WorldWideScience

Sample records for baer walls

  1. BAER suppression during posterior fossa dural opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Shields

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: We hypothesized that the cochlear nerve and vessels entering the acoustic meatus were compressed or stretched when subjected to tissue shift. This movement caused cochlear nerve dysfunction that resulted in BAER suppression. BAER was partially restored after the tumor was decompressed, dura repaired, and bone replaced. BAER was not suppressed following durotomy for removal of a meningioma lying posterior to the cochlear complex. Insight into the mechanisms of durotomy-induced BAER inhibition would allay the neurosurgeon′s anxiety during the operation.

  2. Baer-invariants with Respect to Two Varieties of Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Reza R. Moghaddam; Ali Reza Salemkar; Mostafa Taheri

    2001-01-01

    This paper is devoted to present some properties of the Baer-invariants of groups with respect to two varieties V and W of groups. We give some inequalities for such Baer-invariants of finite groups. A generalized version of the Stalling type theorem is presented. Also, if N is a normal subgroup of a group G in the variety W, then we give a necessary and sufficient condition for which the Baer-invariant of G can be embedded into the Baer-invariant of the factor group G/N.

  3. Highly Inventive Explorer of Creativity: An Interview with John Baer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshon, Suzanna E.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Baer is a Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Rider University. Dr. Baer has published 10 books and scores of research articles and book chapters on creativity, cooperative learning, and other educational psychology topics. His research on the development of creativity and his teaching have both won national awards,…

  4. Karl ernst von Baer's 'Uber Entwickelungsgeschichte der Thiere II' and its unpublished drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammiksaar, Erki; Brauckmann, Sabine

    2004-01-01

    In 1828 Karl Ernst von Baer (1792-1876) published his seminal Uber Entwickelungsgeschichte der Thiere. Beobachtung und Reflexion. In the preface he announced that a second volume with one copper plate would be finished 'in a few weeks'. However, it took nine years until the unfinished second volume was released, with four copperplates. In his 'Autobiography', von Baer did not clarify the reasons why he did not finish his research program of comparative embryology. The paper attempts to elucidate them, furnished by archival documents and von Baer's unpublished embryological drawings. Our sketch of a few figures will show that (1) von Baer searched for 'analogies' (homologies) as a unifying principle and (2) explained the mechanisms of embryogenesis by physiological reasoning (electromagnetism). The main objective is to show that technical problems in illustrating and conceptual difficulties impeded von Baer's ambitious research program.

  5. Baer *-rings reprint of the 1972 edition with errata list and later developments indicated

    CERN Document Server

    Berberian, Sterling K

    2010-01-01

    A systematic exposition of Baer *-Rings, with emphasis on the ring-theoretic and lattice-theoretic foundations of von Neumann algebras. Equivalence of projections, decompositio into types; connections with AW*-algebras, *-regular rings, continuous geometries. Special topics include the theory of finite Baer *-rings (dimension theory, reduction theory, embedding in *-regular rings) and matrix rings over Baer *-rings. Written to be used as a textbook as well as a reference, the book includes more than 400 exercises, accompanied by notes, hints, and references to the literature. Errata and commen

  6. A Positive and Entropy-Satisfying Finite Volume Scheme for the Baer-Nunziato Model

    CERN Document Server

    Coquel, Frédéric; Saleh, Khaled; Seguin, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We present a relaxation scheme for approximating the entropy dissipating weak solutions of the Baer-Nunziato two-phase flow model. This relaxation scheme is straightforwardly obtained as an extension of the relaxation scheme designed in the reference [16] for the isentropic Baer-Nunziato model and consequently inherits its main properties. Up to our knowledge, this is the only existing scheme for which the approximated phase fractions, phase densities and phase pressures are proven to remain positive without any restrictive condition other than a classical fully computable CFL condition. It is also the only scheme for which a discrete entropy inequality is proven, under a CFL condition derived from the natural sub-characteristic condition associated with the relaxation approximation. These two properties of the numerical scheme (discrete positivity and entropy inequality) are satisfied for any admissible equation of state. We provide a numerical study for the convergence of the approximate solutions towards s...

  7. George Martin Baer, DVM, MPH, 1936-2009. The father of oral rabies vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Paul E. Grunenwald, DVM, MSc

    2009-01-01

    George Martin Baer, known for his development of the oral rabies vaccine instrumental in rabies control in Europe, died on 2 June 2009 at the age of 73 in Mexico City, Mexico. He was born on 12 January 1936 in London, England, to German immigrants who had fled Nazi Germany. His family emigrated to the United States in 1940 where he grew up in New Rochelle, New York.George had a love of animals, particularly horses, which may have influenced his career path. He earned an undergraduate degree i...

  8. Philander opossum (Marsupialia, a new host record for Sparganum of Lueheella Baer, 1924 (= Spirometra Mueller, 1937

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delir Corrêa Gomes

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available Two samples of Sparganum, the larval form of Lueheella Baer, 1924 (= Spirometra Mueller, 1937 were recovered from Philander opossum (L. 1758 captured in Salobra, Mato Grosso State, Brazil, by Dr. Lauro Travassos in may, 1942. This is the first report of the presence of this larval form in P. opossum. Dealing with helminths recovered from Brazilian Marsupialia, deposited in Oswaldo Cruz Institute Helminthological Collection, we examined in two samples of the preserved material collected in Salobra. Mato Grosso State, nine larval forms (Sparganum of Lueheella sp. One of the samples, with six specimens, tissue. It is the first report of philander opossum harbouring this larval stage. The studied preserved wet material was stained and whole mounts were deposited in the Oswaldo Cruz institute Helminthological collection ns. 31.470 and 31.471. Measurements are in mm.Duas amostras de Sparganum, a forma larvar de Lueheella Baer, 1924 (=Spirometra Mueller, 1937, foram coletadas em Philander opossum (L., 1758 capturado em Salobra, MT, pelo Dr. Lauro Travassos, em maio de 1942. Essa é a primeira referência da presença desse estágio larvar em P. opossum.

  9. In memoriam: George Martin Baer, DVM, MPH, 1936-2009. The father of oral rabies vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunenwald, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    George Martin Baer, known for his development of the oral rabies vaccine instrumental in rabies control in Europe, died on 2 June 2009 at the age of 73 in Mexico City, Mexico. He was born on 12 January 1936 in London, England, to German immigrants who had fled Nazi Germany. His family emigrated to the United States in 1940 where he grew up in New Rochelle, New York. George had a love of animals, particularly horses, which may have influenced his career path. He earned an undergraduate degree in agricultural sciences in 1954 from Cornell University followed by a degree in veterinary medicine in 1959. He then went on to earn a master's degree in public health in 1960 from the University of Michigan. During some time in Mexico, George met and fell in love with his wife, Maria Olga Lara. Thanks to James H. Steele, his long-time friend and mentor, he started his public health career with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and was assigned to the New York State Health Department where he learned epidemiology and virology. He went on to work on bat rabies at the CDC's Southwest Rabies Investigations Laboratory in New Mexico. From 1966 to 1969, he worked with the National Institute for Livestock Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Pecuarias: INIP) in Mexico and helped develop the Plan Derriengue to control paralytic bovine rabies which became the early work in the development of Mexico's rabies control programmes. He returned to Atlanta in 1969 to direct the CDC Rabies Laboratory. There, he led a team of researchers in developing an oral rabies vaccine for wildlife, earning him the title 'The Father of Oral Rabies Vaccination'. His text, The Natural History of Rabies, first published in 1975 and again in 1991, continues to be a definitive international reference for rabies control. After his retirement, George returned to Mexico and continued his research and training, working to develop not only public health programmes, but new researchers as well. At the

  10. George Martin Baer, DVM, MPH, 1936-2009. The father of oral rabies vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E. Grunenwald, DVM, MSc

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available George Martin Baer, known for his development of the oral rabies vaccine instrumental in rabies control in Europe, died on 2 June 2009 at the age of 73 in Mexico City, Mexico. He was born on 12 January 1936 in London, England, to German immigrants who had fled Nazi Germany. His family emigrated to the United States in 1940 where he grew up in New Rochelle, New York.George had a love of animals, particularly horses, which may have influenced his career path. He earned an undergraduate degree in agricultural sciences in 1954 from Cornell University followed by a degree in veterinary medicine in 1959. He then went on to earn a master’s degree in public health in 1960 from the University of Michigan. During some time in Mexico, George met and fell in love with his wife, Maria Olga Lara. Thanks to James H. Steele, his long-time friend and mentor, he started his public health career with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC and was assigned to the New York State Health Department where he learned epidemiology and virology. He went on to work on bat rabies at the CDC’s Southwest Rabies Investigations Laboratory in New Mexico. From 1966 to 1969, he worked with the National Institute for Livestock Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Pecuarias: INIP in Mexico and helped develop the Plan Derriengue to control paralytic bovine rabies which became the early work in the development of Mexico’s rabies control programmes. He returned to Atlanta in 1969 to direct the CDC Rabies Laboratory. There, he led a team of researchers in developing an oral rabies vaccine for wildlife, earning him the title ‘The Father of Oral Rabies Vaccination’. His text, The Natural History of Rabies, first published in 1975 and again in 1991, continues to be a definitive international reference for rabies control.After his retirement, George returned to Mexico and continued his research and training, working to develop not only public health programmes, but new

  11. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  12. Evaluation of BAER surface model for aerosol optical thickness retrieval over land surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Chiang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of surface reflectance is essential for an accurate retrieval of aerosol optical thickness (AOT by satellite remote sensing approach. Due to the variability of surface reflectance over land surfaces, a surface model is required to take into account the crucial factor controlling this variability. In the present study, we attempted to simulate surface reflectance in the short-wave channels with two methods, namely the land cover type dependent method and a two-source linear model. In the two-source linear model, we assumed that the spectral property can be described by a mixture of vegetated and non-vegetated area, and both the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, and the vegetation continuous field (VCF was applied to summarize this surface characteristic. By comparing our estimation with surface reflectance data derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, it indicated that the land cover type approach did not provide a better estimation because of inhomogeneous land cover pattern and the mixing pixel properties. For the two-source linear method, the study suggested that the use of NDVI as parameterization for vegetation fraction can reflect the spectral behavior of shortwave surface reflectance, despite of some deviation due to the averaging characteristics in our linear combination process. A channel-dependent offset and scalar factor could enhance reflectance estimation and further improve AOT retrieval by the current Bremen AErosol Retrieval (BAER approach.

  13. Traveling waves in the Baer and Rinzel model of spine studded dendritic tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, G. J.; Coombes, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Baer and Rinzel model of dendritic spines uniformly distributed along a dendritic cable is shown to admit a variety of regular traveling wave solutions including solitary pulses, multiple pulses and periodic waves. We investigate numerically the speed of these waves and their propagation failure as functions of the system parameters by numerical continuation. Multiple pulse waves are shown to occur close to the primary pulse, except in certain exceptional regions of parameter space, which we identify. The propagation failure of solitary and multiple pulse waves is shown to be associated with the destruction of a saddle-node bifurcation of periodic orbits. The system also supports many types of irregular wave trains. These include waves which may be regarded as connections to periodics and bursting patterns in which pulses can cluster together in well-defined packets. The behavior and properties of both these irregular spike-trains is explained within a kinematic framework that is based on the times of wave pulses. The dispersion curve for periodic waves is important for such a description and is obtained in a straightforward manner using the numerical scheme developed for the study of the speed of a periodic wave. Stability of periodic waves within the kinematic theory is given in terms of the derivative of the dispersion curve and provides a weak form of stability that may be applied to solutions of the traveling wave equations. The kinematic theory correctly predicts the conditions for period doubling bifurcations and the generation of bursting states. Moreover, it also accurately describes the shape and speed of the traveling front that connects waves with two different periods.

  14. OBSERVATION OF ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT IN 50 CASES WITH FACIAL PARALYSIS BAER%针灸治疗贝尔面瘫50例临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Dong

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the clinical research on acupuncture treatment of facial paralysis Baer. Methods Baer paralysis patients admitted to our hospital 80 cases as the research object, randomly divided into observation group and control group, 40 cases in each group. The control group was given routine treatment, the observation group used acupuncture treatment by stages. ResultsThe total effective rate of observation group was significantly better than the control group, the difference between groups was significant, with statistical significance (P<0.05).Conclusion The use of acupuncture treatment of facial paralysis Baer, less complications and high safety, can improve the therapeutic effect, improve the quality of life of patients, it is worthy of popularization and application.

  15. Analysis of linear long-term trend of aerosol optical thickness derived from SeaWiFS using BAER over Europe and South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yoon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present paper is to derive and discuss linear long-term trends of Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT at 443 and 555 nm over regions in Europe and South China. These areas are densely populated and highly polluted. The study uses the Bremen AErosol Retrieval (BAER and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS data for AOT retrievals in the specified regions from October 1997 to May 2008. In order to validate the individually retrieved AOTs and the corresponding trends, AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET level 2.0 data have been used. The retrieved AOTs were in good agreement with those of AERONET (0.79 ≤ R ≤ 0.88, 0.08 ≤ RMSD ≤ 0.13. The contamination of BAER aerosol retrievals and/or AERONET observations by thin clouds can significantly degrade the AOT and lead to statistically non-representative monthly-means, especially during cloudy seasons. Therefore an inter-correction method has been developed and applied. The "corrected" trends for both BAER SeaWiFS and AERONET AOT were similar having an average of relative error ~25.19 %. In general terms, negative trends (decrease of aerosol loading were mainly observed over European regions, with magnitudes up to −0.00453 (−1.93 % and −0.00484 (−2.35 % per year at 443 and 555 nm, respectively. In contrast, the trend in Pearl River Delta was positive, most likely attributed to rapid urbanization and industrialization. The magnitudes of AOT increased by +0.00761 (+1.24 % and +0.00625 (+1.15 % per year respectively at 443 and 555 nm.

  16. Retrospective multicenter evaluation of the "fly-catching syndrome" in 24 dogs: EEG, BAER, MRI, CSF findings and response to antiepileptic and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzosek, Marcin; Płonek, Marta; Nicpoń, Józef; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Pakozdy, Akos

    2015-12-01

    The fly-catching syndrome (FCS) is a rare canine condition of sudden, occasional, or constant episodes of biting the air. It may be accompanied by jumping, licking, and swallowing. The etiology of FCS is unknown and controversial. Various explanations for its occurrence have included epileptoid disorders such as visual cortex epileptiform disturbances and simple and complex partial seizures as well as compulsive disorders, hallucinatory behavior, and stereotypy. A retrospective multicenter analysis of 24 dogs with clinical symptoms of FCS is presented. Clinical signs at the time of presentation, the mean age at onset of the disease, the response to treatment, and the clinical outcome were recorded and analyzed in all patients. All dogs underwent clinical, neurological, and otoscopic examinations. Complete blood cell counts (CBCs) and serum chemistry panels were obtained from each dog. Diagnostic testing included MRI and EEG examinations in 21 cases, BAER in 19 cases, and CSF analysis in 20 cases. The EEG revealed spike activity in 8 (38%) of the 21 cases, 7 of which had activity in the occipital lobes. The brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) revealed three cases of bilateral deafness. The MRI revealed six cases of Chiari malformation (CM), one case of syringohydromyelia (SM), and one case of a falx cerebri meningioma. The dogs were divided into groups according to their treatment protocol. Group A included dogs treated with phenobarbital (PB), and group B consisted of dogs treated with fluoxetine (FLX). Thirty-six percent of the dogs in group A responded to PB, while 100% of the dogs in group B responded to FLX. The results suggest that FCS is more responsive to FLX than PB. However, the etiology of this behavior remains unclear in most cases.

  17. Cell Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Albenne, Cécile; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2008-01-01

    This chapter covers our present knowledge of cell wall proteomics highlighting the distinctive features of cell walls and cell wall proteins in relation to problems encountered for protein extraction, separation and identification. It provides clues to design strategies for efficient cell wall proteomic studies. It gives an overview of the kinds of proteins that have yet been identified: the expected proteins vs the identified proteins. Finally, the new vision of the cell wall proteome, and t...

  18. Humboldt, Baer und die Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schmuck

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wie hielt es Alexander von Humboldt mit der Evolution? Dieser Frage geht Thomas Schmuck nach, denn es erscheint ihm auffällig, dass sich Humboldt in seinem umfangreichen Werk kaum zu Fragen der Evolution äußert. An den wenigen Passagen, in denen Humboldt evolutive Themen aufgriff, distanzierte er sich in vorsichtiger Skepsis von nicht durch Empirie gestützten Spekulationen.

  19. BAER - brainstem auditory evoked response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a sign of hearing loss , multiple sclerosis , acoustic neuroma , or stroke. Abnormal results may also be due ... Butterworth-Heinemann; 2012:chap 32A. Read More Acoustic neuroma Central pontine myelinolysis Hearing loss Multiple sclerosis Stroke ...

  20. Wonderful Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  1. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...

  2. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  3. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  4. The Lamportian cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. (Michigan State Univ. Plant Research Lab., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  5. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  6. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  7. Staggered domain wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Hoelbling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We construct domain wall fermions with a staggered kernel and investigate their spectral and chiral properties numerically in the Schwinger model. In some relevant cases we see an improvement of chirality by more than an order of magnitude as compared to usual domain wall fermions. Moreover, we present first results for four-dimensional quantum chromodynamics, where we also observe significant reductions of chiral symmetry violations for staggered domain wall fermions.

  8. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...

  9. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful, a

  10. Skyrmions and domain walls

    OpenAIRE

    Piette, B.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    We study the 3+1 dimensional Skyrme model with a mass term different from the usual one. We show that this new model possesses domain walls solutions. We describe how, in the equivalent 2+1 dimensional model, the Skyrmion is absorbed by the wall.

  11. First wall for NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In collaboration with ANSALDO and within the frame of the European Fusion Tecnology Task N1 (Plasma Facing Components Design Studies), ENEA has performed a design an manufacturing feasibility study for the first wall of the Next European Torus (NET) during its ''physics'' operation phase. The main design specifications are average neutron wall load=1 MW/m2, peak surface heat flux=0.4 MW/m2, total number of burn pulses=1*104, average burn pulse duration=100 s, average neutron fluence=0.03 MWy/m2, structure material=AISI 316L SA, coolant=H2O at 50/100 centigrates (in/out). The reference ENEA-ANSALDO design is based on the use of flat plates coupled by microbrazing to poloidal cooling tubes. The technological development work has led to the design and manufacturing of a representative NET first wall box segment (0.65x 0.25x0.15 m) mockup which will be tested in the 190 kW Thermal Fatique Test Facility at JRC-Ispra. In this paper, we report on the various aspects of the basic experimental and theoretical investigations on the plasma-wall interactions for adequate protection of the first wall against erosion, global stress analysis of the first wall box, thecnological tests on brazed joints, and disign and manufacturing of the first wall mockup

  12. Plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plasma wall interactions for two extreme cases, the 'vacuum model' and the 'cold gas blanket' are outlined. As a first step for understanding the plasma wall interactions the elementary interaction processes at the first wall are identified. These are energetic ion and neutral particle trapping and release, ion and neutral backscattering, ion sputtering, desorption by ions, photons and electrons and evaporation. These processes have only recently been started to be investigated in the parameter range of interest for fusion research. The few measured data and their extrapolation into regions not yet investigated are reviewed

  13. The Humming Wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann Judith; Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Jensen, Brian Walther Skovgaard;

    2016-01-01

    We observed interactions with The Humming Wall, a vibrotactile and vibroacoustic interactive artifact placed in an urban park. Prior studies have focused on interactivity with primarily vision based systems (or with this system, the interaction between the wall and a wearable vibrotactile vest). ......-vibroacoustic interactive artifact in a public space.......We observed interactions with The Humming Wall, a vibrotactile and vibroacoustic interactive artifact placed in an urban park. Prior studies have focused on interactivity with primarily vision based systems (or with this system, the interaction between the wall and a wearable vibrotactile vest...... and groups with children. We contribute incrementally on confirming findings with prior studies on interactive public displays but in this instance the interactions are with vibro-tactile-acoustic responses. In addition, we innovate with the first study that demonstrates the successful use of a vibrotactile...

  14. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your health care provider may have you learn pelvic floor muscle exercises ( Kegel exercises ), use estrogen cream in ... GM. Anatomic defects of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor: abdominal and inguinal hernias, cystocele, urethrocele, enterocele, rectocele, ...

  15. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  16. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  17. Light shining through walls

    CERN Document Server

    Redondo, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Shining light through walls? At first glance this sounds crazy. However, very feeble gravitational and electroweak effects allow for this exotic possibility. Unfortunately, with present and near future technologies the opportunity to observe light shining through walls via these effects is completely out of question. Nevertheless there are quite a number of experimental collaborations around the globe involved in this quest. Why are they doing it? Are there additional ways of sending photons through opaque matter? Indeed, various extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of new particles called WISPs - extremely weakly interacting slim particles. Photons can convert into these hypothetical particles, which have no problems to penetrate very dense materials, and these can reconvert into photons after their passage - as if light was effectively traversing walls. We review this exciting field of research, describing the most important WISPs, the present and future experiments, th...

  18. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takahashi, Fuminobu [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli IPMU, TODIAS, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  19. Double wall underground storage tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canaan, E.B. Jr.; Wiegand, J.R.; Bartlow, D.H.

    1993-07-06

    A double wall underground storage tank is described comprising: (a) a cylindrical inner wall, (b) a cylindrical outer wall comprising plastic resin and reinforcement fibers, and (c) a layer of spacer filaments wound around the inner wall, the spacer filaments separating the inner and outer walls, and the spacer filaments being at least partially surrounded by voids to enable liquids to flow along the filaments.

  20. Back Reaction from Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Di Dio, Enea; Durrer, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    We study the distance-redshift relation in a universe filled with 'walls' of pressure-less dust separated by under dense regions. We show that as long as the density contrast of the walls is small, or the diameter of the under dense regions is much smaller than the Hubble scale, the distance-redshift relation remains close to what is obtained in a Friedmann universe. However, when arbitrary density contrasts are allowed, every prescribed distance-redshift relation can be reproduced with such models.

  1. UWB Propagation through Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hajek

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of ultra wide band (UWB signals through walls is analyzed. For this propagation studies, it is necessary to consider not only propagation at a single frequency but in the whole band. The UWB radar output signal is formed by both transmitter and antenna. The effects of antenna receiving and transmitting responses for various antenna types (such as small and aperture antennas are studied in the frequency as well as time domain. Moreover, UWB radar output signals can be substantially affected due to electromagnetic wave propagation through walls and multipath effects.

  2. Side-wall sampler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, B.

    1969-11-01

    A side-wall sampler which is capable of taking samples from the walls of test holes to a depth of 1,000 ft or more is described. Samples have been extracted from till, clay, silt, and fine- to coarse-grained sands in drift and nonindurated bedrock from more than 1,000 test holes in S. Saskatchewan. Side-hole sampling is faster and cheaper than conventional sampling methods and is ideally suited for geological investigations. Mineralogical paleonto- locical and radiocarbon analyses have been determined on side-hole cores.

  3. Fly on the Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Dave; Korpan, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a peer observation program at the University of Victoria called the Lecture Club. The observers are not interactive during the class--they are the proverbial flies on the wall. The paper identifies the program as self-developmental, discussing the attributes of this learning-to-teach and peer-sharing…

  4. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  5. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  6. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  7. « Les expéditions de K. von Baer en Caspienne 1853-1857 », in : Daniel Balland éd., Hommes et terres d’islam. Mélanges offerts à Xavier de Planhol. Tome I, Téhéran, IFRI (Bibliothèque iranienne 53), 2000, pp. 49-70.

    OpenAIRE

    Bromberger, Christian

    2010-01-01

    De 1853 à 1857, Karl von Baer, un des biologistes les plus réputés de la première moitié du 19e s., effectua quatre longues missions scientifiques sur la mer Caspienne et sur ses rives à la demande du Ministère russe des Biens d’État, inquiet de la diminution des poissons dans cette « principale pêcherie de l’Empire ». Ces expéditions, dont deux couvrirent la partie méridionale de la Caspienne, furent menées dans un esprit encyclopédique et aboutirent à d’importantes découvertes biologiques e...

  8. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  9. Light shining through walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Shining light through walls? At first glance this sounds crazy. However, very feeble gravitational and electroweak effects allow for this exotic possibility. Unfortunately, with present and near future technologies the opportunity to observe light shining through walls via these effects is completely out of question. Nevertheless there are quite a number of experimental collaborations around the globe involved in this quest. Why are they doing it? Are there additional ways of sending photons through opaque matter? Indeed, various extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of new particles called WISPs - extremely weakly interacting slim particles. Photons can convert into these hypothetical particles, which have no problems to penetrate very dense materials, and these can reconvert into photons after their passage - as if light was effectively traversing walls. We review this exciting field of research, describing the most important WISPs, the present and future experiments, the indirect hints from astrophysics and cosmology pointing to the existence of WISPs, and finally outlining the consequences that the discovery of WISPs would have. (orig.)

  10. Wall Street som kreationistisk forkynder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekman, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong......Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong...

  11. Canal Wall Reconstruction Mastoidectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the advantages of canal wall reconstruction (CWR) mastoidectomy, a single-stage technique for cholesteatoma removal and posterior external canal wall reconstruction, over the open and closed procedures in terms of cholesteatoma recurrence. Methods: Between June 2002 and December 2005, 38 patients (40 ears) with cholesteatoma were admited to Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital and received surgical treatments. Of these patients, 25 were male with ages ranging between 11 and 60 years (mean = 31.6 years) and 13 were female with ages ranging between 20 and 65 years (mean = 38.8 years). Canal wall reconstruction (CWR)mastoidectomy was performed in 31 ears and canal wall down (CWD) mastoidectomy in 9 ears. Concha cartilage was used for ear canal wall reconstruction in 22 of the 31 CWR procedures and cortical mastoid bone was used in the remaining 9 cases. Results At 0.5 to 4 years follow up, all but one patients remained free of signs of cholesteatoma recurrence, i.e., no retraction pocket or cholesteatoma matrix. One patient, a smoker, needed revision surgery due to cholesteatoma recurrence 1.5 year after the initial operation. The recurrence rate was therefore 3.2% (1/31). Cholesteatoma recurrence was monitored using postoperative CT scans whenever possible. In the case that needed a revision procedure, a retraction pocket was identified by otoendoscopy in the pars flacida area that eventually evolved into a cholesteatoma. A pocket extending to the epitympanum filled with cholesteatoma matrix was confirmed during the revision operation, A decision to perform a modified mastoidectomy was made as the patient refused to quit smoking. The mean air-bone gap in pure tone threshold was 45 dB before surgery and 25 dB after (p < 0.05). There was no difference between using concha cartilage and cortical mastoid bone for the reconstruction regarding air-bone gap improvement, CT findings and otoendoscopic results. Conclusion CWR mastoidectomy can be used for

  12. Cell Wall Biology: Perspectives from Cell Wall Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kieran J.D.Lee; Susan E.Marcus; J.Paul Knox

    2011-01-01

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are important biomaterials that underpin plant growth,are major repositories for photosynthetically accumulated carbon,and,in addition,impact greatly on the human use of plants. Land plant cell walls contain in the region of a dozen major polysaccharide structures that are mostly encompassed by cellulose,hemicelluloses,and pectic polysaccharides. During the evolution of land plants,polysaccharide diversification appears to have largely involved structural elaboration and diversification within these polysaccharide groups. Cell wall chemistry is well advanced and a current phase of cell wall science is aimed at placing the complex polysaccharide chemistry in cellular contexts and developing a detailed understanding of cell wall biology. Imaging cell wall glycomes is a challenging area but recent developments in the establishment of cell wall molecular probe panels and their use in high throughput procedures are leading to rapid advances in the molecular understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of individual cell walls and also cell wall differences at taxonomic levels. The challenge now is to integrate this knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity with an understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms that underpin cell wall properties and functions.

  13. Correlations of coronary plaque wall thickness with wall pressure and wall pressure gradient: a representative case study

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Biyue; Zheng Jie; Bach Richard; Tang Dalin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There are two major hemodynamic stresses imposed at the blood arterial wall interface by flowing blood: the wall shear stress (WSS) acting tangentially to the wall, and the wall pressure (WP) acting normally to the wall. The role of flow wall shear stress in atherosclerosis progression has been under intensive investigation, while the impact of blood pressure on plaque progression has been under-studied. Method The correlations of wall thickness (WT) with wall pressure (WP...

  14. Geometric optics radome analysis wall incorporating effects of wall curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakoff, Dennis J.

    1993-07-01

    In this research, a principal unmodeled error contributor in radome analysis is identified as the local plane approximation at the ray intercept point. An improved approach to modeling and computing the effects of the radome wall was developed which improves the radome wall transmission wall analysis in three respects: use of surface integration, utilization of a divergence factor (DF) to account for wall curvature, and incorporation of the effects of multiple refraction (MR). Modeling an incident plane wave on an external reference plane as an ensemble of Huygen's sources, geometric optics is used to trace the fields from the reference plane through the radome wall to a receiving monopulse antenna, where the wall transmissions on each ray are collected. The fact that the integration of a bundle of rays through the radome wall, as opposed to a single ray, more densely samples the curvature variation results in a more robust model. A DF derived from Snell's law for spherical shells accounts for the local wall curvature at the ray intercept point. To validate the approach, a microwave measurement setup was assembled around a network analyzer. Swept frequency data were obtained for similar monolithic wall dielectric panels but with different wall curvatures. Comparisons were then with measured data and the predictions of the model herein.

  15. Forward Wall Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Forward Wall Detector is designed to identify projectile like fragments from heavy ion reactions at CELSIUS storage ring in Uppsala, Sweden. The FWD consist of 96 detection modules covering azimuthal angle from 3.9o to 11.7o with efficiency of 81%. The detection module can be either of phoswitch type (10 mm fast plastic + 80 mm CsI(Tl)) or standard ΔE-E telescope (750 μm Si + 88 mm CsI(Tl)). It is expected to have charge identification up to Z=18, mass resolution for H and He isotopes and energy resolution ∼ 8%. (author)

  16. Axions from wall decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S; Hagmann, C; Sikivie, P

    2001-01-08

    The authors discuss the decay of axion walls bounded by strings and present numerical simulations of the decay process. In these simulations, the decay happens immediately, in a time scale of order the light travel time, and the average energy of the radiated axions is {approx_equal} 7m{sub a} for v{sub a}/m{sub a} {approx_equal} 500. is found to increase approximately linearly with ln(v{sub a}/m{sub a}). Extrapolation of this behavior yields {approx_equal} 60 m{sub a} in axion models of interest.

  17. Braids, Walls, and Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Cecotti, Sergio; Vafa, Cumrun

    2011-01-01

    We construct 3d, N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories by considering a one-parameter `R-flow' of 4d, N=2 theories, where the central charges vary while preserving their phase order. Each BPS state in 4d leads to a BPS particle in 3d, and thus each chamber of the 4d theory leads to a distinct 3d theory. Pairs of 4d chambers related by wall-crossing, R-flow to mirror pairs of 3d theories. In particular, the 2-3 wall-crossing for the A_2 Argyres-Douglas theory leads to 3d mirror symmetry for N_f=1 SQED and the XYZ model. Although our formalism applies to arbitrary N=2 models, we focus on the case where the parent 4d theory consists of pairs of M5-branes wrapping a Riemann surface, and develop a general framework for describing 3d N=2 theories engineered by wrapping pairs of M5-branes on three-manifolds. Each 4d chamber, which corresponds to a dual 3d description, maps to a particular tetrahedral decomposition of the UV 3d geometry. In the IR the physics is captured by a single recombined M5-brane which is a branche...

  18. Asymptotic Dynamics of Monopole Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Cross, R

    2015-01-01

    We determine the asymptotic dynamics of the U(N) doubly periodic BPS monopole in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory, called a monopole wall, by exploring its Higgs curve using the Newton polytope and amoeba. In particular, we show that the monopole wall splits into subwalls when any of its moduli become large. The long-distance gauge and Higgs field interactions of these subwalls are abelian, allowing us to derive an asymptotic metric for the monopole wall moduli space.

  19. Dynamical domain wall and localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Toyozato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the previous works (Toyozato et al., 2013 [24]; Higuchi and Nojiri, 2014 [25], we investigate the localization of the fields on the dynamical domain wall, where the four-dimensional FRW universe is realized on the domain wall in the five-dimensional space–time. Especially we show that the chiral spinor can localize on the domain wall, which has not been succeeded in the past works as the seminal work in George et al. (2009 [23].

  20. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    is reduced. To investigate the possibilities, full-size wall elements with wooden cladding and different cavity design, type of cladding and type of wind barrier were exposed to natural climate on the outside and to a humid indoor climate on the inside. During the exposure period parts of the vapour barrier...... were removed in some of the elements to simulate damaged vapour barriers. The condition of the wind barriers of elements with intact vapour barriers was inspected from the inside after four years of exposure. This paper presents results with emphasis on the moisture conditions behind the wind barrier....... It was found that the specific damages made to the vapour barrier as part of the test did not have any provable effect on the moisture content. In general elements with an intact vapour barrier did not show a critical moisture content at the wind barrier after four years of exposure....

  1. Great Wall of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER sub-image covers a 12 x 12 km area in northern Shanxi Province, China, and was acquired January 9, 2001. The low sun angle, and light snow cover highlight a section of the Great Wall, visible as a black line running diagonally through the image from lower left to upper right. The Great Wall is over 2000 years old and was built over a period of 1000 years. Stretching 4500 miles from Korea to the Gobi Desert it was first built to protect China from marauders from the north.This image is located at 40.2 degrees north latitude and 112.8 degrees east longitude.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and measuring surface

  2. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  3. Domain wall description of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Brito, F A; Silva, J C M

    2012-01-01

    In the present work we shall address the issue of electrical conductivity in superconductors in the perspective of superconducting domain wall solutions in the realm of field theory. We take our set up made out of a dynamical complex scalar field coupled to gauge field to be responsible for superconductivity and an extra scalar real field that plays the role of superconducting domain walls. The temperature of the system is interpreted as the parameter to move type I to type II domain walls. Alternatively, this means that the domain wall surface is suffering an acceleration as one goes from one type to another. On the other hand, changing from type I to type II state means a formation of a condensate what is in perfect sense of lowering the temperature around the superconductor. One can think of this scenario as an analog of holographic scenarios where this set up is replaced by a black hole near the domain wall.

  4. Solar walls in tsbi3 user's guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, K.B.

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  5. Green towers and green walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture and Planning, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    North American cities face many major environmental and health issues such as urban heat island effect, the intensity of storms, microclimate around buildings, imperviousness of sites, poor air quality and increases in respiratory disease. Several new technologies are starting to address global impacts and community level issues as well as the personal health and comfort of building occupants. These include green towers, living walls, vegetated rooftops and ecological site developments. This paper examined these forms of eco-development and presented their benefits. It discussed green walls in Japan; green towers in Malaysia, Singapore and Great Britain; green facades of climbing plants; active living walls in Canada; and passive living walls in France and Canada. It also discussed thermal walls; thematic walls; vertical gardens and structured wildlife habitat. Last, it presented testing, monitoring, research and conclusions. The Centre for the Advancement of Green Roof Technology is setting up a program to test thermal performance, to assess plant survival and to monitor green walls at the British Columbia Institute of Technology in Vancouver, Canada as much of the research out of Japan is only available in Japanese script. It was concluded that green architecture can provide shade, food, rainwater, shelter for wildlife and mimic natural systems. 15 refs.

  6. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24035086

  7. Partial domain wall partition functions

    OpenAIRE

    Foda, O.; Wheeler, M.

    2012-01-01

    We consider six-vertex model configurations on an n-by-N lattice, n =< N, that satisfy a variation on domain wall boundary conditions that we define and call "partial domain wall boundary conditions". We obtain two expressions for the corresponding "partial domain wall partition function", as an (N-by-N)-determinant and as an (n-by-n)-determinant. The latter was first obtained by I Kostov. We show that the two determinants are equal, as expected from the fact that they are partition functions...

  8. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Yanagawa, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improv...

  9. Actinomycosis - Left Post Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafil Akhtar, M. Naim, S. Shamshad Ahmad, Nazoora Khan, Uroos Abedi, A.H. Khan*

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A forty year old female of weak body built presented with recurring small hard lumps in let posteriorchest wall for 3 years and discharging ulcers for 3 months duration. Clinically, the provisional diagnosiswas malignancy with secondary infection. FNAC showed features suggestive of dysplasia buthistopathology confirmed the diagnosis as actinomycosis. The present case is reported due to rare incidenceof actinomycosis at post chest wall with muscle involvement.

  10. WallProtDB, a database resource for plant cell wall proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    San Clemente, Hélène; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background During the last fifteen years, cell wall proteomics has become a major research field with the publication of more than 50 articles describing plant cell wall proteomes. The WallProtDB database has been designed as a tool to facilitate the inventory, the interpretation of cell wall proteomics data and the comparisons between cell wall proteomes. Results WallProtDB (http://www.polebio.lrsv.ups-tlse.fr/WallProtDB/) presently contains 2170 proteins and ESTs identified experimentally i...

