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Sample records for badger army ammunition

  1. Water Conservation Study, Badger Army Ammunition Plant, Baraboo, Wisconsin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this water conservation study is to identify projects which will result in energy maintenance and cost savings in the process water distribution system at Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP...

  2. Water Conservation Study. Badger Army Ammunition Plant, Baraboo, Wisconsin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this water conservation study is to identify projects which will result in energy maintenance and cost savings in the process water distribution system at Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP...

  3. Optimizing the Capacity and Operation of U.S. Army Ammunition Production Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bayram, Vedat

    2002-01-01

    .... The Army must also manage and maintain capacity to replenish ammunition consumed by major theater wars without expanding the industrial base, The combined organic and inorganic industrial base...

  4. Determination of OB Emission Factors Using an Unmanned Aerial System (“drone”) at ?Radford Army Ammunition Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    A description of the emission sampling via UAV at the Radford Army Ammunition Plant including number of samples, waste composition, UAV flight data. No emissions data presented; only qualitative description.

  5. Remedial Investigation Badger Army Ammunition Plant, Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 7. Appendices M Through R

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    healthy male volunteers. Subjects ranged in age from 27 to 61 years and had no previous history of diabetes , hypertension, or cardiovascular disease. Diets...Public Health. Association to identify clinical cases of infantile methemoglobinemia that were associated with ingestion of nitrate-contaminated water. A...and Walton (1951) provide convincing evidence that infantile methemoglobinemia does not occur at drinking water levels of 10 mg nitrate-nitrogen/L

  6. Remedial Investigation Badger Army Ammunition Plant, Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 5. Appendix K.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    4 -4 -4 -4 -4.4 -4r44 4 4-4 -4 ~ 4 .010 -4 000000000000000000000000 000000000000000000000000000 *d -4 8 (a *~ SI * 4JI j -OZ2~404 ZtM0G. .P4000I 4bd ...000000000000000 4.3 tD ~-O-.4- 4-%iCiIO f ~~a to -: u t A w 00000000000000000000000000 )1 310000000000000000000000000000 m o >.,V 0i. 01 00 01 r4rle4r e4

  7. Remedial Investigation Badger Army Ammunition Plant, Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 1. Text Sections 1 Through 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    VOCs (acetone [ACET], trichlorofluoromethane [CCL3F], methyl ethyl ketone [MEK]) sporadically detected at very low concentrations (< 1 parts per billion...associated with the site includes red pine ( Pinus resinosa), hickories, cedar (Thuja occidentalis), and American elm (Ulmus americana). Grasses and weedy...cd)pyrene ICDPYR iron FE lead PB magnesium MG *manganese MN mercury HG methylene chloride CH12CL2 methyl ethyl ketone or 2-butanone MIEK

  8. Remedial Investigation Badger Army Ammunition Plant, Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 3. Appendices G Through J

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    WATER DEPTHI FTI ,.f’ WELL I NTEGRITY~...- . -rS Ng~ ELEVATIONI GAL/VOL PROT. CA6 +9lG-lECURE U H E I H T O F •....-7\\ - - C ý C R E T E C O L L A R IN... treatment facility for intercepting and stripping contaminated groundwater of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to perform the aquifer test...available in the IRM treatment facility building were used as a backup for flow rate measurements. During the aquifer test, water from BCW-3 was piped

  9. Remedial Investigation Badger Army Ammunition Plant, Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 1. Appendices A Through D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    discharge of radioactive pollutants to surface waters and oil pollution control are discussed in the following paragraphs. There are three categories...of pollutants regulated under the various parts of the CWA listed below: * Toxic pollutants identified in CWA Section 307(a)(1); Conventional polutants

  10. Remedial Investigation Badger Army Ammunition Plant, Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 2. Appendices D.2 Through F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    FILES FOR COMPOUNDS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN Vol. 7 APPENDIX 0 - HUMAN HEALTH RISK CALCULATIONS Vol. 7 APPENDIX P - INVENTORY OF SITE SPECIES Vol. 7...Driing Mud 0" 0 3 am 01 99 5 .Annula space seal:- GnmuldBsuryoni 0 33 Lbs/gal mud weight ... Benuar-siid shiny 3 33 16. Driling addives used 13 yesLbs...CONSTRUCTION REPORT / 5 WISCONSIN STATE BOARD OF HEALTH WELL DRILLING DIVISION JUL 11 |W Note: Section 32 of the Wisconsin Well Drilling Sanitary Code

  11. Final Remedial Investigation Sampling Plan Addendum. Milan Army Ammunition Plant Remedial Investigation Southern Study Area (Operable Unit No. 5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    91-D-0012 Task Order No. 0007 2.4.7 Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Phytoremediation Pilot Study, USAEC, 1996 .. .............................. 2-28 2.5...indicated that heavy metal contamination (lead, chromium, and mercury ) was present at relatively low levels, and explosive contamination was limited to...and MI172 where lead was found at 22.9 j.g/1 and 18.4 Ig/l, respectively. 2.4.7 Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Phytoremediation Pilot Study, USAEC, 1996

  12. Demolition Range Noise Abatement Technique Demonstration and Evaluation for the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CALDERONE, JAMES J.; GARBIN H, DOUGLAS

    2001-01-01

    Public concern regarding the effects of noise generated by the detonation of excess and obsolete explosive munitions at U.S. Army demolition ranges is a continuing issue for the Army's demilitarization and disposal groups. Recent concerns of citizens living near the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant (MCAAP) in Oklahoma have lead the U.S. Army Defense Ammunition Center (DAC) to conduct a demonstration and evaluation of noise abatement techniques that could be applied to the MCAAP demolition range. With the support of the DAC, MCAAP, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), three types of noise abatement techniques were applied: aqueous foams, overburden (using combinations of sand beds and dirt coverings), and rubber or steel blast mats. Eight test configurations were studied and twenty-four experiments were conducted on the MCAAP demolition range in July of 2000. Instrumentation and data acquisition systems were fielded for the collection of near-field blast pressures, far-field acoustic pressures, plant boundary seismic signals, and demolition range meteorological conditions. The resulting data has been analyzed and reported, and a ranking of each technique's effects has been provided to the DAC

  13. Army System for Mobilization Requirements Planning: Supply Classes V and VII (Ammunition and Equipment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    the last escudo ...I Paul Kennedy, The Rise and Fall of the Great3 Powers (Vintage Books, 1987), page .,cxiv. I I I I i xvii U This page intentionally... fiscal year. Because of its extensive experience in mobilization studies for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and its earlier involvement in

  14. Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant Longterm Groundwater Monitoring Health and Safety Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    glands. It is less toxic to humans than most anticholinesterase agents because malathion and its metabolite, malaoxon, are metabolized in the liver to...During the early and middle 1980s, the U.S. army conducted an incineration project designed to excavate and treat soils beneath leachpits and cesspools...contamination, but was unable to remove all contaminated soil . At many locations, remediation action levels could not be achieved before groundwater was

  15. Badger hair in shaving brushes comes from protected Eurasian badgers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domingo-Roura, X.; Marmi, J.; Ferrando, A.; López-Giráldez, F.; Macdonald, D.W.; Jansman, H.A.H.

    2006-01-01

    The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) is included in Appendix III of the Bern Convention and protected by national laws in many European countries. Badger hair is used to manufacture luxury shaving brushes, although it is frequently argued that the hog badger (Arctonyx collaris), which in Europe is an

  16. Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

    1991-07-01

    Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  17. Independent Auditors Report on the Attestation of the Existence, Completeness, and Rights of Select Army-Held Operating Materials and SuppliesAmmunition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    secured as if it were live ammunition (for example, rocket and missile launcher tubes). 8 │ DODIG-2015-165 DODIG-2015-165 │ 9 Appendix Existence... Liaison congressional@dodig.mil; 703.604.8324 Media Contact public.affairs@dodig.mil; 703.604.8324 Monthly Update dodigconnect-request@listserve.com

  18. Identifying Efficiencies in the Supply Chain for Training Ammunition: Methods, Models, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Standard Army Ammunition System–Modernized ( SAAS -MOD), Total Army Munitions Information System (TAMIS), and the Worldwide Ammunition Reporting System...activities do your ASP personnel execute that are not captured in the Workload Report accessible in SAAS ? How much time would you estimate each of these

  19. Environmental Behavior and Fate of Explosives in Groundwater from the Milan Army Ammunition Plant in Aquatic and Wetland Plants. Fate of TNT and RDX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best, Elly

    1998-01-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the environmental behavior and fate of TNT and RDX in aquatic and wetland plants collected from a field-scale wetland demonstration deployed at Milan Army...

  20. Ammunition production in the USSR in 20-30 years of 20th century and efficiency of the Red Army in the eve and during of the Great Patriotic War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Андрей Николаевич Балыш

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of Ammunition Industry in connection with action variation at the first part of 20th century is analyzed in the present paper. It is studied how the New Economic Policy (NEP influenced onto the development of ammunition industry and respective branches of heavy industry. For the first time several manufacturing peculiarities of ammunition main elements (by example of ammunition bodies in the eve of the Great Patriotic War are analyzed on the base of archival documents and the role of these peculiarities in fighting efficiency of the Soviet forces during the Second World War is studied.

  1. The use of depleted uranium ammunition during NATO aggression against Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaric, M.; Petkovic, S.; Devic, Z.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that DU (depleted uranium) weaponry was extensively used during the 'Desert Storm' operation in Iraq. There is no doubt that NATO used DU ammunition in Bosnia in 1994 and 1995. It is also common knowledge that many NATO armies are equipped with DU ammunition in various calibers (from 20 up to 155 mm) as a standard part of certain weapon systems. These facts, as a result of literature research, as well as Yugoslav Army (YA) intelligence data on the eve of the aggression clearly showed that NATO most probably would use DU ammunition. (author)

  2. 'Mister Badger' Pushing Mars Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Viking's soil sampler collector arm successfully pushed a rock on the surface of Mars during the afternoon of Friday, October 8. The irregular-shaped rock was pushed several inches by the Lander's collector arm, which displaced the rock to the left of its original position, leaving it cocked slightly upward. Photographs and other information verified the successful rock push. Photo at left shows the soil sampler's collector head pushing against the rock, named 'Mister Badger' by flight controllers. Photo at right shows the displaced rock and the depression whence it came. Part of the soil displacement was caused by the collector s backhoe. A soil sample will be taken from the site Monday night, October 11. It will then be delivered to Viking s organic chemistry instrument for a series of analyses during the next few weeks. The sample is being sought from beneath a rock because scientists believe that, if there are life forms on Mars, they may seek rocks as shelter from the Sun s intense ultraviolet radiation.

  3. Modified blank ammunition injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunc, Gokhan I; Ozer, M Tahir; Coskun, Kagan; Uzar, Ali Ihsan

    2009-12-15

    Blank firing weapons are designed only for discharging blank ammunition cartridges. Because they are cost-effective, are easily accessible and can be modified to live firearms plus their unclear legal situation in Turkish Law makes them very popular in Turkey. 2004 through 2008, a total of 1115 modified blank weapons were seized in Turkey. Blank firing weapons are easily modified by owners, making them suitable for discharging live firearm ammunition or modified blank ammunitions. Two common methods are used for modification of blank weapons. After the modification, these weapons can discharge the live ammunition. However, due to compositional durability problems with these types of weapons; the main trend is to use the modified blank ammunitions rather than live firearm ammunition fired from modified blank firing weapons. In this study, two types of modified blank weapons and two types of modified blank cartridges were tested on three different target models. Each of the models' shooting side was coated with 1.3+/-2 mm thickness chrome tanned cowhide as a skin simulant. The first model was only coated with skin simulant. The second model was coated with skin simulant and 100% cotton police shirt. The third model was coated with skin simulant and jean denim. After the literature evaluation four high risky anatomic locations (the neck area; the eyes; the thorax area and inguinal area) were pointed out for the steel and lead projectiles are discharged from the modified blank weapons especially in close range (0-50 cm). The target models were designed for these anatomic locations. For the target models six Transparent Ballistic Candle blocks (TCB) were prepared and divided into two test groups. The first group tests were performed with lead projectiles and second group with steel projectile. The shortest penetration depth (lead projectile: 4.358 cm; steel projectile 8.032 cm) was recorded in the skin simulant and jean denim coated block for both groups. In both groups

  4. Armored Composite Ammunition Pressure Vessel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, William

    1999-01-01

    ...). This ammunition containment system must not only meet environmental and handling requirements but also provide armor protection against impacting threats and reduce the response of the stowed...

  5. Modelling the impact of vaccination on tuberculosis in badgers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardstaff, J L; Bulling, M T; Marion, G; Hutchings, M R; White, P C L

    2013-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in livestock, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, persists in many countries. In Britain, efforts to control TB through the culling of badgers (Meles meles), the principal wildlife host, have so far been unsuccessful, and there is significant interest in vaccination of badgers as an alternative or complementary strategy [corrected]. Using a simulation model, we show that where TB is self-contained within the badger population and there are no external sources of infection, limited-duration vaccination at a high level of efficacy can reduce or even eradicate TB from the badger population. However, where sources of external infection persist, benefits in TB reduction in badgers can only be achieved by ongoing, annual vaccination. Vaccination is likely to be most effective as part of an integrated disease management strategy incorporating a number of different approaches across the entire host community.

  6. BCG vaccination reduces risk of tuberculosis infection in vaccinated badgers and unvaccinated badger cubs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Carter

    Full Text Available Wildlife is a global source of endemic and emerging infectious diseases. The control of tuberculosis (TB in cattle in Britain and Ireland is hindered by persistent infection in wild badgers (Meles meles. Vaccination with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG has been shown to reduce the severity and progression of experimentally induced TB in captive badgers. Analysis of data from a four-year clinical field study, conducted at the social group level, suggested a similar, direct protective effect of BCG in a wild badger population. Here we present new evidence from the same study identifying both a direct beneficial effect of vaccination in individual badgers and an indirect protective effect in unvaccinated cubs. We show that intramuscular injection of BCG reduced by 76% (Odds ratio = 0.24, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.11-0.52 the risk of free-living vaccinated individuals testing positive to a diagnostic test combination to detect progressive infection. A more sensitive panel of tests for the detection of infection per se identified a reduction of 54% (Odds ratio = 0.46, 95% CI 0.26-0.88 in the risk of a positive result following vaccination. In addition, we show the risk of unvaccinated badger cubs, but not adults, testing positive to an even more sensitive panel of diagnostic tests decreased significantly as the proportion of vaccinated individuals in their social group increased (Odds ratio = 0.08, 95% CI 0.01-0.76; P = 0.03. When more than a third of their social group had been vaccinated, the risk to unvaccinated cubs was reduced by 79% (Odds ratio = 0.21, 95% CI 0.05-0.81; P = 0.02.

  7. Information Search of Toxic-Free Ammunition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adelman, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    Task Order No. 0001, Information Search of Toxic-Free Ammunition addresses issues related to toxic and environmentally harmful effects caused by the use of some of the current small arms ammunition...

  8. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Weather

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Weather. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that develops...

  9. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, MOSE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, MOSE. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that develops near...

  10. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Telemetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Telemetry. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that develops...

  11. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, AIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, AIS. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that develops near...

  12. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, CTD

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, CTD. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that develops near...

  13. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Phytoflash

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Phytoflash. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that...

  14. Defense Logistics: Enhanced Policy and Procedures Needed to Improve Management of Sensitive Conventional Ammunition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Information System-Retail OIS-MC Ordnance Information System-Marine Corps SAAS -MOD Standard Army Ammunition System-Modernization SRC Security Risk...automated information systems. For the Army we used LMP, SAAS , and WARS-NT; for the Navy and Marine Corps we used OIS-W, OIS-R, and OIS-MC; and for the Air...Army we used LMP, SAAS , and WARS-NT; for the Navy and Marine Corps we used OIS-W, OIS-R, and OIS-MC; and for the Air Force we used CAS. Military

  15. Super-ranging. A new ranging strategy in European badgers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoibheann Gaughran

    Full Text Available We monitored the ranging of a wild European badger (Meles meles population over 7 years using GPS tracking collars. Badger range sizes varied seasonally and reached their maximum in June, July and August. We analysed the summer ranging behaviour, using 83 home range estimates from 48 individuals over 6974 collar-nights. We found that while most adult badgers (males and females remained within their own traditional social group boundaries, several male badgers (on average 22% regularly ranged beyond these traditional boundaries. These adult males frequently ranged throughout two (or more social group's traditional territories and had extremely large home ranges. We therefore refer to them as super-rangers. While ranging across traditional boundaries has been recorded over short periods of time for extraterritorial mating and foraging forays, or for pre-dispersal exploration, the animals in this study maintained their super-ranges from 2 to 36 months. This study represents the first time such long-term extra-territorial ranging has been described for European badgers. Holding a super-range may confer an advantage in access to breeding females, but could also affect local interaction networks. In Ireland & the UK, badgers act as a wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (TB. Super-ranging may facilitate the spread of disease by increasing both direct interactions between conspecifics, particularly across social groups, and indirect interactions with cattle in their shared environment. Understanding super-ranging behaviour may both improve our understanding of tuberculosis epidemiology and inform future control strategies.

  16. Reports on badgers Meles meles in Dutch newspapers 1900–2013 : same animals, different framings?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, Hens; Runhaar, Marjolein; Vink, Hans

    Culling wild badgers Meles meles in an attempt to control the spread of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) infections in domestic cattle has provoked a long and fierce debate in the UK. Research has shown that the controversy over badger culling exists because of fundamental differences in how badgers and

  17. Trial design to estimate the effect of vaccination on tuberculosis incidence in badgers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aznar, I.; McGrath, G.; Murphy, D.; Corner, L.A.L.; Gormley, E.; Frankena, K.; More, S.J.; Martin, W.; O'Keeffe, J.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The principal wildlife reservoir of Mycobacterium bovis in Ireland is the European badger. Studies in the Republic of Ireland (RoI) have shown that badgers culled in association with cattle herd tuberculosis breakdowns (focal culling) have a higher prevalence of infection than the badger population

  18. Uranium tipped ammunition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, P.

    1993-01-01

    During the uranium enrichment process required to make nuclear weapons or fuel, the concentration of the 'fissile' U-235 isotope has to be increased. What is left, depleted uranium, is about half as radioactive as natural uranium, but very dense and extremely hard. It is used in armour piercing shells. External radiation levels from depleted uranium (DU) are low. However DU is about as toxic as lead and could be harmful to the kidneys if eaten or inhaled. It is estimated that between 40 and 300 tonnes of depleted uranium were left behind by the Allied armies after the Gulf war. The biggest hazard would be from depleted uranium shells which have hit Iraqui armoured vehicles and the resulting dust inhaled. There is a possible link between depleted uranium shells and an illness known as 'Desert Storm Syndrome' occurring in some Gulf war veterans. As these shells are a toxic and radioactive hazard to health and the environment their use and testing should be stopped because of the risks to troops and those living near test firing ranges. (UK)

  19. Plasma ignition for medium calibre ammunition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Schilt, A.; Simor, M.; Schaffers, P.; Weise, T.

    2012-01-01

    Gun performance is usually affected by the operating temperature of the ammunition or weapon. This is caused by several factors, amongst which the temperature dependency of the propellant ignition and combustion processes. Compensation of temperature effects on weapon or ammunition performance is

  20. Analysis of Naval Ammunition Stock Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    not manipulated to be in favor of any system based on the assumption that stock positioned closer to demand would result in more favorable delivery...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT ANALYSIS OF NAVAL AMMUNITION STOCK POSITIONING...professional report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ANALYSIS OF NAVAL AMMUNITION STOCK POSITIONING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) David Sharp and Eric

  1. Badgers in the Netherlands: evaluation of scenarios with models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaapen, J.P.; Engen, van H.C.; Apeldoorn, van R.C.; Schippers, P.; Verboom, J.

    1995-01-01

    The problem of habitat fragmentation is affecting the chances of survival of an increasing number of animal species. The Eurasian badger is a typical example of such a species. Plans and measures addressing the problem of habitat fragmentation have toprovide for ecological qualities both within

  2. Mobil/Badger to market zeolite-based cumene technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotman, D.

    1993-01-01

    Badger (Cambridge, MA) and Mobil (Fairfax, VA) are ready to jointly license a new cumene technology that they say achieves higher yields and product purity than existing processes. The zeolite-based technology is scheduled to be introduced at next month's DeWitt Petrochemical Review in Houston. The Mobil/Badger technology aims to challenge the dominant position of UOP's (Des Plaines, IL) solid phosphoric acid (SPA) catalyst process - which accounts for 80%-90% of the world's cumene production. In addition, Monsanto/Kellogg's aluminum chloride-based technology has gained significant momentum since its introduction in the 1980s. And late last year, ABB Lummus Crest (Bloomfield, NJ) also began marketing a zeolite-based cumene technology. While all the technologies make cumene via the alkylation of benzene with propylene, the Mobil/Badger process uses a zeolite-containing catalyst designed by Mobil to selectively catalyze the benzene/propylene reaction, avoiding unwanted propylene oligomerization. Because the olefin reactions are so fast, says Frank A. Demers, Badger's v.p./technology development and marketing, other zeolite technologies are forced to use complex reactor arrangements to stop the propylene-propylene reactions. However, he says, 'Mobil has designed a catalyst that wants to react benzene with propylene to make cumene.'

  3. WIND TURBINES CAUSE CHRONIC STRESS IN BADGERS (MELES MELES) IN GREAT BRITAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Roseanna C N; Smith, Valerie J; Fowkes, Robert C

    2016-07-01

    A paucity of data exists with which to assess the effects of wind turbines noise on terrestrial wildlife, despite growing concern about the impact of infrasound from wind farms on human health and well-being. In 2013, we assessed whether the presence of turbines in Great Britain impacted the stress levels of badgers ( Meles meles ) in nearby setts. Hair cortisol levels were used to determine if the badgers were physiologically stressed. Hair of badgers living 10 km from a wind farm. This demonstrates that affected badgers suffer from enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal activity and are physiologically stressed. No differences were found between the cortisol levels of badgers living near wind farms operational since 2009 and 2012, indicating that the animals do not become habituated to turbine disturbance. Cortisol levels in the affected badgers did not vary in relation to the distance from turbines within 1 km, wind farm annual power output, or number of turbines. We suggest that the higher cortisol levels in affected badgers is caused by the turbines' sound and that these high levels may affect badgers' immune systems, which could result in increased risk of infection and disease in the badger population.

  4. Design of Waste Heat Boiler for Scranton Army Ammunition Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    order to calculate velocity measurements, the flow (stagnation pressure) was measured with a pitot tube and a slant manometer. The 1.245 m (4𔃻...p where V = velocity (ft/sec) Referring to Figure A-l and letting the subscript 1 indicate conditions at the inlet to the pitot tube where...Mexico, Mo. 65265 Frisch Dampers* Octapus Equipment Co. Buffalo, N.Y. 14221 Alternate source (s) of supply Henry Vogt Machine Co. 1000 W

  5. Environmental Quality Standards Research on Wastewaters of Army Ammunition Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-01

    shown in figures II-A-3, II-A-4, and I1-A-5. The retention times of the majur GC peaks (>1% of total peak area) are listed in tables 11-8 and 11-9. TLC...22134 Attn: NBC Division 1 Fort Benning, GA 31905 108 DISTRIBUTION LIST 5 (Contd) Names Copier Names Copies DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADDITIONAL

  6. Aquatic Field Survey at Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant, Chattanooga, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-24

    cryptocephala v. venta 137 2.3 Other species 883 15.3 Total 5,775 99-9* U-2 Achnanthes minutissima 22,871 85.4 Fragilaria capucina 1,398 5.2 1...delicatissima 550 2.7 Fragilaria capucina 527 2.6 Anomoeoneis vitrea 435 2.1 Navicula cryptocephala v. venta 205 1.0 Other species 1,168 5.8 Total

  7. Removal of DNT from Wastewaters at Radford Army Ammunition Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-31

    appi~cable) U.S. Armty Corps of EngineersI ITEnvronenta Prgras, ic. ____________Toxic an’d Hazardous Material-, zec 6ý.. ADDPLSS (Crty, State. and... Peter Hartmann is RAAP’s Technical Analytical laboratory supervisor and is responsible for tracking analytical progress and ensuring timely completion

  8. Combat Service Support Model Development: BRASS - TRANSLOG - Army 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    throughout’the system. Transitional problems may address specific hardware and related software , such as the Standard Army Ammunition System ( SAAS ...FILE. 00 Cabat Service Support Model Development .,PASS TRANSLOG -- ARMY 21 0 Contract Number DAAK11-84-D-0004 Task Order #1 DRAFT REPOkT July 1984 D...Armament Systems, Inc. 211 West Bel Air Avenue P.O. Box 158 Aberdeen, MD 21001 8 8 8 2 1 S CORMIT SERVICE SUPPORT MODEL DEVELOPMENT BRASS -- TRANSLOG

  9. Using simulation to estimate the power of a badger vaccine trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aznar, I.; More, S.J.; Frankena, K.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the power of a badger vaccine field trial using simulation techniques. The effects of sample size, sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic test, transmission rate between unvaccinated badgers, Vaccine Efficacy for Susceptibility (VES) and Vaccine Efficacy

  10. Robotics In Manufacturing: Army View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. J.

    1983-05-01

    (Figure 1) This is an outline of my presentation today. The U. S. Army has a dual interest in the use of robots, namely: 1. As a substitute for or an extension of the soldier in the battlefield, and 2. in the factories that make Army materiel, or - as we call it -the the production base. The Production Base can again be divided into three separate segments, i.e., the Army owned and operated facilities or GOG6s, such as Rock Island and Watervliet arsenals, and not to be overlooked, the depot operations. There the Army manufactures gun tubes and other related parts for artillery weapons and repairs and overhauls them. A second category is the Army owned and contractor operated facilities or GOCOs,such as the ammunition plants, the tank plants at Lima, Ohio and Warren, Michigan and the Stratford Engine Plant in Connecticut where gas turbines for helicopter and the Abrams tank are manufactured. The last category covers the industrial base, that is those factories which are not only operated but also owned by the contractor himself also referred to as COCOs. You can see from this description that the Army is supported by a base which produces a diversified line of products. Therefore, the task of technology development and technology insertion is considerably more complex than what one encounters in the average U. S. Manufacturing organization.

  11. Summary of Ammunition Support Studies under Information Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Jicheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The informatization demand of military ammunition support was analysed. The research status of ammunition containerization, RFID technology and asset visualization were introduced. The existent problems were pointed out and the future development was predicted.

  12. Application of a Solvent Emulsion Technology for PCB Removal from Older Structures on DoD Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Ammunition Plant, including Mr. Mark Kershner of the USAF, Glen Clark of the Navy, and Ms. Joan Kenney of Badger Army Ammunition Plant...concerns, as the paint degrades and becomes brittle and can become airborne or impact soil, surface water, or groundwater. To date, no reliable methods

  13. Effectiveness of biosecurity measures in preventing badger visits to farm buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Johanna; McDonald, Robbie A; Walker, Neil; Delahay, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis is a serious and economically important disease of cattle. Badgers have been implicated in the transmission and maintenance of the disease in the UK since the 1970s. Recent studies have provided substantial evidence of widespread and frequent visits by badgers to farm buildings during which there is the potential for close direct contact with cattle and contamination of cattle feed. Here we evaluated the effectiveness of simple exclusion measures in improving farm biosecurity and preventing badger visits to farm buildings. In the first phase of the study, 32 farms were surveyed using motion-triggered infrared cameras on potential entrances to farm buildings to determine the background level of badger visits experienced by each farm. In the second phase, they were divided into four treatment groups; "Control", "Feed Storage", "Cattle Housing" and "Both", whereby no exclusion measures were installed, exclusion measures were installed on feed storage areas only, cattle housing only or both feed storage and cattle housing, respectively. Badger exclusion measures included sheet metal gates, adjustable metal panels for gates, sheet metal fencing, feed bins and electric fencing. Cameras were deployed for at least 365 nights in each phase on each farm. Badger visits to farm buildings occurred on 19 of the 32 farms in phase one. In phase two, the simple exclusion measures were 100% effective in preventing badger entry into farm buildings, as long as they were appropriately deployed. Furthermore, the installation of exclusion measures also reduced the level of badger visits to the rest of the farmyard. The findings of the present study clearly demonstrate how relatively simple practical measures can substantially reduce the likelihood of badger visits to buildings and reduce some of the potential for contact and disease transmission between badgers and cattle.

  14. Effectiveness of biosecurity measures in preventing badger visits to farm buildings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Judge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bovine tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis is a serious and economically important disease of cattle. Badgers have been implicated in the transmission and maintenance of the disease in the UK since the 1970s. Recent studies have provided substantial evidence of widespread and frequent visits by badgers to farm buildings during which there is the potential for close direct contact with cattle and contamination of cattle feed. METHODOLOGY: Here we evaluated the effectiveness of simple exclusion measures in improving farm biosecurity and preventing badger visits to farm buildings. In the first phase of the study, 32 farms were surveyed using motion-triggered infrared cameras on potential entrances to farm buildings to determine the background level of badger visits experienced by each farm. In the second phase, they were divided into four treatment groups; "Control", "Feed Storage", "Cattle Housing" and "Both", whereby no exclusion measures were installed, exclusion measures were installed on feed storage areas only, cattle housing only or both feed storage and cattle housing, respectively. Badger exclusion measures included sheet metal gates, adjustable metal panels for gates, sheet metal fencing, feed bins and electric fencing. Cameras were deployed for at least 365 nights in each phase on each farm. RESULTS: Badger visits to farm buildings occurred on 19 of the 32 farms in phase one. In phase two, the simple exclusion measures were 100% effective in preventing badger entry into farm buildings, as long as they were appropriately deployed. Furthermore, the installation of exclusion measures also reduced the level of badger visits to the rest of the farmyard. The findings of the present study clearly demonstrate how relatively simple practical measures can substantially reduce the likelihood of badger visits to buildings and reduce some of the potential for contact and disease transmission between badgers and cattle.

  15. Spatial Targeting for Bovine Tuberculosis Control: Can the Locations of Infected Cattle Be Used to Find Infected Badgers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Smith

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis is a disease of historical importance to human health in the UK that remains a major animal health and economic issue. Control of the disease in cattle is complicated by the presence of a reservoir species, the Eurasian badger. In spite of uncertainty in the degree to which cattle disease results from transmission from badgers, and opposition from environmental groups, culling of badgers has been licenced in two large areas in England. Methods to limit culls to smaller areas that target badgers infected with TB whilst minimising the number of uninfected badgers culled is therefore of considerable interest. Here, we use historical data from a large-scale field trial of badger culling to assess two alternative hypothetical methods of targeting TB-infected badgers based on the distribution of cattle TB incidents: (i a simple circular 'ring cull'; and (ii geographic profiling, a novel technique for spatial targeting of infectious disease control that predicts the locations of sources of infection based on the distribution of linked cases. Our results showed that both methods required coverage of very large areas to ensure a substantial proportion of infected badgers were removed, and would result in many uninfected badgers being culled. Geographic profiling, which accounts for clustering of infections in badger and cattle populations, produced a small but non-significant increase in the proportion of setts with TB-infected compared to uninfected badgers included in a cull. It also provided no overall improvement at targeting setts with infected badgers compared to the ring cull. Cattle TB incidents in this study were therefore insufficiently clustered around TB-infected badger setts to design an efficient spatially targeted cull; and this analysis provided no evidence to support a move towards spatially targeted badger culling policies for bovine TB control.

  16. A potential predator-prey interaction of an American badger and an Agassiz's desert tortoise with a review of badger predation on turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda L.; Puffer, Shellie R.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Tennant, Laura A.; Arundel, Terry; Vamstad, Michael S.; Brundige, Kathleen D.

    2016-01-01

    The federally threatened Agassiz’s desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) was listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act in 1990, but thus far, recovery efforts have been unsuccessful (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service [USFWS] 2015). Predation has been identified as a contributing factor to declining G. agassizii populations range-wide (e.g., Esque et al. 2010, Lovich et al. 2014). Understanding and managing for predator-prey dynamics is thus an important part of the recovery and conservation of this threatened species (USFWS 2011). Desert tortoises have a host of predators at all stages of their life cycle. Over 20 species of birds, mammals, and reptiles have been recorded as known or suspected predators (Woodbury and Hardy 1948, Luckenbach 1982, Ernst and Lovich 2009). American badgers (Taxidea taxus, family: Mustelidae) are confirmed excavators of desert tortoise nests (Turner and Berry 1984). They are also suspected predators of adult desert tortoises, a possibility which has been presented in some studies but without empirical verification (Luckenbach 1982, Turner and Berry 1984). Active mostly at night, badgers are solitary, secretive predators (Lindzey 1978, 1982; Armitage 2004) that are extremely difficult to observe in predatory encounters. Recently, strong circumstantial evidence presented by Emblidge et al. (2015) suggests that badgers do prey on adult Agassiz’s desert tortoises based on observations of more than two dozen dead tortoises in the Western Mojave Desert of California. In this note, we present another case of potential badger predation on a large adult desert tortoise in the Sonoran Desert of California. Collectively, these recent two cases potentially indicate that badger predation may be more common and widespread than previously thought. In addition, we review the worldwide literature of badger predation on turtles in general and summarize reported badger observations in Joshua Tree National Park, where our observation occurred, over a

  17. Addition of a Digital Receiver to the X-BADGER Radar System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past year, the X-Band Atmospheric Doppler Ground-based Radar (X-BADGER) transmitter has undergone a major upgrade from a high voltage traveling-wave tube to...

  18. Comparing badger (Meles meles) management strategies for reducing tuberculosis incidence in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham C; McDonald, Robbie A; Wilkinson, David

    2012-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, continues to be a serious economic problem for the British cattle industry. The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) is partly responsible for maintenance of the disease and its transmission to cattle. Previous attempts to manage the disease by culling badgers have been hampered by social perturbation, which in some situations is associated with increases in the cattle herd incidence of bTB. Following the licensing of an injectable vaccine, we consider the relative merits of management strategies to reduce bTB in badgers, and thereby reduce cattle herd incidence. We used an established simulation model of the badger-cattle-TB system and investigated four proposed strategies: business as usual with no badger management, large-scale proactive badger culling, badger vaccination, and culling with a ring of vaccination around it. For ease of comparison with empirical data, model treatments were applied over 150 km(2) and were evaluated over the whole of a 300 km(2) area, comprising the core treatment area and a ring of approximately 2 km. The effects of treatment were evaluated over a 10-year period comprising treatment for five years and the subsequent five year period without treatment. Against a background of existing disease control measures, where 144 cattle herd incidents might be expected over 10 years, badger culling prevented 26 cattle herd incidents while vaccination prevented 16. Culling in the core 150 km(2) plus vaccination in a ring around it prevented about 40 cattle herd breakdowns by partly mitigating the negative effects of culling, although this approach clearly required greater effort. While model outcomes were robust to uncertainty in parameter estimates, the outcomes of culling were sensitive to low rates of land access for culling, low culling efficacy, and the early cessation of a culling strategy, all of which were likely to lead to an overall increase in cattle disease.

  19. Comparing badger (Meles meles management strategies for reducing tuberculosis incidence in cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham C Smith

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis (bTB, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, continues to be a serious economic problem for the British cattle industry. The Eurasian badger (Meles meles is partly responsible for maintenance of the disease and its transmission to cattle. Previous attempts to manage the disease by culling badgers have been hampered by social perturbation, which in some situations is associated with increases in the cattle herd incidence of bTB. Following the licensing of an injectable vaccine, we consider the relative merits of management strategies to reduce bTB in badgers, and thereby reduce cattle herd incidence. We used an established simulation model of the badger-cattle-TB system and investigated four proposed strategies: business as usual with no badger management, large-scale proactive badger culling, badger vaccination, and culling with a ring of vaccination around it. For ease of comparison with empirical data, model treatments were applied over 150 km(2 and were evaluated over the whole of a 300 km(2 area, comprising the core treatment area and a ring of approximately 2 km. The effects of treatment were evaluated over a 10-year period comprising treatment for five years and the subsequent five year period without treatment. Against a background of existing disease control measures, where 144 cattle herd incidents might be expected over 10 years, badger culling prevented 26 cattle herd incidents while vaccination prevented 16. Culling in the core 150 km(2 plus vaccination in a ring around it prevented about 40 cattle herd breakdowns by partly mitigating the negative effects of culling, although this approach clearly required greater effort. While model outcomes were robust to uncertainty in parameter estimates, the outcomes of culling were sensitive to low rates of land access for culling, low culling efficacy, and the early cessation of a culling strategy, all of which were likely to lead to an overall increase in cattle disease.

