also the inaugural flight of Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, carrying resupply stowage racks and resupply/return stowage platforms. Liftoff on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19.

  4. STS-84 oxygen generator for Mir on display at SPACEHAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    An oxygen generator destined to replace a malfunctioning unit on the Russian Mir Space Station is the object of much curiosity during preflight preparations in the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility. A SPACEHAB Double Module on the Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry the oxygen generator to Mir during STS-84, the sixth Shuttle-Mir docking. The nearly 300-pound generator, manufactured by RSC Energia in Russia, will replace one of two Mir units that have been malfunctioning recently. The generator functions by electrolysis, which separates water into its oxygen and hydrogen components. The hydrogen is vented and the oxygen is used for breathing by the Mir crew. The generator is 4.2 feet in length and 1.4 feet in diameter. STS-84, which is planned to include a Mir crew exchange of astronaut C. Michael Foale for Jerry M. Linenger, is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  5. STS-95 Pilot Steve Lindsey suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Pilot Steven W. Lindsey tests his flight suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. The final fitting takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39B. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  6. REPORT FROM THE STS NATIONAL DATABASE WORK FORCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, David M.; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Prager, Richard L.; Wright, Cameron D.; Clarke, David R.; Pasquali, Sara; O’Brien, Sean M.; Dokholyan, Rachel S.; Meehan, Paul; McDonald, Donna E.; Jacobs, Marshall L.; Mavroudis, Constantine; Shahian, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Several distinct definitions of postoperative death have been used in various quality reporting programs. Some have defined a postoperative mortality as a patient who expires while still in the hospital, while others have considered all deaths occurring within a predetermined, standardized time interval after surgery. While if continues to collect mortality data using both these individual definitions, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) believes that either alone may be inadequate. Accordingly, the STS prefers a more encompassing metric, Operative Mortality, which is defined as (1) all deaths occurring during the hospitalization in which the operation was performed, even if after 30 days; and (2) all deaths occurring after discharge from the hospital, but before the end of the thirtieth postoperative day. This manuscript provides clarification for some uncommon but important scenarios where the correct application of this definition may be problematic. PMID:23799748

  7. STS-47 Endeavour, OV-105, Official crew portrait

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Official portrait includes the seven crewmembers wearing launch and entry suits (LESs). These seven crewmembers are currently in training for the STS-47 Spacelab J (SLJ) mission scheduled for later this year. Pictured are (left to right, front) Mission Specialist (MS) Jerome Apt and Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Jr (both holding launch and entry helmets (LEHs)); and (left to right, rear) MS N. Jan Davis, MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee, Commander Robert L. Gibson, MS Mae C. Jemison, and Japanese Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri. Mohri is representing the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). In the background are the flags of the United States (U.S.) and Japan. Portrait was made by NASA JSC contract photographer Robert G. Markowitz.

  8. Post STS-133 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA Structures engineers submitted main flame deflector witness materials for evaluation after the launch of STS-133. The following items were submitted for analysis: HY-80 steel witness rods, 304 stainless steel caps, tungsten pistons, 17-4 precipitation hardened (PH) stainless steel and A-286 piston sleeves, Medtherm Corporation calorimeters, and Nanmac Corporation thermocouples. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-133, and before they were reinstalled at the launch pad for future launches. The HY -80 witness rods, 304 stainless steel caps, and the piston sleeves were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the HY-80 witness rod and 304 stainless steel cap metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch.

  9. STS-84 M.S. Carlos Noriega suits up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega gets assistance from a suit technician as he dons his launch and entry suit during final prelaunch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building. This will be Noriegas first space flight. Noriega and six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on a mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir.

  10. STS-97 Crew Interview: Carlos Noriega, MS3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The STS-97 Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his training. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, its payload, the rendez-vous with the International Space Station (ISS), and what it will be like to work knowing there is already a crew on board the ISS.

  11. STS-74 Mission Cmdr Kenneth D. Cameron suits up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    STS-74 Commander Kenneth D. Cameron is donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building as a suit technician lends a helping hand. Cameron and four fellow astronauts are scheduled to depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits a second liftoff attempt during a seven- minute window scheduled to open at approximately 7:30 a.m. EST, Nov. 12.

  12. Three STS 26 astronauts training in the Crew Compartment trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Three astronauts named in January 1987 as part of a five-member crew for NASA's first flight since the Challenger accident are shown in a photo session of July 1986. Left to right are Astronauts John M. (Mike) Lounge, Richard O. Covey and David C. Hilmers. Lounge and Hilmers will serve as Mission specialists for the STS 26 flight and Covey will serve as pilot. The three are on the middeck of JSC's one-G Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT).

  13. STS-47 crewmembers during KSC terminal countdown demonstration test (TCDT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 crewmembers participate in terminal countdown demonstration test (TCDT) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). On KSC Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B tower, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark C. Lee (wearing sunglasses) points to a distant location as Japanese Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri (center), and Mission Specialist Mae C. Jemison look on. The crewmembers are standing on the launch tower's slidewire emergency egress system platform.

  14. Unity Module in the Payload Bay for STS-88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Unity module inside the shuttle payload bay of Space Shuttle Endeavour. Endeavour is scheduled to fly on mission STS-88, the first Space Shuttle flight for the assembly of the International Space Station, on December 3, 1998. The primary payload on the mission is the Unity connecting module, which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya Control Module already in orbit at that time.

  15. STS-35 DTO 0634 EDO trash compactor demonstration at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Development Test Objective (DTO) 0634 Trash Compaction and Retention System Demostration extended duration orbiter (EDO) trash compactor is operated by Project Engineer Fred Abolfathi of Lockheed Engineering and Space Corporation (left) and JSC Man-Systems Division Subsystems Manager J.B. Thomas. The EDO trash compactor will occupy one middeck locker and consists of a geared mechanism that allows manual compaction of wet and dry trash.

  16. STS-103 crew practice emergency egress in the slidewire basket

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the slidewire basket on Launch Pad 39B, STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) gets ready to pull the lever, which will release the basket. With Foale are fellow crew members Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.). The baskets are part of the emergency egress system for persons in the Shuttle vehicle or on the Rotating Service Structure. Seven slidewires extend from the orbiter access arm, with a netted, flatbottom basket suspended from each wire. The STS-103 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities in preparation for launch. The other crew members taking part are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Clervoy and Nicollier are with the European Space Agency. The TCDT provides the crew with the emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  17. A science teacher's reflections and knowledge growth about STS instruction after actual implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2002-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to describe a science teacher's views of STS (Science-Technology-Society) instruction and what she acquired after implementing a two-semester STS-oriented science course in a high school of Taiwan. Upon analysis of the teacher's journals, interview data, concept maps, and relevant student questionnaire responses, this study revealed the following findings. The teacher believed that STS instruction was a potential way of practicing so-called constructivist teaching and her pedagogical knowledge about STS showed a considerable growth. As a result of STS instruction, her epistemological views of science seemed to progress toward more constructivist-oriented views of science. The heavy content load of Taiwan's national curriculum, regular cross-class standard tests, the lack of peers' or administrative support, the resource limitations in Chinese language, and the cultural impacts were identified as major factors that inhibited her implementation of STS instruction.

  18. MS Noriega and Tanner check out STS-97 payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-97 Mission Specialists Carlos Noriega (left) and Joe Tanner check out the mission payload, the P6 integrated truss segment. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station's electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The mission includes two spacewalks by Noriega and Tanner to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST.

  19. STS-93 Pilot Ashby suits up before launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparations for the second time, STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby waves after donning his launch and entry suit while a suit tech adjusts his boot. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS- 93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission.

  20. STS-121: Discovery L-1 Countdown Status Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Bruce Buckingham, NASA Public Affairs, introduces Jeff Spaulding, NASA Test Director; Debbie Hahn, STS-121 Payload Manager; and Kathy Winters, Shuttle Weather Officer. Spaulding gives his opening statement on this one day prior to the launching of the Space Shuttle Discovery. He discusses the following topics: 1) Launch of the Space Shuttle Discovery; 2) Weather; 3) Load over of onboard reactants; 4) Hold time for liquid hydrogen; 5) Stowage of Mid-deck completion; 6) Check-out of onboard and ground network systems; 7) Launch windows; 8) Mission duration; 9) Extravehicular (EVA) plans; 10) Space Shuttle landing day; and 11) Scrub turn-around plans. Hahn presents and discusses a short video of the STS-121 payload flow. Kathy Winters gives her weather forecast for launch. She then presents a slide presentation on the following weather conditions for the Space Shuttle Discovery: 1) STS-121 Tanking Forecast; 2) Launch Forecast; 3) SRB Recovery; 4) CONUS Launch; 5) TAL Launch; 6) 24 Hour Delay; 7) CONUS 24 Hour; 8) TAL 24 Hour; 9) 48 Hour Launch; 10) CONUS 48 Hour; and 11) TAL 48 Hour. The briefing ends with a question and answer period from the media.

  1. STS Gene in a Pedigree with X-linked Ichthyosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU An; XIAO Shengxiang; TAN Shengshun; LEI Xiaobing; ZHANG Jiangan; JIAO Ting; LIU Yan

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the gene mutation in a pedigree with X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) and to explore the relationship between the mutation and its clinical manifestations, genomic DNA of affected members, the normal member of the pedigree and 50 unrelated normal members was extracted with a whole blood genomic DNA extraction kit and the DNA was used as a template for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated amplification of exon 1 and exon 10 of the STS gene. hHb6 (human hair basic keratin) gene was used as the internal control. Our results showed that the STS gene was deleted in affected members in the pedigree with X-linked ichthyosis. The normal member of the pedigree and 50 unrelated normal members had no such deletion. The proband and his mother had products in the internal control after PCR amplification. The blank control had no product. It is concluded that deletion of the STS gene existed in this pedigree with X-linked ichthyosis, and it is responsible for the unique skin lesions of X-linked ichthyosis.

  2. STS-103 crew wait inside Discovery for simulated countdown exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. sits inside orbiter Discovery waiting for the start of a simulated countdown exercise. The simulation is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT also provides the crew with emergency egress training and opportunities to inspect their mission payload in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part in the TCDT are Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Jean-Fran'''ois Clervoy of France, and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland. Clervoy and Nicollier are with the European Space Agency. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  3. STS-103 crew on Pad 39-B during TCDT activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Taking a break during emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39B are (left to right) STS-103 Mission Specialists Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and Steven L. Smith. Clervoy and Nicollier are with the European Space Agency. The training is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that also include opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  4. STS-103 MS Clervoy tries on oxygen mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the bunker at Launch Pad 39B, STS-103 Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA), tries on an oxygen mask during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Other crew members taking part are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), plus Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is also with ESA. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  5. Care in context: Becoming an STS researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson-Graham, Melissa; Kenney, Martha; Ladd, Kelly; Murray, Cameron Michael; Simmonds, Emily Astra-Jean

    2015-10-01

    This collaborative article, written by graduate students who attended the Politics of Care in Technoscience Workshop, brings the themes in this volume to bear on their own developing science and technology study projects and research practices. Exploring the contours of five specific moments where questions of care have arisen in the course of their everyday research, they do not find a single or untroubled definition of care; instead, care is often a site of ambivalence, tension, and puzzlement. However, despite this uneasiness, they argue that taking the time to reflect on the multiple, sometimes conflicting, forms and definitions of care within a specific research context can inform the way that science and technology studies scholars envision and conduct their work.

  6. Neutron microtomography-based virtual extraction and analysis of a cercopithecoid partial cranium (STS 1039) embedded in a breccia fragment from sterkfontein member 4 (South Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, Amélie; Braga, José; de Beer, Frikkie; Schillinger, Burkhard; Steininger, Christine; Vodopivec, Vladimira; Zanolli, Clément

    2016-04-01

    The Plio-Pleistocene karstic sedimentary deposits of Sterkfontein Cave, South Africa, yielded numerous fossil primate specimens embedded in blocks of indurated breccia, including the partial cercopithecoid cranium labelled STS 1039. Because the surrounding matrix masks most of its morphology, the specimen remains taxonomically undetermined. While the use of X-ray microtomography did not allow extracting any structural information about the specimen, we experimented a new investigative technique based on neutron microtomography. Using this innovative approach, we successfully virtually extracted, reconstructed in 3D and quantitatively assessed the preserved dentognathic structural morphology of STS 1039, including details of its postcanine maxillary dentition. Following comparative analyses with a number of Plio-Pleistocene and extant cercopithecoid taxa, we tentatively propose a taxonomic attribution to the taxon Cercopithecoides williamsi. Our experience highlights the remarkable potential of this novel imaging method to extract diagnostic information and to identify the fossil remains embedded in hard breccia from the South African hominin-bearing cave sites.

  7. Voice identity recognition: functional division of the right STS and its behavioral relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Sonja; Kiebel, Stefan J; Maess, Burkhard; von Kriegstein, Katharina

    2015-02-01

    The human voice is the primary carrier of speech but also a fingerprint for person identity. Previous neuroimaging studies have revealed that speech and identity recognition is accomplished by partially different neural pathways, despite the perceptual unity of the vocal sound. Importantly, the right STS has been implicated in voice processing, with different contributions of its posterior and anterior parts. However, the time point at which vocal and speech processing diverge is currently unknown. Also, the exact role of the right STS during voice processing is so far unclear because its behavioral relevance has not yet been established. Here, we used the high temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography and a speech task control to pinpoint transient behavioral correlates: we found, at 200 msec after stimulus onset, that activity in right anterior STS predicted behavioral voice recognition performance. At the same time point, the posterior right STS showed increased activity during voice identity recognition in contrast to speech recognition whereas the left mid STS showed the reverse pattern. In contrast to the highly speech-sensitive left STS, the current results highlight the right STS as a key area for voice identity recognition and show that its anatomical-functional division emerges around 200 msec after stimulus onset. We suggest that this time point marks the speech-independent processing of vocal sounds in the posterior STS and their successful mapping to vocal identities in the anterior STS.

  8. Site assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Allan; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report describes the site assessment of given position in a given site, for a wind turbine with a well-defined hub height and rotor diameter. The analysis is carried out in accordance to IEC 61400-12-1 [1], and both an obstacle assessment and a terrain assessment are performed....

  9. Site assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report describes the site assessment of given position in a given site, for a wind turbine with a well-defined hub height and rotor diameter. The analysis is carried out in accordance to IEC 61400-12-1 [1], and both an obstacle assessment and a terrain assessment are performed....

  10. Non-magnetic impurity effects in LiFeAs studied by STM/STS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaguri, T.; Khim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Bumsung; Kim, Kee Hoon; Kitagawa, K.; Matsubayashi, K.; Mazaki, Y.; Uwatoko, Y.; Takigawa, M.; Takagi, H.

    2012-02-01

    Detecting the possible sign reversal of the superconducting gap in iron-based superconductors is highly non-trivial. Here we use non-magnetic impurity as a sign indicator. If the sign of the superconducting gap is positive everywhere in momentum space, in-gap bound state should not be observed near the impurity site unless it is magnetic. On the other hand, if there is a sign-reversal in the gap, even non-magnetic impurity may create in-gap bound state [1]. We performed STM/STS experiments on self-flux and Sn-flux grown LiFeAs crystals and examined the effects of Sn impurity. In STM images of Sn-flux grown samples, we found a ring-like object which may represent Sn. Tunneling spectrum taken at this defect site exhibits in-gap bound state. Together with flat-bottom superconducting gap observed far from the defects, sign-reversing s-wave gap is the most plausible gap structure in LiFeAs. [1] T. Kariyado and M. Ogata, JPSJ 79, 083704 (2010).

  11. STS-49 Landing at Edwards with First Drag Chute Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour concludes mission STS-49 at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 1:57 p.m. (PDT) landing 16 May on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 7-day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 4:41 p.m. (PFT), 7 May, was extended two days to allow extra time to rescue the Intelsat VI satellite and complete Space Station assembly techniques originally planned. After a perfect rendezvous in orbit and numerous attempts to grab the satellite, space walking astronauts Pierre Thuot, Rick Hieb and Tom Akers successfully rescued it by hand on the third space walk with the support of mission specialists Kathy Thornton and Bruce Melnick. The three astronauts, on a record space walk, took hold of the satellite and directed it to the shuttle where a booster motor was attached to launch it to its proper orbit. Commander Dan Brandenstein and Pilot Kevin Chilton brought Endeavours's record setting maiden voyage to a perfect landing at Edwards AFB with the first deployment of a drag chute on a shuttle mission. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their

  12. STS-103 crew pose in front of Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    During Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TDCT) activities at Launch Pad 39B, the STS-103 crew pose in front of the flame trench, which is situated underneath the Mobile Launcher Platform holding Space Shuttle Discovery. Standing left to right are Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., and Mission Specialists Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, also with ESA, and Steven L. Smith. One of the solid rocket boosters and the external tank that are attached to Discovery can be seen in the photo. The flame trench is made of concrete and refractory brick, and contains an orbiter flame deflector on one side and solid rocket booster flame deflector on the other. The deflectors protect the flame trench floor and pad surface from the intense heat of launch. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  13. STS-103 crew look over payload inside Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Members of the STS-103 crew, with representatives from Goddard Space Flight Center, look over the Hubble servicing cargo in the payload bay of Space Shuttle Discovery at Launch Pad 39B. From left are Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland; Steve Pataki and Dave Southwick, with Goddard; and Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. Inspecting the payload is part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), which also provides the crew with emergency egress training and a simulated countdown exercise. Other crew members taking part in the TCDT are Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Jean- Fran'''ois Clervoy of France. Clervoy and Nicollier are with the European Space Agency. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  14. Science Education and the Science-Technology-Society (S-T-S) Theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1987-01-01

    Aims to clarify the relationship between science education and the science-technology-society (STS) theme and to develop a justification for the inclusion of the STS theme. Examines the current debate over definitions in science education, and provides an historical perspective of science education's purpose as a social institution. (TW)

  15. On the relationship between wind profiles and the STS ascent structural loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Orvel E.; Adelfang, Stanley I.; Whitehead, Douglas S.

    1989-01-01

    The response of STS ascent structural load indicators to the wind profile is analyzed. The load indicator values versus Mach numbers are calculated with algorithms using trajectory information. The ascent load minimum margin concept is used to show that the detailed wind profile structure measured by the Jimsphere wind system is not needed to assess the STS rigid body structural wind loads.

  16. STS-56 Commander Cameron, in LES, during JSC emergency egress training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), poses at the Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT) side hatch before climbing into the mockup. Cameron, along with the other STS-56 crewmembers, is participating in an emergency egress simulation at JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  17. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, MS Musgrave on FB-SMS middeck during JSC training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) F. Story Musgrave, wearing lightweight headset (HDST), adjusts controls on communications module mounted on a middeck overhead panel. Musgrave is on the middeck of the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. The STS-44 crewmembers are participating in a flight simulation.

  18. STS-26 MS Hilmers on fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers prepares to ascend a ladder representing the interdeck access hatch from the shuttle middeck to the flight deck. The STS-26 crew is training in the fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  19. STS-26 MS Lounge in fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge, wearing comunications kit assembly headset and crouched on the aft flight deck, performs checklist inspection during training session. The STS-26 crew is training in the fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  20. STS-26 crew on fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck (left) and Pilot Richard O. Covey review checklists in their respective stations on the foward flight deck. The STS-26 crew is training in the fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  1. Official Portrait of STS-52 Canadian Payload Specialist Steve G. MacLean

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-52 Canadian Payload Specialist Steven G. MacLean, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES), poses with a launch and entry helmet (LEH) and Canadian flag for his Official portrait. MacLean representing the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) will fly aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, for the STS-52 mission.