  11. MHD Electrode and wall constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Stewart; Lempert, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Electrode and wall constructions for the walls of a channel transmitting the hot plasma in a magnetohydrodynamic generator. The electrodes and walls are made of a plurality of similar modules which are spaced from one another along the channel. The electrodes can be metallic or ceramic, and each module includes one or more electrodes which are exposed to the plasma and a metallic cooling bar which is spaced from the plasma and which has passages through which a cooling fluid flows to remove heat transmitted from the electrode to the cooling bar. Each electrode module is spaced from and electrically insulated from each adjacent module while interconnected by the cooling fluid which serially flows among selected modules. A wall module includes an electrically insulating ceramic body exposed to the plasma and affixed, preferably by mechanical clips or by brazing, to a metallic cooling bar spaced from the plasma and having cooling fluid passages. Each wall module is, similar to the electrode modules, electrically insulated from the adjacent modules and serially interconnected to other modules by the cooling fluid.

  12. The feasibility of removable prefab diaphragm walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaarouk, R.; De Gijt, J.G.; Braam, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    A diaphragm wall is a cast in-situ reinforced concrete retaining wall applied in, among others, quay walls. The main advantages of this type of retaining wall are that it can be made in almost every preferred length and that it can resist high structural loads. However, there are several disadvantag

  13. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub......Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery...... of incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  14. Chest Wall tumor: combined management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is relatively rare disease among children and adolescents. The incidence of solid tumors other than CNS is less than 2/100,000. Tumors of the chest wall can arise either from the somatic tissue or ribs. These are rare, so either institutional reviews or multi institutional studies should determine optimal therapeutic management. Of the bony chest wall, Ewing's sarcoma or the family of tumor (peripheral neuro epithelioma, Askin tumor), are the most common. These lesions are lytic and have associated large extra pleural component. This large extra pleural component often necessitates major chest wall resection (3 or more ribs), and when lower ribs are involved, this entails resection of portion of diaphragm. Despite this resection, survival in the early 1970 was 10-20%. Since 1970 multi agent chemotherapy has increased survival rates. of importance, however, is these regimens have caused significant reduction of these extra pleural components so that major chest wall resections have become a rarity. With improved survival and decreased morbidity preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery is now the accepted modality of treatment. Another major advantage of this regimen is that potential radiation therapy may be obviated. The most common chest wall lesion is rhabdomyosarcoma. In the IRS study of 1620 RMS patients, in 141 (9%) the primary lesion was in the chest wall. these are primarily alveolar histology. when lesions were superficial, wide local excision with supplemental radiation therapy was associated with low morbidity and good overall survival. however, a majority have significant intra- thoracic components. in these circumstances the resectability rate is less than 30% and the survival poor. Other lesions include non rhabdomyosarcomas, eosinophilic granuloma, chondrosarcoma, and osteomyelitis. The management of these lesions varies according to extent, histology, and patient characteristics

  15. Lymphomas presenting as chest wall tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Witte, Biruta; Hürtgen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Four cases of thoracic lymphoma mimicking chest wall tumors are presented. As resection is not the treatment of first choice in lymphomas, pretherapeutical evaluation of chest wall tumors should include a thoroughly staging and a biopsy for histopathological diagnosis. Chest wall destruction due to an anterior mediastinal mass, or a chest wall tumor associated with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, could be suspicious of thoracic lymphoma. Lymphoma with chest wall involvement mostly turns o...

  16. Wave Forces on Crown Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jan; Burcharth, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some of the results from a large parametric laboratory study including more than 200 long-duration model tests. The study addresses both the wave forces imposed on the breakwater crown wall as well as the performance of the structure in reducing the wave overtopping. The testing...... programme includes variations of the sea state parameters and of the geometrical configuration of the breakwater and crown wall. Basic relations between forces/overtopping and the varied parameters are examined and preliminary design guidelines for structures within the tested range of variations are...

  17. Domain wall description of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, F.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Freire, M.L.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, 58109-753 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Mota-Silva, J.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-970 João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    In the present work we shall address the issue of electrical conductivity in superconductors in the perspective of superconducting domain wall solutions in the realm of field theory. We take our set up made out of a dynamical complex scalar field coupled to gauge field to be responsible for superconductivity and an extra scalar real field that plays the role of superconducting domain walls. The temperature of the system is interpreted through the fact that the soliton following accelerating orbits is a Rindler observer experiencing a thermal bath.

  18. Domain wall description of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work we shall address the issue of electrical conductivity in superconductors in the perspective of superconducting domain wall solutions in the realm of field theory. We take our set up made out of a dynamical complex scalar field coupled to gauge field to be responsible for superconductivity and an extra scalar real field that plays the role of superconducting domain walls. The temperature of the system is interpreted through the fact that the soliton following accelerating orbits is a Rindler observer experiencing a thermal bath

  19. Overlap/Domain-wall reweighting

    CERN Document Server

    Fukaya, H; Cossu, G; Hashimoto, S; Kaneko, T; Noaki, J

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the eigenvalues of nearly chiral lattice Dirac operators constructed with five-dimensional implementations. Allowing small violation of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation, the HMC simulation is made much faster while the eigenvalues are not significantly affected. We discuss the possibility of reweighting the gauge configurations generated with domain-wall fermions to those of exactly chiral lattice fermions.

  20. New Bricks in the Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG JIAOJIAO

    2007-01-01

    @@ Whenever a newcomer enters the classroom, he points at the wall. "Look at that!" says Li Shunye, indicating a picture of something that looks a bit like a pink furry fox, only with an oversized tail. "It's a squirrel," says the 9-year-old. "I made it."

  1. Partial domain wall partition functions

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O

    2012-01-01

    We consider six-vertex model configurations on a rectangular lattice with n (N) horizontal (vertical) lines, and "partial domain wall boundary conditions" defined as 1. all 2n arrows on the left and right boundaries point inwards, 2. n_u (n_l) arrows on the upper (lower) boundary, such that n_u + n_l = N - n, also point inwards, 3. all remaining n+N arrows on the upper and lower boundaries point outwards, and 4. all spin configurations on the upper and lower boundaries are summed over. To generate (n-by-N) "partial domain wall configurations", one can start from A. (N-by-N) configurations with domain wall boundary conditions and delete n_u (n_l) upper (lower) horizontal lines, or B. (2n-by-N) configurations that represent the scalar product of an n-magnon Bethe eigenstate and an n-magnon generic state on an N-site spin-1/2 chain, and delete the n lines that represent the Bethe eigenstate. The corresponding "partial domain wall partition function" is computed in construction {A} ({B}) as an N-by-N (n-by-n) det...

  2. Solar Walls for concrete renovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Lotte; Vejen, Niels Kristian; Olsen, Lars;

    1996-01-01

    This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results of the mea...

  3. PPOOLEX experiments on wall condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, J.; Puustinen, M. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2009-08-15

    This report summarizes the results of the wall condensation experiments carried out in December 2008 and January 2009 with the scaled down PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe to the condensation pool. Altogether five experiments, each consisting of several blows, were carried out. The main purpose of the experiment series was to study wall condensation phenomenon inside the dry well compartment while steam is discharged through it into the condensation pool and to produce comparison data for CFD calculations at VTT. The PPOOLEX test facility is a closed stainless steel vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. For the wall condensation experiments the test facility was equipped with a system for collecting and measuring the amount of condensate from four different wall segments of the dry well compartment. A thermo graphic camera was used in a couple of experiments for filming the outside surface of the dry well wall. The effect of the initial temperature level of the dry well structures and of the steam flow rate for the accumulation of condensate was studied. The initial temperature level of the dry well structures varied from 23 to 99 deg. C. The steam flow rate varied from 90 to 690 g/s and the temperature of incoming steam from 115 to 160 deg. C. During the initial phase of steam discharge the accumulation of condensate was strongly controlled by the temperature level of the dry well structures; the lower the initial temperature level was the more condensate was accumulated. As the dry well structural temperatures increased the condensation process slowed down. Most of the condensate usually accumulated during the first 200 seconds of the discharge. However, the condensation process never completely stopped because a small temperature difference remained between the dry well atmosphere and inner wall

  4. Steel-framed buildings: Impacts of wall detail configurations on the whole wall thermal performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosny, J.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Christian, J.E.

    1998-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is the influence of architectural wall details on the whole wall thermal performance. Whole wall thermal performance analysis was performed for six light gage steel-framed wall systems (some with wood components). For each wall system, all wall details were simulated using calibrated 3-D finite difference computer modeling. The thermal performance of the six steel-framed wall systems included various system details and the whole wall system thermal performance for a typical single-story ranch house. Currently, predicted heat losses through building walls are typically based on measurements of the wall system clear wall area using test methods such as ASTM C 236 or are calculated by one of the procedures recommended in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals that often is carried out for the clear wall area exclusively. In this paper, clear wall area is defined as the part of the wall system that is free of thermal anomalies due to building envelope details or thermally unaffected by intersections with other surfaces of the building envelope. Clear wall experiments or calculations normally do not include the effects of building envelope details such as corners, window and door openings, and structural intersections with roofs, floors, ceilings, and other walls. In steel-framed wall systems, these details typically consist of much more structural components than the clear wall. For this situation, the thermal properties measured or calculated for the clear wall area do not adequately represent the total wall system thermal performance. Factors that would impact the ability of today`s standard practice to accurately predict the total wall system thermal performance are the accuracy of the calculation methods, the area of the total wall that is clear wall, and the quantity and thermal performance of the various wall system details.

  5. Through-the-wall radar imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness G

    2011-01-01

    Wall Attenuation and Dispersion, A. Hussein Muqaibel, M.A. Alsunaidi, Nuruddeen M. Iya, and A. Safaai-JaziAntenna Elements, Arrays, and Systems for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, A. Hoorfar and A. FathyBeamforming for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, G. Alli and D. DiFilippoImage and Localization of Behind-the-Wall Targets Using Collocated and Distributed Apertures, Y.D. Zhang and A. HuntConventional and Emerging Waveforms for Detection and Imaging of Targets behind Walls, F. Ahmad and R.M. NarayananInverse Scattering Approaches in Through-the-Wall Imaging, K. Sarabandi, M. Thiel, M. Dehmollai

  6. WALL-E. Humanamente tecnológicos

    OpenAIRE

    Madrid Brito, Débora

    2014-01-01

    [ES] El cine de animación ha planteado en numerosas ocasiones los conflictos que ha generado la relación entre el hombre y el desarrollo tecnológico y científico. En el caso de Wall-E se aprecia un llamativo cambio de roles entre humanos y robots. La película propone, a través de las relaciones de sus personajes y su argumento, una reflexión en torno a la necesidad de la técnica para la evolución humana. Este artículo, a partir de la descripción e interpretación de algunos elementos clave de ...

  7. Wall conditioning of JET with the ITER-Like Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douai, D.; Brezinsek, S.; Esser, H. G.; Joffrin, E.; Keenan, T.; Knipe, S.; Kogut, D.; Lomas, P. J.; Marsen, S.; Nunes, I.; Philipps, V.; Pitts, R. A.; Shimada, M.; de Vries, P.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2013-07-01

    The initial conditioning cycle of JET ILW is analysed and compared with restart and operation in 2008 with a carbon dominated wall. Comparable water and oxygen decay times are observed during bake-out in both cases. Despite a 2 × 10-3 mbar l/s leak rate during plasma operation, no further wall conditioning has been necessary after plasma restart in ILW, which dramatically contrasts with 2008. Plasma O content is lower with the ILW. Higher O levels are measured after nights or week-ends, BeO layers being formed and re-eroded, but do not impact plasma operation and performance. First results on isotopic wall changeover by GDC on the ILW six months of the first D2 campaign evidence a reservoir of about 3 × 1022 atoms, i.e. ten time lower than in carbon PFCs. A study in JET of the glow discharge current distribution for different ratios of the ionization mean free paths to the vessel dimensions seems to indicate sufficient toroidal and poloidal homogeneity in ITER.

  8. Brick Walls on the Brane

    CERN Document Server

    Medved, A J M

    2002-01-01

    The so-called ``brick-wall model'' is a semi-classical approach that has been used to explain black hole entropy in terms of thermal matter fields. Here, we apply the brick-wall formalism to thermal bulk fields in a Randall-Sundrum brane world scenario. In this case, the black hole entity is really a string-like object in the anti-de Sitter bulk, while appearing as a Schwarzchild black hole to observers living on the brane. In spite of these exotic circumstances, we establish that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy law is preserved. Although a similar calculation was recently considered in the literature, this prior work invoked a simplifying assumption (which we avoid) that can not be adequately justified.

  9. Brick walls on the brane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medved, A J M [Department of Physics and Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    2002-01-21

    The so-called 'brick-wall model' is a semiclassical approach that has been used to explain black hole entropy in terms of thermal matter fields. Here, we apply the brick-wall formalism to thermal bulk fields in a Randall-Sundrum brane world scenario. In this case, the black hole entity is really a string-like object in the anti-de Sitter bulk, while appearing as a Schwarzchild black hole to observers living on the brane. In spite of these exotic circumstances, we establish that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy law is preserved. Although a similar calculation was recently considered in the literature, this prior study invoked a simplifying assumption (which we avoid) that cannot be adequately justified.

  10. Creating universes with thick walls

    CERN Document Server

    Ulvestad, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherically symmetric false vacuum bubble embedded in a true vacuum region separated by a "thick wall", which is generated by a scalar field in a quartic potential. We study the "Farhi-Guth-Guven" (FGG) quantum tunneling process by constructing numerical solutions relevant to this process. The ADM mass of the spacetime is calculated, and we show that there is a lower bound that is a significant fraction of the scalar field mass. We argue that the zero mass solutions used to by some to argue against the physicality of the FGG process are artifacts of the thin wall approximation used in earlier work. We argue that the zero mass solutions should not be used to question the viability of the FGG process.

  11. Actinomycosis involving the chest wall: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of pulmonary actinomycosis with extension to involve the chest wall that were evaluated using computerized tomography are reported. In both cases, the relation of pulmonary and chest wall disease was best shown using CT

  12. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; Stamatakos; Charikleia; Stefanaki; Konstantinos; Kontzoglou; Spyros; Stergiopoulos; Georgios; Giannopoulos; Michael; Safioleas

    2010-01-01

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN), formerly known as pancreatic abscess is a late complication of acute pancreatitis. It can be lethal, even though it is rare. This critical review provides an overview of the continually expanding knowledge about WOPN, by review of current data from references identified in Medline and PubMed, to September 2009, using key words, such as WOPN, infected pseudocyst, severe pancreatitis, pancreatic abscess, acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), pancreas, inflammation and al...

  13. Thermal insulation properties of walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat-protective qualities of building structures are determined by the qualities of the used materials, adequate design solutions and construction and installation work of high quality. This rule refers both to the structures made of materials similar in their structure and nature and mixed, combined by a construction system. The necessity to ecaluate thermal conductivity is important for a product and for a construction. Methods for evaluating the thermal protection of walls are based on the methods of calculation, on full-scale tests in a laboratory or on objects. At the same time there is a reason to believe that even deep and detailed calculation may cause deviation of the values from real data. Using finite difference method can improve accuracy of the results, but it doesn’t solve all problems. The article discusses new approaches to evaluating thermal insulation properties of walls. The authors propose technique of accurate measurement of thermal insulation properties in single blocks and fragments of walls and structures.

  14. Flooding Effect on Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Banimahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth building is a sustainable, environmentally friendly and economical method of construction that has been used worldwide for many centuries. For the past three decades, earth has seen a revival as a building material for a modern construction method due to its benefits in terms of low carbon content, low cost and energy involved during construction, as well as the fact that it is a sustainable technology of building. Climate change is influencing precipitation levels and patterns around the world, and as a consequence, flood risk is increasing rapidly. When flooding occurs, earth buildings are exposed to water by submersion, causing an increase in the degree of saturation of the earth structures and therefore a decrease of the suction between particles. This study investigated the effect of cycles of flooding (consecutive events of flooding followed by dry periods on earth walls. A series of characterization tests were carried out to obtain the physical and mechanical properties of the studied earth material. In a second stage, Flooding Simulation Tests (FST were performed to explore the earth walls’ response to repeated flooding events. The results obtained for the tested earth wall/samples with reinforced material (straw reveal hydraulic hysteresis when wall/samples are subject to cycles of wetting and drying.

  15. Accelerating forward genetics for cell wall deconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Vidaurre, Danielle; Bonetta, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the genes involved in cell wall synthesis and assembly remains one of the biggest challenges of cell wall biology. Although traditional genetic approaches, using simple yet elegant screens, have identified components of the cell wall, many unknowns remain. Exhausting the genetic toolbox by performing sensitized screens, adopting chemical genetics or combining these with improved cell wall imaging, hold the promise of new gene discovery and function. With the recent introduc...

  16. Cell Wall Integrity Signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a highly dynamic structure that is responsible for protecting the cell from rapid changes in external osmotic potential. The wall is also critical for cell expansion during growth and morphogenesis. This review discusses recent advances in understanding the various signal transduction pathways that allow cells to monitor the state of the cell wall and respond to environmental challenges to this structure. The cell wall integrity signaling pathway controlled by the small...

  17. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Alison W. Roberts; Eric M Roberts; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperm...

  18. Domain Walls Zoo in Supersymmetric QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, A V

    1998-01-01

    Solving numerically the equations of motion for the effective lagrangian describing supersymmetric QCD with the SU(2) gauge group, we find a menagerie of complex domain wall solutions connecting different chirally asymmetric vacua. Some of these solutions are BPS saturated walls; they exist when the mass of the matter fields does not exceed some critical value m m*, the complex walls disappear altogether and only the walls connecting a chirally asymmetric vacuum with the chirally symmetric one survive.

  19. How do plant cell walls extend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This article briefly summarizes recent work that identifies the biophysical and biochemical processes that give rise to the extension of plant cell walls. I begin with the biophysical notion of stress relaxation of the wall and follow with recent studies of wall enzymes thought to catalyze wall extension and relaxation. Readers should refer to detailed reviews for more comprehensive discussion of earlier literature (Taiz, 1984; Carpita and Gibeaut, 1993; Cosgrove, 1993).

  20. Correlations of coronary plaque wall thickness with wall pressure and wall pressure gradient: a representative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Biyue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are two major hemodynamic stresses imposed at the blood arterial wall interface by flowing blood: the wall shear stress (WSS acting tangentially to the wall, and the wall pressure (WP acting normally to the wall. The role of flow wall shear stress in atherosclerosis progression has been under intensive investigation, while the impact of blood pressure on plaque progression has been under-studied. Method The correlations of wall thickness (WT with wall pressure (WP, blood pressure on the lumen wall and spatial wall pressure gradient (WPG in a human atherosclerotic right coronary artery were studied. The pulsatile blood flow was simulated using a three dimensional mathematical model. The blood was treated as an incompressible viscous non-Newtonian fluid. The geometry of the artery was re-constructed using an in vivo intravascular ultrasound (IVUS 44-slice dataset obtained from a patient with consent obtained. The WT, the WP and the WPG were averaged on each slice, respectively, and Pearson correlation analysis was performed on slice averaged base. Each slice was then divided into 8 segments and averaged vessel WT, WP and WPG were collected from all 352 segments for correlation analysis. Each slice was also divided into 2 segments (inner semi-wall of bend and outer semi-wall of bend and the correlation analysis was performed on the 88 segments. Results Under mean pressure, the Pearson coefficient for correlation between WT and WP was r = − 0.52 (p  Conclusions Results from this representative case report indicated that plaque wall thickness correlated negatively with wall pressure (r = −0.81 by slice and positively with wall pressure gradient (r = 0.45. The slice averaged WT has a strong linear relationship with the slice averaged WP. Large-scale patient studies are needed to further confirm our findings.

  1. Unique aspects of the grass cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasses are amongst the most important crops worldwide, and the composition of their cell walls is critical for uses as food, feed, and energy crops. Grass cell walls differ dramatically from dicot cell walls in terms of the major structural polysaccharides present, how those polysaccharides are lin...

  2. The cell wall of Fusarium oxysporum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoffelmeer, EAM; Klis, FM; Sietsma, JH; Cornelissen, BJC

    1999-01-01

    Sugar analysis of isolated cell walls from three formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum showed that they contained not only glucose and (N-acetyl)-glucosamine, but also mannose, galactose, and uronic acids, presumably originating from cell wall glycoproteins. Cell wall glycoproteins accounted for 50

  3. To detect anomalies in diaphragm walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, R.

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragm walls are potentially ideal retaining walls for deep excavations in densely built-up areas, as they cause no vibrations during their construction and provide structural elements with high strength and stiffness. In the recent past, however, several projects using diaphragm walls as soil an

  4. Domain walls. II. Baryon-number generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domain walls present in the early universe due to a spontaneous breakdown of charge conjugation can leave behind net baryon number. SU/sub R/(2) instantons provide baryon nonconservation and the proton is effectively stable. Density perturbations (on scales large enough for galaxy formation) and monopole suppression can occur if walls dominate the energy density. Mechanisms for wall removal are discussed

  5. Steel Sheet Pile Walls in Soft Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    For almost a century, steel sheet pile walls are applied worldwide as earth retaining structures for excavations and quay walls. Within the framework of the development of European structural codes for Civil Engineering works, the Eurocodes, Eurocode 3 Part 5 for design of steel sheet pile walls was

  6. Static domain wall in braneworld gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, M.C.B.; Carlesso, P.F. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Fisica Teiorica, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco II, Barra-Funda, Caixa Postal 70532-2, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hoff da Silva, J.M. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we consider a static domain wall inside a 3-brane. Different from the standard achievement obtained in General Relativity, the analysis performed here gives a consistency condition for the existence of static domain walls in a braneworld gravitational scenario. Also the behavior of the domain wall's gravitational field in the newtonian limit is shown. (orig.)

  7. Antigen incorporation on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entrala Emilio

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are the infective stages responsible for transmission and survival of the organism in the environment. In the present work we show that the oocyst wall, far from being a static structure, is able to incorporate antigens by a mechanism involving vesicle fusion with the wall, and the incorporation of the antigen to the outer oocyst wall. Using immunoelectron microscopy we show that the antigen recognized by a monoclonal antibody used for diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis (Merifluor®, Meridian Diagnostic Inc. could be found associated with vesicles in the space between the sporozoites and the oocysts wall, and incorporated to the outer oocyst wall by an unknown mechanism.

  8. Asymmetric counter propagation of domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2016-07-01

    Far from equilibrium systems show different states and domain walls between them. These walls, depending on the type of connected equilibria, exhibit a rich spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we investigate the asymmetrical counter propagation of domain walls in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the shape and speed of the domain walls. Based on the molecular orientation, we infer that the counter propagative walls have different elastic deformations. These deformations are responsible of the asymmetric counter propagating fronts. Theoretically, based on symmetry arguments, we propose a simple bistable model under the influence of a nonlinear gradient, which qualitatively describes the observed dynamics.

  9. Practical considerations in ultrasonic wall thickness measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonic inspection is widely used by industry for the detection of corrosion and the measurement of material wall thickness. Due to wall thinning and the various forms of corrosion that can be found in pressure piping and pressure vessels the annual cost of corrosion damage and related service failures, is very expensive. The author interest is primarily in the examination of personnel who need to become competent and certificated in the various skills that are required to carry out wall thickness measurement and detection of wall thinning due to corrosion. The various techniques and equipment available for ultrasonic wall thickness measurement and assessment give rise to problems regarding the accuracy of results and detection of corrosion. This paper will discuss some of the corrosion conditions that may occur and also problems that may arise during wall thickness measurement. Methods of improving the wall thickness measurement and the assessment process will also be discussed. (author)

  10. Green Walls for Clean Air

    OpenAIRE

    Gölsdorf, Katrin; Müller, Hans; Collier, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Can plants help to improve the air quality? People have often complained about Ivy on buildings, but research by Helix Pflanzen GmbH, a company that is specialised in the cultivation of ivy species and the development of green wall technology, is shedding new light on an old problem. Using a cultivated variety of ivy (Hedera helix 'Wörner'), experiments were carried out that illustrated the binding effect that this Ivy has on fine dust particles. This is particularly important in urban ...

  11. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-06-19

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

  12. Methodology for first wall design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytic parametric scoping tool has been developed for application to first wall (FW) design problems. Both thermal and disruption force effects are considered. For the high heat flux and high disruption load conditions expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) device, Vanadium alloy and dispersion-strengthened copper offer the best stress margins using a somewhat flattened plasma-facing configuration. Ferritic steels also appear to have an acceptable stress margin, whereas the conventional stainless steel 316 does not appear feasible. If a full semicircle shape FW is required, only the Vanadium and ferritic steel alloy have acceptable solutions

  13. Domain Walls Out of Equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Alamoudi, S M; Takakura, F I

    1998-01-01

    We study the non-equilibrium dynamics of domain walls in real time for equation of motion for the collective coordinate is obtained by integrating out the meson excitations around the domain wall to one-loop order and the non-equilibrium relaxation is studied analytically and numerically. The constant friction coefficient vanishes but there is dynamical friction and relaxation caused by non-Markovian effects. A Markovian approximation is shown to fail even at large temperatures. The proper Langevin equation is obtained to this order, the noise is Gaussian and additive but colored. We analyze the classical and hard thermal loop contributions to the self-energy and noise kernels and show that at temperatures larger than the meson mass the hard contributions are negligible and the finite temperature contribution to the dynamics is governed by the classical soft modes of the meson bath. The long time relaxational dynamics is completely dominated by classical Landau damping resulting in that the corresponding time...

  14. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  15. Electrons in ferromagnets with domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domain walls can significantly modify electronic properties of ferromagnetic metals. In this paper we consider theoretically the influence of domain walls on transport properties of ferromagnetic materials and the results are compared with recent experiments. In the case of diffusive transport through a thick domain wall, the semiclassical approximation is applied and a local spin transformation is performed, which replaces the system with a domain wall by the corresponding system without a domain wall but with an additional gauge field. Due to a redistribution of single-particle electron states at the wall, one obtains then either negative or positive contributions to resistivity. The situation is different for very narrow and/or constrained domain walls. In such a case, the semiclassical approximation is not valid. Instead of this the approach based on scattering matrix is applied. The domain wall then gives rise to a large positive contribution to electrical resistivity. The corresponding magnetoresistance can be therefore very large, which is in agreement with recent experiments. The limiting case of narrow domain walls in systems with a single conduction channel is analysed in detail, with the effects due to electron-electron interaction taken into account. In this particular case the magnetoresistance due to a domain wall can be extremely large

  16. RG Domain Walls and Hybrid Triangulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dimofte, Tudor; van der Veen, Roland

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the interplay between the N=2 gauge theories in three and four dimensions that have a geometric description in terms of twisted compactification of the six-dimensional (2,0) SCFT. Our main goal is to construct the three-dimensional domain walls associated to any three-dimensional cobordism. We find that we can build a variety of 3d theories that represent the local degrees of freedom at a given domain wall in various 4d duality frames, including both UV S-dual frames and IR Seiberg-Witten electric-magnetic dual frames. We pay special attention to Janus domain walls, defined by four-dimensional Lagrangians with position-dependent couplings. If the couplings on either side of the wall are weak in different UV duality frames, Janus domain walls reduce to S-duality walls, i.e. domain walls that encode the properties of UV dualities. If the couplings on one side are weak in the IR and on the other weak in the UV, Janus domain walls reduce to RG walls, i.e. domain walls that encode the properties...

  17. Architecture of dermatophyte cell Walls: Electron microscopic and biochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Y.; Kitajima, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 83 references on the cell wall structure of dermatophytes is presented. Topics discussed include separation and preparation of cell walls; microstructure of cell walls by electron microscopy; chemical composition of cell walls; structural model of cell walls; and morphological structure of cell walls.

  18. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell-wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to d...

  19. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Leitao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  20. ADULT ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA IN IBADAN

    OpenAIRE

    Ayandipo, O.O; Afuwape, O.O.; Irabor, D. O.; Abdurrazzaaq, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal wall hernias are very common diseases encountered in surgical practice. Groin hernia is the commonest type of abdominal wall hernias. There are several methods of hernia repair but tension-free repair (usually with mesh) offers the least recurrent rate. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of anterior abdominal wall hernias and our experience in the surgical management of identified hernias Method: The project was a retrospective study of all patients with abdominal wal...

  1. Vapor wall deposition in Teflon chambers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, X; R. H. Schwantes; R. C. McVay; H Lignell; M. M. Coggon; Flagan, R C; Seinfeld, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Teflon chambers are ubiquitous in studies of atmospheric chemistry. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation can be substantially underestimated owing to deposition of SOA-forming compounds to chamber walls. We present here an experimental protocol to constrain the nature of wall deposition of organic vapors in Teflon chambers. We measured the wall deposition rates of 25 oxidized organic compounds generated from the photooxidation of isoprene, toluene, α-pinene, and dodecan...

  2. Tourism Development: Issues for Historic Walled Towns

    OpenAIRE

    Tomi Brezovec; David Bruce

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses issues in tourism development and visitor management in historic walled towns. Historic towns and walled towns in particular, attract tourists that enjoy the preserved medieval ambience, architecture and picturesque streets. Tourism has an impact on economic and social life as well as on the urban and natural environment. Walled towns and cities with their obvious barriers exemplify and crystallise issues, challenges, and opportunities critical to the development of touri...

  3. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurement without coupling liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If the material measured is part of the ultrasonic transducer, then one can do without the usual coupling liquid for ultrasonic measurement of wall thickness. Measuring equipment works on the basis of this electro-dynamic ultrasonic transducer, which has been developed to check the wall thickness (3 to 30 mm) of steel pipes with outside diameters of 25 to 180 mm. Double errors and local changes of wall thickness can be detected. (orig.)

  4. Antigen Incorporation on Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Entrala Emilio; Sbihi Younes; Sánchez-Moreno Manuel; Mascaró Carmen

    2001-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are the infective stages responsible for transmission and survival of the organism in the environment. In the present work we show that the oocyst wall, far from being a static structure, is able to incorporate antigens by a mechanism involving vesicle fusion with the wall, and the incorporation of the antigen to the outer oocyst wall. Using immunoelectron microscopy we show that the antigen recognized by a monoclonal antibody used for diagnosis of cryptosporidi...

  5. Mechanics of the Toxoplasma gondii oocyst wall

    OpenAIRE

    Dumètre, Aurélien; Dubey, Jitender P.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Bongrand, Pierre; Azas, Nadine; Puech, Pierre-Henri

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The ability of microorganisms to survive under extreme conditions is closely related to the physicochemical properties of their wall. In the ubiquitous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the oocyst stage possesses a bilayered wall that protects the dormant but potentially infective parasites from harsh environmental conditions until their ingestion by the host. None of the common disinfectants are effective in killing the parasite, since the oocyst wall acts as a pr...

  6. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations...... are based on static models to ease computational burden leading to inaccurate estimations. The aim of this work was to estimate the effect of vessel wall deformations (expansion and bending) on WSS levels....

  7. Transport and coherent structures in wall turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tardu, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Wall bounded turbulent flows are of major importance in industrial and environmental fluid mechanics. The structure of the wall turbulence is intrinsically related to the coherent structures that play a fundamental role in the transport process. The comprehension of their regeneration mechanism is indispensable for the development of efficient strategies in terms of drag control and near wall turbulence management. This book provides an up-to-date overview on the progress made in this specific area in recent years.

  8. Wall-crossing made smooth

    CERN Document Server

    Pioline, Boris

    2015-01-01

    In $D=4,N=2$ theories on $R^{3,1}$, the index receives contributions not only from single-particle BPS states, counted by the BPS indices, but also from multi-particle states made of BPS constituents. In a recent work [arXiv:1406.2360], a general formula expressing the index in terms of the BPS indices was proposed, which is smooth across walls of marginal stability and reproduces the expected single-particle contributions. In this note, I analyze the two-particle contributions predicted by this formula, and show agreement with the spectral asymmetry of the continuum of scattering states in the supersymmetric quantum mechanics of two non-relativistic, mutually non-local dyons. This provides a physical justification for the error function profile used in the mathematics literature on indefinite theta series, and in the physics literature on black hole partition functions.

  9. Neutron Wall at RIBLL Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuHuagen; XuHushan; LiWenfei; ZhanWenlong; XiaoGuoqing; GuoZhongyan; SunZhiyu; LiChen; ChenRuofu; MaYue; ZhangXueying[; JiaFei

    2003-01-01

    With the construction of the new Radioactive Ion Beam Line in Lanzhou (RIBLL Ⅱ) which connecting the CSRm and the CSRe, an experimental setup.The Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique was recognized as one of the best ways for neutron detection and it, is employed by the neutrons wall. Considering the high neutron multiplicity, the detector shouldal so have the ability to resolve the multiple hits. Moreover, a high detection efficiency for the neutrons with energies ranging from 100MeV to 1 GeV is also required besides the high granularity. In this case, the sampling hadronic calorimeter type of detector has been selected. In order to estimate the performance of the detector and

  10. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  11. Creating universes with thick walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, Andrew; Albrecht, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherically symmetric false vacuum bubble embedded in a true vacuum region separated by a “thick wall”, which is generated by a scalar field in a quartic potential. We study the “Farhi-Guth-Guven” (FGG) quantum tunneling process by constructing numerical solutions relevant to this process. The Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass of the spacetime is calculated, and we show that there is a lower bound that is a significant fraction of the scalar field mass. We argue that the zero mass solutions used to by some to argue against the physicality of the FGG process are artifacts of the thin wall approximation used in earlier work. We argue that the zero mass solutions should not be used to question the viability of the FGG process.

  12. BPS Spectra, Barcodes and Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Cirafici, Michele

    2015-01-01

    BPS spectra give important insights into the non-perturbative regimes of supersymmetric theories. Often from the study of BPS states one can infer properties of the geometrical or algebraic structures underlying such theories. In this paper we approach this problem from the perspective of persistent homology. Persistent homology is at the base of topological data analysis, which aims at extracting topological features out of a set of points. We use these techniques to investigate the topological properties which characterize the spectra of several supersymmetric models in field and string theory. We discuss how such features change upon crossing walls of marginal stability in a few examples. Then we look at the topological properties of the distributions of BPS invariants in string compactifications on compact threefolds, used to engineer black hole microstates. Finally we discuss the interplay between persistent homology and modularity by considering certain number theoretical functions used to count dyons i...

  13. ON WALL SHEAR STRESS OF ARTERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhao-rong; Liu Bao-yu; Qin Kai-rong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a method was proposed that the wall shear stress of artery could be determined by measuring the centerline axial velocity and radial motion of arterial wall simultaneously.The method is simple in application and can get higher precision when it is used to determine the shear stress of arterial wall in vivo.As an example, the shear stress distribution in periodic oscillatory flow of human carotid was calculated and discussed.The computed results show that the shear stress distribution at any given instant is almost uniform and will be zero at the centerline and tends to maximum at the vessel wall.

  14. Determination of arterial wall shear stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The arteries can remodel their structure and function to adapt themselves to the mechanical environment. In various factors that lead to vascular remodeling, the shear stress on the arterial wall induced by the blood flow is of great importance. However, there are many technique difficulties in measuring the wall shear stress directly at present. In this paper, through analyzing the pulsatile blood flow in arteries, a method has been proposed that can determine the wall shear stress quantitatively by measuring the velocity on the arterial axis, and that provides a necessary means to discuss the influence of arterial wall shear stress on vascular remodeling.

  15. Microanalysis of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicolai Obel; Veronika Erben; Tatjana Schwarz; Stefan Kühne; Andrea Fodor; Markus Pauly

    2009-01-01

    Oligosaccharide Mass Profiling (OLIMP) allows a fast and sensitive assessment of cell wall polymer structure when coupled with Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The short time required for sample preparation and analysis makes possible the study of a wide range of plant organs, revealing a high degree of heterogeneity in the substitution pattern of wall polymers such as the cross-linking glycan xyloglucan and the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan. The high sensitivity of MALDI-TOF allows the use of small amounts of samples, thus making it possible to investigate the wall structure of single cell types when material is collected by such methods as laser micro-dissection. As an example, the analysis of the xyloglucan structure in the leaf cell types outer epidermis layer, entire epidermis cell layer, palisade mesophyll cells, and vascular bundles were investigated. OLIMP is amenable to in situ wall analysis, where wall polymers are analyzed on unprepared plant tissue itself without first iso-lating cell walls. In addition, OLIMP enables analysis of wall polymers in Golgi-enriched fractions, the location of nascent matrix polysaccharide biosynthesis, enabling separation of the processes of wall biosynthesis versus post-deposition apo-plastic metabolism. These new tools will make possible a semi-quantitative analysis of the cell wall at an unprecedented level.

  16. Skyrmions from Instantons inside Domain Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Eto, M; Ohashi, K; Tong, D; Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Tong, David

    2005-01-01

    Some years ago, Atiyah and Manton described a method to construct approximate Skyrmion solutions from Yang-Mills instantons. Here we present a dynamical realization of this construction using domain walls in a five-dimensional gauge theory. The non-abelian gauge symmetry is broken in each vacuum but restored in the core of the domain wall, allowing instantons to nestle inside the wall. We show that the worldvolume dynamics of the wall is given by the Skyrme model, including the four-derivative term, and the instantons appear as Skyrmions.