  20. Reproductive Biology Including Evidence for Superfetation in the European Badger Meles meles (Carnivora: Mustelidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh A L Corner

    Full Text Available The reproductive biology of the European badger (Meles meles is of wide interest because it is one of the few mammal species that show delayed implantation and one of only five which are suggested to show superfetation as a reproductive strategy. This study aimed to describe the reproductive biology of female Irish badgers with a view to increasing our understanding of the process of delayed implantation and superfetation. We carried out a detailed histological examination of the reproductive tract of 264 female badgers taken from sites across 20 of the 26 counties in the Republic of Ireland. The key results show evidence of multiple blastocysts at different stages of development present simultaneously in the same female, supporting the view that superfetation is relatively common in this population of badgers. In addition we present strong evidence that the breeding rate in Irish badgers is limited by failure to conceive, rather than failure at any other stages of the breeding cycle. We show few effects of age on breeding success, suggesting no breeding suppression by adult females in this population. The study sheds new light on this unusual breeding strategy of delayed implantation and superfetation, and highlights a number of significant differences between the reproductive biology of female Irish badgers and those of Great Britain and Swedish populations.

  1. Farmer attitudes to vaccination and culling of badgers in controlling bovine tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, M; Lobley, M; Winter, M

    2013-07-13

    Controversy persists in England, Wales and Northern Ireland concerning methods of controlling the transmission of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) between badgers and cattle. The National Trust, a major land-owning heritage organisation, in 2011, began a programme of vaccinating badgers against bTB on its Killerton Estate in Devon. Most of the estate is farmed by 18 tenant farmers, who thus have a strong interest in the Trust's approach, particularly as all have felt the effects of the disease. This article reports on a study of the attitudes to vaccination of badgers and to the alternative of a culling programme, using face-to-face interviews with 14 of the tenants. The results indicated first that the views of the respondents were more nuanced than the contemporary public debate about badger control would suggest. Secondly, the attitude of the interviewees to vaccination of badgers against bTB was generally one of resigned acceptance. Thirdly, most respondents would prefer a combination of an effective vaccination programme with an effective culling programme, the latter reducing population of density sufficiently (and preferably targeting the badgers most likely to be diseased) for vaccination to have a reasonable chance of success. While based on a small sample, these results will contribute to the vigorous debate concerning contrasting policy approaches to bTB control in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

  2. Distemper virus as a cause of central nervous disease and death in badgers (Meles meles) in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne Sofie; Dietz, H. H.; Andersen, T. H.

    2004-01-01

    During the summer of 2002 a distemper-like disease was observed in the free-ranging badger population in Denmark. It was characterised by grand seizures, abnormal behaviour and death; the badgers all had severe chronic pneumonia and some had non-suppurative encephalomyelitis. in this study, eight...... of the affected badgers were examined by gross pathological, histological, immunohistological, bacteriological, parasitological and virological methods, and were diagnosed with distemper; canine distemper virus was identified....

  3. Information Search of Toxic-Free Ammunition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    transient irritation of the eyes and mucus membranes. In this respect, it would make a good choice for an ammunition material if we were concerned...Proudfoot R: The effect of tungstate ingestion on xanthine oxidase in milk and liver. Br J Nutr 22:331-40, 1968 107. Thomerson DR, Price WJ: A...SOURCE FILE: MI File 47 ARTICLE TYPE: column AVAILABILITY: FULL TEXT Online LINE COUNT: 00157 COMPANY NAME(S): Rice Gun Products Inc.--manufactures

  4. Interactions among American badgers, black-footed ferrets, and prairie dogs in the grasslands of western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David A.; Biggins, Dean E.; Grassel, Shaun M.; Livieri, Travis M.; Licht, Daniel S.; Proulx, Gilbert; Do Linh San, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    American badgers (Taxidea taxus) and black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) sometimes occur sympatrically within colonies of prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) in the grasslands of western North America. From the perspective of a simplified food web, badgers are consumers of ferrets and, to a greater extent, prairie dogs; ferrets are specialized consumers of prairie dogs; and prairie dogs are consumers of vegetation. We review information on the predatory behaviours of badgers, which collectively demonstrate that badgers exhibit complex hunting strategies to improve their probability of capturing prairie dogs and, perhaps, ferrets. We also review studies of interactions between badgers and ferrets, which suggest that there is selective pressure on badgers to compete with ferrets, and pressure on ferrets to compete with and avoid badgers. We then speculate as to how prairie dogs might shape interactions between badgers and ferrets, and how badgers could spread the plague bacterium (Yersinia pestis) among prairie dog colonies. Lastly, we provide recommendations for research on this tractable system of semi-fossorial predators and prey.

  5. Strapdown Homing Guidance System Design for Some Ammunition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The strapdown homing guidance system for some ammunition was mainly studied. A strong tracking Kalman filter was designed for the strapdown homing guidance system using the information measured by the strapdown homing seeker to estimate relative movement variables between the ammunition and target. Then the optimal proportional law, which using the estimated information, guided the ammunition. Simulation results show that the designed strapdown homing guidance system with strong tracking Kalman filter can attack the maneuvering target effectively, and satisfy the performance index for the guided ammunition system.

  6. Army Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    that allows them to perform applied research under the Institute for Biotechnology research team 1 2 3 20 | ARMY TECHNOLOGY MAGAZINE ...DASA(R&T) Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology Download the magazine , view online or read each individual story with...Army photo by Conrad Johnson) Front and back cover designs by Joe Stephens EXECUTIVE DEPUTY TO THE COMMANDING GENERAL Army Technology Magazine is an

  7. Genetic structure within and among regional populations of the Eurasian badger (Meles meles) from Denmark and the Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zande, L. van de; Vliet, M. van de; Pertoldi, C.

    2007-01-01

    The Eurasian badger Meles meles has a wide distribution area ranging from Japan to Ireland. In western Europe badger habitats are severely disturbed by anthropogenic factors, leading to fragmentation into subpopulations and formation of a metapopulation substructuring of once continuous panmictic...... to this structuring of badger populations. In contrast, measures that improve migration and connection to other populations from neighboring countries may have prevented substructuring of the Dutch badger population....

  8. Population estimation and trappability of the European badger (Meles meles: implications for tuberculosis management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Byrne

    Full Text Available Estimates of population size and trappability inform vaccine efficacy modelling and are required for adaptive management during prolonged wildlife vaccination campaigns. We present an analysis of mark-recapture data from a badger vaccine (Bacille Calmette-Guérin study in Ireland. This study is the largest scale (755 km(2 mark-recapture study ever undertaken with this species. The study area was divided into three approximately equal-sized zones, each with similar survey and capture effort. A mean badger population size of 671 (SD: 76 was estimated using a closed-subpopulation model (CSpM based on data from capturing sessions of the entire area and was consistent with a separate multiplicative model. Minimum number alive estimates calculated from the same data were on average 49-51% smaller than the CSpM estimates, but these are considered severely negatively biased when trappability is low. Population densities derived from the CSpM estimates were 0.82-1.06 badgers km(-2, and broadly consistent with previous reports for an adjacent area. Mean trappability was estimated to be 34-35% per session across the population. By the fifth capture session, 79% of the adult badgers caught had been marked previously. Multivariable modelling suggested significant differences in badger trappability depending on zone, season and age-class. There were more putatively trap-wary badgers identified in the population than trap-happy badgers, but wariness was not related to individual's sex, zone or season of capture. Live-trapping efficacy can vary significantly amongst sites, seasons, age, or personality, hence monitoring of trappability is recommended as part of an adaptive management regime during large-scale wildlife vaccination programs to counter biases and to improve efficiencies.

  9. Ferret badger rabies origin and its revisited importance as potential source of rabies transmission in Southeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ye

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequent occurrence of ferret badger-associated human rabies cases in southeast China highlights the lack of laboratory-based surveillance and urges revisiting the potential importance of this animal in rabies transmission. To determine if the ferret badgers actually contribute to human and dog rabies cases, and the possible origin of the ferret badger-associated rabies in the region, an active rabies survey was conducted to determine the frequency of rabies infection and seroprevalence in dogs and ferret badgers. Methods A retrospective survey on rabies epidemics was performed in Zhejiang, Jiangxi and Anhui provinces in southeast China. The brain tissues from ferret badgers and dogs were assayed by fluorescent antibody test. Rabies virus was isolated and sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. The sera from ferret badgers and dogs were titrated using rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA test. Results The ferret badgers presented a higher percentage of rabies seroconversion than dogs did in the endemic region, reaching a maximum of 95% in the collected samples. Nine ferret badger-associated rabies viruses were isolated, sequenced, and were phylogenetically clustered as a separate group. Nucleotide sequence revealed 99.4-99.8% homology within the ferret badger isolates, and 83-89% homology to the dog isolates in the nucleoprotein and glycoprotein genes in the same rabies endemic regions. Conclusions Our data suggest ferret badger-associated rabies has likely formed as an independent enzootic originating from dogs during the long-term rabies infestation in southeast China. The eventual role of FB rabies in public health remains unclear. However, management of ferret badger bites, rabies awareness and control in the related regions should be an immediate need.

  10. 27 CFR 479.192 - Commerce in firearms and ammunition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commerce in firearms and..., AND CERTAIN OTHER FIREARMS Other Laws Applicable § 479.192 Commerce in firearms and ammunition. For provisions relating to commerce in firearms and ammunition, including the movement of destructive devices...

  11. Impact of external sources of infection on the dynamics of bovine tuberculosis in modelled badger populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardstaff Joanne L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The persistence of bovine TB (bTB in various countries throughout the world is enhanced by the existence of wildlife hosts for the infection. In Britain and Ireland, the principal wildlife host for bTB is the badger (Meles meles. The objective of our study was to examine the dynamics of bTB in badgers in relation to both badger-derived infection from within the population and externally-derived, trickle-type, infection, such as could occur from other species or environmental sources, using a spatial stochastic simulation model. Results The presence of external sources of infection can increase mean prevalence and reduce the threshold group size for disease persistence. Above the threshold equilibrium group size of 6–8 individuals predicted by the model for bTB persistence in badgers based on internal infection alone, external sources of infection have relatively little impact on the persistence or level of disease. However, within a critical range of group sizes just below this threshold level, external infection becomes much more important in determining disease dynamics. Within this critical range, external infection increases the ratio of intra- to inter-group infections due to the greater probability of external infections entering fully-susceptible groups. The effect is to enable bTB persistence and increase bTB prevalence in badger populations which would not be able to maintain bTB based on internal infection alone. Conclusions External sources of bTB infection can contribute to the persistence of bTB in badger populations. In high-density badger populations, internal badger-derived infections occur at a sufficient rate that the additional effect of external sources in exacerbating disease is minimal. However, in lower-density populations, external sources of infection are much more important in enhancing bTB prevalence and persistence. In such circumstances, it is particularly important that control strategies to

  12. Impact of external sources of infection on the dynamics of bovine tuberculosis in modelled badger populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardstaff, Joanne L; Bulling, Mark T; Marion, Glenn; Hutchings, Michael R; White, Piran C L

    2012-06-27

    The persistence of bovine TB (bTB) in various countries throughout the world is enhanced by the existence of wildlife hosts for the infection. In Britain and Ireland, the principal wildlife host for bTB is the badger (Meles meles). The objective of our study was to examine the dynamics of bTB in badgers in relation to both badger-derived infection from within the population and externally-derived, trickle-type, infection, such as could occur from other species or environmental sources, using a spatial stochastic simulation model. The presence of external sources of infection can increase mean prevalence and reduce the threshold group size for disease persistence. Above the threshold equilibrium group size of 6-8 individuals predicted by the model for bTB persistence in badgers based on internal infection alone, external sources of infection have relatively little impact on the persistence or level of disease. However, within a critical range of group sizes just below this threshold level, external infection becomes much more important in determining disease dynamics. Within this critical range, external infection increases the ratio of intra- to inter-group infections due to the greater probability of external infections entering fully-susceptible groups. The effect is to enable bTB persistence and increase bTB prevalence in badger populations which would not be able to maintain bTB based on internal infection alone. External sources of bTB infection can contribute to the persistence of bTB in badger populations. In high-density badger populations, internal badger-derived infections occur at a sufficient rate that the additional effect of external sources in exacerbating disease is minimal. However, in lower-density populations, external sources of infection are much more important in enhancing bTB prevalence and persistence. In such circumstances, it is particularly important that control strategies to reduce bTB in badgers include efforts to minimise such

  13. 75 FR 43556 - Badger Meter, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Sourcepoint Staffing, Seek, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-73,666] Badger Meter, Inc... of Badger Meter, Inc., including on-site leased workers from Sourcepoint Staffing, Milwaukee... workers are engaged in the production of flow measurement devices and automatic meter reading equipment...

  14. Genetic structure within and among regional populations of the Eurasian badger (Meles meles) from Denmark and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Zande, Louis; van Vliet, Michel; Pertoldi, C.; Loeschcke, V.; Muskens, G; Bijlsma, R.

    The Eurasian badger Meles meles has a wide distribution area ranging from Japan to Ireland. In western Europe badger habitats are severely disturbed by anthropogenic factors, leading to fragmentation into subpopulations and formation of a metapopulation substructuring of once continuous panmictic

  15. Dynamics of a local badger (Meles meles) population in the Netherlands over the years 1983-2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apeldoorn, van R.C.; Vink, J.; Matyástík, T.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term data on badger population dynamics are scarce. For 19 years data on badger and sett numbers were collected by direct observation of a Local population in the province of Utrecht, the Netherlands. Analysis of these data show two different patterns of population growth. The first shows a

  16. Present and past microsatellite variation and assessment of genetic structure in Eurasian badger (Meles meles) in Denmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pertoldi, C; Loeschcke, [No Value; Randi, E; Madsen, AB; Hansen, MM; Bijlsma, R; Van De Zande, L

    During the past 50 years the number of badgers (Meles meles) in Denmark has declined by c. 50%. To assess the genetic consequences of the demographic decline, six DNA-microsatellite loci were used to analyse 139 badger tissue-samples, which were collected in 1995-98 from three zones (1, 2 and 3) in

  17. Genetic structure within and among regional populations of the Eurasian badger (Meles meles) from Denmark and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zande, van de L.; Vliet, van de M.; Pertoldi, C.; Loeschcke, V.; Muskens, G.; Bijlsma, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Eurasian badger Meles meles has a wide distribution area ranging from Japan to Ireland. In western Europe badger habitats are severely disturbed by anthropogenic factors, leading to fragmentation into subpopulations and formation of a metapopulation substructuring of once continuous panmictic

  18. 27 CFR 478.148 - Armor piercing ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Armor piercing ammunition... AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.148 Armor piercing ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes. The Director may exempt certain armor piercing...

  19. Diagnostic accuracy and optimal use of three tests for tuberculosis in live badgers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian A Drewe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB due to infection with Mycobacterium bovis is notoriously difficult in live animals, yet important if we are to understand the epidemiology of TB and devise effective strategies to limit its spread. Currently available tests for diagnosing TB in live Eurasian badgers (Meles meles remain unvalidated against a reliable gold standard. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and optimal use of three tests for TB in badgers in the absence of a gold standard. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A Bayesian approach was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and optimal use of mycobacterial culture, gamma-interferon assay and a commercially available serological test using multiple samples collected from 305 live wild badgers. Although no single test was judged to be sufficiently sensitive and specific to be used as a sole diagnostic method, selective combined use of the three tests allowed guidelines to be formulated that allow a diagnosis to be made for individual animals with an estimated overall accuracy of 93% (range: 75% to 97%. Employing this approach in the study population of badgers resulted in approximately 13 out of 14 animals having their true infection status correctly classified from samples collected on a single capture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This method of interpretation represents a marked improvement on the current procedure for diagnosing M. bovis infection in live badgers. The results should be of use to inform future test and intervention strategies with the aim of reducing the incidence of TB in free-living wild badger populations.

  20. Hunting with lead ammunition is not sustainable: European perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanstrup, Niels; Swift, John; Stroud, David A; Lewis, Melissa

    2018-03-12

    Much evidence demonstrates the adverse effects of lead ammunition on wildlife, their habitats and human health, and confirms that the use of such ammunition has no place within sustainable hunting. We identify the provisions that define sustainable hunting according to European law and international treaties, together with their guidance documents. We accept the substantial evidence for lead's actual and potential effects on wildlife, habitats and health as persuasive and assess how these effects relate to stated provisions for sustainability and hunting. We evaluate how continued use of lead ammunition negatively affects international efforts to halt loss of biodiversity, sustain wildlife populations and conserve their habitats. We highlight the indiscriminate and avoidable health and welfare impacts for large numbers of exposed wild animals as ethically unsustainable. In societal terms, continued use of lead ammunition undermines public perceptions of hunting. Given the existence of acceptable, non-toxic alternatives for lead ammunition, we conclude that hunting with lead ammunition cannot be justified under established principles of public/international policy and is not sustainable. Changing from lead ammunition to non-toxic alternatives will bring significant nature conservation and human health gains, and from the hunter's perspective will enhance societal acceptance of hunting. Change will create opportunities for improved constructive dialogue between hunting stakeholders and others engaged with enhancing biodiversity and nature conservation objectives.

  1. Morphological variability and developmental instability in subpopulations of the Eurasian badger (Meles meles) in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertoldi, Cino; Bach, Lars Arve; Madsen, Aksel Bo

    2002-01-01

    and teeth of the Eurasian badger (Meles meles) collected during the period 1995–97 from three different populations in Denmark. One of these thrives at low population density, whereas the two others are characterized by high local density. Methods The skulls were investigated for developmental instability...... a stabilizing regime hence their FA is mainly affected by environmental stresses. The negative relationship between canine size and FA found in males suggests the capacity of badgers to respond in an evolutionary way to environmental changes, despite the low genetic variability previously found at the molecular...

  2. Large-scale movements in European badgers: has the tail of the movement kernel been underestimated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Andrew W; Quinn, John L; O'Keeffe, James J; Green, Stuart; Sleeman, D Paddy; Martin, S Wayne; Davenport, John

    2014-07-01

    Characterizing patterns of animal movement is a major aim in population ecology, and yet doing so at an appropriate spatial scale remains a major challenge. Estimating the frequency and distances of movements is of particular importance when species are implicated in the transmission of zoonotic diseases. European badgers (Meles meles) are classically viewed as exhibiting limited dispersal, and yet their movements bring them into conflict with farmers due to their potential to spread bovine tuberculosis in parts of their range. Considerable uncertainty surrounds the movement potential of badgers, and this may be related to the spatial scale of previous empirical studies. We conducted a large-scale mark-recapture study (755 km(2); 2008-2012; 1935 capture events; 963 badgers) to investigate movement patterns in badgers, and undertook a comparative meta-analysis using published data from 15 European populations. The dispersal movement (>1 km) kernel followed an inverse power-law function, with a substantial 'tail' indicating the occurrence of rare long-distance dispersal attempts during the study period. The mean recorded distance from this distribution was 2.6 km, the 95 percentile was 7.3 km and the longest recorded was 22.1 km. Dispersal frequency distributions were significantly different between genders; males dispersed more frequently than females, but females made proportionally more long-distance dispersal attempts than males. We used a subsampling approach to demonstrate that the appropriate minimum spatial scale to characterize badger movements in our study population was 80 km(2), substantially larger than many previous badger studies. Furthermore, the meta-analysis indicated a significant association between maximum movement distance and study area size, while controlling for population density. Maximum long-distance movements were often only recorded by chance beyond the boundaries of study areas. These findings suggest that the tail of the badger

  3. Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE) 1995, NIR Propellant Analyzer, to MIL-STD-398, Military Standard Shields, Operational for Ammunition Operations, Criteria for Design of and Tests for Acceptance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2003-01-01

    ... (SJMAC-DEM) to test the Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE) 1995 NIR Propellant Analyzer, to MIL-STD-398, "Military Standard Shields, Operational for Ammunition Operations, Criteria for Design of and Tests for Acceptance...

  4. Army Justified Initial Production Plan for the Paladin Integrated Management Program but Has Not Resolved Two Vehicle Performance Deficiencies (Redacted)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-05

    model oversight organization in the Federal Government by leading change, speaking truth, and promoting excellence—a diverse organization, working ...VIRGINIA 22350-1500 August 5, 2016 MEMORANDUM FOR AUDITOR GENERAL, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUBJECT: Army Justified Initial Production Plan for the Paladin... Family of Vehicles, M109A7 Self-Propelled Howitzer and M992A3 Carrier, Ammunition, Tracked, October 2015; • M109A7 AFES Overview, September 2015

  5. Radioactive reconnaissance in area of utilization ammunition of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortuna, D.; Dimitrijevic, D.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper are presented methods of radioactive reconnaissance and taking of samples in area of utilization ammunition of depleted uranium during the armed aggression of NATO to Yugoslavia (author)

  6. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, C3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, C3. C3 board number 8215 (not coated) appears as board_id=32, task_id=23. C3 board number 771 (coated) appears...

  7. Pathogenesis of Mycobacterium bovis Infection: the Badger Model As a Paradigm for Understanding Tuberculosis in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn Gormley

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis in animals is caused principally by infection with Mycobacterium bovis and the potential for transmission of infection to humans is often the fundamental driver for surveillance of disease in livestock and wild animals. However, with such a vast array of species susceptible to infection, it is often extremely difficult to gain a detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of infection––a key component of the epidemiology in all affected species. This is important because the development of disease control strategies in animals is determined chiefly by an understanding of the epidemiology of the disease. The most revealing data from which to formulate theories on pathogenesis are that observed in susceptible hosts infected by natural transmission. These data are gathered from detailed studies of the distribution of gross and histological lesions, and the presence and distribution of infection as determined by highly sensitive bacteriology procedures. The information can also be used to establish the baseline for evaluating experimental model systems. The European badger (Meles meles is one of a very small number of wild animal hosts where detailed knowledge of the pathogenesis of M. bovis infection has been generated from observations in natural-infected animals. By drawing parallels from other animal species, an experimental badger infection model has also been established where infection of the lower respiratory tract mimics infection and the disease observed in natural-infected badgers. This has facilitated the development of diagnostic tests and testing of vaccines that have the potential to control the disease in badgers. In this review, we highlight the fundamental principles of how detailed knowledge of pathogenesis can be used to evaluate specific intervention strategies, and how the badger model may be a paradigm for understanding pathogenesis of tuberculosis in any affected wild animal species.

  8. Army dreamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-14

    The birth of the Army Nursing Service took place in 1854, when Florence Nightingale, at the request of the Secretary of State for War, recruited and took to Scutari Hospital 38 women to tend the wounded of the Crimean war.

  9. Mouthing off about developmental stress : Individuality of palate marking in the European badger and its relationship with juvenile parasitoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouvellet, P.; Buesching, C. D.; Dugdale, H. L.; Newman, C.; Macdonald, D. W.

    Fluctuating asymmetry has become a common measure of developmental instability (the inability of individuals to buffer their development from environmental stresses). Here we investigate the symmetry of palatine marking (maculation) in the European badger Meles meles, with regard to the

  10. Present and past microsatellite variation and assessment of genetic structure in Eurasian badger ( Meles meles ) in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertoldi, C.; Loeschcke, V.; Randi, E.

    2005-01-01

    During the past 50 years the number of badgers (Meles meles) in Denmark has declined by c. 50%. To assess the genetic consequences of the demographic decline, six DNA-microsatellite loci were used to analyse 139 badger tissue-samples, which were collected in 1995-98 from three zones (1, 2 and 3......) in Jutland (Denmark). Results from contemporary samples were compared to data obtained from DNA extracted from teeth belonging to 39 badgers collected from zones 1 and 2 in 1957-66. The microsatellites showed a low to moderate polymorphism, and the within area genetic diversity (H-E) was relatively low (0.......308 0.05). Despite the drastic recent decline, Danish badgers did not show apparent signs of genetic bottlenecks in both recent and historical samples. The use of molecular techniques which allowed us to work with small amounts of degraded DNA extracted from old teeth, allowed us to exclude...

  11. Diet of the Eurasian badger (Meles meles in an area of the Italian Prealps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Marassi

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Samples of Eurasian badger faeces (n= 147 were collected at monthly intervals from October 1997 to December 1999 in an area of the Italian Prealps (58 km², on the eastern coast of Lario (Como Lake. The altitude of the area ranged from 200 to 1300 m. Badger scats were analysed to estimate the relative volume and the frequency of occurrence of identifiable food items. Fruits, arthropodes, earthworms and mammals constituted the main food categories. Differences were found between the seasonal frequency of occurrences of arthropodes, earthworms and mammals, considering however that the small sample size in summer does not allow any definitive conclusions. The wide range of food items eaten by badgers and the seasonal differences would suggest that the badger is a "generalist" species which adopts an opportunist feeding strategy.

  12. On the Fruit Consumption of Eurasian Badger (Meles meles (Mammalia: Mustelidae during the Autumn Season in Sredna Gora Mountains (Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilian G. Georgiev

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This case study was carried out at one badgers family territory by asingle collection (11.11.2002, north of Stara Zagora City, near Tabashka River of faeces from the animal latrine sites. Total of 1361 individual food items were identified in Eurasian badger (Meles meles faeces from which the fruits of the Cornel-tree (Cornus mas strongly dominated (n=1332, 96.5% from all items, 98.2% from all fruits.

  13. Daily activity of the European Badger (Meles meles, Mustelidae, Carnivora on setts in Darwin Reserve and Meschera National Park (Russia in summer and autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Sidorchuk

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The European badger's (Meles meles daily activity was studied in two regions of European Russia with camera traps. The results of the study show that the daily activity of the European badger on settlements does not differ in the compared populations inhabiting Darwin Reserve and Meschera National Park. The badger appears on surface often during the daylight contrary to the classical idea of nocturnal activity of the species. More than half of all animal registrations occur at daylight during the summer. The moderate climate of the study areas and low level of human persecution are considered among the possible reasons of this type of activity. The daily activity of the European badger undergoes markedly seasonal changes in both populations. Badgers more often came out from their setts during daylight in summer and at night in autumn. The results have practical application in the organisation of the census of badgers by means of camera traps.

  14. Application of a Bimetallic Treatment System (BTS) for PCB Removal from Older Structures on DoD Facilities. Cost and Performance Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the Navy’s Inactive Ship Program and Badger Army Ammunition Plant including: Mr. Mark Kershner of the USAF, Glen ...environment because of inhalation or ingestion concerns as the paint degrades and becomes brittle and can become air-born or impact soil, surface water or

  15. Optimising and evaluating the characteristics of a multiple antigen ELISA for detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection in a badger vaccine field trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inma Aznar

    Full Text Available A long-term research programme has been underway in Ireland to evaluate the usefulness of badger vaccination as part of the national bTB (bovine tuberculosis control strategy. This culminated in a field trial which commenced in county Kilkenny in 2009 to determine the effects of badger vaccination on Mycobacterium bovis transmission in badgers under field conditions. In the present study, we sought to optimise the characteristics of a multiplex chemiluminescent assay for detection of M. bovis infection in live badgers. Our goal was to maximise specificity, and therefore statistical power, during evaluation of the badger vaccine trial data. In addition, we also aimed to explore the effects of vaccination on test characteristics. For the test optimisation, we ran a stepwise logistic regression with analytical weights on the converted Relative Light Units (RLU obtained from testing blood samples from 215 badgers captured as part of culling operations by the national Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM. The optimised test was applied to two other datasets obtained from two captive badger studies (Study 1 and Study 2, and the sensitivity and specificity of the test was attained separately for vaccinated and non-vaccinated badgers. During optimisation, test sensitivity was maximised (30.77%, while retaining specificity at 99.99%. When the optimised test was then applied to the captive badger studies data, we observed that test characteristics did not vary greatly between vaccinated and non-vaccinated badgers. However, a different time lag between infection and a positive test result was observed in vaccinated and non-vaccinated badgers. We propose that the optimized multiplex immunoassay be used to analyse the vaccine trial data. In relation to the difference in the time lag observed for vaccinated and non-vaccinated badgers, we also present a strategy to enable the test to be used during trial evaluation.

  16. A Study of Ammunition Response to the Interior Ballistics Environment of Gun Launch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ray, Stephen E; Nusca, Michael J; Horst, Albert W

    2006-01-01

    ... propellant charge during gun launch. Since material stress imposed on the ammunition could potentially damage the projectile or its payload, a detailed knowledge of the peak stress is essential in the ammunition design process...

  17. Theobromine intoxication in a red fox and a European badger in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, D S; Galgan, V; Schubert, B; Segerstad, C H

    2001-04-01

    A red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and a European badger (Meles meles) were found dead on a golf-course in October 1997 near Stockholm (Sweden). At necropsy, both animals were obese and the main finding was acute circulatory collapse. Theobromine intoxication was suspected as chocolate waste was available at a nearby farm and no other cause of death could be detected. Gastric contents and samples of liver from both animals were analyzed by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography for the presence of methylxanthines. Theobromine and caffeine were detected in gastric contents and theobromine was identified in the liver samples from both animals. This appears to be the first report of theobromine intoxication in the red fox and the European badger.

  18. A life cycle assessment of destruction of ammunition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alverbro, K.; Bjoerklund, A.; Finnveden, G.; Hochschorner, E.; Haegvall, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Swedish Armed Forces have large stocks of ammunition that were produced at a time when decommissioning was not considered. This ammunition will eventually become obsolete and must be destroyed, preferably with minimal impact on the environment and in a safe way for personnel. The aim of this paper is to make a comparison of the environmental impacts in a life cycle perspective of three different methods of decommissioning/destruction of ammunition, and to identify the environmental advantages and disadvantages of each of these destruction methods: open detonation; static kiln incineration with air pollution control combined with metal recycling, and a combination of incineration with air pollution control, open burning, recovery of some energetic material and metal recycling. Data used are for the specific processes and from established LCA databases. Recycling the materials in the ammunition and minimising the spread of airborne pollutants during incineration were found to be the most important factors affecting the life cycle environmental performance of the compared destruction methods. Open detonation with or without metal recycling proved to be the overall worst alternative from a life cycle perspective. The results for the static kiln and combination treatment indicate that the kind of ammunition and location of the destruction plant might determine the choice of method, since the environmental impacts from these methods are of little difference in the case of this specific grenade. Different methods for destruction of ammunition have previously been discussed from a risk and safety perspective. This is however to our knowledge the first study looking specifically on environmentally aspect in a life cycle perspective.

  19. Trophic enrichment factors for blood serum in the European badger (Meles meles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Kelly

    Full Text Available Ecologists undertaking stable isotopic analyses of animal diets require trophic enrichment factors (TEFs for the specific animal tissues that they are studying. Such basic data are available for a small number of species, so values from trophically or phylogenetically similar species are often substituted for missing values. By feeding a controlled diet to captive European badgers (Meles meles we determined TEFs for carbon and nitrogen in blood serum. TEFs for nitrogen and carbon in blood serum were +3.0 ± 0.4‰ and +0.4 ± 0.1‰ respectively. The TEFs for serum in badgers are notably different from those published for the red fox (Vulpes vulpes. There is currently no data for TEFs in the serum of other mustelid species. Our data show that species sharing similar niches (red fox do not provide adequate proxy values for TEFs of badgers. Our findings emphasise the importance of having species-specific data when undertaking trophic studies using stable isotope analysis.

  20. Detection of Babesia DNA in blood and spleen samples from Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Paul M; Wilson, Cari; Innes, Elisabeth A; Katzer, Frank

    2017-08-01

    Babesia are intraerythrocytic parasites of importance worldwide within the fields of human and veterinary medicine, as some Babesia sp., including Babesia microti are potentially zoonotic and can cause fatal disease in both humans and animals. The aims of this study were to use a nested PCR (amplifying the 18S rRNA gene) to determine the presence and species of Babesia parasite DNA found in blood (n = 47) and spleen (n = 47) samples collected from Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) in Scotland. The results showed 28/47 (59·6%) blood and 14/47 (29·8%) spleen samples tested positive for the presence of Babesia DNA. Initial sequence analysis of the Babesia DNA identified three distinct sequence types (submitted to GenBank KX528553, KX528554 and KX528555), which demonstrated ⩾99% identity to Babesia sp. parasites previously identified in badgers in Spain (KT223484 and KT223485). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the three isolates are closely related to Babesia annae, B. microti and other Piroplasmida species found in wildlife. Further sequence analysis of the samples demonstrated that the badgers were routinely infected with more than one parasite isolate and there was also evidence of genetic recombination between the Babesia parasite isolates (submitted to GenBank KY250472 - KY250477).

  1. The Effect of Oral Vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis BCG on the Development of Tuberculosis in Captive European Badgers (Meles meles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Mark A; Aldwell, Frank; Williams, Gareth A; Palmer, Si; Gowtage, Sonya; Ashford, Roland; Dalley, Deanna J; Davé, Dipesh; Weyer, Ute; Salguero, Francisco J; Nunez, Alejandro; Nadian, Allan K; Crawshaw, Timothy; Corner, Leigh A L; Lesellier, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    The European badger ( Meles meles ) is a reservoir host of Mycobacterium bovis and responsible for a proportion of the tuberculosis (TB) cases seen in cattle in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. An injectable preparation of the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is licensed for use in badgers in the UK and its use forms part of the bovine TB eradication plans of England and Wales. However, there are practical limitations to the widespread application of an injectable vaccine for badgers and a research priority is the development of an oral vaccine deliverable to badgers in bait. Previous studies reported the successful vaccination of badgers with oral preparations of 10 8 colony forming units (CFU) of both Pasteur and Danish strains of BCG contained within a lipid matrix composed of triglycerides of fatty acids. Protection against TB in these studies was expressed as a reduction in the number and apparent progression of visible lesions, and reductions in the bacterial load and dissemination of infection. To reduce the cost of an oral vaccine and reduce the potential for environmental contamination with BCG, it is necessary to define the minimal efficacious dose of oral BCG for badgers. The objectives of the two studies reported here were to compare the efficacy of BCG Danish strain in a lipid matrix with unformulated BCG given orally, and to evaluate the efficacy of BCG Danish in a lipid matrix at a 10-fold lower dose than previously evaluated in badgers. In the first study, both BCG unformulated and in a lipid matrix reduced the number and apparent progression of visible lesions and the dissemination of infection from the lung. In the second study, vaccination with BCG in the lipid matrix at a 10-fold lower dose produced a similar outcome, but with greater intra-group variability than seen with the higher dose in the first study. Further research is needed before we are able to recommend a final dose of BCG for oral vaccination of badgers against TB

  2. Optimising and Evaluating the Characteristics of a Multiple Antigen ELISA for Detection of Mycobacterium bovis Infection in a Badger Vaccine Field Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aznar, I.; Frankena, K.; More, S.J.; Whelan, C.; Martin, W.; Gormley, E.; Corner, L.A.L.; Murphy, D.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    A long-term research programme has been underway in Ireland to evaluate the usefulness of badger vaccination as part of the national bTB (bovine tuberculosis) control strategy. This culminated in a field trial which commenced in county Kilkenny in 2009 to determine the effects of badger vaccination

  3. Influence of chamber misalignment on cased telescoped (CT ammunition accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Corriveau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As part of a research program, it was desired to better understand the impact of the rotating chamber alignment with the barrel throat on the precision and accuracy of a novel cased telescoped (CT ammunition firing rifle. In order to perform the study, a baseline CT ammunition chamber which was concentric with a Mann barrel bore was manufactured. Additionally, six chambers were manufactured with an offset relative to the barrel bore. These chambers were used to simulate a misaligned chamber relative to the bore axis. Precision and accuracy tests were then performed at 200 m in an indoor range under controlled conditions. For this project, 5.56 mm CT ammunition was used. As the chamber axis offset relative to the gun bore was increased, the mean point of impact was displaced away from the target center. The shift in the impact location is explained by the presence of in-bore yaw which results in lateral throw-off and aerodynamic jump components. The linear theory of ballistics is used to establish a relationship between the chamber misalignment and the resulting projectile mean point of impact for a rifle developed to fire CT ammunition. This relationship allows for the prediction of the mean point of impact given a chamber misalignment.

  4. Army TLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Fast Deflation Device Tether marking Pennants Balloon / Tether marking LED Flashing light Loading Ramps Customized Trailer for transportation and Field...amount of xtra lift that permits the ballon to rise (if Res_Lift = 0, balloon is at equilibrium) RL = NL – Payload – Tether Payload: the weight of...Army TLS The TLS uses tethered aerodynamic blimps and precision-powered winches to loft one or more specialty-designed meteorological payloads that

  5. Crusader Automated Docking System: Technology support for the Crusader Resupply Team. Interim report, Ammunition Logistics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kring, C.T.; Varma, V.K.; Jatko, W.B.