  2. STS-86 Atlantis rolls out to Pad 39A (full moon on horizon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Shortly before dawn, a red-rimmed moon helps to light the way for the Space Shuttle Atlantis as it rolls out to Launch Pad 39A in preparation for launch of Mission STS-86. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff is targeted for no earlier than Sept. 22.

  3. Science-Technology-Society (STS): A New Paradigm in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Nasser

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the past two decades of goals for science education in schools have induced new orientations in science education worldwide. One of the emerging complementary approaches was the science-technology-society (STS) movement. STS has been called the current megatrend in science education. Others have called it a paradigm shift for the field…

  4. STS-54 DSO 802, Educational activities 'Physics of Toys', equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Toys for STS-54 Detailed Supplementary Objective (DSO) 802, Educational activities 'Physics of Toys', are displayed on a table top. Part of the educational activities onboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, will include several experiments with these toys. DSO 802 will allow the crewmembers to experiment with the various types of toys in a microgravity environment while talking to pupils who will be able to monitor (via classroom television (TV) sets) the onboard activities at their schools. NOTE: Also labeled the Application Specific Preprogrammed Experiment Culture System Physic of Toys (ASPEC).

  5. STS-112 Commander Ashby in white room before launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - -- In the White Room at Launch Pad 39B, STS-112 Commander Jeffrey Ashby receives assistance with his spacesuit before boarding Space Shuttle Atlantis. Liftoff is schedued for 3:46 p.m. EDT. Along with a crew of six, Atlantis will carry the S1 Integrated Truss Structure and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A to the International Space Station (ISS). The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss.

  6. STS-74 Cmdr Kenneth D. Cameron in white room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    At Launch Pad 39A, STS-74 Commander Kenneth D. Cameron finishes preparing his launch/entry suit for flight as a team of white room closeout crew personnel assist him. From left are KSC Lockheed closeout crew lead Mike Mangione; KSC NASA quality assurance technician Eartha Shoemaker; Johnson Space Center Lockheed suit technician Ray Villalobos; JSC NASA suit tech Jean Alexander (behind Cameron); and astronaut Steve Smith.The closeout crew will help Cameron into the cockpit of the orbiter Atlantis, scheduled for liftoff at about 7:30 a.m. EST, Nov. 12.

  7. STS-54 DSO 802, Educational activities 'Physics of Toys', equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Toys for STS-54 Detailed Supplementary Objective (DSO) 802, Educational activities 'Physics of Toys', are displayed on a table top. Part of the educational activities onboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, will include several experiments with these toys. DSO 802 will allow the crewmembers to experiment with the various types of toys in a microgravity environment while talking to pupils who will be able to monitor (via classroom television (TV) sets) the onboard activities at their schools. Among the toys seen here are a friction car and loop track, paper eagle, and a balloon helicopter. NOTE: also labeled the Application Specific Preprogrammed Experiment Culture System Physics of Toys (ASPEC).

  8. STS-47 crew extinquishes fire during JSC fire fighting exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, crewmembers lined up along water hoses direct spray at fire blazing in JSC's Fire Training Pit. At the left are backup Payload Specialist Stan Koszelak, holding the hose nozzle, and Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis. Manning the hose on the right are backup Payload Specialist Takao Doi, holding the hose nozzle, followed by Commander Robert L. Gibson, Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri, and MS Jerome Apt. Guiding the teams are MS Mae C. Jemison (front) and a veteran fire fighter and instructor (center). Doi and Mohri represent Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA). The Fire Training Pit is located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207.

  9. STS-110 Commander Bloomfield during TCDT in Atlantis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-110 Commander Michael Bloomfield settles into his seat in Space Shuttle Atlantis as he prepares for a simulated launch countdown. The simulation is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. TCDT also includes emergency egress training and is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  10. STS-110 Pilot Frick and Commander Bloomfield in slidewire basket

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-110 Pilot Stephen N. Frick and Commander Michael J. Bloomfield climb into the slidewire basket, part of emergency egress equipment on the launch pad.. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown, held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  11. STS-110 Pilot Frick and Commander Bloomfield during TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As part of emergency egress training, STS-110 Pilot Stephen N. Frick and Commander Michael J. Bloomfield head for the slidewire basket on the Fixed Service Structure. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown, held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  12. Impact of STS Issue Oriented Instruction on Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Views and Perceptions of Science, Technology, and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirshokoohi, Aidin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the impact of Science, Technology, Society (STS) issue oriented science methods course on pre-service teachers' views and perceptions toward STS issues and instruction as well as their levels of environmental literacy. The STS issue oriented curriculum was designed to help pre-service teachers improve…

  13. 77 FR 75628 - STS Hydropower, Ltd., Dan River, Inc., and City of Danville, VA; Notice of Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission STS Hydropower, Ltd., Dan River, Inc., and City of Danville, VA; Notice of..., 2012, Jeoffrey L. Burtch, as Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Trustee for Dan River, Inc. and STS Hydropower, Ltd... the license for the Schoolfield Hydroelectric Project from Dan River, Inc. and STS Hydropower, Ltd. to...

  14. Site Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahedi, Haseebullah

    2016-01-01

    different practices in the construction phase. The research is based on an ethnographic study of a case in Denmark. The empirical data were collected through direct observations and semi-structured interviews with site managers, contract managers, foremen and craftsmen. Findings revealed...... that the construction phase comprises several communities and practices, leading to various uses of the drawings. The results indicated that the craftsmen used drawings to position themselves in the correct location, and that the site managers and contract managers used them as management tools and legal documents...

  15. STS-31 Mission Onboard Photograph-Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    In this photograph, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was being deployed on April 25, 1990. The photograph was taken by the IMAX Cargo Bay Camera (ICBC) mounted in a container on the port side of the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery (STS-31 mission). The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit for 15 years or more. The HST provides fine detail imaging, produces ultraviolet images and spectra, and detects very faint objects. Two months after its deployment in space, scientists detected a 2-micron spherical aberration in the primary mirror of the HST that affected the telescope's ability to focus faint light sources into a precise point. This imperfection was very slight, one-fiftieth of the width of a human hair. A scheduled Space Service servicing mission (STS-61) in 1993 permitted scientists to correct the problem. During four spacewalks, new instruments were installed into the HST that had optical corrections. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. Photo Credit: NASA/Smithsonian Institution/Lockheed Corporation.

  16. STS-97 MS Carlos Noriega suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    STS-97 Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega appears relaxed as he dons his launch and entry suit. This is his second Shuttle flight. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. It is transporting the P6 Integrated Truss Structure that comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. The 11-day mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. The Station'''s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST.

  17. STS-103 Discovery crawls to Launch Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    With the American flag flapping in the morning breeze, Space Shuttle Discovery across the turn basin makes its 4.2-mile (6.8 kilometer) crawl to Launch Pad 39B (background, left) atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter. Once at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a 'call-up' due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, both with the European Space Agency.

  18. STS-100 Pilot Ashby arrives at KSC for TCDT activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-100 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby arrives at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. He and the rest of the crew Commander Kent V. Rominger and Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield, Scott E. Parazynski, John L. Phillips, Umberto Guidoni and Yuri Lonchakov -- are going to be taking part in emergency escape training at the pad, equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown. An international crew, Hadfield is with the Canadian Space Agency, Guidoni the European Space Agency and Lonchakov the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. The mission is carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello and the Canadian robotic arm, SSRMS, to the International Space Station. Raffaello carries six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. The SSRMS is crucial to the continued assembly of the orbiting complex and has a unique ability to switch ends as it works, '''inchworming''' along the Station'''s exterior. Launch of mission STS-100 is scheduled for April 19 at 2:41 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  19. ISS and STS Commercial Off-the-Shelf Router Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancie, William D.; Bell, Terry L.; Shell, Dan

    2002-01-01

    This report documents the results of testing performed with commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) routers and Internet Protocols (IPs) to determine if COTS equipment and IP could be utilized to upgrade NASA's current Space Transportation System (STS), the Shuttle, and the International Space Station communication infrastructure. Testing was performed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) personnel within the Electronic Systems Test Laboratory (ESTE) with cooperation from the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Qualification and Utilization of Electronic System Technology (QUEST) personnel. The ESTE testing occurred between November 1 and 9, 2000. Additional testing was performed at NASA Glenn Research Center in a laboratory environment with equipment configured to emulate the STS. This report documents those tests and includes detailed test procedures, equipment interface requirements, test configurations and test results. The tests showed that a COTS router and standard Transmission Control Protocols and Internet Protocols (TCP/IP) could be used for both the Shuttle and the Space Station if near-error-free radio links are provided.

  20. Subsidy of a transforming pedagogical practice: contribution of STS view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Regina Carletto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to enrich the reflection concerning the insertion of the STS (Society, Technology and Science approach and its implications in Science teaching. The methodology used was qualitative research of interpretative nature and occurred during the development of the subject technological principles in cooperation with Science, Math, Portuguese, History and Sociology. The research had as target students from five groups of High School from a public teaching Institution in Ponta Grossa - PR. The problem question that guided the research and served as background for the presentation of this text, concerns the possibilities of using the STS focus for the implementation of a differentiated teaching. The methodological options were defined based on participative planning, a theoretical reflection and limitations which had been found. The results relate to qualitative contributions to the teaching practice and to the teaching-learning process on Science teaching, such as: curricular integration, high level of motivation and students participation, improvement of analysis capability, argumentation and intervention, deeper understanding of the Science nature, the technological scientific process and its social and environmental repercussion.

  1. STS-97 Pilot Mike Bloomfield suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    STS-97 Pilot Michael Bloomfield signals thumbs up for launch after donning his launch and entry suit. This is his second Shuttle flight. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. It is transporting the P6 Integrated Truss Structure that comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. The 11-day mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. The Station'''s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST.

  2. STS-114 Crew Interviews: 1. Eileen Collins 2. Wendy Lawrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    1) STS-114 Commander Eileen Collins emphasized her love for teaching, respect for teachers, and her plan to go back to teaching again someday. Her solid background in Math and Science, focus on her interests, with great support from her family, and great training and support during her career with the Air Force gave her confidence in pursuing her dream to become an astronaut. Commander Collins shares her thoughts on the Columbia, details the various flight operations and crew tasks that will take place during the mission and the importance of Shuttle missions to the International Space Station and space exploration. 2) STS-114 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence first dreamed of becoming an astronaut when she watched Neil Armstrong walk on the moon from their black and white TV set. She majored in Engineering and became a Navy pilot. She shares her thoughts on the Columbia, details her major role as the crew in charge of all the transfer operations; getting the MPLM unpacked and repacked; and the importance of Shuttle missions to the International Space Station and space exploration.

  3. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2001-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of the Site Restoration Department of SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and activities related to the management of decommissioning projects. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations.

  4. Crystallization of proteinase K complexed with substrate analogue peptides on US space missions STS-91 and STS-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenburg, Susanne; Degenhardt, Michael; Moore, Karen; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Peters, Klaus; Fittkau, Siegfried; Weber, Wolfgang; Betzel, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Crystals of proteinase K in complex with synthetic substrate analogues have been grown under microgravity on the US space shuttle missions STS-91 and STS-95 using the vapor diffusion apparatus (c-VDA) supplied by the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The crystals obtained under microgravity are compared with those grown simultanously on ground in identical c-VDA reactors and in conventional hanging-drop set-ups. The diffraction quality of space- and ground-grown crystals has been assessed by collecting complete data sets with a conventional X-ray source and with synchrotron radiation. Crystals grown in microgravity are clearly superior to those grown in the identical hardware on earth in terms of crystal habit and diffraction power. In comparison to best terrestrial crystals obtained in conventional hanging-drop set-ups the differences in crystal size and diffraction quality are less, but still confirm the benefit of microgravity for the crystallization of proteinase K-substrate analogue complexes.

  5. STS-97 Mission Specialist Noriega during pre-pack and fit check

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    STS-97 Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega gets help with his boots from suit technician Shelly Grick-Agrella during pre-pack and fit check. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST.

  6. STS-97 Pilot Bloomfield talks to media after arrival for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-97 crew gather to address the media. At the microphone is Pilot Michael Bloomfield. Behind him stand Commander Brent Jett and Mission Specialists Joseph Tanner, Carolos Noriega and Marc Garneau, who is with the Canadian Space Agency. Mission STS-97is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST.

  7. STS-97 Pilot Bloomfield during pre-pack and fit check

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    STS-97 Pilot Michael Bloomfield gets help with his boots from suit technician Steve Clendenin during pre-pack and fit check. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST.

  8. Free zone electrophoresis simulation of static column electrophoresis in microgravity on shuttle flight STS-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, P. W.; Hjerten, S.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were designed to replicate, as closely as possible in 1-G, the conditions of the STS-3 red blood cell (RBC) experiments. Free zone electrophoresis was the method of choice, since it minimizes the role of gravity in cell migration. The physical conditions of the STS-3 experiments were used, and human and rabbit RBC's fixed by the same method were the test particles. The effects of cell concentration, electroosmotic mobility, and sample composition were tested in order to seek explanations for the STS-3 results and to provide data on cell concentration effects for future zero-G separation on the continuous-flow zero-G electrophoretics separator.

  9. Endeavour lands at Edwards AFB, ending mission STS-100

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    NASA/Edwards AFB, Calif. -- After landing at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., the STS-100 crew poses for a photograph in front of orbiter Endeavour, which successfully launched them to the International Space Station and returned them to Earth. They are (left to right) Mission Specialists John Phillips, Umberto Guidoni and Chris Hadfield; Pilot Jeffrey Ashby; Commander Kent Rominger; and Mission Specialists Yuri Lonchakov and Scott Parazynski. Guidoni is with the European Space Agency, Hadfield with the Canadian Space Agency and Lonchakov with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. The orbiter and crew logged about 4.9 million statute miles in 186 orbits. Due to unfavorable weather conditions, landing at KSC was waved off. The landing marked the third consecutive landing at EAFB.

  10. Development of baseline random vibration criteria for STS pallet payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical evaluation of measured random vibration response data obtained from the Office of Space Science-1 (OSS-1) pallet payload. The data were measured during the acoustic test simulation (September 1980) and the ascent phase of the flight of STS-3, Orbiter 102 (launched from the Kennedy Space Center on March 22, 1982). Acoustic test efficiency factors are evaluated based on the Dynamic, Acoustic and Thermal Environments (DATE) instrumentation as the source of the measured vibration data. Test efficiency correction to test data is applied in the extrapolation of non-DATE acoustic test data to increase sample population size for improved statistical evaluation. For baseline criteria evaluation and development, data are grouped in accordance with the payload 'zone' in which the component is mounted.

  11. STS-26 crew in JSC Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers have donned their new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) for a training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Commander Frederick H. Hauck is in the center foreground. Hauck is flanked by fellow crewmembers (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge, MS George D. Nelson, Pilot Richard O. Covey, and MS David C. Hilmers. Astronaut Steven R. Nagel, not assigned as crewmember but assisting in training, is at far right. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew is scheduled to check out the new partial pressure suits and crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  12. STS-34 MS Chang-Diaz records onboard activity with 16mm camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz records forward flight deck activity with ARRIFLEX 16mm camera onboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. In the background, MS Shannon W. Lucid works at aft flight deck payload station.

  13. STS-75 Chang-Diaz and MS Jeff Hoffman in White Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) and Mission Specialist Jeffrey A. Hoffman (right) prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39B with assistance from the white room closeout crew.

  14. STS-35 Pilot Gardner in sleep station compartment on OV-102's middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner demonstrates the bunk-style sleep compartments onboard Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, middeck. Gardner uses bunk #2 of the sleep station located against the middeck starboard wall.

  15. Improving Indicators in a Brazilian Hospital Through Quality-Improvement Programs Based on STS Database Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gabriel Melo de Barros e Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To report the initial changes after quality-improvement programs based on STS-database in a Brazilian hospital. METHODS: Since 2011 a Brazilian hospital has joined STS-Database and in 2012 multifaceted actions based on STS reports were implemented aiming reductions in the time of mechanical ventilation and in the intensive care stay and also improvements in evidence-based perioperative therapies among patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgeries. RESULTS: All the 947 patients submitted to coronary artery bypass graft surgeries from July 2011 to June 2014 were analyzed and there was an improvement in all the three target endpoints after the implementation of the quality-improvement program but the reduction in time on mechanical ventilation was not statistically significant after adjusting for prognostic characteristics. CONCLUSION: The initial experience with STS registry in a Brazilian hospital was associated with improvement in most of targeted quality-indicators.

  16. Improving epistemological beliefs and moral judgment through an STS-based science ethics education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyemin; Jeong, Changwoo

    2014-03-01

    This study develops a Science-Technology-Society (STS)-based science ethics education program for high school students majoring in or planning to major in science and engineering. Our education program includes the fields of philosophy, history, sociology and ethics of science and technology, and other STS-related theories. We expected our STS-based science ethics education program to promote students' epistemological beliefs and moral judgment development. These psychological constructs are needed to properly solve complicated moral and social dilemmas in the fields of science and engineering. We applied this program to a group of Korean high school science students gifted in science and engineering. To measure the effects of this program, we used an essay-based qualitative measurement. The results indicate that there was significant development in both epistemological beliefs and moral judgment. In closing, we briefly discuss the need to develop epistemological beliefs and moral judgment using an STS-based science ethics education program.

  17. STS 41-D mission specialist Judith Resnik trains on the RMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    STS 41-D mission specialist Judith Resnik prepares for training on the remote manipulator system (RSM) on board the shuttle mission simulator (SMS). She is on the SMS aft deck facing the RMS translation hand control and overhead starboard window.

  18. STS-75 Chang-Diaz and MS Jeff Hoffman in White Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) and Mission Specialist Jeffrey A. Hoffman (right) prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39B with assistance from the white room closeout crew.

  19. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2002-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of SCK-CEN's Site Restoration Department for 2001 are described. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and the management of spent fuel and the flow of dismantled materials and the recycling of materials from decommissioning activities based on the smelting of metallic materials in specialised foundries. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations and performs R and D on new techniques including processes for the treatment of various waste components including the reprocessing of spent fuel, the treatment of tritium, the treatment of liquid alkali metals into cabonates through oxidation, the treatment of radioactive organic waste and the reconditioning of bituminised waste products.

  20. STS-56 Commander Cameron, in LES, with sky genie during JSC egress training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), gives the sky-genie escape device a tug as training instructor Kenneth D. Trujillo holds it in position and explains its operation. Cameron, along with the other STS-56 crewmembers, is briefed on emergency egress procedures at JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE prior to a training simulation. The sky-genie is carried on all Space Shuttle flights for emergency egress purposes.

  1. STS-26 Commander Hauck in fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, wearing comunications kit assembly headset and seated in the commanders seat on forward flight deck, looks over his shoulder toward the aft flight deck. A flight data file (FDF) notebook rests on his lap. The STS-26 crew is training in the fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  2. STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer dons EMU in JSC's WETF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), fastens the strap on his communications carrier assembly (CCA) cap during suit donning in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Positioned on the WETF platform at pool side, Springer is preparing for an underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation. During the training exercise, Springer will rehearse contingency EVA procedures for the STS-38 mission aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104.

  3. STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer dons EMU in JSC's WETF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer dons extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) upper torso with technicians' assistance in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Positioned on the WETF platform at pool side, Springer is preparing for an underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation. During the training session, Springer will rehearse contingency EVA procedures for the STS-38 mission aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104.