  17. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  18. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  19. Interconnections between cell wall polymers, wall mechanics, and cortical microtubules: Teasing out causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chaowen; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-09-01

    In plants, cell wall components including cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins interact with each other to form complex extracellular network structures that control cell growth and maintain cell shape. However, it is still not clear exactly how different wall polymers interact, how the conformations and interactions of cell wall polymers relate to wall mechanics, and how these factors impinge on intracellular structures such as the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, based on studies of Arabidopsis thaliana xxt1 xxt2 mutants, which lack detectable xyloglucan in their walls and display aberrant wall mechanics, altered cellulose patterning and biosynthesis, and reduced cortical microtubule stability, we discuss the potential relationships between cell wall biosynthesis, wall mechanics, and cytoskeletal dynamics in an effort to better understand their roles in controlling plant growth and morphogenesis.

  20. Interconnections between cell wall polymers, wall mechanics, and cortical microtubules: Teasing out causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chaowen; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-09-01

    In plants, cell wall components including cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins interact with each other to form complex extracellular network structures that control cell growth and maintain cell shape. However, it is still not clear exactly how different wall polymers interact, how the conformations and interactions of cell wall polymers relate to wall mechanics, and how these factors impinge on intracellular structures such as the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, based on studies of Arabidopsis thaliana xxt1 xxt2 mutants, which lack detectable xyloglucan in their walls and display aberrant wall mechanics, altered cellulose patterning and biosynthesis, and reduced cortical microtubule stability, we discuss the potential relationships between cell wall biosynthesis, wall mechanics, and cytoskeletal dynamics in an effort to better understand their roles in controlling plant growth and morphogenesis. PMID:27611066

  1. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1” to 1 ½”), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  2. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  3. Cell wall remodelling enzymes modulate fungal cell wall elasticity and osmotic stress resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ene, Iuliana; Walker, Louise; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K.; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A.R.; Munro, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Ce...

  4. Regulation of Cell Wall Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The Cell Wall Integrity Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a strong, but elastic, structure that is essential not only for the maintenance of cell shape and integrity, but also for progression through the cell cycle. During growth and morphogenesis, and in response to environmental challenges, the cell wall is remodeled in a highly regulated and polarized manner, a process that is principally under the control of the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. This pathway transmits wall stress signals from the cell surface to...

  5. Wall-Laws for High Speed Flows over Adiabatic and Isothermal Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Bijan; Puigt, Guillaume

    2000-01-01

    We present the extension of our wall-laws developed for low-speed flows to super and hypersonic configurations. In particular, we are interested in flows over isothermal walls and account for heat transfer. We recall the main steps of the development: - Obtention of generalized wall functions for low-speed fluids, valid for all $y^+$, - Taking into account transversal effects. - Accounting for the compressible feature of the flow on adiabatic walls without using informations on the local boun...

  6. Cell wall proteins: a new insight through proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2006-01-01

    Cell wall proteins are essential constituents of plant cell walls; they are involved in modifications of cell wall components, wall structure, signaling and interactions with plasma membrane proteins at the cell surface. The application of proteomic approaches to the cell wall compartment raises important questions: are there technical problems specific to cell wall proteomics? What kinds of proteins can be found in Arabidopsis walls? Are some of them unexpected? What sort of post-translation...

  7. Risk Assessment of Energy-Efficient Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallin, Simon B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hun, Diana E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jackson, Roderick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kehrer, Manfred [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This multi-year project aims to provide the residential construction industry with energy-efficient wall designs that are moisture durable. The present work focused on the initial step of this project, which is to develop a moisture durability protocol that identifies energy efficient wall designs that have a low probability of experiencing moisture problems.

  8. Moduli of monopole walls and amoebas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkis, Sergey A.; Ward, Richard S.

    2012-05-01

    We study doubly-periodic monopoles, also called monopole walls, determining their spectral data and computing the dimensions of their moduli spaces. Using spectral data we identify the moduli, and compare our results with a perturbative analysis. We also identify an SL(2, {Z}) action on monopole walls, in which the S transformation corresponds to the Nahm transform.

  9. Moduli of Monopole Walls and Amoebas

    CERN Document Server

    Cherkis, Sergey A

    2012-01-01

    We study doubly-periodic monopoles, also called monopole walls, determining their spectral data and computing the dimensions of their moduli spaces. Using spectral data we identify the moduli, and compare our results with a perturbative analysis. We also identify an SL(2,Z) action on monopole walls, in which the S transformation corresponds to the Nahm transform.

  10. Abdominal Wall Modification for the Difficult Ostomy

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, David E.

    2008-01-01

    A select group of patients with major stomal problems may benefit from operative modification of the abdominal wall. Options may include a modified abdominoplasty (abdominal wall contouring), localized flaps, or liposuction. Although frequently successful, these techniques have the potential for significant morbidity.

  11. Designing and building walls with Rammed Earth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galiouna, E.A.; Hammer, L.; Piscitelli, G.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0533 Innovation & Sustainability. Today, a lot of people in the world live in earth dwellings. There are many different techniques for constructing solid walls of raw earth (adobe, bale, cob, mud wall, light clay, wattle and daub, earth bags

  12. Full size testing of sheet pile walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuilen, J.W.G. van de; Linden, M.L.R. van der; Katsma, H.; Stolle, P.

    1996-01-01

    Azobé (Lophira alata) is widely used in timber sheet pile walls in the Netherlands. The boards in these walls are coupled and therefore load-sharing can be expected. A simulation model based on the finite element method DIANA (DIANA, 1992) was developed and load-sharing could be calculated. To check

  13. Statistical analysis of silo wall pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Berntsen, Kasper Nikolaj

    1998-01-01

    Previously published silo wall pressure measurements during plug flow of barley in alarge concrete silo are re-analysed under the hypothesis that the wall pressures are gamma-distributed.The fits of the gamma distribution type to the local pressure data from each measuring cell are satisfactory.H...

  14. 14 CFR 121.245 - Fire walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire walls. 121.245 Section 121.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.245 Fire walls. Each...

  15. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  16. Domain wall fermions in vector gauge theories

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, T.

    1998-01-01

    I review domain wall fermions in vector gauge theories. Following a brief introduction, the status of lattice calculations using domain wall fermions is presented. I focus on results from QCD, including the light quark masses and spectrum, weak matrix elements, the $n_f=2$ finite temperature phase transition, and topology and zero modes and conclude with topics for future study.

  17. Domain Wall Propagation through Spin Wave Emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.S.; Yan, P.; Shen, Y.H.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Wang, X.R.

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically study field-induced domain wall motion in an electrically insulating ferromagnet with hard- and easy-axis anisotropies. Domain walls can propagate along a dissipationless wire through spin wave emission locked into the known soliton velocity at low fields. In the presence of damping

  18. Revisiting the Ladder on a Wall Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salu, Yehuda

    2011-05-01

    The problem of a ladder leaning on a wall has been a staple of introductory physics for years. It is discussed in numerous physics textbooks and in journals.1-4 Now, it even has an Internet presence. Postings from students seek help for "ladder on a wall" problems. A quick review of those postings would show that they all deal with frictionless walls. This is also how the situation is presented in most textbooks. One may get the impression that the friction between a ladder and a wall is always negligible, or that dealing with it is so difficult that it should be left out of the realm of introductory physics. The truth of the matter is that the magnitude of the friction coefficient between a ladder and a wall is not much different from that with the floor, and that friction with the wall is an important part of the conditions for having a static ladder. This paper derives a simple relationship between the friction coefficients of the ladder with the floor (μ1) and with the wall (μ2), when the ladder is in static equilibrium. Figure 1 shows the forces that act on a ladder that leans on a wall.

  19. Cell wall composition of chlorococcal algae

    OpenAIRE

    Blumreisinger, Maria; Meindl, Doris; Loos, Eckhard

    1983-01-01

    The cell walls of representatives of the genera Chlorella, Monoraphidium, Ankistrodesmus and Scenedesmus contained 24–74% neutral sugars, 1–24% uronic acids, 2–16% protein and 0–15% glucosamine. Two types of cell walls could be discerned containing as main sugars either rhamnose and galactose or mannose and glucose with a lack of galactose.

  20. Mechanics of the Toxoplasma gondii oocyst wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of microorganisms to survive under extreme conditions is closely related to the physicochemical properties of their wall. In the ubiquitous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the oocyst stage possesses a bilayered wall that protects the dormant but potentially infective parasites from...

  1. Immobilization of cells via activated cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markt, M.; Kas, J.; Valentova, O.; Demnerova, K.; Vodrazka, Z.

    1986-10-01

    Cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum were activated by periodate oxidation of vicinal diol groups in cell wall polysaccharides. The aldehyde groups thus generated allow the yeast cells to be covalently bound to modified bead cellulose or macroporous glycidyl methacrylate supports, or to enzymes such as glucose oxidase and catalase. 6 references.

  2. Radiation Damping at a Bubble Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J; Lee, C H; Jang, J; Lee, Jae-weon; Kim, Kyungsub; Lee, Chul H.; Jang, Ji-ho

    1999-01-01

    The first order phase transition proceeds via nucleation and growth of true vacuum bubbles. When charged particles collide with the bubble they could radiate electromagnetic wave. We show that, due to an energy loss of the particles by the radiation, the damping pressure acting on the bubble wall depends on the velocity of the wall even in a thermal equilibrium state.

  3. Pressure equalisation of brick masonry cavity walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, C.P.W.; Bouma, P.W.; Aghaei, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes two full-scale experiments in which the pressure distribution over the layers of brick masonry cavity walls is studied. The first experiment focuses on the specification of the wind loads on both outer and inner leafs of these walls. The second experiment is set-up to find a mod

  4. Diaphragm walling for Sizewell B sets records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first phase of construction of the Sizewell-B nuclear reactor has been completed. This was the building of a diaphragm wall around the site. It is one of the largest and deepest diaphragm walls to be installed in Europe. The site can be pumped dry of groundwater and the foundations constructed in the dry. The specifications of the wall and its construction, using two Hydrofraise excavation rigs, are described. The excavated material is brought up as a slurry and the (bentonite) slurry is cleaned and desanded. Most of the wall has been formed using a plastic concrete but reinforced concrete has been used for some stretches. The diaphragm wall, which is 1258m long and 55m deep on average, was built in 19 weeks. (U.K.)

  5. Wind Load Test of Earthbag Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Scott

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Earthbag construction is a sustainable, low-cost, housing option for developing countries. Earthbag structures are built of individual soil-filled fabric bags (i.e., sand bags stacked in a running bond pattern. Once stacked, earthbags are compacted and the soil inside the bags is dried in-place to form earthen bricks. Barbed wires are placed between each course to affect shear transfer within the wall. Results of an out-of-plane load test on a full-scale earthbag wall are presented in this paper. The wall was subjected to out-of-plane pressure up to 3.16 kPa, which resulted in plastic deformations up to 50 mm. The wall did not collapse during loading. Wall behavior and force transfer mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    CERN Document Server

    Leitao, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss on the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit.

  7. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  8. Mirror, mirror on the wall

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    RICH 2, one of the two Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment, is being prepared to join the other detector elements ready for the first proton-proton collisions at LHC. The mirrors of the RICH2 detector are meticulously assembled in a clean room.In a large dark room, men in white move around an immense structure some 7 metres high, 10 metres wide and nearly 2.5 metres deep. Apparently effortlessly, they are installing the two large high-precision spherical mirrors. These mirrors will focus Cherenkov light, created by the charged particles that will traverse this detector, onto the photon detectors. Each spherical mirror wall is made up of facets like a fly's eye. Twenty-eight individual thin glass mirrors will all point to the same point in space to within a few micro-radians. The development of these mirrors has been technically demanding : Ideally they should be massless, sturdy, precise and have high reflectivity. In practice, though not massless, they are made from a mere 6 mm thin gl...

  9. Classification of chest wall diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, E; Gulotta, C

    1993-01-01

    Several disorders of the thoracic cage are known to cause respiratory failure, by means of relatively simple mechanisms, such as the increased work of breathing, which results in alveolar hypoventilation. A variety of pathogenic mechanisms may be considered, as functions of the types of thoracic disorders present. As causes of these additional potential mechanisms, we considered the following: 1) ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) inhomogeneity; 2) inability to cough; 3) malformation or acquired defect of the respiratory centres; and 4) excess blood volume and fluid retention, which aggravate work of breathing and V/Q inhomogeneity. All of these disorders can be grouped into two major categories (which nevertheless have some of the pathophysiology in common): the mechanical syndrome and the neuromuscular or paralytic syndrome. In this paper we discuss chest wall diseases falling into the first category; namely, kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, ankylosing spondylitis and obesity-hypoventilation. Congenital deformities of the thoracic cage, which do not have important effects on ventilatory apparatus (e.g. pectus excavatum and pectus carinatum), were also considered. PMID:8472068

  10. Rotary press utilizing a flexible die wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, G E; Smith, D P; Hiestand, E N

    1981-06-01

    A die with a flexible wall was constructed and evaluated on a specially modified instrumented rotary tablet press. The design permits an inward deflection of the die wall by a side punch, which rolls past a side compression roll during compression-decompression. The side compression roll is instrumented to monitor the applied side compression roll forces. On decompression, return of the die wall to its original position permits release of residual die wall pressure. The decreased residual die wall pressure can decrease fracture and capping of tablets for problem formulations. The performance was tested on three experimental formulations. For these formulations, tablets made in a conventional die exhibited severe capping problems. However, most tablets compressed in the special die were superior. With proper adjustment of punch and die wall compression forces, excellent tablets could be manufactured. The merits of the special die and modified tablet machine are substantiated, although this initial design did not provide adequate die wall pressure for all formulations. Further engineering efforts could result in practical production equipment.

  11. Accelerating forward genetics for cell wall deconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle eVidaurre

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenges of cell wall biology is the elucidation of the genes involved the cell wall and their function due to the recalcitrance of the cell wall. Through traditional genetic approaches, many simple yet elegant screens have been able to identify components of the cell wall and their networks. Despite progress in the identification of several genes of the cell wall, there remain many unknown players whose function has yet to be determined. Exhausting the genetic toolbox by performing secondary screens on a genetically mutated background, chemical genetics using small molecules and improved cell wall imaging hold promise for new gene discovery and function. With the recent introduction of next-generation sequencing technologies, it is now possible to quickly and efficiently map and clone genes of interest in Arabidopsis and any model organism with a completed genome sequence. The combination of a classical genetics approach and cutting edge technology will propel cell wall biology of Arabidopsis and other useful crops forward into the future.

  12. Electron-wall interaction in Hall thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron-wall interaction effects in Hall thrusters are studied through measurements of the plasma response to variations of the thruster channel width and the discharge voltage. The discharge voltage threshold is shown to separate two thruster regimes. Below this threshold, the electron energy gain is constant in the acceleration region and therefore, secondary electron emission (SEE) from the channel walls is insufficient to enhance electron energy losses at the channel walls. Above this voltage threshold, the maximum electron temperature saturates. This result seemingly agrees with predictions of the temperature saturation, which recent Hall thruster models explain as a transition to space-charge saturated regime of the near-wall sheath. However, in the experiment, the maximum saturation temperature exceeds by almost three times the critical value estimated under the assumption of a Maxwellian electron energy distribution function. The channel narrowing, which should also enhance electron-wall collisions, causes unexpectedly larger changes of the plasma potential distribution than does the increase of the electron temperature with the discharge voltage. An enhanced anomalous crossed-field mobility (near wall or Bohm-type) is suggested by a hydrodynamic model as an explanation to the reduced electric field measured inside a narrow channel. We found, however, no experimental evidence of a coupling between the maximum electron temperature and the location of the accelerating voltage drop, which might have been expected due to the SEE-induced near-wall conductivity

  13. Automatic configuration of modular vault walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grković Vladan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Products such as modular partition walls of vault rooms (with or without vault doors are made at the request of the client who chooses the safety degree and provides the available dimensions of the wall that should be made. Modular construction of vault walls is the system of construction of industrially made elements which are composed in situ, which allows design of products adjusted to individual requirements of clients. Since the vault wall modules repeat in every new project and since they differ only by their number and dimensions, the use of modern CA (Computer Aided tools and the possibility of application of parameter and variant design shorten design time and eliminate possible errors in the process of design of modular vault walls, which reduces the costs of production and increases the level of product quality. The paper presents the procedure for calculation of parameters of parts, modules and the entire vault wall in Microsoft Excel based on which the 3D model of a modular vault wall is automatically configured and developed in software package Autodesk Inventor. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR37020

  14. Design of JT-60 first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an outline of JT-60 first wall design. Main purpose of JT-60 is to achieve reactor grade plasma and maintain 5 -- 10 sec plasma discharge. Therefore, the requirements from physics and engineering aspects are extremely severe than the one in currently operating tokamak. In FY1974 -- 1976, to make clear the points at issue and the technological prospects, a number of examinations and R and D works have been performed. As a result, molybdenum has been selected as a JT-60 first wall material. Also, toroidal fixed limiter, magnetic limiter plate and liner have been applied as first wall structures. Since a time constant of plasma current decay during a disruption was changed from 50 msec to 1 msec (Target value), liner material was changed to Inconel 625. Mechanical design criterion is based on ASME Section III code. All first wall components are designed to withstand the mechanical load at 3 msec plasma disruption. Design values of heat flux and duration time are 305 w/cm2 and 10 sec for the toroidal fixed limiter, and 440 w/cm2 and 5 sec for the magnetic limiter plate, respectively. Interval time between discharges is 10 min. Design values of the maximum surface temperature are 900sup( o)C for molybdenum and 600sup( o)C for Inconel 625, respectively. First wall structure is designed to protect bellows, thermocouples and electromagnetic sensors against severe plasma thermal load. Also, the first wall can be exchanged easily for first wall experiment. Titanium carbide, 20 μm in thick, are coated onto the first wall. Details of the first wall design will be published in another reports. (author)

  15. Development of wall ranging radiation inspection robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. J.; Yoon, J. S.; Park, Y. S.; Hong, D. H.; Oh, S. C.; Jung, J. H.; Chae, K. S

    1999-03-01

    With the aging of nation's nuclear facilities, the target of this project is to develop an under water wall ranging robotic vehicle which inspects the contamination level of the research reactor (TRIGA MARK III) as a preliminary process to dismantling. The developed vehicle is driven by five thrusters and consists of small sized control boards, and absolute position detector, and a radiation detector. Also, the algorithm for autonomous navigation is developed and its performance is tested through under water experiments. Also, the test result at the research reactor shows that the vehicle firmly attached the wall while measuring the contamination level of the wall.

  16. Flow Modeling Based Wall Element Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabah Tamimi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Two types of flow where examined, pressure and combination of pressure and Coquette flow of confined turbulent flow with a one equation model used to depict the turbulent viscosity of confined flow in a smooth straight channel when a finite element technique based on a zone close to a solid wall has been adopted for predicting the distribution of the pertinent variables in this zone and examined even with case when the near wall zone was extended away from the wall. The validation of imposed technique has been tested and well compared with other techniques.

  17. Bosonic interactions with a domain wall

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, J R

    2016-01-01

    We consider here the interaction of scalar bosons with a topological domain wall. Not only is there a continuum of scattering states, but there is also an interesting "quasi-discretuum" of positive energy bosonic bound states, describing bosons entrapped within the wall's core. The full spectrum of the scattering and bound state energies and eigenstates is obtainable from a Schr\\"odinger-type of equation with a P\\"oschl-Teller potential. We also consider the presence of a boson gas within the wall and high energy boson emission.

  18. Development of wall ranging radiation inspection robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aging of nation's nuclear facilities, the target of this project is to develop an under water wall ranging robotic vehicle which inspects the contamination level of the research reactor (TRIGA MARK III) as a preliminary process to dismantling. The developed vehicle is driven by five thrusters and consists of small sized control boards, and absolute position detector, and a radiation detector. Also, the algorithm for autonomous navigation is developed and its performance is tested through under water experiments. Also, the test result at the research reactor shows that the vehicle firmly attached the wall while measuring the contamination level of the wall

  19. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  20. Wall shear stress manifolds and near wall flow topology in aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Gambaruto, Alberto M.; Chen, Guoning; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-11-01

    Transport of atherogenic and thrombogenic chemicals near the vessel wall highly influences atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The high Schmidt number of these species leads to a thin concentration boundary layer near the wall. The wall shear stress (WSS) vector field can be scaled to obtain the near wall velocity in this region, thus providing first order approximation to near wall transport. In this study, the complex blood flow in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was considered. Lagrangian tracking of surface-bound tracers representing near wall species was employed to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) for the WSS surface vector field. The WSS LCS matched the stable and unstable manifolds of saddle type fixed points of the time-average WSS vector field, due to the quasi-steady nature of these near wall transport processes. A WSS exposure time measure is introduced to quantify the concentration of near wall species. The effect of diffusion and normal flow on these structures is investigated. The WSS LCS highly influence the concentration of near wall species, and provide a template for near-wall transport.

  1. Homogenization of a viscoelastic model for plant cell wall biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ptashnyk, Mariya; Seguin, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The microscopic structure of a plant cell wall is given by cellulose microfibrils embedded in a cell wall matrix. In this paper we consider a microscopic model for interactions between viscoelastic deformations of a plant cell wall and chemical processes in the cell wall matrix. We consider elastic deformations of the cell wall microfibrils and viscoelastic Kelvin--Voigt type deformations of the cell wall matrix. Using homogenization techniques (two-scale convergence and periodic unfolding me...

  2. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cell wa...

  3. NEW RSW & Wall Fine Fully Tetrahedral Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NEW RSW Fine Fully Tetrahedral Grid with Viscous Wind Tunnel wall at the root. This grid is for a node-based unstructured solver. Note that the CGNS file is very...

  4. NEW RSW & Wall Fine Mixed Element Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — RSW Fine Mixed Element Grid with viscous root wind tunnel wall. This grid is for a node-based unstructured solver. Quad Surface Faces= 38016 Tria Surface Faces=...

  5. NEW RSW & Wall Medium Fully Tetrahedral Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New Medium Fully Tetrahedral RSW Grid with viscous wind tunnel wall at the root. This grid is for a node-based unstructured solver. Medium Tet: Quad Surface Faces=...

  6. NEW RSW & Wall Coarse Mixed Element Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the Coarse Mixed Element Grid for the RSW with a viscous wall at the root. This grid is for a node-based unstructured solver. Quad Surface Faces= 9728 Tria...

  7. NEW RSW & Wall Medium Mixed Element Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — RSW Medium Mixed Element Grid with Viscous Wind Tunnel Wall at the root. This grid is for a node-based unstructured solver. Quad Surface Faces= 18432 Tria Surface...

  8. NEW RSW & Wall Coarse Tet Only Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the RSW Coarse Tet Only grid with the root viscous tunnel wall. This grid is for a node-based unstructured solver. Quad Surface Faces= 0 Tria Surface Faces=...

  9. Manufacturing Advanced Channel Wall Rocket Liners Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR will adapt and demonstrate a low cost flexible method of manufacturing channel wall liquid rocket nozzles and combustors, while providing developers a...

  10. Function of laccases in cell wall biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders; Holm, Preben Bach; Andersen, Jeppe Reitan

    2011-01-01

    substrate specificities and expression patterns. As part of the strategic research centre Bio4Bio, the present project deals with laccase functions in relation to cell wall formation in grasses based on a study of the model species Brachypodium distachyon. Thirty-one isozymes have been retrieved from......Laccases are multicopper oxidases capable of polymerizing monolignols. Histochemical assays have shown temporal and spatial correlation with secondary cell wall formation in both herbs and woody perennials. However, in plants laccases constitutes a relatively large group of isoenzymes with unique...... hybridization. Specific isozymes that show high correlation with the process of secondary cell wall formation will be further studied in a reverse genetic study in which candidates will be knocked out using RNA interference. Phenotypes of knock-out mutants are to be described in relation to cell wall...

  11. Statics of Thin-Walled Pretwisted Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Gunneskov, O.

    1981-01-01

    The displacement and strain fields of thin-walled pretwisted beams are prescribed in terms of generalized displacements for extension, bending, torsion and warping. Differential equations and boundary conditions are obtained from the elastic potential energy functional without assuming coincidenc...

  12. Static inelastic analysis of RC shear walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈勤; 钱稼茹

    2002-01-01

    A macro-model of a reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall is developed for static inelastic analysis. The model iscomposed of RC column elements and RC membrane elements. The column elements are used to model the boundary zone andthe membrane elements are used to model the wall panel. Various types of constitutive relationships of concrete could beadopted for the two kinds of elements. To perform analysis, the wall is divided into layers along its height. Two adjacent layersare connected with a rigid beam. There are only three unknown displacement components for each layer. A method called singledegree of freedom compensation is adopted to solve the peak value of the capacity curve. The post-peak stage analysis isperformed using a forced iteration approach. The macro-model developed in the study and the complete process analysismethodology are verified by the experimental and static inelastic analytical results of four RC shear wall specimens.

  13. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair ...

  14. [A case of abdominal wall actinomycosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Jin Soo; Cho, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Seung Bong; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Il; Lee, In Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative granulomatous infectious disease caused by actinomyces species that is characterized by formation of characteristic clumps called as sulfur granules. Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare disease and is often difficult to diagnose before operation. Abdominal actinomycosis infiltrating into the abdominal wall and adhering to the colon is even rarer. Most abdominal actinomycosis develops after operation, trauma or inflammatory bowel disease, and is also considered as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patient with underlying malignancy, diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus infection, etc. Actinomycosis is diagnosed based on histologic demonstration of sulfur granules in surgically resected specimen or pus, and treatment consists of long-term penicillin based antibiotics therapy with or without surgical resection. Herein, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall actinomycosis which developed in a patient after acupuncture and presented as abdominal wall mass that was first mistaken for abdominal wall invasion of diverticulum perforation. PMID:25896158

  15. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR COMPLEX ABDOMINAL WALL RECONSTRUCTION ALBANY MEDICAL CENTER ALBANY, NY April 30, 2008 00:00: ... Koumanis. The surgery comes to you from Albany Medical Center in Albany, New York. In just moments, ...

  16. Thin wall ductile and austempered iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fraś

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that it is possible to produce thin wall castings made of ductile iron with wall thickness in the range of 1.2 to 2.9 mm(without chills, cold laps and misruns. Thin wall ductile iron castings can be lighter (380 g than their substitutes made of aluminium alloys (580g. The kinetics of austenitising transformation was studied in unalloyed ductile iron. The advance of transformations during austenitising was monitored by measurement the fraction of martensite and also by dilatometic studies. It has been shown that in thin wall ductile iron castings austenitising at 880 oC for 20 minutes is adequate to obtain the austenite matrix at the end of the first stage of austempering heat treatment cycle.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... size and can usually be diagnosed early in fetal development, typically between the tenth and fourteenth weeks of ... organs at the abdominal wall opening late in fetal development may also contribute to organ injury. Intestinal damage ...

  18. Plant Wall Degradative Compounds and Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The present invention relates to cell wall degradative systems, in particular to systems containing enzymes that bind to and/or depolymerize cellulose. These...

  19. Nonextensive statistical dynamics applied to wall turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2014-01-01

    We apply a formalism of nonextensive statistical mechanics to experimental wall turbulence data, for the first time to our knowledge. Wind tunnel data for velocity differences a streamwise distance $r$ apart are compared to the prediction from theory as developed by Beck. The simplest theory, in which all free parameters are removed, is found to reproduce statistics for the wall-normal velocity component remarkably well, even for $r$ well beyond the corresponding integral scale, while the corresponding description of the streamwise velocity fluctuations is reasonable at separations below the integral scale. A least-squares 2-parameter fit is performed, and the dependence of the optimum parameter values on wall separation and $r$ is analysed. Both parameters are found to be approximately independent of wall-separation in the logarithmic sub-layer.

  20. Wall Shear Rates in Taylor Vortex Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sobolik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wall shear rate and its axial and azimuthal components were evaluated in stable Taylor vortices. The measurements were carried out in a broad interval of Taylor numbers (52-725 and several gap width (R1/R2 = 0.5 – 0.8 by two three-segment electrodiffusion probes and three single probes flush mounted in the wall of the outer fixed cylinder. The axial distribution of wall shear rate components was obtained by sweeping the vortices along the probes using a slow axial flow. The experimental results were verified by CFD simulations. The knowledge of local wall shear rates and its fluctuations is of primordial interest for industrial applications like tangential filtration, membrane reactors and bioreactors containing shear sensitive cells.

  1. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted a...

  2. Cell Wall Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Lesage, Guillaume; Bussey, Howard

    2006-01-01

    An extracellular matrix composed of a layered meshwork of β-glucans, chitin, and mannoproteins encapsulates cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organelle determines cellular morphology and plays a critical role in maintaining cell integrity during cell growth and division, under stress conditions, upon cell fusion in mating, and in the durable ascospore cell wall. Here we assess recent progress in understanding the molecular biology and biochemistry of cell wall synthesis and it...

  3. Plasma-wall interaction; Interaction plasma paroi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichle, R

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the 43 slides presented in the framework of the week long lecture 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak. This document is divided into 4 parts: 1) thermal load on the wall, power extraction and particle recovery, 2) basic edge plasma physics, 3) processes that drive the plasma-solid interaction, and 4) material conditioning (surface treatment...) for ITER.

  4. Thermal Bridge Effects in Walls Separating Rowhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    In this report the thermal bridge effects at internal wall/roof junctions in rowhouses are evaluated. The analysis is performed using a numerical calculation programme, and different solutions are evaluated with respect to extra heat loss and internal surface temperatures.......In this report the thermal bridge effects at internal wall/roof junctions in rowhouses are evaluated. The analysis is performed using a numerical calculation programme, and different solutions are evaluated with respect to extra heat loss and internal surface temperatures....

  5. Wall slip of bubbles in foams

    OpenAIRE

    WEAIRE, DENIS LAWRENCE

    2006-01-01

    PUBLISHED We present a computational analysis of the flow of liquid foam along a smooth wall, as encountered in the transport of foams in vessels and pipes. We concentrate on the slip of the bubbles at the wall and present some novel finite element calculations of this motion for the case of fully mobile gas/liquid interfaces. Our two-dimensional simulations provide for the first time the bubble shapes and entire flow field, giving detailed insight into the distribution of stre...

  6. Reliability Analysis of Existing Vertical Wall Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1998-01-01

    Vertical wall breakwaters are used under quite different conditions where failure of the breakwater or a part of it will have very different consequences. Further a number of existing vertical wall breakwaters have been subjected to significant wave loads which have caused partial failures of the...... of the structures. The main objective of this paper is to describe how the reliability of existing breakwater structures within the expected remaining lifetime can be estimated taking into account the available information....

  7. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  8. Modelling of a coke oven heating wall

    OpenAIRE

    Landreau, M.; Isler, D.; Gasser, A.; Blond, E.; Daniel, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    International audience This work deals with thermomechanical modelling of a coke oven heating wall. The objective is to define the safe limits of coke oven battery operating conditions compatible with a long service life in terms of thermal and mechanical stresses. For this purpose a 3D thermomechanical model of a heating wall taking into account the assembly of bricks and joints was developed with PRISME Laboratory. To build an efficient and complete model, different parameters must be ta...

  9. The Great Wall for the first time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>Jin Shanling is on the way of a spectacular 7 mile hike to the incredible knife-edge peaks at Simatai. From each watch-tower (67 are said to grace this section) it is like the Great Wall for the first time. It is a swaying cable bridge crosses to Simatai. Atop tours reached through steep, narrow steps are million-dollar vistas of an endless dragon’s tail. Here, the wall

  10. Domain Walls Zoo in Supersymmetric QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Smilga, A. V.; Veselov, A. I.

    1997-01-01

    Solving numerically the equations of motion for the effective lagrangian describing supersymmetric QCD with the SU(2) gauge group, we find a menagerie of complex domain wall solutions connecting different chirally asymmetric vacua. Some of these solutions are BPS saturated walls; they exist when the mass of the matter fields does not exceed some critical value m < m* < 4.67059... There are also sphaleron branches (saddle points of the ebergy functional). In the range m* < m < m** \\approx 4.83...

  11. Bremsstrahlung Radiation At a Vacuum Bubble Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jae-Weon; Lee, Chul H; Jang, Ji-ho

    2007-01-01

    When charged particles collide with a vacuum bubble, they can radiate strong electromagnetic waves due to rapid deceleration. Owing to the energy loss of the particles by this bremsstrahlung radiation, there is a non-negligible damping pressure acting on the bubble wall even when thermal equilibrium is maintained. In the non-relativistic region, this pressure is proportional to the velocity of the wall and could have influenced the bubble dynamics in the early universe.

  12. Shear wall experiments and design in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.

    1994-12-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the available experimental data bases and design codes/standards for reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall structures in Japan. Information related to the seismic design of RC reactor buildings and containment structures was emphasized in the survey. The seismic requirements for concrete structures, particularly those related to shear strength design, are outlined. Detailed descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

  13. Changes in wall shear stresses in abdominal aortic aneurysms with increasing wall stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Fernandez, Miguel

    2006-11-01

    During the growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms, local changes occur in the composition and structure of the diseased wall, resulting in its stiffening. A numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions is performed in idealized models of aneurysms using a finite element method. A full coupling of the equations governing the pulsatile blood flow and the deformation of the compliant wall is undertaken. The effect of the progressive stiffening of the wall is analyzed at various stages in the growth of the aneurysm. Increasing the wall stiffness alters the distribution of wall shear stresses and leads to an increase in their magnitude. The wall compliance is shown to have a more pronounced effect on non-axisymmetric aneurysms, which sustain large displacements. The overall movement of the aneurysm models increases the three-dimensionality of the flow.

  14. A Wall of Funnels Concentrates Swimming Bacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galajda, Peter; Keymer, Juan; Chaikin, Paul; Austin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Randomly moving but self-propelled agents, such as Escherichia coli bacteria, are expected to fill a volume homogeneously. However, we show that when a population of bacteria is exposed to a microfabricated wall of funnel-shaped openings, the random motion of bacteria through the openings is rectified by tracking (trapping) of the swimming bacteria along the funnel wall. This leads to a buildup of the concentration of swimming cells on the narrow opening side of the funnel wall but no concentration of nonswimming cells. Similarly, we show that a series of such funnel walls functions as a multistage pump and can increase the concentration of motile bacteria exponentially with the number of walls. The funnel wall can be arranged along arbitrary shapes and cause the bacteria to form well-defined patterns. The funnel effect may also have implications on the transport and distribution of motile microorganisms in irregular confined environments, such as porous media, wet soil, or biological tissue, or act as a selection pressure in evolution experiments. PMID:17890308

  15. Dynamic response of flexible retaining walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younan, A.H.; Veletsos, A.S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1997-01-01

    Making use of an extension of a recently proposed, relatively simple, approximate method of analysis, a critical evaluation is made of the response to horizontal ground shaking of flexible walls retaining a uniform, linear, viscoelastic stratum of constant thickness and semiinfinite extent in the horizontal direction. Both cantilever and top-supported walls are examined. Following a detailed description of the method and of its rate of convergence, comprehensive numerical solutions are presented that elucidate the action of the system and the effects of the various parameters involved. The parameters varied include the flexibility of the wall, the condition of top support, and the characteristics of the ground motion. The effects of both harmonic base motions and an actual earthquake record are examined. Special attention is paid to the effects of long-period, effectively static excitations. A maximum dynamic response is then expressed as the product of the corresponding static response and an appropriate amplification or deamplification factor. The response quantities examined include the displacements of the wall relative to the moving base, the dynamic wall pressures, and the total wall force, base shear and base moment.

  16. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant–pathogen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Bellincampi, Daniela; Cervone, Felice; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteri...

  17. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant-pathogen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela eBellincampi; Felice eCervone; Vincenzo eLionetti

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteri...

  18. A Review of Double-Walled and Triple-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kazunori Fujisawa; Hee Jou Kim; Su Hyeon Go; Hiroyuki Muramatsu; Takuya Hayashi; Morinobu Endo; Thomas Ch. Hirschmann; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Yoong Ahm Kim; Araujo, Paulo T.

    2016-01-01

    Double- and triple-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs and TWNTs) consist of coaxially-nested two and three single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). They act as the geometrical bridge between SWNTs and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), providing an ideal model for studying the coupling interactions between different shells in MWNTs. Within this context, this article comprehensively reviews various synthetic routes of DWNTs’ and TWNTs’ production, such as arc discharge, catalytic chemical vapor...

  19. The character of a wall : the changing construction of agricultural walls on the island of Gozo

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Adam

    2007-01-01

    The current paper describes the changing construction of agricultural walls on the island of Gozo, part of the Maltese islands in the Mediterranean Sea. The described changes represent physical artifactual evidence of the changing culture of a nation that gained its independence only forty years ago yet maintains a history over five thousand years old. In this regard, the analysis provides an ethnoarchaeological portrayal of a wall and its construction; the form of the wall displays its...