    1995-11-01

    The US Army and Team Crusader (United Defense, Lockheed Martin Armament Systems, etc.) are developing the next generation howitzer, the Crusader. The development program includes an advanced, self-propelled liquid propellant howitzer and a companion resupply vehicle. The resupply vehicle is intended to rendezvous with the howitzer near the battlefront and replenish ammunition, fuel, and other material. The Army has recommended that Crusader incorporate new and innovative technologies to improve performance and safety. One conceptual design proposes a robotic resupply boom on the resupply vehicle to upload supplies to the howitzer. The resupply boom would normally be retracted inside the resupply vehicle during transit. When the two vehicles are within range of the resupply boom, the boom would be extended to a receiving port on the howitzer. In order to reduce exposure to small arms fire or nuclear, biological, and chemical hazards, the crew would remain inside the resupply vehicle during the resupply operation. The process of extending the boom and linking with the receiving port is called docking. A boom operator would be designated to maneuver the boom into contact with the receiving port using a mechanical joystick. The docking operation depends greatly upon the skill of the boom operator to manipulate the boom into docking position. Computer simulations at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have shown that computer-assisted or autonomous docking can improve the ability of the operator to dock safely and quickly. This document describes the present status of the Crusader Autonomous Docking System (CADS) implemented at Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the CADS project is to determine the feasibility and performance limitations of vision systems to satisfy the autonomous docking requirements for Crusader and conduct a demonstration under controlled conditions.

  6. The effect of oral vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis BCG on the development of tuberculosis in captive European badgers (Meles meles)

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers, MA; Aldwell, F; Williams, GA; Palmer, S; Gowtage, S; Ashford, R; Dalley, D; Davé, D; Weyer, U; Salguero Bodes, FJ; Nunez, A; Nadian, A; Crawshaw, T; Corner, LAL; Lesellier, S

    2017-01-01

    The European badger (Meles meles) is a reservoir host of Mycobacterium bovis and responsible for a proportion of the tuberculosis (TB) cases seen in cattle in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. An injectable preparation of the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is licensed for use in badgers in the UK and its use forms part of the bovine TB eradication plans of England and Wales. However, there are practical limitations to the widespread application of an injectable vaccine for b...

  7. Effects of habitat fragmentation on the Eurasian badger (Meles meles subpopulations in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cino Pertoldi

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic variation in five populations of the Eurasian badger from Denmark was screened, using the hyper-variable minisatellite DNA probe 33.15. Very low genetic variability was found within populations. This lack of variability could be related to the fragmentation of the Danish landscape which reduces the effective population size of local populations and the gene flow between different subpopulations. The present paper discusses the possibility of managing the Danish badger subpopulations as a metapopulation.

  8. Molecular identification of badger-associated Babesia sp. DNA in dogs: updated phylogeny of piroplasms infecting Caniformia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornok, Sándor; Horváth, Gábor; Takács, Nóra; Kontschán, Jenő; Szőke, Krisztina; Farkas, Róbert

    2018-04-11

    Piroplasms are unicellular, tick-borne parasites. Among them, during the past decade, an increasing diversity of Babesia spp. has been reported from wild carnivores. On the other hand, despite the known contact of domestic and wild carnivores (e.g. during hunting), and a number of ixodid tick species they share, data on the infection of dogs with babesiae from other families of carnivores are rare. In this study blood samples were collected from 90 dogs and five road-killed badgers. Ticks were also removed from these animals. The DNA was extracted from all blood samples, and from 33 ticks of badgers, followed by molecular analysis for piroplasms with PCR and sequencing, as well as by phylogenetic comparison of detected genotypes with piroplasms infecting carnivores. Eleven of 90 blood DNA extracts from dogs, and all five samples from badgers were PCR-positive for piroplasms. In addition to the presence of B. canis DNA in five dogs, sequencing identified the DNA of badger-associated "Babesia sp. Meles-Hu1" in six dogs and in all five badgers. The DNA of "Babesia sp. Meles-Hu1" occurred significantly more frequently in dogs often taken to forests (i.e. the preferred habitat of badgers in Hungary), than in dogs without this characteristic. Moreover, detection of DNA from this Babesia sp. was significantly associated with hunting dogs in comparison with dogs not used for hunting. Two PCR-positive dogs (in one of which the DNA of the badger-associated Babesia sp. was identified, whereas in the other the DNA of B. canis was present) showed clinical signs of babesiosis. Engorged specimens of both I. canisuga and I. hexagonus were collected from badgers with parasitaemia, but only I. canisuga contained the DNA of "Babesia sp. Meles-Hu1". This means a significant association of the DNA from "Babesia sp. Meles-Hu1" with I. canisuga. Phylogenetically, "Babesia sp. Meles-Hu1" belonged to the "B. microti" group. This is the first detection of the DNA from a badger

  9. The Safety Analysis of Shipborne Ammunition in Fire Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Junpeng; Wang, Xudong; Yue, Pengfei

    2017-12-01

    The safety of Ammunition has always been the focus of national military science and technology issues. And fire is one of the major safety threats to the ship’s ammunition storage environment, In this paper, Mk-82 shipborne aviation bomb has been taken as the study object, simulated the whole process of fire by using the FDS (Fire Detection System) software. According to the simulation results of FDS, ANSYS software was used to simulate the temperature field of Mk-82 carrier-based aviation bomb under fire environment, and the safety of aviation bomb in fire environment was analyzed. The result shows that the aviation bombs under the fire environment can occur the combustion or explosion after 70s constant cook-off, and it was a huge threat to the ship security.

  10. Constraints placed on Marine Corps ammunition requirements by the PPBS

    OpenAIRE

    Burlingham, Donald Michael.

    1988-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The purpose of this report is to determine whether the products of the Planning, Programming and Budgeting System (PPBS) are worthwhile, they must be measured against some form of output. The prepositioned War Reserve (PWR) of the Marine Corps is a measure of sustainability: a desired output of the PPBS. This thesis investigated the PPBS, the Marine Corps programming methodology and ammunition requirement generation to determine whethe...

  11. Lead Free Frangible Ammunition Exposure at United States Air Force Small Arms Firing Ranges, 2005 - 2007

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moran, Michael P; Ott, Darrin K

    2008-01-01

    ...) has performed related to health concerns expressed by Security Forces Combat Arms (CATM) instructors regarding exposure to contaminants generated during the discharge of lead free frangible ammunition...

  12. Administration: Army Congressional Fellowship Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    This printing publishes a new Army Regulation. This regulation presents the policies and procedures under which the Army manages the Army Congressional Fellowship Program and supplements applicable Department...

  13. Energy requirements for gestation and lactation in a delayed implanter, the American badger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, H J; Miller, B; Ryder, T; Ryder, L

    1985-01-01

    1. Two adult female badgers were water-deprived and/or fasted during the last one-half to two-thirds of pregnancy while a third pregnant female received water ad libitum and was fed meat and dog food. 2. The litter size, birth weights, post partum energy consumption, growth rate, development of homeothermy, tooth eruption and date of weaning, as well as other developmental characteristics, were not significantly different between cubs born to the fed or fasted mothers. 3. The energy demands for gestation are apparently small and are accommodated by fat reserves during periods of food deprivation. However, the calculated energy for lactation is 16 times that of gestation, which is quadruple the expenditure for most mammals. 4. As a result of delayed implantation, the length of gestation and litter weights of badgers are considerably below those predicted from allometric equations. 5. The period of lactation is therefore extremely critical to the survival of both the cubs and lactating adults which require heavy fat stores and possibly torpor to ensure sufficient energy availability during prolonged winter food shortage.

  14. Lethal distemper in badgers (Meles meles) following epidemic in dogs and wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sabatino, Daria; Di Francesco, Gabriella; Zaccaria, Guendalina; Malatesta, Daniela; Brugnola, Luca; Marcacci, Maurilia; Portanti, Ottavio; De Massis, Fabrizio; Savini, Giovanni; Teodori, Liana; Ruggieri, Enzo; Mangone, Iolanda; Badagliacca, Pietro; Lorusso, Alessio

    2016-12-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) represents an important conservation threat to many wild carnivores. A large distemper epidemic sustained by an Arctic-lineage strain occurred in Italy in 2013, mainly in the Abruzzi region, causing overt disease in domestic and shepherd dogs, Apennine wolves (Canis lupus) and other wild carnivores. Two badgers were collected by the end of September 2015 in a rural area of the Abruzzi region and were demonstrated to be CDV-positive by real time RT-PCR and IHC in several tissues. The genome of CDV isolates from badgers showed Y549H substitution in the mature H protein. By employing all publicly available Arctic-lineage H protein encoding gene sequences, six amino acid changes in recent Italian strains with respect to Italian strains of dogs from 2000 to 2008, were observed. A CDV strain belonging to the European-wildlife lineage was also identified in a fox found dead in the same region in 2016, proving co-circulation of an additional CDV lineage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The taxonomic status of badgers (Mammalia, Mustelidae) from Southwest Asia based on cranial morphometrics, with the redescription of Meles canescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Alexei V; Puzachenko, Andrey Yu

    2013-01-01

    The Eurasian badgers (Meles spp.) are widespread in the Palaearctic Region, occurring from the British Islands in the west to the Japanese Islands in the east, including the Scandinavia, Southwest Asia and southern China. The morphometric variation in 30 cranial characters of 692 skulls of Meles from across the Palaearctic was here analyzed. This craniometric analysis revealed a significant difference between the European and Asian badger phylogenetic lineages, which can be further split in two pairs of taxa: meles - canescens and leucurus - anakuma. Overall, European badger populations are very similar morphologically, particularly with regards to the skull shape, but differ notably from those from Asia Minor, the Middle East and Transcaucasia. Based on the current survey of badger specimens available in main world museums, we have recognized four distinctive, parapatric species: Meles meles, found in most of Europe; Meles leucurus from continental Asia; M. anakuma from Japan; and M. canescens from Southwest Asia and the mountains of Middle Asia. These results are in agreement with those based on recent molecular data analyses. The morphological peculiarities and distribution range of M. canescens are discussed. The origin and evolution of Meles species, which is yet poorly understood, is also briefly discussed.

  16. Discovery of a polyomavirus in European badgers (Meles meles) and the evolution of host range in the family Polyomaviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sarah C; Murphy, Aisling A; Cotten, Matthew; Palser, Anne L; Benson, Phillip; Lesellier, Sandrine; Gormley, Eamonn; Richomme, Céline; Grierson, Sylvia; Bhuachalla, Deirdre Ni; Chambers, Mark; Kellam, Paul; Boschiroli, María-Laura; Ehlers, Bernhard; Jarvis, Michael A; Pybus, Oliver G

    2015-06-01

    Polyomaviruses infect a diverse range of mammalian and avian hosts, and are associated with a variety of symptoms. However, it is unknown whether the viruses are found in all mammalian families and the evolutionary history of the polyomaviruses is still unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a novel polyomavirus in the European badger (Meles meles), which to our knowledge represents the first polyomavirus to be characterized in the family Mustelidae, and within a European carnivoran. Although the virus was discovered serendipitously in the supernatant of a cell culture inoculated with badger material, we subsequently confirmed its presence in wild badgers. The European badger polyomavirus was tentatively named Meles meles polyomavirus 1 (MmelPyV1). The genome is 5187 bp long and encodes proteins typical of polyomaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses including all known polyomavirus genomes consistently group MmelPyV1 with California sea lion polyomavirus 1 across all regions of the genome. Further evolutionary analyses revealed phylogenetic discordance amongst polyomavirus genome regions, possibly arising from evolutionary rate heterogeneity, and a complex association between polyomavirus phylogeny and host taxonomic groups.

  17. Notes on food and foraging of the Honey Badger Mellivora capensis in the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kruuk

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Contents of faeces indicated that honey badgers in the Kalahari eat mostly rodents, followed by lizards and scorpions, all of which are caught by digging. Larger mammals (aardwolf, bat-eared fox, springhare and large snakes are also eaten. Foraging behaviour is described and individual differences in foraging strategies are discussed.

  18. Characterisation of twenty-one European badger (Meles meles) microsatellite loci facilitates the discrimination of second-order relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annavi, Geetha; Dawson, Deborah A.; Horsburgh, Gavin J.; Greig, Carolyn; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W.; Burke, Terry

    The European badger (Meles meles) breeds plurally in lowland England and is important economically due to its link with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) transmission. To understand disease transmission and facilitate effective management, it is vital to elucidate the social structure of

  19. Effect of culling and vaccination on bovine tuberculosis infection in a European badger (Meles meles) population by spatial simulation modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdou, Marwa; Frankena, Klaas; O'Keeffe, James; Byrne, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    The control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle herds in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) is partially hindered by spill-back infection from wild badgers (Meles meles). The aim of this study was to determine the relative effects of interventions (combinations of culling and/or vaccination) on bTB

  20. Army medical imaging system: ARMIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siedband, M.P.; Kramp, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances of stimulable phosphor screens, data cards using optical storage means, and new personal computers with image processing capability have made possible the design of economical filmless medical imaging systems. The addition of communication links means that remote interpretation of images is also possible. The Army Medical Imaging System uses stimulable phosphor screens, digital readout, a small computer, an optical digital data card device, and a DIN/PACS link. Up to 200 images can be stored in the computer hard disk for rapid recall and reading by the radiologist. The computer permits image processing, annotation, insertion of text, and control of the system. Each device contains an image storage RAM and communicates with the computer via the small computer systems interface. Data compression is used to reduce the required storage capacity and transmission times of the 1-mB images. The credit card-size optical data cards replace film and can store 12 or more images. The data cards can be read on an independent viewer. The research is supported by the U.S. Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory

  1. Milan Army Ammunition Plant. Remedial Investigation Report. Volume 4. Appendices M - T

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    and it acts as an insulin antagonist in intermediary carbohydrate metabolism (NRC 1980). Ingestion of excess potassium results in hyperkalemia which...LOCALLY PRODUCED BEEF As discussed in Section 9, some beef and dairy cattle are raised in the MAAP area, although beef cattle are more prevalent (personal...in beef. It was assumed that four percent (Fries 1987) of a beef cow’s total dry matter intake would be soil. Not all of the chemical that a beef cow

  2. Cost Reductions for Wastewater Treatment Utilizing Water Management at Holston Army Ammunition Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    says that the granular carbon used is made from bituminous coal. As the waste stream pass through a bed of carbon granules, com- pounds are adsorbed to...findings of laboratory-scale reactor studies conducted at Purdue University for * Clark, Dietz and Associates. The original recommendations and cost...Pretreatment Denitrification by Submerged Anaerbbic I ilters I ~ Trickling Filters S F ,2al Clarification "•’i Pump - ~ Sludge ,Treatment Dual Media Filh:ration

  3. Remedial Investigation Report for USATHAMA - RATSS Lake City Army Ammunition Plant, Independence, Missouri. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    animals, acute oral administration produces fatty infiltration and histological alterations in the liver. High doses produce irreversible liver damage...animals has produced histological or pathological changes in the liver, brain, and lungs (Troshina 1964). Chronic exposure of animals to chloroethane...ingestion include salivation, gastrointestinal irritation, nausea, vomiting, hemorrhagic gastritis , and diarrhea (ACGIH 1986). Dermal or ocular exposure of

  4. Archeological Survey and Testing Along Boone Creek, Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant, Webster Parish, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    appear- ance in the early nineteenth century, when explorers found it clogged by an immense log jam known as the Great Raft (Freeman [and Custis 1806?] :3...Caddo for food: acorns, nuts of various kinds, persimmons, plums, wild cherries, mulberries, strawberries , blackberries, and wild grapes. Cultivated

  5. Remedial Investigation Report for Lake City Army Ammunition Plant. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    4.2.l8 4,-Dichlorobenzene 1,4-Dichlorobenzene is a solid used as an air deodorant and as an insecticide . EPA (1987) reports that 100% of an oral dose...sumac, and wild grapevine are also found within the woodlands. Common weed species include blackeyed susan, bull thistle, Carolina horse nettle , chickweed

  6. 37 CFR 5.18 - Arms, ammunition, and implements of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... implements of war. 5.18 Section 5.18 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... implements of war. (a) The exportation of technical data relating to arms, ammunition, and implements of war... parts 120 through 130); the articles designated as arms, ammunitions, and implements of war are...

  7. 27 CFR 478.37 - Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufacture, importation... COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 478.37 Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition. No person shall manufacture or import, and no manufacturer...

  8. Key questions and responses regarding the transition to use of lead-free ammunition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Vernon G.; Kanstrup, Niels; Gremse, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Questions and concerns about the use of lead-free ammunition in hunting were encountered during the Oxford Lead Symposium. Many originated from commonly-held, but unsubstantiated, reports that have hindered the transition to use of lead-free ammunition in the UK and elsewhere. This paper examines...... and answers the principal reservations raised about the use of lead-free hunting ammunition. The issue of how the evidence for lead exposure and toxicity to wildlife from discharged lead shot cartridges could be better communicated to the public to enhance adoption of lead–free ammunition is addressed....... The paper presents evidence to assuage concerns about the effectiveness and nontoxicity of lead ammunition substitutes, their suitability for British shooting and weapons, and their role in wildlife health protection. Collectively, these answers to concerns could lower the public resistance to use of lead...

  9. 2009 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    right time, handling pre- education attitudes, and tracking performance gains and career advantages related to academics.  Developing current, relevant...Army Leadership Technical Report 2010-2 2009 CENTER FOR ARMY LEADERSHIP ANNUAL SURVEY OF ARMY LEADERSHIP (CASAL): ARMY EDUCATION ...Joshua Hatfield ICF International John P. Steele Center for Army Leadership June 2010 The Center for Army Leadership An

  10. BADGER v1.0: A Fortran equation of state library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltemes, T. A.; Moses, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The BADGER equation of state library was developed to enable inertial confinement fusion plasma codes to more accurately model plasmas in the high-density, low-temperature regime. The code had the capability to calculate 1- and 2-T plasmas using the Thomas-Fermi model and an individual electron accounting model. Ion equation of state data can be calculated using an ideal gas model or via a quotidian equation of state with scaled binding energies. Electron equation of state data can be calculated via the ideal gas model or with an adaptation of the screened hydrogenic model with ℓ-splitting. The ionization and equation of state calculations can be done in local thermodynamic equilibrium or in a non-LTE mode using a variant of the Busquet equivalent temperature method. The code was written as a stand-alone Fortran library for ease of implementation by external codes. EOS results for aluminum are presented that show good agreement with the SESAME library and ionization calculations show good agreement with the FLYCHK code. Program summaryProgram title: BADGERLIB v1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEND_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEND_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 41 480 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 904 451 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90. Computer: 32- or 64-bit PC, or Mac. Operating system: Windows, Linux, MacOS X. RAM: 249.496 kB plus 195.630 kB per isotope record in memory Classification: 19.1, 19.7. Nature of problem: Equation of State (EOS) calculations are necessary for the accurate simulation of high energy density plasmas. Historically, most EOS codes used in these simulations have relied on an ideal gas model. This model is inadequate for low

  11. A badger in Bannerghatta: an opportunistic record of the Ratel Mellivora capensis (Schreber, 1776 (Mammalia: Carnivora: Mustelidae from Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Krishnan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A single observation of a Ratel Mellivora capensis has been photo-documented in Bannerghatta National Park on 2 November 2015. This record being the first contemporary evidence of badgers in this region of Karnataka, India, the paper also presents a case study of badgers being close to a highly human-dominated landscape which could be due to some ecological factors that may be conducive as a habitat within the Park. Though a resident population and distribution within the BNP could not be ascertained, it can be proposed that the region may be an extension of range of its most recently documented distribution in the Eastern Ghats landscape. 

  12. Contents of chemical elements in tissues of European badger (Meles meles affected by ovarian tumour – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Bukovjan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher concentrations of chemical elements in animal tissues may be associated with tumours and may explain cancerogenity. In this study, selected chemical elements were measured in the liver, kidneys, muscles and tissues affected by tumour in a dead female European badger (Meles meles with a metastatic ovarian carcinoma. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used for the assessment of concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc. AMA 254 analyser was used for the assessment of mercury concentration. Concentrations of heavy metals such as As, Cr, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, and total Hg amounted to 0.031, 0.16, 7.74, 44.54, 0.67, 0.67, and 0.36 mg·kg-1 in the tumour tissue. This is the first detection of ovarian tumour in a European badger (Meles meles which was systematically examined for the presence of chemical elements.

  13. Reduction of badger (Meles meles setts damage to artificial elements of the territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Balestrieri

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the Alessandria section of the Turin railway-basin (northern Italy, the presence of the badger (Meles meles setts in railway embankments causes progressive track subsidence. Rail traffic is dangerous and continuous maintenance and surveillance are required. In the past, the problem was managed without success, by trying to damage and disturb the setts. In 1997 the Italian Railways decided to promote some specific research. Four used setts have been found along the surveyed lines. The choice of a suitable site to dig the sett appears to be influenced only by pedological parameters. A comparison of used and unused banks revealed that soils with significantly lower percentages of gravel and higher percentages of fine sands are preferred. Badgers have been deterred from using one of the found setts, and successively the railway embankment has been covered with chain link fencing. Methods and results are discussed.

  14. Reducing Lead on the Landscape: Anticipating Hunter Behavior in Absence of a Free Nonlead Ammunition Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Chase

    Full Text Available Lead is a neurotoxin that has been documented to affect many forms of wildlife, and has been identified as a limiting factor in a population of California Condors in Northern Arizona. The Arizona Game and Fish Department provides vouchers for free nonlead ammunition to hunters selected to hunt within the distribution of California Condors, with the intention of having fewer lead-laden offal piles available to California Condors. Although wildlife agencies may reasonably assume voucher programs motivate hunters into choosing nonlead ammunition, the lead reduction efforts attributable to the voucher program has not been empirically quantified. Our intention was to compare a control group of hunters to a treatment group of hunters within California Condor occupied areas. Both groups received educational materials regarding the deleterious effects of lead, but the treatment group also received a voucher for a free initial box of ammunition. About half of the control group used nonlead ammunition, compared to about three-fourths of the treatment group. Prominent barriers to adoption of nonlead ammunition included a general difficulty of obtaining it, obtaining it in the desired caliber, and its costliness. Frequently mentioned motivations for using nonlead was the exhortation to use it by the Department, and the desire to aid California Condor recovery by hunters. The disparate compliance rates found herein confirm and quantify the success of nonlead ammunition voucher programs, but underscore the importance of working to increase the supply of nonlead ammunition with the end of facilitating its procurement and reducing its cost.

  15. Efficacy of passive hair-traps for the genetic sampling of a low-density badger population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Balestrieri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available

    A hair-trapping survey was carried out in the western River Po plain (NW Italy. We aimed to test whether barbed wire hair snares in combination with DNA profiling might represent an effective tool to study a low-density badger population. Traps were placed above the entrances of twelve badger setts between 15 February and 30 April 2010. Trapping effort was expressed as the number of trap-nights required to pluck a hair sample and the trend in the number of genotyped individual over time was analysed by regression analysis. Forty-three hair samples were collected, with an overall trapping effort of 54.8 trap-nights per one hair sample. Twenty-eight samples yielded reliable genotypes, allowing the identification of nine individual badgers. The length of storage period (1-3 months before DNA extraction did not seem to affect genotyping success. According to the regression model, trapping effort allowed to sample 75% of the overall population. Our results suggest that the efficacy of passive devices is affected by population density.

  16. Molecular analysis of Ixodes rugicollis, Candidatus Neoehrlichia sp. (FU98) and a novel Babesia genotype from a European badger (Meles meles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornok, Sándor; Trauttwein, Klaudia; Takács, Nóra; Hodžić, Adnan; Duscher, Georg Gerhard; Kontschán, Jenő

    2017-01-01

    The European badger (Meles meles) is a widespread mammal in most countries of the European continent, with increasingly recognized veterinary/medical importance owing to its preferred habitats (including pastures and urban environments), broad spectrum of food items, and role as a game hunting target. However, ticks and tick-borne pathogens associated with badgers are only partly known, and most of them have not yet been analysed with molecular biological methods The aim of this study was to perform molecular taxonomic analysis of ticks collected from a road-killed European badger, as well as to molecularly investigate its ticks and blood sample for the presence of Anaplasmataceae and piroplasms. Ticks from the badger were morphologically identified as females of Ixodes rugicollis. Based on its cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA sequences, I. rugicollis phylogenetically clustered together with I. lividus and I. arboricola, i.e. other members of the subgenus Pholeoixodes. The blood sample of the badger contained the DNA of Candidatus Neoehrlichia sp. (FU98) recently identified in red fox in Austria and the Czech Republic. This genotype is most closely related to Ca. N. lotoris (from raccoons in North America), and has lower sequence identity with the I. ricinus-transmitted zoonotic agent, Ca. N. mikurensis found in Eurasia. In the blood of the badger and in one female I. rugicollis, the DNA of a new Babesia genotype was also present, which differed from a piroplasm detected in M. meles in Spain, and clustered phylogenetically in the B. microti clade. Phylogenetic analysis of I. rugicollis (based on two genetic markers) confirms its status in subgenus Pholeoixodes. Ca. Neoehrlichia sp. (FU98) was identified for the first time in M. meles and in Hungary. In addition, a molecularly previously not yet characterized Babesia genotype occurs in badgers in Central Europe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Corrosion of ammunition dumped in the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurczak Wojciech

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the preliminary results of a research aimed at preparation for the extraction of chemical ammunition immersed after the Second World War(WWII in the waters of the Baltic Sea (BS. It has been 70 years since the first steps aiming at elimination of mainly German chemical weapons were taken, while the expected durability (tightness of metal barrels construction or other containers was estimated at 50-60 years. Consequently there is a serious risk of contamination of the Baltic Sea waters, not only with toxic warfare agents but also with the products of their decomposition. The evaluation of barrels’ and containers’ with TWA corrosion processes progress will determine the possibility of these munitions extraction to the surface in order to perform their classic utilization.

  18. Tombs, tunnels, and terraces a cultural resources survey of a former ammunition supply point in Okinawa, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhaaren, B. T.; Levenson, J. B.; Komine, G.

    2000-02-09

    U.S. forces serving at military bases on foreign soil are obligated to act as good stewards of the cultural and natural resources under their control. However, cultural resources management presents special challenges at U.S. bases in other countries where cultural properties laws differ in emphasis and detail from those in the United States and issues of land ownership and occupancy are not always clear. Where status of forces agreements (SOFAs) exist, environmental governing standards bridge the gap between U.S. and host nation cultural priorities. In Japan, the Department of Defense Japan Environmental Governing Standards (JEGS) fill this function. Under Criteria 12-4.2 and 12-4.3 of the JEGS, U.S. Forces Japan commit themselves to inventory and protect cultural properties found on the lands they control or use. Cultural properties include archaeological sites, tombs, historic buildings, and shrines. Natural monuments, such as landscape features or plant and animal species, may also be designated as cultural properties. As part of this commitment, in February 1999 a cultural resources inventory was conducted in Area 1, part of Kadena Air Base (AB), Okinawa, Japan. Area 1, the former U.S. army Ammunition Supply Point 1, is currently used primarily for training exercises and recreational paint ball.

  19. Discovering the Army's Core Competencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudesheim, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    This paper seeks to answer the question, "Has the Army correctly identified its core competencies to ensure the Army can adequately respond to the national military strategy?" FM 1, The Army (Prototype Draft...

  20. Women in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-06

    Army womenpower re- quirements with no apparent end in sight. No country, not even Russia or Israel, has ever made a conscious decision to include...provide a basis for decision making. iiI CHAPTER ONE AN HISTORICAL OVERVIEW Few books have been written which outline the history of military women...with a bill introducing the Women’s Army Auxillary Corps (WAAC). In order 7 that the Army could maintain control over this sensitive issue, General

  1. Army Maintenance System Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilbertson, Frank V

    2006-01-01

    .... Used in conjunction with pertinent historical data and developed with Army transformation goals in mind, General Systems thinking can provide the framework for guiding maintenance transformation...

  2. The conventional ammunition requirements determination process of the U.S. Navy.

    OpenAIRE

    Mawson, John III

    1985-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The objective of this thesis is to analyze the Requirements Determination procedures in the Navy's Conventional Gun Ammunition System in an attempt to identify areas for potential improvement. The Conventional Gun Ammunition System involves a logical progression of steps initiated on an annual basis. The Secretary of Defense begins the process by issuing broad guidance for the development of documentation to support b...

  3. Hydroacoustic detection of dumped ammunition in the Ocean with multibeam snippet backscatter analyses. A case study from the 'Kolberger Heide' ammunition dump site (Baltic Sea, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunde, Tina; Schneider von Deimling, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Dumped ammunition in the sea is a matter of great concern in terms of safe navigation and environmental threads. Because corrosion of the dumped ammunition's hull is ongoing, future contamination of the ambient water by their toxic interior is likely to occur. The location of such dump sites is approximately known from historical research and ship log book analyses. Subsequent remote sensing of ammunition dumping sites (e.g. mines) on the seafloor is preferentially performed with hydro-acoustic methods such as high resolution towed side scan or by the sophisticated synthetic aperture sonar approach with autonomous underwater vehicles. However, these are time consuming and expensive procedures, while determining the precise position of individual mines remains a challenging task. To mitigate these shortcomings we suggest using ship-born high-frequency multibeam sonar in shallow water to address the task of mine detection and precise localization on the seabed. Multibeam sonar systems have improved their potential in regard to backscatter analyses significantly over the past years and nowadays present fast and accurate tools for shallow water surveying to (1) detect mines in multibeam snippet backscatter data (2) determine their precise location with high accuracy intertial navigation systems. A case study was performed at the prominent ammunition dumping site 'Kolberger Heide' (Baltic Sea, Germany) in the year 2014 using a modern hydro-acoustic multibeam echosounder system with 200-400 kHz (KONGSBERG EM2040c). With an average water depth of not even 20 m and the proximity to the shore line and dense waterways, this investigated area requires permanent navigational care. Previously, the study area was surveyed by the Navy with the very sophisticated HUGIN AUV equipped with a synthetic aperture sonar with best resolution by current technology. Following an evaluation of the collected data, various ammunition bodies on the sea floor could be clearly detected. Analyses

  4. ARMY CYBER STRUCTURE ALIGNMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    content/?q=historic-cyber-unit-begins- daily-action . 14 John M. McHugh , Secretary of the Army, HQDA General Order 2014-02, Affirmation of Secretary of...support-plays-role-in-tactical-operations/75545442/. McHugh , John M., Secretary of the Army, HQDA General Order 2014-02, Affirmation of Secretary of

  5. Performance of TB immunodiagnostic tests in Eurasian badgers (Meles meles of different ages and the influence of duration of infection on serological sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayers Robin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In parts of Great Britain and Ireland, Eurasian badgers (Meles meles constitute a reservoir of Mycobacterium bovis infection and a potential source of infection for cattle. In vitro diagnostic tests for live badgers are an important component of strategies to control TB in this species. Immunological tests have been developed for badgers, although little is known about the influence of the age of the animal on test performance. To address this, we evaluated the performance of three immunological tests for badgers with respect to the age of the animal: the Brock Test and BrockTB STAT-PAK® serological tests and the recently developed interferon-gamma enzyme immunoassay (IFNγ EIA. Data published elsewhere suggested that seropositivity was associated with more progressive forms of TB in the badger. To gain further evidence for this, we used longitudinal data from a well-studied population of badgers to test for an association between the sensitivity of the Brock Test and the duration of TB infection. Results Sensitivity of the two serological tests was approximately 54% for both cubs and adults. Sensitivity of the IFNγ EIA was lower in cubs (57% compared with adults (85% when a common cut-off value was used to define test positivity. Taking data from the cubs alone, the IFNγ EIA cut-off value could be adjusted to increase the sensitivity to 71% with no loss in specificity. As a general observation, specificity of all tests was higher in cubs, although only significantly so in the case of the Brock Test. Using logistic regression analysis to adjust for age, sensitivity of the Brock Test was significantly lower at first culture positive event (58%, but increased to >80% as infection progressed. Conclusion These data suggest that serodiagnosis could be a valuable tool for detecting a higher proportion of badgers with the greatest probability of transmitting infection. The age category of the badger appeared to exert little

  6. Spatial organisation of badgers (Meles meles in a medium-density population in Luxembourg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain C Frantz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract
    Any hypothesis aiming to explain the social organisation of Eurasian badgers Meles meles has to consider its wide inter-population variability. We used radiotracking techniques to investigate the spatial organisation and the pattern of space-use by badger in Luxembourg, where badger density can be considered moderate compared to most of Europe.
    Eight badgers belonging to five social groups were caught and radio-collared. The size of individual home ranges, as assesses by 100% minimum convex polygons in spring-summer 2002 and 2003, varied from 42.5 ha to 171.8 ha. Core areas corresponded to the 50-70% kernel isopleths and covered an average of 10.1% of individual home ranges. The home ranges of badgers caught at the same sett overlapped largely (average 83.3%, whilst the overlap between neighbouring ranges did not exceed 13.8%. Altogether six boundary latrines were found at the intersection of group ranges. Overall, the spatial system of the Luxembourg badgers is quite flexible, with the boundaries of some group ranges remaining constant over the years, while others may expand or contract.
    Riassunto
    Organizzazione spaziale del tasso (Meles meles in una popolazione a media densità del Lussemburgo.
    Qualsiasi ipotesi che voglia spiegare l’organizzazione sociale del tasso Meles meles, deve tener conto della sua ampia variabilità tra le popolazioni.
    Tramite la radiotelemetria e il monitoraggio delle latrine, la struttura territoriale e l’uso dello spazio da parte del tasso sono stati analizzati in una popolazione del Lussemburgo, dove la densità della specie può essere considerata intermedia rispetto ai valori noti per il resto dell’Europa.
    Sono stati marcati con radio-collari otto tassi, appartenenti a cinque diversi gruppi sociali. Le dimensioni delle aree vitali, stimate con il minimo poligono convesso al 100

  7. The effect of badger culling on breakdown prolongation and recurrence of bovine tuberculosis in cattle herds in Great Britain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Karolemeas

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis is endemic in cattle herds in Great Britain, with a substantial economic impact. A reservoir of Mycobacterium bovis within the Eurasian badger (Meles meles population is thought to have hindered disease control. Cattle herd incidents, termed breakdowns, that are either 'prolonged' (lasting ≥ 240 days or 'recurrent' (with another breakdown within a specified time period may be important foci for onward spread of infection. They drain veterinary resources and can be demoralising for farmers. Randomised Badger Culling Trial (RBCT data were re-analysed to examine the effects of two culling strategies on breakdown prolongation and recurrence, during and after culling, using a Bayesian hierarchical model. Separate effect estimates were obtained for the 'core' trial areas (where culling occurred and the 'buffer' zones (up to 2 km outside of the core areas. For breakdowns that started during the culling period, 'reactive' (localised culling was associated with marginally increased odds of prolongation, with an odds ratio (OR of 1.7 (95% credible interval [CI] 1.1-2.4 within the core areas. This effect was not present after the culling ceased. There was no notable effect of 'proactive' culling on prolongation. In contrast, reactive culling had no effect on breakdown recurrence, though there was evidence of a reduced risk of recurrence in proactive core areas during the culling period (ORs and 95% CIs: 0.82 (0.64-1.0 and 0.69 (0.54-0.86 for 24- and 36-month recurrence respectively. Again these effects were not present after the culling ceased. There seemed to be no effect of culling on breakdown prolongation or recurrence in the buffer zones. These results suggest that the RBCT badger culling strategies are unlikely to reduce either the prolongation or recurrence of breakdowns in the long term, and that reactive strategies (such as employed during the RBCT are, if anything, likely to impact detrimentally on breakdown persistence.

  8. The diet of feral raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) and native badger (Meles meles) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmeros, Morten; Mikkelsen, Dorthe Malene Götz; Nørgaard, Louise Solveig

    2018-01-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is an East Asian Canid that has been introduced in Europe. Introduction of alien species is an increasing conservation issue. We examined the diet of a recently established raccoon dog population in Denmark by analysing stomach content in 249 carcasses...... collected in 2008–2016. Raccoon dog diet was compared to the diet of native badger (Meles meles) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Denmark. The most common food for raccoon dogs were invertebrates (frequency of occurrence, FO 69%), small mammals (FO 68%), birds (FO 41%), fruits (FO 38%), amphibians (FO 36...