  4. STS-86 Pilot Bloomfield feels heat from a tire after landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, the only space rookie on the crew, feels the heat from a tire on the orbiter Atlantis more than an hour after the landing on KSCs Runway 15. The nearly 11- day mission ended with main gear touchdown at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997. STS-86 was the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir.

  5. PUMA promotes Bax translocation in FOXO3a-dependent pathway during STS-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Qun

    2009-08-01

    PUMA (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis, also called Bbc3) was first identified as a BH3-only Bcl-2 family protein that is transcriptionally up-regulated by p53 and activated upon p53-dependent apoptotic stimuli, such as treatment with DNA-damaging drugs or UV irradiation. Recently studies have been shown that Puma is also up-regulated in response to certain p53-independent apoptotic stimuli, such as growth factor deprivation or treatment with glucocorticoids or STS (staurosporine). However, the molecular mechanisms of PUMA up-regulation and how PUMA functions in response to p53-independent apoptotic stimuli remain poorly understood. In this study, based on real-time single cell analysis, flow cytometry and western blotting technique, we investigated the function of PUMA in living human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) after STS treatment. Our results show that FOXO3a was activated by STS stimulation and then translocated from cytosol to nucleus. The expression of PUMA was up-regulated via a FOXO3a-dependent manner after STS treatment, while p53 had little function in this process. Moreover, cell apoptosis and Bax translocation induced by STS were not blocked by Pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor), which suggested that p53 was not involved in this signaling pathway. Taken together, these results indicate that PUMA promoted Bax translocation in a FOXO3a-dependment pathway during STS-induced apoptosis, while p53 was dispensable in this process.

  6. Virtual reconstruction of the Australopithecus africanus pelvis Sts 65 with implications for obstetrics and locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Alexander G; Hammond, Ashley S; Romano, Julia; Oleinik, Ekaterina; DeSilva, Jeremy M

    2016-10-01

    Characterizing australopith pelvic morphology has been difficult in part because of limited fossilized pelvic material. Here, we reassess the morphology of an under-studied adult right ilium and pubis (Sts 65) from Member 4 of Sterkfontein, South Africa, and provide a hypothetical digital reconstruction of its overall pelvic morphology. The small size of the pelvis, presence of a preauricular sulcus, and shape of the sciatic notch allow us to agree with past interpretations that Sts 65 likely belonged to a female. The morphology of the iliac pillar, while not as substantial as in Homo, is more robust than in A.L. 288-1 and Sts 14. We created a reconstruction of the pelvis by digitally articulating the Sts 65 right ilium and a mirrored copy of the left ilium with the Sts 14 sacrum in Autodesk Maya. Points along the arcuate line were used to orient the ilia to the sacrum. This reconstruction of the Sts 65 pelvis looks much like a "classic" australopith pelvis, with laterally flared ilia and an inferiorly deflected pubis. An analysis of the obstetric dimensions from our reconstruction shows similarity to other australopiths, a likely transverse or oblique entrance of the neonatal cranium into the pelvic inlet, and a cephalopelvic ratio similar to that found in humans today.

  7. Introduction to the STS National Database Series: Outcomes Analysis, Quality Improvement, and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Shahian, David M; Prager, Richard L; Edwards, Fred H; McDonald, Donna; Han, Jane M; D'Agostino, Richard S; Jacobs, Marshall L; Kozower, Benjamin D; Badhwar, Vinay; Thourani, Vinod H; Gaissert, Henning A; Fernandez, Felix G; Wright, Cam; Fann, James I; Paone, Gaetano; Sanchez, Juan A; Cleveland, Joseph C; Brennan, J Matthew; Dokholyan, Rachel S; O'Brien, Sean M; Peterson, Eric D; Grover, Frederick L; Patterson, G Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Database is the foundation for most of the Society's quality, research, and patient safety activities. Beginning in January 2016 and repeating each year, The Annals of Thoracic Surgery will publish a monthly Database series of scholarly articles on outcomes analysis, quality improvement, and patient safety. Six articles will be directly derived from the STS National Database and will be published every other month: three articles on outcomes and quality (one each from the STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database, the STS Congenital Heart Surgery Database, and the STS General Thoracic Surgery Database), and three articles on research (one from each of these three specialty databases). These six articles will alternate with five additional articles on topics related to patient safety. The final article, to be published in December, will provide a summary of the prior 11 manuscripts. This series will allow STS and its Workforces on National Databases, Research Development, and Patient Safety to convey timely information aimed at improving the quality and safety of cardiothoracic surgery. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. STS study of TiO2 film and Pt-deposited TiO2 film in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Min; Jin Zhensheng

    2004-01-01

    Direct investigation of the electronic structure of catalyst surfaces on the near-atomic scale in general has not been impossible in the past. However, with the advent of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the opportunity arises for incorporating the scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) for correlation in-situ surface electronic structure with topography on a sub-nanometer scale. In this paper, we report the STS results of thin film TiO2 and Pt-deposited TiO2 annealed at 450℃. It was found that the TiO2 semiconductor changes from n-type to p-type after Pt deposition.Fig. 1 shows the surface electronic property (Ⅰ-Ⅴ curve) of thin TiO2 film measured in air by STS. A steep descent of the anodic tunneling current at ca.- 1.0 Ⅴ and a rapid ascent of cathodic tunneling current at ca. +2.0V. The zero bias represents the Fermi level (Ef). Ef is situated at the Ecb side indicating that the thin TiO2 film possesses the same band gap as that of bulk TiO2 phase ( Egs =3.0 to 3.2 eV). For the sample of Pt-deposited TiO2 film, Pt/(Pt+Ti+O) atomic ratio≈0.2, which indicates that the surface of TiO2 film is partly covered by Pt particles, and there are two types of Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves to be detected. One of them (Fig.2a)is attributed to the electronic property of TiO2, which has same Egs as that shown in Fig. 1. However, the Ef is transferred to valence side (△≈1eV). This phenomenon hints that TiO2 is doped by an impurity which can introduce h+ into TiO2 lattice.Such a type of defects may be described by Ti1-xPtxO2(h )2x, here Pt+2 as a substitutional site of Ti+4. Fig.2b is the Ⅰ-Ⅴ curve of a Pt particle situated on a TiO2 particle contained Ti1-xPtxO2(h )2x.

  9. Region 9 NPL Sites (Superfund Sites) Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site POLYGON locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  10. Region 9 NPL Sites (Superfund Sites 2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site POINT locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  11. Region 9 NPL Sites (Superfund Sites)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site POINT locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  12. STS-70 Launch - Nikon E-2 Digital Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This test images was taken with a Nikon E-2 Digital Imaging System camera and are provided courtesy of Nikon (GIF 450x450 JPEG 1280x1000): The second Shuttle launch in 16 days hurtles off the pad into a sweltering summer sky. The unstable weather typical to Florida in the summertime didn't have a chance to coalesce and impact this morning's launch window, and the Space Shuttle Discovery began its planned seven-day, 22-hour flight on Mission STS-70 from Launch Pad 39B at 9:41:55.078 a.m. EDT, just seconds off schedule. On board for Discovery's 21st spaceflight are a crew of five: Commander Terence 'Tom' Henricks; Pilot Kevin R. Kregel; and Mission Specialists Nancy Jane Currie, Donald A. Thomas and Mary Ellen Weber. The crew's primary objective during the 70th Shuttle flight is to deploy the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-G), which will join a constellation of other TDRS spacecraft already on orbit. TDRS-G is destined to become an on- orbit, fully operational 'ready reserve' satellite, available along with one other ready reserve TDRS spacecraft to back up the two primary TDRS satellites positions, TDRS East over the Atlantic Ocean and TDRS West over the Pacific. Assured capability of the TDRS communications network is essential for linking Earth-orbiting spacecraft such as the Shuttle and the Hubble Space Telescope with the ground.

  13. A correlative STS: lessons from a Chinese medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Yuan; Law, John

    2014-12-01

    How might Science and Technology Studies learn more from the intersection between 'Western' and 'other' forms of knowledge? In this article, we use Eduardo Viveiros de Castro's writing on equivocal translation to explore a moment of encounter in a Chinese Medical consultation in Taiwan in which a practitioner hybridizes Chinese Medicine and biomedicine. Our description is symmetrical, but creates a descriptive equivocation in which 'Western' analytical terms are used to describe a 'Chinese' medical reality. Drawing on the history of Chinese Medicine, we argue that the latter is not analytical, but 'correlative' in a specifically 'Chinese' manner that explores patternings, flows, and propensities in local collections of things and symptoms. In particular, it both handles difference without seeking to unearth stable causal mechanisms and absorbs new elements including relevant features of biomedicine. We conclude by briefly considering the scope of a possible post-colonial and 'correlative' STS and show that a 'correlative' description of the same Chinese Medical consultation would differ markedly from one making use of 'Western' analytical assumptions.

  14. STS-114: Crew Interviews 1. Andy Thomas 2. Steve Robinson

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    STS-114 Mission Specialists, Andy Thomas and Steve Robinson, are seen in this pre-flight interview. Andy Thomas begins by talking about his interest in spaceflight as a young boy growing up in Australia. He expresses that the chances of an Australian boy studying to eventually become an astronaut was very remote. His Mechanical Engineering Degree in Australia and a Doctorate enabled him to acquire unique skills to come to the United States to work for Lockheed Martin. On the topic of return to flight, he reflects on experiences that he had working with the Michael Anderson and Kalpana Chawla of the ill-fated Space Shuttle Columbia. He also talks about the safety of the Space Shuttle Discovery and repairs to its Thermal Protection system. He explains in detail the Logistics Flight (LF) 1, spacewalks, Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the External Stowage Platform (ESP)-2. Steve Robinson expresses that he had many interests as a child and becoming an astronaut was one of them. He was fascinated with things that fly and wanted to find out how they flew. He also designed hang gliders as a teenager. He expresses how his family feels about the risky business of spaceflight. He talks about how the space shuttle discovery crew will remember the Columbia crew by including seven stars on their patch so that they can bring them into orbit and then back home. Robinson also talks about his primary job, and the spacewalks that he and Soichi Noguchi will be performing.

  15. Electrophoretic separation of kidney and pituitary cells on STS-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D. R.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Barlow, G. H.; Cleveland, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Farrington, M. A.; Hatfield, J. M.; Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Wilfinger, W.; Grindeland, R.; Lewis, M. L.

    A Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System (CFES) was used on Space Shuttle flight STS-8 to separate specific secretory cells from suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic kidney cells and rat pituitary cells. The objectives were to isolate the subfractions of kidney cells that produce the largest amounts of urokinase (plasminogen activator), and to isolate the subfractions of rat pituitary cells that secrete growth hormone, prolactin, and other hormones. Kidney cells were separated into more than 32 fractions in each of two electrophoretic runs. Electrophoretic mobility distributions in flight experiments were spread more than the ground controls. Multiple assay methods confirmed that all cultured kidney cell fractions produced some urokinase, and five to six fractions produced significantly more urokinase than the other fractions. Several fractions also produced tissue plasminogen activator. The pituitary cells were separated into 48 fractions in each of the two electrophoretic runs, and the amounts of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) released into the medium for each cell fraction were determined. Cell fractions were grouped into eight mobility classes and immunocytochemically assayed for the presence of GH, PRL, ACTH, LH, TSH, and FSH. The patterns of hormone distribution indicate that the specialized cells producing GH and PRL are isolatable due to the differences in electrophoretic mobilities.

  16. STS-40 descent BET products: Development and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Kevin F.; Wood, James S.; Findlay, John T.

    1991-01-01

    Descent Best Estimate Trajectory (BET) Data were generated for the final Orbiter Experiments Flight, STS-40. This report discusses the actual development of these post-flight products: the inertial BET, the Extended BET, and the Aerodynamic BET. Summary results are also included. The inertial BET was determined based on processing Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRSS) coherent Doppler data in conjunction with observations from eleven C-band stations, to include data from the Kwajalein Atoll and the usual California coastal radars, as well as data from five cinetheodolite cameras in the vicinity of the runways at EAFB. The anchor epoch utilized for the trajectory reconstruction was 53,904 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) seconds which corresponds to an altitude at epoch of approximately 708 kft. Atmospheric data to enable development of an Extended BET for this mission were upsurped from the JSC operational post-flight BET. These data were evaluated based on Space Shuttle-derived considerations as well as model comparisons. The Aerodynamic BET includes configuration information, final mass properties, and both flight-determined and predicted aerodynamic performance estimates. The predicted data were based on the final pre-operational databook, updated to include flight determined incrementals based on an earlier ensemble of flights. Aerodynamic performance comparisons are presented and correlated versus statistical results based on twenty-two previous missions.

  17. STS-133/ET-137 Tanking Test Photogrammetry Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stanley T.

    2012-01-01

    Following the launch scrub of Space Shuttle mission STS-133 on November 5, 2010, an anomalous condition of cracked and raised thermal protection system (TPS) foam was observed on the External Tank (ET). Subsequent dissection of the affected TPS region revealed cracks in the feet of two Intertank (IT) metallic stringers. An extensive investigation into the cause(s) and corrective action(s) for the cracked stringers was initiated, involving a wide array of material and structural tests and nondestructive evaluations, with the intent to culminate into the development of flight rational. One such structural test was the instrumented tanking test performed on December 17, 2010. The tanking test incorporated two three-dimensional optical displacement measurement systems to measure full-field outer surface displacements of the TPS surrounding the affected region that contained the stringer cracks. The results showed that the radial displacement and rotation of the liquid oxygen (LO2) tank flange changed significantly as the fluid level of the LO2 approached and passed the LO2 tank flange.

  18. Gravisensing in flax roots - results from STS-107

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Scherp, P.; Ma, Z.

    The goal of the experiment "magnetophoretic induction of curvature in roots" (MICRO) on STS-107 was the induction of curvature in roots by high-gradient magnetic fields (HGMF) in microgravity. The scientific objectives included investigating the growth/curvature pattern in response to a HGMF, the determination of amyloplasts as gravisensing/curvature-inducing structures, and a study of the effects of HGMF and microgravity on the plant cytoskeleton. Flax seeds were germinated in orbit in specially designed seed cassettes. The seeds were oriented so that the emerging roots grew away from the cassette. The magnetic system consisted of ferro-magnetic wedges, magnetized by permanent NdFeB magnets (coercivity > 32k Oe). The HGMF that results from the transition from the high magnetic field density at the wedge tips to air repels diamagnetic amyloplasts. As a result of the previously demonstrated internal displacement of the amyloplasts, the roots were expected to curve as if gravistimulated. Despite successful germination (>90%), the growth rate of the seedlings was significantly lower than comparable controls. Despite the slower growth rate, root curvature was enhanced and initiated earlier than in ground controls. The results indicate that microgravity-grown roots exhibit higher sensitivity for the HGMF than ground controls. The enhanced sensitivity of root curvature in microgravity suggests that the root gravisensing system responds to the displacement of amyloplasts. In the absence of gravity, the higher sensitivity might result from intracellular motion, which in microgravity is likely to be stronger than on the ground.

  19. Unity hatch closed in preparation for launch on STS-88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility prepare the Unity connecting module for closure before its launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in December. Unity will now undergo a series of leak checks before a final purge of clean, dry air inside the module to ready it for initial operations in space. Other testing includes the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock and the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. The next time the hatch will be opened it will be by astronauts on orbit. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time.

  20. Análisis de varistores mediante STM y STS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro, M. S.

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available ZnO-Varistors have been studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy. Tunnelling current-voltage characteristics indicate that grains present a rectifying behaviour. Since the prebreakdown zone is controlled by Schottky barriers formed by intergranular states, current density vs. temperature curves were fitted considering the tunnelling current through these barriers. Then, the Schottky barrier heights determined using the model are compared with the barrier heights obtained from the scanning tunnelling spectroscopy analysis in the grain boundary.

    Varistores de ZnO fueron estudiados mediante el empleo de microscopía y espectroscopía de efecto túnel. Las curvas de corriente túnel vs. tensión indican que las muestras presentan una conducta rectificante. Dado que la conducción en la zona de pre-ruptura es controlada por la formación de barreras de Schottky en los bordes de grano debidas a la presencia de estados intergranulares, las curvas de densidad de corriente vs. temperatura fueron ajustadas considerando la corriente túnel que atraviesa dichas barreras. La altura de las barreras de Schottky determinada con el modelo es comparada con las alturas obtenidas a través del análisis de barrido por espectroscopía túnel (STS en la región del borde de grano.

  1. Unity hatch closed in preparation for launch on STS-88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility close the access hatch to the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, before its launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in December. Unity will now undergo a series of leak checks before a final purge of clean, dry air inside the module to ready it for initial operations in space. Other testing includes the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock and the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. The next time the hatch will be opened it will be by astronauts on orbit. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time.

  2. Challenger STS-17 (41-G) post-flight best estimate trajectory products: Development and summary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, G. M.; Heck, M. L.; Mcconnell, J. G.; Waters, L. A.; Troutman, P. A.; Findlay, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Results from the STS-17 (41-G) post-flight products are presented. Operational Instrumentation recorder gaps, coupled with the limited tracking coverage available for this high inclination entry profile, necessitated selection of an anchor epoch for reconstruction corresponding to an unusually low altitude of h approx. 297 kft. The final inertial trajectory obtained, BT17N26/UN=169750N, is discussed in Section I, i.e., relative to the problems encountered with the OI and ACIP recorded data on this Challenger flight. Atmospheric selection, again in view of the ground track displacement from the remote meteorological sites, constituted a major problem area as discussed in Section II. The LAIRS file provided by Langley was adopted, with NOAA data utilized over the lowermost approx. 7 kft. As discussed in Section II, the Extended BET, ST17BET/UN=274885C, suggests a limited upper altitude (H approx. 230 kft) for which meaningful flight extraction can be expected. This is further demonstrated, though not considered a limitation, in Section III wherein summary results from the AEROBET (NJ0333 with NJ0346 as duplicate) are presented. GTFILEs were generated only for the selected IMU (IMU2) and the Rate Gyro Assembly/Accelerometer Assembly data due to the loss of ACIP data. Appendices attached present inputs for the generation of the post-flight products (Appendix A), final residual plots (Appendix B), a two second spaced listing of the relevant parameters from the Extended BET (Appendix C), and an archival section (Appendix D) devoting input (source) and output files and/or physical reels.

  3. AlpArray-Italy: Site description and noise characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govoni, Aladino; Bonatto, Luciana; Capello, Marco; Cavaliere, Adriano; Chiarabba, Claudio; D'Alema, Ezio; Danesi, Stefania; Lovati, Sara; Margheriti, Lucia; Massa, Marco; Mazza, Salvatore; Mazzarini, Francesco; Monna, Stephen; Moretti, Milena; Nardi, Anna; Piccinini, Davide; Piromallo, Claudia; Pondrelli, Silvia; Salimbeni, Simone; Serpelloni, Enrico; Solarino, Stefano; Vallocchia, Massimiliano; Santulin, Marco; AlpArray Working Group

    2017-03-01

    Within the framework of the European collaborative research initiative AlpArray (http://www.alparray.ethz.ch), the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanolgia (INGV) deployed overall 20 broad-band seismic stations in Northern Italy and on two islands in the Tyrrhenian Sea (Capraia and Montecristo) during Fall-Winter 2015. The temporary deployment (16 stations) will run for two to three years and 4 INGV National Seismic Network accelerometric sites are now equipped with additional permanent broad-band sensors. The 16 temporary stations are equipped with REF TEK 130 digitizers and Nanometrics Trillium Compact 120 s sensors, a couple have Nanometrics Trillium 120P sensors and one a Streckeisen STS2. For each site we describe the settings and discuss the noise levels, the site effects and the preliminary sensitivity analysis.