  20. Flaw Detection in Thin-Walled Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author considers the special features and advantages of ultrasonic methods of detecting flaws in thin-walled tubes by means of Lamb's waves and describes the apparatus used. In addition to standard methods of inspecting and testing tubes, ultrasonics and eddy currents are now widely used in detecting concealed defects (fissures, non-metallic inclusions, foliation, blisters), deep notches, cracks and scratches on inner surfaces, determining grain size, and measuring wall thickness and corrosion depth. For the ultrasonic detection of flaws in thin-walled tubes using Lamb's waves one must work on the relatively flat parts of the dispersion curves. For example, greatest sensitivity to foliation during inspection by the reflection method is possessed by anti-symmetrical waves of the first and second modes. The author shows the effect of non-uniform thickness and ovalness of tubes on signal fluctuations in inspection by the shadow method. Metal structure is tested by the ''ratio'' method based on a comparison between signals of different frequency which are reflected by or which pass through the materials. In smooth and finned thin-walled tubes with diameters of 3 to 60 mm and wall thickness of 0.2 mm or more, made of stainless steel, high-nickel, zirconium, aluminium and other alloys, defects are detected with IDTs-3M, IDTs-5, UDT-4M, UKT-2 and other ultrasonic apparatus. Inspection is carried out by the immersion technique, the shadow method and the reflection method with working frequencies up to 10 MHz. Positive detection is achieved of defects over 0.5 mm in length and with a depth of 5% of the wall thickness. Grain size is controlled by USAD-61 structure analysers. Eddy-current apparatus is used for measuring the wall thickness of tubes made of non-magnetic materials. (author)

  1. Spalling of concrete walls under blast load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common effect of the detonation of explosives in close proximity of concrete shield walls is the spalling (scabbing) of the back face of the wall. For explosions close-in to the wall, where the reflected blast wave pressures are sufficiently high, multiple spall layers are formed. Successive spall layers are of increasing thickness, at the same time the spall velocities decrease. For a given wall configuration and peak blast wave pressure the spall thickness scales directly with the cube root of the charge weight. The spall velocities on the other hand, which are proportional to the impulse trapped in the spall layer, vary only slightly with charge weight due to minor differences of shock attenuation in the wall. For a given charge weight, the spall thickness increases with stand-off distance from the wall and the spall velocity decreases. For fixed charge stand-off distance the spall thicknesses decrease as the charge weight is increased, at the same time spall velocities increase. This is caused by the steeper pressure decay associated with higher blast wave pressures. Fixing the charge parameters, spall thicknesses increase slightly as the wall thickness is increased. The opposite holds for the spalling velocities. As the angle of incidence for the blast wave increases the spall thicknesses increase also. Again the corresponding spall velocities decrease. Assuming elastic concrete behavior, no spalling will occur for angles of shock wave incidence greater than 450. A phase reversal of the reflection coefficient occurs at this point, thus the longitudinal wave reflected at the free surface becomes a compression wave

  2. Yukawa Textures From Heterotic Stability Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Lara B; Ovrut, Burt

    2010-01-01

    A holomorphic vector bundle on a Calabi-Yau threefold, X, with h^{1,1}(X)>1 can have regions of its Kahler cone where it is slope-stable, that is, where the four-dimensional theory is N=1 supersymmetric, bounded by "walls of stability". On these walls the bundle becomes poly-stable, decomposing into a direct sum, and the low energy gauge group is enhanced by at least one anomalous U(1) gauge factor. In this paper, we show that these additional symmetries can strongly constrain the superpotential in the stable region, leading to non-trivial textures of Yukawa interactions and restrictions on allowed masses for vector-like pairs of matter multiplets. The Yukawa textures exhibit a hierarchy; large couplings arise on the stability wall and some suppressed interactions "grow back" off the wall, where the extended U(1) symmetries are spontaneously broken. A number of explicit examples are presented involving both one and two stability walls, with different decompositions of the bundle structure group. A three famil...

  3. Radiation induced osteosarcoma of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Tsutomu; Yuki, Yoshihiro; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Yoshiyuki; Fujishima, Tsukasa; Shimazaki, Yasuhisa [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    We report a successful resection of an osteosarcoma in the chest wall developed 25 years after irradiation. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for her swelling in the left chest wall at August 24, 1995. At 49-year-old, she had undergone an operation and postoperative irradiation for left breast cancer. A computed tomography demonstrated a mass in the left chest wall that destructed the first rib, extending into the pleural space and invaded into the left common carotid and subclavian arteries. We planned a radical resection of the mass after repeated CT scannings, since it was histopathologically diagnosed as a chondrosarcoma and showed a rapid growth. The tumor was completely removed with radical transmediastinal forequarter amputation of the partial chest wall and total left upper extremity. The left common carotid artery was partially replaced with 6 mm EPTFE vascular prosthesis. The chest wall was reconstructed with Marlex-mesh prosthesis and a myocutaneous flap. She was discharged uneventfully and has not shown any evidence of recurrence. (author)

  4. Tank wall thinning -- Process and programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-service thinning of tank walls has occurred in the power industry and can pose a significant risk to plant safety and dependability. Appropriate respect for the energy stored in a high-pressure drain tank warrants a careful consideration of this possibility and appropriate action in order to assure the adequate safety margins against leakage or rupture. Although it has not proven to be a widespread problem, several cases of wall thinning and at least one recent tank rupture has highlighted this issue in recent years, particularly in nuclear power plants. However, the problem is not new or unique to the nuclear power industry. Severe wall thinning in deaerator tanks has been frequently identified at fossil-fueled power plants. There are many mechanisms which can contribute to tank wall thinning. Considerations for a specific tank are dictated by the system operating conditions, tank geometry, and construction material. Thinning mechanisms which have been identified include: Erosion/Corrosion Impingement Erosion Cavitation Erosion General Corrosion Galvanic Corrosion Microbial-induced Corrosion of course there are many other possible types of material degradation, many of which are characterized by pitting and cracking. This paper specifically addresses wall thinning induced by Erosion/Corrosion (also called Flow-Accelerated Corrosion) and Impingement Erosion of tanks in a power plant steam cycle. Many of the considerations presented are applicable to other types of vessels, such as moisture separators and heat exchangers

  5. Interactions between domain walls and spin currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaui, M.; Laufenberg, M.; Backes, D.; Buhrer, W.; Rudiger, U.; Vila, L.; Vouille, C.; Faini, G.

    2006-03-01

    A promising novel approach for switching magnetic nanostructures is current-induced domain wall propagation (CIDP), where due to a spin torque effect, electrons transfer angular momentum to a head-to-head domain wall and thereby push it in the direction of the electron flow without any externally applied fields. This effect has been observed with a variety of techniques including MFM [1] and spin polarized scanning electron microscopy [2] to directly observe current-induced domain wall propagation in ferromagnetic nanostructures and magnetoresistance measurements to systematically probe the critical current densities as a function of the geometry [3]. The observed wall velocities and critical current densities, where wall motion sets in at room temperature, do not agree well with theoretical 0K calculations [4]. We have therefore measured the critical current densities as a function of the sample temperature. We find that the spin torque effect becomes more efficient at low temperatures, which could account for some of the observed discrepancies between the 300K experiment and the 0K simulation. [1] A. Yamaguchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 77205 (2004); [2] M. Klaui et al., PRL 95, 26601 (2005); [3] M. Klaui et al., PRL 94, 106601 (2005); [4] A. Thiaville et al., EPL 69, 990 (2005); G. Tatara et al., APL 86, 252509 (2005);

  6. Modes of deformation of walled cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumais, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The bewildering morphological diversity found in cells is one of the starkest illustrations of life's ability to self-organize. Yet the morphogenetic mechanisms that produce the multifarious shapes of cells are still poorly understood. The shared similarities between the walled cells of prokaryotes, many protists, fungi, and plants make these groups particularly appealing to begin investigating how morphological diversity is generated at the cell level. In this review, I attempt a first classification of the different modes of surface deformation used by walled cells. Five modes of deformation were identified: inextensional bending, equi-area shear, elastic stretching, processive intussusception, and chemorheological growth. The two most restrictive modes-inextensional and equi-area deformations-are embodied in the exine of pollen grains and the wall-like pellicle of euglenoids, respectively. For these modes, it is possible to express the deformed geometry of the cell explicitly in terms of the undeformed geometry and other easily observable geometrical parameters. The greatest morphogenetic power is reached with the processive intussusception and chemorheological growth mechanisms that underlie the expansive growth of walled cells. A comparison of these two growth mechanisms suggests a possible way to tackle the complexity behind wall growth.

  7. Initial phase wall conditioning in KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial phase wall conditioning in KSTAR is depicted. The KSTAR wall conditioning procedure consists of vessel baking, glow discharge cleaning (GDC), ICRH wall conditioning (ICWC) and boronization (Bz). Vessel baking is performed for the initial vacuum conditioning in order to remove various kinds of impurities including H2O, carbon and oxygen and for the plasma operation. The total outgassing rates after vessel baking in three successive KSTAR campaigns are compared. GDC is regularly performed as a standard wall cleaning procedure. Another cleaning technique is ICWC, which is useful for inter-shot wall conditioning under a strong magnetic field. In order to optimize the operation time and removal efficiency of ICWC, a parameter scan is performed. Bz is a standard technique to remove oxygen impurity from a vacuum vessel. KSTAR has used carborane powder which is a non-toxic boron-containing material. The KSTAR Bz has been successfully performed through two campaigns: water and oxygen levels in the vacuum vessel are reduced significantly. As a result, KSTAR has achieved its first L-H mode transition, although the input power was marginal for the L-H transition threshold. The characteristics of boron-containing thin films deposited for boronization are investigated.

  8. Comparison of Turbulent Heat-Transfer Results for Uniform Wall Heat Flux and Uniform Wall Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, R.; Sparrow, E. M.

    1960-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to examine in a more precise way how the Nusselt numbers for turbulent heat transfer in both the fully developed and thermal entrance regions of a circular tube are affected by two different wall boundary conditions. The comparisons are made for: (a) Uniform wall temperature (UWT); and (b) uniform wall heat flux (UHF). Several papers which have been concerned with the turbulent thermal entrance region problem are given. 1 Although these analyses have all utilized an eigenvalue formulation for the thermal entrance region there were differences in the choices of eddy diffusivity expressions, velocity distributions, and methods for carrying out the numerical solutions. These differences were also found in the fully developed analyses. Hence when making a comparison of the analytical results for uniform wall temperature and uniform wall heat flux, it was not known if differences in the Nusselt numbers could be wholly attributed to the difference in wall boundary conditions, since all the analytical results were not obtained in a consistent way. To have results which could be directly compared, computations were carried out for the uniform wall temperature case, using the same eddy diffusivity, velocity distribution, and digital computer program employed for uniform wall heat flux. In addition, the previous work was extended to a lower Reynolds number range so that comparisons could be made over a wide range of both Reynolds and Prandtl numbers.

  9. Enhanced cold wall CVD reactor growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Kwak, Eun-Hye; Chen, Bingan; Huang, Shirong; Edwards, Michael; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Teo, Kenneth; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Liu, Johan

    2016-05-01

    HASynthesis of horizontally-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (HA-SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) directly on quartz seems very promising for the fabrication of future nanoelectronic devices. In comparison to hot-wall CVD, synthesis of HA-SWCNTs in a cold-wall CVD chamber not only means shorter heating, cooling and growth periods, but also prevents contamination of the chamber. However, since most synthesis of HA-SWCNTs is performed in hot-wall reactors, adapting this well-established process to a cold-wall chamber becomes extremely crucial. Here, in order to transfer the CVD growth technology from a hot-wall to a cold-wall chamber, a systematic investigation has been conducted to determine the influence of process parameters on the HA-SWCNT's growth. For two reasons, the cold-wall CVD chamber was upgraded with a top heater to complement the bottom substrate heater; the first reason to maintain a more uniform temperature profile during HA-SWCNTs growth, and the second reason to preheat the precursor gas flow before projecting it onto the catalyst. Our results show that the addition of a top heater had a significant effect on the synthesis. Characterization of the CNTs shows that the average density of HA-SWCNTs is around 1 - 2 tubes/ μm with high growth quality as shown by Raman analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. The role of wall calcium in the extension of cell walls of soybean hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, S. S.; Cleland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Calcium crosslinks are load-bearing bonds in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) hypocotyl cell walls, but they are not the same load-bearing bonds that are broken during acid-mediated cell elongation. This conclusion is reached by studying the relationship between wall calcium, pH and the facilitated creep of frozen-thawed soybean hypocotyl sections. Supporting data include the following observations: 1) 2-[(2-bis-[carboxymethyl]amino-5-methylphenoxy)methyl]-6-methoxy-8-bis[car boxymethyl]aminoquinoline (Quin 2) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) caused only limited facilitated creep as compared with acid, despite removal of comparable or larger amounts of wall calcium; 2) the pH-response curves for calcium removal and acid-facilitated creep were different; 3) reversible acid-extension occurred even after removal of almost all wall calcium with Quin 2; and 4) growth of abraded sections did not involve a proportional loss of wall calcium. Removal of wall calcium, however, increased the capacity of the walls to undergo acid-facilitated creep. These data indicate that breakage of calcium crosslinks is not a major mechanism of cell-wall loosening in soybean hypocotyl tissues.

  11. Dynamic damping of domain walls in weak ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscopic theory is developed for the energy dissipation of a moving domain wall of a weak ferromagnetic by interaction between the wall and thermal magnons. Different dynamic regimes are considered - translational wall motion and propagation of flexure waves along the wall. The special roles of small system-energy terms that disturb the soliton character of the domain wall, and of the fact that the wall does not reflect the magnons with which it interacts, are pointed out. A phenomenological equation that describes consistently the domain-wall dynamics and relaxation is proposed on the basis of the microscopic calculations

  12. Seismic Behavior of Dual Function Slitted Shear Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶列平; 康胜

    2001-01-01

    The concept of seismic structural control was used to design a new type reinforced concrete shear wall, the dual function slitted shear wall. Connectors are installed in vertical slits in the slitted shear wall to provide the dual function slitted shear wall with greater stiffness and capacity for small and moderate earthquake intensities. The wall becomes a slitted wall with the ductile flexure failure mode when the connectors fail during severe earthquakes. Seven specimens were tested to study the seismic behavior of the dual function slitted shear wall, The results showed that the connector controlled function well and provided better seismic behavior.

  13. Stability of resistive wall modes with plasma rotation and thick wall in ITER scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Chu, M.; Chance, M.; Turnbull, A.

    2004-11-01

    The rotation effect on resistive wall modes (RWMs) is examined for realistically shaped, high-beta tokamak equilibria, including reactor relevant cases with low mach number M and realistic thick walls. For low M, Stabilization of RWMs arises from unusually thin inertial layers. The investigation employs the newly developed adaptive eigenvalue code (AEGIS: Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Solution), which describes both low and high n modes and is in good agreement with GATO in the benchmark studies. AEGIS is unique in using adaptive methods to resolve such inertial layers with low mach number rotation. This feature is even more desirable for transport barrier cases. Additionally, ITER and reactors have thick conducting walls ( ˜.5-1 m) which are not well modeled as a thin shell. Such thick walls are considered here, including semi-analytical approximations to account for the toroidally segmented nature of real walls.

  14. "Steiner trees" between cell walls of sisal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI GuanShi; YIN YaJun; LI Yan; ZHONG Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Through careful analysis on the cross-section of sisal fibers,it is found that the middle lamellae between the cell walls have clear geometric characteristics:between the cell walls of three neighboring cells,the middle lamellae form a three-way junction with 120°symmetry. If the neighboring three-way junctions are connected,a network of Steiner tree with angular symmetry and topological invariability is formed. If more and more Steiner trees are connected,a network of Steiner rings is generated. In another word,idealized cell walls and the middle lamellae are dominated by the Steiner geometry. This geometry not only depicts the geometric symmetry,the topological invariability and minimal property of the middle lamellae,but also controls the mechanics of sisal fibers.

  15. Gravitational waves from Higgs domain walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Naoya, E-mail: kitajima@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takahashi, Fuminobu, E-mail: fumi@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli IPMU, TODIAS, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-05-18

    The effective potential for the Standard Model Higgs field allows two quasi-degenerate vacua; one is our vacuum at the electroweak scale, while the other is at a much higher scale. The latter minimum may be at a scale much smaller than the Planck scale, if the potential is lifted by new physics. This gives rise to a possibility of domain wall formation after inflation. If the high-scale minimum is a local minimum, domain walls are unstable and disappear through violent annihilation processes, producing a significant amount of gravitational waves. We estimate the amount of gravitational waves produced from unstable domain walls in the Higgs potential and discuss detectability with future experiments.

  16. Imaging of Chest Wall Lesions in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hekmatnia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall lesions in childhood include a wide range of pathologies; Benign lesions include lipoma, neurofibroma, lymphangioma, hemangioma, and mesenchymal hamartoma."nMalignant lesions include Neuroblastoma, Rhabdo-myosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and Askin tumor."nSystemic diseases such as leukemia, lymphoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and also infections such as tuberculosis, and actinomycosis may also cause chest wall lesions."nThe imaging characteristics of these lesions are re-viewed, but only a minority of the lesions shows diagnostic imaging features, and most of lesions re-quire biopsy and histopathological examination for "ndefinitive diagnosis."nThe role of different modalities is discussed with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging for demonstrating lesion morphology and local spread. Computed tomography and neuclear medicine being used mainly to assess remote disease."nIn this lecture, we discuss about imaging of chest wall lesions in children.

  17. INTEGRATED ENERGY EFFICIENT WINDOW-WALL SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Arney, Ph.D.

    2002-12-31

    The building industry faces the challenge of reducing energy use while simultaneously improving construction methods and marketability. This paper describes the first phase of a project to address these concerns by designing an Integrated Window Wall System (IWWS) that can be commercialized. This work builds on previous research conducted during the 1990's by Lawrence Berkeley national Laboratories (LBNL). During this phase, the objective was to identify appropriate technologies, problems and issues and develop a number of design concepts. Four design concepts were developed into prototypes and preliminary energy analyses were conducted Three of these concepts (the foam wall, steel wall, and stiffened plate designs) showed particular potential for meeting the project objectives and will be continued into a second phase where one or two of the systems will be brought closer to commercialization.

  18. Energy conserving effects of dividing wall column☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Fang; Hanmei Zhao; Jianchao Qi; Chunli Li; Junjie Qi; Jiajia Guo

    2015-01-01

    The energy-conserving performance of dividing wal column (DWC) is discussed in this paper. The heat transfer through the dividing wall is considered and the results are compared with that of common heat insulation dividing wall column (HIDWC). Based on the thermodynamic analysis of heat transfer dividing wall column (HTDWC) and HIDWC, both computer simulation and experiments are employed to analyze the energy-conserving situation. Mixtures of n-hexane, n-heptane and n-octane are chosen as the example for separation. The results show that the energy consumption of HTDWC is 50.3%less than that of conventional distillation column, while it is 46.4% less than that of HIDWC. It indicates that DWC is efficient on separating three-component mixtures and HTDWC can save more energy than HIDWC. Thus it is necessary to consider the heat transfer while applying DWC to industry.

  19. Vibrotactile Vest and The Humming Wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann; Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Knoche, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Vibrotactile information can be used to elicit sensations and encourage particular user body movements. We designed a vibrotactile vest with physiological monitoring that interacts with a vibroacoustic urban environment, The Humming Wall. In this paper, we describe the first field trial with the ......Vibrotactile information can be used to elicit sensations and encourage particular user body movements. We designed a vibrotactile vest with physiological monitoring that interacts with a vibroacoustic urban environment, The Humming Wall. In this paper, we describe the first field trial...... with the system held over a 5-week period in an urban park. We depict the participants’ experience, engagement and impressions while wearing the vibrotactile vest and interacting with the wall. We contribute with positive responses to novel interactions between the responsive environment and the vibrotactile vest...

  20. Solitary Plasmacytoma of the Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet Kayhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 55-year-old man with right sided lateral chest pain admitted to clinic. It was found a solid and painful mass at the right 4th rib in physical examination. Chest X-ray and thoracic computarized tomography showed an opacity measured 60x33 mm within the right chest wall destructing the 4th rib. Needle aspiration was performed from tumor and cytologic examination showed atypic plasma cell infiltration. The patient was scheduled for a chest wall resection and reconstructive surgery. Examination of a permanent section showed that the chest wall tumor was solitary plasmacytoma. There was no evidence of multiple myeloma recurrence after two years from the operation.

  1. Untethered photonic sensor for wall pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Maurizio; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2015-05-15

    In this Letter, we study a novel untethered photonic wall pressure sensor that uses as sensing element a dome-shaped micro-scale laser. Since the sensor does not require any optical or electrical cabling, it allows measurements where cabling tends to be problematic. The micro-laser is made by a mixture of Trimethylolpropane Tri(3-mercaptopropionate), commercial name THIOCURE and Polyethylene (glycol) Diacrylate (PEGDA) mixed with a solution of rhodamine 6G. Two different volume ratios between the THIOCURE and the PEGDA are studied, since different ratios lead to different mechanical properties. In addition, two different sensor configurations are presented: (i) sensor coupled to a membrane, that allows differential wall pressure measurement and (ii) sensor without membrane that allows absolute wall pressure measurement. The sensitivity plots are presented in the paper for both sensor configurations and polymer ratios.

  2. Color doppler sonography in thickened gallbladder wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thickening of the gallbladder wall is a valuable finding for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, but may be seen in non-cholecystic disease as well as in acute or chronic cholecystitis. The purpose of this study is to determine the value of color Doppler sonography in differentiating the causes of thickened gallbladder wall. Ninety eight patients with thickened gallbladder wall(more than 3mm) which was not due to gallbladder cancer were prospectively evaluated with color Doppler sonography. Sixty-six cases, confirmed by pathologic reports and clinical records, were analyzed for correlation between thickened gallbladder wall and color flow signal according to the underlying causes. Of the 66 patients, 28 cases were cholecystitis and 38 cases had non-cholecystic causes such as liver cirrhosis, ascites, hepatitis, pancreatitis, renal failure, and hypoalbuminemia. Of the 28 patients with cholecystitis(12 acute, 16 chronic), 23(82%) had color Doppler flow signals in the thickened gallbladder wall. Of the 38 patients with non-cholecystic causes, eight(21%) had color Doppler flow signals. There was a statistically significant difference of color Doppler flow signals between the cholecystitis and non-cholecystic groups(p=0.0001). No significant difference of color Doppler flow signals was found between cases of acute and chronic cholecystitis. Of the 23 patients with color Doppler flow signals in 28 cases of cholecystitis, 18(78.3%) showed a linear pattern and five(21.7%) showed a spotty pattern. Of the eight patients with color Doppler flow signals in the 38 non-cholecystic cases, four(50%) showed a linear pattern and four(50%) showed a spotty pattern. In cholecystitis, a linear color Doppler flow signal pattern is a much more frequent finding than a spotty pattern. Color Doppler sonography is a useful and adequate method for determining whether a thickened gallbladder wall is the result of cholecystitis or has non-cholecystic causes

  3. Arrangement of peptidoglycan in the cell wall of Staphylococcus spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Amako, K; Umeda, A.; Murata, K

    1982-01-01

    The arrangement of peptidoglycan in the cell wall of Staphylococcus was observed with the newly developed freeze-fracture technique, using n-octanol instead of water as the freezing medium. The replica of the trichloroacetic acid-extracted cell wall (TCA-wall) showed two areas. One of them has a concentric circular structure, a characteristic surface structure of the staphylococcal cell wall, and the other showed an irregular and rough surface. The chemical analysis of the wall revealed that ...

  4. Soil-Bentonite Cutoff Walls: Hydraulic Conductivity and Contaminant Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Britton, Jeremy Paul

    2001-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soil-bentonite cutoff walls are commonly used to contain contaminants in the subsurface. A key property in determining the effectiveness of a cutoff wall is its hydraulic conductivity. There are important difficulties and uncertainties regarding the accuracy of commonly used methods of measuring the hydraulic conductivity of cutoff walls. When predicting contaminant transport through cutoff walls, common practice is to use the average hydraulic conductivity of the wall. ...

  5. Brick Walls for Nonstationary Black Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎忠恒; 米丽琴; 赵峥

    2002-01-01

    The validity condition of the brick-wall model is analysed in nonstationary space time. It is shown that the model holds only in thin regions, only by using tortoise coordinates, near the event horizon of a slowly varying (quasi-stationary) black hole. The reason for the use of tortoise coordinates is that the stationary state solutions of quantum field equations in other coordinates do not exist for any region in nonstationary space-time. Meanwhile,the quantum corrections to the entropy of the Vaidya-Bonner black hole due to the spin fields are calculated in terms of the brick-wall model.

  6. Multigrid Algorithms for Domain-Wall Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Saul D; Clark, M A; Osborn, J C

    2012-01-01

    We describe an adaptive multigrid algorithm for solving inverses of the domain-wall fermion operator. Our multigrid algorithm uses an adaptive projection of near-null vectors of the domain-wall operator onto coarser four-dimensional lattices. This extension of multigrid techniques to a chiral fermion action will greatly reduce overall computation cost, and the elimination of the fifth dimension in the coarse space reduces the relative cost of using chiral fermions compared to discarding this symmetry. We demonstrate near-elimination of critical slowing as the quark mass is reduced and small volume dependence, which may be suppressed by taking advantage of the recursive nature of the algorithm.

  7. Thin Wall Ductile Iron Castings: Technological Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Fraś

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the reasons for the current trend of substituting ductile iron castings by aluminum alloys castings.However, it has been shown that ductile iron is superior to aluminum alloys in many applications. In particular it has beendemonstrated that is possible to produce thin wall wheel rim made of ductile iron without the development of chills, coldlaps or misruns. In addition it has been shown that thin wall wheel rim made of ductile iron can have the same weight, andbetter mechanical properties, than their substitutes made of aluminum alloys.

  8. Thermonuclear burn in wall-confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The one-dimensional initial value problem describing a hot, dense, thermonuclear reacting plasma which is magnetically insulated and contained between cold metal walls has been studied by means of computational simulation. The resulting time evolution of the plasma temperature, number density and magnetic field profiles includes the effects of thermal conduction and radiation energy losses from the plasma, convection, and a detailed treatment of alpha particle heating, as well as ohmic heating and magnetic field diffusion. The results are used to evaluate the net energy gains possible in a shock-heated, magnetically insulated, wall-confined fusion cycle

  9. Soft-wall modelling of meson spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Afonin, S S

    2016-01-01

    The holographic methods inspired by the gauge/gravity correspondence from string theory have been actively applied to the hadron spectroscopy in the last eleven years. Within the phenomenological bottom-up approach, the linear Regge-like trajectories for light mesons are naturally reproduced in the so-called "Soft-wall" holographic models. I will give a very short review of the underlying ideas and technical aspects related to the meson spectroscopy. A generalization of soft-wall description of Regge trajectories to arbitrary intercept is proposed. The problem of incorporation of the chiral symmetry breaking is discussed.

  10. Effects of wall condition on flow distributions in arterial modeling: comparison of rigid, dynamic, and compliant walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fan [Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Beijing (China); Hua, Lu; Gao, Li jian [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2016-03-15

    Blood flow distributions were evaluated using various computational strategies. Three commonly used wall conditions in arterial modeling were employed, namely rigid, dynamic and compliant walls. The results show that the velocity distributions are similar under rigid and dynamic walls, developing into the Poiseuille flow, but they are blunt under compliant walls. The peak pressure under rigid walls is highest, but the model of dynamic walls has a good approximation of pressure against the model of compliant walls. The results indicate that a model of compliant walls appears to be a computationally and reasonably accurate approximation of blood velocity distributions compared with the analysis under rigid or dynamic walls. Introducing fluid-structure interaction into arterial modeling is necessary to ensure reliable results and information. However, a model of dynamic walls seems to be a computationally inexpensive yet reasonably accurate approximation for pressure.

  11. A Typical Magnetohydrodynamic Flow of a Viscous Incompressible Fluid Between a Parallel Flat Wall and a Wavy Wall : Constant Suction Through the Former Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Maitra

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available A magnetohydrodynamic flow of a viscous, incompressible and slightly conducting fluid is developed between a parallel flat wall and a wavy wall whereas at the same time fluid is continuously sucked through the flat wall with a constant suction velocity. The velocity and temperature distribution are determined alongwith the pressure gradient and co-efficient of skin friction.

  12. Thick-wall effects on the rotational stabilization of resistive wall modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is devoted to studying the combined effect of mode rotation and energy dissipation in the resistive wall on plasma stability. The problem is analysed on the basis of the energy approach complementing the standard methods of the traditional MHD theory of plasma stability. The key element that makes our model different from this theory and commonly used thin-wall approaches to the stability analysis of resistive wall modes (RWMs) is the incorporation of the skin effect. In the ideal MHD theory of plasma stability, the skin depth is, formally, zero. In contrast, the conventional thin-wall theory of RWM stability assumes a skin depth much larger than the wall thickness. The presented model considers the intermediate case with a finite skin depth compared with the wall thickness. This covers the modes in between the typical RWMs and the ideal MHD modes when wall resistivity still affects the mode dynamics. It is shown that, in this region, the growth rate of the locked modes must be substantially larger than that calculated in the thin-wall models. On the other hand, the fast RWMs can be completely stabilized by mode rotation above some critical level. Qualitatively, this corresponds to the rotational stabilization observed in the DIII-D tokamak and allowing the plasma operation above the no-wall stability limit (Strait et al 2003 Nucl. Fusion 43 430). This is the main result of this study, which is completely analytical with all dependences explicitly shown. In particular, the dispersion relations for the fast RWMs and the critical frequency of mode rotation necessary for rotational stabilization are expressed through quantities that depend on the plasma parameters or can be experimentally found by magnetic measurements outside the plasma. (paper)

  13. Magnetoresistance in magnetic domain wall systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, PAE

    2002-01-01

    The contribution to the magneto resistance (MR) was calculated for a single magnetic domain wall present in a small 2D impure ferromagnetic wire. On assuming low-temperatures and spin-independent impurity scattering the mechanism responsible for a positive contribution to MR is quantum interference.

  14. Phase transition – Break down the walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandahl, Søren

    2012-01-01

    . In a popular term this problem is often called “over the wall syndrome”. The manufacturing industry has worked with this for many years, in e.g. integrated product development, concurrent engineering, supply chain management, etc. Now the construction industry needs to focus more on these crucial inter...

  15. Domain walls in an FRW universe

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, D; González-Ruiz, A; Holman, R; Takakura, F I; Boyanovsky, D; Brahm, D E; Gonzalez-Ruiz, A; Holman, R; Takakura, F I

    1995-01-01

    We solve the equations of motion for a scalar field with domain wall boundary conditions in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spacetime. We find (in agreement with Basu and Vilenkin) that no domain wall solutions exist in de Sitter spacetime for h = H/m > 1/2, where H is the Hubble parameter and m is the scalar mass. In the general FRW case we develop a systematic perturbative expansion in h to arrive at an approximate solution to the field equations. We calculate the energy momentum tensor of the domain wall configuration, and show that the energy density can become *negative* at the core of the defect for some values of the non-minimal coupling parameter \\xi. We develop a translationally invariant theory for fluctuations of the wall, obtain the effective Lagrangian for these fluctuations, and quantize them using the Bunch-Davies vacuum in the de Sitter case. Unlike previous analyses, we find that the fluctuations act as zero-mass (as opposed to tachyonic) modes. This allows us to calculate the distortion a...

  16. Vector solitons with an embedded domain wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kevrekidis, P.G.; Susanto, H.; Carretero-Gonzalez, R.; Malomed, B.A.; Frantzeskakis, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a class of soliton solutions to a system of two coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, with an intrinsic domain wall (DW) which separates regions occupied by two different fields. The model describes a binary mixture of two Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with interspecies repulsion. F

  17. Microanalysis of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obel, N.; Erben, V.; Schwarz, T.; Kühnel, S.; Fodor, A.; Pauly, M.

    2009-01-01

    Oligosaccharide Mass Profiling (OLIMP) allows a fast and sensitive assessment of cell wall polymer structure when coupled with Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The short time required for sample preparation and analysis makes possible the s

  18. Lonely Birthday Eaters Anonymous: The Chinese Wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Laine

    2015-01-01

    Loneliness forms the emotional core of The Chinese Wall. But rather than inviting empathetic identification with the main character, this film embodies the feeling by means of voice-over, mise-en-scène and the role of food (its consumption, tasting and sharing).

  19. Semisimplicity of Hecke and (walled) Brauer Algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Tubbenhauer, Daniel; Stroppel, Catharina

    We show how to use Jantzen's sum formula for Weyl modules to prove semisimplicity criteria for endomorphism algebras of Uq-tilting modules (for any field 핂 and any parameter q∈핂−{0,−1}). As an application, we recover the semisimplicity criteria for the Hecke algebras of types A and B, the walled...

  20. Distortional Modes of Thin-Walled Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Andreassen, Michael Joachim

    2009-01-01

    The classic thin-walled beam theory for open and closed cross-sections can be generalized by including distortional displacement modes. The introduction of additional displacement modes leads to coupled differential equations, which seems to have prohibited the use of exact shape functions in the...

  1. Moisture movements in render on brick wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Munch, Thomas Astrup; Thorsen, Peter Schjørmann;

    2003-01-01

    A three-layer render on brick wall used for building facades is studied in the laboratory. The vertical render surface is held in contact with water for 24 hours simulating driving rain while it is measured with non-destructive X-ray equipment every hour in order to follow the moisture front thro...

  2. Safety Aspects for Vertical Wall Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Burcharth, H. F.; Christiani, E.

    1996-01-01

    In this appendix some safety aspects in relation to vertical wall breakwaters are discussed. Breakwater structures such as vertical wall breakwaters are used under quite different conditions. The expected lifetime can be from 5 years (interim structure) to 100 years (permanent structure) and the ......In this appendix some safety aspects in relation to vertical wall breakwaters are discussed. Breakwater structures such as vertical wall breakwaters are used under quite different conditions. The expected lifetime can be from 5 years (interim structure) to 100 years (permanent structure......) and the accepted level of probability of failure in the expected lifetime can vary from a very small number, e.g. 10-4 if failure of the breakwater results in significant damage to large probabilities, e.g. 0.5 if the consequences are insignificant. This has to be taken into account when discussing safety aspects...... and possible level I and D code formats. In the following first the most important failure modes are briefly described, see section 2. It is assumed that the failure modes can be modelled by limit state functions. Wave load models are described in section 3. In section 5 uncertainties related to the parameters...

  3. Remarks on 't Hooft's brick wall model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A semi-classical reasoning leads to the non-commutativity of the space and time coordinates near the horizon of Schwarzschild black hole. This non-commutativity in turn provides a mechanism to interpret the brick wall thickness hypothesis in 't Hooft's brick wall model as well as the boundary condition imposed for the field considered. For concreteness, we consider a noncommutative scalar field model near the horizon and derive the effective metric via the equation of motion of noncommutative scalar field. This metric displays a new horizon in addition to the original one associated with the Schwarzschild black hole. The infinite red-shifting of the scalar field on the new horizon determines the range of the noncommutative space and explains the relevant boundary condition for the field. This range enables us to calculate the entropy of black hole as proportional to the area of its original horizon along the same line as in 't Hooft's model , and the thickness of the brick wall is found to be proportional to the thermal average of the noncommutative space-time range. The Hawking temperature has been derived in this formalism. The study here represents an attempt to reveal some physics beyond the brick wall model. (author)

  4. Global Learning Communities: Science Classrooms without Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlin, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    The physical walls of a classroom have typically acted as the boundary of school science learning communities. The participants in these learning communities are the students and the teacher in individual classrooms. These participants contribute to scientific discourse about a specific content area under study. Scientific learning communities, on…

  5. Cell-wall dynamics in growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furchtgott, Leon; Wingreen, Ned; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial cells come in a large variety of shapes, and cell shape plays an important role in the regulation of many biological functions. Cell shape in bacterial cells is dictated by a cell wall composed of peptidoglycan, a polymer made up of long, stiff glycan strands and flexible peptide crosslinks. Although much is understood about the structural properties of peptidoglycan, little is known about the dynamics of cell wall organization in bacterial cells. In particular, during cell growth, how does the bacterial cell wall continuously expand and reorganize while maintaining cell shape? In order to investigate this question quantitatively, we model the cell wall of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli using a simple elastic model, in which glycan and peptide subunits are treated as springs with different spring constants and relaxed lengths. We consider the peptidoglycan network as a single-layered network of these springs under tension due to an internal osmotic pressure. Within this model, we simulate possible hypotheses for cell growth as different combinations of addition of new springs and breakage of old springs.

  6. Connective tissue alteration in abdominal wall hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Yadete, D H; Sørensen, Lars Tue;

    2011-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of abdominal wall hernia formation is complex. Optimal treatment of hernias depends on a full understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in their formation. The aim of this study was to review the literature on specific collagen alterations in abdom...

  7. Tearing Down the Wall: Literature and Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Warren B.; Spell, J. Everett

    1999-01-01

    Suggests English teachers might draw from authors such as Carl Sagan, Arthur C. Clarke, Mary Shelly and others: (1) to knock down the walls that separate science and literature; (2) to show their interrelationship; and (3) to instill enthusiasm for the study of both. (NH)

  8. Gravitation toward Walls among Human Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.; Wheeler, Patricia A.

    1976-01-01

    In two studies, college students (N=34) in a classroom corridor who walked near the wall ("gravitators") were contrasted with those who walked near the center ("non-gravitators"). Gravitators were lower than non-gravitators on Autonomy and Defendence and appeared to be less responsive to other persons. (Author)

  9. China Great Wall Industry Corporation Regrouped

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The ceremony for the regroup of China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC) was held in Beijing on December 27. Leaders and officials from CASC, CASIC,COSTIND, state-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission (SASAC), Ministry of Finance took part in the event. CGWIC was founded in 1980 and appointed as China's exclusive agent for international commercial launch services and satellite cooperation.