  9. [Complete genome sequencing and analyses of rabies viruses isolated from wild animals (Chinese Ferret-Badger) in Zhejiang province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Fu-Ming; Chen, Xiu-Ying; Ye, Bi-Feng; Mei, Jian-Hua; Lan, Jin-Quan; Tang, Qing

    2009-08-01

    Based on sequencing the full-length genomes of two Chinese Ferret-Badger, we analyzed the properties of rabies viruses genetic variation in molecular level to get information on prevalence and variation of rabies viruses in Zhejiang, and to enrich the genome database of rabies viruses street strains isolated from Chinese wildlife. Overlapped fragments were amplified by RT-PCR and full-length genomes were assembled to analyze the nucleotide and deduced protein similarities and phylogenetic analyses of the N genes from Chinese Ferret-Badger, sika deer, vole, dog. Vaccine strains were then determined. The two full-length genomes were completely sequenced to find out that they had the same genetic structure with 11 923 nts including 58 nts-Leader, 1353 nts-NP, 894 nts-PP, 609 nts-MP, 1575 nts-GP, 6386 nts-LP, and 2, 5, 5 nts- intergenic regions (IGRs), 423 nts-Pseudogene-like sequence (Psi), 70 nts-Trailer. The two full-length genomes were in accordance with the properties of Rhabdoviridae Lyssa virus by blast and multi-sequence alignment. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences among Chinese strains had the highest similarity, especially among animals of the same species. Of the two full-length genomes, the similarity in amino acid level was dramatically higher than that in nucleotide level, so that the nucleotide mutations happened in these two genomes were most probably as synonymous mutations. Compared to the referenced rabies viruses, the lengths of the five protein coding regions did not show any changes or recombination, but only with a few-point mutations. It was evident that the five proteins appeared to be stable. The variation sites and types of the two ferret badgers genomes were similar to the referenced vaccine or street strains. The two strains were genotype 1 according to the multi-sequence and phylogenetic analyses, which possessing the distinct geographyphic characteristics of China. All the evidence suggested a cue that these two ferret badgers

  10. Design of Ammunition Gripper for 155-mm Robotic Howitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy , or decision, unless so designated by other docimientation. The citation in this...ocn-^moocaocouiincD-^rcTXDoinnnru’rin lA- ■♦ fuin—«p-oo^mr--^ T ■^ iD’^ .-4ono>inc»^ o^incwr- cncD ’-^-^.^ocucuoooorucDinmLnf^CJicn ojcnnj^u)t7

  11. Hunting, Sale, and Consumption of Bushmeat Killed by Lead-Based Ammunition in Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukrullah Ahmadi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Human consumption of animal meat killed by lead ammunition has been reported as a risk factor for elevated blood lead levels. However, little is known about how meat killed by lead ammunition is hunted, prepared, sold, and consumed. We explored the process from hunting to consumption within communities in Benin from the perspective of preventive measures. We conducted 38 semi-structured interviews with hunters (n = 9 and sellers (n = 8 of bushmeat and families (n = 21 as consumers of bushmeat killed by lead ammunition. Data were transcribed, translated, and coded for analysis. We conducted content analysis to identify and describe key themes and processes from hunting to consumption. Many hunters (n = 7/9 used lead-based ammunition. After the meat is hunted, market sellers often buy it directly from the hunters. Amongst the hunters and sellers, few (n = 4/17 acknowledged removing the meat impacted by lead shot prior to sale. Many families (n = 15/21 mentioned consumption of the hunted bushmeat. The meat is cooked before sharing with children. Many families (n = 19/21 mentioned they look for the remains of the lead shot or remove the meat impacted by the shot. The finding suggests that hunting, sale, and consumption of bushmeat killed by lead ammunition are well-known practices in Allada, Benin. The bushmeat often hunted illegally with lead shot is sold in the markets and eventually consumed by families who attempt to clean the meat impacted by the lead shot before cooking it.

  12. An investigation of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and Eurasian badger (Meles meles) scavenging, scattering, and removal of deer remains: forensic implications and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alexandria; Márquez-Grant, Nicholas; Stillman, Richard; Smith, Martin J; Korstjens, Amanda H

    2015-01-01

    Within northwest Europe, especially the United Kingdom, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and the Eurasian Badger (Meles meles) are the largest wild scavengers capable of modifying a set of remains through scavenging. Knowledge of region-specific and species-typical scavenging behaviors of scavengers within the crime scene area and surroundings can aid in more efficient and accurate interpretations. The scavenging behaviors of captive and wild foxes and badgers were recorded and compared through actualistic methods and direct observation. The scavenging by wild foxes and badgers of surface-deposited baits and whole deer (Cervus nippon; Capreolus capreolus) in a woodland was observed and analyzed. Wild foxes were found to scavenge deer more frequently than badgers. The scavenging of deer remains by foxes was also compared with forensic cases. The scavenging pattern and recovery distances of deer and human remains scavenged by foxes were similar but were potentially affected by the condition and deposition of a body, and the presence of clothing. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Experimental oral immunization of ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) with a recombinant canine adenovirus vaccine CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP and an attenuated rabies virus SRV9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinghui; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Shoufeng; Fang, Lijun; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rongliang

    2014-04-01

    Ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) are a major reservoir of rabies virus in southeastern China. Oral immunization has been shown to be a practical method for wildlife rabies management in Europe and North America. Two groups of 20 ferret badgers were given a single oral dose of a recombinant canine adenovirus-rabies vaccine, CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP, or an experimental attenuated rabies virus vaccine, SRV9. At 21 days, all ferret badgers had seroconverted, with serum virus-neutralizing antibodies ranging from 0.1 to 4.5 IU/mL. Titers were >0.50 IU/mL (an acceptable level) in 17/20 and 16/20 animals receiving CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP or SRV9, respectively. The serologic results indicate that the recombinant CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP is at least as effective as the attenuated rabies virus vaccine. Both may be considered for additional research as oral rabies vaccine candidates for ferret badgers.

  14. First report of Troglotrema acutum (Digenea, Troglotrematidae) in the Eurasian badger Meles meles in the Iberian Peninsula and presumptive lesions caused in the host

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ribas, Alexis; Molina-Vacas, G.; Boadella, M.; Rodríguez-Teijeiro, J. D.; Fernández-Cardo, R.; Arrizabalaga, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 2 (2012), s. 222-227 ISSN 0022-149X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Eurasian badger * parasites * Iberian Peninsula Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.157, year: 2012

  15. 27 CFR 478.149 - Armor piercing ammunition manufactured or imported for the purpose of testing or experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Armor piercing ammunition... Armor piercing ammunition manufactured or imported for the purpose of testing or experimentation. The provisions of §§ 478.37 and 478.99(d) with respect to the manufacture or importation of armor piercing...

  16. The Army Ethic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    The Constitution and Declaration of Independence simultaneously hold two different views of human nature, an individualist and a collectivist view...Profession, defines the Army Ethic as “the evolving set of laws, values, and beliefs, deeply embedded within the core of the Army culture and...incorporate other viewpoints or respond to shifts in morality, religion, economics, and other socio- cultural factors. This thesis will use the term

  17. The Total Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    http://thediplomat.com/2015/04/chinas-growing-cyberwar-capabilities/ (accessed April 25, 2016); Nicolas Giacometti, “China’s Nuclear Modernization and...link between the operational and tactical levels of war.48 47. Michelle Tan , “US Army Generals Criticize Outdated Deployment Model: ‘We’ve Gotten...unveils-its-big-8-initiatives/81882852/ (accessed March 16, 2016). 58. Michelle Tan , “US Army Generals Criticize Outdated Deployment Model: ‘We’ve

  18. Army Leader Transitions Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The courseware allows users to tailor training materials to specific needs. Users access this at the CAL AKO website or Army eLearning https...usarmy.skillport.com/ skillportfe/login/usarmylogin.cfm. New users must register with eLearning . Then login, select “Army Custom Curricula” and scroll to...challenges of your transition. Patience, flexibility and a good understanding of influence techniques on your part will help make any needed realignment a

  19. Initial pen and field assessment of baits to use in oral rabies vaccination of Formosan ferret-badgers in response to the re-emergence of rabies in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Wallace

    Full Text Available Taiwan had been considered rabies free since 1961, until a newly established wildlife disease surveillance program identified rabies virus transmission within the Formosan ferret-badger (Melogale moschata subaurantiaca in 2013. Ferret-badgers occur throughout southern China and Southeast Asia, but their ecological niche is not well described.As an initial feasibility assessment for potential rabies control measures, field camera trapping and pen assessment of 6 oral rabies vaccine (ORV baits were conducted in Taiwan in 2013. 46 camera nights were recorded; 6 Formosan ferret-badgers and 14 non-target mammals were sighted. No baits were consumed by ferret-badgers and 8 were consumed by non-target mammals. Penned ferret-badgers ingested 5 of the 18 offered baits. When pen and field trials were combined, and analyzed for palatability, ferret-badgers consumed 1 of 9 marshmallow baits (11.1%, 1 of 21 fishmeal baits (4.8%, 0 of 3 liver baits, and 3 of 3 fruit-flavored baits. It took an average of 261 minutes before ferret-badgers made oral contact with the non-fruit flavored baits, and 34 minutes for first contact with the fruit-based bait. Overall, ferret-badgers sought out the fruit baits 8 times faster, spent a greater proportion of time eating fruit baits, and were 7.5 times more likely to have ruptured the vaccine container of the fruit-based bait.Ferret-badgers are now recognized as rabies reservoir species in China and Taiwan, through two independent 'dog to ferret-badger' host-shift events. Species of ferret-badgers can be found throughout Indochina, where they may be an unrecognized rabies reservoir. Findings from this initial study underscore the need for further captive and field investigations of fruit-based attractants or baits developed for small meso-carnivores. Non-target mammals' competition for baits, ants, bait design, and dense tropical landscape represent potential challenges to effective ORV programs that will need to be

  20. Initial pen and field assessment of baits to use in oral rabies vaccination of Formosan ferret-badgers in response to the re-emergence of rabies in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ryan M; Lai, Yuching; Doty, Jeffrey B; Chen, Chen-Chih; Vora, Neil M; Blanton, Jesse D; Chang, Susan S; Cleaton, Julie M; Pei, Kurtis J C

    2018-01-01

    Taiwan had been considered rabies free since 1961, until a newly established wildlife disease surveillance program identified rabies virus transmission within the Formosan ferret-badger (Melogale moschata subaurantiaca) in 2013. Ferret-badgers occur throughout southern China and Southeast Asia, but their ecological niche is not well described. As an initial feasibility assessment for potential rabies control measures, field camera trapping and pen assessment of 6 oral rabies vaccine (ORV) baits were conducted in Taiwan in 2013. 46 camera nights were recorded; 6 Formosan ferret-badgers and 14 non-target mammals were sighted. No baits were consumed by ferret-badgers and 8 were consumed by non-target mammals. Penned ferret-badgers ingested 5 of the 18 offered baits. When pen and field trials were combined, and analyzed for palatability, ferret-badgers consumed 1 of 9 marshmallow baits (11.1%), 1 of 21 fishmeal baits (4.8%), 0 of 3 liver baits, and 3 of 3 fruit-flavored baits. It took an average of 261 minutes before ferret-badgers made oral contact with the non-fruit flavored baits, and 34 minutes for first contact with the fruit-based bait. Overall, ferret-badgers sought out the fruit baits 8 times faster, spent a greater proportion of time eating fruit baits, and were 7.5 times more likely to have ruptured the vaccine container of the fruit-based bait. Ferret-badgers are now recognized as rabies reservoir species in China and Taiwan, through two independent 'dog to ferret-badger' host-shift events. Species of ferret-badgers can be found throughout Indochina, where they may be an unrecognized rabies reservoir. Findings from this initial study underscore the need for further captive and field investigations of fruit-based attractants or baits developed for small meso-carnivores. Non-target mammals' competition for baits, ants, bait design, and dense tropical landscape represent potential challenges to effective ORV programs that will need to be considered in future

  1. Army Healthcare Enterprise Management System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    ... to buy the Enterprise Management System. The Information Technology Business Center provides information technology services to Fort Sam Houston tenants which include the Army Medical Command and the Army Medical Department Center and School...

  2. Army Business Transformation - Next Steps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    As a follow-on to the Army Science Board 2005 Summer Study on Best Practices, the Army Science Board was tasked to identify areas where alternative approaches and application of transforming practices...

  3. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval...Information 4 Responsible Office 4 References 4 Program Description 5 Business Case 5 Program Status 6 Schedule 7 Performance...Program Information Program Name Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) DoD Component Army Responsible Office Program Manager References MAIS

  4. 27 CFR 70.444 - Importation of arms, ammunition, and implements of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., ammunition, and implements of war. 70.444 Section 70.444 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... implements of war. Part 47 of title 27 CFR implements Executive Order 11958 and supplements the import... implements of war, (b) Import permit requirements, (c) Import certification and verification, (d) Import...

  5. The effect of range and ammunition type on fracture patterns in porcine postcranial flat bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkouli, Kleio; Al Hakeem, Eyad; Bulut, Ozgur; Simmons, Tal

    2018-01-01

    Pig half-carcasses were shot in scapulae, ribs and mandibles with either 0.243 hunting rifle using high velocity expanding ammunition (N = 30) or AK47 using full metal jacketed (FMJ) ammunition (N = 12) from a range of either 5 or 20 m. Fracture patterns related to distance of fire and ammunition type were compared on de-fleshed, macerated, and reconstructed bones. For expanding ammunition, location of fracture on ribs affected the resulting pattern. Scapulae shot from 5 m presented a comminuted pattern different from those shot from 20 m. Mandibles shot from 20 m showed a characteristic radiating pattern at entrance with the opposite ramus un-fractured; those shot from 5 m exhibited fractures to both rami. Using decision tree analysis provided accuracies of 93.8% for scapulae and 87.5% for mandibles. For FMJ, no distance dependent fracture differences were apparent in any bone. Decision tree analysis facilitated the interpretation of fracture patterns caused by projectile trauma. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Small-Caliber Ammunition Identification Guide. Volume 1. Small-Arms Cartridges Up to 15 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-01

    ti acer - T trac~aute, traCLur, Traiong, traceri traccusc T[ R ElD. tir r6duitc. Gallery practicc, surhcalibcr TI’traiqan ce pcrforaiute AP-T V. B...Mukden Arsenal in 1929. ý,A A242 A248 SWEDEN MALAYSIA 2 Made at Maricbcrg Ammunition 1973. Factory. 1925-1928, 4 DOMINICAN RLPUBIAC ITALY 60 1960

  7. The transition to non-lead rifle ammunition in Denmark: national obligations and policy considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Niels; Thomas, Vernon G.; Krone, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The issue of Denmark regulating use of lead-free rifle ammunition because of potential risks of lead exposure in wildlife and humans was examined from a scientific and objective policy perspective. The consequences of adopting or rejecting such regulation were identified. Denmark is obliged to ex......-contaminated wild game meat. Opposition from hunting organizations would be expected....

  8. Diet of the Eurasian badger (Meles meles in an agricultural riverine habitat (NW Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Balestrieri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Badger Meles meles diet was studied throughout 2001-03 by the analysis of 199 scats collected in the River Po Park (Piedmont region, NW Italy. The study area (136 km² included a large portion of plain (129.2 km² dominated by agriculture (maize, rice and poplar plantations with scarce riparian vegetation cover, and a small sector of hill (6.8 km² mainly covered by broadleaved woods. Earthworms and maize were the staple foods in the overall badger diet and together accounted for 57% of the mean estimated volume (Vm%. Earthworm consumption varied seasonally with a marked decrease in summer, probably due to drought that reduced their availability (emergence of worms on the surface. This decline was compensated by a significant increase in the utilisation of fruits, mostly in hilly lands. Maize was consumed all year round without significant seasonal variation (percent frequency of occurrence: from 21% in summer to 44.6% in winter. Besides earthworms, the amount of protein of animal origin derived mainly from amphibians (Vm% = 9% and mammals (Vm% = 7.2%, primarily rodents and lagomorphs. Badger diet consisted mainly of maize, amphibians and mammals in agricultural lowlands, and of earthworms, fruits and insects in hilly lands. Trophic niche breadth (B varied from a minimum of 0.34 in autumn to maximum of 0.55 in summer. Our results characterize the badger as a generalist or opportunist feeder. Riassunto Dieta del Tasso (Meles meles in un'area agricola fluviale dell'Italia nord occidentale La dieta è stata studiata nel 2001-03, tramite l'analisi di 199 feci raccolte nel Parco Fluviale del Po e dell'Orba (Tratto vercellese-alessandrino, regione Piemonte. L'area di studio (136 km² è ripartita tra le due sponde orografiche del Po: un'ampia porzione (129,2 km² è pianeggiante e prevalentemente coltivata a mais, riso e pioppi, con strette fasce di vegetazione riparia, la

  9. Copper and zinc content in wild game shot with lead or non-lead ammunition - implications for consumer health protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Daniela; Sommerfeld, Christine; Müller-Graf, Christine; Selhorst, Thomas; Greiner, Matthias; Gerofke, Antje; Ulbig, Ellen; Gremse, Carl; Spolders, Markus; Schafft, Helmut; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, Monika

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contamination of game meat with copper and zinc and establish whether the use of alternative (non-lead) ammunition can lead to higher or unsafe levels of copper and zinc in the meat of roe deer, wild boar and red deer. The research project "Safety of game meat obtained through hunting" (LEMISI) was conducted in Germany with the purpose of examining the entry of lead as well as copper and zinc into the meat of hunted game when using either lead or non-lead ammunition. The outcome of this study shows that the usage of both lead-based ammunition and alternative non-lead ammunition results in the entry of copper and zinc into the edible parts of the game. Using non-lead ammunition does not entail dangerously elevated levels of copper and zinc, so replacing lead ammunition with alternative ammunition does not introduce a further health problem with regard to these metals. The levels of copper and zinc in game meat found in this study are in the range found in previous studies of game. The content of copper and zinc in game meat is also comparable to those regularly detected in meat and its products from livestock (pig, cattle, sheep) for which the mean human consumption rate is much higher. From the viewpoint of consumer health protection, the use of non-lead ammunition does not pose an additional hazard through copper and zinc contamination. A health risk due to the presence of copper and zinc in game meat at typical levels of consumer exposure is unlikely for both types of ammunition.

  10. Plastic litter from shotgun ammunition on Danish coastlines - Amounts and provenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanstrup, Niels; Balsby, Thorsten J S

    2018-06-01

    Plastic litter in the marine environment is a major global issue. Discarded plastic shotgun ammunition shells and discharged wads are an unwelcome addition and feature among the top ten litter items found on reference beaches in Denmark. To understand this problem, its scale and origins, collections were made by volunteers along Danish coastal shorelines. In all 3669 plastic ammunition items were collected at 68 sites along 44.6 km of shoreline. The collected items were scored for characteristic variables such as gauge and length, shot type, and the legibility of text, the erosion, and the presence of metallic components. Scores for characteristics were related to the site, area, and season and possible influences discussed. The prevalence of collected plastic shotgun litter ranges from zero to 41 items per 100 m with an average of 3.7 items per 100 m. Most ammunition litter on Danish coasts originates from hunting on Danish coastal waterbodies, but a small amount may come from further afield. North Sea coasts are the most distinctive suggesting the possible contribution of long distance drift as well as the likelihood that such litter can persist in marine habitats for decades. The pathway from initial discard to eventual wash-up and collection depends on the physical properties of plastic components, marine tides and currents, coastal topography and shoreline vegetation. Judging from the disintegration of the cartridge and the wear and decomposition of components, we conclude that there is a substantial supply of polluting plastic ammunition materials that has and will accumulate. These plastic items pose a hazard to marine ecosystems and wash up on coasts for many years to come. We recommend that responsible managers, hunters and ammunition manufacturers will take action now to reduce the problem and, thereby, protect ecosystems, wildlife and the sustainability of hunting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An Archeological Overview and Management Plan for the Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant, Bossier and Webster Parishes, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-06

    Project-Specific Resource Protection or Treatment Options .......................... 6-11 6.2.3 A Summary of Recommended Management Directions and...C 1-0 Ce w- .40. a0𔃾 Ca6 : )4 3 L0 CO 0 00 E 00 00 6 =a 0 .01-- 0 r ti~ 41 0 4) 4 . 0 - ... c 4 CC04o1 10 04 - 1 CV 0 - 0 m .00 C0C 2(0 4 0-. 0 00 .~c...techniques, styles and decorative treatments . The earliest Post-Archaic components recognized in the vicinity of the study area appear to be part of a broad

  12. Biopolymer as an Alternative to Petroleum-based Polymers to Control Soil Erosion: Iowa Army Ammunition Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    be aware of wind directions and attempt to coordinate field activities and gasoline powered equipment so that exhaust fumes and chemical vapors are...exposed skin and respiratory tract. Section 4: First Aid Measures Eye Contact: Skin Contact: Inhalation : Wash with water and seek medical...Skin: Use safety gloves as with any chemicals. Inhalation : None normally required. If dust possible, a NIOSH approved respirator should be worn. C

  13. Demonstration of the Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactor for Pinkwater Treatment at McAlester Army Ammunition Plant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maloney, Stephen W; Heine, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    .... The bacteria are cultivated on granules of activated carbon contained in a fluidized bed. The demonstration equipment controlled the conditions to maintain favorable conditions for anaerobic bacteria through control of temperature, pH, and nutrients. Fuel grade ethanol was used as the substrate to maintain the bacterial population. The results show that this technique can be successful and less costly than the existing granular activated carbon adsorption process.

  14. FY95 Limited Energy Study. Area B Nitric Acid Production Facilities, Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    .... The field survey of existing conditions was completed in July 1995. The results of this field survey were subsequently tabulated and used to generate single line process flow diagrams on Autocad...

  15. EVALUATION OF THE PROTOCOL FOR THE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS: CASE STUDY AT THE TWIN CITIES ARMY AMMUNITION PLANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    At the request of staff in the EPA Regions, EPA?s Office of Research and Development carried out an independent evaluation of the Technical Protocol for Evaluating Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in Ground Water (EPA/600/R-98/128). The Protocol was developed around c...

  16. Evaluation of Rhizobium tropici-derived Biopolymer for Erosion Control of Protective Berms. Field Study: Iowa Army Ammunition Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    for two 14-hr days. Both the bulldozer and hydroseeder had a delivery surcharge; however, the contractor purchased the necessary fuel ($1800) and an...Section 4: First Aid Measures Eye Contact: Skin Contact: Inhalation : Wash with water and seek medical assistance if irritation persists. Wash...any chemicals. Inhalation : None normally required. If dust possible, a NIOSH approved respirator should be worn. ERDC TR-16-5 37 Section 9

  17. Rodent sperm analysis in field-based ecological risk assessment: pilot study at Ravenna army ammunition plant, Ravenna, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, L.V.; Bazar, M.; Hawkins, M.S.; Cornaby, B.W.; Ferguson, E.A.; Chantelle Carroll, L.; Ryan, P.F.

    2003-01-01

    Rodent sperm analysis is a visable method for use in field studies of risk at contaminated sites. - Ecological risk assessment (ERA) guidance recommends that field-truthing efforts proceed when modeled hazard quotients (HQs) suggest that toxicological effects are occurring to site receptors. To date, no field methods have been proposed by the regulatory community that can lead to definitive determinations of acceptable or unacceptable risk for birds and mammals, the two terrestrial classes of receptors that are commonly assessed using the HQ method. This paper describes rodent sperm analysis (RSA) as a viable method to be applied in the field at sites with historical contamination. RSA is capable of detecting biological differences that bear on reproduction, a highly regarded toxicological endpoint of concern in USEPA Superfund-type ERAs. The results of RSA's first application at a study site are reported and discussed. The paper also provides the rationale for RSA's efficacy in the context of Superfund and other environmental cleanup programs, where limited time and money are available to determine and evaluate the field condition

  18. Demonstration Results for the Phytoextraction of Lead-Contaminated Soil at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant, Arden Hills, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    resulted in corresponding blood lead levels, USEPA has not developed a cancer slope factor and has focused on the non-carcinogenic effects. Lead...threshold value. USEPA’s alternative approach to the use of cancer slope factors and RfDs to evaluate lead exposure is to consider the effect of...the sites, the grass in the 90- x 90-foot farm plots was eradicated with an application of RoundupTM ( glyphosate ) [Figure 4-3]. These activities were

  19. Initial pen and field assessment of baits to use in oral rabies vaccination of Formosan ferret-badgers in response to the re-emergence of rabies in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ryan M.; Lai, Yuching; Doty, Jeffrey B.; Chen, Chen-Chih; Vora, Neil M.; Blanton, Jesse D.; Chang, Susan S.; Pei, Kurtis J. C.

    2018-01-01

    Background Taiwan had been considered rabies free since 1961, until a newly established wildlife disease surveillance program identified rabies virus transmission within the Formosan ferret-badger (Melogale moschata subaurantiaca) in 2013. Ferret-badgers occur throughout southern China and Southeast Asia, but their ecological niche is not well described. Methodology/Principle findings As an initial feasibility assessment for potential rabies control measures, field camera trapping and pen assessment of 6 oral rabies vaccine (ORV) baits were conducted in Taiwan in 2013. 46 camera nights were recorded; 6 Formosan ferret-badgers and 14 non-target mammals were sighted. No baits were consumed by ferret-badgers and 8 were consumed by non-target mammals. Penned ferret-badgers ingested 5 of the 18 offered baits. When pen and field trials were combined, and analyzed for palatability, ferret-badgers consumed 1 of 9 marshmallow baits (11.1%), 1 of 21 fishmeal baits (4.8%), 0 of 3 liver baits, and 3 of 3 fruit-flavored baits. It took an average of 261 minutes before ferret-badgers made oral contact with the non-fruit flavored baits, and 34 minutes for first contact with the fruit-based bait. Overall, ferret-badgers sought out the fruit baits 8 times faster, spent a greater proportion of time eating fruit baits, and were 7.5 times more likely to have ruptured the vaccine container of the fruit-based bait. Conclusions/Significance Ferret-badgers are now recognized as rabies reservoir species in China and Taiwan, through two independent ‘dog to ferret-badger’ host-shift events. Species of ferret-badgers can be found throughout Indochina, where they may be an unrecognized rabies reservoir. Findings from this initial study underscore the need for further captive and field investigations of fruit-based attractants or baits developed for small meso-carnivores. Non-target mammals’ competition for baits, ants, bait design, and dense tropical landscape represent potential

  20. The Army Lawyer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    authors in the articles do not necessarily reflect the view of The Judge Advocate General or the Department of the Army. Masculine or feminine...for the hegemonic power (read ‘United States’) and its followers to determine international public enemy on a case-by-case basis. A legal

  1. Army Sustainability Report 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    the Fairfax Village Neighborhood Center’s native plant and butterfly garden. The center is the first LEED platinum military project (photo: US Army... Bush in 2007. 11 Statement of Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Strategy, Plans, and Forces, Kathleen Hicks before the Senate Environment and

  2. Containerized Ammunition Delivery System in the Republic of Korea: A Study to Determine the Shortfalls and Logisticsl Infrastructure Requirements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Michael

    2000-01-01

    .... Transportation Command sponsored exercises, and expert interviews. The analysis presented indicates widespread deficiencies in the ammunition-receiving infrastructure at United States Air Force bases in the Republic of Korea...

  3. Department of the Army - The Fiscal Year 2008 Military Personnel, Army Appropriation and the Antideficiency Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    of the Army, U.S. Army Audit Agency, Budgeting for the Military Personnel, Army Appropriation, Report No. A-2010-0028- FFM (Jan. 6, 2010); Department...of the Army, U.S. Army Audit Agency, Military Personnel, Army FY 05 Subsistence Charges, Report No. A-2008-0037- FFM (Feb. 12, 2008); Department of

  4. Army Programs: Army Finance and Accounting Quality Assurance Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1988-01-01

    This regulation discusses the primary responsibilities of commanders and staff officers at installation and higher levels for execution of the Army Finance and Accounting Quality Assurance (QA) Program...

  5. Prohibited Possessors and the Law: How Inmates in Los Angeles Jails Understand Firearm and Ammunition Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Barragan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Using data from 140 interviews with individuals detained in the Los Angeles County Jail system, this article examines what gun offenders know about gun and ammunition regulation in California. Though most respondents had a consistent, albeit general, understanding of the regulations limiting gun acquisition and possession, analysis suggests that their understanding of ammunition restrictions was more limited. Our sample’s awareness of firearms law is especially important to consider given that they are the very population targeted by firearms regulations and prohibitions at the local, state, and federal level. By examining what detained offenders know about firearms laws, we can better theorize about individual gaps in legal knowledge and the realistic expectations for how understanding of the law can affect behavior.

  6. Union Directions - Army Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-06

    reflects the long-held belief in the Army that employee participation in decisions that affect their worklife is healthy and desirable. Although some...pluralistic society, checks and balances are as important for the economy as for the government. Business executives who salivate at the thought of vanishing...Unions. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1976. 37. National Federation of Federal Employees. NFFE’s Guide to Quality of Worklife Programs. No. G-21

  7. Operationalizing Army Cyber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    killed just under 3,000 people and cost the U.S. economy somewhere between three and five trillion dollars. The Japanese attacked with a state... economy , and military readiness. The challenge is to design an Army Cyber force that can support the United States Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) national...still keeps the intelligence and signal functions separate in most units today from battalion to echelon above Corps ( EAC ). There are many past reasons

  8. 2007 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Additional confi gurations include two NATO li ers with patients and one medical a endant. The aircra has a hoist for use in emergency...including airframes, wiring bundles and hydraulic systems on the remanufactured CH-47Fs are new. Program Status. The Army received its fi rst fully...Expansible Van and the 10T Dump Truck. Another new variant, the FMTV-Load Handling System, is expected to be fi elded in late-2007, initially to medical

  9. 1998 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Biological (CB) Protective Duty Uniform (STO) • Biometrics (SRO) • Nanoscience (SRO) • Millimeter Wave Material and Dissemination Technology... Biometrics and Nanoscience SROs will enable the development of advanced NBC detection and characterization systems, including the exploitation of biologically...Requirements Trailers • Procure HEMAT Trailers Figure K-23 K-19 //;<?. U.S. Army 1997Modernization Plan This final fleet assessment, made against the

  10. Bioaccessibility of Pb from ammunition in game meat is affected by cooking treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Mateo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The presence of lead (Pb ammunition residues in game meat has been widely documented, yet little information exists regarding the bioaccessibility of this Pb contamination. We study how cooking treatment (recipe can affect Pb bioaccessibility in meat of animals hunted with Pb ammunition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used an in vitro gastrointestinal simulation to study bioaccessibility. The simulation was applied to meat from red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa hunted with Pb shot pellets and cooked using various traditional Spanish game recipes involving wine or vinegar. Total Pb concentrations in the meat were higher in samples with visible Pb ammunition by X-ray (mean±SE: 3.29±1.12 µg/g w.w. than in samples without this evidence (1.28±0.61 µg/g. The percentage of Pb that was bioaccessible within the simulated intestine phase was far higher in meat cooked with vinegar (6.75% and wine (4.51% than in uncooked meat (0.7%. Risk assessment simulations using our results transformed to bioavailability and the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic model (IEUBK; US EPA show that the use of wine instead of vinegar in cooking recipes may reduce the percentage of children that would be expected to have >10 µg/dl of Pb in blood from 2.08% to 0.26% when game meat represents 50% of the meat in diet. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Lead from ammunition in game meat is more bioaccessible after cooking, especially when using highly acidic recipes. These results are important because existing theoretical models regarding Pb uptake and subsequent risk in humans should take such factors into account.

  11. Bioaccessibility of Pb from ammunition in game meat is affected by cooking treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Rafael; Baos, Ana R; Vidal, Dolors; Camarero, Pablo R; Martinez-Haro, Monica; Taggart, Mark A

    2011-01-14

    The presence of lead (Pb) ammunition residues in game meat has been widely documented, yet little information exists regarding the bioaccessibility of this Pb contamination. We study how cooking treatment (recipe) can affect Pb bioaccessibility in meat of animals hunted with Pb ammunition. We used an in vitro gastrointestinal simulation to study bioaccessibility. The simulation was applied to meat from red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa) hunted with Pb shot pellets and cooked using various traditional Spanish game recipes involving wine or vinegar. Total Pb concentrations in the meat were higher in samples with visible Pb ammunition by X-ray (mean±SE: 3.29±1.12 µg/g w.w.) than in samples without this evidence (1.28±0.61 µg/g). The percentage of Pb that was bioaccessible within the simulated intestine phase was far higher in meat cooked with vinegar (6.75%) and wine (4.51%) than in uncooked meat (0.7%). Risk assessment simulations using our results transformed to bioavailability and the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic model (IEUBK; US EPA) show that the use of wine instead of vinegar in cooking recipes may reduce the percentage of children that would be expected to have >10 µg/dl of Pb in blood from 2.08% to 0.26% when game meat represents 50% of the meat in diet. Lead from ammunition in game meat is more bioaccessible after cooking, especially when using highly acidic recipes. These results are important because existing theoretical models regarding Pb uptake and subsequent risk in humans should take such factors into account.

  12. Stock Liquidity and Corporate Cash Holdings: Feedback and the Cash as Ammunition Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Nyborg, Kjell G; Wang, Zexi

    2013-01-01

    The paper contributes to the literature on corporate cash holdings by showing that there is a financial markets channel that affects corporations’ cash holdings. Leaning on the literature on stock price feedback to firm fundamentals, we advance the hypothesis that firms with more liquid stocks hold more cash, ceteris paribus, as ammunition to defend against negative cascades or stimulate positive ones. This contrasts with an alternative view that firms with more liquid stocks are less financi...

  13. Army Healthcare Enterprise Management System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... The complaint alleged that the Army Healthcare Enterprise Management System was not properly competed, potential conflicts of interest existed, and possible contract performance problems existed...

  14. [Sequencing and analysis of complete genome of rabies viruses isolated from Chinese Ferret-Badger and dog in Zhejiang province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Guang; Tao, Xiao-Yan; Li, Hao; Meng, Sheng-Li; Chen, Xiu-Ying; Liu, Fu-Ming; Ye, Bi-Feng; Tang, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Based on sequencing the full-length genomes of four Chinese Ferret-Badger and dog, we analyze the properties of rabies viruses genetic variation in molecular level, get the information about rabies viruses prevalence and variation in Zhejiang, and enrich the genome database of rabies viruses street strains isolated from China. Rabies viruses in suckling mice were isolated, overlapped fragments were amplified by RT-PCR and full-length genomes were assembled to analyze the nucleotide and deduced protein similarities and phylogenetic analyses from Chinese Ferret-Badger, dog, sika deer, vole, used vaccine strain were determined. The four full-length genomes were sequenced completely and had the same genetic structure with the length of 11, 923 nts or 11, 925 nts including 58 nts-Leader, 1353 nts-NP, 894 nts-PP, 609 nts-MP, 1575 nts-GP, 6386 nts-LP, and 2, 5, 5 nts- intergenic regions(IGRs), 423 nts-Pseudogene-like sequence (psi), 70 nts-Trailer. The four full-length genomes were in accordance with the properties of Rhabdoviridae Lyssa virus by BLAST and multi-sequence alignment. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences among Chinese strains had the highest similarity, especially among animals of the same species. Of the four full-length genomes, the similarity in amino acid level was dramatically higher than that in nucleotide level, so the nucleotide mutations happened in these four genomes were most synonymous mutations. Compared with the reference rabies viruses, the lengths of the five protein coding regions had no change, no recombination, only with a few point mutations. It was evident that the five proteins appeared to be stable. The variation sites and types of the four genomes were similar to the reference vaccine or street strains. And the four strains were genotype 1 according to the multi-sequence and phylogenetic analyses, which possessed the distinct district characteristics of China. Therefore, these four rabies viruses are likely to be street viruses

  15. Study of gunshot residues from Sintox® ammunition containing marking substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Polovková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two types of factory marked Sintox® ammunition were investigated from the composition of gunshot residue particles (GSR and occurrence of marking substance points of view. The experiments were carried out with two cartridges of caliber 9 mm Luger (9 × 19 Parabellum of two producers (Ruag Ammotec, Switzerland and Men, Germany. The first cartridge (type Action 4, Ruag Ammotec contains gadolinium as a marking element, while the other cartridge (type PEP II, Men is marked with gallium in gunpowder. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with EDAX analyzer (SEM/EDX was used to detect and analyze the GSR particles in samples collected from the cartridges, barrels and shooter’s hands. Besides those, particles from the hit clothes placed at different shooting distances were collected and analyzed. The spreading of GSR cloud from the gun was observed using the high-speed camera. Results obtained clearly revealed that the way of ammunition production/construction and type of marking of ammunition can significantly influence the presence and detection reliability of marking elements in GSR. The detectability is affected also by the shooting distance.