  4. Initial evaluation of the radioecological situation at the Semipalatinsk Test Site in the Republic of Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, G.; Semiochkina, N. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz

    1998-12-31

    The Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS) located in the Republic of Kazakhstan (Figure 1.1) was one of the major nuclear weapon test sites of the former Soviet Union. At the site, four hundred fifty six nuclear explosions took place between 1949 and 1989 within the STS (Mikhailov et al. 1996; Dubasov et al. 1994a), resulting in radioactive contamination both within and around the STS. Incidences of radiation related illnesses in such areas may be higher than normal levels (Burkhart 1996). Published estimates of the resulting dose to the public vary according to the source, but an independent study (Grosche 1996) indicated that as many as 30,000-40,000 people could have been exposed to an average dose of 1.6 Sv (160 rem) or more (mainly due to short-lived radionuclides such as {sup 131}I). A detailed international assessment of the impact of these tests on the local population has not yet been undertaken. A current investigation under the acronym, RADTEST, includes an evaluation of Semipalatinsk as part of a broad review of internal and external doses to people arising from nuclear tests at many different sites in the world. In the context of the European Commission funded project RESTORE (Restoration Strategy for Radioactive Contaminated Ecosystems) an attempt is being made to assess the present radiolecological situation in the STS. This initial report collates currently available data published in Russian-language literature and internal CIS reports, reports from Europe and the USA, and other international literature. In this initial evaluation, only an overview of published data made available to the RESTORE project is provided and briefly discussed. In addition, further assessments including experimental work are suggested. Additional sources of data will be pursued and will be integrated with experimental results in the final evaluation report. (orig.)

  5. The STS-93 crew takes part in payload familiarization of the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A TRW technician joins STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins (center) and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby (right) as they observe the Chandra X- ray Observatory on its work stand inside the Vertical Processing Facility. Other members of the STS-93 crew who are at KSC for payload familiarization are Mission Specialists Catherine G. Coleman and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a shuttle mission commander. She was the first woman pilot of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-63, and also served as pilot on mission STS-84. The fifth member of the crew is Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe.

  6. A comparison of carbon depletion on STS-8 with atmospheric atomic oxygen flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triolo, J. [Swales and Associates Inc., 5050 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States); Kruger, R. [Technical Services, 4740 Connecticut Ave. N. W., Washington, District of Columbia 20008 (United States); Chen, P.; Straka, S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    In the early and mid 1980s, there were a number of experiments flown aboard the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle to measure contamination accumulation and atomic oxygen erosion effects on various materials. One of these experiments was the Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP), designed and built at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The CMP was a small, easily integrated instrument which basically consisted of a box with four Temperature Controlled Quartz Crystal Microbalances (TQCMs), a tape recorder, and electronics. The CMP flew on several of the early Shuttle missions including STS-3, 8, and 11. The focus of this paper is to present the results of the CMP experiment flown on the STS-8 mission. This CMP mission was designed to measure atomic oxygen erosion of several different materials, including erosion of carbon from a TQCM. This paper presents the data and discusses the results from the STS-8 CMP experiment and seeks to establish a correlation model between predicted atomic oxygen densities and the carbon erosion rates observed during the STS-8 mission. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Involvement of right STS in audio-visual integration for affective speech demonstrated using MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Cindy C; Woods, Will; Johnson, Sam; Green, Gary G R; Young, Andrew W

    2013-01-01

    Speech and emotion perception are dynamic processes in which it may be optimal to integrate synchronous signals emitted from different sources. Studies of audio-visual (AV) perception of neutrally expressed speech demonstrate supra-additive (i.e., where AV>[unimodal auditory+unimodal visual]) responses in left STS to crossmodal speech stimuli. However, emotions are often conveyed simultaneously with speech; through the voice in the form of speech prosody and through the face in the form of facial expression. Previous studies of AV nonverbal emotion integration showed a role for right (rather than left) STS. The current study therefore examined whether the integration of facial and prosodic signals of emotional speech is associated with supra-additive responses in left (cf. results for speech integration) or right (due to emotional content) STS. As emotional displays are sometimes difficult to interpret, we also examined whether supra-additive responses were affected by emotional incongruence (i.e., ambiguity). Using magnetoencephalography, we continuously recorded eighteen participants as they viewed and heard AV congruent emotional and AV incongruent emotional speech stimuli. Significant supra-additive responses were observed in right STS within the first 250 ms for emotionally incongruent and emotionally congruent AV speech stimuli, which further underscores the role of right STS in processing crossmodal emotive signals.

  8. STS-111 M.S. Chang-Diaz suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-111 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz suits up again for the second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-111 to the International Space Station. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Endeavour will also carry the Expedition 5 crew, who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  9. Contaminated Sites in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Sites contaminated by hazardous materials or wastes. These sites are those administered by the Contaminated Sites Section of Iowa DNR. Many are sites which are...

  10. Effectiveness of Science-Technology-Society (STS) Instruction on Student Understanding of the Nature of Science and Attitudes toward Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Behiye; Akcay, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    The study reports on an investigation about the impact of science-technology-society (STS) instruction on middle school student understanding of the nature of science (NOS) and attitudes toward science compared to students taught by the same teacher using traditional textbook-oriented instruction. Eight lead teachers used STS instruction an…

  11. Comparative evaluation of Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the OSS-1 payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the Office of Space Science-1 (OSS-1) payload is presented. The results provide insight into the characteristics of vibroacoustic response of pallet payload components in the payload bay during STS flights.

  12. STS-111 Crew Interviews: Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-111 Mission Specialist 2 Franklin Chang-Diaz is seen during this interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Chang-Diaz outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes in great detail his duties in the three EVAs which involved preparing the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS) for installation onto the Space Station's Mobile Transporter, attaching the MBS onto the Space Station and replacing a wrist roll joint on the station's robot arm. Chang-Diaz also discusses the science experiments which are being brought on board the Space Station by the STS-111 mission. He also offers thoughts on how the International Space Station (ISS) fits into NASA's vision and how his previous space mission experience will benefit the STS-111 flight.

  13. The STS-95 crew addresses KSC employees in the Training Auditorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Training Auditorium, STS-95 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (at podium) addresses KSC employees who were invited to hear the STS-95 crew describe their experiences during their successful mission dedicated to microgravity research and to view a videotape of the highlights of the mission. The other STS-95 crew members are (seated, from left to right) Pilot Steven W. Lindsey; Mission Specialist and Payload Commander Stephen K. Robinson; Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski and Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA); and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), and John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio and one of the original seven Project Mercury astronauts. Later in the afternoon, the crew will participate in a parade down State Road A1A in nearby Cocoa Beach, reminiscent of those held after missions during the Mercury Program.

  14. Dispersing artifacts in FT-STS: a comparison of set point effects across acquisition modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, A. J.; Tremblay-Johnston, Y.-S.; Grothe, S.; Chi, S.; Dosanjh, P.; Johnston, S.; Burke, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    Fourier-transform scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (FT-STS), or quasiparticle interference, has become an influential tool for the study of a wide range of important materials in condensed matter physics. However, FT-STS in complex materials is often challenging to interpret, requiring significant theoretical input in many cases, making it crucial to understand potential artifacts of the measurement. Here, we compare the most common modes of acquiring FT-STS data and show through both experiment and simulations that artifact features can arise that depend on how the tip height is stabilized throughout the course of the measurement. The most dramatic effect occurs when a series of dI/dV maps at different energies are acquired with simultaneous constant current feedback; here a feature that disperses in energy appears that is not observed in other measurement modes. Such artifact features are similar to those arising from real physical processes in the sample and are susceptible to misinterpretation.

  15. STS-97 Mission Specialist Noriega talks to media after arrival for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-97 crew gather to address the media. At the microphone is Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega. Behind him stand Commander Brent Jett, Pilot Michael Bloomfield and Mission Specialists Joseph Tanner and Marc Garneau, who is with the Canadian Space Agency. Mission STS-97is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST.

  16. STS-47 Endeavour, OV-105, crew eats preflight breakfast at KSC O and C Bldg

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 crewmembers who will be aboard for Endeavour's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105's, second trip into space are about to have a light breakfast prior to the prelaunch suiting up process in the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and Checkout (O and C) Building. Sitting around table (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis, MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee, Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Jr, Commander Robert L. Gibson, MS Jerome Apt, MS Mae C. Jemison, and Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri. Mohri represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA). STS-47 will be devoted to the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) payload, a joint effort between Japan and the United States. A cake decorated with the STS-47 mission insignia is in the center of the table.

  17. Polymorphisms of three gene-derived STS on Pig chromosome 13q41 are associated with susceptibility to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4ab/ac in pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiang; REN Jun; YAN XueMing; PENG QiuLing; TANG Huan; ZHANG Bo; JI HuaYuan; YANG ShuJin; HUANG LuSheng

    2008-01-01

    Neonatal diarrhea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) F4 is a common and serious disease, resulting in significant economical loss in the pig industry. The locus encoding ETEC F4 re-ceptor has been mapped to pig chromosome (SSC) 13q41, and one of the most significantly linked markers is S0075. In this study, we selected three genes including SLC12A8, MYLKand KPNA1 from a chromosomal region flanking S0075 on SSC13 to develop pig specific sequence tagged sites (STS). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in the three pig STS using DNA of four full-sib susceptible and resistant animals in a White Duroc × Erhualian intercross. All grandparents, parents and 755 offspring in the intercross were genotyped for three polymorphisms, including SLC12A8 g.159AG, MYLK g.1673AG and KPNA1g.306AG. Family-based transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) revealed that.all polymorphisms and the corresponding haplotypes are significantly associated with ETEC F4ab/ac (especially F4ac) brush border adhesion phenotypes, indicating that these polymor-phism are in linkage disequlibrium with causal mutation(s) of the gene encoding ETEC F4ab/ac receptor. Our results strengthen the evidence for the involvement of SSC13q41 in high acquiring risk of ETEC F4ab/ac infection, and provide novel .polymorphic markers for fine mapping of the ETEC F4ab/ac re-ceptor locus.

  18. STS-91 M.S. Franklin Chang-Diaz and Janet Kavandi participate in CEIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-91 Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. During CEIT, the crew have an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they'll be working on-orbit. The STS-91 crew are scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on May 28 at 8:05 EDT.

  19. STS-35 Pilot Gardner during fire fighting exercises at JSC fire training pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner extinguishes a small blaze during a fire handling training session for crewmembers at JSC Fire Training Pit across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Wearing a navy blue flight suit, Gardner approaches fire while operating a fire extinguisher as Commander Vance D. Brand (far right) and Payload Specialist Samuel T. Durrance look on. The crew was briefed on types of potential blazes and the correct means of controlling each type. STS-35 will mark the first seven-member crew staffing since the Challenger accident of January 1986.

  20. STS-35 crewmembers during fire fighting exercises at JSC fire training pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 crewmembers extinguish a small blaze during a fire handling training session at JSC Fire Training Pit across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Wearing navy blue flight suits, Mission Specialist (MS) Robert A.R. Parker (second right) and MS John M. Lounge (third left) approach fire while operating a fire extinguishers. The crew was briefed on types of potential blazes and the correct means of controlling each type. Also pictured are (left to right) Commander Vance D. Brand, Payload Specialist Samuel T. Durrance, Pilot Guy S. Gardner, and training officer Al Putnam. STS-35 will mark the first seven-member crew staffing since the Challenger accident of January 1986.

  1. STS-29 crewmembers inspect TDRS-D inertial upper stage (IUS) at KSC VPF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Astronaut Mae C. Jemison and STS-29 Mission Specialist (MS) James P. Bagian and MS Robert C. Springer inspect the interface between the tracking and data relay satellite D (TDRS-D) and inertial upper stage (IUS-9) in a test cell located in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vertical Processing Facility (VPF). The clean-suited astronauts, engineers, and technicians discuss the payload. Springer and Bagian are responsible for deployment of IUS / TDRS-D from Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB) on STS-29. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-89PC-16.

  2. STS-45 payload specialists with crew escape system (CES) mockup at JSC's MAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Payload Specialist Dirk D. Frimout (European Space Agency (ESA) Belgian crewmember) (left), backup Payload Specialist Charles R. Chappell (center), and Payload Specialist Byron K. Lichtenberg (right) listen to technician explain the operation of the crew escape system (CES) pole. Frimout is engaging the handle which extends the CES pole out the side hatch. The payload specialists along with the other STS-45 crewmembers are participating in side hatch emergency egress exercises in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A.

  3. STS-65 PLC Hieb at mockup side hatch prepares to egress via an inflated slide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Mission Specialist and Payload Commander (PLC) Richard J. Hieb, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), sits at the top of the inflated slide at the crew compartment trainer (CCT) side hatch and listens to a crew training staffer's instructions. Hieb practiced post landing emergency escape procedures along with his six STS-65 crewmates. The CCT is located in the Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE. Hieb will join five NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist for the International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, later this year.

  4. STS-31 MS Sullivan exits airlock mockup during JSC WETF underwater simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Mission Specialist (MS) Kathryn D. Sullivan, fully suited in an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and holding a semirigid tether (SRT) and ratchet caddy assembly, egresses the airlock (AL) mockup during an underwater simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. The open AL extravehicular (EV) hatch appears in the foreground as Sullivan backs out into the payload bay (PLB). Though no extravehicular activity (EVA) is planned for STS-31, two crewmembers train for contingencies that would necessitate leaving the shirt sleeve environment of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, cabin and performing chores with their Hubble Space Telescope (HST) payload or related hardware in the PLB.

  5. STS-26 crew during MB shuttle mission simulator (SMS) training in Bldg 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in motion base (MB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) training in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Five veteran astronauts recently named to man the Discovery for the STS-26 mission are pictured prior to a training session in the nearby MB SMS. Commander Frederick H. Hauck (top right) stands next to Pilot Richard O. Covey with (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, MS David C. Hilmers, and MS John M. Lounge on front row.

  6. OrientSTS: A Spatio-Temporal Scene Sequence Searching System%OrientSTS:一个时空景点序列分析系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周春姐; 刘东琦; 孟小峰

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, due to the increasing user requirements of efficient and personalized services, a perfect travel plan is urgently needed. In this paper we propose a novel complex spatio-temporal sequence (STS) searching in Flickr, which retrieves the optimal STS in terms of distance, weight, visiting time, opening hour, scene features, etc. . The goal of our work is to provide travelers with the optimal STS, which passes through as many chosen scenes as possible with the maximum weight and the minimum distance within their travel time (e. G. , one day). The difficulty of mining STS lies in the consideration of the weight of each scene, and its difference for different users, as well as the travel time limitation. In this paper, we provide four approximate algorithms.%目前,随着用户对高效的、个性化服务的需求的日益增长,如何制定一个完美的旅游计划是一个亟待解决的问题.因此提出了一种新颖的时空序列分析方法.该方法综合考虑了距离、权值、游览时间、开放时间和景点特色等因素,为用户提供一个最优的时空景点序列.该序列能够使用户在其旅游时间范围限制内,走最少的路程来游览他最想游览的那些景点.本研究的难点在于考虑每个景点的权重,对不同用户而言其权重的差异性,以及总的旅游时间限制.本文提出了4种近似算法.

  7. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time on 31 March 1996 after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both March 30 and March 31 necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards AFB. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton. Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Serving as payload commander and mission specialist-1 was Ronald M. Sega. Mission specialist-2 was Richard Clifford. Linda Godwin served as mission specialist-3, and Shannon Lucid was mission specialist-4. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they

  8. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base, Drag Chute Deploy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards. This photo shows the drag chute deployed to help the shuttle roll to a stop. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was payload commander and mission specialist-1. Mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be

  9. STS-34 Mission Specialist (MS) Chang-Diaz dons EMU during WETF exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz dons extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) in preparation for an extravehicular activity (EVA) contingency exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. This closeup shows Chang-Diaz straightening his EMU sleeve.

  10. STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz floats in life raft during water egress training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), relies on a one-person life raft to get him to 'safety' during a launch emergency egress (bailout) simulation conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool.

  11. Space Shuttle Endeavour flares for landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California to conclude STS-100

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    At the conclusion of Space Shuttle Mission STS-100, Endeavour landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, May 1, 2001. There the Orbiter would be readied by technicians at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center for return to Kennedy Space Center, Florida, atop a 747 carrier aircraft.

  12. Landing of STS-59 Shuttle Endeavour at Edwards Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The main landing gear of the Space Shuttle Endeavour touches down at Edwards Air Force Base to complete the 11 day STS-59/SRL-1 mission. Landing occured at 9:54 a.m., April 20, 1994. Mission duration was 11 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes.

  13. STS-39 MS Veach monitors AFP-675 panel on OV-103's aft flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-39 Mission Specialist (MS) Charles L. Veach analyzes data displayed on Air Force Program 675 (APF-675) command and monitor panel on the aft flight deck payload station aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Just above Veach's head, Panel A3 closed circuit television (CCTV) screen A2 glows. At Veach's right is a portable laptop computer attached to panel L10.

  14. Interface Methods Renegotiating relations between digital social research, STS and the sociology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marres, N.; Gerlitz, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a distinctive approach to methods development in digital social research called ‘interface methods’. We begin by discussing various methodological confluences between digital media, social studies of science and technology (STS) and sociology. Some authors have posited signific

  15. STS-93 Pilot Ashby takes part in suit check in the O&C Bldg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby has his launch and entry suit checked by a technician in the Operations and Checkout Bldg. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include equipment check and a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Others in the crew participating are Commander Eileen M. Collins and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B.

  16. STS-35 Pilot Gardner shoots picture during water egress training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner shoots picture using a 35mm camera during water egress training conducted in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 at JSC. Gardner is wearing a launch and entry suit and a life jacket.

  17. STS-37 Pilot Cameron and MS Godwin work on OV-104's aft flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron and Mission Specialist (MS) Linda M. Godwin pause from their work on aft flight deck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, to pose for a picture. Cameron holds onto an onorbit station control panel while Godwin steadies herself by using the overhead window (W8) sill.

  18. STS-56 Commander Cameron and Pilot Oswald on OV-103's forward flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    During an STS-56 orbiter maneuver, Commander Kenneth Cameron (left), holding checklist, and Pilot Stephen S. Oswald man their respective stations on the forward flight deck of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. They are surrounded by forward flight deck windows and forward, center, and overhead control panels. A portable laptop computer is positioned on the forward window sill.

  19. STS-37 Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron during egress training in JSC's WETF Bldg 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-37 Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), discusses simulated emergency egress training on the pool side of JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Cameron will be dropped into a simulated ocean, the WETF's 25-ft pool, into which a parachute landing might be made.

  20. STS-56 Commander Cameron with camera stowage bag on OV-103's flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Commander Kenneth Cameron, with a penlight flashlight velcroed to his headband, prepares to open a camera stowage bag on the forward flight deck of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Behind him are the forward flight deck windows, forward control panels, and the commanders and pilots seatbacks.

  1. STS-45 ATLAS-1 pallet and Igloo power unit mating in KSC O and C Bldg

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Atmosphere Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1 pallet and Igloo power unit mating completed in Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Operations and Checkout (O and C) Bldg test stand 3. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-91PC-1704.

  2. STS-84 M.S. Kondakova with husband Ryumin at SLF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, and her husband, Valery Ryumin, greet press represenatives and other well wishers after her arrival at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility. Ryumin is director of the Mir- Shuttle program for RSC Energia in Russia. This will be Kondakovas first flight on a U.S. Space Shuttle, but her second trip into space. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the Russian space station to become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months until his replacement arrives on STS-86 in September.