  10. Effect of cyanoacrylate treatment of cavity walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Y; Fusayama, T

    1980-04-01

    Cyanoacrylate treatment of the cavity wall for composite resin restoration failed to keep adhesion when set, but the marginal closure improved markedly both in vivo and vitro, even when thermal-cycled. It irritated the pulp slightly only at the beginning. Ethylcyanoacrylate was superior to methylcyanoacrylate in regard to adhesion, leakage and pulp response.

  11. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-08-01

    Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids.A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6-18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors.Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  12. Domain wall partition functions and KP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We observe that the partition function of the six-vertex model on a finite square lattice with domain wall boundary conditions is (a restriction of) a KP τ function and express it as an expectation value of charged free fermions (up to an overall normalization)

  13. Domain wall partition functions and KP

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O; Zuparic, M

    2009-01-01

    We observe that the partition function of the six vertex model on a finite square lattice with domain wall boundary conditions is (a restriction of) a KP tau function and express it as an expectation value of charged free fermions (up to an overall normalization).

  14. Evolution of the Stability Work from Classic Retaining Walls to Mechanically Stabilized Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anghel Stanciu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For the consolidation of soil mass and the construction of the stability works for roads infrastructure it was studied the evolution of these kinds of works from classical retaining walls - common concrete retaining walls, to the utilization in our days of the modern and competitive methods - mechanically stabilized earth walls. Like type of execution the variety of the reinforced soil is given by the utilization of different types of reinforcing inclusions (steel strips, geosynthetics, geogrids or facing (precast concrete panels, dry cast modular blocks, metal sheets and plates, gabions, and wrapped sheets of geosynthetics.

  15. Fast domain wall dynamics in amorphous and nanocrystalline magnetic microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, R., E-mail: rvarga@upjs.sk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54, Kosice (Slovakia); Klein, P.; Richter, K. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54, Kosice (Slovakia); Zhukov, A. [Dept. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. Quimica, UPV/EHU, San Sebastian (Spain); Vazquez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    We have studied the effect of thermal treatment on the domain wall dynamics of FeSiB and FeCoMoB microwires. It was shown that annealing in transversal magnetic field increases the domain wall mobility as well as the domain wall velocity. Annealing under the tensile stress hinders the appearance of the monodomain structure but application of tensile stress leads to the magnetic bistability having the domain wall mobility twice higher that in as-cast state. Further increase of the tensile stress reduces the domain wall mobility but the domain wall velocity increases as a result of the decrease of critical propagation field. Annealing of the FeCoMoB microwire by Joule heating leads to introduction of the circular anisotropy that favors the vortex domain wall. Such treatment increases the domain wall mobility as well as the maximum domain wall velocity.

  16. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  17. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. PMID:26661933

  18. Thermomechanical layout of the NET first wall assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2D-finite element (FE) method is applied for the NET first wall structure to compute the quasi-harmonic steady-state temperature distribution within the wall and to determine the nonlinear elastic stresses under thermomechanical loads. 26 different cases (as proposed) have been investigated for the structure containing plane wall, grooved wall and thin wall concepts, respectively. The wall's support condition and the nonlinear material and thermal parameters are varied. The computations are carried out once with water coolant and then with high pressure helium coolant. The results are documented in this final report. (orig./GG)

  19. Shear-resistant behavior of light composite shear wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李升才; 董毓利

    2015-01-01

    Shear test results for a composite wall panel in a light composite structure system are compared with test results for shear walls in Japan. The analysis results show that this kind of composite wall panel works very well, and can be regarded as a solid panel. The composite wall panel with a hidden frame is essential for bringing its effect on shear resistance into full play. Comprehensive analysis of the shear-resistant behavior of the composite wall panel suggests that the shear of the composite shear wall panel can be controlled by the cracking strength of the web shearing diagonal crack.

  20. Enzymes and other agents that enhance cell wall extensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polysaccharides and proteins are secreted to the inner surface of the growing cell wall, where they assemble into a network that is mechanically strong, yet remains extensible until the cells cease growth. This review focuses on the agents that directly or indirectly enhance the extensibility properties of growing walls. The properties of expansins, endoglucanases, and xyloglucan transglycosylases are reviewed and their postulated roles in modulating wall extensibility are evaluated. A summary model for wall extension is presented, in which expansin is a primary agent of wall extension, whereas endoglucanases, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, and other enzymes that alter wall structure act secondarily to modulate expansin action.

  1. Shear-Resistant Behavior Analysis of Light Composite Shear Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李升才; 江见鲸; 于庆荣

    2002-01-01

    Shear test results for a composite wall panel in a light composite structure system are compared with test results for shear walls in Japan in this paper. The analysis results show that this kind of composite wall panel works very well, and can be regarded as a solid panel. The composite wall panel with a hidden frame is essential for bringing its effect on shear resistance into full play. Comprehensive analysis of the shear-resistant behavior of the composite wall panel suggests that the shear of the composite shear wall panel can be controlled by the cracking strength of the web shearing diagonal crack.

  2. Comparative Study of Adsorption Isotherms of Vitamin C on Multi wall and single wall Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azin Dehmolaei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the interaction of Vitamin C solution on multi-wall and single-wall carbon nanotubeAfter investigated comparative study and assigned to Vitamin C adsorption isotherm. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms were fitted by Freundlich, Langmuir, and Temkin models. It was found that the Langmuirmodel described the adsorption process better than other two isotherm models. The amount of Antioxidant drug(Vitamin C adsorbed on Multi wallcarbon nanotube surface increased with the increase of the initial Antioxidant concentration. Based on the results, under similar conditions the efficiency of adsorption of Vitamin C by Multi-wall carbon nanotube(MWCNTs was more thansingle-wall carbon nanotube.

  3. SimWall: a practical user-friendly stereo tiled display wall system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Li-jun; ZHENG Yao; YANG Ting-jun; GAO Wen-xuan; PAN Ning-he

    2007-01-01

    Sim Wall is a user-friendly, stereo tiled display wall system composed of 18 commodity projectors operated by a Linux graphics cluster. Collaborating together, these projectors work as a single logical display capable of giving a high-resolution show,large-scale, and passive stereo scene. In order to avoid tedious system setup and maintenance, software-based automatic geometry and photometric calibration are used. The software calibration is integrated to the system seamlessly by an on-card transform method and is transparent to users. To end-users, Sim Wall works just as a common PC, but provides super computing, rendering and displaying ability. In addition, Sim Wall has stereoscopic function that gives users a semi-immersive experience in polarized passive way. This paper presents system architecture, implementation, and other technical issues such as hardware constraints,projectors alignment, geometry and photometric calibration, implementation of passive stereo, and development of overall software environment.

  4. Engineering the fusion reactor first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently the National Academy of Engineering published a set of Grand Challenges in Engineering in which the second item listed was entitled 'Provide energy from fusion'. Clearly a key component of this challenge is the science and technology associated with creating and maintaining burning plasmas. This is being vigorously addressed with both magnetic and inertial approaches with various experiments such as ITER and NIF. Considerably less attention is being given to another key component of this challenge, namely engineering the first wall that will contain the burning plasma. This is a daunting problem requiring technologies and materials that can not only survive, but also perform multiple essential functions in this extreme environment. These functions are (1) shield the remainder of the device from radiation. (2) convert of neutron energy to useful heat and (3) breed and extract tritium to maintain the reactor fuel supply. The first wall must not contaminate the plasma with impurities. It must be infused with cooling to maintain acceptable temperatures on plasma facing and structural components. It must not degrade. It must avoid excessive build-up of tritium on surfaces, and, if surface deposits do form, must be receptive to cleaning techniques. All these functions and constraints must be met while being subjected to nuclear and thermal radiation, particle bombardment, high magnetic fields, thermal cycling and occasional impingement of plasma on the surface. And, operating in a nuclear environment, the first wall must be fully maintainable by remotely-operated manipulators. Elements of the first wall challenge have been studied since the 1970' s both in the US and internationally. Considerable foundational work has been performed on plasma facing materials and breeding blanket/shield modules. Work has included neutronics, materials fabrication and joining, fluid flow, tritium breeding, tritium recovery and containment, energy conversion, materials damage and

  5. Increased wall-to-wall curing contraction in thin bonded resin layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feilzer, A J; De Gee, A J; Davidson, C L

    1989-01-01

    Wall-to-wall (WTW) polymerization contraction of filled and unfilled chemically and photo-initiated resins was studied in relation to the WTW distance. In an experimental set-up, the resins were bonded to two opposing disks, and the axial (WTW) displacement resulting from the polymerization shrinkage was measured continuously. It was found that the WTW contraction increased with decreasing WTW distance and ultimately reached a value of almost three times the linear polymerization shrinkage.

  6. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki eYoshida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications.

  7. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  8. Scale resolving computation of submerged wall jets on flat wall with different roughness heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Joongcheol; Bombardelli, Fabian

    2014-11-01

    Scale-adaptive simulation is used to investigate the response of velocity and turbulence in submerged wall jets to abrupt changes from smooth to rough beds. The submerged wall jets were experimentally investigated by Dey and Sarkar [JFM, 556, 337, 2006] at the Reynolds number of 17500 the Froude number of 4.09 and the submergence ratio of 1.12 on different rough beds that were generated by uniform sediments of different median diameters The SAS is carried out by means of a second-order-accurate finite volume method in space and time and the effect of bottom roughness is treated by the approach of Cebeci (2004). The evolution of free surface is captured by employing the two-phase volume of fluid (VOF) technique. The numerical results obtained by the SAS approach, incorporated with the VOF and the rough wall treatment, are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The computed turbulent boundary layer grows more quickly and the depression of the free surface is more increased on the rough wall than those on smooth wall. The size of the fully developed zone shrinks and the decay rate of maximum streamwise velocity and Reynolds stress components are faster with increase in the wall roughness. Supported by NSF and NRF of Korea.

  9. A Novel Technique for Anterior Vaginal Wall Prolapse Repair: Anterior Vaginal Wall Darn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Köse

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study is to introduce a new technique, anterior vaginal wall darn (AVWD, which has not been used before to repair the anterior vaginal wall prolapse, a common problem among women. Materials and Methods. Forty-five women suffering from anterior vaginal wall prolapse were operated on with a new technique. The anterior vaginal wall was detached by sharp and blunt dissection via an incision beginning from the 1 cm proximal aspect of the external meatus extending to the vaginal apex, and the space between the tissues that attach the lateral walls of the vagina to the arcus tendineus fascia pelvis (ATFP was then darned. Preoperation and early postoperation evaluations of the patients were conducted and summarized. Results. Data were collected six months after operation. Cough stress test (CST, Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q evaluation, Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7, and Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6 scores indicated recovery. According to the early postoperation results, all patients were satisfied with the operation. No vaginal mucosal erosion or any other complications were detected. Conclusion. In this initial series, our short-term results suggested that patients with grade II-III anterior vaginal wall prolapsus might be treated successfully with the AVWD method.

  10. Skyrmion domain wall collision and domain wall-gated skyrmion logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Pong, Philip W. T.; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Skyrmions and domain walls are significant spin textures of great technological relevance to magnetic memory and logic applications, where they can be used as carriers of information. The unique topology of skyrmions makes them display emergent dynamical properties as compared with domain walls. Some studies have demonstrated that the two topologically inequivalent magnetic objects could be interconverted by using cleverly designed geometric structures. Here, we numerically address the skyrmion domain wall collision in a magnetic racetrack by introducing relative motion between the two objects based on a specially designed junction. An electric current serves as the driving force that moves a skyrmion toward a trapped domain wall pair. We see different types of collision dynamics depending on the driving parameters. Most importantly, the modulation of skyrmion transport using domain walls is realized in this system, allowing a set of domain wall-gated logical NOT, NAND, and NOR gates to be constructed. This work provides a skyrmion-based spin-logic architecture that is fully compatible with racetrack memories.

  11. A possible formation mechanism of double-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dianrong; Luo, Chenglin; Dai, Yafei; Zhu, Xingfeng

    2016-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations based on an empirical potential were performed to study the interaction of graphene nanoribbons and the single-walled carbon nanotubes. The results indicated that a piece of graphene nanoribbon can form a tube structure inside or outside single-walled carbon nanotubes spontaneously under certain condition. Based on this kind of spontaneous phenomenon, we proposed a new possible formation mechanism of double walled carbon nanotube and multi-walled carbon nanotube, and suggested the possibility of controlling the structure of double-walled carbon nanotube and/or multi-walled carbon nanotube.

  12. Wall current monitor for SPring-8 linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fast rise time, broad band width and wide dynamic range wall current monitor was developed for SPring-8 linac. The performances are a rise time of ∼250ps, an effective impedance of 1.4Ω (output of ∼1.4V/A) and a bandwidth of 18kHz-2GHz. From a result of examination using 40ns electron beam, a significant change of effective impedance was not observed when a peak current was changed up to 12A or when a beam was moved by 8mm in a vacuum pipe. A circuit model that includes a core inductor loop was constructed. Using this model effective impedance and band width were calculated and compared to measured ones. They agreed very well except one part. In consequence the mechanism of wall current monitor can be explained by means of this model. (author)

  13. OBLIQUE SHOCK WAVE REFLECTION FROM THE WALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Regular and Mach (irregular reflection of an oblique shock wave from the wall is considered. Criteria for the transition from regular to irregular reflection are described: von Neumann criterion and the criterion for fixed Mach configuration. Specific incident shock wave intensities corresponding to the two criteria for the transition from regular to irregular reflection were plotted. The area of ambiguity solutions was demonstrated in which both regular and Mach reflection is not prohibited by the conditions of dynamic compatibility. Areas in which the transition from one type of reflection to another is possible only by a shock wave were described, as well as areas of a possible smooth transition. Dependence of the magnitude of this abrupt change in reflected discontinuity intensity from the intensity of the incident shock wave was plotted. Intensity dependences of the reflected discontinuity from the intensity of the shock wave incident on the wall for all types of reflections were shown.

  14. Wave Forces Acting on Vertical Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ben-xia; YU Yu-xiu; YU Xi-ping

    2008-01-01

    Regular and irregular wave forces acting on vertical walls are studied by a previously developed numerical model. The computed wave forces are compared with the available experimental data to verify the numerical model, and satisfactory agreements are obtained. The variation of wave forces with incident angles and the shape of simultaneous pressure distribution are investigated, and the comparisons between numerical results and Goda's predictions are also carried out. It is concluded that the maximum wave forces acting on the unit length of vertical wall is often induced by the obliquely incident waves instead of normally incident waves, while Goda's formula may be inapplicable for oblique wave incidence. The shape of simultaneous pressure distribution is not significantly influenced by incident angles, and it can be favorably predicted by Goda's formula. When regular wave heights are taken as the same as irregular wave height H1%, the irregular wave forces Ph,1% are slightly larger than regular wave forces in most cases.

  15. The Kevlar-walled anechoic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenport, William J.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Borgoltz, Aurelien; Ravetta, Patricio A.; Barone, Matthew F.; Brown, Kenneth A.; Morton, Michael A.

    2013-08-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of an anechoic wind tunnel test section with walls made from thin Kevlar cloth have been measured and analyzed. The Kevlar test section offers some advantages over a conventional free-jet arrangement. The cloth contains the bulk of the flow but permits the transmission of sound with little loss. The containment results in smaller far-field aerodynamic corrections meaning that larger models can be tested at higher Reynolds numbers. The containment also eliminates the need for a jet catcher and allows for a much longer test section. Model-generated noise is thus more easily separated from facility background using beamforming. Measurements and analysis of acoustic and aerodynamic corrections for a Kevlar-walled test section are presented and discussed, along with benchmark trailing edge noise measurements.

  16. ECOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS FOR LOW ENERGY BUILDING WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia COŞEREANU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents constructive solutions for thermal insulation of the building walls, using recycled and biodegradable materials. The thermal insulatingcomposite materials are made of textile fibers obtained from waste of the textile industrial sector, wood fibers and wood chips from the wood industrial sector and mineral materials as binders: gypsum, cement, ceramic dust or industrial clay. For each type of compositematerial, the thermal conductivity coefficient has been determined and compared. The final results of thermal insulation of the walls were obtained after using the software of analyzing the thermal insulation property of various proposed composites. The main advantage of the proposed materials is their ecological characteristic compared with classical structures used today in buildings thermal insulation.

  17. Interactions of tokamak plasma with solid walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactions of tokamak fusion plasmas with solid walls of the devices were investigated on special model systems. The elastic recoil detection method was used for the determination of absolute hydrogen concentration. For the calibration of the method the scattering cross sections were measured in large ranges of scattering angle and energy. The erosion and deformation of wall surfaces were investigated by reemission of accelerated He ions. Theoretical models were developed to describe the surface undulation discovered earlier, caused by large dose He irradiation. The surface sputtering and segregation were investigated by nuclear methods and the mechanism of sputtering was simulated by computer. The surface deformation and gas reemission of Al surfaces were analyzed by Ar implementation and heat treatment. (D.Gy.) 6 figs

  18. Parietal wall endometriosis: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahija Sahu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A 28 year old P2L1 with one previous cesarean presented with cyclical pain in periumblical area just below umbilicus for 1 year with USG finding suggestive of parietal wall endometriosis planned for surgery on her 2nd day of menstruation. She underwent diagnostic laparoscopy with complete excision of endometrioma. Diagnostic laparoscopy showed no evidence of endometrioma in the pelvic cavity except for omental adhesion at parietal wall endometrioma site, adhesiolysis of omentum, mesh repair of rectus sheath defect done. She is followed up for last 3 cycles post-operative and has no cyclical pain further. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 524-526

  19. Advanced technologies for plant cell wall evolution and diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik

    Plant cell walls consist of polysaccharides, glycoproteins and phenolic polymers interlinked together in a highly complex network. The detailed analysis of cell walls is challenging because of their inherent complexity and heterogeneity. Also, complex carbohydrates, unlike proteins and nucleotide...

  20. Alfalfa stem tissues: Cell wall deposition, composition, and degradability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, H.G.; Engels, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Declining cell wall degradability of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stems with maturation limits the nutritional value of alfalfa for ruminants. This study characterized changes in cell wall concentration, composition, and degradability by rumen microbes resulting from alfalfa stem tissue proliferatio

  1. Polarization control at spin-driven ferroelectric domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Naëmi; Bergman, Anders; Cano, Andres; Poudel, Narayan; Lorenz, Bernd; Fiebig, Manfred; Meier, Dennis

    2015-04-01

    Unusual electronic states arise at ferroelectric domain walls due to the local symmetry reduction, strain gradients and electrostatics. This particularly applies to improper ferroelectrics, where the polarization is induced by a structural or magnetic order parameter. Because of the subordinate nature of the polarization, the rigid mechanical and electrostatic boundary conditions that constrain domain walls in proper ferroics are lifted. Here we show that spin-driven ferroelectricity promotes the emergence of charged domain walls. This provides new degrees of flexibility for controlling domain-wall charges in a deterministic and reversible process. We create and position a domain wall by an electric field in Mn0.95Co0.05WO4. With a magnetic field we then rotate the polarization and convert neutral into charged domain walls, while its magnetic properties peg the wall to its location. Using atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations we quantify the polarization changes across the two wall types and highlight their general occurrence.

  2. Lightweight dividing walls : adaptation to temperate climates

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonça, Paulo, ed. lit.; Macieira, Mónica

    2011-01-01

    This paper intends to prove that it is possible to use lightweight membranes on interior partition walls and on external façades, even in housing buildings at temperate climate regions, if their properties are well explored. The few material used, even less than conventional lightweight solutions - the most common is plasterboard with light steel frame structure - allow a lower specific embodied energy and other more favourable environmental impact indicators. Compared to conventional heavywe...

  3. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    OpenAIRE

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be ...

  4. Wall-jet electrode linear sweep voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Compton, Richard G.; Fisher, Adrian C.; Latham, Mark H.; Brett, Christopher M. A.; Brett, Ana Maria C. F. Oliveira

    1992-01-01

    Theory is presented which predicts the linear sweep voltammetry behavior at the wall-jet electrode for a reversible couple. The scan rate and electrode geometry dependences are established, and hence the requirements for the measurement of true “steady state” hydrodynamic voltammograms are defmed. Theory is found to be in good agreement with experiments conducted on the oxidation of the ferrocyanide anion in aqueous solution

  5. Patterns on House Walls in Gyirong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXIANJIONG

    2004-01-01

    Once you have a chance to visit Jingchuan and the Mingjiang River Valley in northwestem Sichuan Province, you will find yourself in a mysterious world:Rivers meander through mountains like hada scarves, snow-capped mountains fill people with mysterious atmosphere, sutra streamers flutter in wind, pillboxes stretch their arms to hug the sky, and there are various kinds of patterns drawn on the walls of villages and mountain rocks.

  6. Crossing Walls to Date Girls in Zhaba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    In Zhaba, whenever a boy falls in love with a girl, no ceremony is necessary. The boy only has to cross the 10-meter-high wall of the girl's house to spend the night with her. Children born in this way are brought up by the mothers; the fathers are exempt from responsibility, but make some efforts in terms of support under obligation. In their own maternal families,males play assisting roles in bringing up their sisters' children.

  7. Plasma-wall interactions in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the status of the design of the divertor and first-wall/shield, the main in-vessel components for ITER. Under nominal ignited conditions, 300 MW of alpha power will be produced and must be removed from the divertor and first-wall. Additional power from auxiliary sources up to the level of 100 MW must also be removed in the case of driven burns. In the ignited case, about 100 MW will be radiated to the first wall as bremsstrahlung. Allowing the remaining power to be conducted to the divertor target plates would result in excessive heat fluxes. The power handling strategy is to radiate an additional 100-150 MW in the SOL and the divertor channel via a combination of radiation from hydrogen, and intrinsic and seeded impurities. Vertical targets have been adopted for the baseline divertor configuration. This geometry promotes partial detachment, as found in present experiments and in the results of modelling runs for ITER conditions, and power densities on the target plates can be ≤5 MW/m2. Such regimes promote relatively high pressure (>1 Pa) in the divertor and even with a low helium enrichment factor of 0.2, the required pumping speed to pump helium is ≤50 m3/s. An important physics question is the quality of core confinement in these attractive divertor regimes. In addition to power and particle handling issues, the effects of disruptions play a major role in the design and performance of in-vessel components. Both centered disruptions and VDE's produce stresses in the first-wall/shield modules, backplate and the divertor wings and cassettes that are near or even somewhat in excess of allowables for normal operation. (orig.)

  8. Hydrogen uptake in vanadium first wall structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonen, E.P.; Jones, R.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Evaluation of hydrogen sources and transport are needed to assess the mechanical integrity of V structures. Two sources include implantation and transmutation. The proposed coatings for the DEMO and ITER first wall strongly influence retention of hydrogen isotopes. Upper limit calculations of hydrogen inventory were based on recycling to the plasma and an impermeable coolant-side coating. Hydrogen isotope concentrations in V approaching 1,000 appm may be activated.

  9. Stent implantation influence wall shear stress evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Bosioc, A. I.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. The impact of flow alterations around struts vary as the strut geometrical parameters change. Our results provide data regarding the hemodynamic parameters for the blood flow in both stenosed and stented coronary artery under physiological conditions, namely wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  10. Preparation of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Bin; WEI Jinquan; CI Lijie; WU Dehai

    2004-01-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared using the floating chemical vapor deposition with methane as carbon source and adding small amount of sulfur into the ferrocene catalyst. The optimized technological parameters are: the reaction temperature is 1200℃; the catalyst vapor temperature is 80℃; the flow rate of argon is 2000 SCCM; the flow rate of methane is 5 SCCM. The purified DWNTs under these optimized technological parameters have high purity above 90 wt%.

  11. Analysis of boronized wall in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boronization has been carried out in some experimental fusion devices as one of wall conditioning Methods. The well-known merits of the boronization are as follows: 1) coated-boron on the first wall has strong gettering function for oxygen impurities and oxygen has been kept into boron films as a boron-oxide and 2) boron film covers first wall with apparently low Z materials facing the plasma. However, an operation scenario of boronization for next generation devices such as ITER is not optimized. In this paper, we discuss an optimized method of coated film uniformity in a wide area and a lifetime of boron film as an oxygen getter using experimental data in the large helical device (LHD). In LHD, boronization by glow discharges has been carried out a few times during each experimental campaign. Helium-diborane mixtured gas is used and plasma facing components (PFM) are stainless steel (SS) for the first wall and carbon for the divertor plates kept in the room temperature. Material probes made of SS316 and Si were installed in the vacuum vessel and exposed during the experimental campaign. Depth profiles of their impurities were analyzed using the X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Two types of gettering process by boron film have been investigated. One is the process during boronization and the other is that after boronization. Concerning a lifetime of boron film, the distribution of oxygen near the top surface region (0 to 20 nm) indicates a process of oxygen gettering, it shows a contribution after boronization. In this paper, these kinds of process using material probes are shown. (authors)

  12. Time-Dependent Dilatonic Domain Walls

    CERN Document Server

    La, H S

    1992-01-01

    Time-dependent domain wall solutions with infinitesimal thickness are obtained in the theory of a scalar field coupled to gravity with the dilaton, i.e. the Jordan-Brans-Dicke gravity. The value of the dilaton is determined in terms of the Brans-Dicke parameter $\\omega$. In particular, the solutions exist for any $\\omega>0$ and as $\\omega\\to\\infty$ we obtain new solutions in general relativity. They have horizons whose sizes depend on $\\omega$.

  13. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beavers, J.E. [MS Technology, Inc. (United States)

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  14. Primary Burkitt Lymphoma of the Chest Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Rommel Lu

    2012-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) originating in the skin and soft tissue at any site is exceedingly rare. This paper is about a case of primary sporadic BL that presented as an isolated, rapidly enlarging chest wall mass arising from skin and/or soft tissue in an adult. As with other BL presentations, this patient was treated with aggressive chemotherapy with central nervous system (CNS) chemoprophylaxis, but he later died because of sepsis.

  15. Primary Burkitt Lymphoma of the Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkitt lymphoma (BL originating in the skin and soft tissue at any site is exceedingly rare. This paper is about a case of primary sporadic BL that presented as an isolated, rapidly enlarging chest wall mass arising from skin and/or soft tissue in an adult. As with other BL presentations, this patient was treated with aggressive chemotherapy with central nervous system (CNS chemoprophylaxis, but he later died because of sepsis.

  16. Jeff Wall: Works and Collected Writings

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Some of the carefully staged and composed images here are digitally altered, and almost all of them were originally displayed in backlit boxes. If those strategies sound familiar, you can thank Jeff Wall, born in Vancouver in 1946 and widely recognized as one of the most adventurous and inventive artists of his generation. For more than 20 years, his outstanding pioneering work has contributed significantly to placing the medium of photography in the midst of contemporary art. He uses it to e...

  17. Innovative masonry blocks for partition walls

    OpenAIRE

    Vasconcelos, Graça; Poletti, Elisa; Medeiros, Pedro; Mendonça, Paulo; Carvalho, Pedro; Cunha, Sandra Raquel Leite; Camões, Aires; Lourenço, Paulo B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper intends to propose a non structural system of partition walls with monolithic blocks based on a composite material resulting from an admixture of cork and textile fibers combined with a non cement binder, gypsum. These blocks consist of two half blocks which have to be connected during laying process. The developed blocks were first tested under compressive and flexural loading in order to derive their mechanical behaviour. Different curing conditions were applied to the blocks dur...

  18. Reconstruction of chest, abdominal walls and perineum

    OpenAIRE

    Vijaykumar D; Vijayaraghavan Sundeep

    2007-01-01

    The structural integrity of the chest and abdominal walls and perineum is frequently altered by cancer extirpation. Advances in reconstructive surgery and the availability of innovative techniques have helped the cancer surgeon to proceed with radical excisions with minimum morbidity. The ability to harvest flaps from distant sites and the availability of good prosthetic materials have now become part of the routine armamentarium of the plastic surgeon engaged in reconstructive surgery of the...

  19. Superheater Tube Flat Wall Stationary Temperature Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parpiev A.T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The BKZ-220-100-9 steam generator platen superheater tube flat wall stationary temperature fields analysis have been made. The six steel grades, using in boiler fabrication, namely, St. 10, St. 20, 12H1MF, 15HM, 1H18N9T and 12H18N12T, have been used. The temperature curves calculation has been made by using outer and inner surface heat-transfer coefficients nine different combinations.

  20. Soft wall model for a holographic superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Afonin, S S

    2015-01-01

    We apply the soft wall holographic model from hadron physics to a description of the high-$T_c$ superconductivity. In comparison with the existing bottom-up holographic superconductors, the proposed approach is more phenomenological. On the other hand, it is much simpler and has more freedom for fitting the conductivity properties of the real high-$T_c$ materials. We demonstrate some examples of emerging models and discuss a possible origin of the approach.

  1. An invisible wall put up by ghosts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>When I was a child, my grandmother would often tell me ghost stories. One of them was about an invisible wall that had been put up by ghosts.It was a winter night that was getting darker and darker, colder and colder. A lone farmer was driving his horse and cart along a country path. As he was getting close to his village, he could see the cemetery with the myriad tombs on both sides

  2. Anisotropic behaviour of human gallbladder walls

    OpenAIRE

    W.G. Li; Hill, N. A.; Ogden, R W; Smythe, A; Majeed, A.W.; Bird, N.; Luo, X. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Inverse estimation of biomechanical parameters of soft tissues from non-invasive measurements has clinical significance in patient-specific modelling and disease diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a fully nonlinear approach to estimate the mechanical properties of the human gallbladder wall muscles from in vivo ultrasound images. The iteration method consists of a forward approach, in which the constitutive equation is based on a modified Hozapfel–Gasser–Ogden law initially developed for ar...

  3. Developing innovative systems for reinforced masonry walls

    OpenAIRE

    Mosele, F.; Porto, F. da; Modena, C.; Fusco, A. di; Cesare, G. di; Vasconcelos, Graça; Haach, V.; Lourenço, Paulo B.; Beer, I; Schmidt, U.; Brameshuber, W.; Scheufler, W.; Schermer, D. C.; Zilch, K.

    2006-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities has recently funded a CRAFT research project aimed at developing innovative systems for load and non-load-bearing reinforced masonry walls. The project involves twelve partners coming from four different European countries, among which there are universities and research centres, small and medium enterprises for the production of clay and concrete units and mortars, a company for advanced metal products and industrial associations of brick and block ...

  4. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties—all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts. PMID:27330220

  5. Domain wall motion in ferroelectrics: Barkhausen noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, V.; Rumyantsev, E.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Nikolaeva, E.; Shishkin, E.

    2002-03-01

    The switching current noise has been recorded during polarization reversal in single-crystalline gadolinium molybdate (GMO) and lithium tantalate (LT). Analysis of Barkhausen noise (BN) data allows to classify the noise types by determination of the critical indexes and fractal dimensions. BN is manifested as the short pulses during the polarization reversal. We have analyzed the BN data recorded in GMO and LT with various types of controlled domain structure. The data treatment in terms of probability distribution of duration, area and energy of individual pulses reveals the critical behavior typical for the fractal records in time. We used the Fourier transform and Hurst's rescaled range analysis for obtaining the Hurst factor, fractal dimension and classifying the noise types. We investigated by computer simulation the mechanism of sideways motion of 180O domain wall by nucleation at the wall taking into account the nuclei-nuclei interaction. It was shown that the moving domain walls display the fractal shape and their motion is accompanied by Flicker noise, which is in accord with experimental data. The research was made possible in part by Programs "Basic Research in Russian Universities" and "Priority Research in High School. Electronics", by Grant No. 01-02-17443 of RFBR, by Award No.REC-005 of CRDF.

  6. BPS domain walls from backreacted orientifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Blåbäck, Johan; Van Riet, Thomas; Vercnocke, Bert

    2013-01-01

    Compactifications with D-brane and orientifold sources lead to standard gauged supergravity theories if the sources are smeared over the internal directions. It is therefore of interest to find how the solutions described by the gauged supergravity are altered by properly localising the sources. In this paper we analyse this for BPS domain wall solutions in the seven-dimensional gauged supergravity obtained from an O6 toroidal orientifold compactification in massive IIA supergravity. This is one of the simplest no-scale supergravities that can be constructed and analysed in full detail. We find and discuss the BPS domain walls both when the O6 planes are smeared and localised. When the O6 planes are localised the domain wall solutions live in a warped compactification. In order to get explicit expressions we also consider the non-compact versions of the solutions for which the O6 planes have been traded for D6 branes. Through T-duality we obtain partially localised solutions for compactifications to four dime...

  7. Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharide Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ajay Pal S. Sandhu; Gursharn S. Randhawa; Kanwarpal S. Dhugga

    2009-01-01

    The wall of an expanding plant cell consists primarily of cellulose microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemi-cellulosic and pectic polysaccharides along with small amounts of structural and enzymatic proteins. Matrix polysacchar-ides are synthesized in the Golgi and exported to the cell wall by exocytosis, where they intercalate among cellulose microfibrUs, which are made at the plasma membrane and directly deposited into the cell wall. Involvement of Golgi glucan synthesis in auxin-induced cell expansion has long been recognized; however, only recently have the genes corresponding to glucan synthases been identified. Biochemical purification was unsuccessful because of the labile nature and very low abundance of these enzymes. Mutational genetics also proved fruitless. Expression of candidate genes identified through gene expression profiling or comparative genomics in heterologous systems followed by functional characterization has been relatively successful. Several genes from the cellulose synthase-like (Cs/) family have been found to be involved in the synthesis of various hemicellulosic glycans. The usefulness of this approach, however, is limited to those enzymes that probably do not form complexes consisting of unrelated proteins. Nonconventional approaches will continue to incre-mentally unravel the mechanisms of Golgi polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  8. Resistive Wall Wakefield in the LCLS Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Bane, Karl Leopold Freitag

    2005-01-01

    In the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a short, intense bunch (rms length 20 microns, bunch charge 1 nC) will pass through a small, long undulator beam pipe (radius 2.5 mm, length 130 m). The wakefields in the undulator, particularly the resistive wall wake of the beam pipe, will induce an energy variation along the bunch, a variation that needs to be kept to within a few times the Pierce parameter for all beam particles to continue to lase. Earlier calculations included the short-range resistive wall wake, but did not include the frequency dependence of conductivity (ac conductivity) of the beam pipe walls. We show that for copper and for the LCLS bunch structure, including the ac conductivity results in a very large effect. We show that the effect can be ameliorated by choosing aluminum and also by taking a flat, rather than round, beam pipe chamber (if the vertical aperture is fixed). The effect of the (high frequency) anomalous skin effect is also considered.

  9. Space-time characteristics of wall-pressure and wall shear-stress fluctuations in wall-modeled large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Moin, Parviz

    2016-06-01

    We report the space-time characteristics of the wall-pressure fluctuations and wall shear-stress fluctuations from wall-modeled large eddy simulation (WMLES) of a turbulent channel flow at Reτ=2000 . Two standard zonal wall models (equilibrium stress model and nonequilibrium model based on unsteady RANS) are employed, and it is shown that they yield similar results in predicting these quantities. The wall-pressure and wall shear-stress fields from WMLES are analyzed in terms of their r.m.s. fluctuations, spectra, two-point correlations, and convection velocities. It is demonstrated that the resolution requirement for predicting the wall-pressure fluctuations is more stringent than that for predicting the velocity. At least δ /Δ x >20 and δ /Δ z >30 are required to marginally resolve the integral length scales of the pressure-producing eddies near the wall. Otherwise, the pressure field is potentially aliased. Spurious high wave number modes dominate in the streamwise direction, and they contaminate the pressure spectra leading to significant overprediction of the second-order pressure statistics. When these conditions are met, the pressure statistics and spectra at low wave number or low frequency agree well with the DNS and experimental data. On the contrary, the wall shear-stress fluctuations, modeled entirely through the RANS-based wall models, are largely underpredicted and relatively insensitive to the grid resolution. The short-time, small-scale near-wall eddies, which are neither resolved nor modeled adequately in the wall models, seem to be important for accurate prediction of the wall shear-stress fluctuations.

  10. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  11. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transpor...

  12. Fluorescent tags to explore cell wall structure and dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Martine eGonneau; Herman eHöfte; Samantha eVernhettes

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are highly dynamic and heterogeneic structures, which vary between celltypes, growth stages but also between microdomains within a single cell wall. In this review, we summarize the imaging techniques using fluorescent tags that are currently being used and which should in the coming years revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics of cell wall architecture and the cellular processes involved in synthesis of cell wall components.

  13. Fluorescent tags to explore cell wall structure and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gonneau, Martine; Höfte, Herman; Vernhettes, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are highly dynamic and heterogeneous structures, which vary between cell types, growth stages but also between microdomains within a single cell wall. In this review, we summarize the imaging techniques using fluorescent tags that are currently being used and which should in the coming years revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics of cell wall architecture and the cellular processes involved in the synthesis of cell wall components.

  14. Entropy production by domain wall decay in the NMSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Hironori; Omoto, Naoya; Seto, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We consider domain walls in the $Z_3$ symmetric NMSSM. The spontaneous $Z_3$ discrete symmetry breaking produces domain walls, and the stable domain walls are problematic. Thus, we assume the $Z_3$ symmetry is slightly but explicitly broken and the domain walls decay. Such a decay causes a large late-time entropy production. We study its cosmological implications on unwanted relics such as moduli, gravitino, LSP and axion.