  16. Uranium favorability of tertiary rocks in the Badger Flats, Elkhorn Thrust Area, Park and Teller Counties, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.; Mickle, D.G.

    1976-10-01

    Uranium potential of Tertiary rocks in the Badger Flats--Elkhorn Thrust area of central Colorado is closely related to a widespread late Eocene erosion surface. Most uranium deposits in the area are in the Eocene Echo Park Alluvium and Oligocene Tallahassee Creek Conglomerate, which were deposited in paleodrainage channels on or above this surface. Arkosic detritus within the channels and overlying tuffaceous sedimentary rocks of the Antero and Florissant Formations of Oligocene age and silicic tuffs within the volcanic units provide abundant sources of uranium that could be concentrated in the channels where carbonaceous debris facilitates a reducing environment. Anomalous soil, water, and stream-sediment samples near the Elkhorn Thrust and in Antero basin overlie buried channels or are offset from them along structural trends; therefore, uranium-bearing ground water may have moved upward from buried uranium deposits along faults. The area covered by rocks younger than the late Eocene erosion surface, specifically the trends of mapped or inferred paleochannels filled with Echo Park Alluvium and Tallahassee Creek Conglomerate, and the Antero Formation are favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits

  17. Army Blast Claims Evaluation Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    ATIN: AFZX-JA Building 4551 Fort Polk, LA 71459-5000 Commander U.S. Army Engineer Center and Fort Leonard Wood ATIN: AlZT-JA Building 1706 East...U.S. Armed Forces Claims Service, Korea APO AP 96205-0084 No. of Copies Organization 1 Commander U.S. Army South ATI’N: SOJA Building 154 APO

  18. The Army Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-09

    STUDDIES BY CATEGORY STUDY TITLE SPONSOR NMtTHOO PPA ADM RE:MOTE LINK PRUG DARCOM CONTRACT ADV TECH MODEL FULL DARCON CONTRACT ARMY COMMAND ANDi CONTROL...HOUUSE NUN -RLCURRIN 1 LMANUS DARCON I"-HUSL FF-TH-hLLI TM~k ECUNLNI(. ANALYSIS DARCOM CUNTRALT FOR SFELTKUM ANALYZERS UPLRA1IUN&L FLt)AI/EKPSL TKADL...TECHNULOGY A5 AESM:NT TRADOC bUTH *TEN YEAR INSTRUMENTATIOft ANALYSkIS OCSA ot" PHASE I TERRAIN MODELS DARCOM bUTH lEST CRITLRIA FUOR NUN -IIILLL-K WEAPUN

  19. Recycling of Badger/Fox Burrows in Late Pleistocene Loess by Hyenas at the Den Site Bad Wildungen-Biedensteg (NW, Germany): Woolly Rhinoceros Killers and Scavengers in a Mammoth Steppe Environment of Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Diedrich, Cajus

    2013-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene (MIS 5c-d) Ice Age spotted hyena open air den and bone accumulation site Bad Wildungen-Biedensteg (Hesse, NW, Germany) represents the first open air loess fox/badger den site in Europe, which must have been recycled by Crocuta crocuta spelaea (Goldfuss, 1823) as a birthing den. Badger and fox remains, plus remains of their prey (mainly hare), have been found within the loess. Hyena remains from that site include parts of cub skeletons which represent 10% of the megafauna ...

  20. 76 FR 66282 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: November 15, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... issues and matters related to the continued growth and development of the United States Army War College...

  1. 76 FR 72914 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ...: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: December 14, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... issues and matters related to the continued growth and development of the United States Army War College...

  2. Wildlife disease ecology from the individual to the population: Insights from a long-term study of a naturally infected European badger population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jenni L; Robertson, Andrew; Silk, Matthew J

    2018-01-01

    Long-term individual-based datasets on host-pathogen systems are a rare and valuable resource for understanding the infectious disease dynamics in wildlife. A study of European badgers (Meles meles) naturally infected with bovine tuberculosis (bTB) at Woodchester Park in Gloucestershire (UK) has produced a unique dataset, facilitating investigation of a diverse range of epidemiological and ecological questions with implications for disease management. Since the 1970s, this badger population has been monitored with a systematic mark-recapture regime yielding a dataset of >15,000 captures of >3,000 individuals, providing detailed individual life-history, morphometric, genetic, reproductive and disease data. The annual prevalence of bTB in the Woodchester Park badger population exhibits no straightforward relationship with population density, and both the incidence and prevalence of Mycobacterium bovis show marked variation in space. The study has revealed phenotypic traits that are critical for understanding the social structure of badger populations along with mechanisms vital for understanding disease spread at different spatial resolutions. Woodchester-based studies have provided key insights into how host ecology can influence infection at different spatial and temporal scales. Specifically, it has revealed heterogeneity in epidemiological parameters; intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting population dynamics; provided insights into senescence and individual life histories; and revealed consistent individual variation in foraging patterns, refuge use and social interactions. An improved understanding of ecological and epidemiological processes is imperative for effective disease management. Woodchester Park research has provided information of direct relevance to bTB management, and a better appreciation of the role of individual heterogeneity in disease transmission can contribute further in this regard. The Woodchester Park study system now offers a rare

  3. The Possible Effects of Depleted Uranium (DU) Ammunition on the Environment and in Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozic, T.; Popovic, D.; Stevanovic, J.; Koracevic-Filipovic, M.; Jovic, S.; Todorovic, D.; Radenkovic, M.

    2004-01-01

    As stated by the official reports, during NATO bombing of Serbia and Montenegro in 1999 approximately 500.000 missiles were used i.e. 3600 kg of uranium oxide, yielding activity of 18,3x1010 Bq entered the environment. Yugoslav Federal Ministry of Defense announced that 8 locations in the region of Vranje, Bujanovac and Lustica Peninsula, outside Kosovo/Metohia, were hit by DU ammunition and were isolated afterwards. The soil was contaminated with 200.000-250.000 Bq uranium/kg soil but this was mainly agricultural land, far from urban areas. The report stated that no DU ammunition was used above 44th parallel. The paper presents the preliminary results of the study on environmental and animal health effects due to the use of DU ammunition during NATO bombing of Serbia and Montenegro in 1999. The samples of animal blood (sheep, caws), soils and vegetation (corps, grass, leaves) were collected randomly in the region of Bujanovac (Novo Selo, Borovac) in the spring/fall of 2003. The hematological and some biochemical parameters of the peripheral blood were analyzed: concentration of hemoglobin, number of erythrocytes, leukocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, eozinophiles, neutrophiles, serumamiloidA (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and malondialdehide in erythrocytes and blood serum. The samples were analyzed by classical manual counting methods, spectrophotometry (by Drapkin) and ELISA immunological technique. Blood samples from the control group of animals on a farm in the vicinity of Belgrade were taken and analyzed for the same parameters, too. The samples of soils and vegetation were dried up and analyzed for the contents of uranium and other natural and man made radionuclides by standard gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector, relative efficiency 23%). The results are to be correlated with the data on the concentration of DU that entered the environment during the bombing, as well as with the data of the long-term measurements of uranium concentrations in the environment and human

  4. Quality of consumer-targeted internet guidance on home firearm and ammunition storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, Katherine L; Skoczylas, Maria Shakour; Schmidt, John P; Keshavarzi, Nahid R; Mohr, Bethany Anne

    2016-10-01

    Four storage practices protect against unintentional and/or self-inflicted firearm injury among children and adolescents: keeping guns locked (1) and unloaded (2) and keeping ammunition locked up (3) and in a separate location from the guns (4). Our aim was to mimic common Google search strategies on firearm/ammunition storage and assess whether the resulting web pages provided recommendations consistent with those supported by the literature. We identified 87 web pages by Google search of the 10 most commonly used search terms in the USA related to firearm/ammunition storage. Two non-blinded independent reviewers analysed web page technical quality according to a 17-item checklist derived from previous studies. A single reviewer analysed readability by US grade level assigned by Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Index. Two separate, blinded, independent reviewers analysed deidentified web page content for accuracy and completeness describing the four accepted storage practices. Reviewers resolved disagreements by consensus. The web pages described, on average, less than one of four accepted storage practices (mean 0.2 (95% CL 0.1 to 0.4)). Only two web pages (2%) identified all four practices. Two web pages (2%) made assertions inconsistent with recommendations; both implied that loaded firearms could be stored safely. Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Index averaged 8.0 (95% CL 7.3 to 8.7). The average technical quality score was 7.1 (95% CL 6.8 to 7.4) out of an available score of 17. There was a high degree of agreement between reviewers regarding completeness (weighted κ 0.78 (95% CL 0.61 to 0.97)). The internet currently provides incomplete information about safe firearm storage. Understanding existing deficiencies may inform future strategies for improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Portraying the Army Reserve Components in Army War Games and Exercises

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dillon, Dick

    2002-01-01

    .... Ensuring that accuracy and realism was the primary purpose of the Role of the Army National Guard and Army Reserve in Army Exercises workshop conducted at the Collins Center for Strategic Leadership from 23-26 September 2002.

  6. The identification of lead ammunition as a source of lead exposure in First Nations: The use of lead isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Leonard J.S.; Wainman, Bruce C.; Martin, Ian D.; Sutherland, Celine; Weber, Jean-Philippe; Dumas, Pierre; Nieboer, Evert

    2008-01-01

    The use of lead shotshell to hunt water birds has been associated with lead-contamination in game meat. However, evidence illustrating that lead shotshell is a source of lead exposure in subsistence hunting groups cannot be deemed definitive. This study seeks to determine whether lead shotshell constitutes a source of lead exposure using lead isotope ratios. We examined stable lead isotope ratios for lichens, lead shotshell and bullets, and blood from residents of Fort Albany and Kashechewan First Nations, and the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and regression analyses. ANOVA of isotope ratios for blood revealed significant differences with respect to location, but not sex. Hamilton differed from both Kashechewan and Fort Albany; however, the First Nations did not differ from each other. ANOVA of the isotope ratios for lead ammunition and lichens revealed no significant differences between lichen groups (north and south) and for the lead ammunition sources (pellets and bullets). A plot of 206 Pb/ 204 Pb and 206 Pb/ 207 Pb values illustrated that lichens and lead ammunition were distinct groupings and only the 95% confidence ellipse of the First Nations group overlapped that of lead ammunition. In addition, partial correlations between blood-lead levels (adjusted for age) and isotope ratios revealed significant (p 206 Pb/ 204 Pb and 206 Pb/ 207 Pb, and a significant negative correlation for 208 Pb/ 206 Pb, as predicted if leaded ammunition were the source of lead exposure. In conclusion, lead ammunition was identified as a source of lead exposure for First Nations people; however, the isotope ratios for lead shotshell pellets and bullets were indistinguishable. Thus, lead-contaminated meat from game harvested with lead bullets may also be contributing to the lead body burden

  7. Experimentally Evaluated Explosion Resistance and Performance of Destruction Unit in Multiple Detonation of Ammunition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Baskakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of development and experimental investigation of explosion resistance and destruction unit performance in multiple detonation of ammunition with an explosive weight up to 0.7 kg of TNT. A preliminary evaluation of the explosion resistance was carried out using a model of explosion resistance localizer, represented as a thick-walled tube. As a result of explosive tests, the nature and characteristics of tube deformation under repeated explosions have been revealed. The findings allowed us to develop the first embodiment of the destruction unit with a turning non-separable heater and a two-layer localizer, which was heated by the induction field. The explosive life tests have revealed the following drawbacks: low resource localizer, jamming rotating mechanism in contact with the splinters, and impossible replacement of damaged localizer. In the second embodiment of the destruction unit a plate-assembled easychange localizer is mounted on the heater, and it is heated by heat transfer from the core. Tests have shown that, with such a placement, the uniform heating of the localizer is not reached. This leads to incomplete destruction of ammunition. Besides, because of the low strength of the pins connecting the plates, occurrs their rapid destruction. Taking into consideration the shortcomings of the previous two designs, the third option of the destruction unit with a replaceable localizer and induction heating of a localizer has been designed. A localizer material having high mechanical strength at high temperatures and good ferromagnetic properties has been selected. The paper offers an all-metal localizer design with the thickest wall at the bottom that is the most damageable. The paper has experimentally determined a critical deformation of the localizer when destroying the ammunition with varying weight of explosive and defined the heater and bump resource. As a result, the work proposes the destruction unit design

  8. Radioactivity of drinking waters from regions exposed to depleted uranium ammunition bombing in 2003 end 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaskovic, I.; Pantelic, G.; Vuletic, V.; Eremic Savkovic, M.; Javorina, L.J.

    2006-01-01

    Due to the military application of the depleted uranium in our country, the problem of its radioactivity and hemo toxicity is actualized. The locations verified to be contaminated by depleted uranium ammunition were at the South part of Serbia (Pljackovica, Bratoselce, Borovac and Reljan). The soluble forms of uranium could translocated and dispersed from soils and sediments into surface waters and groundwater. The environmental presence of depleted uranium is considered as potential threat to human health. The study presents the results of radiological safety analysis of drinking water in 2003 and 2004. All samples were analyzed by gamma spectrometry and measurements of alpha and beta activity. (authors)

  9. Recovery of radiation sources after the explosion of ammunition military facility of the city of Rio Tercero (Cordoba, Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntarulo, Luis J.; D'Apice, Americo A.; Superintendencia Federal de Bomberos, Buenos Aires

    2001-01-01

    In this work it is reflected the operative task of the Team of Radiological Emergencies of the Federal Superintendence of Firemen, in the intervention that took place November 3 of 1995, in the Military Factory of Ammunition of the City of River Third, in the county of Cordoba (Argentina). After big explosions that caused the destruction of the building and surrounding areas, with dispersion of ammunition of canyons, we proceeded to locate and recover the industrial sources which were also at the scene. After their recovery, the sources were given to the Nuclear Regulatory Authority for its safe guard.(author)

  10. Increasing Army Retention Through Incentives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beerman, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    .... If the Army fails to address the enlisted retention issue in the near future departures of experienced NCOs will have a detrimental impact our military's ability to provide for our nation's security...

  11. Christian Contributions to Army Values

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Emma, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    .... The Army builds the soldier's heart, spirit, and soul by the values we instill. Over the years these values of loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity, and personal courage have been trained and reinforced...

  12. Racial Extremism in the Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hudson, Walter M

    1998-01-01

    ... modem phenomenon of "skinheads." I then discuss the history of white supremacist extremism in the Army, culminating in the December, 1995 murders of two black civilians by soldiers assigned to the 82d Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina...

  13. [Gunshot wounds caused by non-lethal ammunition on the porcine model post-mortem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabrocký, Peter; Pivko, Juraj; Vondráková, Mária; Tažký, Boris

    2013-10-01

    In this article we focus on the effects of so called non-lethal ammunition. We studied possible mechanism of firearm injury formation as a consequence of using firearm on the body, to present a more comprehensive material in wound ballistics. We pointed out possible actions of a projectile causes on human, respectively other animal organisms, as well as to a manner in which an injury is caused by rifles or shotguns using non-lethal ammunition with rubber projectiles. In the experiment, we have focused on macroscopic analysis of the tissue penetrated by a rubber projectile fired from a long firearm and pump-action shotgun while focusing on the anatomical-morphological analysis of entry wounds to determine the effectiveness respectively, the wounding potential of the projectile. The results of the experiment based on the macroscopic analysis of entry wounds, cavities and exit wounds, show that when a rubber projectile penetrates the body it causes loss of the tissue (i.e. the minus effect) and mechanical disruption of the tissue similar to lethal projectile. Based on the measures and ballistic computations we concluded that in specific cases, like for example in a close range hit, a penetration of vital organs can cause serious or even lethal injuries.

  14. Attenuated total reflectance-FT-IR spectroscopy for gunshot residue analysis: potential for ammunition determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Justin; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Lednev, Igor K

    2013-08-06

    The ability to link a suspect to a particular shooting incident is a principal task for many forensic investigators. Here, we attempt to achieve this goal by analysis of gunshot residue (GSR) through the use of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with statistical analysis. The firearm discharge process is analogous to a complex chemical process. Therefore, the products of this process (GSR) will vary based upon numerous factors, including the specific combination of the firearm and ammunition which was discharged. Differentiation of FT-IR data, collected from GSR particles originating from three different firearm-ammunition combinations (0.38 in., 0.40 in., and 9 mm calibers), was achieved using projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The technique was cross (leave-one-out), both internally and externally, validated. External validation was achieved via assignment (caliber identification) of unknown FT-IR spectra from unknown GSR particles. The results demonstrate great potential for ATR-FT-IR spectroscopic analysis of GSR for forensic purposes.

  15. Numerical simulation and optimized design of cased telescoped ammunition interior ballistic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-gang Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve the optimized design of a cased telescoped ammunition (CTA interior ballistic design, a genetic algorithm was introduced into the optimal design of CTA interior ballistics with coupling the CTA interior ballistic model. Aiming at the interior ballistic characteristics of a CTA gun, the goal of CTA interior ballistic design is to obtain a projectile velocity as large as possible. The optimal design of CTA interior ballistic is carried out using a genetic algorithm by setting peak pressure, changing the chamber volume and gun powder charge density. A numerical simulation of interior ballistics based on a 35 mm CTA firing experimental scheme was conducted and then the genetic algorithm was used for numerical optimization. The projectile muzzle velocity of the optimized scheme is increased from 1168 m/s for the initial experimental scheme to 1182 m/s. Then four optimization schemes were obtained with several independent optimization processes. The schemes were compared with each other and the difference between these schemes is small. The peak pressure and muzzle velocity of these schemes are almost the same. The result shows that the genetic algorithm is effective in the optimal design of the CTA interior ballistics. This work will be lay the foundation for further CTA interior ballistic design. Keywords: Cased telescoped ammunition, Interior ballistics, Gunpowder, Optimization genetic algorithm

  16. Defense Logistics: Improved Data and Information Sharing Could Aid in DOD’s Management of Ammunition Categorized for Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    same criteria.10 Further, we conducted a data reliability assessment of the military services’ data in their respective information management systems ...extent to which the information in the services’ ammunition inventory systems is useful for their purposes. We interviewed Single Manager for...6. Incineration - Incineration provides an environmentally acceptable means to destroy munitions not suitable for other demilitarization methods

  17. Fire protection in ammunition storage spaces on board naval craft: An evaluation of the water application rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindström, J.; Rahm, M.; Hiltz, J.; Boonacker, B.; Wal, R. van der; Haara, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ammunition storage spaces on naval vessels are commonly fitted with drencher systems that are designed to prevent ordnance reaching a temperature where it might explode due to fast or slow “cook‐off”. Many of these systems are traditional low pressure water spray systems that are required by the

  18. Diversity Issues in the Army as Perceived by Army Students at the United States Army War College

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Webster, Cecil

    1997-01-01

    ..., welfare, and other related programs. In recognizing this diversity, this paper identifies some diversity issues within the Army, analyzes the perception of those diversity issues by the resident Army students in the USAWC Class of 1997...

  19. U.S. Army Physical Demands Study: Reliability of Simulations of Physically Demanding Tasks Performed by Combat Arms Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulis, Stephen A; Redmond, Jan E; Frykman, Peter N; Warr, Bradley J; Zambraski, Edward J; Sharp, Marilyn A

    2017-12-01

    Foulis, SA, Redmond, JE, Frykman, PN, Warr, BJ, Zambraski, EJ, and Sharp, MA. U.S. Army physical demands study: reliability of simulations of physically demanding tasks performed by combat arms soldiers. J Strength Cond Res 31(12): 3245-3252, 2017-Recently, the U.S. Army has mandated that soldiers must successfully complete the physically demanding tasks of their job to graduate from their Initial Military Training. Evaluating individual soldiers in the field is difficult; however, simulations of these tasks may aid in the assessment of soldiers' abilities. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of simulated physical soldiering tasks relevant to combat arms soldiers. Three cohorts of ∼50 soldiers repeated a subset of 8 simulated tasks 4 times over 2 weeks. Simulations included: sandbag carry, casualty drag, and casualty evacuation from a vehicle turret, move under direct fire, stow ammunition on a tank, load the main gun of a tank, transferring ammunition with a field artillery supply vehicle, and a 4-mile foot march. Reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), standard errors of measurement (SEMs), and 95% limits of agreement. Performance of the casualty drag and foot march did not improve across trials (p > 0.05), whereas improvements, suggestive of learning effects, were observed on the remaining 6 tasks (p ≤ 0.05). The ICCs ranged from 0.76 to 0.96, and the SEMs ranged from 3 to 16% of the mean. These 8 simulated tasks show high reliability. Given proper practice, they are suitable for evaluating the ability of Combat Arms Soldiers to complete the physical requirements of their jobs.

  20. Comparative analysis of field ration for military personnel of the ukrainian army and armies of other countries worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mardar; M. Hkrupalo; M. Stateva

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of improvement of the Ukrainian nutritional standards this Article provides comparative analysis of field rations of different countries worldwide to make a proposal on improvement of food-stuff assortment in food ration for military personnel in the Armed Forces of Ukraine, Army of USA, the British Army, Army of Germany, Army of Italy, Army of Canada, Army of France, Army of Belarus, Army of Armenia. In accordance with the comparative analysis it was established that ration c...

  1. Answering the Hottest Question in Army Education: What Is Army University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kem, John S.; LeBoeuf, Eugene J.; Martin, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The most common question heard by senior members of Army University is always, "What is Army University?" The newest education institution in the U.S. Army was created to unify the training and educational institutions of the Army, making the large learning organization more effective and efficient for its soldiers, bringing together 37…

  2. Operational Reach: Is Current Army Doctrine Adequate?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heintzelman, Scott

    2003-01-01

    The term operational reach, an element of operational design, is new to U.S. Army doctrine. Operational reach is not found in the previous edition of the Army's basic operational doctrine, Field Manual...

  3. The Evolution of Army Leader Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Human Resources Command, OPMD- MFE -I. 4 U.S. Army General Officer Management Office, Army General Officer Roster (Washington, DC, U.S. Department of the...Human Resources Command, Command Management Branch post board data analysis. 15 Data from the United States Army Human Resources Command, OPMD- MFE -A...May 1, 2008), D-1. 25 19 Data from the United States Army Human Resources Command, OPMD- MFE -A, 01 February, 2013. 20 U.S. Joint Chiefs of

  4. 76 FR 12087 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ...: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: March 24, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... faculty; table and examine online College issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self...

  5. 75 FR 7255 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Date of Meeting: March 11, 2010. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command...; table and examine online College issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self- study...

  6. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy. (a...

  7. [Injury patterns and roentgen findings in gunshot wounds with rare flint ammunition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, S; Lindermann, A

    1990-01-01

    Smoothbore shotgun barrels can fire cartridges with common pellet loads as well as shotgun slugs and rubber bullets. Other than conventional shot, the cylindrical Brenneke-type rifled shotgun slugs sometimes cause perforating wounds. The shotgun ammunition for use in self-defence can have a single projectile or several rubber pellets. Where the propellant is black powder, short range shots will probably leave searing marks and intensive soot deposits. Fired at close range, rubber bullets can penetrate through the skin into the body, fired at greater distance they cause contusions. A case of homicide (repeated firing with a 12-ga. pump gun) is used to present and discuss the injury patterns and X-ray findings after impact of Brenneke-type slugs and rubber bullets as well as of "classical" shot pellets.

  8. Characterization of airborne uranium from test firing of XM774 ammunition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Mishima, J.

    1979-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland, to characterize the airborne depleted uranium (DU) resulting from the test firings of 105-mm, APFSDS-T XM774 ammunition. The goal was to obtain data pertinent to evaluations of human inhalation exposure to the airborne DU. Data was desired concerning the following: (1) size distribution of airborne DU; (2) quantity of airborne DU; (3) dispersion of airborne DU from the target vicinity; (4) amount of DU deposited on the ground; (5) solubility of airborne DU compounds in lung fluid; and (6) oxide forms of airborne and fallout DU. The experiments involved extensive air sampling for total airborne DU particulates and respirable DU particles both above the targets and at distances downwind. Fallout and fragments were collected around the target area. High-speed movies of the smoke generated from the impact of the penetrators were taken to estimate the cloud volumes. Results of the experiments are presented

  9. Method development for the analysis of nitrotoluenes, nitramines and other organic compounds in ammunition waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussmann, P.; Preiss, A.; Levsen, K.; Wuensch, G.

    1994-01-01

    Gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography were used to determine explosives, their by- and degradation products near the former ammunition plant Elsnig in Saxony. Enrichment procedures using liquid/liquid-and solid-phase extraction, which have already been developed, were used to investigate ground and surface water samples. Mono-, di- and trinitrotoluenes as well as aminonitro- and chlorinated nitroaromatics were identified and quantified using GC/MS, the electron capture detector (ECD) and the nitrogen-phosphorus detector (NPD). Besides, some nitrophenols were identified in ground water. Additionally, RDX, which is hardly to be determined by GC, was quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. Identification was performed by the UV-spectra using a photodiode array detector. (orig.) [de

  10. Natural Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composite for Ballistic Armor Against Class III-A Ammunition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fabio Cassiano; Holanda, Luane Isquerdo Ferreira; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Gomes, Alaelson Vieira; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2017-10-01

    Epoxy matrix composites reinforced with up to 30 vol pct of continuous and aligned natural mallow fibers were for the first time ballistic tested as personal armor against class III-A 9 mm FMJ ammunition. The ballistic efficiency of these composites was assessed by measuring the dissipated energy and residual velocity after the bullet perforation. The results were compared to those in similar tests of aramid fabric (Kevlar™) commonly used in vests for personal protections. Visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy analysis of impact-fractured samples revealed failure mechanisms associated with fiber pullout and rupture as well as epoxy cracking. As compared to Kevlar™, the mallow fiber composite displayed practically the same ballistic efficiency. However, there is a reduction in both weight and cost, which makes the mallow fiber composites a promising material for personal ballistic protection.

  11. Angiostrongylus vasorum in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes and badgers (Meles meles from Central and Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Magi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During 2004-2005 and 2007-2008, 189 foxes (Vulpes vulpes and 6 badgers (Meles meles were collected in different areas of Central Northern Italy (Piedmont, Liguria and Tuscany and examined for Angiostrongylus vasorum infection. The prevalence of the infection was significantly different in the areas considered, with the highest values in the district of Imperia (80%, Liguria and in Montezemolo (70%, southern Piedmont; the prevalence in Tuscany was 7%. One badger collected in the area of Imperia turned out to be infected, representing the first report of the parasite in this species in Italy. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role played by fox populations as reservoirs of infection and the probability of its spreading to domestic dogs.
    Riassunto Angiostrongylus vasorum nella volpe (Vulpes vulpes e nel tasso (Meles meles in Italia centro-settentrionale. Nel 2004-2005 e 2007-2008, 189 volpi (Vulpes vulpes e 6 tassi (Meles meles provenienti da differenti aree dell'Italia settentrionale e centrale (Piemonte, Liguria Toscana, sono stati esaminati per la ricerca di Angiostrongylus vasorum. La prevalenza del nematode è risultata significativamente diversa nelle varie zone, con valori elevati nelle zone di Imperia (80% e di Montezemolo (70%, provincia di Cuneo; la prevalenza in Toscana è risultata del 7%. Un tasso proveniente dall'area di Imperia è risultato positivo per A. vasorum; questa è la prima segnalazione del parassita in tale specie in Italia. Ulteriori studi sono necessari per valutare il potenziale della volpe come serbatoio e la possibilità di diffusione della parassitosi ai cani domestici.

    doi:10.4404/hystrix-20.2-4442

  12. Male parentage in army ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, Daniel J C; Schöning, Caspar; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2006-01-01

    of active research in insect sociobiology. Here we present microsatellite data for 176 males from eight colonies of the African army ant Dorylus (Anomma) molestus. Comparison with worker genotypes and inferred queen genotypes from the same colonies show that workers do not or at best very rarely reproduce...

  13. The Army word recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  14. Army Transformation to Expeditionary Formations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bryson, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the path of transformation in the U.S. Army from its inception in the late 1990s by then Chief of Staff GEN Eric Shinseki to the Interim Brigade Combat Team and through Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom...

  15. 2013 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-30

    Army civilian workforce with regard to gender and ethnic origin (Office of the Assistant G-1 for Civilian Personnel, 2013). The reported education...climates of perceived inequality . Civilian leader comments frequently referenced favoritism as reflecting cronyism, unfair personnel actions, and...interests of others, unequal enforcement of standards and discipline, and use of discretion in workplace justice. As demonstrated in previous CASAL

  16. Gums, badgers, and economics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wilgen, BW

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gums trees (in the genus Eucalyptus, from Australia) are not set to ‘disappear’ (even if some people wanted them to). Gums form an important component of the forest industry and, at last count, they covered over 540 000 ha in formal plantations...

  17. Ingestion of lead from ammunition and lead concentrations in white-tailed sea eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla) in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, B.; Axelsson, J.; Borg, H.; Holm, K.; Bignert, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we show for the first time that lead poisoning from ammunition is a significant mortality factor for white-tailed sea eagle (WSE) (Haliaeetus albicilla) in Sweden. We analyzed 118 WSEs collected between 1981 and 2004 from which both liver and kidney samples could be taken. A total of 22% of all eagles examined had elevated (> 6 μg/g d.w.) lead concentrations, indicating exposure to leaded ammunition, and 14% of the individuals had either liver or kidney lead concentrations diagnostic of lethal lead poisoning (> 20 μg/g d.w.). Lead concentrations in liver and kidney were significantly correlated. In individuals with lead levels 20 μg/g, concentrations were significantly higher in liver. The lead isotope ratios indicate that the source of lead in individuals with lethal concentrations is different from that of individuals exhibiting background concentrations of lead ( 10 times higher than concentrations reported for Baltic fish from the same time period. In contrast to other biota there was no decrease in lead concentrations in WSE over the study period. The proportion of lead poisoned WSE remained unchanged over the study period, including two years after a partial ban of lead shot was enforced in 2002 for shallow wetlands. The use of lead in ammunition poses a threat to all raptors potentially feeding on shot game or offal. The removal of offal from shot game and alternatives to leaded ammunition needs to be implemented in order to prevent mortality from lead in raptors and scavengers.

  18. Ingestion of lead from ammunition and lead concentrations in white-tailed sea eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla) in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helander, B., E-mail: bjorn.helander@nrm.se [Department of Contaminant Research, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm (Sweden); Axelsson, J., E-mail: jeanette.axelsson@hgen.slu.se [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Borg, H., E-mail: hans.borg@itm.su.se [Department of Applied Environmental Science/ITM, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Holm, K. [Department of Applied Environmental Science/ITM, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Bignert, A., E-mail: anders.bignert@nrm.se [Department of Contaminant Research, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-10-15

    In this study we show for the first time that lead poisoning from ammunition is a significant mortality factor for white-tailed sea eagle (WSE) (Haliaeetus albicilla) in Sweden. We analyzed 118 WSEs collected between 1981 and 2004 from which both liver and kidney samples could be taken. A total of 22% of all eagles examined had elevated (> 6 {mu}g/g d.w.) lead concentrations, indicating exposure to leaded ammunition, and 14% of the individuals had either liver or kidney lead concentrations diagnostic of lethal lead poisoning (> 20 {mu}g/g d.w.). Lead concentrations in liver and kidney were significantly correlated. In individuals with lead levels < 6 {mu}g/g, concentrations were significantly higher in kidney than in liver; in individuals with lead levels > 20 {mu}g/g, concentrations were significantly higher in liver. The lead isotope ratios indicate that the source of lead in individuals with lethal concentrations is different from that of individuals exhibiting background concentrations of lead (< 6 {mu}g/g d.w.) There were no significant sex or age differences in lead concentrations. A study from the Baltic reported in principle no biomagnification of lead, but background lead concentrations in WSE liver in this study were still four to > 10 times higher than concentrations reported for Baltic fish from the same time period. In contrast to other biota there was no decrease in lead concentrations in WSE over the study period. The proportion of lead poisoned WSE remained unchanged over the study period, including two years after a partial ban of lead shot was enforced in 2002 for shallow wetlands. The use of lead in ammunition poses a threat to all raptors potentially feeding on shot game or offal. The removal of offal from shot game and alternatives to leaded ammunition needs to be implemented in order to prevent mortality from lead in raptors and scavengers.

  19. 77 FR 50089 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory... learning environment. The agenda will include topics relating to Army Learning Model 2015 and support to...

  20. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory... Army 2020 learning environment. The agenda will include topics relating Arm Learning Model 2015 and to...

  1. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... possession of ionizing radiation sources by non-Army agencies (including their civilian contractors) on an... radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires Non-Army agencies (including their civilian contractors... ionizing radiation sources on an Army Installation. For the purpose of this proposed rule, ``ionizing...

  2. 78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ...--This study evaluates what science and technology competencies the Army must maintain and/or develop as... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Session AGENCY... the Army announces the following committee meeting: 1. Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). 2...

  3. Characterization of exposure to byproducts from firing lead-free frangible ammunition in an enclosed, ventilated firing range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabinski, Christin M; Methner, Mark M; Jackson, Jerimiah M; Moore, Alexander L; Flory, Laura E; Tilly, Trevor; Hussain, Saber M; Ott, Darrin K

    2017-06-01

    U.S. Air Force small arms firing ranges began using copper-based, lead-free frangible ammunition in the early 2000s due to environmental and health concerns related to the use of lead-based ammunition. Exposure assessments at these firing ranges have routinely detected chemicals and metals in amounts much lower than their mass-based occupational exposure limits, yet, instructors report work-related health concerns including respiratory distress, nausea, and headache. The objective of this study at one firing range was to characterize the aerosol emissions produced by weapons during firing events and evaluate the ventilation system's effectiveness in controlling instructor exposure to these emissions. The ventilation system was assessed by measuring the range static air pressure differential and the air velocity at the firing line. Air flow patterns were near the firing line. Instructor exposure was sampled using a filter-based air sampling method for metals and a wearable, real-time ultrafine particle counter. Area air sampling was simultaneously performed to characterize the particle size distribution, morphology, and composition. In the instructor's breathing zone, the airborne mass concentration of copper was low (range = free frangible ammunition. Using an ultrafine particle counter appears to be an alternative method of assessing ventilation effectiveness in removing ultrafine particulate produced during firing events.

  4. Angled shots onto body armour using 9 mm ammunition: the effect on potential blunt injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyall, Alison; Carr, D J; Lankester, C; Malbon, C

    2017-02-01

    Some military specialists wear body armour that is more similar to police armour and provides protection from ammunition fired from pistols. During ballistic testing, these armours are mounted on a standardised type of modelling clay and the back face signature (BFS; depth of depression) formed as a result of the non-perforating impact event on to the armour is measured. This study investigated the effect of impact angle on the BFS and on the deformation of the bullet. Two commonly worn types of armour (HG1/A+KR1 and HG1+KR1) were considered that provide protection from pistol ammunition and sharp weapons. Armours were tested against two types of pistol ammunition (9 mm full metal jacket and 9 mm hollow point) at eight different impact angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 70°, 75° and 80°). Increased impact angles resulted in smaller BFSs. Impact angle also affected whether bullets were retained in the armour; as the impact angle increased, the probability of a round exiting the side of the armour increased. Bullet deformation was affected by impact angle. Understanding the deformation of bullets may assist with recreating a shooting incident and interpreting forensic evidence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Tank... personnel management demonstration project for eligible TARDEC employees. Within that notice the table...