  3. What is political in sub-politics? How Aristotle might help STS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, G.

    2007-01-01

    Recent contributions by Collins, Evans, Jasanoff and Wynne to the discussion of how science and technology studies (STS) might contribute to understanding ‘subpolitics’ - the complex, expert knowledge-intensive and distributed political issues technological societies have to deal with - and involvem

  4. STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Godwin during simulation in JSC's FB-SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Linda M. Godwin rehearses some phases of her scheduled duties on the middeck of the fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Godwin is inspecting supplies stowed in the middeck lockers during this unsuited simulation.

  5. STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Ross during simulation in JSC's FB-SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Jerry L. Ross 'borrows' the pilots station to rehearse some of his scheduled duties for his upcoming mission. He is on the flight deck of the fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) during this unsuited simulation. The SMS is part of JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  6. STS-31 Pilot Bolden with beverages on the FB-SMS middeck during JSC training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-31 Pilot Charles F. Bolden holds three beverage containers while in front of the galley on the middeck of the fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) during a training simulation at JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. From the middeck, Bolden, wearing lightweight headset, simulates a communications link with ground controllers and fellow crewmembers.

  7. STS-31 crewmembers review checklist with instructor on JSC's FB-SMS middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Bruce McCandless II (left) and Pilot Charles F. Bolden (right) discuss procedures with a training instructor on the middeck of JSC's fixed-based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). The three are pointing to a checklist during this training simulation in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  8. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, Pilot Henricks in FB-SMS training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Pilot Terence T. Henricks, seated at the pilots station on the forward flight deck, reviews checklists before a flight simulation in the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Surrounding Henricks are the seat back, the overhead panels, forward panels, and forward windows.

  9. Whatever Happened to STS? Pre-Service Physics Teachers and the History of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashon, Samson; Nielsen, Wendy; Petrina, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    If issues in the history and philosophy of science and those related to science, technology and society are generally accepted in policy, how ought these be handled in practice? Mandate in policy does not guarantee implementation in practice. Indeed, HPS and STS have for decades been marginalized in the curriculum. Subject areas designated to…

  10. STS-38 MS Springer on OV-104's flight deck with Navy banner and Marine decal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer stretches out in front of the forward flight deck control panels onboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Springer poses with a 'Semper Fi United States Marines' decal and a U.S. Naval Academy banner. A HASSELBLAD camera freefloats in front of his chest.

  11. STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Springer uses camera on OV-104 aft flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer, holding HASSELBLAD camera, positions himself under aft flight deck overhead window W7 before recording the Earth's surface below. Behind Springer are Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, onorbit station and aft flight deck viewing windows.

  12. Astronauts Ross and Helms at CAPCOM station during STS-61 simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Astronauts Jerry L. Ross and Susan J. Helms are pictured at the Spacecraft Communicators console during joint integrated simulations for the STS-61 mission. Astronauts assigned to extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were simultaneously rehearsing in a neutral buoyancy tank at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Alabama.

  13. STS-47 MS Davis trains at Payload Crew Training Complex at Marshall SFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis, wearing the Autogenic Feedback Training System 2 suit and lightweight headset, reviews a Payload Systems Handbook in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) mockup during training at the Payload Crew Training Complex at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. View provided with alternate number 92P-137.

  14. SE83-9 'Chix in Space' student experimenter monitors STS-29 onboard activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Student experimenter John C. Vellinger watches monitor in the JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Customer Support Room (CSR) during the STS-29 mission. Crewmembers are working with his Student Experiment (SE) 83-9 Chicken Embryo Development in Space or 'Chix in Space' onboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. The student's sponsor is Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC).

  15. STS-32 MS Dunbar trains in JSC Manipulator Development Facility (MDF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-32 Mission Specialist (MS) Bonnie J. Dunbar reviews checklist with training personnel in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) in JSC's Mockup and Integration Facility (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Dunbar (left) discusses procedures with trainer in front of the aft flight deck onorbit station controls. Overhead window W8 is visible above their heads.

  16. Official portrait of STS-47 Mission Specialist Mae C. Jemison in LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Official portrait of STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Spacelab Japan (SL-J) Mission Specialist Mae C. Jemison wearing launch entry suit (LES) and holding helmet. Jemison is an M.D., a 1987 astronaut candidate, and member of Astronaut Class 12.

  17. STS-47 MS Davis and MS Jemison with LBNP device in SLJ module aboard OV-105

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis (left) and MS Mae C. Jemison prepare the lower body negative pressure (LBNP) device for the LBNP experiment in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. Displayed on the aft end cone in the background is an Auburn University banner.

  18. Technicians assist STS-47 MS Jemison prior to JSC bailout training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison, assisted by technicians, adjusts a strap on her launch and entry suit (LES) prior to launch emergency egress (bailout) exercises in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Jemison is making her first flight in space.

  19. STS-26 MS Nelson adjusts ADSF power cable on Discovery's middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson adjusts power cable on automated directional solidification furnace (ADSF) support electronics package. ADSF is located in forward (starboard side) lockers on Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, middeck. ADSF consists of the furnace container (left) and the control electronics container (right). An Air National Guard, Houston, Texas, decal appears on middeck locker above ADSF.

  20. STS-26 Commander Hauck poses on shuttle mockup aft flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck poses on shuttle mockup aft flight deck in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Hauck's right hand is propped on Onorbit Station control panel A2 remote manipulator system (RMS) translation hand control. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  1. STS-46 Payload Specialist Malerba sits at the pilots station in JSC mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba sits at the pilots station on the forward flight deck of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9. Malerba, wearing a flight suit, is participating in a hardware familiarity training session.

  2. STS-41 MS Akers looks up at mockup prior to egress training in JSC's MAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), looks up at crew compartment trainer (CCT) prior to emergency egress training exercises. The exercises were conducted in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A.

  3. Payload specialists in training for STS 51-L in mockup and integration lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Payload specialists in training for STS 51-L take a break in Shuttle emergency egress training at JSC's mockup and integration laboratory. Left to right are Gregory Jarvis of Hughes, Sharon Christa McAuliffe and Barbara Morgan of the Teacher in Space Project.

  4. STS-28 Columbia, OV-102, MS Brown dons LES in JSC Mockup and Integration Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-28 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark N. Brown, wearing communications carrier assembly (CCA) and launch and entry suit (LES), prepares to don launch and entry helmet (LEH). Brown suits up for shuttle emergency egress (bailout) procedures in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A.

  5. Night image of New York City as seen from STS-59 Endeavour

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This 35mm night image of the New York City metropolitan area was captured by the crew of the STS-59 crew during the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL) mission. Scientists studying film from the Space Shuttle Endeavour feel this is the best nocturnal view of this region from the manned space program.

  6. Paul Tillich and Technology: His Importance for Robust Science, Technology, and Society (STS) Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitrich, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the linkage between science, technology, and religious ideas. Tillich's continuum of existentialism, philosophy, and theology and his concepts of the multidimensional unity of life have been used to develop a technology and religion course. Included are the core ethic and basic tenets for STS education. (KR)

  7. STS-9 and Amateur Radio. NASA Educational Briefs for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Designed for secondary and postsecondary school students, the article discusses the STS-9 (Space Transportation System), a hand-held amateur radio (ham) station used on the Space Shuttle Columbia. The article details the mechanics of this battery-powered unit and how it is used. Separate sections discuss necessary equipment for picking up space…

  8. Closeup of STS-26 Discovery, OV-103, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Closeup of STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) reaction control system (RCS) nitrogen tetroxide gas leak was captured by a Cobra borescope and displayed on a video monitor. The borescope has a miniature videocamera at the end of a flexible rubber tube and is able to be maneuvered into other inaccessible locations.

  9. Reframing and Articulating Socio-Scientific Classroom Discourses on Genetic Testing from an STS Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Swierstra, Tsjalling; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, Science & Technology Studies (STS) have revealed the dynamic interaction between science and technology and society. Technology development is not an autonomous process and its artifacts are not socially inert. Society and technology shape each other. Technologies often have "soft impacts" in terms of unpredicted…

  10. Whatever Happened to STS? Pre-Service Physics Teachers and the History of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashon, Samson; Nielsen, Wendy; Petrina, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    If issues in the history and philosophy of science and those related to science, technology and society are generally accepted in policy, how ought these be handled in practice? Mandate in policy does not guarantee implementation in practice. Indeed, HPS and STS have for decades been marginalized in the curriculum. Subject areas designated to…

  11. Views of the STS-5 Science Press briefing with Student Experimenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Views of the STS-5 Science Press briefing with Student Experimenters. Photos include Michelle Issel of Wallingfor, Connecticut showing her studen experiment dealing with the formation of crystals in a weightless environment (37862); Aaron Gillette of Winter Haven, Florida displaying his student experiment dealing with the growth of Porifera in zero gravity (37863).

  12. STS-69 Crew DEPARTs from O&C Building to Launch pad

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Looking excited about their upcoming spaceflight, the Dog Crew II departs the Operations and Checkout Building. Leading the way is . While they are wearing the traditional crew emblem designed for each Shuttle mission, the STS-69 astronauts are also sporting a special patch denoting them as the Dog Crew I, continuing a tradition of comaraderie that began on an earlier flight, STS-53, on which both Walker and Voss were crew members. Each of the STS- 69 crew members took on a dog-theme name, and the patch, showing a bulldog peering from a doghouse shaped like the Space Shuttle, was designed to capture their sense of esprit de corps. Awaiting the crew at Launch Pad 39A is the Space Shuttle Endeavour, undergoing final preparations for liftoff on the fifth Shuttle flight of 1995. Launch is scheduled during a two and a half hour window opening at 11:09 a.m. EDT. This will be the second try to get STS-69 off the ground; a first attempt on Aug. 31 was scrubbed due to a faulty fuel cell.

  13. Messy Shapes of Knowledge – STS Explores Informatization, New Media, and Academic Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Paul; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Vann, Katie; Ratto, Matt; Hellsten, S; Fry, Jenny; Beaulieu, Anne; Hackett, Edward; Amsterdamska, Olga; Lynch, Michael; Wajcman, Judy

    2008-01-01

    Wouters, Paul, Katie Vann, Andrea Scharnhorst, Matt Ratto, Iina Hellsten, Jenny Fry, and Anne Beaulieu. 2008. “Messy Shapes of Knowledge – STS Explores Informatization, New Media, and Academic Work.” In The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies, edited by Edward Hackett, Olga Amsterdamska, Mich

  14. STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz floats in life raft during water egress training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), relies on a one-person life raft to get him to 'safety' during a launch emergency egress (bailout) simulation conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool.

  15. Ocean Disposal Site Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is responsible for managing all designated ocean disposal sites. Surveys are conducted to identify appropriate locations for ocean disposal sites and to monitor the impacts of regulated dumping at the disposal sites.

  16. Hanford Site Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  17. Communicative Signals Promote Object Recognition Memory and Modulate the Right Posterior STS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redcay, Elizabeth; Ludlum, Ruth S; Velnoskey, Kayla R; Kanwal, Simren

    2016-01-01

    Detection of communicative signals is thought to facilitate knowledge acquisition early in life, but less is known about the role these signals play in adult learning or about the brain systems supporting sensitivity to communicative intent. The current study examined how ostensive gaze cues and communicative actions affect adult recognition memory and modulate neural activity as measured by fMRI. For both the behavioral and fMRI experiments, participants viewed a series of videos of an actress acting on one of two objects in front of her. Communicative context in the videos was manipulated in a 2 × 2 design in which the actress either had direct gaze (Gaze) or wore a visor (NoGaze) and either pointed at (Point) or reached for (Reach) one of the objects (target) in front of her. Participants then completed a recognition memory task with old (target and nontarget) objects and novel objects. Recognition memory for target objects in the Gaze conditions was greater than NoGaze, but no effects of gesture type were seen. Similarly, the fMRI video-viewing task revealed a significant effect of Gaze within right posterior STS (pSTS), but no significant effects of Gesture. Furthermore, pSTS sensitivity to Gaze conditions was related to greater memory for objects viewed in Gaze, as compared with NoGaze, conditions. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the ostensive, communicative signal of direct gaze preceding an object-directed action enhances recognition memory for attended items and modulates the pSTS response to object-directed actions. Thus, establishment of a communicative context through ostensive signals remains an important component of learning and memory into adulthood, and the pSTS may play a role in facilitating this type of social learning.

  18. Interfacial scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) of chalcogenide/metal hybrid nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Mahmoud M.; Abdallah, Tamer [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo (Egypt); Easawi, Khalid; Negm, Sohair [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering (Shoubra), Benha University (Egypt); Talaat, Hassan, E-mail: hassantalaat@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Comparing band gaps values obtained optically with STS. • Comparing direct imaging with calculated dimensions. • STS determination of the interfacial band bending of metal/chalcogenide. - Abstract: The electronic structure at the interface of chalcogenide/metal hybrid nanostructure (CdSe–Au tipped) had been studied by UHV scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) technique at room temperature. This nanostructure was synthesized by a phase transfer chemical method. The optical absorption of this hybrid nanostructure was recorded, and the application of the effective mass approximation (EMA) model gave dimensions that were confirmed by the direct measurements using the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as the high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The energy band gap obtained by STS agrees with the values obtained from the optical absorption. Moreover, the STS at the interface of CdSe–Au tipped hybrid nanostructure between CdSe of size about 4.1 ± 0.19 nm and Au tip of size about 3.5 ± 0.29 nm shows a band bending about 0.18 ± 0.03 eV in CdSe down in the direction of the interface. Such a result gives a direct observation of the electron accumulation at the interface of CdSe–Au tipped hybrid nanostructure, consistent with its energy band diagram. The presence of the electron accumulation at the interface of chalcogenides with metals has an important implication for hybrid nanoelectronic devices and the newly developed plasmon/chalcogenide photovoltaic solar energy conversion.

  19. The functional organization of the left STS: a large scale meta-analysis of PET and fMRI studies of healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat eLiebenthal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The superior temporal sulcus (STS in the left hemisphere is functionally diverse, with sub-areas implicated in both linguistic and non-linguistic functions. However, the number and boundaries of distinct functional regions remain to be determined. Here, we present new evidence, from meta-analysis of a large number of positron emission tomography (PET and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies, of different functional specificity in the left STS supporting a division of its middle to terminal extent into at least three functional areas. The middle portion of the left STS stem (fmSTS is highly specialized for speech perception and the processing of language material. The posterior portion of the left STS stem (fpSTS is highly versatile and involved in multiple functions supporting semantic memory and associative thinking. The fpSTS responds to both language and non-language stimuli but the sensitivity to non-language material is greater. The horizontal portion of the left STS stem and terminal ascending branches (ftSTS display intermediate functional specificity, with the anterior ascending branch adjoining the supramarginal gyrus (fatSTS supporting executive functions and motor planning and showing greater sensitivity to language material, and the horizontal stem and posterior ascending branch adjoining the angular gyrus (fptSTS supporting primarily semantic processing and displaying greater sensitivity to non-language material. We suggest that the high functional specificity of the left fmSTS for speech is an important means by which the human brain achieves exquisite affinity and efficiency for native speech perception. In contrast, the extreme multi-functionality of the left fpSTS reflects the role of this area as a cortical hub for semantic processing and the extraction of meaning from multiple sources of information. Finally, in the left ftSTS, further functional differentiation between the dorsal and ventral aspect is warranted.

  20. SITE COMPREHENSIVE LISTING (CERCLIS) (Superfund) - NPL Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — National Priorities List (NPL) Sites - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Public Access...

  1. Superfund Site Information - Site Sampling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes Superfund site-specific sampling information including location of samples, types of samples, and analytical chemistry characteristics of...

  2. SCHOOL SITE STANDARDS AND SITE SELECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    THIS REPORT PRESENTS ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL SITE DEVELOPMENT DATA COMPILED BY THE DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES PLANNING, NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. ENROLLMENT FIGURES USED REPRESENT THE ULTIMATE SIZE OF THE SCHOOLS. THE STANDARDS ARE MINIMUM FOR THE STATE OF NEW YORK WITH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SITES BASED ON THREE ACRES PLUS…

  3. New STS molecular markers for assessment of genetic diversity and DNA fingerprinting in hop (Humulus lupulus L.)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vrba, Lukas; Matousek, Jaroslav; Patzak, Josef

    2007-01-01

    .... We demonstrate the usefulness of these STS markers and compare them to SSRs for identifying hop genotypes and estimating genetic diversity in a collection of 68 hop cultivars from around the world...

  4. A Study on Changes in Thickness of STS304 Material in the Progressive Drawing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee C.K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the drawing process, the roundness of corners in the punch and the die are very important factors in determining the thicknesses of the product. The results clearly revealed that the thickness of a flange was increased and the thickness of body parts reduced when the roundness of the die entrance was small. The material thickness of the top part was decreased when the corner roundness of the punch was large. The smooth inflow of materials was found to have a significant effect on the thickness during the post-process. The compressive strength of STS 304 material exhibited a higher value compared with other processing methods. Moreover, we clearly observed the corner roundness of the punch and the die to be a very important factor for STS 304 materials.

  5. STS-46 plasma composition measurements using the EOIM-3 mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunton, Donald E.; Trzcinski, Edmund; Gosselin, Roger; Koontz, Steven; Leger, Lubert; Visentine, James T.

    1995-01-01

    One of the active instruments incorporated into the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials - 3 experiment was a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The primary objectives for this instrument, which was built by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and was a veteran of the STS-4 flight in 1982, were to quantify the flux of atomic oxygen striking the test surfaces in the EOIM-3 payload and to detect surface reaction products from the materials in the carousel. Other speakers in this session have covered the results of these experiments. Prior to the 40-hour-long dedicated EOIM-3 mission segment at the end of the STS-46 flight, the authors used the mass spectrometer to make measurements of ion and neutral gas composition in the shuttle environment. About 25 hours of data were collected during a variety of mission events, including Eureca deployment at high altitude and many tethered satellite system operations.

  6. STM and STS investigation of few-wall carbon nanotubes containing non-hexagonal rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osvath, Zoltan; Fulcheri, Laurent; Mark, Geza I.; Tapaszto, Levente; Gyulai, Jozsef; Biro, Laszlo P.

    2003-04-01

    We performed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements on few wall carbon nanotubes that exhibited changing diameter. Such change in the diameter may occur if non-hexagonal carbon ring configurations are introduced in the nanotube walls. A few-walled nanotube knee of 4 degrees, with different diameter values on the two sides of the knee was imaged by STM. Theoretical model structures [1] of single-wall carbon nanotubes show that a bend of 4 degrees may occur when a pentagonal and a heptagonal carbon ring is incorporated side by side in the hexagonal nanotube structure. Scanning tunneling spectroscopic (STS) measurements show that additional electronic states are present in the energy gap in the region where the bend occurs. We also performed STS measurements on a single-wall nanotube with conical tip. In agreement with theory, the results show that the energy gap in the tapered end is larger than in the nanotube.

  7. STS-96 Crew Training, Mission Animation, Crew Interviews, STARSHINE, Discovery Rollout and Repair of Hail Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage shows the crewmembers of STS-96, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev during various training activities. Scenes include astronaut suit-up, EVA training in the Virtual Reality Lab, Orbiter space vision training, bailout training, and crew photo session. Footage also shows individual crew interviews, repair activities to the external fuel tank, and Discovery's return to the launch pad. The engineers are seen sanding, bending, and painting the foam used in repairing the tank. An animation of the deployment of the STARSHINE satellite, International Space Station, and the STS-96 Mission is presented. Footage shows the students from Edgar Allen Poe Middle School sanding, polishing, and inspecting the mirrors for the STARSHINE satellite. Live footage also includes students from St. Michael the Archangel School wearing bunny suits and entering the clean room at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  8. STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz works with laptop PGSC on OV-104's middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz looks away from his work at the laptop payload and general support computer (PGSC) on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Chang-Diaz, wearing a headband, holds onto the airlock hatch opening to position himself in front of the computer keyboard. The treads of the interdeck access ladder are visible at the right.