  15. Life-cycle assessment of lightweight textile membrane partition walls

    OpenAIRE

    Neiva, Sara Daniela Oliveira; Mateus, Ricardo; Macieira, Mónica; Mendonça, Paulo, ed. lit.; Bragança, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyze the environmental, functional and economical performances of some conceptual lightweights textiles membranes partitions walls and to compare one of them with two technologies present in Portuguese market: i) the heavyweight conventional hollow brick partition wall; and ii) the lightweight reference plasterboard partition wall. Advantages of use textile/ fibrous/ membrane based materials in partition walls are focused and they may contribute for the development of new partit...

  16. Stability of spiral welded tubes in Quay Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Gresnigt, A. M.; van Es, S.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    A European research project (RFCS) has started to provide economic and safe guidance for the design of spirally welded tubes in combined walls. The main motivation for this project called COMBITUBE is that the current Eurocode 3 regulations for tubes in quay walls lead to uneconomic designs, because of poor local buckling design rules for these tubes. Because the most important load in quay walls is bending due to earth load, economic design implies a high diameter to wall thickness ratio. Fo...

  17. The normal growth of the tracheal wall in human foetuses

    OpenAIRE

    Szpinda, Michał; Daroszewski, Marcin; Szpinda, Anna; Woźniak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Flisiński, Piotr; Wiśniewski, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal wall thickness is a substantial indicator in various pathological changes. The present study was performed to compile normative data and formulae for the tracheal wall thickness and volume at varying gestational age. Material and methods Using anatomical dissection, digital image analysis and statistics a range of the wall thickness, proximal internal-to-external cross-sectional area ratio, and wall volume for the trachea in 73 spontaneously aborted human fetuses aged 14...

  18. Hamilton-Jacobi method for Domain Walls and Cosmologies

    OpenAIRE

    Skenderis, Kostas; Townsend, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    We use Hamiltonian methods to study curved domain walls and cosmologies. This leads naturally to first order equations for all domain walls and cosmologies foliated by slices of maximal symmetry. For Minkowski and AdS-sliced domain walls (flat and closed FLRW cosmologies) we recover a recent result concerning their (pseudo)supersymmetry. We show how domain-wall stability is consistent with the instability of adS vacua that violate the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We also explore the relation...

  19. The effect of wall friction on magnetohydrodynamic generator performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of wall friction on magnetohydrodynamic generator performance is determined by introduction of a wall friction factor into the one-dimensional generator equations. This addition should be useful in improving generator analysis and determining optimum generator geometry. The curves presented can be used to determine the effects of changes in wall friction and generator performance. Wall friction has an increasing effect on the Mach number increases and a decreasing effect as the pressure drop across the generator increase.

  20. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist, and reducing the amount of wood penetrating the wall cavity.

  1. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    OpenAIRE

    van der Kolk, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging characteristics of intracranial vessel wall pathology in vivo, and distinguishing different vessel wall pathologies remains difficult. In this thesis, several 7.0 tesla MRI sequences – first with small ...

  2. Forced convection along a wall. Liquid metals application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the experimental results in pipes, heated with constant wall heat flux, the dynamical and thermal structure of the wall region of a turbulent flow is studied. We can show that, for high values of Reynolds and Peclet numbers, logarithmic profiles of velocity and temperature exist. A continuous description of the wall is obtained with the use of simple modelisation. The study of the thermal wall region structure is then made in the case of a liquid metal flow

  3. Bio-based composites that mimic the plant cell wall

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhuo

    2009-01-01

    Nature creates high performance materials under modest conditions, i.e., neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressure. One of the most significant materials is the plant cell wall. The plant cell wall is a composite of oriented cellulose microfibrils reinforcing a lignin/hemicellulose matrix. In principle, the plant cell wall composite is designed much like a synthetic fiber-reinforced polymer composite. Unlike synthetic composites, the plant cell wall has an excellent combination of h...

  4. Domain Wall Mobility in Co-Based Amorphous Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kladivova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of the domain wall between opposite circularly magnetized domains in amorphous cylindrical sample with circular easy direction is theoretically studied. The wall is driven by DC current. Various mechanisms which influence the wall velocity were taken into account: current magnitude, deformation of the mowing wall, Hall effect, axially magnetized domain in the middle of the wire. Theoretical results obtained are in a good agreement with experiments on Cobased amorphous ferromagnetic wires.

  5. Skyrmions and domain walls in (2+1) dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Kudryavtsev, A.; Piette, B.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    We study classical solutions of the vector O(3) sigma model in (2+1) dimensions, spontaneously broken to O(2)xZ2. The model possesses Skyrmion-type solutions as well as stable domain walls which connect different vacua. We show that different types of waves can propagate on the wall, including waves carrying a topological charge. The domain wall can also absorb Skyrmions and, under appropriate initial conditions, it is possible to emit a Skyrmion from the wall.

  6. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  7. 30 CFR 56.3130 - Wall, bank, and slope stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wall, bank, and slope stability. 56.3130... Mining Methods § 56.3130 Wall, bank, and slope stability. Mining methods shall be used that will maintain wall, bank, and slope stability in places where persons work or travel in performing their...

  8. The Berlin Wall: A Simulation for the Social Studies Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, William B., III

    2010-01-01

    November 9, 2009, marked the twentieth anniversary of the opening of the Berlin Wall. The Wall, a symbol of the Cold War, separated the German people for 28 years (1961-1989), keeping those on the East side isolated. Although the construction and dismantling of the Berlin Wall is a significant part of history, the topic is little covered in the…

  9. Abdominal wall paresis as a complication of laparoscopic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.H. van Ramshorst (Gabrielle); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); J.J. Hermans (John); T. Terkivatan (Türkan); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Abdominal wall nerve injury as a result of trocar placement for laparoscopic surgery is rare. We intend to discuss causes of abdominal wall paresis as well as relevant anatomy. Methods: A review of the nerve supply of the abdominal wall is illustrated with a rare case of a patie

  10. 30 CFR 56.3131 - Pit or quarry wall perimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pit or quarry wall perimeter. 56.3131 Section... Mining Methods § 56.3131 Pit or quarry wall perimeter. In places where persons work or travel in... stripped back for at least 10 feet from the top of the pit or quarry wall. Other conditions at or near...

  11. Experimental Assessment of Mechanical Night Ventilation on Inner Wall Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenhui, Ji; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Wang, Houhua;

    2016-01-01

    The cooling potential of night ventilation largely depends on the heat exchange at the internal room surfaces. During night time, increased heat transfer on a vertical wall is expected due to cool supply air that flows along the internal wall surface from the top of the wall. This paper presents ...

  12. CELL-WALL GROWTH AND PROTEIN SECRETION IN FUNGI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIETSMA, JH; WOSTEN, HAB; WESSELS, JGH

    1995-01-01

    Secretion of proteins is a vital process in fungi. Because hyphal walls form a diffusion barrier for proteins, a mechanism different from diffusion probably exist to transport proteins across the wall. In Schizophyllum commune, evidence has been obtained for synthesis at the hyphal apex of wall comp

  13. Seismic behavior of semi-supported steel shear walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahanpour, A.; Jönsson, J.; Moharrami, H.

    2012-01-01

    During the recent past decade semi-supported steel shear walls (SSSW) have been introduced as an alternative to the traditional type of steel plate shear walls. In this system the shear wall does not connect directly to the main columns of the building frame; instead it is connected to a pair...

  14. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  15. HVI Ballistic Performance Characterization of Non-Parallel Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, William; Miller, Joshua; Christiansen, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The Double-Wall, "Whipple" Shield [1] has been the subject of many hypervelocity impact studies and has proven to be an effective shield system for Micro-Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) impacts for spacecraft. The US modules of the International Space Station (ISS), with their "bumper shields" offset from their pressure holding rear walls provide good examples of effective on-orbit use of the double wall shield. The concentric cylinder shield configuration with its large radius of curvature relative to separation distance is easily and effectively represented for testing and analysis as a system of two parallel plates. The parallel plate double wall configuration has been heavily tested and characterized for shield performance for normal and oblique impacts for the ISS and other programs. The double wall shield and principally similar Stuffed Whipple Shield are very common shield types for MMOD protection. However, in some locations with many spacecraft designs, the rear wall cannot be modeled as being parallel or concentric with the outer bumper wall. As represented in Figure 1, there is an included angle between the two walls. And, with a cylindrical outer wall, the effective included angle constantly changes. This complicates assessment of critical spacecraft components located within outer spacecraft walls when using software tools such as NASA's BumperII. In addition, the validity of the risk assessment comes into question when using the standard double wall shield equations, especially since verification testing of every set of double wall included angles is impossible.

  16. Utilities:Other:The Retaining Wall (non-historic) at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (Utilities.gdb:Other:wall)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents the retaining wall (non-historic) at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The wall was collected by a Trimble GeoXT GPS unit with...

  17. Silicon carbide at nanoscale: Finite single-walled to "infinite" multi-walled tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kapil

    A systematic ab initio study of silicon carbide (SiC) nanostructures, especially finite single-walled, infinite double- and multi-walled nanotubes and nanocones is presented. Electronic and structural properties of all these nanostructures have been calculated using hybrid density functionals (B3LYP and PBE0) as implemented in the GAUSSIAN 03/09 suite of software. The unusual dependence of band gap of silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNT) has been explained as a direct consequence of curvature effect on the ionicity of the bonds. The study of fullerene hemisphere capped, finite SiC nanotubes indicates that the carbon-capped SiC nanotubes are energetically more preferred than silicon-capped finite or hydrogen terminated infinite nanotubes. Capping a nanotube by fullerene hemisphere reduces its band gap. SiC nanocones have also been investigated as possible cap structures of nanotubes. Electronic properties of the nanocones are found to be strongly dependent upon their tip and edge structures, with possible interesting applications in surface science. Three types of double-walled SiCNTs (n, n)@(m, m) (3 ≤ n ≤ 6 ; 7 ≤ m ≤ 12) have been studied using the finite cluster approximation. The stabilities of these nanotubes are of the same order as those of the single-walled SiC nanotubes and it should be experimentally possible to synthesize both single-walled and double-walled SiC nanotubes. The binding energy per atom or the cohesive energy of the double-walled nanotubes depends not only on the number of atoms but also on the coupling of the constituent single-walled nanotubes and their types. A study of binding energies, Mulliken charges, density of states and HOMO-LUMO gaps has been performed for all nanotubes from (n, n)@(n+3,n+3) to (n, n)@(n+6, n+6) (n=3-6). Evolution of band gaps of the SiCNTs with increase in the number of walls has also been investigated. The nature of interaction between transition metal atoms and silicon carbide nanotubes with different

  18. Electromagnetic thin-wall model for simulations of plasma wall-touching kink and vertical modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Atanasiu, Calin V.; Lackner, Karl; Hoelzl, Matthias; Strumberger, Erika

    2015-12-01

    > The understanding of plasma disruptions in tokamaks and predictions of their effects require realistic simulations of electric current excitation in three-dimensional vessel structures by the plasma touching the walls. As discovered at JET in 1996 (Litunovski JET Internal Report contract no. JQ5/11961, 1995; Noll et al., Proceedings of the 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology, Lisbon (ed. C. Varandas & F. Serra), vol. 1, 1996, p. 751. Elsevier) the wall-touching kink modes are frequently excited during vertical displacement events and cause large sideways forces on the vacuum vessel which are difficult to withstand in large tokamaks. In disruptions, the sharing of electric current between the plasma and the wall plays an important role in plasma dynamics and determines the amplitude and localization of the sideways force (Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 40, 2000, p. 1805; Riccardo & Walker, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, vol. 42, 2000, p. 29; Zakharov, Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 062507; Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 49, 2009, 055012; Bachmann et al., Fusion Engng Des., vol. 86, 2011, pp. 1915-1919). This paper describes a flat triangle representation of the electric circuits of a thin conducting wall of arbitrary three-dimensional geometry. Implemented into the shell simulation code (SHL) and the source sink current code (SSC), this model is suitable for modelling the electric currents excited in the wall inductively and through current sharing with the plasma.

  19. Influence of orifice-to-wall distance on synthetic jet vortex ring simpinging on a fixed wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Yang; FENG; LiHao

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to investigate the influence of the orifice-to-wall distance on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging on a fixed wall. Both evolutions of vortical structures and statistical characteristics of flow fields at different orifice-to-wall distances are presented. It is found that different orifice-to-wall distances have different effects in terms of the vortex strength and impinging speed when the vortex rings are approaching the wall. The secondary vortex ring can be observed within the shear layer only when the dimensionless orifice-to-wall distance is close to or less than the dimensionless stroke length. Consequently, an appropriate orifice-to-wall distance plays a vital role in the sense of impingement effect. The statistical analysis of the flow field indicates that a wall jet forms after impingement, while both the decay rate of the maximum radial velocity and the spreading rate of the half-width decrease with the increasing orifice-to-wall distance. The non-dimensional wall jet velocity profiles at different orifice-to-wall distances all exhibit self-similar behaviors, which is consistent with the theoretical solution of the laminar wall jet.

  20. Fermentation of the endosperm cell walls of monocotyledon and dicotyledon plant species: The relationship between cell wall characteristics and fermentability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van H.; Tamminga, S.; Williams, B.A.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2000-01-01

    Cell walls from the endosperm of four monocotyledons (maize, wheat, rye, and rice) and four dicotyledons (soya bean, lupin, faba bean, and pea) seeds were studied to relate cell wall composition and structure with fermentation characteristics. Cell wall material was isolated from the endosperm of th

  1. High Reynolds number liquid layer flow with flexible walls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J S B Gajjar

    2015-05-01

    The stability of liquid layer flow over an inclined flexible wall is studied using asymptotic methods based on the assumption that the Reynolds number is large. The flexible wall behaviour is described by a spring-plate model, and parameters chosen so that the wall flexibility affects the governing boundary layer problem. For the case of a rigid wall, the problem reverts to one studied by Gajjar. Asymptotic analysis of the governing equations leads to the triple-deck equations governing the interaction between the wall layer and the free-surface. The linearised and other solution properties of these set of equations are discussed.

  2. Curvature Effect on Compressible Turbulent Flow over a Wavy Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-Bo; LU Xi-Yun

    2007-01-01

    @@ A fully developed compressible turbulent flow in a channel with a lower wavy wall and a upper plane wall is studied using large eddy simulation. We mainly attempt to deal with the curvature effect on compressible turbulent flow over the wavy wall. Some typical quantities including the mean turbulence statistics, dilatation and baroclinic terms in the enstrophy equation, turbulent kinetic energy budgets and the near-wall turbulent structures are analysed. The results obtained in this study provide physical insight into the understanding of the effects of curvature and compressibility on wall-bounded compressible turbulent flow.

  3. Cell wall integrity signaling and innate immunity in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Nühse, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    All plant pathogens and parasites have had to develop strategies to overcome cell walls in order to access the host’s cytoplasm. As a mechanically strong, multi-layered composite exoskeleton, the cell wall not only enables plants to grow tall but also protects them from such attacks. Many plant pathogens employ an arsenal of cell wall degrading enzymes, and it has long been thought that the detection of breaches in wall integrity contributes to the induction of defense. Cell wall fragments ar...

  4. Drawing Recognition for Automatic Dimensioning of Shear-Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任爱珠; 喻强; 许云

    2002-01-01

    In computer-aided structural design, the drawing of shear-walls cannot be easily automated; however, dimensioning of the shear-walls provides a method to automate the drawing. This paper presents a drawing recognition method for automatic dimensioning of shear-walls. The regional relationship method includes a graphic shape template library that can learn new shear-wall shapes. The automatic dimensioning of shear-walls is then realized by matching the templates. The regional relationship method for graph recognition effectively describes the topological relationships for graphs to significantly increase the recognition efficiency.

  5. Review:Resuspension of wall deposits in spray dryers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Wall deposition occurs in spray dryers when dried or partially dried particles contact and adhere to the walls during operation, thus reducing the yield of product collected. Wall deposits also present a product contamination risk and a fire or explosion risk when spray drying products that oxidize exothermically, such as milk powder. Re-entrainment is the resuspension of spray dryer wall deposits into the main gas stream for collection as product. Literature suggests that the process for re-entrainment of particles from spray dryer wall deposits is strongly dependent on particle size and gas velocity.

  6. Vibrations in High Speed Milling of Thin-walled Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tongyue; HE Ning; LI Liang

    2006-01-01

    Thin-walled structures have been widely used in the aerospace industry. The dynamic interaction between the milling cutter and thin-walled workpiece can easily lead to vibration. This paper investigates the vibration caused during milling the thin-walled workpiece on the NC machining center, presents a theoretical milling vibration model of thin-walled beam. The model was verified by using milling experiments and numerical simulations. Some valuable conclusions are derived, this will be references to scientific research and guides to the vibration-free milling of thin-walled structures at different cutting speeds.

  7. Influence of the wall on the droplet evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura S. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaporative influence of the wall material and its thickness has been investigated in the present study. The wall influence for heat exchangers is particularly important in the boiling transition regime and in the event of the Leidenfrost temperature. The experimental points significantly diverge in the transition area of the boiling crisis. This fact can be explained by a different residence time of droplet on the wall surface. The discrepancy between the experimental data also takes place at the Leidenfrost temperature. The lower the thermal diffusivity of the wall material (high thermal inertia, the more the wall is cooled under a droplet.

  8. Wind Tunnel Wall Interference Assessment and Correction, 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, P. A. (Editor); Barnwell, R. W. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Technical information focused upon emerging wall interference assessment/correction (WIAC) techniques applicable to transonic wind tunnels with conventional and passively or partially adapted walls is given. The possibility of improving the assessment and correction of data taken in conventional transonic wind tunnels by utilizing simultaneously obtained flow field data (generally taken near the walls) appears to offer a larger, nearer-term payoff than the fully adaptive wall concept. Development of WIAC procedures continues, and aspects related to validating the concept need to be addressed. Thus, the scope of wall interference topics discussed was somewhat limited.

  9. The Layer Cake Walls of Valles Marineris

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This image of the northern wall of Coprates Chasma, in Valles Marineris, was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 1227 UTC (8:27 a.m. EDT) on June 16, 2007, near 13.99 degrees south latitude, 303.09 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across. The region covered is just over 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point. Valles Marineris is a large canyon system straddling Mars' equator, with a total size approximating the Mediterranean Sea emptied of water. It is subdivided into several interconnected 'chasmata' each hundreds of kilometers wide and, in some cases, thousands of kilometers long. The walls of several of the chasmata, including Coprates Chasma, expose a section of Mars' upper crust about 5 kilometers (3 miles) in depth. Exposures like these show the layers of rock that record the formation of Mars' crust over geologic time, much as the walls of the Grand Canyon on Earth show part of our planet's history. The upper panel of this montage shows the location of the CRISM image on a mosaic from the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), taken in longer infrared wavelengths than measured by CRISM. The CRISM image samples the base of Coprates Chasma's wall, including a conspicuous horizontal band that continues along the wall for tens of kilometers to the east and west, and a topographic shelf just above that. The middle two panels show the CRISM image in visible and infrared light. In the middle left panel, the red, green, and blue image planes show brightness at 0.59, 0.53, and 0.48 microns, similar to what the human eye would see. Color variations are subdued by the presence of dust on all exposed surfaces. In the middle right panel, the red, green, and blue image planes show brightness at 2.53, 1.51, and 1.08 microns. These three infrared wavelengths are the 'usual' set

  10. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    Domain structures in magnetic materials are ubiquitous and have been studied for decades. The walls that separate them are topological defects in the magnetic order parameter and have a wide variety of complex forms. In general, their investigation is difficult in bulk materials since only the domain structure on the surface of a specimen is visible. Cutting the sample to reveal the interior causes a rearrangement of the domains into a new form. As with many other areas of magnetism, the study of domain wall physics has been revitalised by the advent of nanotechnology. The ability to fabricate nanoscale structures has permitted the formation of simplified and controlled domain patterns; the development of advanced microscopy methods has permitted them to be imaged and then modelled; subjecting them to ultrashort field and current pulses has permitted their dynamics to be explored. The latest results from all of these advances are described in this special issue. Not only has this led to results of great scientific beauty, but also to concepts of great applicability to future information technologies. In this issue the reader will find the latest results for these domain wall dynamics and the high-speed processes of topological structures such as domain walls and magnetic vortices. These dynamics can be driven by the application of magnetic fields, or by flowing currents through spintronic devices using the novel physics of spin-transfer torque. This complexity has been studied using a wide variety of experimental techniques at the edge of the spatial and temporal resolution currently available, and can be described using sophisticated analytical theory and computational modelling. As a result, the dynamics can be engineered to give rise to finely controlled memory and logic devices with new functionality. Moreover, the field is moving to study not only the conventional transition metal ferromagnets, but also complex heterostructures, novel magnets and even other

  11. Up against the wall: is yeast cell wall integrity ensured by mechanosensing in plasma membrane microdomains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Dufrêne, Yves F; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling serves as a model of the regulation of fungal cell wall synthesis and provides the basis for the development of antifungal drugs. A set of five membrane-spanning sensors (Wsc1 to Wsc3, Mid2, and Mtl1) detect cell surface stress and commence the signaling pathway upon perturbations of either the cell wall structure or the plasma membrane. We here summarize the latest advances in the structure/function relationship primarily of the Wsc1 sensor and critically review the evidence that it acts as a mechanosensor. The relevance and physiological significance of the information obtained for the function of the other CWI sensors, as well as expected future developments, are discussed.

  12. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  13. Experiment and Simulation Study on the Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaic Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on comparative study on two amorphous silicon photovoltaic walls (a-Si PV walls, the temperature distribution and the instant power were tested; and with EnergyPlus software, similar models of the walls were built to simulate annual power generation and air conditioning load. On typical sunshine day, the corresponding position temperature of nonventilated PV wall was generally 0.5~1.5°C higher than that of ventilated one, while the power generation was 0.2%~0.4% lower, which was consistent with the simulation results with a difference of 0.41% in annual energy output. As simulation results, in summer, comparing the PV walls with normal wall, the heat per unit area of these two photovoltaic walls was 5.25 kWh/m2 (nonventilated and 0.67 kWh/m2 (ventilated higher, respectively. But in winter the heat loss of nonventilated one was smaller, while ventilated PV wall was similar to normal wall. To annual energy consumption of heating and cooling, the building with ventilated PV wall and normal wall was also similar but slightly better than nonventilated one. Therefore, it is inferred that, at low latitudes, such as Zhuhai, China, air gap ventilation is suitable, while the length to thickness ratio of the air gap needs to be taken into account.

  14. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  15. Assembly and enlargement of the primary cell wall in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Growing plant cells are shaped by an extensible wall that is a complex amalgam of cellulose microfibrils bonded noncovalently to a matrix of hemicelluloses, pectins, and structural proteins. Cellulose is synthesized by complexes in the plasma membrane and is extruded as a self-assembling microfibril, whereas the matrix polymers are secreted by the Golgi apparatus and become integrated into the wall network by poorly understood mechanisms. The growing wall is under high tensile stress from cell turgor and is able to enlarge by a combination of stress relaxation and polymer creep. A pH-dependent mechanism of wall loosening, known as acid growth, is characteristic of growing walls and is mediated by a group of unusual wall proteins called expansins. Expansins appear to disrupt the noncovalent bonding of matrix hemicelluloses to the microfibril, thereby allowing the wall to yield to the mechanical forces generated by cell turgor. Other wall enzymes, such as (1-->4) beta-glucanases and pectinases, may make the wall more responsive to expansin-mediated wall creep whereas pectin methylesterases and peroxidases may alter the wall so as to make it resistant to expansin-mediated creep.

  16. Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics Stability Spectrum with a Resistive Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2008-05-01

    We show that the eigenvalue equations describing a cylindrical ideal magnetophydrodynamicsw (MHD) plasma interacting with a thin resistive wall can be put into the standard mathematical form: Α•χ = λΒ• χ. This is accomplished by using a finite element basis for the plasma, and by adding an extra degree of freedom corresponding to the electrical current in the thin wall. The standard form allows the use of linear eigenvalue solvers, without additional interations, to compute the complete spectrum of plasma modes in the presence of a surrounding restrictive wall at arbitrary separation. We show that our method recovers standard results in the limits of (1) an infinitely resistive wall (no wall), and (2) a zero resistance wall (ideal wall).

  17. On the design of optimal compliant walls for turbulence control

    CERN Document Server

    Luhar, M; McKeon, B J

    2016-01-01

    This paper employs the theoretical framework developed by Luhar et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 768, 415-441) to consider the design of compliant walls for turbulent skin friction reduction. Specifically, the effects of simple spring-damper walls are contrasted with the effects of more complex walls incorporating tension, stiffness and anisotropy. In addition, varying mass ratios are tested to provide insight into differences between aerodynamic and hydrodynamic applications. Despite the differing physical responses, all the walls tested exhibit some important common features. First, the effect of the walls (positive or negative) is greatest at conditions close to resonance, with sharp transitions in performance across the resonant frequency or phase speed. Second, compliant walls are predicted to have a more pronounced effect on slower-moving structures because such structures generally have larger wall-pressure signatures. Third, two-dimensional (spanwise constant) structures are particularly susceptible to further...

  18. Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics Stability Spectrum with a Resistive Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the eigenvalue equations describing a cylindrical ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) plasma interacting with a thin resistive wall can be put into the standard mathematical form: Α · x = λΒ · x. This is accomplished by using a finite element basis for the plasma, and by adding an extra degree of freedom corresponding to the electrical current in the thin wall. The standard form allows the use of linear eigenvalue solvers, without additional interactions, to compute the complete spectrum of plasma modes in the presence of a surrounding restrictive wall at arbitrary separation. We show that our method recovers standard results in the limits of (1) an infinitely resistive wall (no wall), and (2) a zero resistance wall (ideal wall).

  19. Domain Walls and Vortices in Chiral Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto

    2013-01-01

    We study domain walls and vortices in chiral symmetry breaking in QCD with N flavors in the chiral limit. If the axial anomaly was absent, there exist stable Abelian axial vortices winding around the spontaneously broken U(1)_A symmetry and non-Abelian axial vortices winding around both the U(1)_A and non-Abelian SU(N) chiral symmetries. In the presence of the axial anomaly term, metastable domain walls are present and Abelian axial vortices must be attached by N domain walls, forming domain wall junctions. We show that a domain wall junction decays into N non-Abelian vortices attached by domain walls, implying its metastability. We also show that domain walls decay through the quantum tunneling by creating a hole bounded by a closed non-Abelian vortex.

  20. Surfaces electrons at dielectric plasma walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of the electron surface layer introduced in this thesis provides a framework for the description of the microphysics of the surplus electrons immediately at the wall and thereby complements the modelling of the plasma sheath. In this work we have considered from a surface physics perspective the distribution and build-up of an electron adsorbate on the wall as well as the effect of the negative charge on the scattering of light by a spherical particle immersed in a plasma. In our electron surface layer model we treat the wall-bound electrons as a wall-thermalised electron distribution minimising the grand canonical potential and satisfying Poisson's equation. The boundary between the electron surface layer and the plasma sheath is determined by a force balance between the attractive image potential and the repulsive sheath potential and lies in front of the crystallographic interface. Depending on the electron affinity χ, that is the offset of the conduction band minimum to the potential in front of the surface, two scenarios for the wall-bound electrons are realised. For χ0 electrons penetrate into the conduction band where they form an extended space charge. These different scenarios are also reflected in the electron kinetics at the wall which control the sticking coefficient and the desorption time. If χ-3. For χ>0 electron physisorption takes place in the conduction band. For this case sticking coefficients and desorption times have not been calculated yet but in view of the more efficient scattering with bulk phonons, responsible for electron energy relaxation in this case, we expect them to be larger than for the case of χ0 the electrons in the bulk of the particle modify the refractive index through their bulk electrical conductivity. In both cases the conductivity is limited by scattering with surface or bulk phonons. Surplus electrons lead to an increase of absorption at low frequencies and, most notably, to a blue-shift of an extinction

  1. MR imaging of the vessel wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the risks for thrombosis are more dependent on plaque composition than on the degree of luminal narrowing, the radiological assessment of atherosclerosis should extend beyond mere depiction of the arterial lumen. High-resolution MRI of the vessel wall can provide important information about the individual makeup of atherosclerotic plaques, potentially enabling early detection and characterization of lesions before narrowing of the vessel lumen occurs. The MR-based assessment of the vessel wall with sufficient spatial resolution and image contrast, however, remains challenging. Requirements include high signal-to-noise ratio, high contrast-to-noise ratio, good signal penetration depth and homogeneous signal throughout the vessel under investigation, as well as imaging protocols encompassing various contrast weightings. Numerous dedicated radiofrequency (RF) coils have been developed to achieve these goals employing either external surface phased-array coils, or alternatively, utilizing intravascular coils to image the vessel wall from inside the vessel and thus being invasive. For the non-invasive approach of imaging with surface coils, the carotid and the right coronary arteries have been favoured since they are of critical importance and since they are relatively superficial structures, accessible from the outside. To detect the early development of plaque and visualize it globally rather than locally, intravascular contrast agents on the basis of ultrasmall particles of iron oxide can be used as a marker of macrophage activity within the plaque. In the long run, it appears likely that the combination of luminal MR angiography with the administration of susceptibility-based contrast agents and subsequent high-resolution MR of detected atherosclerotic lesions with dedicated RF coils could evolve as the diagnostic concept of choice for the assessment of atherosclerotic disease. (orig.)

  2. Constricted nanowire with stabilized magnetic domain wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiaa, R.; Al Bahri, M.

    2016-08-01

    Domain wall (DW)-based magnetic memory offers the possibility for increasing the storage capacity. However, stability of DW remains the major drawback of this scheme. In this letter, we propose a stepped nanowire for pinning DW in a desirable position. From micromagnetic simulation, the proposed design applied to in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows that by adjusting the nanowire step size and its width it is possible to stabilize DW for a desirable current density range. In contrast, only a movement of DW could be seen for conventional nanowire. An extension to a multi-stepped nanowire could be used for multi-bit per cell magnetic memory.

  3. Superconductivity in single wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Yavari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   By using Greens function method we first show that the effective interaction between two electrons mediated by plasmon exchange can become attractive which in turn can lead to superconductivity at a high critical temperature in a singl wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT. The superconducting transition temperature Tc for the SWCNT (3,3 obtained by this mechanism agrees with the recent experimental result. We also show as the radius of SWCNT increases, plasmon frequency becomes lower and leads to lower Tc.

  4. Brick walls and AdS/CFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Bernard S.; Ortíz, L.

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the relationship between the bulk-boundary correspondence in Rehren's algebraic holography (and in other `fixed-background', QFT-based, approaches to holography) and in mainstream string-theoretic `Maldacena AdS/CFT'. Especially, we contrast the understanding of black-hole entropy from the point of view of QFT in curved spacetime—in the framework of 't Hooft's `brick wall' model—with the understanding based on Maldacena AdS/CFT. We show that the brick-wall modification of a Klein-Gordon field in the Hartle-Hawking-Israel state on dimensional Schwarzschild AdS has a well-defined boundary limit with the same temperature and entropy as the brick-wall-modified bulk theory. One of our main purposes is to point out a close connection, for general AdS/CFT situations, between the puzzle raised by Arnsdorf and Smolin regarding the relationship between Rehren's algebraic holography and mainstream AdS/CFT and the puzzle embodied in the `complementarity principle' proposed by Mukohyama and Israel in their work on the brick-wall approach to black hole entropy. Working on the assumption that similar results will hold for bulk QFT other than the Klein-Gordon field and for Schwarzschild AdS in other dimensions, and recalling the first author's proposed resolution to the Mukohyama-Israel puzzle based on his `matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis', we argue that, in Maldacena AdS/CFT, the algebra of the boundary CFT is isomorphic only to a proper subalgebra of the bulk algebra, albeit (at non-zero temperature) the (GNS) Hilbert spaces of bulk and boundary theories are still the `same'—the total bulk state being pure, while the boundary state is mixed (thermal). We also argue from the finiteness of its boundary (and hence, on our assumptions, also bulk) entropy at finite temperature, that the Rehren dual of the Maldacena boundary CFT cannot itself be a QFT and must, instead, presumably be something like a string theory.

  5. Study of supersonic coanda wall jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, C.M.; Kim, H.D.; Lee, Y.K. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea); Setoguchi, T. [Saga University (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    The Coanda effect is the tendency for a fluid jet to attach itself to an adjacent surface and follow its contour without causing an appreciable flow separation. The Coanda effect has long been applied to improve aerodynamic characteristics, such as the drag/lift ratio of flight body, the engine exhaust plume thrust vectoring, and the aerofoil/wing circulation control. The present study was performed to get a better understanding of the supersonic Coanda wall jet flow. Experimental and numerical investigations were carried out in order to clarify the effects of pressure ratios and nozzle configurations on the characteristics of the supersonic Coanda jet. (author). 11 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Chest wall, lung, and pleural space trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa A

    2006-03-01

    Chest radiographs frequently underestimate the severity and extent of chest trauma and, in some cases, fail to detect the presence of injury. CT is more sensitive than chest radiography in the detection of pulmonary, pleural, and osseous abnormalities in the patient who has chest trauma. With the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), high-quality multiplanar reformations are obtained easily and add to the diagnostic capabilities of MDCT. This article reviews the radiographic and CT findings of chest wall, pleural, and pulmonary injuries that are seen in the patient who has experienced blunt thoracic trauma.

  7. STATUS OF THE DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Carroll, J; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-04-22

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system is capable of accelerating any charge to mass ratio particle. Applications of high gradient proton and electron versions of this accelerator will be discussed. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  8. Great Wall Drilling Company Operating Worldwide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Great changes have taken place in Great Wall Drilling Company (GWDC) since the start of the new century, when GWDC conducted a profound reorganization in response to CNPC's (China National Petroleum Corporation)continuously restructuring strategy. The reorganization leads to a new top management full of youthful spirit and rich experience in international business by inviting applications for its key positions from the whole drilling sector of CNPC. Also, an effective organization structure forms with its characteristic of centering on international market development and overseas operations, aiming to raise its competitiveness internationally.

  9. Plasticity Approach to HSC Shear Wall Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lunying; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1998-01-01

    of concrete. The reduced strength is named the effective strength. The paper describes simple lower bound solutions. They consist of pure strut action or strut action combined with diagonal compression fields outside the struts. Near moment maximum and near supports the stress fields are modified to save...... to 140 MPa and reinforcement yield strengths up to 1420 MPa. The work was carried out as a Ph.D. study by the first author, the second author supervising the study.Keywords: shear wall, plasticity, strut and tie, load-carrying capacity, concrete, reinforcement....

  10. Midwest cousins of Barnes-Wall lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Griess Jr., Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Given a rational lattice and suitable set of linear transformations, we construct a cousin lattice. Sufficient conditions are given for integrality, evenness and unimodularity. When the input is a Barnes-Wall lattice, we get multi-parameter series of cousins. There is a subseries consisting of unimodular lattices which have ranks $2^{d-1}\\pm 2^{d-k-1}$, for odd integers $d\\ge 3$ and integers $k=1,2, ..., \\frac {d-1}2$. Their minimum norms are moderately high: $2^{\\lfloor \\frac d2 \\rfloor -1}$.

  11. Effects of the Transient Blood Flow-Wall Interaction on the Wall Stress Distribution in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rubing; Geindreau, Christian; Lasheras, Juan

    2006-11-01

    Our static finite element analysis (FEA) of both idealized and real clinical models has shown that the maximum diameter and asymmetry have substantial influence on the AAA wall stress distribution. The thrombus inside the AAA was also found to reduce the magnitude of the wall stresses. To achieve a better understanding of the wall stress distribution in real AAAs, a dynamic FEA was also performed. We considered models, both symmetric and non-symmetric, in which the aorta is assumed isotropic with nonlinear material properties. For the limiting case of rigid walls, the evolution of the flow pattern and the wall shear stresses due to fluid flow at different stages of cardiac cycle predicted by our simulations are compared with experimental results obtained in in-vitro models. A good agreement is found between both results. Finally, we have extended the analysis to the physiologically correct case of deformable walls and characterized the transient effects on the wall stresses.

  12. Anthocyanins influence tannin-cell wall interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Martínez-Hernández, Alejandro; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Gil-Muñoz, Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2016-09-01

    The rate of tannin extraction was studied in a vinification of red grapes and the results compared with another vinification made with white grapes fermented as for typical red wine, in the presence of skins and seeds. Even though the grapes presented a quite similar skin and seed tannin content, the differences in tannin concentration between both vinifications was very large, despite the fact that the only apparent difference between the phenolic composition of both wines was the anthocyanin content. This suggests that anthocyanins play an important role in tannin extractability, perhaps because they affect the extent of the tannin-cell wall interaction, a factor that largely controls the resulting quantity of tannins in wines. To confirm this observation, the effect of anthocyanins on the tannin extractability from grape seeds and skin and on the interaction between tannins and grape cell walls suspended in model solutions were studied. The results indicated that anthocyanins favored skin and seed tannin extraction and that there is a competition for the adsorption sites between anthocyanins and tannins that increases the tannin content when anthocyanins are present. PMID:27041322

  13. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitative agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc x Nc = 4 x 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc x Nc = 4 x 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7-8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback

  14. Treatment of posterior Wall fractures of acetabulum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xin; LIU Jian-guo; GONG Yu-bao; YANG Chen; LI Shu-qiang; FENG Wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the treatment methods and outcome of posterior Wall fractures of the acetabulum.Methods: The data of 31 patients(25 males and 6females,aged 19-59 years,mean:40.5 years)with posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum hospitalized in our department from 2002 to 2006 were analyzed retrospectively in this study.The types of fractures,number of fragments,combined dislocations,and sciatic nerve function were documented before admission.All the fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation.Based on the fracture type and site,either screws alone or reconstructive plates were used.The Patients were immobilized for an average of 12 weeks before partial weight bearing was permitted.After follow-up for 12-70months(43.6months on average),modifled Merle d‘Aubigne score was adopted to evaluate the outcomes of the operations.Results: The percentages of the excellent,good,fair and poor results were 48.4%,41.9%,6.5%,and 3.3%,respectively.with a good to excellent rate of 90.2%.Idio-pathic sciatic nerve injury occurred in only one case.Conclusions: The sciatic nerve should be routinely exposed and protected during the surgery.The type of fixation should be based on the fracture type and site.Prolonged immobilization may be helpful in improving the final outcomes.