  6. 2013 CENTER FOR ARMY LEADERSHIP ANNUAL SURVEY OF ARMY LEADERSHIP (CASAL): MAIN FINDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    The Center for Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) has fielded education and training materials (including doctrine, pamphlets , videos, brochures , and...Army Pamphlet (DA PAM) 600-3, Commissioned Officer Development and Career Management, states that a goal of warrant officer training and education... Pamphlet 600-25, U.S. Army noncommissioned officer professional development and career management. Washington, D.C.: Headquarters, Department of the Army

  7. Racial Extremism in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    of Deference ...................................................................................................... 46 1. The Separation of Powers Doctrine...to the military. This deference has a two-fold basis. First, the separation of powers in the U.S. Constitution gives authority to the executive (and...Why should there be judicial deference to the Army’s policy on extremism? There are two principal reasons. First, the Constitution’s separation of powers doctrine

  8. 2011 Army Strategic Planning Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    TESI ) of 22,000 Soldiers, the Army’s total force by the end of the mid-term period is programmed to be 520K (AC). We will achieve a more...dwell ratios, extending TESI authority to adequately man deploying units and sustain the All-Volunteer Force, right-sizing the generating force, and... TESI Temporary End-Strength Increase WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction 2011 ARMY STRATEGIC PLANNING GUIDANCE Page 19 2011

  9. Inverting the Army Intelligence Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    British experience fighting the Provisional Irish Republican Army ( PIRA ) in Northern Ireland, which began an insurgency in 1969.91...they became extremely successful.”93 Martin Van Creveld posits that the British Army’s success against the PIRA in Northern Ireland stands out as...and MI6 (Secret Intelligence Service) to defeat the PIRA .97 92 John Kiszely, "Learning About

  10. Information Management: Army Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-31

    funds or personnel to produce free programming solely for the benefit of a commercial CATV company. (6) The Army will require that the CATV franchisee ...provided, future customer requirements, and emerging IT capabilities which can benefit the customer. The Army’s increasing employment of IT dictates a...proactive oversight/insight system is operational and ensures mission benefit , cost, and schedule goals are met. (2) IT performance measures at the

  11. 78 FR 24735 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... include topics relating to the Army Learning Model that seeks to improve the Army's learning model by leveraging technology without sacrificing standards so the Army can provide credible, rigorous, and relevant...

  12. Issues and Insights from the Army Technology Seminar Game

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darilek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    ...). The AAN goals were to link Army XXI to a long-term vision of the Army extending well into the 21st century and to ensure that this vision informed evolving Army research and development requirements...

  13. Army Reserve Military Intelligence: Time for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    Miramax Books, 2002. Goleman , Daniel . Emotional Intelligence . New York: Bantam Books, 1997. Goleman , Daniel , Richard Boyatzis, and Annie McKee...or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. ARMY RESERVE MILITARY INTELLIGENCE : TIME FOR CHANGE...Research Project 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Army Reserve Military Intelligence : Time for Change 5a

  14. Effectiveness of the Army Mentorship Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nieberding, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    ...). From the artifacts associated with this mentorship program, it appears that the Army highly values this program as a way to create a culture and climate that fosters learning and development for future leadership. This project will examine the effectiveness of mentorship in the today's Army and evaluate whether the program is sufficient to meet the needs for the Army's next generation of soldiers and leaders.

  15. The United States Army 1996 Modernization Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-08

    time and with less risk. IMA technology improvements are leveraged and inserted into the Army’s information architectures as the competitive market place...to procure a family of complementary, interoperable systems. At the end of the near-term, "Active Defense RD&A Startegy Army will begin fielding...Haul and Engineer tractors were fielded that brought modern technologies from the commercial market to the Army. However, adequate quantities were

  16. A Pilotless Army in the Megalopolis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wegner, Robert

    2004-01-01

    .... Although Army aviation can provide mobility, intelligence gathering, and massive precision fires, its current aviation systems are highly vulnerable within the urban environment and a solution...

  17. Army Cost Culture: What Is It? What Should It Become?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Army leaders to implement inclusion of this Army cost culture value into the larger Army culture. Kotter warns us that failure to complete each step...inculcation of a cost culture. However, this circumstance does not really apply to the Army. Army senior leaders clearly understand that mission comes...changed: In this challenging environment, an improved Army cost culture will enable senior leaders to preserve the nation’s security. This Strategy

  18. RISK MANAGEMENT AND RISK COMMUNICATION IN MOZAMBIQUE: THE CASE OF ARMS AND AMMUNITION DEPOTS OF MALHAZINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Bussotti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Risk management and risk communication affect everybody’s daily life. Local authorities have the duty to manage public structures, to inform civilians of the risks coming from these structures, to implement prophylaxis procedures. Military storage sites are fully included in this category. This article presents – through a qualitative methodology based on risk analysis – how risk management and communication in weapons and ammunition warehouses is managed in a “partially free” country, using as a case-study, the Malhazine depot in Mozambique, which resulted in more than 100 deaths. In 2007, an extraordinary accident related to the management of obsolete conventional weapons occurred at the Malazhine warehouse. In this circumstance, the Mozambican Government adopted a policy of classifying the information “highly confidential”. This policy aimed at obscuring facts and responsibilities by hiding the causes of such a huge tragedy. This article concludes with the consideration that a high level of confidentiality in treating issues of public interest, such as the one kept in regard to Malhazine, does not help public authorities to effectively manage and prevent similar risks from occurring again, with resulting negative impacts on local populations.

  19. Exposure to trinitrotoluene and health effects among workers in an artillery and ammunition plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongtip, Pornpimol; Preklang, Smart; Yoosook, Witaya; Chantanakul, Suttinun

    2012-06-01

    To determine urinary trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2-amino-4, 6-dinitrotoluene (2ADNT) and 4-amino-2, 6-dinitrotoluene (4ADNT) and health effects upon workers in an ammunition plant. The urine samples from forty munition workers and forty office workers were monitored for TNT and its metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The workers were interviewed with a questionnaire. The median levels of TNT and its metabolites were 112.84 and ranged from non-detectable (ND) to 1,833.81 mg/L. Median levels for 2ADNT were 11.66, ranging from ND to 360.89 mg/L. Median levels for 4ADNT were 19.95 and ranged from ND to 314.28 mg/L. There were significant correlations between TNT and 2ADNT in urine (r = 0. 700, p-value workers reported eye, nose and throat irritations, weakness and headaches with considerably higher frequency than non-exposed workers. TNT levels in urine were strongly associated with 4ADNT and 2ADNT levels. Workers exposed to TNT complained of nose, throat and eye irritation, along with overall weakness and headaches.

  20. Analysis of base fuze functioning of HESH ammunitions through high-speed photographic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, T. K.

    2007-01-01

    High-speed photography plays a major role in a Test Range where the direct access is possible through imaging in order to understand a dynamic process thoroughly and both qualitative and quantitative data are obtained thereafter through image processing and analysis. In one of the trials it was difficult to understand the performance of HESH ammunitions on rolled homogeneous armour. There was no consistency in scab formation even though all other parameters like propellant charge mass, charge temperature, impact velocity etc are maintained constant. To understand the event thoroughly high-speed photography was deployed to have a frontal view of the total process. Clear information of shell impact, embedding of HE propellant on armour and base fuze initiation are obtained. In case of scab forming rounds these three processes are clearly observed in sequence. However in non-scab ones base fuze is initiated before the completion of the embedding process resulting non-availability of threshold thrust on to the armour to cause scab. This has been revealed in two rounds where there was a failure of scab formation. As a quantitative measure, fuze delay was calculated for each round and there after premature functioning of base fuze was ascertained in case of non-scab rounds. Such potency of high-speed photography has been depicted in details in this paper.

  1. 3Demonstration Results of Phytoremediation of Explosives-Contaminated Groundwater Using Constructed Wetlands at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Milan, Tennessee Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    recommended to avoid possi- ble contamination.) Use the first 50- 100 mL to rinse the filter flask. Dis- card this portion and collect the...water. Dilute to 1 liter. 6.3.2.13 Starch indicator solution: To 5 grams of starch ( potato , arrowroot, or soluble), add a little cold deionized...treatments. S„^«Ty fta ?e dunng **P°suns. However, the Detailed records of feeding rates and the appearance of addition of the food may alter the

  2. Pilot Test of Hot Gas Decontamination of Explosives-Contaminated Equipment at Hawthorne Army Ammunition Plant (HWAAP), Hawthorne, Nevada. Appendices. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    The data reduction is performed as follows: 7.7.2.1 Average the area responses of each standard and calculate relative standard deviations. 7.7.2.2...from the analyses are on the chronatogram and on the data sheet. Tha data reduction Is performed as follows: 7.7.4.1 Sum the areas of peaks in the...with PlastUce YJa. Journal of the American IndustrIl4 Hygiene AUocioion. .?S.19i-297. 1i44. 3. BurrelU Manual for tis Analysts. Sev. enth editiaoq

  3. Demonstration Results of Phytoremediation of Explosives-Contaminated Groundwater Using Constructed Wetlands At The Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Milan, Tennessee Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Bromoform Bromomethane iso -Butanol n-Butanol 2-Butanone n-Butylbenzene sec-Butylbenzene tert-Butylbenzene Carbon disulfide Carbon tetrachloride...1994 TABLE 10 DIRECT INJECTION .ANALYSIS OF NEW OIL AT 5 PPM Compound Acetone Benzene n-Butanol*,** iso -Butanol*,** Carbon tetrachlorid Carbon...Sediment 48.0 48.0 2977 16.2 Autocl.sediment 53.7 2.7 15.7 11.0 83.1 12755 16.2 Gravel 53.1 6.8 7.8 8.7 76.4 8583 16.2 Autocl.gravel 11.0 7.7

  4. Evaluation of State-of-the-Art High Speed Deluge Systems Presently in Service at Various U.S. Army Ammunition Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    01CLASSIFIAT1o i ooWNGRAoING sO4EO4JLE distribution. 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMSER(S) S. MONITORING ORGANIZACION REPORT NUMSER(S) WL-TR-93...example would be the application of first fire to magnesium Teflon® flares. If done manually , the operator is directly exposed to the high temperature...ED CONFIGURATION * I- -. .-sisod PIO SUPPL.Y MANUAL . PUJLLS PILOT - VLVET OP RATED VALVES WITH NOZZLES BOTH PILOT AND SUPPLY AT TCGH PRESSURE [P L

  5. Energy Conservation Investment Program, FY95 Limited Energy Study Area B Nitric Acid Production Facilities Holston Army Ammunition Plant Kingsport, Tennessee

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    .... The field survey of existing conditions was completed in July 1995. The results of this field survey were subsequently tabulated and used to generate single line process flow diagrams on Autocad...

  6. Automation Study for Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant Hand Held Signal Flight Assembly, Rocket Barrel Assembly, 40 MM Signal, Final Packaging/Pack-Out, and Star Finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    wood protectors in the HHS Rocket Barrel Assembly Operations. d) Use of hot melt sealant rather than lacquer on the end of the assembled Hand Held...4OL.UA8LYADHRlE CG411!cLVPAM-1 ~LW7m~I~o~c~c LCA ~TM18UX"Y.31nSRGU-11 STiIM ASSELYJMACE FINh1TZ1A1*4CWAJKRZAM’ WAOiNt rs~my" LOCATM1ED 0~7 LOCA1ED’ IWCM-1W...Moorfeed Fairview, PA Indianapolis, IN Voice Synthesis Module Square D Micro Chip Technology Palatine, IL Chandler, AZ 85224 Vacuum Unit Venturi’s

  7. Explosives Removal from Groundwater of the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant in Continuous-Flow Laboratory Systems Planted with Aquatic and Wetland Plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best, Elly

    1998-01-01

    A 49-day, continuous-flow, laboratory study was performed to evaluate the ability of two submersed and one emergent plant species to phytoremediate explosives-contaminated groundwater from the Iowa...

  8. Results of the 1998 Field Demonstration and Preliminary Implementation Guidance for Phytoremediation of Lead-Contaminated Soil at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant, Arden Hills, Minnesota

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behel, A

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the first-year (1998) results of a two-year field demonstration conducted to determine if phytoextraction is a viable and feasible technology for remediation of metals (specifically lead) in soil...

  9. Results of the 1998 Field Demonstration and Preliminary Implementation Guidance for Phytoremediation of Lead-Contaminated Soil at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant, Arden Hills, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    corresponding blood lead levels, USEPA has not developed a cancer slope factor and has focused on the non-carcinogenic effects. The major adverse non...reference dose (RfD) threshold value. USEPA’s alternative approach to the use of cancer slope factors and RfDs to evaluate lead exposure is to consider...clearing the sites, the grass in the 90- x 90-foot farm plots was eradicated with an application of Roundup™ ( glyphosate ) [Figure 4-3]. These

  10. The Woman's Land Army: 1918-1920.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Margaret

    1994-01-01

    Describes the origins and work of the Women's Land Army, a World War I British volunteer agricultural production unit. Details similar program in the United States. Identifies the impact of the Women's Land Army including enhanced political, economic, and physical freedom for the participants and future generations of women. (CFR)

  11. Army industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoughton, Kate McMordie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boyd, Brian K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  12. 2004 Army Research Office in Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    the thermal decomposition of nitrate - ester propellants. This is the first such data ever measured and will provide reliable input for Army...strain has been set for the actuator. The research program includes: Multiscale modeling of microstructural evolution and its affect on mechanical... Multiscale modeling and process optimization for engineered microstructural complexity” have had multiple transition interactions with the Army Research

  13. Unusual odd-chain and trans-octadecenoic fatty acids in tissues of feral European beaver (Castorfiber), Eurasian badger (Melesmeles) and raccoon dog (Nyctereutesprocyonoides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martysiak-Zurowska, Dorota; Zalewski, Kazimierz; Kamieniarz, Robert

    2009-06-01

    The fatty acid (FA) composition of depot adipose tissues in the raccoon dog (Nyctereutesprocyonoides) and the European beaver (Castorfiber) differs from that reported for the lipids of other monogastric animals, especially with regard to the presence of trans-octadecenoic acids. The concentrations of pentadecanoic acid 15:0 (PA) and heptadecanoic acid 17:0 (HA) in the lipids of the tested animals ranged from 0.23 to 0.79% and from 0.33 to 2.35% of total FAs, respectively. The total content of their monounsaturated cis isomers varied from 0.12 to 2.75% for pentadecanoic acid (c-PA) and from 0.38 to 2.45% for heptadecanoic acid (c-HA). It is interesting that the tissues of European beavers and raccoon dogs contained also trans isomers of octadecenoic acid C18:1 (t-OA) including vaccenic acid C18:1,11t (VA), typical of ruminants. The presence of FAs with an uneven number of carbon atoms and trans-octadecenoic acids in depot adipose tissue is indicative of the process of hydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid) in the digestive tract. The tissues of badgers also contained t-OA (from below 0.05% in the liver to 0.44% in the kidneys), but no VA was found.

  14. Variations in Badger (Meles meles Sett Microclimate: Differential Cub Survival between Main and Subsidiary Setts, with Implications for Artificial Sett Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayoi Kaneko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining homeothermy is essential for mammals, but has considerable energetic costs. In this study, we monitored the internal conditions of setts within five European badger (Meles meles social groups during the cub-rearing season, that is, February to July, in 2004. Sett temperature showed substantial and significant variation over this period, while relative humidity remained stable throughout. Microclimate was least stable during the period for which cubs remain entirely below ground between February and April; however here the instrumented main sett demonstrated a much warmer and more stable temperature regime than did nearby subsidiary outliers. We thus postulate that the energy budget of reproducing females could be affected by even small temperature fluctuations, militating for optimal sett choice. For comparison we also report microclimatic data from two artificial setts and found them to be markedly inferior in terms of thermal insulative properties, suggesting that man-made setts may need more careful consideration in both thermal and spatial setts network in each territory to adequately compensate the loss (e.g., destruction due to development of a natural sett, especially as a breeding den.

  15. Rotary Friction Welding of Weight Heavy Alloy with Wrought AlMg3 Alloy for Subcaliber Ammunition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgierd Janusz Goroch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies concerning friction welding of Weight Heavy Alloy (WHA with AlMg3 alloy are presented. The friction welding of density 17,5 Mg/m3 with aluminum alloy showed that it is possible to reach the joints with the strength exceeding the yield strength of wrought AlMg3 alloy. This strength looks to be promising from point of view of condition which have to be fulfilled in case of armor subcaliber ammunition, where WHA rods play the role Kinetic Energy Penetrators and aluminum is used for projectile ballistic cup.

  16. Rotary Friction Welding of Weight Heavy Alloy with Wrought AlMg3 Alloy for Subcaliber Ammunition

    OpenAIRE

    Olgierd Janusz Goroch; Zbigniew Gulbinowicz

    2017-01-01

    The results of studies concerning friction welding of Weight Heavy Alloy (WHA) with AlMg3 alloy are presented. The friction welding of density 17,5 Mg/m3 with aluminum alloy showed that it is possible to reach the joints with the strength exceeding the yield strength of wrought AlMg3 alloy. This strength looks to be promising from point of view of condition which have to be fulfilled in case of armor subcaliber ammunition, where WHA rods play the role Kinetic Energy Penetrators and aluminum i...

  17. Characterization of Air Emissions from Open Burning and Open Detonation of Gun Propellants and Ammunition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-07

    Army Engineer Research and Development Center Construction Engineering Research Laboratory P.O. Box 9005 Champaign, IL 61826-9005 8. PERFORMING...area outside the work building, covered by wood pallets as shown in Appendix F, Figures F-22 and F-23. PM and metals were both sampled for 5:51 h:min...Environment 2015, 111 (0), 170-178. 21. Ottmar, R. D. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Modeling fuel consumption. Forest Ecology and Management 2014, 317, 41-50. 66

  18. Measurement of Exhaust Emissions from Diesel-Powered Forklifts during Operations in Ammunition Storage Magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    to CO over a work period can cause central nervous system depression , blackouts, coma, and eventual death at the concentrations that could be reached...Camel, Jr., Eds., National Cancer Institute Monograph No. 9, p. 225, 1962. 11.6 Sawicki, E., R. C. Corey, A. E. Dooley,J. B. Gisclard, J. L. Monkman, R...tum wmammmmm ~m mamas aB-mm7 B-27 1K PEDCO INVIRONMENTAL. INC ARMY DIESEL FORKLIFT STUDY Location THREE TOt Description TEST SI Date: DECEMIER 6. 1103

  19. 78 FR 69077 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice... leading to provisional findings will be referred to the Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation...: ATFL-APO, Monterey, CA 93944, [email protected]us.army.mil , (831) 242-5828. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  20. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice...: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: May 31, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle...

  1. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice... Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: February 23, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle...

  2. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice... Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Dates of Meeting: May 16, 2013. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle Barracks...

  3. Army Study Shows Decline In Behavioral Health Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Army Study Shows Decline in Behavioral Health Stigma By Rob McIlvaine Army News Service WASHINGTON, Jan. 20, 2012 - A newly released Army study on...conference yesterday. The three-year study outlines the problem of suicide in the Army and related issues of substance abuse, spouse abuse and child abuse...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Army Study Shows Decline In Behavioral Health Stigma 5a. CONTRACT

  4. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 2 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q2 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army... Hearing Division General Medical: 500A July 2017 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Army Hearing Program Status Report, Q2FY17...56               INTRODUCTION The Army Hearing Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health

  5. Trust: Implications for the Army Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Georgia Institute of Technology, a MMAS from the School of Advance Military Studies, and an MSS from the U.S. Army War College. He was the U.S. Army...degrees from the School of Advance Military Studies, the US Army War College, and Webster University. His current research focus is senior military...The Repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell—1 Year Later,” Center for American Progress, from <http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/ lgbt /report/2012/09

  6. America’s Army: The Strength of the Nation. 2010 Army Posture Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    that the Army Soldier is the best equipped and most re- spected combatant in the world. In order to ex- ecute Army Modernization and ensure the con...Force Traumatic Brain Injury ( TBI ) Unaccompanied Personnel Housing (UPH) Unmanned Aircraft, Raven Small System Unmanned Aircraft, Shadow System Unmanned...Services TBI Traumatic Brain Injury 30 LoyaLty | Duty | Respect | seLfLess seRvice | HonoR | integRity | peRsonaL couRage 2010 Army

  7. Developing an Army Market Research Index in Support of Army Recruiting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morath, Ray

    2001-01-01

    .... Generating appropriate market research for the Army requires first cataloguing the existing market research databases and identifying the critical questions that are not answered by current research...

  8. Army Business Transformation: The Utility of Using Corporate Business Models within the Institutional Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailer, Jr., John J

    2007-01-01

    .... Through a survey of the literature of published corporate business plans and models, military reports, Army depot case studies, and comparative analysis of emerging computer software technology...

  9. Department of the Army, FY 1999 Amended Budget Estimates, Army Working Capital Fund

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    The Department of the Army has historically operated a significant number of its organic commercial and industrial facilities under revolving fund concepts to encourage these activities to function...

  10. The Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) Annual Survey of the Army Profession (CASAP FY16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-30

    incredibly fatiguing which cuts into my personal time to include mental health, physical health, and emotional well-being.” Understand this...April 2016. Its findings contribute to shared understanding of the State of the Army Profession within the Army Culture of Trust -- informing senior...Army leaders regarding the effectiveness of policies and practices intended to inspire and motivate Army professionals to “live by and uphold the Army

  11. A History of the Army Ground Forces; Study Number 16. The Army Ground Forces History of the Second Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-09-01

    proficiency in conjunction with other arms and services.7 GHQ and Second Army placed great stress on the development of instructors and the proper training of...separate units. This was clearly brought out in a report of iuspection of Second Army units at Ft. Knox, Ky., by Maj. Gen. J. M. Cumins , Commander of the...covered were food and water, hygiene, housing, field sanitation, and contagious and communicable diseases. Physical exercise stressed mass calisthenics

  12. Army's drinking water surveillance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneeringer, P.V.; Belkin, F.; Straffon, N.; Costick, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    In 1976 a total of 827 water sources from Army installations throughout the world were sampled and analyzed for 53 chemical constituents and physical parameters. Medically significant contaminants included radiation measurements, heavy metals, fluoride, nitrate, and pesticides. Radiological activity appeared to vary with geographic location; a majority being from water sources in the western part of the U.S. No results for tritium were found to exceed the health-reference limit. Confirmatory analyses for radium-226 identified 3 groundwater sources as exceeding the limit; one was attributed to natural activity and the other sources are currently being investigated. Of the metals considered to be medically significant, mercury, chromium, lead, cadmium, silver, barium and arsenic were found in amounts within health level limits. Nitrate levels exceeding the health limit were confirmed for 2 drinking water sources

  13. Army Roof Management and Improvement Opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailey, David

    1999-01-01

    ... - about $200 million annually. Systemic, integrated solutions offer the Army a great opportunity to save millions of dollars annually in repair and replacement costs, and to avoid incidental costs incurred due to interrupted...

  14. Evaluation of Sierra Army Depot Groundwater Contamination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1997-01-01

    ...), September 28, 1996. The Congressional conferees were concerned about allegations from a group of investors that the Army precipitously and abruptly changed its position on permits and applications to develop water...

  15. US Army Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaser, R.F.

    1980-07-01

    The Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS) was developed to meet the Army requirements of an unattended, automatic nuclear burst reporting system. It provides pertinent data for battlefield commanders on a timely basis with high reliability

  16. Accelerated Logistics: Streamlining the Army's Supply Chain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Mark

    2000-01-01

    ...) initiative, the Army has dramatically streamlined its supply chain, cutting order and ship times for repair parts by nearly two-thirds nationwide and over 75 percent at several of the major Forces Command (FORSCOM) installations...

  17. Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

    2008-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NREL are developing target energy budgets and design guides to achieve 30% energy savings. This paper focuses the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing.

  18. US Army Cultural Obstacles to Transformational Leadership

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Combs, Peggy C

    2007-01-01

    ...." Although these words sound like a direct lift of the current 2007 Army Posture statement, which discusses the "pentathlete" leader, they were written by the 33rd CSA, General Dennis Reimer, in 1999...

  19. A Pilotless Army in the Megalopolis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wegner, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This monograph answers the question, "Can unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) supplant manned United States Army attack and reconnaissance helicopters in the conduct of future urban operations" and the answer is, "not completely...

  20. Leadership Stability in Army Reserve Component Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Leadership Stability in...standards for research quality and objectivity. Leadership Stability in Army Reserve Component Units Thomas F. Lippiatt, J. Michael Polich NATIONAL SECURITY...RESEARCH DIVISION Leadership Stability in Army Reserve Component Units Thomas F. Lippiatt, J. Michael Polich Prepared for the Office of the

  1. Democratic civilian control of the Nepalese Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    following are recommendations or principles the Army must institutionalize to guide it through the still-evolving civil-military relationship discussions...society. The following are recommendations or principles the Army must institutionalize to guide it through the still-evolving civil-military...hence, the principal–agent framework developed in microeconomics and already used in various political applications can be profitably extended to

  2. Weapons Systems, United States Army 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Mexico, Morocco , Philippines, Turkey Co-Production: Korea The Army began fielding the UH-60 in 1978. Between 1978 and 1989 the Army procured UH-60A...Improvement Program ( CSR TEP) to all Area Common User System (ACUS) switch users (except AN/TTC-39-A(V)l). Incorporate Enhanced Switch Operation Program...Finland, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Morocco , Saudi Arabia National Guard, SHAPE Tech Ctr (NATO), Spain, Special Def Acq Fund (pre-purchased export

  3. Counter - Drug: Mandate for the Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    this comprehensive review will provide a basis for responding to new missions assigned...observations for determining the short-, mid-, and long-term direction of Army support to the national counter-drug effort. Also, this comprehensive review will provide...and long-term direction of Army support to the national counter-drug effort. Also, this comprehensive review will provide a basis for responding

  4. The Cultural Dimension of Army Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    by the conveyor belt of training. Instead of spending so much of their time as resource managers, the challenges become those of the operational...adaptability. 19The ARMY 2020 project defined the design of the future Army. A design team lead by...iterations, a design based approach uses systemic analysis to resolve these criteria. 27 Systems thinking reflects a departure from the common

  5. U.S. Army Space Operational Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    fire, and effects ( MFE ), the operational support (OS), and the functional support division (FSD); it is further divided into many more specialties...cyberspace expertise at the highest levels is a must for the Army. Both ARCYBERCOM and USASMDC/ARSTRAT commands are key positions filled by MFE officers... MFE officers with the majority from infantry and armor (31). The FA, AD, and EN branches will round out the top five.47 Half of the Army branches are

  6. Florence Nightingale: on feeding an army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, B M

    1989-12-01

    Florence Nightingale's work for the British Army during the Crimean War earned her the well-deserved honor of being considered the mother of modern nursing. Less well recognized is her involvement with the development of nutritional services for the military. A nutrient-intake analysis is developed here based on her recommendations and recipes for army troops. The intake profile is compared with modern recommendations for dietary intake for adequacy of the diet.

  7. The Army Ethic-Inchoate but Sufficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    are constraints imposed by this thesis. Delimitations include the scope, jus ad bellum, cultural relativism , descriptive ethics , and implementation...politicians. Third, this thesis will not look in depth at cultural relativism and how changes in laws and society’s philosophical and ethical ...THE ARMY ETHIC –INCHOATE BUT SUFFICIENT A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

  8. Department of the Army Installation Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Army's Installation Restoration Program (IRP) was established in 1975 in response to regulatory action at several installations where past disposal practices had caused contamination of streams and groundwater. The need to decontaminate excess Army-owned real estate also was considered in early IRP activities. A variety of site types have been discovered on Army installations. The major site types evaluated to date include: contaminated soil areas, landfills, lagoons, buildings, burning grounds, sumps, pits, storage tanks, sewage treatment plants, storage pads, industrial wastewater treatment plants, and salvage yards. Twenty Army installations have been proposed for or listed on the National Priorities List (NPL). The need for taking action at hazardous waste sites, however, is based on threats they pose to human health, welfare or the environment. Sites do not have to be on the SPL in order to be cleaned up through IRP activities. All of the sites that caused Army installations to be proposed for the NPL are being evaluated and cleaned up. In addition, all Army properties have been or will be assessed and where needed they will be addressed by the IRP

  9. Can Access to Data Prevent Army Suicides Identifying Optimal Response Strategies for Army Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    activities. One shortfall of this approach, however, is the lack of guidance on how Army leaders should interpret and use these data. To address this gap ...records Personal relationships Divorce, Army Community Service records Financial problems Wage garnishment, creditor notification agreed that leaders...endorsed by three panelists. compared, noting that there are significant differences between battalions with respect to age, gender , and rank

  10. Exposure assessment of a burning ground for chemical ammunition on the Great War battlefields of Verdun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausinger, Tobias; Bonnaire, Eric; Preuss, Johannes

    2007-09-01

    severe arsenic contamination and the transfer of this carcinogen by leachate, surface runoff and probably by wind. Nevertheless, some studies on the effects of the contaminant inventory on the local vegetation revealed that ammonium nitrate elutable zinc is responsible for the spatial distribution of some tolerant plant species and not arsenic. Previously undetected buried munitions from the former delaboration facility can be an other source of environmental contaminants. This is supported by elevated concentrations of chlorate (cmax.=71 mg/l) and perchlorate (cmax.=0.8 mg/l) detected in the leachate samples. This is the second report about environmental contamination related to post-war ammunition destruction activities along the 1914/18 Western Front.

  11. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Cha, Daniel K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Kim, Byung J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Champaign, IL 61826-9005 (United States); Oh, Seok-Young, E-mail: quartzoh@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} Ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. {yields} DNAN is identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. {yields} Iron treatment not only removes energetic compounds but also eliminates the toxic constituents that inhibit the subsequent microbial process. - Abstract: US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21

  12. Army Secure Operating System: Information Security for Real Time Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Eric

    1984-01-01

    The Army Secure Operating System (ASOS) project, under the management of the U.S. Army CECOM organization, will provide real time systems software necessary for fielding modern Battlefield Automation Systems...

  13. The Impact of Irregular Warfare on the US Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDonald, III, Roger L

    2006-01-01

    Although the U.S. Army has yet to clearly define irregular warfare, it is imperative that the Army take near-term action to enhance the ability of Soldiers and units to operate effectively in an irregular warfare environment...

  14. Assessing Army Professional Forums Metrics for Effectiveness and Impact

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cianciolo, Anna T; Heiden, Charles G; Prevou, Michael I

    2006-01-01

    ... meet the challenges brought on by Army transformation. Army professional forums (APFs), powered by advances in collaborative toolsets and multimedia presentation software, provide a means for leader self-development and professional growth...

  15. A Transformed Army in Europe For a Transformed World

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, James

    2003-01-01

    General Gordon R. Sullivan was the Army Chief of Staff when he wrote, "Ultimately, the Army's objective in leveraging change is to create a "learning organization," one that adapts in ever-quicker response cycles...

  16. 2007 Posture Statement, Army Reserve: An Operational Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stultz, Jack C

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 Army Reserve Posture Statement describes how the Army Reserve continues to transform from a strategic reserve to an operational force, meeting today's challenges as it better prepares for future uncertainties...

  17. Army Model and Simulation Standards Report FY98

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    ...) standards efforts as work progresses towards the objective Army M&S environment. This report specifically documents projects approved for funding through the Army Model and Improvement Program (AMIP...

  18. Nanotechnology Laboratory Collaborates with Army to Develop Botulism Vaccine | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) is collaborating with the Army to develop a candidate vaccine against botulism. Under a collaboration agreement between the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of

  19. Role Of The Army In Modern Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Viktorovich Vorobiev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the political development of the country in the modern period. Special attention is paid to the position of the army and its role in the Pakistani society. The article explores in detail the processes of gradual distancing of the army from politics and strengthening of civil society institutions. It is the first time in the Pakistani history that the civilian government managed to complete its full five-year constitutional term. Meanwhile, the country has been advancing on the path to democracy even after the elections 2013: a new civilian government has been formed in Pakistan. As compared with the previous phases of the country's development, the status of the army has considerably changed, evolved from "guiding force" to "shadow" guarantee of democratic development. The process has been largely encouraged by popular among officers feeling of tiredness: many of them are not ready to take power into their own hands and committed to their strictly constitutional duties. Despite this recent positive trend, the army continues to enjoy great authority in the society, often brokers political crisis and helps civilian authorities in settling such pressing problems as, for example, fight against extremism. The military will exert influence on government unless civil authorities are able to resist the current challenges and settle the actual problems. The role of "power broker" fully serves the interests of the top army brass.

  20. ROLE OF THE ARMY IN MODERN PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Viktorovich Vorobiev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the political development of the country in the modern period. Special attention is paid to the position of the army and its role in the Pakistani society. The article explores in detail the processes of gradual distancing of the army from politics and strengthening of civil society institutions. It is the first time in the Pakistani history that the civilian government managed to complete its full five-year constitutional term. Meanwhile, the country has been advancing on the path to democracy even after the elections 2013: a new civilian government has been formed in Pakistan. As compared with the previous phases of the country's development, the status of the army has considerably changed, evolved from "guiding force" to "shadow" guarantee of democratic development. The process has been largely encouraged by popular among officers feeling of tiredness: many of them are not ready to take power into their own hands and committed to their strictly constitutional duties. Despite this recent positive trend, the army continues to enjoy great authority in the society, often brokers political crisis and helps civilian authorities in settling such pressing problems as, for example, fight against extremism. The military will exert influence on government unless civil authorities are able to resist the current challenges and settle the actual problems. The role of "power broker" fully serves the interests of the top army brass.

  1. The Army Communications Objectives Measurement System (ACOMS) Users’ Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    and analysis system to support Army (1) assessments of advertising program effectiveness; (2) assessments of advertising strategy efficiencies; (3...advertising program effectiveness in a timely fashion; 2 (2) To support Army assessments of advertising strategy in an integrated framework; and (3...ACOMS data to assess the Army’s advertising strategy . ACOMS was designed to be used to examine the extent to which the Army’s intended messages are

  2. A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Army Advertising Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    ARMY ADVERTISING ATTRIBUTES EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Research Requirement: In order to assess the impact of the Army’s advertising strategy and campaigns...Sample sizes varied from 4,875 to 4,926 for the NRS and from 3,569 to 3,602 for ACOMS. Improvement type themes. This advertising strategy would make...and college. I recommend that the Army focus advertising strategy on the Army as a positive step between high school and college in addition to work

  3. Optimizing the Sustainment of U.S. Army Weapon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    Dale Carnegie , Fellowship, etc.) NA None of the above OPTIMIZING SUSTAINMENT OF ARMY SYSTEMS 36 Question 11: Army Civilian Education System...Darden, Dale Carnegie , Fellowship, etc.) None of the above 11. Army Civilian Education System (check all that apply) Action Officer Development Course

  4. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  5. A history of US Army PAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalupa, Robyn L; Marble, W Sanders

    2017-11-01

    The US military has a long tradition of using physician assistants (PAs). The Army began using PAs in 1971 in an effort to supplement the physicians and surgeons in the medical corps. As their numbers grew, PAs gradually replaced general medical officers assigned to battalions. Later, specialty positions developed in aviation medicine, orthopedics, and emergency medicine. The need for a PA serving as an adviser in the major commands slowly developed at all levels of leadership. In 2015, the Army removed limitations on female PAs assigned to combat units. PAs lead in tactical and clinical settings, filling command roles, senior clinical positions, and administrative leadership roles.

  6. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, S.C. [Radiation Standards and Dosimetry Laboratory, Redstone Arsenal, AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated.

  7. Army Business Transformation: The Utility of Using Corporate Business Models within the Institutional Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailer, Jr., John J

    2007-01-01

    .... This study finds that working corporate models, such as Lean Six Sigma (LSS), are available which are already enabling the transformation of a very specific aspect within the institutional Army...

  8. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors.

  9. Army ROTC: A Strategy for Developing Tomorrow's Army Leadership in an Era of Diminishing Resources

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Betoney, Charles

    1997-01-01

    .... This study addresses the need to continue a viable Army ROTC program to produce high quality junior officers as well as maintain a positive, mutually beneficial presence on university and college...

  10. 2014 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Military Leader Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-22

    of representativeness across the Army. The respondent sample closely approximated the population of the Army in distribution of component and gender ...standards are types of behaviors that hinder trust by creating climates of perceived inequality . As expected, the display of favoritism is negatively...or ‘favorites’ in lieu of the most qualified personnel, unequal enforcement of standards and discipline, and use of discretion in workplace justice

  11. Evaluating Mobile Device Ownership and Usage in the U.S. Army: Implications for Army Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Mercado University of Central Florida Randall D. Spain U.S. Army Research Institute July 2014 United States Army...NUMBER 633007 6. AUTHOR(S) Joseph E. Mercado ; Randall D. Spain 5c. PROJECT NUMBER A792 5d. TASK NUMBER 5e...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Subject Matter POC and Subject Matter Expert: Joseph E. Mercado 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words): As the U.S

  12. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... productive, meaningful way from the standpoint of environmental quality. (b) The Army will actively... their NEPA responsibility. Only through alertness, foresight, notification through the chain of command... documentation should incorporate the values of NEPA and: (1) Establish the scope of the analysis through full...