  9. Electron tunneling using STM/STS on iron-based oxypnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Yuuki; Ichimura, Koichi; Kurosawa, Toru; Oda, Migaku; Tanda, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Okada, Hironari; Kamihara, Yoichi; Hosono, Hideo

    2010-12-01

    We report the electron tunneling study on SmFeAsO1-xFx (x = 0, 0.045, 0.046, 0.069) by using low temperature UHV-STM/STS. The superconducting gap and pseudogap structures are observed on x = 0.045, 0.046, 0.069. We also found similar structures on non-superconducting sample of x = 0. The value of 2Δ/kT decreases as T increases.

  10. Student Lloyd C. Bruce listens to MS John M. Lounge in CSR during STS-26

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Seated in the customer support room (CSR) of JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30, student experimenter Lloyd C. Bruce listens to Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge onboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, during the STS-26 mission. Bruce's student experiment 82-4 (SE82-4) 'The Effects of Weightlessness on Grain Formation and Strength in Metals' is onboard OV-103. Lounge is visible in the television (TV) monitor on the left.

  11. STS-38 Pilot Culbertson removes film from an OV-104 middeck stowage locker

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Pilot Frank L. Culbertson removes photographic film from stowage locker MF43E located on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Additional items fastened to the forward lockers include a doll, meal tray assemblies, a SONY Walkman, a camera lens, and a Department of Air Force insignia (decal). The crew escape pole (CEP) extends over Culbertson's head and the open airlock hatch appears behind him.

  12. STS-47 MS Davis holds mixed protein sample while working at SLJ Rack 7 FFEU

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis labels sample vial containing mixed proteins while conducting the Separation of Biogenic Materials by Electrophoresis Under Zero Gravity / Separation of Animal Cells and Cellular Organella by Means of Free Flow Electrophoresis (FFEU). Davis is in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. She talks to ground controllers as she works with the Free Flow Electrophoresis Unit (FFEU) located in SLJ Rack 7.

  13. STS-35 Pilot Gardner with descent checklist on OV-102's forward flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner, wearing his launch and entry suit (LES), reviews descent checklist while at the pilots station on the forward flight deck of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Crewmembers are conducting procedures related to the final stages of the mission and the landing sequence. Silhouetted in forward windows W4 and W5 are the head up display (HUD), flight mirror assembly, and a drinking water bag with straw.

  14. Role-play and the Industrial Revolution: an STS approach to the teaching of steam engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabka, Diego; Pereira de Pereira, Alexsandro; Lima Junior, Paulo

    2016-11-01

    Role-play is an interesting, although underexplored, way of teaching physics in high school. This paper presents a science-technology-society (STS) approach to the teaching of heat engines based on a role-play of the Industrial Revolution. Enacting the role-play, students are presented not only to scientific concepts, but also to the social and technological controversies of industrial development.

  15. STS-56 Commander Cameron and Pilot Oswald at CCT hatch during JSC training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron (right) and Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), stand at the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup, prior to entering the mockup. Once inside the CCT, they will don their launch and entry helmets (LEHs) and participate in emergency egress (bailout) procedures. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  16. Teaching Reform of the Course of Introduction to Resource and Environment under "STS" Quality Education Concept

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangyin; XI; Shufeng; WANG; Limei; LI; Ying; XU; Meiyu; LIU

    2013-01-01

    With the purpose of cultivating students’ "STS" quality,multiple teaching methods were discussed,including the students-oriented teaching,group discussion,case teaching,interactive teaching,little teacher teaching,practical teaching and flexible assessment,etc.,thus the students learning initiative could be greatly stimulated,their comprehensive ability can be improved,and more excellent talents can be cultivated.

  17. STS 51-G crewmembers participate in training in crew compartment trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Four members of the STS 51-G crew participate in a training exercise in the Shuttle mission simulator and training facility at JSC. Steven R. Nagel, left foreground, is a mission specialist. Sultan Salam Abdelazize Al-Saud (right foreground) is a payload specialist. In the background are Astronauts Daniel C. Brandenstein (left) in the commander's station and John O. Creighton in the pilot's position.

  18. STS-55 crewmembers repair waste water tank on OV-102's middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Three STS-55 crewmembers participate in an inflight maintenance (IFM) exercise to counter problems experienced with a waste water tank below Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, middeck. Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Bernard A. Harris, Jr, inside the airlock, holds middeck floor access panel MD54G and looks below at Pilot Terence T. Henricks who is in the bilge area. Commander Steven R. Nagel is lying on middeck floor at the left.

  19. STS-55 crewmembers repair waste water tank under OV-102's middeck subfloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Pilot Terence T. Henricks uses a spotlight and pen to point out a possible problem area on a waste water tank in the bilge area below Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, middeck. Mission Specialist 1 (MS1) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross records the activity with a video camcorder. The crewmembers are participating in an inflight maintenance (IFM) exercise to counter problems experienced with the waste water tank.

  20. STS-37 crewmembers train in JSC's FB shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Commander Steven R. Nagel (left) and Mission Specialist (MS) Jerry L. Ross rehearse some of their scheduled duties on the flight deck of JSC's fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. During the unsuited simulation, Nagel reviews checklist while seated at the commanders station as Ross looks on from the pilots station.

  1. STS-36 crewmembers train in JSC's FB shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-36 Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, seated on the aft flight deck, discusses procedures with Commander John O. Creighton (left) and Pilot John H. Casper during a simulation in JSC's Fixed Based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). Casper reviews a checklist at the pilots station on the forward flight deck. The crewmembers are rehearsing crew cabin activities for their upcoming Department of Defense (DOD) mission aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104.

  2. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, crewmembers participate in JSC FB-SMS training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Commander Frederick D. Gregory and Pilot Terence T. Henricks are stationed at their appointed positions on the forward flight deck of the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Gregory (left) in the commanders seat and Henricks (right) in the pilots seat look back toward aft flight deck and the photographer. Seat backs appear in the foreground and forward flight deck control panels in the background.

  3. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, crewmembers participate in FB-SMS training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Commander Frederick D. Gregory (left) and Pilot Terence T. Henricks, positioned at their appointed stations on the forward flight deck, are joined by Mission Specialist (MS) F. Story Musgrave (center) and MS James S. Voss (standing). The crewmembers are participating in a flight simulation in the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. A maze of panel switches appear overhead and in the background.

  4. STS-49 crew in JSC's FB Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) during simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, crewmembers participate in a simulation in JSC's Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Wearing launch and entry suits (LESs) and launch and entry helmets (LEH) and seated on the FB-SMS middeck are (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, MS Kathryn C. Thornton, and MS Pierre J. Thuot.

  5. STS-46 crewmembers participate in Fixed Base (FB) SMS training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Pilot Andrew M. Allen hands Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman checklists from middeck locker MF43E during training session in JSC's fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. European Space Agency (ESA) MS Claude Nicollier outfitted with communications kit assembly headset (HDST) and equipment looks beyond Hoffman to the opposite side of the middeck.

  6. STS-30 crewmembers pose for informal portrait on JSC FB-SMS middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-30 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers pause briefly from their training schedule to pose for informal portrait in JSC fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). On FB-SMS middeck are (left to right) Commander David M. Walker, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark C. Lee, MS Mary L. Cleave, Pilot Ronald J. Grabe, and MS Norman E. Thagard. FB-SMS is located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  7. STS-55 crewmembers repair waste water tank on OV-102's middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Three STS-55 crewmembers participate in an inflight maintenance (IFM) exercise to counter problems experienced with a waste water tank below Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, middeck. Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Bernard A. Harris, Jr, inside the airlock, holds middeck floor access panel MD54G and looks below at Pilot Terence T. Henricks who is in the bilge area. Commander Steven R. Nagel is lying on middeck floor at the left.

  8. STS-55 crewmembers repair waste water tank under OV-102's middeck subfloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Pilot Terence T. Henricks uses a spotlight and pen to point out a possible problem area on a waste water tank in the bilge area below Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, middeck. Mission Specialist 1 (MS1) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross records the activity with a video camcorder. The crewmembers are participating in an inflight maintenance (IFM) exercise to counter problems experienced with the waste water tank.

  9. STS-38 MS Springer climbs through CCT side hatch prior to egress training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), climbs through the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Springer will practice emergency egress through the side hatch using the crew escape system (CES) pole (at Springer's left). The inflated safety cushion under Springer will break his fall as he rolls out of the side hatch.

  10. STS-56 Earth observation of a Canadian sunrise taken aboard Discovery, OV-103

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Earth observation taken aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, is of a Canadian sunrise. Low clouds on the eastern horizon are blocking most of the direct sunlight as the sun climbs over the northern Atlantic in this Canadian sunrise scene. Bright yellow colors are sun rays which penetrate through the cloud-free areas while the reds in the scene are primarily illuminated clouds in the troposphere.

  11. STS-47 Astronaut Crew at Pad B for TCDT, Emergency Egress Training, and Photo Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The crew of STS-47, Commander Robert L. Gibson, Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Payload Commander Mark C. Lee, Mission Specialists N. Jan Davis, Jay Apt, and Mae C. Jemison, and Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri are seen during emergency egress training. Then Commander Gibson introduces the members of the crew and they each give a brief statement about the mission and answer questions from the press.

  12. STS-47 MS Jemison works in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) module aboard OV-105

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison appears to be clicking her heels in zero gravity in the center aisle of the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. Making her first flight in space, Dr. Jemison was joined by five other NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist for eight days of research in support of the SLJ mission, a joint effort between Japan and United States.

  13. STS-47 crew in SLJ module make notes during shift changeover aboard OV-105

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    During STS-47 aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, six of the seven crewmembers supporting the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) mission share this shift changeover scene in the spacelab science module. From the foreground, are Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison, MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee, Commander Robert L. Gibson, MS N. Jan Davis, Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Jr, and Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri. Mohri represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA). Photo was taken by MS Jerome Apt.

  14. STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) Jemison conducts AFTE in SLJ module on OV-105

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison, wearing autogenic feedback training system 2 suit, conducts the Autogenic Feedback Training Experiment (AFTE) in Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. AFTE's objective is to teach astronauts to use biofeedback rather than drugs to combat nausea and other effects of space motion sickness. Jemison's physical responses are monitored by sensors attached to the suit.

  15. STS-40 Columbia, OV-102, KSC liftoff from a remote control tracking device

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-40 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, riding atop the external tank(ET), begins its roll maneuver after lifting off from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch complex (LC) pad at 9:24:51 am (Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). Exhaust plumes billow from the solid rocket booster (SRB) skirts. The glow of the three space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) is visible. This photo was taken by a remote control tracking device mounted 1600 feet from epicenter.

  16. STS-34 crewmembers train with the IMAX camera in JSC's Bldg 9B mockup area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 crewmembers participate in IMAX camera training session held in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9B. The crew is briefed on the operation and handling of the IMAX camera scheduled to fly aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Standing behind the IMAX camera is Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz with IMAX instructors Grant Ferguson and David Douglas on his left. Commander Donald E. Williams (looking at IMAX lens) is at the right edge of the photo.

  17. STS-26 crew poses for group portrait on shuttle mockup middeck in Bldg 9A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers pose on shuttle mockup middeck (port side) in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Clockwise from left foreground are Commander Frederick H. Hauck, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, Pilot Richard O. Covey, MS John M. Lounge, and MS David C. Hilmers. Crewmembers are wearing flight coveralls (jump suits). Nelson stands on middeck ladder and Lounge sits in open side hatch. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  18. STS-29 crewmembers launch/landing procedural training in JSC mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot John E. Blaha and Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer participate in launch and landing training on JSC mockup flight deck in the Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Blaha sits at the pilots station controls in front of Springer who is seated on aft flight deck in mission specialist seat. Springer prepares to don communications kit assembly headset.

  19. STS-40 Payload Specialist Millie Hughes-Fulford trains in JSC's SLS mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    STS-40 Payload Specialist Millie Hughes-Fulford conducts Spacelab Life Sciences 1 (SLS-1) Experiment No. 198, Pulmonary Function During Weightlessness, in JSC's Life Sciences Project Division (LSPD) SLS mockup located in the Bioengineering and Test Support Facility Bldg 36. Hughes-Fulford monitors instruments and settings on Rack 8's panels. Behind her in the center aisle are the body mass measurement device (foreground) and the stowed bicycle ergometer.

  20. STS-26 Pilot Covey, wearing launch and entry suit, trains in JSC mockup area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey, wearing the orange launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), pauses during a training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A crew compartment trainer (CCT). LES, a partial pressure suit to be worn during launch and entry phases of the space shuttle flight, was evaluated and checked out.

  1. STS-34 crewmembers review IFM procedures on JSC's CCT mockup middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 crewmembers review inflight maintenance (IFM) procedures on the middeck of JSC's crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in the Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. IFM trainer, holding cable, discusses procedures with Mission Specialist (MS) Ellen S. Baker (center) and Pilot Michael J. McCulley. An open stowage locker appears in front of the group. Visible on the mockup's middeck are forward and aft stowage lockers, the airlock hatch, and the starboard wall mounted sleep restraints.

  2. STS-26 Commander Hauck looks out window W8 on shuttle mockup aft flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck looks up at overhead window W8 while on shuttle mockup aft flight deck in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Hauck rests his right arm between Onorbit Station control panel A7U and aft viewing window W10. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  3. STS-26 MS Nelson during training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, wearing navy blue launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), is seated in his launch and entry position on crew compartment trainer (CCT) middeck during a training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Visible in the background are the airlock, stowed treadmill, and sleep restraints. NOTE: Photo was taken by William H. Bowers, crew photo instructor, with wide angle lens.

  4. STS-46 Payload Specialist Malerba at aft flight deck controls in JSC mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba, wearing flight suit, operates controls on the aft flight deck of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9. During the training session, Malerba adjusts a control on the A3 panel closed circuit television (CCTV). Onorbit station panels appear in front of Malerba and payload station controls behind him.

  5. STS-26 crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits, train in JSC mockup area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck (left) and Pilot Richard O. Covey, wearing the orange launch and entry suits (LESs), discuss training exercise with technicians in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. During the exercise, the LES, a partial pressure suit to be worn during launch and entry phases of the space shuttle flight, was evaluated and checked out.

  6. STS-26 Pilot Covey looks up at window W7 on shuttle mockup aft flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey, leaning on Onorbit Station control panel, looks up at overhead window W7 on shuttle mockup aft flight deck in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Covey's left hand is positioned on Onorbit Station control panel A7U remote manipulator system (RMS) rotation hand control (RHC). Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  7. STS-28 Columbia, OV-102, crewmembers train in JSC Mockup and Integration Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-28 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, crewmembers participate in shuttle emergency egress (bailout) procedures in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Wearing orange launch and entry suits (LESs), crewmembers (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) Mark C. Brown, MS David C. Leestma, MS James C. Adamson, Pilot Richard N. Richards, and Commander Brewster H. Shaw pause before training exercise. In the background are training personnel and the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) surrounded by helium-filled mockups.

  8. STS-26 Commander Hauck, wearing launch and entry suit, trains in JSC mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, wearing the orange launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), gets assistance from a suit technician prior to participating in a training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A crew compartment trainer (CCT). During the exercise, the LES, a partial pressure suit to be worn during launch and entry phases of the space shuttle flight, was evaluated and checked out.

  9. STS-47 MS Jemison extends side hatch mockup CES pole during JSC training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison extends crew escape system (CES) pole through a side hatch mockup during launch emergency egress (bailout) training in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. MS Jerome Apt (right) looks on. The crewmembers practiced extending the CES pole prior to donning their launch and entry suits (LESs) and conducting the simulation in the Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT).

  10. View of the starboard OMS pod of the STS-6 Challenger

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    This view centers on the starboard orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod of the shuttle Challenger during its STS-6 mission. Two pieces of thermal protection system tile appear to have loosened. The view also shows one of the cargo bay television cameras, part of the extravehicular activity (EVA) slide wire system, three handrails and other features on the aft bulkhead. Part of the airborne support equipment (ASE) is in the lower right foreground.

  11. At JSC's MCC, CAPCOMs display score cards rating STS-26 Discovery landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    In JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30, astronauts and spacecraft communicators (CAPCOMs) L. Blaine Hammond, Jr, John O. Creighton, Frank L. Culbertson, Jr, and an unidentified man display score cards rating the STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, landing at Edwards Air Force Base(EAFB), California. Flight control room (FCR) front visual displays show world tracking map, EAFB post landing activity, and head alignment cone (HAC).

  12. STS-65 Earth observation of northern Australia (winter burning) from OV-102

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Earth observation taken aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, shows late winter burning in northern Australia and the extreme northern coastal area that includes the Cobourg Peninsula, as well as Melville and Bathurst Islands. These fires were probably set intentionally to renew pasture under open canopy woodland. The very dark lowland areas on Melville Island represent mangrove woodland. In contrast to some other tropical regions (for example Madagascar and Indonesia), no soil erosion (sediment plumes) is visible in this photograph.

  13. STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz works with laptop PGSC on OV-104's middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz looks away from his work at the laptop payload and general support computer (PGSC) on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Chang-Diaz, wearing a headband, holds onto the airlock hatch opening to position himself in front of the computer keyboard. The treads of the interdeck access ladder are visible at the right.

  14. STS-48 MS Gemar uses laptop during training session in JSC's MB SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-48 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Charles D. Gemar, wearing lightweight headset, enters data into a portable laptop computer on the middeck of JSC's Motion Based (MB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). Gemar is participating in a preflight familiarization session in the MB-SMS located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Visible to Gemar's right is a stowed extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and on his left are forward locker mockups.

  15. STS-103 MS Clervoy and Pilot Kelly inspect slideware basket at Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 39B. STS-103 Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA), and Pilot Steven J. Kelly inspect the slidewire basket, part of the emergency egress system for persons in the Shuttle vehicle or on the Rotating Service Structure. Seven slidewires extend from the orbiter access arm, with a netted, flatbottom basket suspended from each wire. The STS-103 crew have been participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at KSC. Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, also with ESA. The TCDT provides the crew with the emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  16. NPL Site Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Priorities List (NPL) is a list published by EPA of Superfund sites. A site must be added to this list before remediation can begin under Superfund. The...

  17. NPL Site Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Priorities List (NPL) is a list published by EPA of Superfund sites. A site must be added to this list before remediation can begin under Superfund. The...

  18. Site Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of site boundaries from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times and...

  19. NPL Site Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Priorities List (NPL) is a list published by EPA of Superfund sites. A site must be added to this list before remediation can begin under Superfund. The...

  20. Site Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of site boundaries from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times and...

  1. Drupal 7 Multilingual Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Pol, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    A practical book with plenty of screenshots to guide you through the many features of multilingual Drupal. A demo ecommerce site is provided if you want to practice on a sample site, although you can apply the techniques learnt in the book directly to your site too. Any Drupal users who know the basics of building a Drupal site and are familiar with the Drupal UI, will benefit from this book. No previous knowledge of localization or internationalization is required.