  15. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Bruno S. [UNR; Fuelling, Stephan [UNR

    2013-11-30

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  16. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  17. Wall-Crossing Invariants from Spectral Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    A new construction of BPS monodromies for 4d ${\\mathcal N}=2$ theories of class S is introduced. A novel feature of this construction is its manifest invariance under Kontsevich-Soibelman wall crossing, in the sense that no information on the 4d BPS spectrum is employed. The BPS monodromy is encoded by topological data of a finite graph, embedded into the UV curve $C$ of the theory. The graph arises from a degenerate limit of spectral networks, constructed at maximal intersections of walls of marginal stability in the Coulomb branch of the gauge theory. The topology of the graph, together with a notion of framing, encode equations that determine the monodromy. We develop an algorithmic technique for solving the equations, and compute the monodromy in several examples. The graph manifestly encodes the symmetries of the monodromy, providing some support for conjectural relations to specializations of the superconformal index. For $A_1$-type theories, the graphs encoding the monodromy are "dessins d'enfants" on ...

  18. Wall Crossing from Boltzmann Black Hole Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Manschot, Jan; Sen, Ashoke

    2010-01-01

    A key question in the study of N=2 supersymmetric string or field theories is to understand the decay of BPS bound states across walls of marginal stability in the space of parameters or vacua. By representing the potentially unstable bound states as multi-centered black hole solutions in N=2 supergravity, we provide two fully general and explicit formulae for the change in the (refined) index across the wall. The first, "Higgs branch" formula relies on Reineke's results for invariants of quivers without oriented loops, specialized to the Abelian case. The second, "Coulomb branch" formula results from evaluating an integral over the classical phase space of multi-centered solutions by localization. We provide extensive evidence that these new formulae agree with each other and with the mathematical results of Kontsevich and Soibelman (KS) and Joyce and Song (JS). The main physical insight behind our results is that the Bose-Fermi statistics of individual black holes participating in the bound state can be tra...

  19. Effect of Wall Friction and Vortex Generation on Radial Void Distribution The Wall - Vortex Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguments are presented to prove the existence of rolling vortices in two-phase flow. In liquid phase they will appear in a boundary layer near the walls while in the continuous vapor phase they will occur near the interface with a liquid film. The intensity and size of these vortices are expected to depend on the local velocity gradients normal to the walls. A discussion is given of the interaction between the rotational field associated with such vortices and bubbles in liquid flow or droplets in vapor-flow. This interaction is called the wall-vortex effect. It appears that several, apparently unrelated, phenomena observed in two-phase flow systems may be interpreted in terms of this mechanism. Among these are: Radial void peaking near the walls; Slip ratios less than unity observed even in vertical upward flow; Reduced droplet diffusion near the liquid film; Reduced vapor mixing between subchannels at low steam qualities; and Accelerated flashing process in flow of depressurized liquid. Finally, a comparison with the well-known Magnus effect is also included

  20. Pectic substances from soybean cell walls distinguish themselves from other plant cell wall pectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.M.H.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The uncommon structural features of soybean cell wall pectic substances explain their resistance to degradation by enzymes generally used to degrade this kind of polymers, and indicates that a search for new enzymes is required to enable enzymatic modification of these polysaccharides

  1. COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN METHOD OF FREEZE WALL AND ITS APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENXiangsheng

    1995-01-01

    Artificially ground freezing (AGF) is one of the main methods to establish temporary support for shaft sinking in unstable water bearing strata. Domke(1915) formula based on frozen soil strength has widely been used for designing freeze wall thickness. However, it can not ensure the stability of freeze wall, nor guarantee the safety of shaft construction as frozen depth increase in unstable water bearing strata. F.A.Auld (1985, 1988) presented a design method of freeze wall, which is on the basis of strength and stability, together with deformation of freeze wall.He combined deformation of freeze wall, lining and deformation of freeze tube to set up a comprehensive design method for freeze wall. This paper, according to the practice in China, describes a comprehensive design method for deep freeze wall, considering influence of excavation rate of advance, unsupported length of freeze wall and the sump state on inward deformation of freeze wall, and the allowable pipe deformation caused by inward deformation of freeze wall. Finally, successful application of this method to the large scale coal mine-Jining No.2 Mine in Shandong Province of China, is presented.It saved much investment compared with F.A.Auld's design for the same mine on behalf of Shell Coal International.

  2. Prenatal MRI evaluation of limb-body wall complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre-Pascual, Elisa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital Universitario Doce de Octubre, Department of Radiology, Madrid (Spain); Epelman, Monica [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Johnson, Ann M.; Chauvin, Nancy A.; Coleman, Beverly G.; Victoria, Teresa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The sonographic (US) features of limb-body wall complex have been well documented; however the literature regarding the findings on MRI in limb-body wall complex is scant. To characterize the prenatal MRI features of limb-body wall complex. We performed a retrospective review of all MRI scans of fetuses diagnosed with limb-body wall complex at our institution from 2001 to 2011. Fetuses without correlating US scans or follow-up information were excluded. Three pediatric radiologists blinded to the specific US findings reviewed the prenatal MRIs. Images were evaluated for the organ location and attachment, the body part affected, characterization of the body wall defect, and spinal, limb and umbilical cord abnormalities. Ten subjects met inclusion criteria. MRI was able to detect and characterize the body part affected and associated abnormalities. All fetuses had ventral wall defects, a small thorax and herniated liver and bowel. The kidneys were extracorporeal in three cases. The extruded organs were attached to the placenta or the uterine wall in all cases. Abnormal spinal curvatures of various degrees of severity were present in all cases. Eight cases had a short, uncoiled cord. Limb anomalies were present in 6 of the 10 cases. We illustrate the common fetal MRI findings of limb-body wall complex. The prenatal diagnosis of limb-body wall complex and the differentiation of this defect from treatable abdominal wall defects are crucial to providing appropriate guidance for patient counseling and management. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic domain-wall dynamics in wide permalloy strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, Virginia; Laurson, Lasse

    2016-02-01

    Domain walls in soft permalloy strips may exhibit various equilibrium micromagnetic structures depending on the width and thickness of the strip, ranging from the well-known transverse and vortex walls in narrow and thin strips to double and triple vortex walls recently reported in wider strips [V. Estévez and L. Laurson, Phys. Rev. B 91, 054407 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.054407]. Here, we analyze the field driven dynamics of such domain walls in permalloy strips of widths from 240 nm up to 6 μ m , using the known equilibrium domain wall structures as initial configurations. Our micromagnetic simulations show that the domain wall dynamics in wide strips is very complex, and depends strongly on the geometry of the system, as well as on the magnitude of the driving field. We discuss in detail the rich variety of the dynamical behaviors found, including dynamic transitions between different domain wall structures, periodic dynamics of a vortex core close to the strip edge, transitions towards simpler domain wall structures of the multi-vortex domain walls controlled by vortex polarity, and the fact that for some combinations of the strip geometry and the driving field the system cannot support a compact domain wall.

  4. Soliton-dependent plasmon reflection at bilayer graphene domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lili; Shi, Zhiwen; Zeng, Bo; Wang, Sheng; Kang, Ji-Hun; Joshi, Trinity; Jin, Chenhao; Ju, Long; Kim, Jonghwan; Lyu, Tairu; Shen, Yuen-Ron; Crommie, Michael; Gao, Hong-Jun; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Layer-stacking domain walls in bilayer graphene are emerging as a fascinating one-dimensional system that features stacking solitons structurally and quantum valley Hall boundary states electronically. The interactions between electrons in the 2D graphene domains and the one-dimensional domain-wall solitons can lead to further new quantum phenomena. Domain-wall solitons of varied local structures exist along different crystallographic orientations, which can exhibit distinct electrical, mechanical and optical properties. Here we report soliton-dependent 2D graphene plasmon reflection at different 1D domain-wall solitons in bilayer graphene using near-field infrared nanoscopy. We observe various domain-wall structures in mechanically exfoliated graphene bilayers, including network-forming triangular lattices, individual straight or bent lines, and even closed circles. The near-field infrared contrast of domain-wall solitons arises from plasmon reflection at domain walls, and exhibits markedly different behaviours at the tensile- and shear-type domain-wall solitons. In addition, the plasmon reflection at domain walls exhibits a peculiar dependence on electrostatic gating. Our study demonstrates the unusual and tunable coupling between 2D graphene plasmons and domain-wall solitons.

  5. Dynamic load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Richard Pearson

    2010-02-01

    The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as a means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that dynamically loaded wall segments to compare the performance of walls constructed using the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of four walls were built, two with traditional methods and two with the Arquin method. Two of the walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every third cell filled with grout. The remaining two walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every cell filled with grout. The walls were dynamically loaded with explosive forces. No significant difference was noted between the performance of the walls constructed by the Arquin method when compared to the walls constructed by the traditional method.

  6. Book review: The rise and fall of radical Westminster 1780 – 1890 by Marc Baer

    OpenAIRE

    Blumenau, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Using the most scrutinized political place in modern Britain, The Rise and Fall of Radical Westminster, 1780-1890 aims to expand our understanding of political culture and political institutions, taking in the history of satire, the place of political violence, and the language of democracy. Jack Blumenau is impressed with Marc Baer‘s work, and recommends the book to political scientists and historians.

  7. Studies on first wall and plasma wall interaction in JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes studies on first wall and plasma wall interaction in JT-60. Main results are as follows; (1) To select JT-60 first wall material, various RandD were done in FY1975 ∼ 1976. Mo was selected as first wall materials of limiters and divertor plates because of its reliability under a high heat flux condition. (2) Development of low-Z material has been done to reduce impurity problem of Mo first wall. As a result, titanium carbide (TiC) was selected as a coating material on the Mo. High heat load testing has been done for TiC coated Mo limiter same as JT-60. This material can survive under the condition of 1 kW/cm2 x 10 s, expected in JT-60 limiter design. (3) To reduce high heat load on the divertor plate, separatrix swing is proposed. Optimum frequency of the sweeping is evaluated to be 2 Hz in JT-60. For a discharge with heating power of 30 MW and duration time of 10 s, in addition to the separatrix swing, remote radiative cooling in the divertor region is necessary. Moreover, calculations of erosion thickness have been done for stainless steel, Mo, graphite, TiC and silicon caibide under high heat flux during plasma disruption. (4) In divertor experiments in JT-60, divertor functions on particle, heat load and impurity controls have been demonstrated. In elctron density of 6 x 1019 m-3, particle fueling rate of 20 MW NB heating (3 Pa m3/s) can be exhausted by divertor pumping system. Effectiveness of remote radiative cooling is demonstrated under the condition of 20 MW NB heating power. Also, separatrix swing is demonstrated to reduce heat load on the divertor plate. Total radiation in main plasma is 5 ∼ 10% of total absorbed power. (author) 120 refs

  8. Seismic retrofitting of timber framed walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After the 1755 earthquake that destroyed Lisbon, an innovative anti-seismic structural system was developed consisting of a timber skeleton, that included timber framed masonry walls. After more than 250 years these structures need rehabilitation to face the present demands. The research presented in this paper aimed at experimentally characterizing the cyclic behaviour of timber framed walls reinforced with three different methods, namely: (i elastic-plastic dampers on diagonal braces, (ii reinforcement of timber connections with steel plates, (iii application of a reinforced rendering. The elastic-plastic damper showed an unsymmetrical behaviour and some difficulties to implement in practice. The strengthening with reinforced render led to an initial stiffness increase but showed a limited deformation capacity. The walls with reinforcing steel plates at the timber connections showed the best behaviour in terms of strength, stiffness and energy dissipation.Después del terremoto de 1755 que destruyó Lisboa, un sistema estructural antisísmico muy innovador fue desarrollado. El sistema consistió en un esqueleto de madera, que incluyó la construcción de muros de mampostería con un entramado de madera. Transcurridos más de 250 años, estas estructuras necesitan rehabilitación para poder hacer frente a los requisitos estructurales actuales. La investigación presentada en este trabajo tiene como objetivo caracterizar experimentalmente el comportamiento cíclico de los muros con entramado de madera reforzados con tres métodos diferentes: (i amortiguadores elasto-plásticos, (ii refuerzo de las conexiones de madera con placas de acero, (iii aplicación de un mortero reforzado. El amortiguador elasto-plástico mostró un comportamiento asimétrico y algunas dificultades para aplicarlo en la práctica. El refuerzo con mortero reforzado condujo a un aumento de la rigidez inicial, pero reveló una capacidad de deformación limitada. Los muros con

  9. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, Leung K.; Schumacher, Ray F.; Wicks, George G.

    2010-02-23

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  10. Local wall power loading variations in thermonuclear fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2 1/2-dimensional geometric model is presented that allows calculation of power loadings at various points on the first wall of a thermonuclear fusion device. Given average wall power loadings for brems-strahlung, cyclotron radiation charged particles, and neutrons, which are determined from various plasma-physics computation models, local wall heat loads are calculated by partitioning the plasma volume and surface into cells and superimposing the heating effects of the individual cells on selected first-wall differential areas. Heat loads from the entire plasma are thus determined as a function of position on the first-wall surface. Significant differences in local power loadings were found for most fusion designs, and it was therefore concluded that the effect of local power loading variations must be taken into account when calculating temperatures and heat transfer rates in fusion device first walls

  11. Numerical study on multiphase flows induced by wall adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myong, Hyon Kook [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    The present paper presents a numerical study on multiphase flows induced by wall adhesion. The continuum surface force (CSF) model with the wall adhesion boundary condition model is used for calculating the surface tension force; this model is implemented in an in house solution code (PowerCFD). The present method (code) employs an unstructured cell centered method based on a conservative pressure based finite volume method with a volume capturing method (CICSAM) in a volume of fluid (VOF) scheme for phase interface capturing. The effects of wall adhesion are then numerically simulated by using the present method for a shallow pool of water located at the bottom of a cylindrical tank with no external forces such as gravity. Two different cases are computed, one it which the water wets the wall and one in which the water does not wet the wall. It is found that the present method efficiently simulates the surface tension dominant multiphase flows induced by wall adhesion.

  12. Characteristics of a bubble jet near a vertical wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG A-man; YAO Xiong-liang; LI Jia

    2008-01-01

    A numerical model of a coupled bubble jet and wall was built on the assumption of potential flow and calculated by the boundary integral method. A three-dimensional computing program was then developed. Starting with the basic phenomenon of the interaction between a bubble and a wall, the dynamics of bubbles near rigid walls were studied systematically with the program. Calculated results agreed well with experimental results. The relationship between the Bjerknes effect of a wall and characteristic parameters was then studied and the calculated results of various cases were compared and discussed with the Blake criterion based on the Kelvin-impulse theory. Our analyses show that the angle of the jet's direction and the pressure on the rigid wall have a close relationship with collapse force and the bubble's characteristic parameters. From this, the application range of Blake criterion can be determined. This paper aims to provide a basis for future research on the dynamics of bubbles near a wall.

  13. Thermal Performance of Uninsulated and Partially Filled Wall Cavities: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridouane, E. H.; Bianchi, M.

    2011-08-01

    Low-rise, wood-framed homes are the most common type of residential structures in the United States. Wood wall construction supports roofs efficiently and provides a stable frame for attaching interior and exterior wall coverings. Wall cavities are prevalent and increase thermal resistance, particularly when they are filled with insulating material. This paper describes detailed computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially filled wall cavities and accounts for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. Parameters are ambient outdoor temperature, cavity surface emissivity, cavity aspect ratio, and insulation height. Understanding the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially insulated wall cavities is essential for conserving energy in residential buildings. The results can serve as input for building energy simulation tools such as DOE2 and EnergyPlus for modeling the temperature dependent energy performance of new and older homes with uninsulated or partially insulated walls.

  14. Mapping Out Atom-Wall Interaction with Atomic Clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the feasibility of probing atom-wall interaction with atomic clocks based on atoms trapped in engineered optical lattices. Optical lattice is normal to the wall. By monitoring the wall-induced clock shift at individual wells of the lattice, one would measure the dependence of the atom-wall interaction on the atom-wall separation. We find that the induced clock shifts are large and observable at already experimentally demonstrated levels of accuracy. We show that this scheme may uniquely probe the long-range atom-wall interaction in all three qualitatively distinct regimes of the interaction: van der Waals (image-charge interaction), Casimir-Polder (QED vacuum fluctuations), and Lifshitz (thermal-bath fluctuations) regimes.

  15. Near-wall diffusion tensor of an axisymmetric colloidal particle

    CERN Document Server

    Lisicki, Maciej; Wajnryb, Eligiusz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions with confining boundaries often lead to drastic changes in the diffusive behaviour of microparticles in suspensions. For axially symmetric particles, earlier numerical studies have suggested a simple form of the near-wall diffusion matrix which depends on the distance and orientation of the particle with respect to the wall, which is usually calculated numerically. In this work, we derive explicit analytical formulae for the dominant correction to the bulk diffusion tensor of an axially symmetric colloidal particle due to the presence of a nearby no-slip wall. The relative correction scales as powers of inverse wall-particle distance and its angular structure is represented by simple polynomials in sines and cosines of the particle's inclination angle to the wall. We analyse the correction for translational and rotational motion, as well as the translation-rotation coupling. Our findings provide a simple approximation to the anisotropic diffusion tensor near a wall, which completes a...

  16. Evolution of spherical domain walls in solitonic symmetron models

    CERN Document Server

    Peyravi, Marzieh; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2016-01-01

    In this work, inspired by the symmetron model, we analyse the evolution of spherical domain walls by considering specific potentials that ensure symmetry breaking and the occurrence of degenerate vacua that are necessary for the formation of domain walls. By considering a simple analytical model of spherical domain wall collapse, in vacuum, it is shown that this model fits the more accurate numerical results very well until full collapse, after which oscillations and scalar radiation take place. Furthermore, we explore the effect of a central non-relativistic matter lump on the evolution of a spherical domain wall and show that the central lump can prevent the full collapse and annihilation of the domain wall bubble, due to the repulsion between the domain wall and matter over-density within the adopted symmetron inspired model.

  17. Wall laws for viscous fluids near rough surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalibard Anne-Laure

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review recent results on wall laws for viscous fluids near rough surfaces, of small amplitude and wavelength ε. When the surface is “genuinely rough”, the wall law at first order is the Dirichlet wall law: the fluid satisfies a “no-slip” boundary condition on the homogenized surface. We compare the various mathematical characterizations of genuine roughness, and the corresponding homogenization results. At the next order, under ergodicity properties of the roughness distribution, a Navier wall law with a slip length of order ε can be derived, that leads to better error estimates. We also discuss the relationship beween the slip length and the position of the homogenized surface. In particular, we prove that for adherent rough walls, the Navier wall law associated to the roughness does not correspond to any tangible slip.

  18. Tubular separate first wall for ITER-EDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tubular solution first wall is the most suitable one to cope with the thermal stresses, the use of double wall reduces the risk of leaks inside the vacuum vessel by avoiding the growth of a crack through both walls: the soft brazing in between wall stops the growth of a crack from one tube to the other. The eddy currents induced in the tubes are low and the Halo current flowing poloidally in the tubes exert a radial pressure which is supported by the blanket box via ad hoc supporting points provided in between first wall and blanket. The tubes can be made of steel to resist a heat flux of up to 1 MW/m2. For higher heat loads copper or vanadium can be used. The tubular first wall can be replaced independently from the blanket. The thermo-hydraulic electro-magnetic and dynamic analysis confirm the viability of the solution proposed

  19. Tubular separate first wall for ITER-EDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzuto, A.; Riccardi, B. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Salpietro, E.; Malavasi, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany). NET Design Team

    1994-11-01

    The tubular solution first wall is the most suitable one to cope with the thermal stresses, the use of double wall reduces the risk of leaks inside the vacuum vessel by avoiding the growth of a crack through both walls: the soft brazing in between wall stops the growth of a crack from one tube to the other. The eddy currents induced in the tubes are low and the Halo current flowing poloidally in the tubes exert a radial pressure which is supported by the blanket box via ad hoc supporting points provided in between first wall and blanket. The tubes can be made of steel to resist a heat flux of up to 1 MW/m{sup 2}. For higher heat loads copper or vanadium can be used. The tubular first wall can be replaced independently from the blanket. The thermo-hydraulic electro-magnetic and dynamic analysis confirm the viability of the solution proposed.

  20. Study on pipe wall thinning management based on reliability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipe wall thinning is sporadically detected in ferritic steel piping in Japanese BWR plants. The suitability for continued service of wall thinning pipe is basically evaluated by using the 'Rules on pipe wall thinning management for BWR power plants.' The probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis was performed in order to confirm the failure probability applied the rule. Based on the result, the issues of the rule which should be solved ware clarified. (author)

  1. Dose estimates for the heavy concrete ratchet wall configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 1987 meeting of the APS User's Subcommittee on Conventional Facilities, we were urged to study changes in shield-wall geometry for the storage ring so as to provide an increased portion of the photon beam outside that shield. The shield-wall position, with respect to the source point, is a geometric function of the thickness of the wall, the clearance between the photon beam inside the wall (front-end area), and the corresponding clearance outside the wall. The relationship of any of these three dimensions and the resulting movement of the ratchet portion of the wall (and thus the portion of the beam line outside the shield) is about one-to-eleven, so that for each inch given up in clearance or wall thickness, eleven inches of beam-line length is exposed. Unfortunately, the two clearances were already considered minimal, and the shield-wall thickness determines the radiation dose received on the operating floor and is not really a open-quote free parameterclose quotes. The first change made in geometry was to consider the use of heavy concrete for the wall construction. (The inner wall and roof are still considered to be normal concrete.) A thickness of 0.56 m was chosen, since that provided the same shield quality as the former 0.8-m normal concrete wall. The ratchet thickness itself was left at 0.8 m for several reasons: the wall encloses a lead/concrete plug of 0.8 m total length; there is only a one-to-one relationship between this dimension and the beam-line length exposed; and the 0.8-m length will prove to be important in consideration of the forward-angle bremsstrahlung radiation

  2. Sense through wall human detection using UWB radar

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Dechang; Sheng Li; Singh Sukhvinder; Liang Qilian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this article, we discuss techniques for sense through wall human detection for different types of walls. We have focused on detection of stationary human target behind wall based on breathing movements. In detecting the breathing motion, a Doppler based method is used. Also a new approach based on short time Fourier transform is discussed and an already proposed clutter reduction technique based on singular value decomposition is applied to different measurements.

  3. Micropipette aspiration on the outer hair cell lateral wall.

    OpenAIRE

    Sit, P S; Spector, A A; Lue, A J; Popel, A S; Brownell, W.E.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the lateral wall of the guinea pig cochlear outer hair cell were studied using the micropipette aspiration technique. A fire-polished micropipette with an inner diameter of approximately 4 microm was brought into contact with the lateral wall and negative pressure was applied. The resulting deformation of the lateral wall was recorded on videotape and subjected to morphometric analysis. The relation between the length of the aspirated portion of the cell and aspir...

  4. Swimming and peristaltic pumping between two plane parallel walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swimming at low Reynolds number in a fluid confined between two plane walls is studied for an infinite plane sheet located midway between the walls and distorted with a transverse propagating wave. It is shown that the flow pattern is closely related to that for peristaltic pumping. The hydrodynamic interaction between two flexible sheets swimming parallel in infinite space is related to the problem of peristaltic pumping in a planar channel with two wavy walls.

  5. Investigation of domain walls in GMO crystals by conoscope method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patterns of polarized beam interference (conoscopic patterns) enable assessment of orientation and parameters of crystal's optical indicatrix. The presented conoscopic patterns of gadolinium molybdate crystal in the vicinity to plane and wedge-live domain walls differ from conoscopic patterns of the crystals far away from these walls which allows to spear about changes occurring in the crystal in the vicinity to domain walls

  6. Analysis of Embedded Retaining Wall Using the Subgrade Reaction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasik, Tomasz; Chalecki, Marek; Koda, Eugeniusz

    2015-03-01

    This paper analyzes the distribution of internal forces and displacements of embedded retaining wall in Quaternary deposits and Tertiary clays. Calculations have been based on the Subgrade Reaction Method (SRM) for two different types of earth pressure behind the wall (active, at-rest) in order to show the differences resulting from adopting the limit values. An algorithm for calculation of "cantilever wall" using the Mathematica program was proposed.

  7. Wall Slip in Pipe Rheometry of Multiphase Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Abd Rahman, Nur 'aliaa

    2013-01-01

    Multiphase fluids are widely available in our everyday life. Many of the materials we use and eat every day are classed as multiphase and characterisation of their properties is required to improve quality and manufacture. Being typically non-Newtonian fluids, rheological characterisation of multiphase fluid systems is indeed a complex procedure. Apparent wall slip, or more precisely wall depletion effect near the wall, is an important phenomenon which often occurs in the flow of multiphase f...

  8. Integrated Solar Wall System With Combined Electricity And Windows

    OpenAIRE

    P. Radhakrishnan; Mahesh, Priya L; S, Sowmya

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the utilization of solar energy, and building solar wall system. A significant amount of research and development work has to be carried out in developed nations. Windows with power generation system is not developed. A range of theoretical model have investigated for and their appropriateness validated by simulation data. Improvement of the solar wall's performances can be obtained using double glazing. The results demonstrated that solar wall provides energy s...

  9. Analysis of superheater's pipe wall overtemperature by fault tree diagnose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛德仁; 任浩仁; 陈坚红; 李蔚

    2002-01-01

    After research on a 2000t/h subcritical forced-circulation balanced v entilation were applied boiler and the structure and operation of its auxiliary system builds up this heat transfer model of a superheater's pipe wall and analy ze the effect of primary factors on the overtemperature of the pipe wall. Fault tree structure was used to uncover the multiplayer logic between the overtempera ture of the superheater's pipe wall and the faults.

  10. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Vivekchang, SRC; Govindaraj, A.

    2003-01-01

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes. The purified single-walled carbon nanotubes have been characterised by low-angle X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and Raman spect...

  11. Design studies of an aluminum first wall for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides the high erosion rates (including evaporation) expected for INTOR, there may also be high heat fluxes to the first wall, e.g., approx. 9 (Case I) to 24 (Case II) W/cm2, from two sources - radiation and charge exchange neutrals. There will also be internal heat generation by neutron and gamma deposition. An aluminum first wall design is analyzed, which substantially reduces concerns about survivability of the first wall during INTOR's operating life

  12. Magnetic moment softening and domain wall resistance in Ni nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J D; Sabirianov, R F; Jaswal, S S; Tsymbal, E Y; Mryasov, O N

    2006-08-18

    We perform ab initio calculations of the electronic structure and conductance of atomic-size Ni nanowires with domain walls only a few atomic lattice constants wide. We show that the hybridization between noncollinear spin states leads to a reduction of the magnetic moments in the domain wall resulting in the enhancement of the domain wall resistance. Experimental studies of the magnetic moment softening may be feasible with modern techniques such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy. PMID:17026271

  13. Strategy Guideline: Modeling Enclosure Design in Above-Grade Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Musunuru, S. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-24

    The Strategy Guideline describes how to model and interpret results of models for above grade walls. The Measure Guideline analyzes the failure thresholds and criteria for above grade walls. A library of above-grade walls with historically successful performance was used to calibrate WUFI (Warme Und Feuchte Instationar) software models. The information is generalized for application to a broad population of houses within the limits of existing experience.

  14. Characterisation of cell wall polysaccharides in bilberries and black currants

    OpenAIRE

    Hilz, H

    2007-01-01

    During berry juice production, polysaccharides are released from the cell walls and cause thickening and high viscosity when the berries are mashed. Consequences are a low juice yield and a poor colour. This can be prevented by the use of enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides. To use these enzymes most efficiently, the structure and composition of the cell walls had to be known. This thesis describes a detailed composition of the cell walls of bilberries and black currants. The obtained ...

  15. Human Uterine Wall Tension Trajectories and the Onset of Parturition

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Sokolowski; Francis Saison; Warwick Giles; Shaun McGrath; David Smith; Julia Smith; Roger Smith

    2010-01-01

    Uterine wall tension is thought to be an important determinant of the onset of labor in pregnant women. We characterize human uterine wall tension using ultrasound from the second trimester of pregnancy until parturition and compare preterm, term and twin pregnancies. A total of 320 pregnant women were followed from first antenatal visit to delivery during the period 2000-2004 at the John Hunter Hospital, NSW, Australia. The uterine wall thickness, length, anterior-posterior diameter and tran...

  16. Sonographic gallbladder wall thickness in normal adult population in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, S; Tahir, A.; A Ahidjo; Z Mustapha; Franza O

    2010-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the study was to determine the ultrasonic gallbladder wall thickness in normal adult Nigerians so as to create standards for defining gallbladder abnormalities in Nigerians. Method. Four hundred adults comprising 228 (57%) women and 172 (43%) men aged 16 - 78 years, who had normal clinical history and physical findings, were recruited. The gallbladder wall thickness was obtained in the supine, prone and right anterior oblique positions. Differences in gallbladder wall thick...

  17. Ultrasonic flow measurement and wall acoustic impedance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willatzen, M

    2004-03-01

    An examination of the influence of wall acoustic impedance effects on sound propagation in flowing liquids confined by cylindrical walls is presented. Special focus is given to the importance of the wall acoustic impedance value for ultrasonic flow meter performance. The mathematical model presented allows any radially-dependent axial flow profile to be examined in the linear flow acoustics regime where fluid flow speed is much smaller than the fluid sound speed everywhere in the fluid medium. PMID:14996531

  18. Monitoring of Double Stud Wall Moisture Conditions in the Northeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K.

    2015-03-01

    Double-stud walls insulated with cellulose or low-density spray foam can have R-values of 40 or higher. However, double stud walls have a higher risk of interior-sourced condensation moisture damage, when compared with high-R approaches using exterior insulating sheathing.; Moisture conditions in double stud walls were monitored in Zone 5A (Massachusetts); three double stud assemblies were compared.

  19. Spectral characteristics of chest wall breath sounds in normal subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Gavriely, N; Nissan, M.; Rubin, A. H.; Cugell, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--This study was carried out to establish a reliable bank of information on the spectral characteristics of chest wall breath sounds from healthy men and women, both non-smokers and smokers. METHODS--Chest wall breath sounds from 272 men and 81 women were measured using contact acoustic sensors, amplifiers, and fast Fourier transform (FFT) based spectral analysis software. Inspiratory and expiratory sounds were picked up at three standard locations on the chest wall during breathing...

  20. Energy-momentum balance in particle - domain wall perforating collision

    OpenAIRE

    Gal'tsov, D. V.; Melkumova, E. Yu.; Spirin, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the energy-momentum balance in the perforating collision of a point particle with an infinitely thin planar domain wall within the linearized gravity in arbitrary dimensions. Since the metric of the wall increases with distance, the wall and the particle are never free, and their energy-momentum balance involves not only the instantaneous kinetic momenta, but also the non-local contribution of gravitational stresses. However, careful analysis shows that the stresses can be unam...

  1. Wall grid structure for interior scene synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wenzhuo

    2015-02-01

    We present a system for automatically synthesizing a diverse set of semantically valid, and well-arranged 3D interior scenes for a given empty room shape. Unlike existing work on layout synthesis, that typically knows potentially needed 3D models and optimizes their location through cost functions, our technique performs the retrieval and placement of 3D models by discovering the relationships between the room space and the models\\' categories. This is enabled by a new analytical structure, called Wall Grid Structure, which jointly considers the categories and locations of 3D models. Our technique greatly reduces the amount of user intervention and provides users with suggestions and inspirations. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach on three types of scenarios: conference rooms, living rooms and bedrooms.

  2. The CBM time-of-flight wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deppner, I., E-mail: deppner@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut Uni. Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Herrmann, N. [Physikalisches Institut Uni. Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Gonzalez-Diaz, D. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Ammosov, V. [IHEP, Protvino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Cheng, J. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Ciobanu, M. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Gapienko, V. [IHEP, Protvino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Hildenbrand, K.D.; Kiseleva, A.; Kis, M.; Kresan, D. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Kotte, R. [FZ Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Huangshan, C. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Leifels, Y.; Fruehauf, J.; Li, C. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Li, Y. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Loizeau, P.-A. [Physikalisches Institut Uni. Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Naumann, L. [FZ Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Petrovici, M. [NIPNE, Bucharest (Romania); and others

    2012-01-01

    The key element providing hadron identification in the future Compressed Baryonic Matter spectrometer at FAIR is a time-of-flight wall placed at 10 m distance from the target. The most promising technological option for such a task consists on a 150 m{sup 2} carpet based on Resistive Plate Chambers. Due to the fixed-target geometry, the conceptual design foresees two extreme regions: an outermost region (low rate/low multiplicity) covered by float glass RPCs in multi-strip fashion, and a central region (high rate/high multiplicity) consisting of densely packed read-out cells made with low resistive electrodes. The status of the ongoing R and D efforts in both regions is presented.

  3. The Digital Evolution of Occupy Wall Street

    CERN Document Server

    Conover, Michael D; Menczer, Filippo; Flammini, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We examine the temporal evolution of digital communication activity relating to the American anti-capitalist movement Occupy Wall Street. Using a high-volume sample from the microblogging site Twitter, we investigate changes in Occupy participant engagement, interests, and social connectivity over a fifteen month period starting three months prior to the movement's first protest action. The results of this analysis indicate that, on Twitter, the Occupy movement tended to elicit participation from a set of highly interconnected users with pre-existing interests in domestic politics and foreign social movements. These users, while highly vocal in the months immediately following the birth of the movement, appear to have lost interest in Occupy related communication over the remainder of the study period.

  4. Wild Wall Crossing and BPS Giants

    CERN Document Server

    Galakhov, Dmitry; Mainiero, Tom; Moore, Gregory W; Neitzke, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We show that the BPS spectrum of pure SU(3) four-dimensional super Yang-Mills with N=2 supersymmetry exhibits a surprising phenomenon: there are regions of the Coulomb branch where the growth of the BPS degeneracies with the charge is exponential. We show this using spectral networks and independently using wall-crossing formulae and quiver methods. The computations using spectral networks provide a very nontrivial example of how these networks determine the four-dimensional BPS spectrum. We comment on some physical implications of the wild spectrum: for example, exponentially many field-theoretic BPS states with large charge are gigantic. Finally, we exhibit some surprising, thus far unexplained, regularities of the BPS spectrum.

  5. Hidden imperfect synchronization of wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardu, Sedat F.

    2010-03-01

    Instantaneous amplitude and phase concept emerging from analytical signal formulation is applied to the wavelet coefficients of streamwise velocity fluctuations in the buffer layer of a near wall turbulent flow. Experiments and direct numerical simulations show both the existence of long periods of inert zones wherein the local phase is constant. These regions are separated by random phase jumps. The local amplitude is globally highly intermittent, but not in the phase locked regions wherein it varies smoothly. These behaviors are reminiscent of phase synchronization phenomena observed in stochastic chaotic systems. The lengths of the constant phase inert (laminar) zones reveal a type I intermittency behavior, in concordance with saddle-node bifurcation, and the periodic orbits of saddle nature recently identified in Couette turbulence. The imperfect synchronization is related to the footprint of coherent Reynolds shear stress producing eddies convecting in the low buffer.

  6. Granger causality in wall-bounded turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granger causality is based on the idea that if a variable helps to predict another one, then they are probably involved in a causality relationship. This technique is based on the identification of a predictive model for causality detection. The aim of this paper is to use Granger causality to study the dynamics and the energy redistribution between scales and components in wall-bounded turbulent flows. In order to apply it on flows, Granger causality is generalized for snapshot-based observations of large size using linear-model identification methods coming from model reduction. Optimized DMD, a variant of the Dynamic Mode Decomposition, is considered for building a linear model based on snapshots. This method is used to link physical events and extract physical mechanisms associated to the bursting process in the logarithmic layer of a turbulent channel flow.

  7. Flow over convergent and divergent wall riblets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeltzsch, K.; Dinkelacker, A.; Grundmann, R. [Institut fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 36460 Merkers (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Fast swimming sharks have small riblets on their skin, which are assumed to improve the swimming performance of the fish. Fluid dynamic experiments in water as well as in air confirm this assumption. With riblet surfaces as compared to smooth surfaces, drag reductions up to about 10% were measured. The overall riblet pattern on sharks shows parallel riblets directed from head to tail, but besides this overall pattern fast swimming sharks have also small areas with converging riblets and others with diverging riblets. In the present study the velocity field over convergent and divergent riblet patterns is investigated by hot-wire measurements in turbulent pipe flow. Significant changes in the near wall velocity field were found. (orig.)

  8. [Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma of the Chest Wall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Genkichi; Yoneshima, Yasuto; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kitagawa, Dai; Kinjo, Nao; Ohgaki, Kippei; Maehara, Shinichiro; Teramoto, Seiichi; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi; Mine, Mari

    2016-08-01

    A 79-year-old man complaining of an anterior chest mass with pain had an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. A mass, 7 cm in size, with destruction of the right 4th rib was found on chest computed tomography. A F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) corresponding to the lesion showed an abnormal accumulation of FDG with the standardized uptake value(SUV) max=16.19. A malignant tumor of the chest wall origin was suspected and the tumor was resected with the 3th, 4th, and 5th ribs. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma. He died of local recurrence about 5 months after the operation. PMID:27476566

  9. On coherent structure in wall turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, A S

    2013-01-01

    A new theory of coherent structure in wall turbulence is presented. The theory is the first to predict packets of hairpin vortices and other structure in turbulence, and their dynamics, based on an analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations, under an assumption of a turbulent mean profile. The assumption of the turbulent mean acts as a restriction on the class of possible structures. It is shown that the coherent structure is a manifestation of essentially low-dimensional flow dynamics, arising from a critical layer mechanism. Using the decomposition presented in McKeon & Sharma (J. Fluid Mech, 658, 2010), complex coherent structure is recreated from minimal superpositions of response modes predicted by the analysis, which take the form of radially-varying travelling waves. By way of example, simple combinations of these modes are offered that predicts hairpins and modulated hairpin packets. The phase interaction also predicts important skewness and correlation results known in the literature. It is also sho...

  10. Living Near de Sitter Bubble Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, J H; Cho, Jin-Ho; Nam, Soonkeon

    2006-01-01

    We study various bubble solutions in string/M theories obtained by double Wick rotations of (non-)extremal brane configurations. Typically, the geometry interpolates de Sitter space-time times non-compact extra-dimensional space in the near-bubble wall region and the asymptotic flat Minkowski space-time. These bubble solutions provide nice background geometries to reconcile string/M theories with de Sitter space-time. For the applications of these solutions to cosmology, we consider multi-bubble solutions and find a landscape of varying cosmological constant. Double Wick rotation in string/M theories introduces imaginary higher-form fields. Rather than regard these fields as classical pathologies, we interpret them as semi-classical decay processes of de Sitter vacuum via the production of spherical branes. We speculate on the possibility of solving the cosmological constant problem making use of the condensation of the spherical membranes.

  11. Tritium issues in plasma wall interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2010-05-01

    Since tritium resources are very limited, not only for safety reason but also for tritium economy, tritium inventory in a reactor must be kept as small as possible. In the present tokamaks, however, hydrogen retention rate in their vacuum vessel is significantly large, i.e. more than 20% of fueled hydrogen is continuously piled up, which must not be allowed in a reactor. After the introduction of tritium as a hydrogen radioisotope, the paper summarizes present tritium issues in plasma wall interactions, in particular, fueling, retention and recovering, considering the handling of large amounts of tritium, i.e. confinement, leakage, contamination, permeation, regulations and tritium accountancy. Progress in overcoming such problems will be also presented.

  12. Are tiled display walls needed for astronomy?

    CERN Document Server

    Meade, Bernard F; Manos, Steven; Sinnott, Richard O

    2014-01-01

    Clustering commodity displays into a Tiled Display Wall (TDW) provides a cost-effective way to create an extremely high resolution display, capable of approaching the image sizes now gen- erated by modern astronomical instruments. Astronomers face the challenge of inspecting single large images, many similar images simultaneously, and heterogeneous but related content. Many research institutions have constructed TDWs on the basis that they will improve the scientific outcomes of astronomical imagery. We test this concept by presenting sample images to astronomers and non- astronomers using a standard desktop display (SDD) and a TDW. These samples include standard English words, wide field galaxy surveys and nebulae mosaics from the Hubble telescope. These experiments show that TDWs provide a better environment for searching for small targets in large images than SDDs. It also shows that astronomers tend to be better at searching images for targets than non-astronomers, both groups are generally better when em...

  13. Slow flow in channels with porous walls

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kaare H

    2012-01-01

    We consider the slow flow of a viscous incompressible liquid in a channel of constant but arbitrary cross section shape, driven by non-uniform suction or injection through the porous channel walls. A similarity transformation reduces the Navier-Stokes equations to a set of coupled equations for the velocity potential in two dimensions. When the channel aspect ratio and Reynolds number are both small, the problem reduces to solving the biharmonic equation with constant forcing in two dimensions. With the relevant boundary conditions, determining the velocity field in a porous channels is thus equivalent to solving for the vertical displacement of a simply suspended thin plate under uniform load. This allows us to provide analytic solutions for flow in porous channels whose cross-section is e.g. a rectangle or an equilateral triangle, and provides a general framework for the extension of Berman flow (Journal of Applied Physics 24(9), p. 1232, 1953) to three dimensions.

  14. Resistive Wall Mode studies in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In advanced tokamak operation the ultimate performance limit is set by resistive wall modes (RWMs). The nature of the plasma damping term governing RWM stability is not unambiguously established. A model based on ion Landau damping represented through a parallel viscosity term has been used extensively, but recently a more accurate 'kinetic' model, based on drift-kinetic theory, has been implemented in the MARS-F stability code. The damping of stable RWMs may be determined experimentally by measuring the response to n=1 helical magnetic perturbations from coils external to the plasma, under conditions where rotational stabilisation suppresses RWM growth - in JET, saddle coil systems both internal and external to the vacuum vessel are available for such studies. The resonant field amplification (RFA) has been measured for both DC and AC applied magnetic perturbations. RFA is observed in JET as β increases, particularly beyond the no-wall limit, and good agreement with MARS-F is found for either the kinetic damping model or for strong ion Landau damping. The occurrence of a critical flow velocity below which the RWM becomes unstable can also be compared with modelling. Magnetic braking is used to slow the plasma until a naturally unstable mode occurs. Comparison of the critical velocity with MARS-F modelling again shows reasonable agreement with the kinetic damping model or strong ion Landau damping. The results presented provide a very important experimental validation of RWM damping models, allowing for extrapolation to ITER, where it is found that the observed strong damping leads to a requirement for a flow of ∼2 to 3% of the Alfven velocity at the plasma centre to stabilise RWMs. (author)

  15. Cosegregation of cell wall and DNA in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schlaeppi, J M; Karamata, D

    1982-01-01

    Cosegregation of cell wall and DNA of a lysis-negative mutant of Bacillus subtilis was examined by continuously labeling (i) cell wall, (ii) DNA, and (iii) both cell wall and DNA. After four to five generations of chase in liquid media it was found by light microscope autoradiography that the numbers of wall segregation units per cell are 29 and 9 in rich and minimal medium, respectively. Under the same conditions the numbers of segregation units of DNA were almost 50% lower: 15 and 5, respec...

  16. Cell wall sorting of lipoproteins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Navarre, W W; Daefler, S; Schneewind, O

    1996-01-01

    Many surface proteins are thought to be anchored to the cell wall of gram-positive organisms via their C termini, while the N-terminal domains of these molecules are displayed on the bacterial surface. Cell wall anchoring of surface proteins in Staphylococcus aureus requires both an N-terminal leader peptide and a C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. By fusing the cell wall sorting of protein A to the C terminus of staphylococcal beta-lactamase, we demonstrate here that lipoproteins can also ...

  17. Halo current and resistive wall simulations of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of ITER relevant problems in resistive MHD concern the effects of a resistive wall: vertical displacement events (VDE), halo currents caused by disruptions, and resistive wall modes. Simulations of these events have been carried out using the M3D code. We have verified the growth rate scaling of VDEs, which is proportional to the wall resistivity. Simulations have been done of disruptions caused by large inversion radius internal kink modes, as well as by nonlinear growth of resistive wall modes. Halo current flowing during the disruption has asymmetries with toroidal peaking factor up to about 3. VDEs have larger growth rates during disruption simulations, which may account for the loss of vertical feedback control during disruptions in experiments. Further simulations have been made of disruptions caused by resistive wall modes in ITER equilibria. For these modes the toroidal peaking factor is close to 1. Resistive wall modes in ITER and reactors have also been investigated utilizing the newly developed AEGIS (Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Solution) linear full MHD code, for realistically shaped, fully toroidal equilibria. The AEGIS code uses an adaptive mesh in the radial direction which allows thin inertial layers to be accurately resolved, such as those responsible for the stabilization of resistive wall modes (RWM) by plasma rotation. Stabilization of resistive wall modes by rotation and wall thickness effects are examined. (author)

  18. Hamilton-Jacobi method for curved domain walls and cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skenderis, Kostas; Townsend, Paul K.

    2006-12-01

    We use Hamiltonian methods to study curved domain walls and cosmologies. This leads naturally to first-order equations for all domain walls and cosmologies foliated by slices of maximal symmetry. For Minkowski and AdS-sliced domain walls (flat and closed FLRW cosmologies) we recover a recent result concerning their (pseudo)supersymmetry. We show how domain-wall stability is consistent with the instability of AdS vacua that violate the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We also explore the relationship to Hamilton-Jacobi theory and compute the wave-function of a 3-dimensional closed universe evolving towards de Sitter spacetime.

  19. Hamilton-Jacobi for Domain Walls and Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Skenderis, K; Skenderis, Kostas; Townsend, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    We use Hamiltonian methods to study curved domain walls and cosmologies. This leads naturally to first order equations for all domain walls and cosmologies foliated by slices of maximal symmetry. For Minkowski and AdS-sliced domain walls (flat and closed FLRW cosmologies) we recover a recent result concerning their (pseudo)supersymmetry. We show how domain-wall stability is consistent with the instability of adS vacua that violate the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We also explore the relationship to Hamilton-Jacobi theory and compute the wave-function of a 3-dimensional closed universe evolving towards de Sitter spacetime.

  20. Size effect of welded thin-walled tubular joints

    OpenAIRE

    Mashiri, Fidelis Rutendo; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Hirt, Manfred A.; NUSSBAUMER, Alain

    2007-01-01

    This paper clarifies the terminologies used to describe the size effect on fatigue behaviour of welded joints. It summarizes the existing research on size effect in the perspective of newly defined terminologies. It identifies knowledge gaps in designing tubular joints using the hot spot stress method, i.e. thin-walled tubular joints with wall thickness less than 4 mm and thick-walled tubular joints with wall thickness larger than 50 mm or diameter to thickness ratio less than 24. It is the t...

  1. Oocyst wall formation and composition in coccidian parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Mai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The oocyst wall of coccidian parasites is a robust structure that is resistant to a variety of environmental and chemical insults. This resilience allows oocysts to survive for long periods, facilitating transmission from host to host. The wall is bilayered and is formed by the sequential release of the contents of two specialized organelles - wall forming body 1 and wall forming body 2 - found in the macrogametocyte stage of Coccidia. The oocyst wall is over 90% protein but few of these proteins have been studied. One group is cysteine-rich and may be presumed to crosslink via disulphide bridges, though this is yet to be investigated. Another group of wall proteins is rich in tyrosine. These proteins, which range in size from 8-31 kDa, are derived from larger precursors of 56 and 82 kDa found in the wall forming bodies. Proteases may catalyze processing of the precursors into tyrosine-rich peptides, which are then oxidatively crosslinked in a reaction catalyzed by peroxidases. In support of this hypothesis, the oocyst wall has high levels of dityrosine bonds. These dityrosine crosslinked proteins may provide a structural matrix for assembly of the oocyst wall and contribute to its resilience.

  2. Oscillating light wall above a sunspot light bridge

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Shuhong; Jiang, Fayu; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2015-01-01

    With the high tempo-spatial \\emph{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} 1330 {\\AA} images, we find that many bright structures are rooted in the light bridge of NOAA 12192, forming a \\emph{light wall}. The light wall is brighter than the surrounding areas, and the wall top is much brighter than the wall body. The New Vacuum Solar Telescope H$\\alpha$ and the \\emph{Solar Dynamics Observatory} 171 {\\AA} and 131 {\\AA} images are also used to study the light wall properties. In 1330 {\\AA}, 171 {\\AA}, and 131 {\\AA}, the top of the wall has a higher emission, while in the H$\\alpha$ line, the wall top emission is very low. The wall body corresponds to bright areas in 1330 {\\AA} and dark areas in the other lines. The top of the light wall moves upward and downward successively, performing oscillations in height. The deprojected mean height, amplitude, oscillation velocity, and the dominant period are determined to be 3.6 Mm, 0.9 Mm, 15.4 km s$^{-1}$, and 3.9 min, respectively. We interpret the oscillations of the lig...

  3. Energy and Moisture Impact of EIFS Walls in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Johnston, David [EIFS Industry Members Association (EIMA)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper summarizes a family of computer simulations that have been performed to assess the hygrothermal performance of exterior insulation finish systems and discusses the validation of the model prior to its use. This research deals with evaluation of the performance of a number of selected wall systems in all 8 IECC USA climate zones. The research produced a range of performances that are representative of generic EIFS wall systems, and not for a specific manufactured product. A comparison was performed between three different EIFS walls and a brick wall system.

  4. Closure for a wall opening in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention concerns a closure for the radiation shielding closing of a wall opening between two large adjacent cells in nuclear plants. If one of the two large cells is provided with a cell crane, the adjacent large cell is usually made an intervention area, so as to be able to do maintenance on the cell crane in it. The wall opening between the two large cells must be closed during repair work to the cell crane. The closure is therefore arranged so that it can run on horizontal rails. The external profile of the closure fits tightly into the internal profile of the wall opening, or covers the wall opening completely. (orig.)

  5. Cell wall degradation in the autolysis of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Leblic, M I; Reyes, F; Martinez, M J; Lahoz, R

    1982-12-27

    A systematic study on autolysis of the cell walls of fungi has been made on Neurospora crassa, Botrytis cinerea, Polystictus versicolor, Aspergillus nidulans, Schizophyllum commune, Aspergillus niger, and Mucor mucedo. During autolysis each fungus produces the necessary lytic enzymes for its autodegradation. From autolyzed cultures of each fungus enzymatic precipitates were obtained. The degree of lysis of the cell walls, obtained from non-autolyzed mycelia, was studied by incubating these cell walls with and without a supply of their own lytic enzymes. The degree of lysis increased with the incubation time and generally was higher with a supply of lytic enzymes. Cell walls from mycelia of different ages were obtained. A higher degree of lysis was always found, in young cell walls than in older cell walls, when exogenous lytic enzymes were present. In all the fungi studied, there is lysis of the cell walls during autolysis. This is confirmed by the change of the cell wall structure as well as by the degree of lysis reached by the cell wall and the release of substances, principally glucose and N-acetylglucosamine in the medium.

  6. Nanosurgery: observation of peptidoglycan strands in Lactobacillus helveticus cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firtel, Max; Henderson, Grant; Sokolov, Igor

    2004-11-15

    The internal cell wall structure of the bacterium Lactobacillus helveticus has been observed in situ in aqueous solution using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The AFM tip was used not only for imaging but presumably to remove mechanically large patches of the outer cell wall after appropriate chemical treatment, which typically leaves the bacteria alive. The surface exposed after this 'surgery' revealed {approx}26 nm thick twisted strands within the cell wall. The structure and location of the observed strands are consistent with the glycan backbone of peptidoglycan fibers that give strength to the cell wall. The structural organization of these fibers has not been observed previously.

  7. Beyond growth: novel functions for bacterial cell wall hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Timna J; Taylor, Jennifer A; Salama, Nina R

    2012-11-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall maintains turgor pressure and cell shape of most bacteria. Cell wall hydrolases are essential, together with synthases, for growth and daughter cell separation. Recent work in diverse organisms has uncovered new cell wall hydrolases that act autonomously or on neighboring cells to modulate invasion of prey cells, cell shape, innate immune detection, intercellular communication, and competitor lysis. The hydrolases involved in these processes catalyze the cleavage of bonds throughout the sugar and peptide moities of peptidoglycan. Phenotypes associated with these diverse hydrolases reveal new functions of the bacterial cell wall beyond growth and division.

  8. Scaling law for bubbles rising near vertical walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Bhuvankar, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the rising motion of a layer of gas bubbles next to a vertical wall in a liquid in the presence of an upward flow parallel to the wall to help with the understanding of the fluid dynamics in a bubbly upflow in vertical channels. Only the region near the wall is simulated with an average pressure gradient applied to the domain that balances the weight of the liquid phase. The upward flow is created by the rising motion of the bubbles. The bubbles are kept near the wall by the lateral lift force acting on them as a result of rising in the shear layer near the wall. The rise velocity of the bubbles sliding on the wall and the average rise velocity of the liquid depend on three dimensionless parameters, Archimedes number, Ar, Eötvös number, Eo, and the average volume fraction of bubbles on the wall. In the limit of small Eo, bubbles are nearly spherical and the dependency on Eo becomes negligible. In this limit, the scaling of the liquid Reynolds number with Archimedes number and the void fraction is presented. A scaling argument is presented based on viscous dissipation analysis that matches the numerical findings. Viscous dissipation rates are found to be high in a thin film region between the bubble and the wall. A scaling of the viscous dissipation and steady state film thickness between the bubble and the wall with Archimedes number is presented.

  9. Directed compact percolation near a damp wall with biased growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, H.; Owczarek, A. L.

    2012-11-01

    The model of directed compact percolation near a damp wall is generalized to allow for a bias in the growth of a cluster, either towards or away from the wall. The percolation probability for clusters beginning with seed width m, any distance from the wall, is derived exactly by solving the associated recurrences. It is found that the general biased case near a damp wall leads to a critical exponent β = 1, in line with the dry biased case, which differs from the unbiased damp/dry exponent β = 2.

  10. Directed compact percolation near a damp wall with biased growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The model of directed compact percolation near a damp wall is generalized to allow for a bias in the growth of a cluster, either towards or away from the wall. The percolation probability for clusters beginning with seed width m, any distance from the wall, is derived exactly by solving the associated recurrences. It is found that the general biased case near a damp wall leads to a critical exponent β = 1, in line with the dry biased case, which differs from the unbiased damp/dry exponent β = 2. (paper)

  11. Experiment and Simulation Study on the Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaic Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjie Zhang; Bin Hao; Nianping Li

    2014-01-01

    Based on comparative study on two amorphous silicon photovoltaic walls (a-Si PV walls), the temperature distribution and the instant power were tested; and with EnergyPlus software, similar models of the walls were built to simulate annual power generation and air conditioning load. On typical sunshine day, the corresponding position temperature of nonventilated PV wall was generally 0.5~1.5°C higher than that of ventilated one, while the power generation was 0.2%~0.4% lower, which was consis...

  12. Scalar triplet on a domain wall: an exact solution

    CERN Document Server

    Gani, Vakhid A; Radomskiy, Roman V

    2016-01-01

    We study a model with a real scalar Higgs field and a scalar triplet field that allows existence of a topological defect -- a domain wall. The wall breaks the global $O(3)$ symmetry of the model, which gives rise to non-Abelian orientational degrees of freedom. We found an exact analytic solution that describes a domain wall with a localized configuration of the triplet field on it. This solution enables one to calculate contributions to the action from the orientational and translational degrees of freedom of the triplet field. We also study the linear stability of the domain wall with the triplet field switched off.

  13. Structural Studies of Complex Carbohydrates of Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvill, Alan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Hahn, Michael G. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); O' Neill, Malcolm A. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); York, William S. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Most of the solar energy captured by land plants is converted into the polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) that are the predominant components of the cell wall. These walls, which account for the bulk of plant biomass, have numerous roles in the growth and development of plants. Moreover, these walls have a major impact on human life as they are a renewable source of biomass, a source of diverse commercially useful polymers, a major component of wood, and a source of nutrition for humans and livestock. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to wall assembly and how cell walls and their component polysaccharides contribute to plant growth and development is essential to improve and extend the productivity and value of plant materials. The proposed research will develop and apply advanced analytical and immunological techniques to study specific changes in the structures and interactions of the hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides that occur during differentiation and in response to genetic modification and chemical treatments that affect wall biosynthesis. These new techniques will make it possible to accurately characterize minute amounts of cell wall polysaccharides so that subtle changes in structure that occur in individual cell types can be identified and correlated to the physiological or developmental state of the plant. Successful implementation of this research will reveal fundamental relationships between polysaccharide structure, cell wall architecture, and cell wall functions.

  14. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  15. Thermal performance of concrete masonry unit wall systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosny, J.

    1995-12-31

    New materials, modern building wall technologies now available in the building marketplace, and unique, more accurate, methods of thermal analysis of wall systems create an opportunity to design and erect buildings where thermal envelopes that use masonry wall systems can be more efficient. Thermal performance of the six masonry wall systems is analyzed. Most existing masonry systems are modifications of technologies presented in this paper. Finite difference two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer modeling and unique methods of the clear wall and overall thermal analysis were used. In the design of thermally efficient masonry wall systems is t to know how effectively the insulation material is used and how the insulation shape and its location affect the wall thermal performance. Due to the incorrect shape of the insulation or structural components, hidden thermal shorts cause additional heat losses. In this study, the thermal analysis of the clear wall was enriched with the examination of the thermal properties of the wall details and the study of a quantity defined herein the Thermal Efficiency of the insulation material.

  16. Effective pinning energy landscape perturbations for propagating magnetic domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, D. M.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a magnetic domain wall and a pinning site is explored in a planar nanowire using micromagnetics to reveal perturbations of the pinning energetics for propagating domain walls. Numerical simulations in the high damping ’quasi-static’ and low damping ’dynamic’ regimes are compared and show clear differences in de-pinning fields, indicating that dynamical micromagnetic models, which incorporate precessionally limited magnetization processes, are needed to understand domain wall pinning. Differences in the micromagnetic domain wall structure strongly influence the pinning and show periodic behaviour with increasing applied field associated with Walker breakdown. In the propagating regime pinning is complicated. PMID:27694953

  17. Asymmetric Domain Walls of Small Angle in Soft Ferromagnetic Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Lukas; Ignat, Radu

    2016-05-01

    We focus on a special type of domain wall appearing in the Landau-Lifshitz theory for soft ferromagnetic films. These domain walls are divergence-free S^2-valued transition layers that connect two directions {m_θ^± in S^2} (differing by an angle {2θ}) and minimize the Dirichlet energy. Our main result is the rigorous derivation of the asymptotic structure and energy of such "asymmetric" domain walls in the limit {θ downarrow 0}. As an application, we deduce that a supercritical bifurcation causes the transition from symmetric to asymmetric walls in the full micromagnetic model.

  18. The Toxoplasma gondii Cyst Wall Protein CST1 Is Critical for Cyst Wall Integrity and Promotes Bradyzoite Persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Tadakimi Tomita; Bzik, David J.; Yan Fen Ma; Fox, Barbara A.; Lye Meng Markillie; Taylor, Ronald C.; Kami Kim; Louis M Weiss

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infects up to one third of the world's population. A key to the success of T. gondii as a parasite is its ability to persist for the life of its host as bradyzoites within tissue cysts. The glycosylated cyst wall is the key structural feature that facilitates persistence and oral transmission of this parasite. Because most of the antibodies and reagents that recognize the cyst wall recognize carbohydrates, identification of the components of the cyst wall has been technicall...

  19. Wall-to-wall tree type classification using airborne lidar data and CIR images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Johannes; Nord-Larsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Extensive ground surveys of forest resources are expensive, and remote sensing is commonly used to extend surveys to large areas for which no ground data are available to provide more accurate estimates for forest management decisions. Remote-sensing data for tree type classification are usually.......61. These results demonstrate that using wall-to-wall remote-sensing data, unsupervised classification of forest stands into broadleaf, conifer, or mixed is possible with an accuracy comparable to that of limited area studies. However, challenges and restrictions of using countrywide airborne remote sensing data...... airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) data and colour infrared (CIR) images on a countrywide scale. We adjusted the classification procedure using field data from countrywide tree species trial (TST) plots, and verified it on data from the National Forest Inventory (NFI). Results of the object...

  20. Stability of gravity-scalar systems for domain-wall models with a soft wall

    CERN Document Server

    George, Damien P

    2010-01-01

    We show that it is possible to create an RS soft-wall model, a model with a compact extra dimension, without using fundamental branes. All that is required are bulk scalar fields minimally coupled to gravity. Of crucial importance is the stability of the size of the extra dimension. Without branes, one cannot easily implement the Goldberger-Wise mechanism, and instead it must be shown that the scalar configuration is stable in its own right. We use the superpotential approach for generating solutions, the so called 'fake supergravity' scenario, and show that configurations generated in such a way are always free of tachyonic modes. Furthermore, we show that the model is also free of zero modes (in the spin-0 sector) if all the scalars have odd parity. We discuss the hierarchy problem in soft-wall models, and applications of our analysis to the AdS/QCD correspondence.

  1. Effect of pressure upon wall-to-wall polymerization contraction of a chemically-cured resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, E K

    1983-02-01

    The marginal gaps of 105 Silar fillings were measured after application of a load between zero and 100 N on the matrix during the initial polymerization. The fillings were placed in non-etched dentin cavities in extracted human teeth. The dentin surrounding the cavities was either roughened with carborundum paper No. 220 or polished with Alfa Micropolish 1 micron before the cavities were filled. When load was applied to the matrix, no effect was found of the roughness surrounding the cavities, but without load the wall-to-wall contraction was significantly greater in cavities where the surrounding dentin surfaces had been polished with Alfa Micropolish. Apparently the effect of load was related to friction during the polymerization between filling surplus and the dentin surrounding the cavities and not to load per se.

  2. Wall and Anti-Wall in the Randall-Sundrum Model and A New Infrared Regularization

    CERN Document Server

    Ichinose, S

    2000-01-01

    An approach to find the field equation solution of the Randall-Sundrum model with the $S^1/Z_2$ extra axis is presented. We closely examine the infrared singularity. The vacuum is set by the 5 dimensional Higgs field. Both the domain-wall and the anti-domain-wall naturally appear, at the ends of the extra compact axis, by taking a {\\it new infrared regularization}. The stability is guaranteed from the outset by the kink boundary condition. A {\\it continuous} (infrared-)regularized solution, which is a truncated {\\it Fourier series} of a {\\it discontinuous} solution, is utilized.The ultraviolet-infrared relation appears in the leading order of the solution.

  3. Resistive wall stabilization by toroidal rotation: effects of partial wall configurations and aspect ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, D.J. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-09-01

    The results of this work demonstrate that with a pair of close-fitting conducting plates, which leave a large gap at the outboard midplane, a high-{beta} equilibrium at conventional aspect ratio can be stabilized at a rotation speed reduced by a factor of over 3.5 compared to a fully surrounding, continuous and complete wall at the same separation. Results were also presented which show that low-aspect-ratio equilibria can be stabilized at significantly lower rotation speeds than at conventional aspect ratio. These two effects can perhaps be combined to enhance even further the effect of resistive wall stabilization at low aspect ratio. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs.

  4. Small Diameter Few- Walled Carbon Nanotubes: An Alternative for Single Walled nanotubes in Bulk Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Liu

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Although Single walled carbon nanotubes have shown tremendous potential in many applications due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties, the lack of a large scale synthesis method at low cost is still the main limiting factor for the realization of the full potential of this unique materials. On the other hand, multiwalled carbon nanotubes are being made in tons per year quantity and found their application in conducting plastic and other bulk applications.

  5. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Based Numerical Simulation of Machining of Thin-Wall Components with Varying Wall Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shrikrishna Nandkishor; Bolar, Gururaj

    2016-06-01

    Control of part deflection and deformation during machining of low rigidity thin-wall components is an important aspect in the manufacture of desired quality products. This paper presents a comparative study on the effect of geometry constraints on the product quality during machining of thin-wall components made of an aerospace alloy aluminum 2024-T351. Three-dimensional nonlinear finite element (FE) based simulations of machining of thin-wall parts were carried out by considering three variations in the wall constraint viz. free wall, wall constrained at one end, and wall with constraints at both the ends. Lagrangian formulation based transient FE model has been developed to simulate the interaction between the workpiece and helical milling cutter. Johnson-Cook material and damage model were adopted to account for material behavior during machining process; damage initiation and chip separation. A modified Coulomb friction model was employed to define the contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece. The numerical model was validated with experimental results and found to be in good agreement. Based on the simulation results it was noted that deflection and deformation were maximum in the thin-wall constrained at one end in comparison with those obtained in other cases. It was noted that three dimensional finite element simulations help in a better way to predict the product quality during precision manufacturing of thin-wall components.

  6. Measurement of streptococcal cell wall in tissues of rats resistant or susceptible to cell wall-induced chronic erosive arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderle, S K; Allen, J B; Wilder, R L; Eisenberg, R A; Cromartie, W J; Schwab, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The quantity of streptococcal cell wall localized in the joints of rats of strains which are either susceptible (Sprague-Dawley, LEW/N, M520/N) or resistant (Buffalo, WKY/N, F344/N) to cell wall-induced chronic erosive arthritis was measured after intraperitoneal injection of group A streptococcal cell wall fragments. Susceptibility or resistance was not associated with a difference in the amount of cell wall localized in limbs or other tissues. It is concluded that although localization of c...

  7. Effect of Shock Wave on Fabricated Anti-Blast Wall and Distribution Law Around the Wall Under Near Surface Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jun; LIU Jingbo; YAN Qiushi

    2008-01-01

    The loads of shock wave effect on fabricated anti-blast wall and distribution law around the wall were investigated by using near surface explosion test method and FEM.The pressure-time histories and variety law on the foreside and backside of the anti-blast wall were adopted in the tests of variety of different explosion distances and dynamites,as well as in the comparison between the test and numerical calculation.The test results show that the loads of shock wave effect on the anti-blast wall were essen-tially consistent with calculation results using criterion under surface explosion when explosion distances exceed 2 m,the distribution of overpressure behind wall was gained according to variety law based on small-large-small.It is also demonstrated that the peak overpressure behind wall had commonly appeared in wall height by 1.5--2.5 multiples,and the peak overpressures of protective building behind wall could be reduced effectively by using the fabricated anti-blast wall.

  8. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galizia, Mauricio S.; Barker, Alex; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Liao, Yihua [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); McDermott, Mary M. [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. (orig.)

  9. Life Cycle Assessment of Wall Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Sriranjani

    Natural resource depletion and environmental degradation are the stark realities of the times we live in. As awareness about these issues increases globally, industries and businesses are becoming interested in understanding and minimizing the ecological footprints of their activities. Evaluating the environmental impacts of products and processes has become a key issue, and the first step towards addressing and eventually curbing climate change. Additionally, companies are finding it beneficial and are interested in going beyond compliance using pollution prevention strategies and environmental management systems to improve their environmental performance. Life-cycle Assessment (LCA) is an evaluative method to assess the environmental impacts associated with a products' life-cycle from cradle-to-grave (i.e. from raw material extraction through to material processing, manufacturing, distribution, use, repair and maintenance, and finally, disposal or recycling). This study focuses on evaluating building envelopes on the basis of their life-cycle analysis. In order to facilitate this analysis, a small-scale office building, the University Services Building (USB), with a built-up area of 148,101 ft2 situated on ASU campus in Tempe, Arizona was studied. The building's exterior envelope is the highlight of this study. The current exterior envelope is made of tilt-up concrete construction, a type of construction in which the concrete elements are constructed horizontally and tilted up, after they are cured, using cranes and are braced until other structural elements are secured. This building envelope is compared to five other building envelope systems (i.e. concrete block, insulated concrete form, cast-in-place concrete, steel studs and curtain wall constructions) evaluating them on the basis of least environmental impact. The research methodology involved developing energy models, simulating them and generating changes in energy consumption due to the above mentioned

  10. Stability of spiral welded tubes in Quay Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, A.M.; van Es, S.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    A European research project (RFCS) has started to provide economic and safe guidance for the design of spirally welded tubes in combined walls. The main motivation for this project called COMBITUBE is that the current Eurocode 3 regulations for tubes in quay walls lead to uneconomic designs, because

  11. Myocardial wall motion imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, Dani�l; Kuijpers, D.; Oudkerk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Wall motion imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) provides important functional information about global and regional myocardial function. This review will give an overview of the current state of myocardial wall motion imaging, especially focusing on the clinical role of dobutamine

  12. Spin-dependent electron transport through a ferromagnetic domain wall

    OpenAIRE

    Ohe, J.; Yamamoto, M.; Ohtsuki, T.; Slevin, K.

    2002-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of spin-dependent transport through a ferromagnetic domain wall. With an increase of the number of components of the exchange coupling, we have observed that the variance of the conductance becomes half. As the strength of the domain wall magnetization is increased, negative magnetoresistance is also observed.

  13. Decay of charge deposited on the wall of gaseous void

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1992-01-01

    After partial discharge activity within a gaseous void, charges accumulate on the wall of the void. The decay of such charges due to surface currents at the void wall is studied analytically, and the factors affecting this decay are indicated. The results show that in terms of the basic time...

  14. Rail gun performance and plasma characteristics due to wall ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment of Bauer, et al. (1982) is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time.

  15. A“TIME-SPACE” RELATED DESIGNMETHOD OF FREEZING WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈湘生

    1996-01-01

    Artificially ground freezing (AGF) is one of the main methods to establish temporarysupport for shaft sinking in unstable water bearing strata. Domde (1915) formula based on frozensoil strength has widely been used for designing freezing wall thickness. However, it can not en-sure the stability of freezing wall, nor guarantee the safety of shaft construction as frozen depth in-creases in unstable water bearing strata. F. A. Auld (1985, 1988)[1'2] presented a designmethod of freezing wall, which is on the basis of strength and stability, together with deformationof freezing wall. This paper, according to the practice in China, describes a "time -space" relat-ed design method for deep freezing wall. The method is based on "time-space" concept, whichincludes influence of excavation rate of advance, unsupported length of freezing wall and the sumpstate on inward deformation of freezing wall, and the allowable pipe deformation caused by in-ward deformation of freezing wall. Finally, successful application of this method to the large scalecoal mine-Jining No. 2 Mine[3] in Shandong Province of China is presented. It saved much invest-ment compared with F. A. Auld's design for the same mine.

  16. Mortality by Level of Emphysema and Airway Wall Thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Ane; Skorge, Trude Duelien; Bottai, Matteo;

    2013-01-01

    There is limited knowledge of the prognostic value of quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness (AWT) on mortality.......There is limited knowledge of the prognostic value of quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness (AWT) on mortality....

  17. The no-wall holographic model for vector quarkonia

    CERN Document Server

    Afonin, S S

    2016-01-01

    We use the no-wall holographic approach (a relative of the soft-wall one) to construct a universal description of vector mesons with arbitrary quark masses. The proposed model predicts a specific dependence of the parameters of radial Regge trajectories on the quark masses in a reasonable agreement with the meson phenomenology and some theoretical expectations.

  18. Tube wall thickness guage for hot stretch reducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new system of tube wall thickness gauge for seamless tube on hot stretch reducing-mill is reported. The system adapts two methods using gamma rays. One is a new method measuring double wall thickness of tube another is a known method measuring mean value of cross section of tube. (author)

  19. Evaluation of Tube Wall Thickness of Feed Water Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikura, Takahisa; Morisaki, Koichi; Hamada, Seiichi

    With regard to the high pressure (HP) feed water heater of thermal power plant at Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) sites, inspection of feed water (FW) tubes wall thickness are conducted whenever required such that frequent tube leak occurs. As a standard inspection methodology, FW heater is disassembled during planned outage, tube wall thickness is measured by the ultrasonic pulse techique (UT), then plugs are installed at the both ends of FW tube if its measured wall thickness is found below calculated threshold. However, the root causes of wall thinning of FW tube are various such as erosion and corrosion, based on wall thinning condition, the above threshold is not applied but utilizing the other technically well-grounded evaluation method is sometimes more rational. Therefore, TEPCO classified wall-thinning condition based on inspection data and established technically well-grounded and rational evaluation methodologies of FW tube wall thickness to suite each wall thinning condition. Moreover, with recent improvement of inspection technique, technology enabled faster, larger amount, and more accurate data acquisition, TEPCO has developed the systematized evaluation methodology that can transact data acquisition and evaluation simultaneously. This article introduces the logic of evaluation methods and examined algorithms to make them systematized.

  20. Dynamic stiffness for thin-walled structures by power series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Bin; LEUNG A.Y.T.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic stiffness method is introduced to analyze thin-walled structures including thin-walled straight beams and spatial twisted helix beam. A dynamic stiffness matrix is formed by using frequency dependent shape functions which are exact solutions of the governing differential equations. With the obtained thin-walled beam dynamic stiffness matrices, the thin-walled frame dynamic stiffness matrix can also be formulated by satisfying the required displacements compatibility and forces equilibrium, a method which is similar to the finite element method (FEM). Then the thin-walled structure natural frequencies can be found by equating the determinant of the system dynamic stiffness matrix to zero. By this way, just one element and several elements can exactly predict many modes of a thin-walled beam and a spatial thin-walled frame, respectively. Several cases are studied and the results are compared with the existing solutions of other methods. The natural frequencies and buckling loads of these thin-walled structures are computed.