  13. Economic Value of Army Foreign Military Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT ECONOMIC VALUE OF ARMY FOREIGN MILITARY SALES ...this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instruction, searching existing data...sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden

  14. Army Information Operations Officer Needs Analysis Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    helping with formatting the final report iv ARMY INFORMATION OPERATIONS OFFICER NEEDS ANALYSIS REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Research...time.” One IO officer suggested the IPO try to get a access the database that has all the old APA reports archived as a way to look at assessment

  15. Fostering Creative Thinking in the Institutional Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    organizational structure, training, leadership development and education, personnel, facilities, and policies foster creative thinking ? These questions will be...in fostering creative thinking at the organizational level across the US Army. This assumption justifies researching if CGSOC fosters creative...creative thinking . Doctrine and policy and organizational structure and personnel will also be grouped to consolidate analysis. While the researcher will

  16. The Army's Role in Nation Building

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edmonds, Mark L

    2009-01-01

    ... should be and how to execute this task. The tasks associated with nation building are part of the Army's core competencies under the auspices of 'Stability Operations', and are now cited in doctrine in the recently published Field Manual 3-07...

  17. Determination of 236U and transuranium elements in depleted uranium ammunition by α-spectrometry and ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desideri, D.; Meli, M.A.; Roselli, C.; Testa, C.; Boulyga, S.F.; Becker, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that ammunition containing depleted uranium (DU) was used by NATO during the Balkan conflict. To evaluate the origin of DU (the enrichment of natural uranium or the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel) it is necessary to directly detect the presence of activation products ( 236 U, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Am, and 237 Np) in the ammunition. In this work the analysis of actinides by α-spectrometry was compared with that by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after selective separation of ultratraces of transuranium elements from the uranium matrix. 242 Pu and 243 Am were added to calculate the chemical yield. Plutonium was separated from uranium by extraction chromatography, using tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), with a decontamination factor higher than 10 6 ; after elution plutonium was determined by ICP-MS ( 239 Pu and 240 Pu) and α-spectrometry ( 239+240 Pu) after electroplating. The concentration of Pu in two DU penetrator samples was 7 x 10 -12 g g -1 and 2 x 10 -11 g g -1 . The 240 Pu/ 239 Pu isotope ratio in one penetrator sample (0.12±0.04) was significantly lower than the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratios found in two soil samples from Kosovo (0.35±0.10 and 0.27±0.07). 241 Am was separated by extraction chromatography, using di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP), with a decontamination factor as high as 10 7 . The concentration of 241 Am in the penetrator samples was 2.7 x 10 -14 g g -1 and -15 g g -1 . In addition 237 Np was detected at ultratrace levels. In general, ICP-MS and α-spectrometry results were in good agreement.The presence of anthropogenic radionuclides ( 236 U, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Am, and 237 Np) in the penetrators indicates that at least part of the uranium originated from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. Because the concentrations of radionuclides are very low, their radiotoxicological effect is negligible. (orig.)

  18. Determination of {sup 236}U and transuranium elements in depleted uranium ammunition by {alpha}-spectrometry and ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desideri, D.; Meli, M.A.; Roselli, C.; Testa, C. [General Chemistry Institute, Urbino University, Urbino (Italy); Boulyga, S.F.; Becker, J.S. [Central Department of Analytical Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2002-11-01

    It is well known that ammunition containing depleted uranium (DU) was used by NATO during the Balkan conflict. To evaluate the origin of DU (the enrichment of natural uranium or the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel) it is necessary to directly detect the presence of activation products ({sup 236}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 237}Np) in the ammunition. In this work the analysis of actinides by {alpha}-spectrometry was compared with that by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after selective separation of ultratraces of transuranium elements from the uranium matrix. {sup 242}Pu and {sup 243}Am were added to calculate the chemical yield. Plutonium was separated from uranium by extraction chromatography, using tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), with a decontamination factor higher than 10{sup 6}; after elution plutonium was determined by ICP-MS ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu) and {alpha}-spectrometry ({sup 239+240}Pu) after electroplating. The concentration of Pu in two DU penetrator samples was 7 x 10{sup -12} g g{sup -1} and 2 x 10{sup -11} g g{sup -1}. The {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu isotope ratio in one penetrator sample (0.12{+-}0.04) was significantly lower than the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratios found in two soil samples from Kosovo (0.35{+-}0.10 and 0.27{+-}0.07). {sup 241}Am was separated by extraction chromatography, using di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP), with a decontamination factor as high as 10{sup 7}. The concentration of {sup 241}Am in the penetrator samples was 2.7 x 10{sup -14} g g{sup -1} and <9.4 x 10{sup -15} g g{sup -1}. In addition {sup 237}Np was detected at ultratrace levels. In general, ICP-MS and {alpha}-spectrometry results were in good agreement.The presence of anthropogenic radionuclides ({sup 236}U, {sup 239}Pu,{sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 237}Np) in the penetrators indicates that at least part of the uranium originated from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. Because the concentrations of

  19. Determination of (236)U and transuranium elements in depleted uranium ammunition by alpha-spectrometry and ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desideri, D; Meli, M A; Roselli, C; Testa, C; Boulyga, S F; Becker, J S

    2002-11-01

    It is well known that ammunition containing depleted uranium (DU) was used by NATO during the Balkan conflict. To evaluate the origin of DU (the enrichment of natural uranium or the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel) it is necessary to directly detect the presence of activation products ((236)U, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Am, and (237)Np) in the ammunition. In this work the analysis of actinides by alpha-spectrometry was compared with that by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after selective separation of ultratraces of transuranium elements from the uranium matrix. (242)Pu and (243)Am were added to calculate the chemical yield. Plutonium was separated from uranium by extraction chromatography, using tri- n-octylamine (TNOA), with a decontamination factor higher than 10(6); after elution plutonium was determined by ICP-MS ((239)Pu and (240)Pu) and alpha-spectrometry ((239+240)Pu) after electroplating. The concentration of Pu in two DU penetrator samples was 7 x 10(-12) g g(-1) and 2 x 10(-11) g g(-1). The (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotope ratio in one penetrator sample (0.12+/-0.04) was significantly lower than the (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratios found in two soil samples from Kosovo (0.35+/-0.10 and 0.27+/-0.07). (241)Am was separated by extraction chromatography, using di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP), with a decontamination factor as high as 10(7). The concentration of (241)Am in the penetrator samples was 2.7 x 10(-14) g g(-1) and <9.4 x 10(-15) g g(-1). In addition (237)Np was detected at ultratrace levels. In general, ICP-MS and alpha-spectrometry results were in good agreement. The presence of anthropogenic radionuclides ((236)U, (239)Pu,(240)Pu, (241)Am, and (237)Np) in the penetrators indicates that at least part of the uranium originated from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. Because the concentrations of radionuclides are very low, their radiotoxicological effect is negligible.

  20. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

  1. Stratification of risk to the surgical team in removal of small arms ammunition implanted in the craniofacial region: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Jonathan A; Laughlin, Ian; Newberry, Shane; Ryhn, Michael; Pasley, Jason; Newberry, Travis

    2016-09-01

    In cases of penetrating injury with implantation of small arms ammunition, it can often be difficult to tell the difference between simple ballistics and ballistics associated with unexploded ordnances (UXOs). In the operative environment, where highly flammable substances are often close to the surgical site, detonation of UXOs could have catastrophic consequences for both the patient and surgical team. There is a paucity of information in the literature regarding how to evaluate whether an implanted munition contains explosive material. This report describes a patient who presented during Operation Enduring Freedom with an implanted munition suspicious for a UXO and the subsequent workup organized by Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Company prior to surgical removal. Clinical risk factors for UXOs include assassination attempts and/or wartime settings. Specific radiological features suggestive of a UXO include projectile size greater than 7.62-mm caliber, alterations in density of the tip, as well as radiological evidence of a hollowed-out core. If an implanted UXO is suspected, risks to the surgical and anesthesia teams can be minimized by notifying the nearest military installation with EOD capabilities and following clinical practice guidelines set forth by the Joint Theater Trauma System.

  2. Army Sustainment. Volume 47, Issue 4, July-August 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    ESBSs performed remarkably well. The bags contained either wa- ter, meals ready-to- eat , ammunition (of which 40-millimeter rounds were the most...troops. Therefore, on some nights, the marching doughboys had to eat , rest, and sleep alongside the road wherever they had stopped. These hardships...uneven for a while. It was noted that while the 42nd Division received a nice Christmas dinner with all the trimmings, some nearby 4th Division

  3. Army Sustainment. Volume 47, Issue 5, September-October 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    for dinner and replace them with new- ly filled ones. We circumvented this problem starting with situational training days. We pushed class I to...ammunition), food was served. We returned with the same trays that we used for dinner . During force-on-force days, our ration cycle was M-M-M, meaning...the Soldiers had three meals ready- to- eat (MREs) per day. All troops crossed the line of departure with three days of supply and needed one

  4. Making Weapons for the Terracotta Army

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Martinón-Torres

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Terracotta Army of the First Emperor of China is one of the most emblematic archaeological sites in the world. Many questions remain about the logistics of technology, standardisation and labour organisation behind the creation of such a colossal construction in just a few decades over 2,000 years ago. An ongoing research project co-ordinated between the UCL Institute of Archaeology and the Emperor Qin Shihang's Terracotta Army Museum is beginning to address some of these questions. This paper outlines some results of the typological, metric, microscopic, chemical and spatial analyses of the 40,000 bronze weapons recovered with the Terracotta Warriors. Thanks to a holistic approach developed specifically for this project, it is possible to reveal remarkable aspects of the organisation of the Qin workforce in production cells, of the standardisation, efficiency and quality-control procedures employed, and of the sophisticated technical knowledge of the weapon-makers.

  5. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs.

  6. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs

  7. Army European Tour Extension: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    vitality .41 .62 .16 .00 -.01 Spousal satisfaction with family life .11 .11 .I .18 .35 Spousal perception:II eCommunity gives me secure feeling* .03...institutions to families living overseas for two reasons. First, they provide Army families with an economical means of obtaining food and clothing. Second...less variety, less meaning , and fewer prospects for satisfaction in their work than do.., soldiers in administration and supply MOS. The researchers

  8. Army Transformation and the Future Combat System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Christina Fishback. “U.S. Army’s Reaction to FM 100-5.” Master’s Thesis Draft. (Manhattan: Kansas State University, 2008). Introduction . 12 U.S. Army...Military Revolution, 1300-2050. Ed. Macgregor Knox and Williamson Murray. ( Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001); Even with the...Ibid. This evident by his saying that "glory is fleeting, but obscurity is forever." 131 In an abstract manner, Shakespeare observes the similar

  9. Army Officers’ Attitudes of Conflict Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-11

    The purpose of this study was to measure the attitudes of the middle level career Army officers relative to the concepts of conflict management . The...the literature concerning conflict management and its related fields of study, an exploratory analysis employing Hierarchical Clustering Schemes, and... conflict management . (2) No difference exists in the attitudes of conflict management according to the sample’s three branch groups: combat arms

  10. Economic Value of Army Foreign Military Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    USASAC leads the AMC Security Assistance Enterprise, develops and manages security assistance programs and foreign military sales cases to build...that leads to cost savings and cost avoidance. The Shadow’s FMS sales are currently 1.6% of the total units in operation and accounts for the same...SPONSORED REPORT SERIES Economic Value of Army Foreign Military Sales December 2015 MAJ James P. Allen, USA MAJ Scott A. Bailey, USA CPT

  11. US Army Medical Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    RI) US ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT. Colonel/John Jr DTIC JUL 1 5 1980; A USL &MY MEDICAL BIOENGINEERING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT...pollutants in water or soil . Pollutant by-products and breakdown products in water, air or soil will be isolated, characterized, and quantified. Where...determination of selected low-level pollutants io soil and water. Degradation products and secondary pollutants arising from munitions manufacture or pest

  12. Army Communicator. Volume 35, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    heliograph at Fort Whipple , Virginia and flashed signals up to 30 miles distant. In 1886 the army used heliographs in for the first time in...Lockard and Elliot returned to their billets for breakfast. The Signal Corps equipment, training and aircraft warning procedures had worked...Training this many Soldiers in common procedures and techniques required a sound training program of instruction. master sergeant, later LTC

  13. Army nurses in wartime: distinction and pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, L P

    1996-08-01

    Nurses have served with distinction in wartime since Florence Nightingale went to the Crimea. Women often accompanied their husbands to battle during the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, caring for the sick and wounded. Although not officially given officer status until 1920, Army nurses served in the Spanish-American War and World War I. As officers, thousands of nurses served in subsequent wars, distinguishing themselves by their heroism, devotion to duty, and sheer tenacity of spirit.

  14. Exploring the Use of Microworld Models to Train Army Logistics Management Skills

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levy, Dina

    2001-01-01

    The Army faces new challenges in training its logistics managers. As the Army evolves into a force-projection Army, the design and management of large-scale logistics systems assume increasing importance...

  15. Operational, Social, and Religious Influences upon the Army Chaplain Field Manual, 1926-1952

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nay, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The early formulation of the Army Chaplain Field Manual reveals the Army Chaplaincy struggling with individuals using the Army Chaplain Field Manual to further their social and religious beliefs upon other chaplains...

  16. Army Vocational Guidance in Two-Year Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    worklife . Second, counselors were quite receptive to the idea of having high quality Army information available that could aid student career planning...the CVG/JOIN information presentations to be informative and rather objective (i.e., balanced pros and cons about Army life/options). Nonetheless...presentation; variety, color is excellant. - Very honest and balanced presentations. "* 130 0 - - - - - - - - - - 15) quality of "Army Jobs" info

  17. Army Sustainment. Volume 44, Issue 5. September-October 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Department of Defense or any of its agencies, and do not change or supersede official Army publications. The masculine pro - noun may refer to either gender...the Army Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC), AMC, and the Army staff, who con - stitute the candidate selection panel. CASCOM provides the TRADOC...improper use of these items that causes the fires. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration ( OSHA ) states that equipment needs to be used

  18. Analysis of Lean Six Sigma in the Army Contracting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    xii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xiii LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AC Acquisition Center ACA Army Acquisition Agency ACAT... Utilizing the Results of Lean Six Sigma efforts (www.armyobt.army.mil) The Army mimics the DoD structure for Business Transformation to align with the DoD...understand the marketplace and work collaboratively to clearly describe the government’s requirements in a way that can generate robust competition. 15

  19. Army Air and Missile Defense Network Design Facility (AAMDNDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides JTIDS network designs and platform initialization load files for all Joint and Army-only tests, exercises, operations, and contingency events...

  20. An Identification of Interpersonal Skills for Building Army Civilian Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elliott, Kari A; Erickson, Michael D; Fowler, Edward T; Gieseking, John K; Weiss, Mary P

    2006-01-01

    .... This project expands the findings from the 2003 Army Training and Leadership Development Panel, Communication Task Force initiative, which identified a perceived gap in interpersonal skills exhibited...

  1. Management: The Missing Link to Army Leadership Doctrine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flemming, Lee

    2003-01-01

    .... There are numerous applications for management in today's Army to include the developing Operational Career Fields, budget and procurement management, garrison activities, logistics sustainment, and acquisitions...

  2. Occupational stress in the armed forces: An Indian army perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakshi Sharma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to explore factors influencing occupational stress faced by Indian army soldiers and evaluate applicability of the scale used for measuring occupational stressors. Structured interview schedules were used to collect first hand data from a sample of 415 soldiers. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA highlights lack of control at work, role conflict, inadequate awareness about profession, workload and job pressure, and indifferent organisational attitude as the major occupational stressors in the Indian army. In addition, Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA confirms occupational stressor as an eight factor model in the army. The study recommends implementing commitment-based management approach and techniques such as Sahaja Yoga meditation in the army.

  3. Assessing Leadership Potential for the Army's Future Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donahue, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A transforming Army requires a corresponding transformation in its leader development and assessment methodology to enable the future force in the volatile uncertain complex and ambiguous contemporary...

  4. Battling Bullying in the British Army 1987 – 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Wither

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the attempts by the UK MOD to eradicate bullying in the British Army. Although British recruits are not confronted by mistreatment that compares with the phenomenon of dedovshchina, the Army has struggled to eliminate incidents of bullying from the ranks, which have tarnished the image of the British Army. The article examines the nature and extent of the problem, the efficacy of official policy to combat it, and suggests reasons why bullying persists even in a long- standing professional army. It also seeks to provide instructive insights for those militaries of the successor states of the Soviet Union that are currently blighted by dedovshchina.

  5. Nonfacility Particulate Matter Issues in the Army - A Comprehensive Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kemme, Michael

    2001-01-01

    .... Army nonfacility sources include soil-based PM from training activities, prescribed burning, smoke and obscurant training, artillery practice, weapons impact testing, and open burning/open detonation...

  6. Hazardous Waste Surveys of Two Army Installations and an Army Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    232 Nickel-63 Uranium-238 Plutonium-239 Polonium - 210 6 Army Medical Treatment Facilities: General Administration Army Regulation (AR) 40-2, 42A peren...Adhesive BN R 0x AU DOI545AO GI. 312 F 44 0,3 27)d17 N6341( 2 14,5 0 6 Adhesive 81 A XY AO D041419A0 PI 210 82140 O0 5824596 RO.34 140376139 Adhesi E ON...conform to clean air pollutant standards. 46 4 Noninfectious Solid Waste. Most wastes in this category are: (1) food waste from the military mess and

  7. Force Structure: Capabilities and Cost of Army Modular Force Remain Uncertain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    .... The Army's goals for increasing combat power while introducing predictability in deployments for its soldiers are important, and the Army leadership in headquarters, military and civilian staffs...

  8. Comparative analysis of field ration for military personnel of the ukrainian army and armies of other countries worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mardar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of improvement of the Ukrainian nutritional standards this Article provides comparative analysis of field rations of different countries worldwide to make a proposal on improvement of food-stuff assortment in food ration for military personnel in the Armed Forces of Ukraine, Army of USA, the British Army, Army of Germany, Army of Italy, Army of Canada, Army of France, Army of Belarus, Army of Armenia. In accordance with the comparative analysis it was established that ration composition used for the Armed Forces of Ukraine military personnel lags behind developed countries of the world both in nutrition arrangement and in nutrient composition, especially in relation to assortment and variety of ration food-stuff. Moreover, a field ration is strictly unified and doesn’t consider individual needs of military personnel in calories, proteins, fats, carbohydrates, food fibers. Selection of individual field ration takes to account only age of military personnel, i. e. individual needs related to nutrition composition such as physical abilities, level of physical activity, gender, type of occupation before military conscription and etc. are not consideredThe obtained results confirms practicability of assortment products assortment included to field rations for the purpose to correct nutrition rations towards optimal balance for military efficiency of army, adaptation of military personnel to physical and psychological loads.

  9. Commentary on "The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)": Army STARRS: a Framingham-like study of psychological health risk factors in soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Kerry J; Schoomaker, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    Although historically the Army suicide rate has been significantly lower than the civilian rate, in 2004, the suicide and accidental death rates began trending upward. By 2008, the Army suicide rate had risen above the national average (20.2 per 100,000). In 2009, 160 active duty Soldiers took their lives, making suicide the third leading cause of death among the Army population. If accidental death, frequently the result of high-risk behavior, is included, then more Soldiers died by their own actions than in combat in 2009. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) was thus created in 2009 to begin to address these problems. The Army STARRS project is a large consortium of seven different studies to develop data-driven methods for mitigating or preventing suicide behaviors and improving the overall mental health and behavioral functioning of Army Soldiers during and after their Army service. The first research articles from the Army STARRS project were published in late 2013 and early 2014. This work has already begun to outline important facets of risk in the military, and it is helping to drive an empirically derived approach to improvements in understanding mental disorders and risk behavior and to improve prevention and support of mental health and resilience. The Framingham Heart Study, started in the 1940s, marked a watershed event in utilizing large cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal collaborative research to identify and understand risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The Army STARRS project, through its collaborative, prospective, and robust innovative design and implementation, may provide the beginning of a similar scientific cohort in mental disorders. The work of this project will help understand biological and psychological aspects of military service, including those leading to suicide. When coupled with timely feedback to Army leadership, it permits near real-time steps to diagnose, mitigate, and

  10. The 1985 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Tabular Description of NPS (active) Army Accessions. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    ACTIVE) ARMY ACCESSIONS, VOLUME 2 INTRODUCTION The purpose of this document and a companion volume, The 1985 Survey of Armv Recruits; Tabular...supsnssrket. Stock shelves in a eupenserket Check out goods in a auperserkst 143. 145. Lssrn *out being a chef . Lasrn about being an auto «echenic

  11. 2015 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Military Leader Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    composite scale indicating that they displayed more counterproductive than productive behaviors. By analyzing several indicators simultaneously, CASAL...serving behaviors; character or integrity issues; lack of concern for subordinate welfare and development; poor communication; disconnected, absentee , or...behavior or absence of a behavior will be counter to productive results, processes, and attitudes. At the most detrimental level in the Army

  12. 2010 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Volume 1, Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    activities and Army leadership requirements. Steele and Fullagar (2009) demonstrated a link between 3 primary course characteristics and student engagement , namely...Institute. Steele, J. P., & Fullagar, C. J. (2009) Facilitators and outcomes of student engagement in a college setting. Journal of Psychology, 143, 5-27.

  13. Child Abuse and Neglect United States Army U.S. Army Central Registry (1989-1996)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-31

    This report is an analysis of the child abuse and neglect cases that have been recorded in the Army Central Registry between 1989-1996. The following...were 30,551 initial substantiated cases of child abuse and neglect, or an average of about 3,80 cases per year. There were 2,336 subsequent incidents

  14. International Affairs Programs: The Air Force Versus the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    individual tutoring programs . Additionally RAS personnel are offered regional enhancement studies opportunities at several facilities.48 RAS personnel...AU/ACSC/2015 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS PROGRAMS : THE AIR FORCE VERSUS THE ARMY by Robin L...5 COMPARISON: INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS PROGRAMS AIR FORCE VERSUS ARMY 8

  15. The Process of Curriculum Innovations in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    just tell them they were wrong. The hands-on exercises were viewed as one way of developing the technical competence needed, as instructors...PowerPoint) __Soldier competencies per the Army Learning Model __Learner-centered and/or problem solving activities/ exercises /scenarios __Principles...Diffusion of Innovations, Program of Instruction, Instructional Techniques, Curriculum Development, Soldier Competencies , Army Training and Education 16

  16. The Army Communications Objectives Measurement System (ACOMS): Survey Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    advertising strategy efficiencies; (3) management of the advertising program; and (4) planning and development of new marketing strategies and...scientific methodology. ACOMS is being used for Army (1) assessments of advertising program effectiveness; (2) assessments of advertising strategy efficiencies...advertising program effectiveness in a timely fashion; (2) To support Army assessments of advertising strategy in an integrated framework; and (3) To support

  17. Netherlands Army Long Range Anti Armour Study - Status Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, P.A.B. van

    1989-01-01

    At the end of the nineties the munition for the TOW weapon system in use at The Netherlands army, has to be replaced. The Life of Type of The Tow carrier ends in 2005. The long range anti armour study is to gain insight into the possibilities and limitations for the Netherlands army to deploy future

  18. Demographic and Anthropometric Assessment of US Army Anthropometric Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    suggest that any projections for future demographic characterizations for the Army should be based on Army data and policy alone, and not on trends...decade in adults. 33 .7.-a , ... ,5 ,.W *.1n LU) I--4 cncd Cc 0 U) 4- 34 Military surveys, which are generally conducted on subjects either at or near the

  19. The Effects of Multiple Deployments on Army Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    deployment-related feelings.12 Focusing on a parent’s absence, dwelling on potential negative outcomes, or ruminating on problems often sends a child...maintain balance in the pull of both noble institutions. Some Army adolescents contend poorly in this dilemma; others—many more than soldiers or Army

  20. Operational Reservations: Considerations for a Total Army Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    individually proficient. To answer some of the questions about the viabil- ity of a 5-year training cycle for RC units, Major Gen- eral Tim Orr, the Adjutant...resident school). 85. “Structured Self-Development,” Ft. Bliss , TX: U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, available from https://usasma.bliss. army.mil

  1. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... possession of ionizing radiation sources by non-Army entities (including their civilian contractors) on an... Radiation Permit (ARP) from the garrison commander to use, store, or possess ionizing radiation sources on an Army installation. For the purpose of this rule, ``ionizing radiation source'' means any source...

  2. A Candidate Army Energy and Water Management Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fournier, Donald F; Westervelt, Eileen T

    2004-01-01

    .... This work augments on-going energy and water management initiatives within the Army by developing a new candidate Army level strategy that responds to anticipated legislation; reflects current DOD and DA requirements, vision, and values in light of the current world situation; incorporates sound science and management principles; and organizes and focuses efforts into an integrated program.

  3. United States Army Weapon Systems 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-18

    equipment, tractor, van, wrecker, 8.8-ton Load Handling System (LHS), 8.8-ton LHS trailer, and 10-ton dump truck models). Three truck variants and...NJ) hydraulic pump and motor: Vickers (Jackson, MS) 131 UnIteD StAteS Army ACqUISItIon phASe InveStment Component High Mobility Engineer Excavator...MEDEVAC and hoist configuration, the UH-72A is also being fielded in a VIP, National Guard Homeland Security (HLS) and a Combined Training Center

  4. The Role of the US Army Reserve in Support of the US Army Force 2025 and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    the Army Reserve mission or force structure will radically be rebalanced , but it did point to a new emerging mindset which the Total Army will be...verified and validated within individual portfolio reviews, professional certifications and trade credentials in support of civilian career requirements

  5. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite layout plans for Army...

  6. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army Boundaries...

  7. Adaptive Army: Embracing the Concept of Operational Manoeuvre from the Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    PEACE Source: Headquarters Training Command- Army. Land Warfare Doctrine LWD 3-01: Formation Tactics. Australian Army, November 27, 2003. 27...Amphibious Capability Implementation Team, June 15, 2009. Headquarters Training Comrriand- Army. Land Warfare Doctrine LWD 3-0: Operations. Australian Army

  8. Educating for Innovation: Finding Balance in the Army’s Professional Military Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    house and senate by Secretary of the Army, John McHugh , and Chief of staff of the Army, General Raymond Odierno. Of particular interest is the chapter...Strategic Leader Education for the 21st-Century Army.” Parameters (Autumn 2001): 17-33. McHugh , John. 2014 Army Posture Statement. Presented 25 March 2014

  9. [Andrologic disease detected during army medical visit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campodonico, Fabio; Michelazzi, Alberto; Capurro, Anna; Carmignani, Giorgio

    2003-12-01

    Aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of andrologic diseases in young men (age 18 years) recruited for conscription in a north-western Italian region. A random sample of 1993 young men was evaluated at the Army Medical Visit Center of the Military District of Genoa. The visits were performed by the same doctor. An examination of external genitalia and secondary sex characters was made and the medical history of each conscript was recorded. Investigation procedures were standardized according to the guidelines of the WHO for the diagnosis and management of the infertile male. Andrologic disorders were found in 547 subjects (27.5%) and first diagnosed in 412 (20.7%). Specific acquired or congenital disorders are discussed. Some patients with most significant diseases were referred to the Urologic Department for second level diagnostic exams. This study underlines the role of the army medical visit as a tool for andrologic screening in young males. The military health service may be a relevant institution for postpuberal control and it could be useful to prevent future sexual and fertility problems in adult males.

  10. Prior Mental Disorders and Lifetime Suicidal Behaviors Among US Army Soldiers in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millner, Alexander J; Ursano, Robert J; Hwang, Irving; J King, Andrew; Naifeh, James A; Sampson, Nancy A; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Kessler, Ronald C; Nock, Matthew K

    2017-09-19

    We report on associations of retrospectively reported temporally prior mental disorders and Army career characteristics with subsequent first onset of suicidal behaviors in a large, representative sample of US Army soldiers who participated in the Consolidated All-Army Survey of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (N = 29,982). Results reveal that among men and women, all self-reported lifetime disorders measured (some assessed with screening scales) are associated with subsequent onset of suicide ideation. Among men, three disorders characterized by agitation and impulsiveness (intermittent explosive disorder, panic disorder, and substance disorders) predict the transition from suicide ideation to attempt. For both men and women, being in the Regular Army (vs. National Guard or Army Reserve) predicts suicide attempts in the total sample. For men, a history of deployment and junior rank are predictors of suicide attempts after adjusting for preenlistment disorders but not accounting for pre- and postenlistment disorders, suggesting that postenlistment disorders account for some of the increased suicide risk among these career characteristics. Overall, these results highlight associations between mental disorders and suicidal behaviors, but underscore limitations predicting which people with ideation attempt suicide. © 2017 The American Association of Suicidology.

  11. Cultural Changes Required in the Army to Truly Achieve a Total Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    tailored to achieve anticipated objectives.”1 Honorable John M. McHugh , Secretary of the Army Army Directive 2012-08 (Army Total Force Policy...United States Soldier. 16 End Notes 1 McHugh , John M. “Army Directive 2012-08 (Army Total Force Policy).” Secretary of the Army, September 4...1 (February 2006): 40–42. McCullough, Amy. “Out of Reserve (Air Force Reserve Command)” 94, no. 12 (2011): 40. McHugh , John M. “Army Directive 2012

  12. The Army study to assess risk and resilience in servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursano, Robert J; Colpe, Lisa J; Heeringa, Steven G; Kessler, Ronald C; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE/OBJECTIVE: Although the suicide rate in the U.S. Army has traditionally been below age-gender matched civilian rates, it has climbed steadily since the beginning of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts and since 2008 has exceeded the demographically matched civilian rate. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multicomponent epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce Army suicides and increase knowledge about risk and resilience factors for suicidality and its psychopathological correlates. This paper presents an overview of the Army STARRS component study designs and of recent findings. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/INTERVENTION: Army STARRS includes six main component studies: (1) the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) of Army and Department of Defense (DoD) administrative data systems (including records of suicidal behaviors) for all soldiers on active duty 2004-2009 aimed at finding administrative record predictors of suicides; (2) retrospective case-control studies of fatal and nonfatal suicidal behaviors (each planned to have n = 150 cases and n = 300 controls); (3) a study of new soldiers (n = 50,765 completed surveys) assessed just before beginning basic combat training (BCT) with self-administered questionnaires (SAQ), neurocognitive tests, and blood samples; (4) a cross-sectional study of approximately 35,000 (completed SAQs) soldiers representative of all other (i.e., exclusive of BCT) active duty soldiers; (5) a pre-post deployment study (with blood samples) of soldiers in brigade combat teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (n = 9,421 completed baseline surveys), with sub-samples assessed again one, three, and nine months after returning from deployment; and (6) a pilot study to follow-up SAQ respondents transitioning to civilian life. Army/DoD administrative data are being linked prospectively to the large-scale survey

  13. We Want You: It Takes a Village To Market the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    controls over its marketing activities. While policy governs Army behavior, principles of marketing shape it as well. In marketing , the brand...18. 92 Ibid., 18. 93 Head, 4. 94 Kotler and Lee, 239. 95 Ibid., 209. 96 Ibid., 218. 97 U.S. Army Marketing and Research Group, “Army...We Want You: It Takes a Village To Market the Army by Lieutenant Colonel Daniel C. Hodne United States Army

  14. The Army rolls through Indianapolis: Fieldwork at the Virtual Army Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Allen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay takes an ethnographic look at the individuals and institutions associated with the development, production, and implementation of the Virtual Army Experience (VAE, a mobile mission simulator that travels across the United States to venues such as state fairs and air shows. As an explicit aid to Army recruitment and interaction with the public, the VAE is an interesting nexus point that often channels public anxieties surrounding the medium of the video game and its role in the militarization of society. Here, I present my own experience of doing ethnography at this site, describing how it is received by visitors and interpreted by its employees. By means of the example of the VAE, I argue that polarizing media reports and academic criticisms that pit the processes of militarization against critical reflection of those processes are counterproductive and result in silencing more nuanced and thoughtful critical reflection that is already present at sites such as the VAE.

  15. History of the Army Ground Forces. Study Number 17. History of the Third Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    impotence; Facist Italy rattled swords, and Germany was giving itself to Nazism. On 9 August 1932, without fanfare and almost without public awareness, the...picking up pecans under ofte tree. 5. All units should continue to remove the physically unfit as rapidly as possible. While this conference was going...with War Department orders, he visited the Fifth Army front in Italy , as an observer, in November, 1943. In his report to General McNair,322 General

  16. Typology of Army Families. Coping Styles of Successful, Career Army Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    to deal with environment induced stress tend to become non- * productive and dysfunctional. This is a qualitative study of the coping styles of 18...and can only guess at the number, either through surveys or through Non- Combatant Evacuation Operation (NEO) sign-up exercises . NEO is the Army plan...headaches, stomach upsets, amenorrhea , a~id sleep difficulties. There was also a significant increase in weight change problems. Perceptions of

  17. Army Communicator. Volume 27, Number 3, Fall 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    play in the Army’s transformation to the Objec- tive Force.” Gizmo’s debut in the Beatle Bailey comic strip came July 4. And according to a source close...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army ARMY COMMUNICATOR Voice of the Signal Regiment ! PB 11...02-3 Fall 2002 Vol. 27 No. 3 ! Special focus: radio’s resurgence -- its “new” uses in the current and near- future Army, Pgs. 2-18 ! Signal-planning

  18. Netherlands Army Long Range Anti Armour Study - Status Report

    OpenAIRE

    Schagen, P.A.B. van

    1989-01-01

    At the end of the nineties the munition for the TOW weapon system in use at The Netherlands army, has to be replaced. The Life of Type of The Tow carrier ends in 2005. The long range anti armour study is to gain insight into the possibilities and limitations for the Netherlands army to deploy future (time period 1995-2000) weapon systems in the long range anti armour battle. The first study results are expected at the end of 1989. The study is sponsored by the Netherlands army and is carried ...

  19. Is the Chinese Army the Real Winner in PLA Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    44 Commentary / The Chinese Army and PLA Reforms JFQ 83, 4th Quarter 2016 Is the Chinese Army the Real Winner in PLA Reforms? By Phillip C. Saunders...and John Chen G round force officers run China’s military, the People’s Liberation Army ( PLA ). About 70 percent of PLA soldiers serve in the PLA ...Saunders and Chen 45 services and arms of the PLA ” has meant reductions in “technologically backward” PLAA units and personnel increases for the other

  20. Inspector General, DoD, Oversight of the Army Audit Agency Audit of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works Program, FY 1996 Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    1997-01-01

    The audit objective was to determine the accuracy and completeness of the audit of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works Program, FY 1996, financial statements conducted by the Army Audit Agency...

  1. Inspector General, DoD, Oversight of the Army Audit Agency Audit of the FY 2000 Army Working Capital Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    Our objectives were to oversee the Army Audit Agency audit of the FY 2000 Department of the Army Working Capital Fund financial statements to verify whether we can rely on their work and to determine...

  2. Inspector General, DoD, Oversight of the Army Audit Agency Audit of the FY 1998 Army General Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    ... Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 1998: Summary Audit Rep oft." Our objective was to determine the accuracy and completeness of the Army Audit Agency audit of the FY 1998 Army General Fund Fund Financial Statements...

  3. Mercenaries in the Army of Hellenistic Athens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Vostrikov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article interests in history of armed forces of the antiquity states, their structure, deployment order, the organization of command, evolution of arms, policy strokes, action of armies in the military conflicts, and to their use in internal political fight, as well as to involvement of mercenaries. During the Classical Period of Greek history big fame was gained by armed forces of Athens and Sparta. Athens in the 5th century BC was at the peak of power and pursued active foreign policy which was in many respects supported by powerful army and fleet. The reason of traditionally high interest in history of Athens of the Classical Period including the armed forces history of the polis also lies in it. However Athens and their armed forces suffered a serious loss and got beaten in the Peloponnese war and the final decline of political and military power of Athens occurred after defeat in Lamian war therefore military activity of the polis sharply decreases. Therefore the history of Hellenistic period Athens gets much less attention. Proceeding from it, the purpose of article consists in a research of the role of mercenaries in armed forces of Athens in the period of Hellenism. The leading method of this research is the comparative-historical method allowing tracking mercenaries hire by Athens during the specified period on the basis of a complex sources use. The main research results consist in identification of an order and features of the hired contingents use, their places in armed forces of the polis. Materials of article can be useful to the further scientific research regarding the history of Athens and military ancient history as well as to creating educational and handbooks on this perspective.

  4. Funding Ammunition Ports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    a pure version of either approach, but MOTSU has a greater relative emphasis on working capital funding than MOTCO does. Figure 1.1 depicts how...midnight on September 30, the government’s coach turns into a pumpkin . That is the moment—at the end of the fiscal year—at which every agency, with a few

  5. Human Resource Automation Architecture Validation for a Transforming Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Devine, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    .... These steps if taken will result in better support to United States Army members while expediting access to commander's key information requirements and decreasing the workload of service providers...

  6. The Impact on Army Transformation if Supplemental Funding Wanes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavender, Wayne M

    2006-01-01

    ... it (congressional support) will be there." But increased budgetary pressures fueled by domestic spending, record budget deficits and a burgeoning federal debt may shift spending priorities - at the expense of the Army...

  7. Integrating Language and Cultural Knowledge into the Army Officer Corps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Purser, Jennifer L

    2008-01-01

    .... By promoting the acquisition of culture and language comprehension before individuals become commissioned, the Army can save both time and money in training officers to prepare for the COIN fight...

  8. Army Logistician. Volume 40, Issue 1, January-February 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    certainties . . .; it closes questions; it records terminal collective decisions; it is not a franchise for the individual questioner.” ARMy LOGISTICIAN...Model: Dynamism and adaptability, entrepreneurship , innovation, or risk-taking; individual risk- taking, innovation, freedom, recognition of

  9. Resourcing Army Transformation: Solid Plan or House of Cards?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brimberry, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    .... We are also an army that is embarking on a monumental transformation effort. This ambitious plan to modernize and reorganize the force will take 30 plus years and over 210 billion dollars to complete...

  10. Integrating Language and Cultural Knowledge into the Army Officer Corps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Purser, Jennifer L

    2008-01-01

    As the Contemporary Operating Environment (COE) has shifted away from a necessity to apply conventional tactics towards a counterinsurgency fight, culture has become increasingly important to the U.S. Army...

  11. The Army and the Endangered Species Act: Who's Endangering Whom?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diner, David N

    1993-01-01

    Mankind is causing a mass extinction of plant and animal species. The Army, as steward of 25 million acres of public lands, is being asked to play an increasingly decisive role in recovering endangered species...

  12. US Army Corps of Engineers Reachback Operations Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Providing Relevant Solutions to the Armed Forces and the NationThe USACE Reachback Operation Center at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC)...

  13. Power and Energy Architecture for Army Advanced Energy Initiative

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaffer, Edward C; Massie, Darrell D; Cross, James B

    2006-01-01

    ... technologies for the Army. The current P&E architecture is an amalgam of independent programs, which traditionally have been developed in stovepipe organizations, and often as an afterthought to the development of other advanced technologies...

  14. Army Transformation and Digitization - Training and Resource Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferrell, Robert

    2002-01-01

    .... A changing world order, diminishing resources and rapid and continuous advances in technology are the driving forces behind the Army's transformation campaign and the redesign of the force to the Force XXI concept...

  15. Revolution in Business Affairs: Strategic Business Alliances in Army Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bliss, Gary

    2002-01-01

    .... What commercial business practices could assist the Army in its Transformation? Can Strategic Business Alliances between the government and contractors help forge a winning team to aid in the Transformation effort?

  16. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis for US Army Recruiting Input Allocation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brence, John

    2004-01-01

    .... An objective study of the quantitative and qualitative aspects of recruiting is necessary to meet the future needs of the Army, in light of strong possibilities of recruiting resource reduction...

  17. Distribution and Supply Chain Management: Educating the Army Officer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Solseth, Mark E

    2005-01-01

    ... and distribution management environment. It analyzes how officers should attain these skills using the three pillars of leader development in Department of the Army Pamphlet 600-3, "Commissioned Officer Development and Career Management...

  18. The Global War on Terror and Army Officer Military Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, Joseph M

    2008-01-01

    .... Unfortunately, history and current trends have demonstrated that the Army's selfless culture has struggled to meet long term educational goals during periods of high operational demand like the present...

  19. Optimizing the Distribution of United States Army Officers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McElroy, Jeremy S

    2005-01-01

    .... The Army responds to imbalances by redistributing officers to provide each location with the minimum required officers while minimizing the number of unfilled targets and excess officers at each location...

  20. U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cerami, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    For more than 3 decades, the Army War College Department of National Security and Strategy has faced the challenge of educating future strategic leaders on the subject of national security, or grand strategy...

  1. One Team, One Fight, One Future, Total Army Integration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    ...; and, most important, our vision for maintaining a trained and ready force. As the ideas in One Team, One Fight, One Future unfold, you will find the key themes of Total Army integration emerging again and again...

  2. The Strategic Effect of Army Civilian Workplace Injuries and Illnesses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koucheravy, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    .... Lately, the Army has improved safety and embedded a more effective safety culture, but it has not improved its program for reducing civilian accident costs or returning injured workers to the workplace...

  3. A Work Environment Climate Assessment of an Army Acquisition Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doelling, Michael C; Kalapacs, Jenni J

    2005-01-01

    .... The goal of this Joint Applied Project was to identify organizational climate characteristics of the Army Acquisition Center to provide supervisors with data on the extent to which employees perceive...

  4. Leader Development Process in Pakistan Army at the Tactical Level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nawaz, Amer

    2004-01-01

    .... up to a maximum of seven years of service. It analyzes the present leader development process of Pakistan Army to see its effectiveness to train leaders at the tactical level to perform effectively in future...

  5. Army Medical Department Leaders in Military Operations Other Than War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sadlon, Gary

    2000-01-01

    .... Likewise, the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) must insure its leaders, specifically those selected to deploy world-wide, have a more diverse skill set that enables them to fully operate within the full spectrum of scenarios...

  6. Using Venture Capital to Improve Army Research and Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Held, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    ...) while keeping current equipment relevant and affordable. This issue paper introduces the idea that the Army should fund some of its technology development through a private venture capital organization...

  7. Army Junior Officer Education: An Assessment of Institutional Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Landers, Christopher S

    2007-01-01

    As the Army continues its transformation into a more lethal and responsive force, in the midst of the War on Terror, it becomes increasingly important to make qualitative and critical assessments of our progress...

  8. Branding: A Strategy for Manning an All-Volunteer Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keeter, John M

    2008-01-01

    .... The ability to man the Army and realize the vision of a "quality" force is challenged not only by the impacts of a protracted war on the attitudes of the youth, and their influencers, but also...

  9. Army Transformation The Unhinging of Title 10 Logistics Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lundgren, Kenneth S

    2005-01-01

    .... Successful expeditionary operations will require a much better understanding of the Department of Defense and US Army transformation strategies and how those proposed changes will impact the joint community.

  10. An Overdue Post-Cold War Army Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dixon, Michael

    2004-01-01

    ...). The Army has rapidly aligned itself with the Department of Defense (DoD) Transformation plan and is aggressively identifying and building required capabilities now in support of the Global War on Terrrorism (GWOT...

  11. Optimizing the Internal Medicine Clinic at Evans Army Community Hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonilla, Jose

    2003-01-01

    ...) 2002, the Internal Medicine (IM) clinic at Evans Army Community Hospital, Fort Carson, Colorado, failed to meet access to care standards for routine appointments, and was only marginally successful in meeting standards for urgent appointments...

  12. Thinking Strategically About Army Strategic Leadership: Revolution or Evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyce, Lisa

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 Senior Leadership Seminar held at George Mason University on 10 September 1999 brought together key senior Army leaders and civilian leadership experts from academia and industry to discuss...

  13. U.S. Army War College Key Strategic Issues List

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    The Key Strategic Issues List (KSIL) offers military and civilian researchers a ready reference of topics that are of particular interest to the Department of the Army and the Department of Defense...

  14. Determining Composite Validity Coefficients for Army Jobs and Job Families

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zeidner, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    .... These correlation coefficients are corrected, first, for unreliability of the criterion and, then, for restriction in range effects due to assignment from an Army input population to MOS samples...

  15. Advancing Army Women as Senior Leaders - Understanding the Obstacles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ellefson, Kristi

    1998-01-01

    This paper examined through research, whether any evidence exists which indicates that, army women are confronted with inherent obstacles as they try to advance through the ranks to senior level positions...

  16. Computer Backgrounds of Soldiers in Army Units: FY00

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fober, Gene

    2001-01-01

    .... Soldiers from four Army installations were given a survey that examined their experiences with computers, self-perceptions of their skill, and an objective test of their ability to identify Windows-based icons...

  17. Improving Mentorship and Leader Development in the US Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    the son of Odysseus, penned by the classic storyteller Homer. In this classic example, a senior and experienced mentor provided sage advice to a...34receives minimal exposure in the structured classroom instruction in the Army’s formal educations system.” It would almost indicate that the Army...outside of the classroom . In a perfect scenario, they receive 15 further guidance in this area so that in the non-distant future they may assume

  18. The Army Communications Objectives Measurement System (ACOMS): Survey Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    tiveness, assessments of advertising strategy efficiencies, management of the advertising program, and planning and development of new marketing strategies... advertising strategy and market segmentation. The ACOMS development effort has focused on specifying the design and analysis plan for the survey...second set of goals involves the use of ACOMS data to assess the Army’s advertising strategy . ACOMS is examining the extent to which the Army’s in

  19. The Army Communications Objectives Measurement System (ACOMS): Quarterly Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    program effectiveness; (2) assessments of advertising strategy efficiencies; (3) management of the advertising program; and (4) planning and development...for ACOMS has involved the use of ACOMS data to assess the Army’s advertising strategy . ACOMS has been used to examine the extent to which the Army’s...intended messages are actually being exposed to, and perceived by, their target audiences. Advertising strategy has been supported by the analysis of

  20. Scouts Out! The Development of Reconnaissance Units in Modern Armies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    forces they encountered.61 The French command did not realize the Germans were still east of Neufchâteau, particularly after secondhand information...37; Seaton, 90–91; Robert Citino, Armored Forces: History and Source Book (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1994), 57; Walter Goerlitz, History of the...British Army, 1943 (New York: Hippocrene Books , 1976), 41, 228; Ogorkiewicz, 57– 60. 43. Ellis and Chamberlain, 166; Leo Niehorster, “British Army

  1. Recruiting and Retaining Army Nurses: An Annotated Bibliography

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Benjamin J.; Kocher, Kathryn M.

    1988-01-01

    This listing of annotated references includes studies dealing with the labor market behavior of registered nurses. References describing both the military and the civilian working environments for RNs are contained in the bibliography. Because the Army must recruit and retain nurses in the context of the national labor market for nurses, a broad perspective was maintained in selecting publication. Studies dealing with the factors influential in attracting and retaining Army Active Duty and Re...

  2. Army Logistician. Volume 41, Issue 1, January-February 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    metrics and academic discipline. ARMy LOGISTICIAN PROFESSIONAL BULLETIN OF UNITED STATES ARMY LOGISTICS 47 According to Miles and Huberman , “when...transformation efforts from an NCW 8 Matthew B. Miles and A. Michael Huberman , Qualitative Data Analysis, Sage, Thousand Oaks, California, 1994. 9 Department of...their first 5 months in Iraq, the 426th BSB “Taskmasters” drove more than 89,000 miles on perilous roads to deliver their essential cargo—a feat

  3. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 3 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    are not being attended. Clinical Hearing Services: Clinical records review is a critical component of a quality assurance program. Army...Regulation (AR) 40-68 outlines requirements for ongoing clinical performance reviews, to include peer reviews and chart audits . The Joint Commission...Health Center. • Implement peer reviews and/or chart audits at all installations for all privileged providers. • Increase the Army Hearing Program (AHP

  4. Je Maintiendrai: The Royal Netherlands Army Within the Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    CHAPTER I Combat History of the Dutch Army The Kir.ngdom of the Netherlands has tended to favor neutrality or abstentionism over involvement in...a small power and the Dutch increasingly favored abstentionism from European conflicts. Subsequently, the wartime organization of the Royal Army was...Netherlands abandoned its traditional policy of abstentionism and became a founding member of the Brussels Treaty (1948) and the North Atlantic

  5. The Dynamics of Change: Regeneration of the Indonesian Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-15

    Army Special Forces (KOPASSANDHA): COI1U11a11Idl MG Yogic Suardi Memet * it(B) CCL, W ismuy Ar i.-j MU11,1IL101 A (N4) Deputy Commander *MG Soedjasmin0...KLTG Yogic Suardi Memet Cdr KODAM, VI/Cdr Special Forces Cdr KOWILHAN II BG S. Momon HI. Ad ip)Utro) Unknown Chi Army F iulaaic L’uia’ BC IP1

  6. A Study of Placing Army Requirements on Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    the program office in an integrated product team fashion under the leadership of the program manager. The U.S. Army contracting command is a key... fashion 46 A STUDY OF PLACING ARMY REQUIREMENTS ON CONTRACT  Our requirements can be routinely changed by the Acquisition Center. The reason for... consulted .  No, processes were unclear and if there are/were process, they were not communicated well with Program Office and even among the ACC personnel

  7. The United States Army Comprehensive Soldier Fitness: A Critical Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Psychoanalysis Professor Stephen Soldz, stated “ the problems identified with CSF are legion. It is time for the Army to step back from uncritically...Frederick J. Gellert Department of Command, Leadership and Management Project Adviser This manuscript is submitted in partial fulfillment of the ...organization and at every level within the Army, MRTs serve as the principal advisor to the leadership regarding CSF and as a resource for Soldiers

  8. Back Pain in the U.S. Army Aviation Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-16

    69 0 Active Duty 268 250 18 Reserve/National Guard 136 130 6 Dept. of the Army Civilian 16 16 0 Contractor 2 2 0 *Missing 45 45 0...respondents based on reported military affiliation could be qualified to receive such benefits (Department of the Army Civilians and contractors that are...activity actual help manage my pain 23 20-Seat material is non-supportive- I used an organ aero seat helped. Seat ht when reclined was to low

  9. A Critical Analysis of Attribute Development Programs for Army Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    implement a holistic approach to developing attributes within its members. These domains are human performance, psychological performance, spiritual ...A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF ATTRIBUTE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR ARMY LEADERS A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army...RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 10-06-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Master’s Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) AUG 2015

  10. Social Media Misuse in the United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    phenomenon for the Army and it will increase as more Soldiers in the millennial generation communicate through social media as well as use numerous...social media . Soldiers and leaders must also understand the punitive actions that could result from not upholding the Army values and ethics resulting...browsing a social media network’s community page in 2014 when she came upon a video that she found offensive and sexist. In one scene of the video

  11. The Underrepresentation of African Americans in Army Combat Arms Branches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-04

    socially significant. While the glass ceiling for African Americans appears to have been shattered for society as a whole, the fact that only eight of more...Chief of Staff, and there has yet to be an African American Chief of Staff of the Army all suggest that the glass ceiling still exists in the Army.34...whole of society had even accepted these individuals as more than three-fifths of a person.1 In the twentieth century, women integrated into the

  12. Army Hearing Program Talking Points Calendar Year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    provides summary information regarding the prevalence of hearing injury experienced by U.S. Army Soldiers in 2016. Soldiers who completed a DD Form...2215 (Reference Audiogram) or DD Form 2216 ( Hearing Conservation Data) during Calendar Year 2016 (CY16) were included in the analysis. Information is...broken out by Service component and will be updated annually. TOTAL ARMY STATISTICS FOR CY16 24% of Soldiers have some degree of hearing

  13. An investigation into the factors that influence toolmark identifications on ammunition discharged from semi-automatic pistols recovered from car fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collender, Mark A; Doherty, Kevin A J; Stanton, Kenneth T

    2017-01-01

    Following a shooting incident where a vehicle is used to convey the culprits to and from the scene, both the getaway car and the firearm are often deliberately burned in an attempt to destroy any forensic evidence which may be subsequently recovered. Here we investigate the factors that influence the ability to make toolmark identifications on ammunition discharged from pistols recovered from such car fires. This work was carried out by conducting a number of controlled furnace tests in conjunction with real car fire tests in which three 9mm semi-automatic pistols were burned. Comparisons between pre-burn and post burn test fired ammunition discharged from these pistols were then performed to establish if identifications were still possible. The surfaces of the furnace heated samples and car fire samples were examined following heating/burning to establish what factors had influenced their surface morphology. The primary influence on the surfaces of the furnace heated and car fire samples was the formation of oxide layers. The car fire samples were altered to a greater extent than the furnace heated samples. Identifications were still possible between pre- and post-burn discharged cartridge cases, but this was not the case for the discharged bullets. It is suggested that the reason for this is a difference between the types of firearms discharge-generated toolmarks impressed onto the base of cartridge cases compared to those striated along the surfaces of bullets. It was also found that the temperatures recorded in the front foot wells were considerably less than those recorded on top of the rear seats during the car fires. These factors should be assessed by forensic firearms examiners when performing casework involving pistols recovered from car fires. Copyright © 2016 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nostalgia in the Army (17th-19th Centuries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battesti, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    People died from nostalgia in the army in the 17th-19th centuries. The term 'nostalgia', created by the doctor Johannes Hofer (1669-1752), from Mulhouse, came from the Germanic Heimweh, or 'homesickness'. It affected the young people enrolled in the army, such as Swiss mercenaries. Longing for their native land, they were consumed by an ongoing desire to return home. If it was impossible to do so, they sank into 'a sadness accompanied with insomnia, anorexia and other unpleasant symptoms' that could lead to death. Nostalgia became classified as a disease during the last quarter of the 18th century and ravaged the French army during the Revolution and the Napoleonic wars. However, as soon as the wars ended, it ceased to exist in the army (except the colonial army). It was removed from the nosology in the first half of the 19th century. Rapidly explained as an example of a misdiagnosis or a confusion between 'connection and cause', nostalgia needs to be assessed in regard to the medical debate between 'alienists' and 'organicists'. Creating much concern, nostalgia needs to be considered in the historical context of a society destabilized by modernity, with some individuals uprooted by the sudden transition from civil society to military life. It raises questions about the role that the army played in the creation of the French national union. Nostalgia may have also covered psychic traumatisms later designated as combat fatigue, war neurosis, or post-traumatic stress disorder. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Army Plasma/Propellant Interaction Workshop - U.S. Army Research Office, 17-18 November 1998

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaw, Robert

    1999-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory (ARL)-ARO effort to develop a coordinated research program to address the needs of advanced gun propulsion, in particular, in the application of plasmas as ignition and energy augmentation sources...

  16. Department of the Army Supply Bulletin, Army Medical Department Supply Information, SB8-75-S7

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... Army Medical Materiel Agency (USAMMA), Fort Detrick, Maryland This edition focuses on the mission and functions of the SCMD and its capability to support the "Warfighter" during a full range of contingency operations While all of...

  17. Fiscal Year 2011 United States Army Annual Financial Report. America’s Army: At a Strategic Crossroads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    successful in any operational scenario. In FY 2011, the Army updated the Cost of the Doctrinal Army Model using improved and refined methods and the...General Fund uses engineering estimates and independently validated models to estimate environmental cleanup liabilities. The Remedial Action Cost ...Standard Price LCM = Lower of Cost or Market AC = Actual Cost O = Other MAC = Moving Average Cost Abnormal Balance The Revaluation Allowance for

  18. Sales Training for Army Recruiter Success: Sales Strategies and Skills Used by Excellent U. S. Army Recruiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    Army recruiters. Neurolinguistic programming (NLP) was used as the protocol for modeling performance and acquiring information on the communication...kills -Linguistic pattern~ Sales cycle, Communica tion s trategies Mode-H.R-g. Sales skills, {:( ~Expert kn0\\vlc dge1 ’ Neurolinguist ic~ Sales...describe s a program of r esearch on the communicat ion st rate - gies a nd skills use d by excellen t Army r ecrui t e rs. Information to be used to

  19. The Army National Guard: Part of the Operational Force and Strategic Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Training periods. John M. McHugh , the Secretary of the Army, published Army Directive 2012-08 (Army Total Force Policy) on September 4, 2012. The...Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jo Ann Rooney, “Equipping the Reserve Forces,” 2. 35 US Secretary of the Army John M. McHugh , “Army Directive 2012-08...Washington, DC: April 4, 2012. Accessed January 21, 2016. http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/123512p.pdf. US Secretary of the Army John M. McHugh

  20. Evaluation of Various Organic Fertilizer Substrates and Hydraulic Retention Times for Enhancing Anaerobic Degradation of Explosives-Contaminated Groundwater While Using Constructed Wetlands at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Milan, Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Sulfate Solution By Volume: In a 1 L volumetric flask, dissolve 20 g copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuS04 • 5H20) in about 800 mL water. Dilute to mark with...water. Invert to mix thoroughly. By Weight: To a 1 L container, add 20 g copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuS04 • 5H20) to 991 g water. Stir or shake...100 mL portion of 2% copper sulfate solution (reagent 5) to the cadmium prepared above. Swirl for about 5 minutes, then decant the liquid and

  1. U.S. Army Unmanned Aircraft Systems Roadmap 2010-2035: Eyes of the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    disadvantages of manned versus unmanned, as well as fixed-wing versus vertical takeoff and landing, capabilities. 9.6 Synchronization Effort The...flight rules ( IFR ) flight plans. As the DoD CONOPS for UAS matures and as the Army ensures the airworthiness of our UAS, we will look toward...Flight Level (FL) 180 (18,000 feet mean sea level [MSL]) to FL600 (60,000 feet MSL). Flights within Class A airspace must be under IFR and under the

  2. The 1984 ARI Survey of Army Recruits. Codebook for Summer 84 Active Army Survey Respondents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    ARMY SURVEY RESPONDENTS T261 - DO YOU HATCH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS OR PROGRAMMING TYPES ON TV? - NBA BASKETBALL . RAN DATA ICARD i1 COLS ILENGTHII... BASKETBALL 280 T262 WATCH TV PROG:COLLEGE BASKETBALL 281 T263 WATCH TV PROG:NHL HOCKEY 282 T264 WATCH TV PROG:PROFESSIONAL WRESTLING 283 T265 WATCH TV...SURVEY RESPONDENTS T262 - DO YOU HATCH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS OR PROGRAMMING TYPES ON TV? - COLLEGE BASKETBALL . RAW DATA ICARD #1 COLS ILENGTHII

  3. NATO Pallet with Javelin Missiles, MIL-STD-1660 Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Army Defense Ammunition Center (DAC), Validation Engineering Division (SJMAC-DEV) conducted tests in accordance with MIL-STD-1660, "Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads" on the NATO pallet with Javelin missiles...

  4. Projectile, 155MM, XM982, Excalibur, Packed One (1) per PA179 Container, Unitized Up to Three (3) per 40 in. x 48 in. Wooden Pallet, MIL-STD-1660 Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dugan, Jeffery L

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Army Defense Ammunition Center (DAC), Validation Engineering Division (SJMAC-DEV), conducted tests in accordance with MIL-STD-1660, "Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads" on the XM982 155MM Excalibur Projectile packed one...

  5. Special Army Reports Prepared by Defense Finance and Accounting Service Indianapolis Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul J; Marsh, Patricia A; Armstrong, Jack L; Wenzel, Paul C; Barnes, Leslie M; Grum, Andrew D; Kleiman, E. E; Baer, Joseph A; Maroska, Chad A; Thompson, Ann L

    2007-01-01

    .... This is the second in a series of reports related to Army budget execution operations. The first report discussed the transmission of Army budget execution data by the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS...

  6. Boundaries - US Army Corps of Engineers - Habitat Restoration and Enhancement Projects (HREPs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — Congress authorized the Environmental Management Program (EMP) in the 1986 Water Resources Development Act to help address ecological needs on the Upper Mississippi...

  7. Assessing the Army National Guard's Enhanced Brigade Concept: Searching for Readiness and Relevance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greene, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The Army's Enhanced Brigades were created in the early 1990s to correct readiness deficiencies discovered in the unsuccessful mobilization of Army National Guard combat units for the Persian Gulf War...

  8. Development of a Formal Army Officer Mentorship Model for the Twenty-First Century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harney, Robert

    2000-01-01

    This study addresses the role of formal mentoring processes in the U.S. Army. Specifically, this study examines which formal mentoring model should the Army adopt and implement as part of its overall officer development process...

  9. 75 FR 22757 - Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ..., school curriculums, educational philosophy and objectives, program effectiveness, facilities, staff and... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory... Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the Army Education Advisory Committee (hereafter...

  10. [On the role of army physicians in the creation of Ukrainian medical terminology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radysh, Ia F; Holyk, L A

    2002-01-01

    Tha article is devoted to the analysis of the role army surgeons had in creation of Ukrainean medical terminology. In the article, medical dictionaries are briefly analyzed, of which Ukrainean army surgeons are authors or co-authors.

  11. Implementation of the Asthma Practice Guideline in the Army Medical Department: Evaluation of Process and Effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farley, Donna O; Cretin, Shan; Vernez, Georges; Pieklik, Suzanne; Quiter, Elaine; Ashwood, J. S; Tu, Wenli

    2005-01-01

    .... The Quality Management Directorate of the Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) contracted with RAND to work as a partner in the development and testing of guideline implementation methods for ultimate application to an Army-wide guideline program...

  12. The Need to Change Army Policies Toward Single Parents and Dual Military Couples With Children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carroll, Carolyn

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify the key challenges with current Army personnel policies and to provide recommendations that would reduce the impact of single parents on Army unit readiness...

  13. The AEF Way of War: The American Army and Combat in the First World War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grotelueschen, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Many scholars of the First World War have examined the European armies in new ways that have shown not only how those armies actually fought along the Western Front, but how they changed their ideas...

  14. A Peer Sharing Approach to Mission Planning and Development in US Army Tactical Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lundy, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the technical and information management environment that United States Army heavy combat tactical units operate in and provides a solution for how the Army's software development...

  15. Updating ARI Educational Benefits Usage Data Bases for Army Regular, Reserve, and Guard: 2005 - 2006

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Winnie

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the updating of ARI's educational benefits usage database with Montgomery GI Bill and Army College Fund data for Army Regular, Reserve, and Guard components over the 2005 and 2006 period...

  16. Is Fatigue a Problem in Army Aviation: The Results of a Survey of Aviators and Aircrews

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caldwell, John

    2000-01-01

    .... The current study, in which the responses from 241 Army aviators and 120 Army enlisted crew members were analyzed, indicates that inadequate sleep and/or insufficient sleep quality is adversely...

  17. The Victory Disease and the US Army After the Cold War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allen, John

    1999-01-01

    This study investigates the US Army after the end of the Cold War, specifically how the "Victory Disease" resulting from winning the Cold War caused a complacency in the US Army which eventually led...

  18. Green Warriors: Army Environmental Considerations for Contingency Operations from Planning through Post-Conflict

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mosher, David E; Lachman, Beth E; Greenberg, Michael D; Nichols, Tiffany; Rosen, Brian; Willis, Henry H

    2008-01-01

    .... Army conducts overseas. Countries in which the Army conducts operations tend to have environmental problems caused by industrialization, lack of environmental protection, long-running conflict, and natural conditions...

  19. Missing in Action: African American Combat Arms Officers in the United States Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doward, Jr, Oscar W

    2008-01-01

    .... The monograph examines the African American Army officer's service during each period of major conflict over the last 100 years to explain why modern-day African American Army officers are prone...

  20. 75 FR 22756 - Federal Advisory Committee; United States Army Science Board; Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... relating to the Army's scientific, technical, manufacturing, acquisition, logistics, and business... the following disciplines: Science, technology, manufacturing, acquisition, logistics, business...; the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology; and as requested, other...

  1. The Role of the Army Reserve in the Weapons of Mass Destruction/Homeland Defense Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    ... attack. Given these increasing threats to the territory, population, and infrastructure of the United States, the Army Reserve should have an expanded role in providing homeland defense capabilities. The Army Reserve is well suited to homeland defense missions.

  2. Identifying British Army infantry recruit population characteristics using biographical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, M D; Arthur, A; Repper, J; Mukhuty, S; Fear, N T

    2016-04-01

    The infantry accounts for more than a quarter of the British Army but there is a lack of data about the social and educational background of its recruits. To provide an insight into British Army infantry recruits' personal, social and educational background prior to enlistment. The study sample consisted of infantry recruits who enlisted into the British Army School of Infantry. Each recruit completed a 95-item biographical questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample in terms of demographic, physical, personal, social and educational attributes. The study sample consisted of 1000 male recruits. Over half of the recruits were consuming alcohol at a hazardous or harmful level prior to enlistment and 60% of recruits had used cannabis prior to joining the Army. Academic attainment was low, with the majority of recruits achieving GCSE grade C and below in most subjects, with 15% not taking any examinations. Over half the recruits had been in trouble with the police and either been suspended or expelled from school. Substance misuse and poor behaviour are highly prevalent among recruits prior to enlistment. Taken alongside existing evidence that some of these problems are commonplace among personnel in regular service, the assumption that the British Army infantry is, in itself, a cause of these behaviours should be questioned. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The 1986/1987 Army Communications Objectives Measurement System. Supplementary Tabulations of Officer Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    assessments of advertising strategy efficiencies; (3) management of the advertising program; and (4) planning and development of new marketing strategies and...fashion; (2) To support Army assessments of advertising strategy in an integrated framework; and (3) To support Army advertising management and planning for...Army attain its annual recruiting goals. A second set of goals for ACOMS involved the use of ACOMS data to assess the Army’s advertising strategy . ACOMS

  4. Creativity and Strategic Vision: The Key to the Army’s Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-21

    future strategic leadership . 22 ENDNOTES 1. U.S. Army War College, Army Command. Leadership , and Management : Theory and Practice ([Carlisle Barracks...referring to a strategic leader, the Army War College reference text on command, leadership and management quoted earlier states. "he develops and...strategic leadership , are still applicable. He suggests that the Army should identify and track creative Individuals at the accession point, managing

  5. General of the Army George C. Marshall’s Strategic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Depression to perform conservation tasks in rural areas.31 In 1938, Marshall moved to the War Plans Division of the General Staff. Unbeknownst to...125 US Army Center of Military History, “Omar Nelson Bradley: The Centennial ,” US Army, 2006...Omar Nelson Bradley: The Centennial .” US Army, 2006. Accessed April 2, 2017. http://www.history.army.mil/brochures/bradley/bradley.htm. Watson

  6. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Volume 1. Army Abstracts of Phase 1 Awards 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    RESERVE SERVICE. GELTECH, INC. Topic#: 91-242 W. 91SDC-017 TWO INNOVATION DRIVE Office: SDC ALACHUA, FL 32615 Contract #: Phone: (904) 462-2358 P1: VINAY K...REFERENCE PHYSICAL OPTICS CORP. PRADEEP K. GUPTA , INC. ARMY 91-071 AF 91-128 ARMY 91-144 ARMY 91-169 PRECISION COMBUSTION, INC. NAVY 91-102 ARMY 91-011 NAVY

  7. Ad Hoc Subgroup on Threat of Aids on Operational Deployment of Army Forces to a Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    chaim ) Alexandier, Dr. Martin Barth, Dr. Delbert S.-(final chaiirman) (cont.) V* PERMOMNG ORGANIZATIN NAMIR AND ADORE-SN ESA. PERFORMING OROANIZAMlO...behavioral change requires a moral as well as a policy commitment from the senior Army leadership to keep soldiers from contracting this deadly illness. (R-29...for consideration by Army leadership . All of these options go beyond current Army policy. Option 1: The Army should immediately place each HIV-infected

  8. From Darkness to Light: Posttraumatic Growth among Recently Deployed Army National Guard Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    Stress and Associated Functioning of Army National Guard Following Exposure to Iraq Warzone Trauma,” Traumatology 14 (2008): 51. 9. Army National...Associated Functioning of Army National Guard Following Exposure to Iraq Warzone Trauma.” Traumatology , 14 (2008): 51–56. Ouimette, Paige, Dawne Vogt

  9. Boundaries - US Army Corps of Engineers - St. Paul District (MVP) Civil Works

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The US Army Corps of Engineers - St. Paul District Civil Works boundary. Boundary is based on 1:24k watershed data and coordination with MVR to determine shared...

  10. The Expanded Application of Forensic Science and Law Enforcement Methodologies in Army Counterintelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    enforcement (LE) capabilities during the investigation of criminal offenses has become commonplace in the U.S. criminal justice system . These... system , and FORENSICS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT IN ARMY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE 22 would likely need to go to their local Army CID or military police...THE EXPANDED APPLICATION OF FORENSIC SCIENCE AND LAW ENFORCEMENT METHODOLOGIES IN ARMY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE A RESEARCH PROJECT

  11. Tooele Army Depot - South Area Suspected Release Units. RCRA Facility Investigation - Phase 2, for SWMUs 1, 25, and 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    metabolism before reaching the systemic circulation. Therefore, a toxic effect attributable to an active metabolite might be more pronounced if the compound...no first-pass metabolism might result in a greater dose of the toxic constituent entering the systemic circulation than if the compound were absorbed...great horned owls, red-tailed hawks, loggerhead shrikes, badgers, Ord’s kangaroo rats, horned larks, and sagebrush lizards. The vegetation types

  12. Mentoring the Afghan Army at the Officer Academy in Kabul

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster Christensen, Maya

    Capacity building of host nation militaries is a central component of current multinational military operations, which is likely to become increasingly vital to future military interventions in conflict settings. Focusing on the mentoring of the Afghan National Army at the British-led officer...... academy in Kabul, this policy brief stresses the urgency with which Western militaries should improve military capacity building efforts. Based on qualitative data collected at the British Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and the Afghan National Army Officer Academy, the brief outlines five clusters...

  13. Army AL&T, October-December 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    appearance. The results of this research have been exploited in movies such as Spider Man II, Superman Returns and King Kong. A new challenge being...project manager/superintendent and quality control manager at LEAD who work from an office trailer in the depot’s industrial area. The availability of...and I think AMC as a command is much better to do that for the Army. The 3.5-day event also included a tour of and reception at the U.S. Army

  14. Listing of Army Fuel-Consuming Nonautomotive Ground Support Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    W Z(55I(00W(.J...J0((55(5 X55(S NNN. .6uu m xv~ 00d0. . -z 00 0 0a0 e~ W 0 0 1fl 0 40.28 QUf0=Q lS59uuIIIII 4 a a acca N0QgI %q c a It, 4t 0 0 0 - !3...ATDO-S FORT MONROE VA 23651 DIR US ARMY MATERIALS & MECHANICS CDR RSCH CTR US ARMY NATICK RES & DEV CMD ATTN: DRXMR-E 1 ATTN: DRDNA-YEP ( DR KAPLAN

  15. Army Communicator. Voice of the Signal Regiment. Volume 33, Number 2, Spring 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Militant Islam, and one on Cultural Aware- ness. Many of these works can be downloaded. http://www-cgsc.army.mil/carl/resources/ biblio ...CAC_counterinsurgency.asp http://www-cgsc.army.mil/carl/resources/ biblio /CAC_militant.asp http://www-cgsc.army.mil/carl/resources/ biblio /CAC_cultural.asp Are you...deploying to Iraq or Afghanistan? http://cgsc.leavenworth.army.mil/carl/re- sources/ biblio /3acrart.asp http://cgsc.leavenworth.army.mil/carl/re- sources

  16. US Army Research Office research in progress, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The US Army Research Office, under the US Army Materiel Command (AMC), is responsible for coordinating and supporting research in the physical and engineering sciences, in materials science, geosciences, biology, and mathematics. This report describes research directly supported by the Army Research Projects Agency, and several AMC and other Army commands. A separate section is devoted to the research program at the US Army Research, Development and Standardization Group - United Kingdom. The present volume includes the research program in physics, chemistry, biological sciences, mathematics, engineering sciences, metallurgy and materials science, geosciences, electronics, and the European Research Program. It covers the 12-month period from 1 July 1991 through 30 June 1992.

  17. Organizational Analysis of the United States Army Evaluation Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    customer at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. Figure 14 shows the placement of the AEC APG directorates and was derived from Google Maps. Figure 14...Information (PII)  Portable Electronic Devices & Removable Storage Media  Phishing Awareness  Army G3 Computer Security Training In addition to the

  18. Army General Fund Adjustments Not Adequately Documented or Supported

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    For financial statements to be accepted into CARS, the amounts must match. In theory , the amount submitted by the various accounting systems and...DEFENSE (COMPTROLLER)/ CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DIRECTOR, DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE AUDITOR GENERAL, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUBJECT... financial management system requirements, applicable Federal accounting standards, and the U.S. Government Standard General Ledger at the

  19. U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-01

    Stanford University Press, 1993. 26. Rudolf Hrbek and Sabine Wegand, Betrifft! Europa der Regionen, Berlin: C.H. Beck, 1994. 27. John Mueller...Barracks: U.S. Army War College, November 1998. Navarro, Jaime . Joint Vision 2010: Naval Warfare Imperatives. Newport: U.S. Naval War College

  20. Peer-to-Peer Learning and the Army Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    education will be delivered to the current and future force. This thesis examined the salient areas proposed by the ALM and its impact on P2P learning ...The Army Learning Model is the new educational model that develops adaptive leaders in an era of persistent conflict. Life-long, individual