  2. The Greenland Ramsar Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egevang, C.; Boertmann, D.

    The eleven Ramsar sites in Greenland are reviewed in terms of their status as habitats for waterbirds and other fauna. Management and monitoring is proposed, as well as revisions of their boundaries. A number of potential new Ramsar sites are described......The eleven Ramsar sites in Greenland are reviewed in terms of their status as habitats for waterbirds and other fauna. Management and monitoring is proposed, as well as revisions of their boundaries. A number of potential new Ramsar sites are described...

  3. Human Spaceflight Trajectory Operations: A Case Study from STS-132/ULF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutri-Kohart, Rebecca; Browns, Ansley

    2010-01-01

    Prior to the launch of the STS-132/ULF4 mission, the International Space Station (ISS) Flight Control Team was alerted to the approach of a space debris with a predicted time of closest approach approximately 1 hr after Space Shuttle docking. As a result, the ISS team considered performing a collision avoidance maneuver prior to the Space Shuttle s approach. The purpose of this presentation will be to use this case study to illustrate best practices of the human spaceflight trajectory operations team. The presentation will begin with an overview of the roles of the real-time ISS and Space Shuttle trajectory flight control teams. Then, the STS-132/ULF4 case study will be used to illustrate the issues and lessons learned involved in performing Space Shuttle rendezvous maneuver planning and execution. Specific elements of the STS-132 Space Shuttle rendezvous maneuver profile that can be used to provide mission assurance in cases of trajectory uncertainty will be described and discussed. Additionally, this case study will be used to provide context for identifying lessons learned in an operational environment that requires technical and decision-making coordination between two control center teams with two potentially maneuvering space vehicles.

  4. Reframing and Articulating Socio-scientific Classroom Discourses on Genetic Testing from an STS Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Swierstra, Tsjalling; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2012-08-01

    In recent decades, Science & Technology Studies (STS) have revealed the dynamic interaction between science and technology and society. Technology development is not an autonomous process and its artifacts are not socially inert. Society and technology shape each other. Technologies often have `soft impacts' in terms of unpredicted side effects on individuals and society. Nevertheless, current societal discourse on technological innovations is still dominated by `hard impacts' such as quantifiable risks for health, safety and the environment. Furthermore, participants in socio-scientific discourses often underestimate their agency in influencing technological innovations, and at the same time overestimate their freedom of choice to use a technology. Past debates on technological innovations have shown how these debates were framed and often caught in fruitless discourse patterns or arguments. Interventionist STS research experiments with solutions to this problem. Assuming that an STS perspective is helpful in reframing and articulating socio-scientific classroom discourses, the case of genetic testing is used to explore this. An important positive `hard impact' of genetic testing is disease prevention. However, this is put into perspective by addressing `soft impacts' such as limited access to certain careers based on genetic risk and changes in the conception of health and the perception of responsibility for one's health. Discussion stoppers such as `playing God' or `We can't stop technological advancement' can be challenged through uncovering underlying assumptions. The use of narratives and future scenarios in classrooms seems fruitful in provoking imagination and engaging students in public debates on technological innovations.

  5. STS-103 crew pose at 195-foot level of Fixed Service Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    At the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure on Launch Pad 39B, the STS-103 crew take a break from Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Standing from left to right are Mission Specialists Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who are with the European Space Agency; Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; Pilot Scott J. Kelly; and Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and Steven L. Smith. The TCDT provides the crew with the emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  6. STS-103 Commander Brown introduces crew during interview at Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 39B, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. introduces the rest of the crew: (left to right) Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is also with ESA. As a preparation for launch, they have been participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at KSC. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  7. STS-103 Commander Brown answers question during interview at Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. answers a question from the media about the mission. As a preparation for launch, the crew have been participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at KSC. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Other crew members are Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is also with ESA. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  8. STS-103 Pilot Scott Kelly and MS John Grunsfeld try on oxygen masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the bunker at Launch Pad 39B, STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly (left) and Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) (right) try on oxygen masks during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Other crew members taking part are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who are with the European Space Agency. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  9. Tomography finds waste sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Susan M.

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT), a remote sensing method, is being developed for hazardous waste site characterization by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tenn., with the support of the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.More accurate assessment of hazardous sites translates into more efficient and less costly cleanup efforts by defining parameters such as waste site boundaries, geophysical site characteristics, buried container leakage, and hazardous material migration. Remote sensing devices eliminate the potential for environmental damage, safety hazards, or high costs associated with intrusive site characterization techniques.

  10. Olkiluoto site description 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    This fourth version of the Olkiluoto Site Report, produced by the OMTF (Olkiluoto Modelling Task Force), updates the Olkiluoto Site Report 2008 with the data and knowledge obtained up to December 2010. A descriptive model of the site (the Site Descriptive Model, SDM), i.e. a model describing the geological and hydrogeological structure of the site, properties of the bedrock and the groundwater and its flow, and the associated interacting processes and mechanisms. The SDM is divided into six parts: surface system, geology, rock mechanics, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and transport properties.

  11. Site Environmental Report, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

  12. Site Development Planning Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The Handbook provides facility managers and site planners at DOE organizations responsible for planning site developments and facilities utilization a step-by-step planning checklist to ensure that planners at each site are focusing on Department-wide goals and objectives. It begins with a brief discussion of a site development-by-objectives program design to promote, recognize, and implement opportunities for improvements in site utilization through planning. Additional information is included on: assembling existing data, plans, programs, and procedures; establishing realistic objectives; identifying site problems, opportunities; and development needs; determining priorities among development needs; developing short and long-range plans; choosing the right development solutions and meeting minimum legal site restrictions; presenting the plan; implementing elements of the plan; monitoring and reporting plan status; and modifying development program plans. (MCW)

  13. Hanford Site Comprehensive site Compliance Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollefson, K.S.

    1997-08-05

    This document is the second annual submittal by WHC, ICF/KH, PNL and BHI and contains the results of inspections of the stormwater outfalls listed in the Hanford Site Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) (WHC 1993a) as required by General Permit No. WA-R-00-000F (WA-R-00-A17F): This report also describes the methods used to conduct the Storm Water Comprehensive Site Compliance Evaluation, as required in Part IV, Section D, {ampersand} C of the General Permit, summarizes the results of the compliance evaluation, and documents significant leaks and spills.

  14. Ambient Light Intensity, Actigraphy, Sleep and Respiration, Circadian Temperature and Melatonin Rhythms and Daytime Performance of Crew Members During Space Flight on STS-90 and STS-95 Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeisler, Charles A.; Dijk, D.-J.; Neri, D. F.; Hughes, R. J.; Ronda, J. M.; Wyatt, J. K.; West, J. B.; Prisk, G. K.; Elliott, A. R.; Young, L. R.

    1999-01-01

    Sleep disruption and associated waking sleepiness and fatigue are common during space flight. A survey of 58 crew members from nine space shuttle missions revealed that most suffered from sleep disruption, and reportedly slept an average of only 6.1 hours per day of flight as compared to an average of 7.9 hours per day on the ground. Nineteen percent of crewmembers on single shift missions and 50 percent of the crewmembers in dual shift operations reported sleeping pill usage (benzodiazepines) during their missions. Benzodiazepines are effective as hypnotics, however, not without adverse side effects including carryover sedation and performance impairment, anterograde amnesia, and alterations in sleep EEG. Our preliminary ground-based data suggest that pre-sleep administration of 0.3 mg of the pineal hormone melatonin may have the acute hypnotic properties needed for treating the sleep disruption of space flight without producing the adverse side effects associated with benzodiazepines. We hypothesize that pre-sleep administration of melatonin will result in decreased sleep latency, reduced nocturnal sleep disruption, improved sleep efficiency, and enhanced next-day alertness and cognitive performance both in ground-based simulations and during the space shuttle missions. Specifically, we have carried out experiments in which: (1) ambient light intensity aboard the space shuttle is assessed during flight; (2) the impact of space flight on sleep (assessed polysomnographically and actigraphically), respiration during sleep, circadian temperature and melatonin rhythms, waking neurobehavioral alertness and performance is assessed in crew members of the Neurolab and STS-95 missions; (3) the effectiveness of melatonin as a hypnotic is assessed independently of its effects on the phase of the endogenous circadian pacemaker in ground-based studies, using a powerful experimental model of the dyssomnia of space flight; (4) the effectiveness of melatonin as a hypnotic is

  15. CELT site testing program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeck, Matthias; Erasmus, D. Andre; Djorgovski, S. George; Chanan, Gary A.; Nelson, Jerry E.

    2003-01-01

    The California Extremely Large Telescope, CELT, is a proposed 30-m telescope. Choosing the best possible site for CELT is essential in order to extract the best science from the observations and to reduce the complexity of the telescope. Site selection is therefore currently one of the most critical pacing items of the CELT project. In this paper, we first present selected results from a survey of the atmospheric transparency at optical and infrared wavelengths over the southwestern USA and northern Mexico using satellite data. Results of a similar study of South America have been reported elsewhere. These studies will serve as the pre-selection criterion of the sites at which we will perform on-site testing. We then describe the current status of on-site turbulence evaluation efforts and the future plans of the CELT site testing program.

  16. Hazardous waste sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hembra, R.L

    1989-01-01

    This report has found that while most states have accomplished few or no cleanups of sites contaminated by hazardous waste, some have enacted tough cleanup laws, committed relatively large resources to the cleanup effort, and achieved considerable results. At the 17 cleanup sites analyzed, state cleanup plans were generally stringent. However, no federal standards have been set for over half of the contaminants found at these sites. For 11 sites, the states set cleanup levels without doing formal risk assessments. Also, most states reviewed did not consider the full range of alternatives EPA requires. Most states have not shown that they can effectively clean up large, hazardous waste sites. This report recommends that EPA turn sites targeted for cleanup over to the states only if there are adequate controls and oversight.

  17. Site environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Hanf, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the site environmental programs. Effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs monitor for impacts from operations in several areas. The first area consists of the point of possible release into the environment. The second area consists of possible contamination adjacent to DOE facilities, and the third area is the general environment both on and off the site.

  18. Neural adaptation in pSTS correlates with perceptual aftereffects to biological motion and with autistic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Steven M; van Boxtel, Jeroen J A; Monti, Martin M; Chiang, Jeffrey N; Lu, Hongjing

    2016-08-01

    The adaptive nature of biological motion perception has been documented in behavioral studies, with research showing that prolonged viewing of an action can bias judgments of subsequent actions towards the opposite of its attributes. However, the neural mechanisms underlying action adaptation aftereffects remain unknown. We examined adaptation-induced changes in brain responses to an ambiguous action after adapting to walking or running actions within two bilateral regions of interest: 1) human middle temporal area (hMT+), a lower-level motion-sensitive region of cortex, and 2) posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), a higher-level action-selective area. We found a significant correlation between neural adaptation strength in right pSTS and perceptual aftereffects to biological motion measured behaviorally, but not in hMT+. The magnitude of neural adaptation in right pSTS was also strongly correlated with individual differences in the degree of autistic traits. Participants with more autistic traits exhibited less adaptation-induced modulations of brain responses in right pSTS and correspondingly weaker perceptual aftereffects. These results suggest a direct link between perceptual aftereffects and adaptation of neural populations in right pSTS after prolonged viewing of a biological motion stimulus, and highlight the potential importance of this brain region for understanding differences in social-cognitive processing along the autistic spectrum.

  19. 1994 Site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

  20. Region 9 Removal Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of CERCLA (Superfund) Removal sites. CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act)...

  1. STS-76 - SCA 747 Aircraft Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft leaves the runway with the Shuttle Atlantis on its back. Following the STS-76 dawn landing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on 31 March 1996. NASA 905, one of two modified 747's, was prepared to ferry Atlantis back to the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Delivery of Altlantis to Florida was delayed until 11 April 1996, due to an engine warning light that appeared shortly after take off on 6 April. The SCA #905 returned to Edwards with Atlantis aboard only minutes after departure. The right inboard engine #3 was exchanged and the 747 with Atlantis atop was able to depart for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for a refueling stop. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the

  2. SITE-94. Mineralogy of the Aespoe site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Karin [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Technical Environmental Planning

    1996-12-01

    The water composition has several impacts on the repository. It will influence the behaviour of the engineered materials (e.g. corrosion). It may also determine the possible solubility and speciation of released radionuclides. It also acts as a transport medium for the released elements. The groundwater composition and the potential development of the composition due to the presence of the repository as well as due to external variations is thus an important issue in a safety analysis. The development of the groundwater composition is strongly dependent on reactions with the minerals present in water bearing fractures. Here equilibrium chemistry may be of importance, but also reaction kinetics is important to the long-term behaviour. Within the SITE-94 project, a safety analysis is performed for the conditions at the Aespoe site. The mineralogy of the area has been evaluated from drill cores at various places at the site. In this report a recommendation for selection of mineralogy to be used in geochemical modelling of the repository is given. Calcite and iron containing minerals dominate the fracture filling mineralogy at the Aespoe site. Some typical fracture filling mineralogies may be identified in the fractures: epidote, chlorite, calcite, hematite, some illite/smectite + quartz, fluorite, pyrite and goethite. In addition to these a number of minor minerals are found in the fractures. Uncertainties in the fracture filling data may be due to problems when taking out the drill cores. Drilling water may remove important clay minerals and sealed fractures may be reopened mechanically and treated as water conducting fractures. The problem of determining the variability of the mineralogy along the flow paths also remains. This problem will never be solved when the investigation is performed by drilling investigation holes

  3. Preliminary Site Characterization Report, Rulsion Site, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report is a summary of environmental information gathered during a review of the documents pertaining to Project Rulison and interviews with personnel who worked on the project. Project Rulison was part of Operation Plowshare (a program designed to explore peaceful uses for nuclear devices). The project consisted of detonating a 43-kiloton nuclear device on September 10, 1969, in western Colorado to stimulate natural gas production. Following the detonation, a reentry well was drilled and several gas production tests were conducted. The reentry well was shut-in after the last gas production test and was held in standby condition until the general cleanup was undertaken in 1972. A final cleanup was conducted after the emplacement and testing wells were plugged in 1976. However, some surface radiologic contamination resulted from decontamination of the drilling equipment and fallout from the gas flaring during drilling operations. With the exception of the drilling effluent pond, all surface contamination at the Rulison Site was removed during the cleanup operations. All mudpits and other excavations were backfilled, and both upper and lower drilling pads were leveled and dressed. This report provides information regarding known or suspected areas of contamination, previous cleanup activities, analytical results, a review of the regulatory status, the site`s physical environment, and future recommendations for Project Ruhson. Based on this research, several potential areas of contamination have been identified. These include the drilling effluent pond and mudpits used during drilling operations. In addition, contamination could migrate in the gas horizon.

  4. Site characterization handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This Handbook discusses both management and technical elements that should be considered in developing a comprehensive site characterization program. Management elements typical of any project of a comparable magnitude and complexity are combined with a discussion of strategies specific to site characterization. Information specific to the technical elements involved in site characterization is based on guidance published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with respect to licensing requirements for LLW disposal facilities. The objective of this Handbook is to provide a reference for both NRC Agreement States and non-Agreement States for use in developing a comprehensive site characterization program that meets the specific objectives of the State and/or site developer/licensee. Each site characterization program will vary depending on the objectives, licensing requirements, schedules/budgets, physical characteristics of the site, proposed facility design, and the specific concerns raised by government agencies and the public. Therefore, the Handbook is not a prescriptive guide to site characterization. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Site characterization handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This Handbook discusses both management and technical elements that should be considered in developing a comprehensive site characterization program. Management elements typical of any project of a comparable magnitude and complexity are combined with a discussion of strategies specific to site characterization. Information specific to the technical elements involved in site characterization is based on guidance published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with respect to licensing requirements for LLW disposal facilities. The objective of this Handbook is to provide a reference for both NRC Agreement States and non-Agreement States for use in developing a comprehensive site characterization program that meets the specific objectives of the State and/or site developer/licensee. Each site characterization program will vary depending on the objectives, licensing requirements, schedules/budgets, physical characteristics of the site, proposed facility design, and the specific concerns raised by government agencies and the public. Therefore, the Handbook is not a prescriptive guide to site characterization. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  6. The Greenland Ramsar Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egevang, C.; Boertmann, D.

    The eleven Ramsar sites in Greenland are reviewed in terms of their status as habitats for waterbirds and other fauna. Management and monitoring is proposed, as well as revisions of their boundaries. A number of potential new Ramsar sites are described...

  7. Site-Specific Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik; Hemmersam, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Currently, cities across the Northern European region are actively redeveloping their former industrial harbours. Indeed, harbours areas are essential in the long-term transition from industrial to information and experience societies; harbours are becoming sites for new businesses and residences...... question is how innovation may contribute to urban life and site-specific qualities....

  8. Fibroblast growth factor 2 orchestrates angiogenic networking in non-GIST STS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smeland Eivind

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor soft-tissue sarcomas (non-GIST STSs constitute a heterogeneous group of tumors with poor prognosis. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR-1, in close interplay with platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3, are strongly involved in angiogenesis. This study investigates the prognostic impact of FGF2 and FGFR-1 and explores the impact of their co-expression with PDGF-B and VEGFR-3 in widely resected tumors from non-GIST STS patients. Methods Tumor samples from 108 non-GIST STS patients were obtained and tissue microarrays were constructed for each specimen. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expressions of FGF-2, FGFR-1, PDGF-B and VEGFR-3. Results In the multivariate analysis, high expression of FGF2 (P = 0.024, HR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.4 and the co-expressions of FGF2 & PDGF-B (overall; P = 0.007, intermediate; P = 0.013, HR = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.3-9.7, high; P = 0.002, HR = 6.0, 95% CI = 2.0-18.1 and FGF2 & VEGFR-3 (overall; P = 0.050, intermediate; P = 0.058, HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 0.98-4.1, high; P = 0.028, HR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.1-6.0 were significant independent prognostic indicators of poor disease-specific survival. Conclusion FGF2, alone or in co-expression with PDGF-B and VEGFR-3, is a significant independent negative prognosticator in widely resected non-GIST STS patients.

  9. STS-103 crew exit O&C Building to head for launch pad

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Wearing their launch suits, the STS-103 crew exit the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC, heading for the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B and more Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) actvities. In front (left to right) are Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; in the second row are Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA); in the third row are C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, also with ESA; and at the rear is Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  10. STS-103 Pilot Kelly answers questions during interview at Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    During an interview at Launch Pad 39B, STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly responds to a question from the media about the mission. Standing with him are the remainder of the crew: (left to right) Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is also with ESA. As a preparation for launch, they have been participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at KSC. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  11. STS-103 M.S. Mike Foale answers question during interview at Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) (at right) responds to a question from the media about the mission during an interview at Launch Pad 39B. Next to him is Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.). As a preparation for launch, the crew have been participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at KSC. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland. Clervoy and Nicollier are with the European Space Agency. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  12. STS-103 crew instructed about bunker equipment at Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Inside a bunker at Launch Pad 39B, the STS-103 crew are instructed about use of the equipment. From left (in their astronaut uniforms) are Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, Steven L. Smith, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Pilot Steven J. Kelly. Not shown in the photo is Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are both with the European Space Agency. As a preparation for launch, the crew have been participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at KSC. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  13. STS-103 crew in white room at Launch Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    As part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, the STS-103 crew inspect the 'white room,' an environmentally controlled chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm through which the crew enters the orbiter. Standing from left to right are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith, and Pilot Scott J. Kelly. Clervoy and Nicollier are with the European Space Agency. The TCDT provides the crew with the emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  14. STS-103 crew are interviewed by media at Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 39B, Lisa Malone, chief, Media Services at KSC introduces the STS-103 crew standing ready to answer questions from the media. From left are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is also with ESA. As a preparation for launch, the crew have been participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at KSC. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  15. STS-103 crew learn about use of slideware basket at Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    At the slidewire area of Launch Pad 39B, the STS-103 crew listen to use of the emergency egress equipment. From left are the trainer, with crew members Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Pilot Steven J. Kelly, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and (kneeling) Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. Clervoy and Nicollier are both with the European Space Agency. As a preparation for launch, the crew have been participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at KSC. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  16. Site decommissioning management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

  17. Coating Layer and Corrosion Protection Characteristics in Sea Water with Various Thermal Spray Coating Materials for STS304

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Jong; Woo, Yong-Bin

    We investigated the optimal method of application and the anticorrosive abilities of Zn, Al, and Zn + 15%Al spray coatings in protecting stainless steel 304 (STS304) in sea water. If a defect such as porosity or an oxide layer, causes STS304 to be exposed to sea water, and the thermal spray coating material will act as the cathode and anode, respectively. The Tafel experiments revealed that Al-coated specimens among applied coating methods had the lowest corrosion current densities. As the corrosion potential decreases with increasing corrosion current density, we estimated the characteristics and lifetime of the protective thermal spray coating layer in the galvanic cell formed by the thermal spray coating layer and STS304.

  18. STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz suits up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) chats with Johnson Space Center officials Olan Bertrand (left) and David Leestma (right) during suitup activities in the Operations and Checkout Building. Born in Costa Rica, Chang-Diaz joined NASA in 1980. He has already completed four spaceflights and logged more than 656 hours on-orbit. He and six fellow crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff during a two-and-a-half-hour launch window opening at 3:18 p.m. EST.

  19. STS-34 Mission Specialists Chang-Diaz and Baker with EVA tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) and MS Ellen S. Baker (right) examine extravehicular activity (EVA) tools along with Rockwell Space Operations (RSO) technician Wayne J. Wedlake prior EVA contingency exercise (underwater simulation) in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Chang-Diaz and Baker will practice using the EVA tools and rehearse chores which would require manual action outside the spacecraft in the event of failure of remote systems in the WETF's 25 ft pool.

  20. Electron tunneling using STM/STS on iron-based oxypnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Yuuki, E-mail: yuki-k@eng.hokudai.ac.j [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ichimura, Koichi [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kurosawa, Toru; Oda, Migaku [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanda, Satoshi [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Takahashi, Hiroki; Okada, Hironari [Department of Physics, Nihon University, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Kamihara, Yoichi [TriP, JST, Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Hosono, Hideo [Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    We report the electron tunneling study on SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} (x = 0, 0.045, 0.046, 0.069) by using low temperature UHV-STM/STS. The superconducting gap and pseudogap structures are observed on x = 0.045, 0.046, 0.069. We also found similar structures on non-superconducting sample of x = 0. The value of 2{Delta}{sub sc}/kT{sub c} decreases as T{sub c} increases.

  1. STS-47 Payload Specialist Mohri holds sample syringe during SLJ experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri holds sample syringe while conducting Studies on the Effects of Microgravity on the Ultrastructure and Function of Cultured Mammalian Cells (KIDNEY CELLS). Mohri, wearing a lightweight headset, works inside the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. In the background are the NASDA Material Sciences Rack 10 with field sequential (FS) crew cabin camera attached and the SLJ end cone with a banner from Auburn University and portraits of the backup payload specialists. Mohri represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA).

  2. STS-97 MS Noriega prepares to enter Endeavour from the White Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    In the White Room, STS-97 Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega Tanner prepares for entry into Space Shuttle Endeavour with the help of the Closeout Crew, Travis Thompson (left) and Jack Burritt (right). Space Shuttle Endeavour is targeted to launch Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST for the six construction flight to the International Space Station. Endeavour is transporting the P6 Integrated Truss Structure that comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to provide power to the Space Station. After the 11-day mission, which includes three spacewalks, it is expected to land at KSC Dec. 11 at 6:19 p.m. EST.

  3. STS-31 Discovery, OV-103, auxiliary power unit 1 (APU-1) controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The controller for Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, auxiliary power unit 1 (APU-1) is documented before removal following the launch scrub on 04-10-90. The controller weighs about 15 pounds and controls the speed of the APU. It was flown to the vendor, Sundstrand Corp., Rockford, Illinois, for analysis and testing. Launch of OV-103 on mission STS-31 has been rescheduled for 04-24-90 following the successful replacement of the APU-1 and the recharging of the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) nickel-hydrogen batteries. View provided by the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) with alternate KSC number KSC-90PC-663.

  4. STS-35 Pilot Gardner and MS Hoffman during egress training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner (standing) and Mission Specialist (MS) Jeffrey A. Hoffman prepare for egress training at JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Gardner and Hoffman, wearing orange launch and entry suits (LESs), adjust their parachute harnesses as they listen to instructions before training begins. The astronaut crewmembers and payload specialists for the scheduled May flight were specifically learning proper measures to take in the event of an emergency on the launch pad necessitating emergency evacuation of the orbiter.

  5. STS-35 MS Hoffman and Pilot Gardner 'commute' to work on the middeck of OV-102

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Mission Specialist (MS) Jeffrey A. Hoffman (front) and Pilot Guy S. Gardner, holding Development Test Objective (DTO) 634 trash compactor handles to the ceiling, 'commute' to work on the middeck of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Just below Hoffman's right elbow in locker MF43G DTO 634, Trash Compaction and Retention System Demonstration, trash compactor with a geared mechanism that allows manual compaction of wet and dry trash is visible. Also in the view are the stowed treadmill on the middeck floor and the starboard side sleep station.

  6. STS-37 Pilot Cameron uses SAREX to communicate amateur radio operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron, wearing Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) headset (HDST), communicates with amateur radio operators and students while on aft flight deck aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. SAREX provided radio transmissions between ground based amateur radio operators around the world and Cameron (call sign KB5AWP) and the other crewmembers, all of whom are licensed amateur radio operators. SAREX enabled students from all over the United States to have a chance to communicate with an astronaut in space. The cloud-covered surface of the Earth is visible above Cameron framed in the overhead window W8.

  7. STS-56 Commander Cameron and Pilot Oswald on CCT flight deck in JSC's MAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron, (left) and Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs) and launch and entry helmets (LEHs), are seated on the forward flight deck of the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup. Cameron mans the commander station controls and Oswald the pilots station controls during an emergency egress (bailout) simulation. The view was taken from the aft flight deck looking forward and includes Cameron's and Oswald's profiles and the forward flight deck controls and checklists. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  8. Approaches to environmental verification of STS free-flier and pallet payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the environmental verification programs followed on an STS-launched free-flier payload, using the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) as an example, and a pallet payload, using the Office of Space Sciences-1 (OSS-1) as an example. Differences are assessed and rationale given as to why the differing programs were used on the two example payloads. It is concluded that the differences between the programs are due to inherent differences in the payload configuration, their respective mission performance objectives and their operational scenarios rather than to any generic distinctions that differentiate between a free-flier and a pallet payload.

  9. STS-31 crewmembers during simulation on the flight deck of JSC's FB-SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    On the flight deck of JSC's fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS), Mission Specialist (MS) Steven A. Hawley (left), on aft flight deck, looks over the shoulders of Commander Loren J. Shriver, seated at the commanders station (left) and Pilot Charles F. Bolden, seated at the pilots station and partially blocked by the seat's headrest (right). The three astronauts recently named to the STS-31 mission aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, go through a procedures checkout in the FB-SMS. The training simulation took place in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  10. STS-57 crewmembers train in JSC's FB Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-57 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Nancy J. Sherlock, holding computer diskettes and procedural checklist, discusses equipment operation with Commander Ronald J. Grabe on the middeck of JSC's fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). Payload Commander (PLC) G. David Low points to a forward locker location as MS3 Peter J.K. Wisoff switches controls on overhead panels MO42F and MO58F, and MS4 Janice E. Voss looks on. The FB-SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  11. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, MS Springer on JSC crew compartment trainer middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer, wearing navy blue launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), participates in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) exercises. MS Springer is seated in mission specialist seat on CCT middeck, the position he will occupy during the entry phase of flight. Behind Springer is the closed airlock hatch and stowed treadmill. The crew escape system (CES) pole extends overhead from starboard wall to side hatch. On Springer's left is the galley. CCT is located in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Photo was taken by Bill Bowers of JSC.

  12. New approach towards imaging -DNA using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shirshendu Dey; Sushama Pethkar; Suguna D Adyanthaya; Murali Sastry; C V Dharmadhikari

    2008-06-01

    A new methodology to anchor -DNA to silanized -Si(111) surface using Langmuir Blodget trough was developed. The -Si (111) was silanized by treating it with low molecular weight octyltrichlorosilane in toluene. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) image of -DNA on octyltrichlorosilane deposited Si substrate shows areas exhibiting arrayed structures of 700 nm length and 40 nm spacing. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) at different stages depict a broad distribution of defect states in the bandgap region of -Si(111) which presumably facilitates tunneling through otherwise insulating DNA layer.

  13. CT scans of Sts 14 provide the potential for manufacturing casts

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kirkbride, AN

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available : To place article links in an external web document, simply copy and paste the HTML below, starting with "Sts 14 provide the potential for manufacturing casts. Authors: Yates, Simon C. Kirkbride, Anthony N. Source...

  14. STS-29 crewmembers receive briefing on Student Experiment (SE) 83-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers receive briefing on Student Experiment (SE) 83-9 Chicken Embryo Development in Space or 'Chix in Space' from student experimenter John C. Vellinger and sponsor Mark S. Deusser. Vellinger (right) explains operation of an incubator used in his experiment to crewmembers, seated around table, and other support personnel in audience. Clockwise from Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer (hands together at left) are MS James F. Buchli (glasses), Commander Michael L. Coats, Pilot John E. Blaha, MS James P. Bagian, Vellinger, and Deusser. The student's sponsor is Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC).

  15. STS-31 Discovery, OV-103, is hidden in low-lying clouds after KSC liftoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, is hidden in low-lying cloud cover as it rises above Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B just after its liftoff at 8:33:51.0492 am (Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). The glow of the solid rocket booster (SRB) and the space shuttle main engine (SSME) firings appears just below the cloud cover and is reflected in the nearby waterway (foreground). An exhaust plume trails from OV-103 and its SRBs and covers the launch pad area.

  16. STS-31 Discovery, OV-103, rockets through low-lying clouds after KSC liftoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rides above the firey glow of the solid rocket boosters (SRBs) and space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) and a long trail of exhaust as it heads toward Earth orbit. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B is covered in an exhaust cloud moments after the liftoff of OV-103 at 8:33:51.0492 am (Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). The exhaust plume pierces the low-lying clouds as OV-103 soars into the clear skies above. A nearby waterway appears in the foreground.

  17. The Neurolab Spacelab Mission: Neuroscience Research in Space: Results from the STS-90, Neurolab Spacelab Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckey, Jay C., Jr. (Editor); Homick, Jerry L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    Neurolab (STS-90) represents a major scientific achievement that built upon the knowledge and capabilities developed during the preceding 15 successful Spacelab module missions. NASA proposed a dedicated neuroscience research flight in response to a Presidential declaration that the 1990's be the Decade of the Brain. Criteria were established for selecting research proposals in partnership with the National Institutes of Health (NM), the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, and a number of the International Space Agencies. The resulting Announcement of Opportunity for Neurolab in 1993 resulted in 172 proposals from scientists worldwide. After an NIH-managed peer review, NASA ultimately selected 26 proposals for flight on the Neurolab mission.

  18. STS-44 DSP / IUS spacecraft tilted to predeployment position in OV-104's PLB

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Defense Support Program (DSP) / Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) spacecraft, with forward airborne support equipment (ASE) payload retention latch actuator released (foreground), is raised to a 29 degree predeployment position by the ASE aft frame tilt actuator (AFTA) table in the payload bay (PLB) of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Underneath the DSP / IUS combination, the umbilical boom is connected to the IUS. DSP components include Infrared (IR) sensor (top), AR I, SHF Antenna, EHF Antenna, Link 2 High-Gain Antenna, star sensor, and stowed solar paddles (box-like structure around the base). The Earth's limb and the blackness of space create the backdrop for this deployment scene.

  19. STS-47 MS Davis and MS Jemison conduct LBNP experiment in the SLJ module

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    At the aft end of the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module, STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis (foreground) readies Rack 9 Automatic Blood Pressure System (ABPS) controls as MS Mae C. Jemison, inside the cylindrical fabric lower body negative pressure (LBNP) device, waits for the LBNP experiment to begin. LBNP device is sealed around Jemison's waist. It is attached to the SLJ floor and has a controller that operates a pump to change the pressure inside. Davis will monitor Jemison's pulse rate, blood pressure, and cardiac dimensions and functions.

  20. STS-47 crew poses for Official onboard (in space) portrait in SLJ module

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 crewmembers assemble for their traditional onboard (in-flight) portrait in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. Pictured, left to right, back row are Commander Robert L. Gibson and Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Jr; middle row Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis, MS Jerome Apt, and MS Mae C. Jemison; and front row MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee and Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri. Mohri represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA).

  1. STS-47 MS Jemison works at SLJ Rack 5 during crew station review at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison, wearing clean suit, flips centrifuge switch on Spacelab Japan (SLJ) Rack 5 Frog Environmental Unit during training and review activities at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Jemison is inside the SLJ laboratory module installed in Endeavour's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105's, payload bay (PLB). OV-105 is currently undergoing pre-flight processing in a high bay area of KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF). View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-92PC-1645.

  2. STS-47 crew poses for portrait after having been named to the SLJ mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-47 crewmembers pose for portrait after having been named to the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) mission scheduled for flight aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) recently named the four to the mission. Posing in front of the flags of the United States (U.S.) and Japan are (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison, Japanese NASDA Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri, MS N. Jan Davis, and MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee.

  3. STS-47 crewmembers work in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) module aboard OV-105

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) Jerome Apt responds to a crewmate's query during a shift changeover in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. Apt, positioned in front of Rack 3's general purpose workstation (GPWS), talks to MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee (foreground, partially out of frame). Behind Apt and in front of the spacelab tunnel hatch are MS Mae C. Jemison (left) and MS N. Jan Davis. Note that Commander Robert L. Gibson freefloats above the GPWS during the discussion.

  4. STS-47 crew leaves KSC's O and C Building on their way to Launch Complex 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), leave the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and Checkout (O and C) Building to board a van headed for Launch Complex (LC) 39. Leading the crew is Commander Robert L. Gibson (front right). He is followed by Mission Specialist (MS) Jerome Apt (glasses, front center), Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Jr (front left), MS N. Jan Davis (center left), MS and Payload Commander Mark C. Lee (center right), Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri (waving back left), and MS Mae C. Jemison (back right). Mohri represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA).

  5. STS-47 MS Jemison trains in SLJ module at MSFC Payload Crew Training Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison, wearing Autogenic Feedback Training System 2 suit, works with the Frog Embryology Experiment in a General Purpose Workstation (GPWS) in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) module mockup at the Payload Crew Training Complex. The experiment will study the effects of weightlessness on the development of frog eggs fertilized in space. The Payload Crew Training Complex is located at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. View provided with alternate number 92P-139.

  6. Views of the OSS-1 Experiment Pallet installed in the Cargo Bay for STS-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Views of the OSS-1 Experiment Pallet installed in the Cargo Bay for STS-3. Photos include view of the OSS-1 inside the payload bay of the Columbia before the bay doors were closed in flight configuration. Along the bay's edge is the remote manipulator system (RMS) (26910); Wide angle view of the payload bay including the OSS-1 and RMS (26911); high angle view of the OSS-1 inside the payload bay before the bay doors were closed. Also seen along the edge is the RMS (26912).

  7. STS-110 Commander Bloomfield in M-113 personnel carrier during TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-110 Commander Michael Bloomfield is eager to take his turn turn at driving the M-113 armored personnel carrier, part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. To his left is Mission Specialist Steven Smith. TCDT includes emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown, and is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  8. Unity nameplate is attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    - In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks placement of the nameplate to be attached to the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station. Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  9. Unity nameplate gets final check before being attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    - In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers make a final check of the nameplate to be attached to the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station. Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  10. Unity nameplate added to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers look over the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, after attaching the nameplate. Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  11. Unity nameplate examined after being attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, Joan Higgenbotham, with KSC's Astronaut Office Computer Support, checks placement of the nameplate for the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station. Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  12. STS-41 Discovery, OV-103, KSC liftoff from a remote control tracking device

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, riding atop the external tank (ET), begins its roll maneuver after lifting off from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39 at 7:47 am (Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). Exhaust plumes billow from the solid rocket booster (SRB) skirts. The glow of the three space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) is visible. This photo was taken by a remote control tracking device mounted 1600 feet from epicenter and looks from the bottom of the ET to OV-103's nose.

  13. STS-26 crew in JSC Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers model the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (launch and entry suits (LESs)) for entry and launch phases before a training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Pictured (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, Pilot Richard O. Covey, MS John M. Lounge, and MS George D. Nelson. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew is scheduled to check out the new partial pressure suits and crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  14. STS-26 crew trains in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) shuttle mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck tests cushion outside the crew compartment trainer (CCT) side hatch. Hauck, wearing new (navy blue) partial pressure suit (launch and entry suit (LES)) and helmet, tumbles out CCT side hatch onto cushion as technicians look on. During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new partial pressure suits and checked out crew escape system (CES) configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options. CCT is located in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A.

  15. STS-46 Payload Specialist Malerba on the middeck of JSC's FFT mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba with his hand resting on the crew escape system (CES) pole stands on the middeck of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9. Malerba, wearing a flight suit, familiarizes himself with the operation of the CES pole which extends out the shuttle mockup's open side hatch. The CES pole is used if emergency egress is required during the launch or ascent phase of flight.

  16. STS-34 crewmembers sit in M1-13 APC during emergency egress training at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 crewmembers sit in M1-13 Armored Personnel Carrier (APC) during emergency egress training at KSC's shuttle landing facility (SLF) prior to terminal countdown demonstration test (TCDT) activities. Wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), are (from left) Mission Specialist (MS) Ellen S. Baker, MS Shannon W. Lucid, Commander Donald E. Williams (right side, in back), MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, and Pilot Michael J. McCulley (holding headset). View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-89PC-871.

  17. STM and STS investigations of Ce-doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Tinghong; MAO Jian; ZHU Xiaodong; TU Mingjing

    2006-01-01

    Ce-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles were investigated in the paper. The surface structures of undoped and Ce-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were observed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The experimental results of scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) show that the surface electronic structures of TiO2 nanoparticles are modified by introducing new electronic states in the surface band gap through cerium ion doping. The results are discussed in terms of the influence of doping concentration on the surface band gap of TiO2.

  18. Unity nameplate examined after being attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks placement of the nameplate for the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station. Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  19. Unity nameplate examined before being attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, holding the nameplate for the Unity connecting module are (left) Joan Higginbotham, with the Astronaut Office Computer Support Branch, and (right) Nancy Tolliver, with Boeing-Huntsville. Part of the International Space Station, Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  20. STS-55 MS3 Harris draws blood sample from Payload Specialist Schlegel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 German Payload Specialist 2 Hans Schlegel (left) serves as a test subject inside the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) science module onboard the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Bernard A. Harris, Jr, a physician, performs one of many blood draws designed to help investigate human physiology under microgravity conditions. The two crewmembers use intravehicular activity (IVA) foot restraints (foot loops) in front of Rack 10, a stowage rack, to steady themselves during the procedure. Schlegel represents the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR).