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Sample records for bacteroides fragilis group

  1. BACTEROIDES FRAGILIS IN SEPSIS

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    Sugumari Chandrasegaran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE 1. To find out the prevalence of Bacteroides fragilis in patients with Sepsis and to perform Antimicrobial susceptibility testing. 2. To identify the Metronidazole resistant Bacteroides fragilis and to confirm the resistant pattern genomically by gene sequencing. MATERIALS AND METHODS This prospective study was conducted for 6 months in 175 patients with varied infections. The presumptive identification of Bacteroides fragilis was confirmed and Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Broth disc method described by Kurynski & Co-workers. Resistant strains confirmed by short sequencing by NCBI Blast. RESULTS Bacteroides fragilis was isolated from 32 of 175 samples with a prevalence of 18.3%. Out of this 32 samples, only one organism revealed resistance to Metronidazole. CONCLUSION The prevalence of Bacteroides fragilis resistant to metronidazole was isolated in post-operative wound infections giving a warning signal to the clinicians on emerging Metronidazole resistance on nosocomial infections in this hospital.

  2. Multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis group on the rise in Europe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, G N; Sóki, J; Nagy, E;

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of multidrug-resistance (MDR) in a strain of Bacteroides fragilis from a blood culture and abdominal fluid in a Danish patient. The patient had not been travelling for several years and had not received antibiotics prior to the present case. We also summarize the cases that have...... been reported to date of MDR B. fragilis group in Europe. As far as we know, a case like this with MDR B. fragilis has not been described in Scandinavia before....

  3. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of Bacteroides fragilis group isolated from stool samples in North Lebanon

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    Mariam Yehya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifty one strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group were isolated from 45 fecal samples. Classical phenotypic identification showed that 16 isolates were B. thetaiotaomicron, 12 B. uniformis, 9 B. eggerthii,7 B. vulgatus,3 B. caccae,2 Parabacteroides distasonis with 1 identified B. ovatus and 1 B. fragilis. The 51 strains were tested for susceptibility against 16 antimicrobial agents and the MICs for metronidazole were determined. The tests showed that imipenem, meropenem and chloram-phenicol were the most effective antibiotics (98%, 98% and 92.16% of susceptibility, respectively followed by ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, piperacillin/tazobactam, rifampin (88.24% susceptibility, moxifloxacin 86.27% and tigecycline 84.31%. Ofloxacin and cefotaxime were the least effective antibiotics with 27.45% and 0% of activity respectively. Only six of the 51 isolated strains were resistant to metronidazole with MICs = 64 mg/L (1 strain and > 256 mg/L (5 strains.

  4. An assessment of Bacteroides fragilis group organisms as indicators of human faecal pollution.

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    Allsop, K; Stickler, D J

    1985-01-01

    Membrane filtration techniques were used to enumerate Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) organisms and Escherichia coli in a variety of natural waters, the influents and effluents from three types of sewage treatment plants and faeces of various animals. The results suggest that BFG organisms die off more rapidly than E. coli in water and that animal faeces are not a significant source of BFG. It is suggested that the ratio of BFG to E. coli in water may be used to indicate the proximity of a source of human faecal contamination.

  5. The enumeration of Bacteroides fragilis group organisms from sewage and natural waters.

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    Allsop, K; Stickler, D J

    1984-02-01

    A membrane filtration technique has been developed for the enumeration of Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) organisms from sewage and natural waters. The method uses the agar medium of Wilkins and Chalgren supplemented with gentamicin, penicillin, aesculin and ferric ammonium citrate. Membrane filters with 0.22 micron pores were significantly more efficient than those with 0.45 micron pores in the isolation of BFG. A preliminary incubation period of 4 h at 30 degrees C prior to 44 h at 37 degrees C yielded significantly higher numbers of BFG than direct incubation at 37 degrees C for 48 h.

  6. Lactate dehydrogenase activity in Bacteroides fragilis group strains with induced resistance to metronidazole.

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    Presečki Stanko, Aleksandra; Sóki, Jozsef; Varda Brkić, Dijana; Plečko, Vanda

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to induce in vitro metronidazole resistance in nim-negative Bacteroides fragilis group strains and to determine the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity of the induced strains. A collection of B. fragilis group strains were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for metronidazole were determined by the agar dilution technique. The presence of nim genes was screened by PCR. A sample of 52 nim-negative metronidazole-susceptible strains were selected at random and were exposed to metronidazole in the resistance induction experiment. LDH activity was measured by spectrophotometry. Of the 52 selected strains, 12 (23.1%) acquired resistance to metronidazole. MICs ranged from 8mg/L to 96mg/L. Eight of the twelve induced strains displayed decreased LDH activity, whilst only one expressed a significant increase in LDH activity with LDH values of 49.1U/mg and 222.0U/mg, respectively. In conclusion, in vitro induction of metronidazole resistance could be selected in nim-negative B. fragilis group strains. A statistically significant decrease in LDH activity was in contrast to previous findings in which, underlying higher metronidazole MICs, an increase in LDH activity compensated for the decreased activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). These findings could be explained if the induction caused only physiological and not genetic changes. We believe that genetic mutations in the B. fragilis strain that demonstrated an emergent increase in LDH activity were responsible for the increased activity. PMID:27436459

  7. Effect of clavulanic acid on the activities of ten beta-lactam agents against members of the Bacteroides fragilis group.

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    Lamothe, F; Auger, F; Lacroix, J M

    1984-01-01

    Clavulanic acid reduced the MICs of amoxicillin, carbencillin , cefamandole, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftizoxime, cephalothin, and penicillin G, but not of cefoxitin or moxalactam, against 77 isolates of the Bacteroides fragilis group, all rapidly beta-lactamase positive by the nitrocefin slide test. It had no effect on the susceptibilities of eight Bacteroides distasonis strains that were slowly beta-lactamase positive (18 h of incubation). PMID:6732233

  8. Heterogeneity in resistant fecal Bacteroides fragilis group collected from healthy people.

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    Narimani, T; Douraghi, M; Owlia, P; Rastegar, A; Esghaei, M; Nasr, B; Talebi, M

    2016-06-01

    Normal nonpathogenic flora would represent a constant lake of resistance genes potentially transferable to human pathogens. To assess the prevalence of resistance genes and genetic variability of Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) from normal flora, 177 Bacteroides isolates obtained from the fecal samples of healthy individuals. These isolates were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The isolates were further tested for the presence of ermF, tetQ and bft genes by PCR. Our results indicated the presence of different clonal strains (1 common type and 57 single types) among the resistant isolates. The resistance rate for the six antibiotics in this study was between 1% and 95%. Most of the isolates (99%) were susceptible to metronidazole. ermF and tetQ were detected in all erythromycin and tetracycline resistant isolates. None of the isolates were carried bft gene. These data suggest dissemination of heterogenic clonal groups in healthy persons and resistance to 5 high commonly used antibiotics.

  9. Tetracycline transport in Bacteroides fragilis.

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    Fayolle, F; Privitera, G; Sebald, M

    1980-01-01

    In susceptible strain of Bacteroides fragilis, tetracycline uptake is biphasic. The initial phase is independent of adenosine 5'-triphosphate synthesis, which is coupled to fumarate reduction; this phase is not altered by expression of tetracycline resistance genes in a resistant strain. The second phase appears to occur by active transport, since it is largely reduced by rotenone, an inhibitor of electron transport to fumarate; moreover, this phase is under negative control of the tetracycli...

  10. Evaluation of a direct fluorescent antibody staining method for rapid identification of members of the bacteroides fragilis group.

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    DeGirolami, P C; Mepani, C P

    1981-07-01

    A direct fluorescent antibody test kit (Fluorotec-F, Pfizer Inc., New York, New York) designed for rapid identification of members of the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) was evaluated. Tested were 228 clinical specimens (144 direct smears of clinical material, 14 smears of positive blood cultures, and 70 smears of colonies isolated from clinical material) and 49 reference strains of anaerobic bacteria, including 23 members of the BFG. Fluorotec-F detected 68 of 69 (98.5%) members of the BFG, including 55 B. fragilis, 12 B. thetaiotaomicron, and two B. ovatus, identified by cultural methods in all clinical specimens. Three specimens that yielded B. uniformis also fluoresced. Three specimens fluoresced but failed to yield members of the BFG or B. uniformis on culture. Of the 49 reference strains tested, all strains of B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, nd B. uniformis tested were detected by Fluorotec-F, but only five of a total of 14B. vulgatus, B. distasonis, and B. ovatus tested fluoresced. Of the 25 reference strains of anaerobic bacteria not belonging to the BFG, none fluoresced except for two strains of B. eggerthii. Direct fluorescent antibody staining of smears of clinical specimens suitable for anaerobic culture is a valuable tool for rapid detection of B. fragilis infections.

  11. Activities of New Antimicrobial Agents (Trovafloxacin, Moxifloxacin, Sanfetrinem, and Quinupristin-Dalfopristin) against Bacteroides fragilis Group: Comparison with the Activities of 14 Other Agents

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    Betriu, Carmen; Gómez, María; Palau, M. Luisa; Sánchez, Ana; Picazo, Juan J.

    1999-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of trovafloxacin, moxifloxacin, sanfetrinem, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and 14 other antimicrobial agents against 218 Bacteroides fragilis group strains were determined. A group of 10 imipenem-resistant strains were also tested. Imipenem, meropenem, and sanfetrinem had the lowest MICs of all of the β-lactams. Quinupristin-dalfopristin inhibited all of the strains at 2 μg/ml. Overall, the MICs of trovafloxacin and moxifloxacin for 90% of the strains tested were 1 a...

  12. [Use of reactions with Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) to determine biological activity of lipopolysaccharides from reference and clinical strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group].

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    Rokosz, Alicja; Fiejka, Maria; Górska, Paulina; Aleksandrowicz, Janina; Meisel-Mikołajczyk, Felicja; Łuczak, MirosŁaw

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and compare a biological activity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from reference and clinical strains of strictly anaerobic bacteria belonging to the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) by means of quantitative, photometric BET (LAL) method with Limulus polyphemus amoebocyte lysate and chromogenic substrate S-2423. Lipopolysaccharides of five BFG species were extracted by Westphal and Jann method (1965) from eight reference and two clinical strains of B. fragilis group. Crude LPS preparations were purified according to the procedure described by Gmeiner (1975) with ultracentrifugation and nuclease treatment. Biological activities of bacterial endotoxins were determined by quantitative BET method with chromogenic substrate S-2423 (ENDOCHROME kit, Charles River Endosafe Ltd., USA). Tests were performed according to the producer's recommendations. E. coli O55:B5 LPS was applied to compare its activity in reaction with LAL reagent with activities of LPS preparations from rods of the Bacteroides genus. Among examined bacterial compounds the most active in BET method was E. coli O55:B5 LPS. Activities of lipopolysaccharides from five species of BFG rods in reaction with Limulus amoebocyte lysate were differentiated. Greater ability to activate LAL proenzyme revealed lipopolysaccharides of these species of the Bacteroides genus, which are important from the clinical point of view--B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron.

  13. [Selected properties of Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxigenic strains].

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    Rokosz, A; Meisel-Mikołajczyk, F

    1995-01-01

    Seven B. fragilis strains were examined. One strain was reference, non-enterotoxigenic, representing serotype E2 according to Beerens et al. (1971). Six strains produced enterotoxin (ETBF). Four of them were isolated from human feces and two of them from swine feces. All strains were investigated morphologically, biochemically (ATB Expression, France) and by means of direct immunofluorescence (Bacteroides--IF test, Poland). Their resistance to chemotherapeutics was tested (ATB Expression, France). The MIC values of clindamycin and metronidazole were determined using E test strips (AB Biodisk, Sweden). Each strain formed capsules. The percentage of encapsulated cells was high (80-100%). Some strains produced thick capsules. Biochemical patterns were similar and typical for B. fragilis rods. One enterotoxigenic strain produced gelatinase and three ETBF strains fermented trehalose. All strains reacted in direct immunofluorescence exclusively with conjugate against serotype E of BFG. Thus, each strain showed antigenic pattern E. Drug susceptibility of all strains was similar. One enterotoxigenic strain was resistant to clindamycin. All strains were susceptible to metronidazole. These studies indicate that on the basis of morphological, biochemical and serological features (IF), enterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains cannot be distinguished from the nonenterotoxigenic one. Also, the correlation between toxigenicity and drug sensitivity of the examined strains is not observed.

  14. Detection of Bacteroides fragilis endotoxin in amniotic fluid by counterimmunoelectrophoresis

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    I. Beckmann (Ilse); K. de Graaff (K.); F. Meisel-Mikolajczyk; H.C.S. Wallenburg (Henk)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe ability of counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) to detectBacteroides fragilis endotoxin in amniotic fluid in small concentrations was evaluated. A method was developed which, in combination with ultrafiltration, permits detection ofB. fragilis endotoxin in amniotic fluid in a concentr

  15. Distribution, detection of enterotoxigenic strains and antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns of Bacteroides fragilis group in diarrheic and non-diarrheic feces from Brazilian infants

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    Débora Paula Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of gastrointestinal diseases and their global distribution, affecting millions of individuals around the world, the role and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria such as those in the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG are still unclear in young children. This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of species in the BFG and enterotoxigenic strains in the fecal microbiota of children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Diarrheic (n=110 and non-diarrheic (n=65 fecal samples from children aged 0-5 years old were evaluated. BFG strains were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. Alternatively, bacteria and enterotoxigenic strains were detected directly from feces by molecular biology. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar dilution method according to the guidelines for isolated bacteria. BFG was detected in 64.3% of the fecal samples (55% diarrheic and 80.4% non-diarrheic, and 4.6% were enterotoxigenic. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, ceftriaxone, clindamycin and chloramphenicol. The data show that these bacteria are prevalent in fecal microbiota at higher levels in healthy children. The molecular methodology was more effective in identifying the B. fragilis group when compared to the biochemical and physiological techniques. The observation of high resistance levels stimulates thoughts about the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs in early infancy. Further quantitative studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the role of these bacteria in acute diarrhea in children.

  16. Distribution, detection of enterotoxigenic strains and antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns of bacteroides fragilis group in diarrheic and non-diarrheic feces from brazilian infants.

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    Ferreira, Débora Paula; Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Guimarães, Danielle Aparecida; Coelho, Cíntia Marques; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Farias, Luiz Macêdo; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Diniz, Claudio Galuppo

    2010-07-01

    Despite the importance of gastrointestinal diseases and their global distribution, affecting millions of individuals around the world, the role and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria such as those in the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) are still unclear in young children. This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of species in the BFG and enterotoxigenic strains in the fecal microbiota of children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Diarrheic (n=110) and non-diarrheic (n=65) fecal samples from children aged 0-5 years old were evaluated. BFG strains were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. Alternatively, bacteria and enterotoxigenic strains were detected directly from feces by molecular biology. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar dilution method according to the guidelines for isolated bacteria. BFG was detected in 64.3% of the fecal samples (55% diarrheic and 80.4% non-diarrheic), and 4.6% were enterotoxigenic. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, ceftriaxone, clindamycin and chloramphenicol. The data show that these bacteria are prevalent in fecal microbiota at higher levels in healthy children. The molecular methodology was more effective in identifying the B. fragilis group when compared to the biochemical and physiological techniques. The observation of high resistance levels stimulates thoughts about the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs in early infancy. Further quantitative studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the role of these bacteria in acute diarrhea in children.

  17. Bacteroides fragilis aortic arch pseudoaneurysm: case report with review

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    Yang Yu-Jen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of 58-year-old woman with underlying diabetes mellitus, hepatitis C virus-related liver cirrhosis, and total hysterectomy for uterine myoma 11 moths ago, who was diagnosed ruptured aortic arch mycotic pseudoaneurysm after a certain period of survey for her unknown fever cause. After emergent surgery with prosthetic graft interposition, all her blood cultures and tissue cultures revealed pathogen with Bacteroides fragilis. Although mycotic aneurysms have been well described in literatures, an aneurysm infected solely with Bacteroides fragilis is unusual, with only eight similar cases in the literature. Here we reported the only female case with her specific clinical and management course and summarized all reported cases of mycotic aneurysm caused by Bacteroides fragilis to clarify their conditions and treatments, alert the difficulty in diagnosis, and importance of highly suspicious.

  18. Prevalence of Fragilysin Gene in Bacteroides fragilis Isolates from Blood and Other Extraintestinal Samples

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    Foulon, Ina; Piérard, Denis; Muyldermans, Gaëtan; Vandoorslaer, Kristof; Soetens, Oriane; Rosseel, Paul; Lauwers, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    Of 166 Bacteroides fragilis isolates, 26.2% of 103 isolates from blood and 20.6% of 63 extraintestinal isolates harbored the fragilysin gene (difference not statistically significant). Clinical characteristics and evolution were comparable in patients with B. fragilis bacteremia with or without this enterotoxin. Fragilysin seems not to be an important virulence factor in B. fragilis disease.

  19. Detection of non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in stool samples from children in São Paulo, Brazil Detecção de Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxigênicos e não enterotoxigênicos de amostras fecais de crianças em São Paulo, Brasil

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    Flávio Krzyzanowsky; Avila-Campos, Mario J.

    2003-01-01

    Non-enterotoxigenic bacteria of the Bacteroides fragilis group and enterotoxigenic B. fragilis were identified from children with and without aqueous acute diarrhea. In this study, 170 stool samples from 96 children with and 74 without diarrhea were analyzed. Enterotoxin production and the toxin gene detection were detected by cytotoxicity assay on HT-29/C1 cells and by PCR, respectively. B. fragilis species was prevalent in both groups and enterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains were isolated fr...

  20. Exploratory Investigation of Bacteroides fragilis Transcriptional Response during In vitro Exposure to Subinhibitory Concentration of Metronidazole

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    de Freitas, Michele C. R.; Resende, Juliana A.; Ferreira-Machado, Alessandra B.; Saji, Guadalupe D. R. Q.; de Vasconcelos, Ana T. R.; da Silva, Vânia L.; Nicolás, Marisa F.; Diniz, Cláudio G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, member from commensal gut microbiota, is an important pathogen associated to endogenous infections and metronidazole remains a valuable antibiotic for the treatment of these infections, although bacterial resistance is widely reported. Considering the need of a better understanding on the global mechanisms by which B. fragilis survive upon metronidazole exposure, we performed a RNA-seq transcriptomic approach with validation of gene expression results by qPCR. Bacteria strains were selected after in vitro subcultures with subinhibitory concentration (SIC) of the drug. From a wild type B. fragilis ATCC 43859 four derivative strains were selected: first and fourth subcultures under metronidazole exposure and first and fourth subcultures after drug removal. According to global gene expression analysis, 2,146 protein coding genes were identified, of which a total of 1,618 (77%) were assigned to a Gene Ontology term (GO), indicating that most known cellular functions were taken. Among these 2,146 protein coding genes, 377 were shared among all strains, suggesting that they are critical for B. fragilis survival. In order to identify distinct expression patterns, we also performed a K-means clustering analysis set to 15 groups. This analysis allowed us to detect the major activated or repressed genes encoding for enzymes which act in several metabolic pathways involved in metronidazole response such as drug activation, defense mechanisms against superoxide ions, high expression level of multidrug efflux pumps, and DNA repair. The strains collected after metronidazole removal were functionally more similar to those cultured under drug pressure, reinforcing that drug-exposure lead to drastic persistent changes in the B. fragilis gene expression patterns. These results may help to elucidate B. fragilis response during metronidazole exposure, mainly at SIC, contributing with information about bacterial survival strategies under stress conditions in their

  1. [Tigecycline: CMI 50/90 towards 1766 Gram-negative bacilli (3rd generation cephalosporins resistant enterobacteriaceae), Acinetobacter baumannii and Bacteroides fragilis group, University Hospital - Montpellier, 2008-2011].

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    Froment Gomis, P; Jean-Pierre, H; Rousseau-Didelot, M-N; Compan, B; Michon, A-L; Godreuil, S

    2013-12-01

    Tigecycline is a new glycylcyclin with a wide spectre including multi-resistant bacteria. Our laboratory tests in routine the in vitro activity of the TGC towards clinically significant isolates of 3rd generation cephalosporins resistant enterobacteriaceae (EC3R), Acinetobacter baumannii and Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG). The objective of this study is to describe the in vitro activity of TGC against these strains isolated between 2008 and 2011 in the university hospital of Montpellier. In this study period, 1070 isolates EC3R including 541 extended spectrum β-lactamase-producers (ESBL) strains, 47 isolates of A. baumannii including 40 multi-resistant isolates and 645 isolates of BFG were tested. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined using the E-test method. TGC was active against 86.2% of EC3R with a MIC 90 less or equal to 1mg/L (Escherichia coli being the most sensitive species). A. baumannii and BFG were also inhibited at low concentrations of TGC with a MIC 90 less or equal to 2mg/L respectively for 47% and 84.2% of the isolates. Our study confirms the activity of TGC against the EC3R including ESBL-producers strains. The relevance of the therapeutic use of TGC on the BFG isolates with a MIC greater than 2mg/L should be better documented. Often prescribed in therapeutic impasse, the proper use of TGC would require: clarifying the threshold of sensitivity for some species (i.e., A. baumannii, Bacteroides fragilis group); a better understanding of correlation between in vitro and in vivo activity.

  2. Immunochemical and Biological Characterization of Three Capsular Polysaccharides from a Single Bacteroides fragilis Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Wiltrud M Kalka-Moll; Wang, Ying(School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100, PR China); Comstock, L. E.; Gonzalez, Sylvia E.; Tzianabos, Arthur O.; Dennis L Kasper

    2001-01-01

    Although Bacteroides fragilis accounts for only 0.5% of the normal human colonic flora, it is the anaerobic species most frequently isolated from intra-abdominal and other infections with an intestinal source. The capsular polysaccharides of B. fragilis are part of a complex of surface polysaccharides and are the organism's most important virulence factors in the formation of intra-abdominal abscesses. Two capsular polysaccharides from strain NCTC 9343, PS A1 and PS B1, have been characterize...

  3. Augmentation of the in vitro activity of azlocillin against Bacteroides fragilis by clavulanic acid.

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    Bansal, M B; Chuah, S K; Thadepalli, H

    1984-01-01

    Azlocillin was active against 90% of 154 strains of Bacteroides fragilis at a concentration of 64 micrograms/ml. Twenty-eight strains of B. fragilis with an azlocillin MIC of greater than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml were retested with a combination of azlocillin plus clavulanic acid. Of these strains, 71% showed a 4- to 32-fold decrease in the MIC of azlocillin plus clavulanic acid. PMID:6517552

  4. Evidence for T Cell-dependent Immunity to Bacteroides fragilis in an Intraabdominal Abscess Model

    OpenAIRE

    Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Markham, Richard B.; Zaleznik, Dori F.; Cisneros, Ronald L.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that active immunization of rats with the capsular polysaccharide of Bacteroides fragilis protects these animals against abscess development following intraperitoneal challenge with this species. Passive transfer of hyperimmune globulin from immunized animals to nonimmune recipients provided protection against B. fragilis bacteremia in challenged animals, but did not confer protection against abscess development. On the other hand, adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immu...

  5. The effect of environmental conditions on expression of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron C10 protease genes

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    Thornton Roibeard F

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are members of the normal human intestinal microbiota. However, both organisms are capable of causing opportunistic infections, during which the environmental conditions to which the bacteria are exposed change dramatically. To further explore their potential for contributing to infection, we have characterized the expression in B. thetaiotaomicron of four homologues of the gene encoding the C10 cysteine protease SpeB, a potent extracellular virulence factor produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Results We identified a paralogous set of genes (btp genes in the B. thetaiotaomicron genome, that were related to C10 protease genes we recently identified in B. fragilis. Similar to C10 proteases found in B. fragilis, three of the B. thetaiotaomicron homologues were transcriptionally coupled to genes encoding small proteins that are similar in structural architecture to Staphostatins, protease inhibitors associated with Staphopains in Staphylococcus aureus. The expression of genes for these C10 proteases in both B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron was found to be regulated by environmental stimuli, in particular by exposure to oxygen, which may be important for their contribution to the development of opportunistic infections. Conclusions Genes encoding C10 proteases are increasingly identified in operons which also contain genes encoding proteins homologous to protease inhibitors. The Bacteroides C10 protease gene expression levels are responsive to different environmental stimuli suggesting they may have distinct roles in the bacterial-host interaction.

  6. Bacteroides fragilis induce necrosis on mice peritoneal macrophages: In vitro and in vivo assays

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    Vieira, J.M.B.D., E-mail: jmanya@terra.com.br [Laboratorio de Tecnologia em Cultura de Celulas, UEZO, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biologia de Anaerobios, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Seabra, S.H. [Laboratorio de Tecnologia em Cultura de Celulas, UEZO, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Vallim, D.C. [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Americo, M.A.; Fracallanza, S.E.L. [Laboratorio de Bacteriologia Medica, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Vommaro, R.C. [Laboratorio de Ultra-estrutura Celular Hertha Meyer, IBCCF, UFRJ (Brazil); Domingues, R.M.C.P. [Laboratorio de Biologia de Anaerobios, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2009-10-02

    Bacteroides fragilis is an anaerobic bacteria component of human intestinal microbiota and agent of infections. In the host B. fragilis interacts with macrophages, which produces toxic radicals like NO. The interaction of activated mice peritoneal macrophages with four strains of B. fragilis was evaluated on this study. Previously was shown that such strains could cause metabolic and morphologic alterations related to macrophage death. In this work propidium iodide staining showed the strains inducing macrophage necrosis in that the labeling was evident. Besides nitroblue tetrazolium test showed that B. fragilis stimulates macrophage to produce oxygen radicals. In vivo assays performed in BalbC mice have results similar to those for in vitro tests as well as scanning electron microscopy, which showed the same surface pore-like structures observed in vitro before. The results revealed that B. fragilis strains studied lead to macrophage death by a process similar to necrosis.

  7. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

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    Cristian Merchan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin.

  8. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

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    Parajuli, Sunita; Siegfried, Justin; Dubrovskaya, Yanina; Rahimian, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin. PMID:27418986

  9. Genome sequence of the Bacteroides fragilis phage ATCC 51477-B1

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins Shawn A; Layton Alice C; Ripp Steven; Williams Dan; Sayler Gary S

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The genome of a fecal pollution indicator phage, Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 51477-B1, was sequenced and consisted of 44,929 bases with a G+C content of 38.7%. Forty-six putative open reading frames were identified and genes were organized into functional clusters for host specificity, lysis, replication and regulation, and packaging and structural proteins.

  10. Genome sequence of the Bacteroides fragilis phage ATCC 51477-B1

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, Shawn A; Layton, Alice C.; Ripp, Steven; Williams, Dan; Sayler, Gary S.

    2008-01-01

    The genome of a fecal pollution indicator phage, Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 51477-B1, was sequenced and consisted of 44,929 bases with a G+C content of 38.7%. Forty-six putative open reading frames were identified and genes were organized into functional clusters for host specificity, lysis, replication and regulation, and packaging and structural proteins.

  11. A proteomic approach towards understanding the cross talk between Bacteroides fragilis and Bifidobacterium longum in coculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Covián, David; Sánchez, Borja; Martínez, Noelia; Cuesta, Isabel; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of the interactions among intestinal microbes is needed to decipher the complex cross talk that takes place within the human gut. Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium genera are among the most relevant intestinal bacteria, and it has been previously reported that coculturing of these 2 microorganisms affects their survival. Therefore, coculturing of Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bacteroides fragilis DSMZ2151 was performed with the aim of unravelling the mechanisms involved in their interaction. To this end, we applied proteomic (2D-DIGE) analyses, and by chromatographic techniques we quantified the bacterial metabolites produced during coincubation. Coculture stimulated the growth of B. longum, retarding that of B. fragilis, with concomitant changes in the production of some proteins and metabolites of both bacteria. The combined culture promoted upregulation of the bifidobacterial pyruvate kinase and downregulation of the Bacteroides phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase - 2 enzymes involved in the catabolism of carbohydrates. Moreover, B. fragilis FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, a protein with chaperone-like activity, was found to be overproduced in coculture, suggesting the induction of a stress response in this microorganism. This study provides mechanistic data to deepen our understanding of the interaction between Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium intestinal populations. PMID:27156738

  12. Population structure and distribution of virulence-related genes of Bacteroides fragilis isolates from Korea and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwan Soo; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Lee, Kyungwon; Kook, Yoon-Hoh

    2009-07-01

    Sequences for rpoB, gyrB, pdiA, and ompA were determined from 63 Bacteroides fragilis isolates, which were from Korea and Japan and include 4 reference strains. All 4 gene sequences supported clear separation of the cfi(+) group from the cfi(-) group. Combined sequences of the 60 division I isolates (cfi(-)) produced 45 different clones. Apparent discordance of gene trees, index of association, maximum likelihood test, and homoplasy ratio all supported a high frequency of recombination. There was no association between the presence of virulence-related genes and phylogenetic clustering in any gene tree.

  13. Cephamycin inactivation due to enzymatic hydrolysis by beta-lactamase from Bacteroides fragilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Yotsuji, A; Minami, S; Kakizawa, H; Yasuda, T; Takai, A.; Saikawa, I; Inoue, M.; Mitsuhashi, S

    1985-01-01

    The susceptibility of 53 clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis to cephamycins was examined. Judging from the MICs for 50% of the strains tested, moxalactam was the most active, however, judging from the MICs for 90% of the strains tested, cefbuperazone was more effective than moxalactam. A correlation was observed between in vitro activity of benzylpenicillin and cephaloridine and beta-lactamase production. Inactivation due to enzymatic hydrolysis of cephamycins over a short time was not ...

  14. Stability in Escherichia coli of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from Bacteroides fragilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rashtchian, A; Booth, S J

    1981-01-01

    A Bacteroides fragilis strain resistant to penicillin G, tetracycline, and clindamycin was screened for the presence of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Agarose gel electrophoresis of ethanol-precipitated DNA from cleared lysates of this strain revealed two plasmid DNA bands. The molecular weights of the plasmids were estimated by their relative mobility in agarose gel and compared with standard plasmids with known molecular weights. The molecular weights were 3.40 +/- 0.20 x 10(6) and 1....

  15. Genome sequence of the Bacteroides fragilis phage ATCC 51477-B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkins Shawn A

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genome of a fecal pollution indicator phage, Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 51477-B1, was sequenced and consisted of 44,929 bases with a G+C content of 38.7%. Forty-six putative open reading frames were identified and genes were organized into functional clusters for host specificity, lysis, replication and regulation, and packaging and structural proteins.

  16. A novel strain of Bacteroides fragilis enhances phagocytosis and polarises M1 macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huimin; Li, Zhengchao; Tan, Yafang; Guo, Zhaobiao; Liu, Yangyang; Wang, Ye; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Ruifu; Bi, Yujing; Bai, Yang; Zhi, Fachao

    2016-01-01

    Commensal Bacteroides fragilis possesses immune-regulatory characteristics. Consequently, it has been proposed as a potential novel probiotic because of its therapeutic effects on immune imbalance, mental disorders and inflammatory diseases. Macrophages play a central role in the immune response, developing either a classical-M1 or an alternative-M2 phenotype after stimulation with various signals. The interactions between macrophages and B. fragilis, however, remain to be defined. Here, a new isolate of B. fragilis, ZY-312, was shown to possess admirable properties, including tolerance to simulated gastric fluid, intestinal fluid and ox bile, and good safety (MOI = 100, 200) and adherent ability (MOI = 100) to LoVo cells. Isolate ZY-312 cell lysate promoted phagocytosis of fluorescent microspheres and pathogenic bacteria in bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMDM) cells. Gene expression of IL-12, iNOS and IL-1β in BMDM cells was increased after treatment with ZY-312, indicating the induction of M1 macrophages, consistent with enhanced secretion of NO. Cell surface expression of CD80 and CD86 was also increased. This study is the first to demonstrate that B. fragilis enhances the phagocytic functions of macrophages, polarising them to an M1 phenotype. Our findings provide insight into the close relationship between B. fragilis and the innate immune system. PMID:27381366

  17. Differential proteomic analysis of outer membrane enriched extracts of Bacteroides fragilis grown under bile salts stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boente, Renata F; Pauer, Heidi; Silva, Deborah N S; Filho, Joaquim Santos; Sandim, Vanessa; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Ferreira, Rosana Barreto Rocha; Zingali, Russolina B; Domingues, Regina M C P; Lobo, Leandro A

    2016-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated anaerobic bacteria from infectious processes. Several virulence traits contribute to the pathogenic nature of this bacterium, including the ability to tolerate the high concentrations of bile found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The activity of bile salts is similar to detergents and may lead to membrane permeabilization and cell death. Modulation of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is considered a crucial event to bile salts resistance. The primary objective of the current work was to identify B. fragilis proteins associated with the stress induced by high concentration of bile salts. The outer membrane of B. fragilis strain 638R was isolated after growth either in the presence of 2% conjugated bile salts or without bile salts. The membrane fractions were separated on SDS-PAGE and analyzed by ESI-Q/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 37 proteins were identified; among them nine were found to be expressed exclusively in the absence of bile salts whereas eight proteins were expressed only in the presence of bile salts. These proteins are related to cellular functions such as transport through membrane, nutrient uptake, and protein-protein interactions. This study demonstrates the alteration of OMPs composition in B. fragilis during bile salts stress resistance and adaptation to environmental changes. Proteomics of OMPs was also shown to be a useful approach in the identification of new targets for functional analyses. PMID:26948242

  18. The dissemination of C10 cysteine protease genes in Bacteroides fragilis by mobile genetic elements

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thornton, Roibeard F

    2010-04-23

    Abstract Background The C10 family of cysteine proteases includes enzymes that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens, such as SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes. The presence of homologues of cysteine protease genes in human commensal organisms has not been examined. Bacteroides fragilis is a member of the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum of the human intestinal microbiota, and is a significant opportunistic pathogen. Results Four homologues of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB were identified in the B. fragilis genome. These four protease genes, two were directly contiguous to open reading frames predicted to encode staphostatin-like inhibitors, with which the protease genes were co-transcribed. Two of these protease genes are unique to B. fragilis 638R and are associated with two large genomic insertions. Gene annotation indicated that one of these insertions was a conjugative Tn-like element and the other was a prophage-like element, which was shown to be capable of excision. Homologues of the B. fragilis C10 protease genes were present in a panel of clinical isolates, and in DNA extracted from normal human faecal microbiota. Conclusions This study suggests a mechanism for the evolution and dissemination of an important class of protease in major members of the normal human microbiota.

  19. The dissemination of C10 cysteine protease genes in Bacteroides fragilis by mobile genetic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagawa Todd F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C10 family of cysteine proteases includes enzymes that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens, such as SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes. The presence of homologues of cysteine protease genes in human commensal organisms has not been examined. Bacteroides fragilis is a member of the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum of the human intestinal microbiota, and is a significant opportunistic pathogen. Results Four homologues of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB were identified in the B. fragilis genome. These four protease genes, two were directly contiguous to open reading frames predicted to encode staphostatin-like inhibitors, with which the protease genes were co-transcribed. Two of these protease genes are unique to B. fragilis 638R and are associated with two large genomic insertions. Gene annotation indicated that one of these insertions was a conjugative Tn-like element and the other was a prophage-like element, which was shown to be capable of excision. Homologues of the B. fragilis C10 protease genes were present in a panel of clinical isolates, and in DNA extracted from normal human faecal microbiota. Conclusions This study suggests a mechanism for the evolution and dissemination of an important class of protease in major members of the normal human microbiota.

  20. Enterotoxigenic and non-enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis from fecal microbiota of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF is an important part of the human and animal intestinal microbiota and is commonly associated with diarrhea. ETBF strains produce an enterotoxin encoded by the bft gene located in the B. fragilispathogenicity island (BfPAI. Non-enterotoxigenic B. fragilis(NTBF strains lack the BfPAI and usually show two different genetic patterns, II and III, based on the absence or presence of a BfPAI-flanking region, respectively. The incidence of ETBF and NTBF strains in fecal samples isolated from children without acute diarrhea or any other intestinal disorders was determined. All 84 fecal samples evaluated were B. fragilis-positive by PCR, four of them harbored the bft gene, 27 contained the NTBF pattern III DNA sequence, and 52 were considered to be NTBF pattern II samples. One sample was positive for both ETBF and NTBF pattern III DNA sequences. All 19 B. fragilis strains isolated by the culture method were bft-negative, 9 belonged to pattern III and 10 to pattern II. We present an updated overview of the ETBF and NTBF incidence in the fecal microbiota of children from Sao Paulo City, Brazil.

  1. Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant clinical Bacteroides fragilis isolates by whole genome shotgun sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Sóki, József; Hasman, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis constitutes the most frequent anaerobic bacterium causing bacteremia in humans. The genetic background for antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis is diverse with some genes requiring insertion sequence (IS) elements inserted upstream for increased expression. To evaluate whole...... genetic data will most likely require complete or nearly complete genomes. Current approaches to this are laborious and/or costly. Emerging technologies such as nanopore based single DNA strand sensing could perhaps provide a solution in the future....

  2. Tetracycline-inducible transfer of tetracycline resistance in Bacteroides fragilis in the absence of detectable plasmid DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Rashtchian, A; Dubes, G R; Booth, S J

    1982-01-01

    Tetracycline resistance of three Bacteroides fragilis strains was shown to be inducible by subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline. Tetracycline resistance markers could be transferred to another B. fragilis strain by filter mating. The transferability was inducible by subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline and did not take place in the absence of tetracycline. The optimum concentration of tetracycline for induction of transfer was about 2 microgram/ml. The transfer was shown to be...

  3. Evaluation of Bacteroides fragilis GB-124 bacteriophages as novel human-associated faecal indicators in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phages infecting human-associated Bacteroides fragilis (GB-124 phages) have been employed in the European Union (EU) to identify human fecal pollution, but their utility for U.S. was unclear. Primary sewage effluent samples were collected seasonally from seven wastewater treatme...

  4. Comparison of standard, quantitative and digital PCR in the detection of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Rachel V.; Pearson, John; Frizelle, Frank A.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2016-01-01

    Gut colonization with enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) appears to be associated with the development of colorectal cancer. However, differences in carriage rates are seen with various testing methods and sampling sites. We compared standard PCR, SYBR green and TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) and digital PCR (dPCR) in detecting the B. fragilis toxin (bft) gene from cultured ETBF, and from matched luminal and faecal stool samples from 19 colorectal cancer patients. Bland-Altman analysis found that all three quantitative methods performed comparably in detecting bft from purified bacterial DNA, with the same limits of detection (<1 copy/μl). However, SYBR qPCR under-performed compared to TaqMan qPCR and dPCR in detecting bft in clinical stool samples; 13/38 samples were reported positive by SYBR, compared to 35 and 36 samples by TaqMan and dPCR, respectively. TaqMan qPCR and dPCR gave bft copy numbers that were 48-fold and 75-fold higher for the same samples than SYBR qPCR, respectively (p < 0.001). For samples that were bft-positive in both fecal and luminal stools, there was no difference in relative abundance between the sites, by any method tested. From our findings, we recommend the use of TaqMan qPCR as the preferred method to detect ETBF from clinical stool samples. PMID:27686415

  5. Characterization of the Primary Starch Utilization Operon in the Obligate Anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis: Regulation by Carbon Source and Oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Spence, Cheryl; Wells, W. Greg; Smith, C. Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Bacteroides fragilis is a commensal organism in the large intestine, where it utilizes both dietary and host-derived polysaccharides as a source of carbon and energy. In this study, a four-gene operon required for starch utilization was identified. The operon also was found to be oxygen responsive and thus was designated osu for oxygen-induced starch utilization. The first three genes in the operon were predicted to encode outer membrane proteins involved in starch ...

  6. Cryptic tetracycline resistance determinant (class F) from Bacteroides fragilis mediates resistance in Escherichia coli by actively reducing tetracycline accumulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, B. H.; Hendricks, M; Malamy, M H; Tally, F P; Levy, S. B.

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli bearing a cryptic tetracycline resistance determinant from Bacteroides fragilis expressed low-level constitutive resistance to tetracycline under aerobic, but not anaerobic, growth conditions and accumulated less tetracycline aerobically than did isogenic susceptible cells. This decreased uptake was energy dependent and reversible by increased concentrations of tetracycline, suggesting a saturable carrier-mediated active efflux mechanism. Decreased uptake was not seen when th...

  7. Twenty-eight divergent polysaccharide loci specifying within and amongst strain capsule diversity in three strains of Bacteroides fragilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick, S.; Blakely, G.W.; Houston, S.;

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of the complete genome sequence of Bacteroides fragilis 638R originally isolated in the USA, was made with two previously sequenced strains isolated in the UK (NCTC 9343) and Japan (YCH46). The presence of 10 loci containing genes associated with polysaccharide biosynthesis, each...... including a putative Wzx flippase and Wzy polymerase, was confirmed in all three strains, despite a lack of cross-reactivity between NCTC 9343 and 638R surface polysaccharide-specific antibodies by immunolabelling and microscopy. Genomic comparisons revealed an exceptional level of polysaccharide...... restriction and modification systems that act to prevent acquisition of foreign DNA. The level of amongst strain diversity in polysaccharide biosynthesis loci is unprecedented....

  8. Effect of the oral intake of yogurt containing Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on the cell numbers of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odamaki, Toshitaka; Sugahara, Hirosuke; Yonezawa, Sumiko; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Tanabe, Soichi; Tominaga, Tomoya; Togashi, Hideo; Benno, Yoshimi; Xiao, Jin-zhong

    2012-02-01

    Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains have been suggested to be associated with acute and persistent diarrheal disease, inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer, although further epidemiological studies are needed for clarification. Here, a pilot study was performed to examine the effect of the oral administration of yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain on the cell numbers of fecal ETBF in a healthy population. Among 420 healthy adults, 38 subjects were found to be ETBF carriers, giving a prevalence of approximately 9%. Among them, 32 subjects were enrolled in an open, randomized, parallel-group study to ingest yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain, Bifidobacterium longum BB536 (BB536Y group), for 8 weeks, with milk provided to the control group (milk group). The cell numbers of ETBF and the dominant species of the B. fragilis group were measured by a quantitative PCR method. Compared with the baseline values, there was a significant decrease in the cell number of ETBF at week 8 in the BB536Y group but not in the milk group. Linear mixed models analysis for longitudinal data revealed a significant difference in the changes of ETBF cell number between the two groups during the intervention phase. These results imply the potential of probiotic yogurt for eliminating ETBF in the microbiota, but its clinical significance needs to be evaluated in the future. This is the first report of a possible effect of probiotic intake on ETBF in the microbiota.

  9. The effect of UV-C radiation (254 nm) on candidate microbial source tracking phages infecting a human-specific strain of Bacteroides fragilis (GB-124).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diston, D; Ebdon, J E; Taylor, H D

    2012-06-01

    The enumeration of phages infecting host-specific strains of Bacteroides has been widely recognised as an effective and low-cost method of microbial source tracking (MST). A recently described human-specific Bacteroides host strain (GB-124) has been shown to detect bacteriophages exclusively in human-impacted waters and is emerging as a useful MST tool. However, a better understanding of the morphology and ecological behaviour of the phages, especially in wastewater disinfection processes, is now required in order to validate their role as MST markers. Bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides fragilis GB-124 (n = 21) were isolated from wastewater effluent and irradiated using laboratory-based UV-C (254 nm) collimated beam experiments. Bacteriophages were found to be both a morphologically and ecologically homogeneous group, with all specimens showing highly similar first order log-linear inactivation profiles (mean fluence required to inactivate phages by 4-log(10) was 36 mJ/cm(2)). These findings present the first evidence that phages infecting GB-124 are inactivated by the levels of UV-C radiation routinely delivered during tertiary wastewater treatment processes. More importantly, comparison with previously published inactivation data suggests that their response to UV-C radiation makes GB-124 phages more suitable surrogates for selected enteric viruses in UV disinfection processes than traditional faecal indicator bacteria or human-specific molecular markers.

  10. Efficient and regioselective synthesis of globotriose by a novel α-galactosidase from Bacteroides fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei; Xu, Li; Gu, Guofeng; Lu, Lili; Xiao, Min

    2016-08-01

    Globotriose (Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc) is an important cell surface epitope that acts as the receptor for Shiga-like toxins, and it is also the core structure of Globo H and SSEA4 that are tumor-associated glycans. Hence, the enzymatic synthesis of globotriose would be necessary for the development of carbohydrate-based therapeutics for bacterial infections and cancers. Here, a novel GH27 α-galactosidase gene (agaBf3S), a 1521-bp DNA encoding 506 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 57.7 kDa, from Bacteroides fragilis NCTC9343 was cloned and heterogeneously expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme AgaBf3S preferentially hydrolyzed p-nitrophenyl-α-D-galactopyranoside (pNPαGal) in all tested nitrophenyl glycosides. It showed maximum activity at pH 4.5 and 40 °C, and it was stable at pH 4.0-11.0 below 40 °C and metal-independent. The K m and k cat values for pNPαGal, melibiose, and globotriose were 1.27 mM and 172.97 S(-1), 62.76 mM and 17.74 S(-1), and 4.62 mM and 388.45 S(-1), respectively. AgaBf3S could transfer galactosyl residue from pNPαGal to lactose (Galβ1-4Glc) with high efficiency and strict α1-4 regioselectivity. The effects of initial substrate concentration, pH, temperature, and reaction time on transglycosylation reaction catalyzed by AgaBf3S were studied in detail. AgaBf3S could synthesize globotriose as a single transglycosylation product with a maximum yield of 32.4 % from 20 mM pNPαGal and 500 mM lactose (pH 4.5) at 40 °C for 30 min. This new one-enzyme one-step synthetic reaction is simple, fast, and low cost, which provides a promising alternative to the current synthetic methods for access to pharmaceutically important Galα1-4-linked oligosaccharides. PMID:27020280

  11. Analysis of the outer membrane proteome and secretome of Bacteroides fragilis reveals a multiplicity of secretion mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena M Wilson

    Full Text Available Bacteroides fragilis is a widely distributed member of the human gut microbiome and an opportunistic pathogen. Cell surface molecules produced by this organism likely play important roles in colonization, communication with other microbes, and pathogenicity, but the protein composition of the outer membrane (OM and the mechanisms used to transport polypeptides into the extracellular space are poorly characterized. Here we used LC-MS/MS to analyze the OM proteome and secretome of B. fragilis NCTC 9343 grown under laboratory conditions. Of the 229 OM proteins that we identified, 108 are predicted to be lipoproteins, and 61 are predicted to be TonB-dependent transporters. Based on their proximity to genes encoding TonB-dependent transporters, many of the lipoprotein genes likely encode proteins involved in nutrient or small molecule uptake. Interestingly, protease accessibility and biotinylation experiments indicated that an unusually large fraction of the lipoproteins are cell-surface exposed. We also identified three proteins that are members of a novel family of autotransporters, multiple potential type I protein secretion systems, and proteins that appear to be components of a type VI secretion apparatus. The secretome consisted of lipoproteins and other proteins that might be substrates of the putative type I or type VI secretion systems. Our proteomic studies show that B. fragilis differs considerably from well-studied Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli in both the spectrum of OM proteins that it produces and the range of secretion strategies that it utilizes.

  12. Characterisation of a multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis isolate recovered from blood of a patient in Denmark using whole-genome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ank, Nina; Sydenham, Thomas V; Iversen, Lene H;

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a patient undergoing extensive abdominal surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy due to primary adenocarcinoma in the sigmoid colon with peritoneal carcinomatosis. During hospitalisation the patient suffered from bacteraemia with a multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fr...... fragilis isolate. Whole-genome sequencing of the isolate resulted in identification of nimE, cfiA and ermF genes corresponding to metronidazole, carbapenem and clindamycin resistance....

  13. Levofloxacin plus metronidazole administered once daily versus moxifloxacin monotherapy against a mixed infection of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Elizabeth D; Hovde, Laurie B; Sprandel, Kelly A; Rodvold, Keith A; Rotschafer, John C

    2005-02-01

    Moxifloxacin has been suggested as an option for monotherapy of intra-abdominal infections. Recent data support the use of a once-daily metronidazole regimen. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of levofloxacin (750 mg every 24 h [q24h]) plus metronidazole (1,500 mg q24h) compared with that of moxifloxacin (400 mg q24h) monotherapy in a mixed-infection model. By using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model in duplicate, Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis were exposed to peak concentrations of 8.5 mg of levofloxacin/liter q24h, 32 mg of metronidazole/liter q24h, and 2 mg for moxifloxacin/liter q24h for 24 h. The activities of levofloxacin, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, and levofloxacin plus metronidazole were evaluated against E. coli, B. fragilis, and E. coli plus B. fragilis. The targeted half-lives of levofloxacin, metronidazole, and moxifloxacin were 8, 8, and 12 h, respectively. Time-kill curves were analyzed for time to 3-log killing, slope, and regrowth. Pre- and postexposure MICs were determined. The preexposure levofloxacin, metronidazole, and moxifloxacin MICs for E. coli and B. fragilis were 0.5 and 1, >64 and 0.5, and 1 and 0.25 mg/liter, respectively. Levofloxacin and moxifloxacin achieved a 3-log killing against E. coli and B. fragilis in all experiments, as did metronidazole against B. fragilis. Metronidazole did not decrease the starting inoculum of E. coli. The area under the concentration-time curve/MIC ratios for E. coli and B. fragilis were 171.7 and 85.9, respectively, for levofloxacin and 26 and 103.9, respectively, for moxifloxacin. Levofloxacin plus metronidazole exhibited the fastest rates of killing. The levofloxacin and moxifloxacin MICs for B. fragilis increased 8- to 16-fold after the organism was exposed to moxifloxacin. No other changes in the postexposure MICs were found. Levofloxacin plus metronidazole administered once daily exhibited activity similar to that of moxifloxacin against the mixed E. coli and B

  14. Determination of thermodynamic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis by metallo-β-lactamase CcrA from Bacteroides fragilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Le; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Ya-Jun [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Yang, Ke-Wu, E-mail: kwyang@nwu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2013-03-20

    Highlights: ► First report the thermokinetic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis with CcrA. ► The hydrolysis is a spontaneous and exothermic reaction with order of 1.4. ► Summarized that CcrA prefer to hydrolyze penicillins among β-lactam antibiotics. - Abstract: One of the most common way that bacteria become resistant to antibiotics is by the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs) to hydrolyze the β-lactam-containing antibiotics. In this paper, the thermodynamic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis with B1 subclasses MβL CcrA (carbapenem and cephamycin resistance) from Bacteroides fragilis were determined by microcalorimetry. The activation free energy ΔG{sub ≠}{sup θ} is 87.90 ± 0.03, 88.99 ± 0.01, 89.93 ± 0.04 and 90.93 ± 0.05 kJ mol{sup −1} at 293.15, 298.15, 303.15 and 308.15 K, activation enthalpy ΔH{sub ≠}{sup θ} is 29.21 ± 0.03 kJ mol{sup −1}, activation entropy ΔS{sub ≠}{sup θ} is −200.34 ± 0.08 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}, the reaction order is 1.4, and the apparent activation energy E is 31.71 kJ mol{sup −1}. The thermodynamic characterization indicated that CcrA prefer to hydrolyze penicillins among three kinds of β-lactam-containing antibiotics.

  15. Levofloxacin plus Metronidazole Administered Once Daily versus Moxifloxacin Monotherapy against a Mixed Infection of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis in an In Vitro Pharmacodynamic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hermsen, Elizabeth D.; Hovde, Laurie B.; Sprandel, Kelly A.; Rodvold, Keith A.; Rotschafer, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Moxifloxacin has been suggested as an option for monotherapy of intra-abdominal infections. Recent data support the use of a once-daily metronidazole regimen. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of levofloxacin (750 mg every 24 h [q24h]) plus metronidazole (1,500 mg q24h) compared with that of moxifloxacin (400 mg q24h) monotherapy in a mixed-infection model. By using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model in duplicate, Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis were exposed t...

  16. Diversity of Bacteroides fragilis Strains in Their Capacity To Recover Phages from Human and Animal Wastes and from Fecally Polluted Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Puig, Anna; Queralt, Nuria; Jofre, Juan; Araujo, Rosa

    1999-01-01

    Great differences in capability to detect bacteriophages from urban sewage of the area of Barcelona existed among 115 strains of Bacteroides fragilis. The capability of six of the strains to detect phages in a variety of feces and wastewater was studied. Strains HSP40 and RYC4023 detected similar numbers of phages in urban sewage and did not detect phages in animal feces. The other four strains detected phages in the feces of different animal species and in wastewater of both human and animal...

  17. In vitro activity of trovafloxacin against Bacteroides fragilis in mixed culture with either Escherichia coli or a vancomycin- resistant strain of Enterococcus faecium determined by an anaerobic time-kill technique.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.E.T. Stearne (Lorna); C. Kooi; W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma); I.C. Gyssens (Inge)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractTo determine the efficacy of trovafloxacin as a possible treatment for intra-abdominal abscesses, we have developed an anaerobic time-kill technique using different inocula to study the in vitro killing of Bacteroides fragilis in pure culture or in mixed cul

  18. Comparative study of the effects of ceftizoxime, piperacillin, and piperacillin-tazobactam concentrations on antibacterial activity and selection of antibiotic-resistant mutants of Enterobacter cloacae and Bacteroides fragilis in vitro and in vivo in mixed-infection abscesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.E.T. Stearne (Lorna); D. van Boxtel (Doret); N. Lemmens; W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); J.W. Mouton (Johan); I.C. Gyssens (Inge)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effects of ceftizoxime (CZX), piperacillin (PIP), and PIP-tazobactam (PT) concentrations on the antibacterial activity and selection of resistant mutants of Bacteroides fragilis and Enterobacter cloacae were investigated in vitro in a mixed-culture anaerobic time-ki

  19. Demonstration of bacteroides capsules by light microscopy and ultrastructural cytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, H; Payne, C M; Ryan, K J

    1983-05-01

    Forty-six anaerobic gram-negative bacilli, including 26 members of the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG), were examined for capsules by the India ink technic. Thirty-five were encapsulated, including all the BFG strains. As a follow-up, seven of these isolates and two previously studied reference strains (B. fragilis ATCC 23745 and Bacteroides vulgatus ATCC 8482) were examined for capsules by ultrastructural cytochemistry. Using the periodic acid thiocarbohydrazide silver proteinate (PATCSP) method of Thiéry, all the BFG examined were encapsulated. In addition to the reference strains, this included one strain of B. fragilis and four of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. One non-BFG strain showed no capsular material. Differences between these results and those reported previously with the ruthenium red technic may reflect species differences in the chemical composition of Bacteroides capsules.

  20. The Dysregulation of Polyamine Metabolism in Colorectal Cancer Is Associated with Overexpression of c-Myc and C/EBPβ rather than Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya V. Snezhkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is well known that the chronic inflammation can promote the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC. Recently, a number of studies revealed a potential association between colorectal inflammation, cancer progression, and infection caused by enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF. Bacterial enterotoxin activates spermine oxidase (SMO, which produces spermidine and H2O2 as byproducts of polyamine catabolism, which, in turn, enhances inflammation and tissue injury. Using qPCR analysis, we estimated the expression of SMOX gene and ETBF colonization in CRC patients. We found no statistically significant associations between them. Then we selected genes involved in polyamine metabolism, metabolic reprogramming, and inflammation regulation and estimated their expression in CRC. We observed overexpression of SMOX, ODC1, SRM, SMS, MTAP, c-Myc, C/EBPβ (CREBP, and other genes. We found that two mediators of metabolic reprogramming, inflammation, and cell proliferation c-Myc and C/EBPβ may serve as regulators of polyamine metabolism genes (SMOX, AZIN1, MTAP, SRM, ODC1, AMD1, and AGMAT as they are overexpressed in tumors, have binding site according to ENCODE ChIP-Seq data, and demonstrate strong coexpression with their targets. Thus, increased polyamine metabolism in CRC could be driven by c-Myc and C/EBPβ rather than ETBF infection.

  1. Preparation and Identification of Polyclonal Antibody Against a Nov-el α-Galactosidase from Bacteroides fragilis%新型α-半乳糖苷酶多克隆抗体的制备及特异性鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李素波; 高红伟; 张雪; 鲍国强; 檀英霞; 王颖丽; 季守平; 宫锋

    2013-01-01

    目的:制备高效价、高特异性的新型α-半乳糖苷酶的兔多抗,并鉴定该抗体的特异性。方法:用脆弱类杆菌来源的基因重组α-半乳糖苷酶(纯度大于90%)免疫新西兰大白兔,获得α-半乳糖苷酶的兔抗血清,并经HiTrap rProtein A柱纯化获得高纯度的抗体;用间接ELISA法检测抗体效价,Western印迹评价抗体的特异性。结果:通过免疫法得到了α-半乳糖苷酶的兔多克隆抗体血清,抗体效价达1∶1×106,经rProtein A柱纯化后获得了高效价、高纯度的抗体,Western印迹显示该抗体特异性地与新型α-半乳糖苷酶结合。结论:获得了新型α-半乳糖苷酶的高效价、高特异性的兔多克隆抗体,可用于血型转变过程中残留α-半乳糖苷酶含量的特异性检测。%Objective: To prepare high titer and high specific rabbit polyclonal antibody against a novel α-galac-tosidase from Bacteroides fragilis. Methods: The New Zealand rabbits were immunized with purified recombinant bacteria α-galactosidase(the purity>90%). Rabbit sera were purified by HiTrap rProtein A column, and its titer and specificity were detected by ELISA and Western blotting respectively Results: The purity of antibody protein was about 95%. And the titer of rabbit sera were 1∶1 × 106. Western blotting showed that the antibody reacted with α-galactosidase only. Conclusion: We had obtained high titer and high purity rabbit polyclonal antibody ofα-galactosidase. The antibody can be used in detecting the minimal amount of residual α-galactosidase involved in conversion of blood type B to O.

  2. Epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of B. fragilis group organisms isolated from clinical specimen and human intestinal microbiota Epidemiologia e resistência a antimicrobianos de microorganismos do grupo B. fragilis isolados de espécime clínico e microbiota intestinal humana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Barreto Mano de Carvalho

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological aspects and the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolated from clinical and human intestinal specimens were examined in this study. B. fragilis group strains were isolated from 46 (37% of 124 clinical specimens and the source of the samples was: Blood culture (3, intraabdominal infection (27, brain abscess (2, soft tissue infection (17, respiratory sinus (3, pleural aspirate (9, breast abscess (3, surgical infected wound (22, pelvic inflammatory disease (22, chronic otitis media (9 and miscellaneous (7. Intraabdominal and soft tissue infections were responsible for more than half of the clinical isolates. Susceptibility to penicillin, cefoxitin, tetracycline, metronidazole, chloramphenicol and clindamycin was examined. All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and chloramphenicol. For clindamycin and cefoxitin the resistance rates observed were 21.7% and 10.9% respectively. Susceptibility profiles varied among the different species tested. A total of 37 species of B. fragilis group isolated from intestinal microbiota of individuals who had no antimicrobial therapy for at least 1 month before the sampling was also examined. All strains were also susceptible to chloramphenicol and motronidazole and the resistance rates to clindamycin and cefoxitin were 19.4% and 5.4% respectively. A few institutions, in Brazil, have monitored the antimicrobial susceptibility of B. fragilis group strains isolated from anaerobic infections. The resistance rates to cefoxitin and clindamycin and the variation in susceptibility patterns among the species isolated in this study emphasize the need for monitoring of susceptibility patterns of B. fragilis group organisms isolated, especially at our University Hospitals.Alguns aspectos epidemiológicos e o perfil de sensibilidade a antimicrobianos de amostras do grupo B. fragilis isoladas de espécime clínico e microbiota intestinal humana foram delineados neste

  3. Development of EUCAST disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Elisabeth; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Eitel, Zsuzsa;

    2015-01-01

    -clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, clindamycin, imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline by agar dilution method previously. The inhibition zones of the same antibiotics including meropenem disc were determined by the disc diffusion on Brucella blood agar supplemented with haemin...

  4. Structural and mechanistic insights into a Bacteroides vulgatus retaining N-acetyl-β-galactosaminidase that uses neighbouring group participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, C; Petricevic, M; John, A; Goddard-Borger, E D; Davies, G J; Williams, S J

    2016-09-25

    Bacteroides vulgatus is a member of the human microbiota whose abundance is increased in patients with Crohn's disease. We show that a B. vulgatus glycoside hydrolase from the carbohydrate active enzyme family GH123, BvGH123, is an N-acetyl-β-galactosaminidase that acts with retention of stereochemistry, and, through a 3-D structure in complex with Gal-thiazoline, provide evidence in support of a neighbouring group participation mechanism. PMID:27546776

  5. In Vitro Kinetic Analysis of Oligofructose Consumption by Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium spp. Indicates Different Degradation Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Makras, Lefteris; Verbrugghe, Kristof; Adriany, Tom; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-01-01

    The growth of pure cultures of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bacteroides fragilis LMG 10263 on fructose and oligofructose was examined and compared to that of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 through in vitro laboratory fermentations. Gas chromatography (GC) analysis was used to determine the different fractions of oligofructose and their degradation during the fermentation process. Both B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and B. fragilis LMG 10263 were able to grow on oligofructose as fas...

  6. 抗脆弱类杆菌和产气荚膜杆菌McAb池在外科感染快速诊断中的应用%Application of monoclonal antibody pool against Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium perfringens in rapid diagnosis in surgical infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雅萍; 甘露; 常山

    2001-01-01

    目的 制备抗脆弱类杆菌和抗产气荚膜杆菌单克隆抗体池,并用于快速诊断及时指导临床治疗。方法 采用间接免疫荧光抗体染色法(IFA)和免疫酶标抗体染色法(ELA)对我院1998~1999年191例外科感染患者的标本进行细菌学检测,并与常规培养法进行比较。结果 3种方法从191份标本中分别检出脆弱类杆菌53株(27.7%)和55株(28.8%)以及25株(13.1%);检出产气荚膜杆菌12株(6.3%)和11株(5.8%)以及6株(3.1%)。IFA和ELA法2种厌氧菌检出率明显高于CM法。但IFA和ELA法之间检出率差异无显著性。结论 自制抗脆弱类杆菌和抗产气荚膜杆菌的McAb池,检测平时常见的脆弱类杆菌和战时常见的产气荚膜杆菌,敏感性高,特异性强,简便,快速,便于推广。%Objective To prepare monoclonal antibody (McAb) pool against Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium perfringens and evaluated its effect in rapid diagnosis in surgical infection. Methods After the preparation of monoclonal antibodies against B. fragilis and C. perfringens, 191 specimens collected from infectious patients was detected with indirect immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) and enzyme labeled antibody (ELA). The results were compared with routine cultural method (CM). Results Among the 191 specimens, 53 (27.7%), 55 (28.8%) and 25 (13.1%)strains of B. fragilis were detected with IFA, ELA and CM respectively, and for C.perfringens, 12(6.3%), 11(5.8%), and 6(3.1%) strains were found. The detectable rate of anaerobic bacteria by IFA and ELA was higher than by CM, but no difference was found between these 2. Conclusion The self-made McAb pool against B.fagilis and C.perfringens might be a rapid, specific, sensitive and simple McAb pool for detecting B.fragilis in surgical infection and C.perfringens in wartime.

  7. Talking of... Dientamoeba fragilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Zorzi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dientamoeba fragilis is a protozoan parasite of human gastrointestinal tract with worldwide distribution and a controversial pathogenic role. Data on prevalence and geographical distribution are underestimated for difficult microscopic recognition and “fragility” of the protozoan. Generally to perform the O & P exam for identification of D. fragilis it is necessary to recur to a permanent stain and to an expert microscopist. Methods: we analyzed fecal samples of 3907 patients enrolled among the patients referred to the Service of Microbiology of Padova University Hospital for routine parassitology examinations from June 2011 to June 2012. The aim of this study was to document the prevalence and the clinical features of D. fragilis infection. The laboratory detection rate of the organism is greatly enhanced by use of preservative to fix stool specimens immediately after passage. As previously described for a rapid identification of D. fragilis, in unstained fixed fecal material by direct microscopy (400X, the demonstration of the characteristic “golf-club” and “acanthopodia-like” structures are suitable. Results: in this study the prevalence was found to be 6.8%, higher than our previous reports. Out of the 267 patients in which we detected D. fragilis, 26.0% presented with extra-intestinal symptoms, 19.8% reported gastrointestinal complaints and 17.0% referred abdominal pain. Conclusions: D. fragilis, even if considered a neglected parasite, is not rare and the presence of this fecal agent is associated to various intestinal and probably systemic clinical symptoms, even though asymptomatic carriers have been reported. D. fragilis infects in high rates among close household contacts; so the Authors stress the importance of screening close contacts to prevent re-infections after treatment.

  8. Dientamoeba fragilis, One of the Neglected Intestinal Protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lynne S

    2016-09-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a single-celled protozoan, closely related to the trichomonads. Reported worldwide as causing human gastrointestinal symptoms, D. fragilis is very common and is second only to Blastocystis spp. Dientamoebiasis equals or exceeds the incidence of giardiasis. This minireview includes diagnostic options, clinical relevance, therapy, an animal model, the confirmed cyst stage, and sequencing data. The development of a rodent model, fulfilling Koch's postulates, and the confirmation of a cyst stage have clarified transmission routes, including fecal-oral transmission. The prevalence of D. fragilis varies between 0% to over 82%; results depend on the geographic location, group studied, and diagnostic methods used. PMID:27053676

  9. Dientamoeba fragilis, One of the Neglected Intestinal Protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lynne S

    2016-09-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a single-celled protozoan, closely related to the trichomonads. Reported worldwide as causing human gastrointestinal symptoms, D. fragilis is very common and is second only to Blastocystis spp. Dientamoebiasis equals or exceeds the incidence of giardiasis. This minireview includes diagnostic options, clinical relevance, therapy, an animal model, the confirmed cyst stage, and sequencing data. The development of a rodent model, fulfilling Koch's postulates, and the confirmation of a cyst stage have clarified transmission routes, including fecal-oral transmission. The prevalence of D. fragilis varies between 0% to over 82%; results depend on the geographic location, group studied, and diagnostic methods used.

  10. Adhesion molecule expression stimulated by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron cell-surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokosz, A; Meisel-Mikołajczyk, F; Malchar, C; Nowaczyk, M; Górski, A

    1999-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a Gram-negative anaerobic rod belonging to the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG), is involved in many systemic and local, most frequently suppurative infections in man. The cell envelope of these rods is composed of two carbohydrate-containing antigens: lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and capsular polysaccharide (CPS). Adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin (ELAM-1) are induced on the endothelial cells by mediators of inflammation. The aim of this study was to assay the ability of B. thetaiotaomicron surface antigens to induce adhesion molecule expression on the endothelial cells. The influence of LPS and CPS on the expression of adhesion molecules on HMEC-1 cell line was examined in an ELISA test. ELISA was performed with monoclonal mouse anti-human: ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin antibodies of the IgG class. B. thetaiotaomicron lipopolysaccharides revealed the ability to induce ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression on the endothelial cells. Their activities were similar, but lower than the activity of Eschericha coli LPS. ICAM-1 was the most stimulated adhesion molecule. The strongest activation by LPS was achieved at the concentrations of 10.0 and 1.0 micrograms/ml. The ability of capsular polysaccharide to induce the expression of adhesion molecules was considerably weaker.

  11. In vitro kinetic analysis of oligofructose consumption by Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium spp. indicates different degradation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Makras, Lefteris; Verbrugghe, Kristof; Adriany, Tom; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-02-01

    The growth of pure cultures of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bacteroides fragilis LMG 10263 on fructose and oligofructose was examined and compared to that of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 through in vitro laboratory fermentations. Gas chromatography (GC) analysis was used to determine the different fractions of oligofructose and their degradation during the fermentation process. Both B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and B. fragilis LMG 10263 were able to grow on oligofructose as fast as on fructose, succinic acid being the major metabolite produced by both strains. B. longum BB536 grew slower on oligofructose than on fructose. Acetic acid and lactic acid were the main metabolites produced when fructose was used as the sole energy source. Increased amounts of formic acid and ethanol were produced when oligofructose was used as an energy source at the cost of lactic acid. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed a preferential metabolism of the short oligofructose fractions (e.g., F2 and F3) for B. longum BB536. After depletion of the short fractions, the larger oligofructose fractions (e.g., F4, GF4, F5, GF5, and F6) were metabolized, too. Both Bacteroides strains did not display such a preferential metabolism and degraded all oligofructose fractions simultaneously, transiently increasing the fructose concentration in the medium. This suggests a different mechanism for oligofructose breakdown between the strain of Bifidobacterium and both strains of Bacteroides, which helps to explain the bifidogenic nature of inulin-type fructans.

  12. Interactions between Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides species in cofermentations are affected by carbon sources, including exopolysaccharides produced by bifidobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Covian, David; Arboleya, Silvia; Hernandez-Barranco, Ana M; Alvarez-Buylla, Jorge R; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel; de los Reyes-Gavilan, Clara G

    2013-12-01

    Cocultures of strains from two Bifidobacterium and two Bacteroides species were performed with exopolysaccharides (EPS) previously purified from bifidobacteria, with inulin, or with glucose as the carbon source. Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20004 grew in glucose but showed poor or no growth in complex carbohydrates (inulin, EPS E44, and EPS R1), whereas Bacteroides grew well in the four carbon sources tested. In the presence of glucose, the growth of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron DSM-2079 was inhibited by B. breve, whereas it remained unaffected in the presence of B. longum. Ba. fragilis DSM-2151 contributed to a greater survival of B. longum, promoting changes in the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and organic acids in coculture with respect to monocultures. In complex carbohydrates, cocultures of bifidobacterium strains with Ba. thetaiotaomicron did not modify the behavior of Bacteroides nor improve the poor growth of bifidobacteria. The metabolic activity of Ba. fragilis in coculture with bifidobacteria was not affected by EPS, but greater survival of bifidobacteria at late stages of incubation occurred in cocultures than in monocultures, leading to a higher production of acetic acid than in monocultures. Therefore, cocultures of Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides can behave differently against fermentable carbohydrates as a function of the specific characteristics of the strains from each species. These results stress the importance of considering specific species and strain interactions and not simply higher taxonomic divisions in the relationship among intestinal microbial populations and their different responses to probiotics and prebiotics. PMID:24077708

  13. Thioredoxin Reductase Is Essential for Thiol/Disulfide Redox Control and Oxidative Stress Survival of the Anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Edson R.; Tzianabos, Arthur O; Smith, C. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Results of this study showed that the anaerobic, opportunistic pathogen Bacteroides fragilis lacks the glutathione/glutaredoxin redox system and possesses an extensive number of putative thioredoxin (Trx) orthologs. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed six Trx orthologs and an absence of genes required for synthesis of glutathione and glutaredoxins. In addition, it was shown that the thioredoxin reductase (TrxB)/Trx system is the major or sole redox system for thiol/disulfide cellular hom...

  14. Dientamoeba fragilis nella popolazione suina: indagini preliminari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Crotti

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Dientamoeba fragilis is a worldwide distributed protozoon which is now estimated responsible of enteric diseases in humans. A wide spectrum of intestinal symptoms has been described: diarrhoea (acute or prolonged, flatulence, abdominal pains, and not specific bowel syndrome; however, asymptomatic infection has been also reported. D. fragilis is still not well know because only the delicate trophozoite stage has been demonstrated in stool samples and definitive identification is based on permanent stains, usually not performed in ova and parasites (O&P examinations, in Italy.D. fragilis is difficult to cultivate but molecular techniques, such as PCR, appear promising for a sure diagnosis of this protozoan infection.The epidemiology of dientamoebiasis is not clear too, and this paper presents preliminary results concerning the presence of D. fragilis in swine faeces in order to evaluate the possible role of pigs as reservoir of the parasite. So, 121 stool specimens of swine population were examined using Giemsa permanent stain and D. fragilis was observed in 53 stool specimens (43.8%. Other consideratioona are reported too.

  15. Occurrence of bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides host strains (ARABA 84 and GB-124) in fecal samples of human and animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diston, David; Wicki, Melanie

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriophage-based microbial source-tracking studies are an economical and simple way of identifying fecal sources in polluted water systems. Recently isolated Bacteroides spp. strains ARABA 84, and GB-124 have been shown to detect bacteriophages exclusively in aquatic systems impacted by human fecal material. To date, limited examination of the occurrence or concentration of phages capable of infecting Bacteroides fragilis strain GB-124 or B. thetaiotaomicron strain ARABA 84 in human and animal feces has been carried out. This study reports the prevalence rates and concentrations of phages infecting ARABA 84 and GB-124 host strains in human and a range of animal feces. Discrete human fecal samples (n=55) and pooled animal samples (n=46, representing the feces of over 230 animals) were examined for phages infecting the host strains ARABA 84, GB-124, and E. coli strain WG5. Both human Bacteroides host strains were highly specific (95% and 100% for ARABA 84 and GB-124, respectively), challenging results from previous studies. This study supports the use of Bacteroides strains GB-124 and ARABA 84 in fecal source tracking studies for the detection of human fecal contamination.

  16. Species differentiation of Bacteroides dorei from Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides ovatus from Bacteroides xylanisolvens - Back to basics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micha Pedersen, Rune; Marmolin, Ea Sofie; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2013-01-01

    We present the results from 16S sequencing and phenotypic tests for differentiation of Bacteroides dorei from Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides ovatus from Bacteroides xylanisolvens, which was not possible with MALDI-TOF MS. Testing with β-glucosidase could differentiate B. dorei from B. vulga....... vulgatus and a negative catalase reaction could identify B. xylanisolvens....

  17. Bacteroides species: maintenance of laboratory strains.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, W W; Tseng, M; Landay, M E

    1981-01-01

    A medium composed of blood agar base (40 g/liter), yeast extract (5 g/liter), and cysteine hydrochloride (0.05 g/liter), completely filling screw-cap tubes (13 by 100 mm), can keep Bacteroides species alive for at least 10 months without refrigeration.

  18. Azide protection of bacteroides superoxide dismutases from inactivation by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anaerobes Bacteroides fragilis, B. distasonis and B. thetaiotaomicron produce an iron-containing superoxide dismutase (FeSOD). These FeSODs are reversibly inhibited by 1 mM azide (NaN3) and are irreversibly inactivated upon incubation with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). H2O2 inactivation of the enzyme likely depends on a Fenton type reaction with the production of hydroxyl radical (OH). Addition of NaN3 to the enzyme solution decreased the rate of inactivation by H2O2. After 20 minutes incubation of purified B. distasonis FeSOD with 2.5 mM H2O2, 61% of the initial enzymatic activity remained when 1 mM NaN3 was also present compared with 29% activity without NaN3. Similar results were seen with FeSOD from B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron. Metal analyses of the native, peroxidized, and NaN3 protected samples are consistent with loss of Fe from the enzyme upon peroxidation, but retention of Fe and enzymatic activity in the NaN3 protected sample. Protection of FeSOD activity from H2O2 inactivation was dependent on NaN3 concentration. Anionic hydroxyl radical scavengers, such as urate and xanthine did not significantly protect the enzyme. The results are consistent with binding of azide to the active site either preventing entry of H2O2 or altering Fe redox potential, preventing OH production

  19. Repeated Dientamoeba fragilis infections: a case report of two families from Sydney, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Stark

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We report cases of two unrelated families who both presented with recurrent Dienta-moeba fragilis infections. Subsequent antimicrobial therapy resulted in the clearance of D. fragilis and total resolution of gastrointestinal symptoms in both families. This report highlights the potentially recurrent nature of D. fragilis infections and the need for laboratories to routinely test for this organism.

  20. Polaribacter gen. nov., with three new species, P. irgensii sp. nov., P. franzmannii sp. nov. and P. filamentus sp. nov., gas vacuolate polar marine bacteria of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group and reclassification of 'Flectobacillus glomeratus' as Polaribacter glomeratus comb. nov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosink, J. J.; Woese, C. R.; Staley, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Several psychrophilic, gas vacuolate strains of the Cytophage-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB) phylogenetic group were isolated from sea ice and water from the Arctic and the Antarctic. The closest taxonomically defined species by 16S rRNA sequence analysis is 'Flectobacillus glomeratus'. However, 'Flc. glomeratus' is phylogenetically distant from the Flectobacillus type species, Flc. major. On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and 16S rRNA sequence analyses we propose a new genus, Polaribacter, with three new species, Polaribacter irgensii strain 23-P (ATCC 700398), Polaribacter franzmannii strain 301 (ATCC 700399) and Polaribacter filamentus strain 215 (ATCC 700397). P. filamentus is the type species of the genus. None of these species exhibits a cosmopolitan or bipolar distribution. This is the first taxonomic description of gas vacuolate bacteria in the CFB group. Additionally, we propose that 'Flc. glomeratus' be reclassified to the genus Polaribacter as P. glomeratus, comb. nov.

  1. Molecular Investigations of Bacteroides as Microbial Source Tracking Tools in Southeast Louisiana Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, C. J.; Childers, G. W.; Engel, A. S.

    2006-12-01

    Microbial Source Tracking (MST) is a developing field that is gaining increased attention. MST refers to a host of techniques that discriminates among the origins of fecal material found in natural waters from different sources (e.g. human, livestock, and wildlife) by using microbial indicator species with specificity to only certain host organisms. The development of species-specific molecular markers would allow for better evaluation of public health risks and tracking of nutrient sources impacting a watershed. Although several MST methods have been reported with varying levels of success, few offer general applicability for natural waters due to spatial and temporal constraints associated with these methods. One group of molecular MST markers that show promise for broad environmental applications are molecular 16S rDNA probes for Bacteroides. This method is based on 16S rDNA detection directly from environmental samples without the need for a preliminary cultivation step. In this study we have expanded previous sampling efforts to compile a database of over 1000 partial 16S rRNA Bacteroides genes retrieved from the fecal material of 15 different host species (human, cat, dog, pig, kangaroo). To characterize survival of Bacteroides outside of the host, survival time of the Bacteroides marker was compared to that of E.coli under varying natural environmental conditions (temperature and salinity). Bacteroides displayed a survival curve with shouldering and tailing similar to that of E.coli, but log reduction times differed with treatment. In summary, MST marker stability was identified within host species and the overall Bacteroides community structure correlated to host diet, suggesting that detection of a Bacteroides community could confidently identify fecal contamination point sources. Natural water samples from southeast Louisiana were collected for MST including the Tangipahoa River watershed where the source of fecal contamination has been hotly debated. The

  2. Inactivation of bacteriophage infecting Bacteroides strain GB124 using UV-B radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diston, David; Ebdon, James E; Taylor, Huw D

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (280-320 nm) has long been associated with the inactivation of microorganisms in the natural environment. Determination of the environmental inactivation kinetics of specific indicator organisms [used as tools in the field of microbial source tracking (MST)] is fundamental to their successful deployment, particularly in geographic regions subject to high levels of solar radiation. Phage infecting Bacteroides fragilis host strain GB124 (B124 phage) have been demonstrated to be highly specific indicators of human fecal contamination, but to date, little is known about their susceptibility to UV-B radiation. Therefore, B124 phage (n = 7) isolated from municipal wastewater effluent, were irradiated in a controlled laboratory environment using UV-B collimated beam experiments. All B124 phage suspensions possessed highly similar first order log-linear inactivation profiles and the mean fluence required to inactivate phage by 4 - log(10) was 320 mJ cm(-2). These findings suggest that phage infecting GB124 are likely to be inactivated when exposed to the levels of UV-B solar radiation experienced in a variety of environmental settings. As such, this may limit the utility of such methods for determining more remote inputs of fecal contamination in areas subject to high levels of solar radiation.

  3. DNA of Dientamoeba fragilis detected within surface-sterilized eggs of Enterobius vermicularis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röser, Dennis; Nejsum, Peter; Carlsgart, Anne Josefine;

    2013-01-01

    With no evidence of a cyst stage, the mode of transmission of Dientamoeba fragilis, an intestinal protozoon of common occurrence and suggested pathogenicity, is incompletely known. Numerous studies have suggested that eggs of intestinal nematodes, primarily Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm), can...... serve as vectors for D. fragilis, although attempts to culture D. fragilis from pinworm eggs have been unsuccessful and data from epidemiological studies on D. fragilis/pinworm co-infection have been conflicting. The aim of this study was to investigate whether we could detect D. fragilis DNA from...... pinworm eggs collected from routine diagnostic samples (cellophane tape) and surface-sterilised by hypochlorite. DNA was extracted from individual eggs and tested by PCR using D. fragilis- and E. vermicularis-specific primers; amplicons were sequenced for confirmation. In cellophane tape samples from 64...

  4. Dientamoeba fragilis detection in suid populations: an emerging zoonosis hypothesized in Central Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Daniele Crotti; Silvia Crotti; Marco Sensi; Sonia Salamida; Elisabetta Manuali; Cacciò, Simone M.; Edoardo Pozio

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis (D. fragilis) is a worldwide distributed protozoan parasite; it is pathogenic for humans. A wide spectrum of gastrointestinal symptoms has been described in infected patients: diarrhoea, flatulence, abdominal pains, colic and weight loss. However, asymptomatic infection has been also described. D. fragilis is still not well known; no cystic stage has been demonstrated and only the trophozoites are detected in stool samples. For identifying this typically more often binucl...

  5. Genome Relationship between Psathyrostachys huashanica and P. fragilis (Poaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothmer, R. Von; Kotimäki, M.; Linde-Laursen, I.

    1987-01-01

    Hybrids between the Chinese endemic species Psathyrostachys huashanica KENG and the SW. Asian species P. fragilis (BOISS.) NEVSKI (all 2n = 14) developed normally but were completely sterile. Meiotic analyses revealed a high chiasma frequency indicating that the two species as well as P. juncea...... (FISCH.) NEVSKI share the same basic genome (called N). The hybrid nature of the plants was established through karyotype analysis and Giesma C-banding....

  6. Comparison of the Giemsa C-banded karyotypes of the three subspecies of Psathyrostachys fragilis, subspp. villosus (2x), secaliformis (2x, 4x), and fragilis (2x) (Poaceae), with notes on chromosome pairing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, I.; Baden, C.

    1994-01-01

    The karyotypes of diploid P. fragilis subsp. villosus (2n = 2x = 14) and tetraploid subsp. secaliformis (2n = 4x = 28) were studied by Giemsa C- and N-banding, and AgNO3 staining and compared with the karyotype of subsp. fragilis (2x). The complements of subsp. villosus and subsp. fragilis were s...

  7. [The first metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides species isolated at Marmara University Hospital: Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak Ülger, Nurver; Sayın, Elvan; Soyad, Ad; Dane, Faysal; Söyletir, Güner

    2013-10-01

    Bacteroides species, the predominant constituents of the human intestinal microbiota can cause serious intraabdominal and postoperative wound infections and bacteremia. Moreover, these bacteria are more resistant to antimicrobial agents than the other anaerobes. The limited number of the antimicrobials, such as carbapenems, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors and nitroimidazoles are highly effective in eliminating Bacteroides. However, a few metronidazole-resistant isolates have been reported from several countries recently. The nim genes (nim A-G) are suggested to be responsible for the majority of the metronidazole resistance. Here, we describe a metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron isolated from a blood culture. A gram-negative obligate anaerobic rod was isolated from the postoperative 5th day blood culture of a 62-year-old male patient with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas head. The strain was identified as B.thetaiotaomicron by using a combination of conventional tests and commercially available biochemical kits. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by agar dilution method. The resistance genes were investigated by means of PCR using specific primer pairs for nim gene. The purified PCR product was sequenced and analyzed by comparison of the consensus sequences with GenBank sequences. The MIC for metronidazole was 16 mg/L. Although the strain was intermediate according the CLSI criteria, it was resistant (> 4 mg/L) according to EUCAST criteria. The isolate was nim gene positive, and nucleotide sequencing of the PCR product shared 100% similarity with nimE gene (emb |AM042593.1 |). On the other hand the isolate was susceptible to carbapenems and sulbactam-ampicillin. Following administration of ampicillin-sulbactam, the patient's fever disappeared after 24 hours. The clinical condition improved considerably and he was discharged at day 8. The patient was followed up at the medical oncology clinic; however he died due to disease

  8. [The first metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides species isolated at Marmara University Hospital: Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak Ülger, Nurver; Sayın, Elvan; Soyad, Ad; Dane, Faysal; Söyletir, Güner

    2013-10-01

    Bacteroides species, the predominant constituents of the human intestinal microbiota can cause serious intraabdominal and postoperative wound infections and bacteremia. Moreover, these bacteria are more resistant to antimicrobial agents than the other anaerobes. The limited number of the antimicrobials, such as carbapenems, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors and nitroimidazoles are highly effective in eliminating Bacteroides. However, a few metronidazole-resistant isolates have been reported from several countries recently. The nim genes (nim A-G) are suggested to be responsible for the majority of the metronidazole resistance. Here, we describe a metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron isolated from a blood culture. A gram-negative obligate anaerobic rod was isolated from the postoperative 5th day blood culture of a 62-year-old male patient with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas head. The strain was identified as B.thetaiotaomicron by using a combination of conventional tests and commercially available biochemical kits. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by agar dilution method. The resistance genes were investigated by means of PCR using specific primer pairs for nim gene. The purified PCR product was sequenced and analyzed by comparison of the consensus sequences with GenBank sequences. The MIC for metronidazole was 16 mg/L. Although the strain was intermediate according the CLSI criteria, it was resistant (> 4 mg/L) according to EUCAST criteria. The isolate was nim gene positive, and nucleotide sequencing of the PCR product shared 100% similarity with nimE gene (emb |AM042593.1 |). On the other hand the isolate was susceptible to carbapenems and sulbactam-ampicillin. Following administration of ampicillin-sulbactam, the patient's fever disappeared after 24 hours. The clinical condition improved considerably and he was discharged at day 8. The patient was followed up at the medical oncology clinic; however he died due to disease

  9. Physiological effects of environmental acidification in the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. R.; Lovera, C.; Whaling, P. J.; Buck, K. R.; Pane, E. F.; Barry, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is now reaching depths over 1000 m in the Eastern Pacific, overlapping the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Deep-sea animals are suspected to be especially sensitive to environmental acidification associated with global climate change. We have investigated the effects of elevated pCO2 and variable O2 on the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis, a species whose range of 200-1200 m depth includes the OMZ and spans a pCO2 range of approx. 600-1200 μatm (approx. pH 7.6 to 7.8). Individuals were evaluated during two exposure experiments (1-month and 4 month) at control and three levels of elevated pCO2 at in situ O2 levels of approx. 10% air saturation. A treatment of control pCO2 at 100% air saturation was also included in experiment two. During the first experiment, perivisceral coelomic fluid (PCF) acid-base balance was investigated during a one-month exposure; results show S. fragilis has limited ability to compensate for the respiratory acidosis brought on by elevated pCO2, due in part to low non-bicarbonate PCF buffering capacity. During the second experiment, individuals were separated into fed and fasted experimental groups, and longer-term effects of elevated pCO2 and variable O2 on righting time, feeding, growth, and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were investigated for both groups. Results suggest that the acidosis found during experiment one does not directly correlate with adverse effects during exposure to realistic future pCO2 levels.

  10. Bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes after a cat bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida Ringsborg; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite.......Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite....

  11. Comparison of Bacteroides-Prevotella 16S rRNA genetic markers for fecal samples from different animal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, L.R.; Voytek, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    To effectively manage surface and ground waters it is necessary to improve our ability to detect and identify sources of fecal contamination. We evaluated the use of the anaerobic bacterial group Bacteroides-Prevotella as a potential fecal indicator. Terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA genes from this group was used to determine differences in populations and to identify any unique populations in chickens, cows, deer, dogs, geese, horses, humans, pigs, and seagulls. The group appears to be a good potential fecal indicator in all groups tested except for avians. Cluster analysis of Bacteroides-Prevotella community T-RFLP profiles indicates that Bacteroides-Prevotella populations from samples of the same host species are much more similar to each other than to samples from different source species. We were unable to identify unique peaks that were exclusive to any source species; however, for most host species, at least one T-RFLP peak was identified to be more commonly found in that species, and a combination of peaks could be used to identify the source. T-RFLP profiles obtained from water spiked with known-source feces contained the expected diagnostic peaks from the source. These results indicate that the approach of identifying Bacteroides-Prevotella molecular markers associated with host species might be useful in identifying sources of fecal contamination in the environment.

  12. Cloning and expression of Kluyveromyces fragilis LAC4 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍克克; 李育阳

    1995-01-01

    The genomic library of Kluyveromyces fragilis was constructed in E.coli TG1,and 5β-galactosidase gene(LAC4)clones have been obtained from the library by complementation of theKluyveromyces lactis lac4-8 mutation.The studies on the structure and the function of the LAC4 gene revealedthat(i)the gene can also complement E.coli lacZ mutation;(ii)the physical map of the K.fragilis LAC4gene was very similar to that of K.lactis;(iii)the β-galactosidase levels expressed by the clone strains weremuch higher than that expressed by the original strain;(iv)the variation of the β-galactosidase level of differ-ent clone strains induced by lactose or galactose was related to the retained degree of the 5’ flanking region ofLAC4 gene,suggesting that there migth he a lactose specific transcription activating element in the region.

  13. Bis-sesquiterpene from the Marine Sponge Dysidea fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiem, Phan Van; Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Tai, Bui Huu; Anh, Hoang Le Tuan; Hang, Dan Thi Thuy; Cuc, Nguyen Thi; Huyen, Le Thi; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Yen, Pham Hai; Thung, Do Cong; Minh, Chau Van

    2016-04-01

    Two new sesquiterpenes and one new bis-sesquiterpene, named dysinidins C-E (1-3) along with three known sterols, dysideasterol F, 9α,l lα-epoxycholest-7-en-3β,5α,6α-triol, and 9α,11α-epoxycholest-7-en-3β,5α,6α,19-tetrol 6-acetate (4-6) were isolated from the Vietnamese marine sponge Dysidea fragilis (Montagu, 1814). Their structures were determined by 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopies and HR-ESI-MS, as well as by comparison with reported literature data. Compounds 4-6 were found to inhibit eight human cancer cell lines (KB, LU-1, HL-60, LNCaP, SK-Mel-2, HepG-2, MCF-7, and PC-3), with IC50 values ranging from 7.3 to 31.5 µM. PMID:27396186

  14. Haploid Barley from the Intergeneric Cross Hordeum vulgare x Psathyrostachys fragilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothmer, Roland; Jacobsen, Niels; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke;

    1984-01-01

    The intergeneric hybrid Hordeum vulgare x Psathyrostachys fragilis was fairly easily obtained. During each growing season the intermediate, perennial hybrid yielded haploid tillers of H. vulgare. Late in one season few, hybrid tillers headed. The morphology, cytology and enzymatic patterns...

  15. Is the treatment of Enterobius vermicularis co-infection necessary to eradicate Dientamoeba fragilis infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Boga

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Co-infection with E. vermicularis may act as a factor favoring D. fragilis infection by preventing eradication measures. This suggests that both parasites should be treated simultaneously.

  16. Long-wave UV light fluorescence for identification of black-pigmented Bacteroides spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Slots, J; Reynolds, H S

    1982-01-01

    Black-pigmented Bacteroides strains were grown on blood agar, and the colonies were evaluated for fluorescence from long-wave UV light. Most test strains of Bacteroides melaninogenicus subsp. intermedius exhibited a brilliant red fluorescence. B. melaninogenicus subsp. melaninogenicus fluoresced mostly red-orange. Bacteroides asaccharolyticus showed a yellow or red fluorescence. The intensity of the Bacteroides fluorescence weakened when the black pigment of the colonies developed. In contras...

  17. Detection of Dientamoeba fragilis in animal faeces using species specific real time PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Douglas; Barratt, Joel; Roberts, Tamalee; Phillips, Owen; Šlapeta, Jan; Ryan, Una; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2016-08-30

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a potentially pathogenic, enteric, protozoan parasite with a worldwide distribution. While clinical case reports and prevalence studies appear regularly in the scientific literature, little attention has been paid to this parasite's biology, life cycle, host range, and possible transmission routes. Overall, these aspects of Dientamoeba biology remain poorly understood at best. In this study, a total of 420 animal samples, collected from Australia, were surveyed for the presence of Dientamoeba fragilis using PCR. Several PCR assays were evaluated for sensitivity and specificity. Two previously published PCR methods demonstrated cross reactivity with other trichomonads commonly found in animal samples. Only one assay exhibited excellent specificity. Using this assay D. fragilis was detected from one dog and one cat sample. This is the first report of D. fragilis from these animals and highlights the role companion animals may play in D. fragilis transmission. This study demonstrated that some published D. fragilis molecular assays cross react with other closely related trichomonads and consequently are not suitable for animal prevalence studies. PMID:27523936

  18. Cytologic and Genetic Characteristics of Endobiotic Bacteria and Kleptoplasts of Virgulinella fragilis (Foraminifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Masashi; Toyofuku, Takashi; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Brüchert, Volker; Collen, John; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kitazato, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The benthic foraminifer Virgulinella fragilis Grindell and Collen 1976 has multiple putative symbioses with both bacterial and kleptoplast endobionts, possibly aiding its survival in environments from dysoxia (5-45 μmol-O2 /L) to microxia (0-5 μmol-O2 /L) and in the dark. To clarify the origin and function of V. fragilis endobionts, we used genetic analyses and transmission electron microscope observations. Virgulinella fragilis retained δ-proteobacteria concentrated at its cell periphery just beneath the cell membranes. Unlike another foraminifer Stainforthia spp., which retains many bacterial species, V. fragilis has a less variable bacterial community. This suggests that V. fragilis maintains a specific intracellular bacterial flora. Unlike the endobiotic bacteria, V. fragilis klepto-plasts originated from various diatom species and are found in the interior cytoplasm. We found evidence of both retention and digestion of kleptoplasts, and of fragmentation of the kleptoplastid outer membrane that likely facilitates transport of kleptoplastid products to the host. Accumulations of mitochondria were observed encircling endobiotic bacteria. It is likely that the bacteria use host organic material for carbon oxidation. The mitochondria may use oxygen available around the δ-proteobacteria and synthesize adenosine triphosphate, perhaps for sulfide oxidation.

  19. Isolation and characterization of proteases from Bacteroides melaninogenicus.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimura, S.; Nakamura, T.(International Center for Elementary Particle Physics and Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan)

    1981-01-01

    We isolated two types of intracellular proteases from a strain of Bacteroides melaninogenicus. These enzymes were extracted from cells by ultrasonic treatment and were partially purified. These two enzymes (proteases I and II) differed in molecular weight, heat stability, sensitivity to reducing agents, Km value, and optimum pH for activity.

  20. Organic Acid Metabolism by Isolated Rhizobium japonicum Bacteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, Iris; Cole, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum bacteroids isolated from soybean (Glycine max L.) nodules oxidized 14C-labeled succinate, pyruvate, and acetate in a manner consistent with operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and a partial glyoxylate cycle. Substrate carbon was incorporated into all major cellular components (cell wall + membrane, nucleic acids, and protein). PMID:16660386

  1. Bacteroides gingivalis vesicles bind to and aggregate Actinomyces viscosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen, R P; Grove, D A

    1989-01-01

    Isolated Bacteroides gingivalis 2561 vesicles aggregated suspensions of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii of all taxonomy clusters. Vesicles bound near A. viscosus cell walls and among its surface fibrils. Tritiated vesicles bound slightly better to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) than to SHA coated with A. viscosus; saturation was approached at the concentrations that were tested. Pretreatment of A. viscosus-coated SHA with vesicles impaired the subsequent adherence of B. gi...

  2. Could be the swine responsible of transmission to the humans of Dientamoeba fragilis infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Crotti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dientamoeba fragilis, atypical protozoon because “flagellate without flagella” but amoeba-like, of whom we know only the trophozoitic stage (an so its brittleness outside intestinal tract, is a frequent responsible of intestinal human infections, worldwide, and some authors relate that D. fragilis is the most frequent protozoon and parasite that can infects humans. Actually we don’t know a sure potential “reservoir” in animals who are strictly in contact with humans, and it is difficult to understand its epidemiological chain, otherwise the transmissions to humans and from humans to humans. For all these reasons we performed another study on subjects of swine breedings, and among people who work in these breedings, that are in direct contact or not with pigs. Using standardized methodologies, we analyzed 224 faecal specimens of swine and 15 human specimens.We use for identification of D. fragilis the Giemsa stain.These were the results: D. fragilis was observed in 50.9% of pigs and 20% among humans (30% in workers strictly in contact with breedings and pigs, 0% in familiars or other without a closed contact with swines. Other commensal protozoa were observed with variable associations, but in this article we want to analyze the possible transmission from this pigs to humans (and for us this protozoon is undoubtedly a “reservoir” of D. fragilis for humans, and underline two aspects: for the research of this protozoon, standard procedures area mandatory, with a permanent stain, as Giemsa stain, is necessary, and in all humans with various intestinal infections or troubles, particularly “irritable bowel syndrome” (or similar ones, the specimens must be analyzed for D. fragilis. At least we think that in the near future molecular studies are important for confirming this our observations, and for verifying eventual and probable differences inside genotypes of this very suggestive protozoon, that until now present not rarely

  3. Study of physiological properties of Kluyveromyces fragilis: consequences on the production of SCP from whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, G.; Malige, B.; Galzy, P.

    The production of single cell proteins (SCP) from whey, is performed with continuous culture of Kluyveromyces fragilis. This strain, does not show any crabtree effect, but the Pasteur effect is very strong; the fermentative activity is never absent even when strong aeration is present. So in all cases, alcohol is present in the medium. This observation can explain why the yield in an industrial production with an appropriate mixture culture is always higher than the yield in pure culture of Kluyveromyces fragilis. (Refs. 10).

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarella, Sara; Lovrovich, Paola; Scalabrin, Simone; Campedelli, Ilenia; Backovic, Ana; Gatto, Veronica; Cattonaro, Federica; Turello, Alessandro; Torriani, Sandra; Felis, Giovanna E

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399, the first yeast approved as a probiotic for human consumption not belonging to the genus Saccharomyces The genome is composed of 8 chromosomes, with a total size of 11.44 Mb, including mitochondrial DNA. PMID:27587830

  5. Symptoms and treatment of Dientamoeba fragilis infection in children, a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schure, Janna M A Ter; de Vries, Marrit; Weel, Jan F L; van Roon, Eric N; Faber, Tina E

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dientamoeba fragilis infection in children is common, and its incidence has increased since the introduction of more sensitive molecular techniques. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Current medical practice in the Netherlands is to treat symptomatic children with clioqui

  6. Is paromomycin the drug of choice for eradication of Dientamoeba fragilis in adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); N. Molhoek (Nicky); R. Koelewijn (Rob); P.J. Wismans (Pieter); P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDientamoeba fragilis is a debated protozoan parasite that is often detected in stools of patients with chronic gastro-intestinal complaints. A retrospective follow-up study of a large cohort of patients was performed to better understand the natural course of the infection and possible t

  7. Bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides as a marker for microbial source tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofre, Joan; Blanch, Anicet R; Lucena, Francisco; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-05-15

    Bacteriophages infecting certain strains of Bacteroides are amid the numerous procedures proposed for tracking the source of faecal pollution. These bacteriophages fulfil reasonably well most of the requirements identified as appropriate for a suitable marker of faecal sources. Thus, different host strains are available that detect bacteriophages preferably in water contaminated with faecal wastes corresponding to different animal species. For phages found preferably in human faecal wastes, which are the ones that have been more extensively studied, the amounts of phages found in waters contaminated with human fecal samples is reasonably high; these amounts are invariable through the time; their resistance to natural and anthropogenic stressors is comparable to that of other relatively resistant indicator of faecal pollution such us coliphages; the abundance ratios of somatic coliphages and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron GA17 are unvarying in recent and aged contamination; and standardised detection methods exist. These methods are easy, cost effective and provide data susceptible of numerical analysis. In contrast, there are some uncertainties regarding their geographical stability, and consequently suitable hosts need to be isolated for different geographical areas. However, a feasible method has been described to isolate suitable hosts in a given geographical area. In summary, phages infecting Bacteroides are a marker of faecal sources that in our opinion merits being included in the "toolbox" for microbial source tracking. However, further research is still needed in order to make clear some uncertainties regarding some of their characteristics and behaviour, to compare their suitability to the one of emerging methods such us targeting Bacteroidetes by qPCR assays; or settling molecular methods for their determination.

  8. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-04-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade.

  9. Plasmid-associated transfer of tetracycline resistance in Bacteroides ruminicola.

    OpenAIRE

    Flint, H J; Thomson, A. M.; Bisset, J

    1988-01-01

    Tetracycline resistance was transferred at frequencies between 10(-7) and 10(-6) per recipient cell in anaerobic matings between two strains of the strictly anaerobic rumen bacterium Bacteroides ruminicola. The donor strain, 223/M2/7, was a multiple-plasmid-bearing tetracycline-resistant strain from the ovine rumen, and the recipient, F101, was a rifampin-resistant mutant of B14, a bovine strain belonging to B. ruminicola subsp. brevis. Resistance transfer could occur in the presence of DNase...

  10. Dientamoeba fragilis detection in suid populations: an emerging zoonosis hypothesized in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Crotti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Dientamoeba fragilis (D. fragilis is a worldwide distributed protozoan parasite; it is pathogenic for humans. A wide spectrum of gastrointestinal symptoms has been described in infected patients: diarrhoea, flatulence, abdominal pains, colic and weight loss. However, asymptomatic infection has been also described. D. fragilis is still not well known; no cystic stage has been demonstrated and only the trophozoites are detected in stool samples. For identifying this typically more often binucleate protozoan, is necessary to perform permanent stain (eg. Giemsa on fresh stool specimens. This protozoan is extremely difficult to cultivate but molecular techniques such as the Polymerase Chain Reaction offer promise as a means of diagnosing infection. In five years time (2006-2010, faecal samples were collected from pigs housed in farrow-to-finish herds (494 samples, splitted in three different categories: sows, growers, finishing pigs and from hunted or slaughtered wild boars (87 samples. Simultaneously, the study was undertaken on human faeces (17 samples to evaluate the presence of D. fragilis in pig breeders. All samples were collected directly from the rectum, cooled and sent to the laboratory where they were examined for D. fragilis by direct microscopic examination. The fresh faecal smears were stained with a 10% Giemsa solution in distilled water for 30 min. Biomolecular investigations (TaqMan real-time PCR which targets the 5.8S rRNA, nested PCR for the 18S rRNA, nested PCR for the internal transcribed spacer 1 region were carried out on 38 pigs and 17 pig breeders specimens. The microscopic examination of the fresh fecal smears revealed positivity in 277 domestic pigs, corresponding to 56.07%. In particular higher positivity was observed on youngest animal (76.57%, while oldest or mature pigs recorded an important decreasing of positivity according the age (Table 1. Concerning wild boars, we revealed positivity in 35 animals (40.22%. Among

  11. Purification of microbial b-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces fragilis by bioaffinity partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Maria Estela da

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the partitioning of b-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces fragilis in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS by bioaffinity. PEG 4000 was chemically activated with thresyl chloride, and the biospecific ligand p-aminophenyl 1-thio-b-D-galactopyranoside (APGP was attached to the activated PEG 4000. A new two-step method for extraction and purification of the enzyme b-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces fragilis was developed. In the first step, a system composed of 6% PEG 4000-APGP and 8% dextran 505 was used, where b-galactosidase was strongly partitioned to the top phase (K = 2,330. In the second step, a system formed of 13% PEG-APGP and 9% phosphate salt was used to revert the value of the partition coefficient of b-galactosidase (K = 2 x 10-5 in order to provide the purification and recovery of 39% of the enzyme in the bottom salt-rich phase.

  12. Physiological compensation for environmental acidification is limited in the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Taylor

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic CO2 is now reaching depths over 1000 m in the Eastern Pacific, overlapping the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ. Deep-sea animals – particularly, calcifiers – are suspected to be especially sensitive to environmental acidification associated with global climate change. We have investigated the effects of hypercapnia and hypoxia on the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis, during two long-term exposure experiments (1 month and 4 month at three levels of reduced pH at in situ O2 levels of approx. 10% saturation, and also to control pH at 100% O2 saturation. During the first experiment, internal acid-base balance was investigated during a one-month exposure; results show S. fragilis has limited ability to compensate for the respiratory acidosis brought on by reduced pH, due in part to low non-bicarbonate extracellular fluid buffering capacity. During the second experiment, longer-term effects of hypercapnia and variable O2 on locomotion, feeding, growth, and gonadosomatic index (GSI were investigated; results show significant mortality and correlation of all measured parameters with environmental acidification at pH 6.6. Transient adverse effects on locomotion and feeding were seen at pH 7.2, without compromise of growth or GSI. Based on the expected changes in ocean pH and oxygen, results suggest extinction of S. fragilis in the eastern North Pacific is unlikely. Rather, we expect a shoaling and contraction of its bathymetric range.

  13. Physiological compensation for environmental acidification is limited in the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. R.; Lovera, C.; Whaling, P. J.; Buck, K. R.; Pane, E. F.; Barry, J. P.

    2013-05-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is now reaching depths over 1000 m in the Eastern Pacific, overlapping the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Deep-sea animals - particularly, calcifiers - are suspected to be especially sensitive to environmental acidification associated with global climate change. We have investigated the effects of hypercapnia and hypoxia on the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis, during two long-term exposure experiments (1 month and 4 month) at three levels of reduced pH at in situ O2 levels of approx. 10% saturation, and also to control pH at 100% O2 saturation. During the first experiment, internal acid-base balance was investigated during a one-month exposure; results show S. fragilis has limited ability to compensate for the respiratory acidosis brought on by reduced pH, due in part to low non-bicarbonate extracellular fluid buffering capacity. During the second experiment, longer-term effects of hypercapnia and variable O2 on locomotion, feeding, growth, and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were investigated; results show significant mortality and correlation of all measured parameters with environmental acidification at pH 6.6. Transient adverse effects on locomotion and feeding were seen at pH 7.2, without compromise of growth or GSI. Based on the expected changes in ocean pH and oxygen, results suggest extinction of S. fragilis in the eastern North Pacific is unlikely. Rather, we expect a shoaling and contraction of its bathymetric range.

  14. Persistence of Bacteroides ovatus under simulated sunlight irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Shengkun

    2014-07-04

    Background: Bacteroides ovatus, a member of the genus Bacteroides, is considered for use in molecular-based methods as a general fecal indicator. However, knowledge on its fate and persistence after a fecal contamination event remains limited. In this study, the persistence of B. ovatus was evaluated under simulated sunlight exposure and in conditions similar to freshwater and seawater. By combining propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection, the decay rates of B. ovatus were determined in the presence and absence of exogenous photosensitizers and in salinity up to 39.5 parts per thousand at 27°C. Results: UVB was found to be important for B. ovatus decay, averaging a 4 log10 of decay over 6 h of exposure without the presence of extracellular photosensitizers. The addition of NaNO2, an exogenous sensitizer producing hydroxyl radicals, did not significantly change the decay rate of B. ovatus in both low and high salinity water, while the exogenous sensitizer algae organic matter (AOM) slowed down the decay of B. ovatus in low salinity water. At seawater salinity, the decay rate of B. ovatus was slower than that in low salinity water, except when both NaNO2 and AOM were present. Conclusion: The results of laboratory experiments suggest that if B. ovatus is released into either freshwater or seawater environment in the evening, 50% of it may be intact by the next morning; if it is released at noon, only 50% may be intact after a mere 5 min of full spectrum irradiation on a clear day. This study provides a mechanistic understanding to some of the important environmental relevant factors that influenced the inactivation kinetics of B. ovatus in the presence of sunlight irradiation, and would facilitate the use of B. ovatus to indicate the occurrence of fecal contamination.

  15. Morphometric characteristics of bacteroidal tissue in yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus L. nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Władysław Golinowski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Morphometric methods were used to analyse the bacteroidal tissue in yellow lupine nodules. Volume fraction - Vv, surface area - Sv and ratio of surface area to its volume - R, were calculated from electron micrographs for some selected cell structures in 9, 13, 15, 20, 29 and 60 day-old nodules. The rate at which bacteroid Vv increased varied in time. Between days 13 and 20 of nodule development, bacteroid Vv increased in geometrical progression. Rough endoplasmic reticulum was active in nodule development and/or protein manufacturing necessary for the functioning of the system whereas the role of mitochondria was apparently limited.

  16. Design and evaluation of Bacteroides DNA probes for the specific detection of human fecal pollution.

    OpenAIRE

    Kreader, C A

    1995-01-01

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers specific for 16S rRNA gene sequences of Bacteroides distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. vulgatus were designed. Hybridization with species-specific internal probes was used to detect the intended PCR products. Extr...

  17. Clinical and microbiological features of dientamoebiasis in patients suspected of suffering from a parasitic gastrointestinal illness: A comparison of Dientamoeba fragilis and Giardia lamblia infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Vandenberg; R. Peek; H. Souayah; A. Dediste; M. Buset; R. Scheen; P. Retore; G. Zissis; T. van Gool

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical and microbiological features of Dientomoeba fragilis and Giordia lamblia infected patients, and to analyze the genetic variation of D. fragilis strains. Methods: For a period of two years, all stool samples collected from patients suspected of having a parasitic

  18. Characterization of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) Sulfatases from the Human Gut Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Reveals the First GAG-specific Bacterial Endosulfatase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Jonathan E.; Vilén, Eric Morssing; Namburi, Ramesh Babu; Benjdia, Alhosna; Beneteau, Julie; Malleron, Annie; Bonnaffé, David; Driguez, Pierre-Alexandre; Descroix, Karine; Lassalle, Gilbert; Le Narvor, Christine; Sandström, Corine; Spillmann, Dorothe; Berteau, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of the microbiota in human physiology, the molecular bases that govern the interactions between these commensal bacteria and their host remain poorly understood. We recently reported that sulfatases play a key role in the adaptation of a major human commensal bacterium, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, to its host (Benjdia, A., Martens, E. C., Gordon, J. I., and Berteau, O. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 25973–25982). We hypothesized that sulfatases are instrumental for this bacterium, and related Bacteroides species, to metabolize highly sulfated glycans (i.e. mucins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)) and to colonize the intestinal mucosal layer. Based on our previous study, we investigated 10 sulfatase genes induced in the presence of host glycans. Biochemical characterization of these potential sulfatases allowed the identification of GAG-specific sulfatases selective for the type of saccharide residue and the attachment position of the sulfate group. Although some GAG-specific bacterial sulfatase activities have been described in the literature, we report here for the first time the identity and the biochemical characterization of four GAG-specific sulfatases. Furthermore, contrary to the current paradigm, we discovered that B. thetaiotaomicron possesses an authentic GAG endosulfatase that is active at the polymer level. This type of sulfatase is the first one to be identified in a bacterium. Our study thus demonstrates that bacteria have evolved more sophisticated and diverse GAG sulfatases than anticipated and establishes how B. thetaiotaomicron, and other major human commensal bacteria, can metabolize and potentially tailor complex host glycans. PMID:25002587

  19. Frajunolides L–O, Four New 8-Hydroxybriarane Diterpenoids from the Gorgonian Junceella fragilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Sheng Lin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Four new 8-hydroxybriarane diterpenoids, frajunolides L–O (1–4, were isolated from the Taiwanese gorgonian Junceella fragilis. The structures of compounds 1–4 were elucidated based on spectroscopic analysis, especially 2D NMR (1H-1H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY and HRMS. Compounds 1 and 4 showed weak anti-inflammatory activity as tested by superoxide anion generation and elastase release by human neutrophil in response to fMLP/CB. Compound 3 showed selective inhibition on elastase release in vitro.

  20. Microbial enterotypes, inferred by the prevotella-to-bacteroides ratio, remained stable during a 6-month randomized controlled diet intervention with the new nordic diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Licht, Tine Rask; Poulsen, Sanne;

    2014-01-01

    with central obesity and components of metabolic syndrome could be grouped into two discrete groups simply by their relative abundance of Prevotella spp. divided by Bacteroides spp. (P/B ratio) obtained by quantitative PCR analysis. Furthermore, we showed that these groups remained stable during a 6-month......, controlled dietary intervention, where the effect of consuming a diet in accord with the new Nordic diet (NND) recommendations as opposed to consuming the average Danish diet (ADD) on the gut microbiota was investigated. In this study, subjects (with and without stratification according to P/B ratio) did...

  1. A Peptidoglycan-Remodeling Enzyme Is Critical for Bacteroid Differentiation in Bradyrhizobium spp. During Legume Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, Djamel; Gargani, Daniel; Bonaldi, Katia; Grangeteau, Cédric; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Fardoux, Joël; Nguyen, Phuong; Marchetti, Roberta; Nouwen, Nico; Molinaro, Antonio; Mergaert, Peter; Giraud, Eric

    2016-06-01

    In response to the presence of compatible rhizobium bacteria, legumes form symbiotic organs called nodules on their roots. These nodules house nitrogen-fixing bacteroids that are a differentiated form of the rhizobium bacteria. In some legumes, the bacteroid differentiation comprises a dramatic cell enlargement, polyploidization, and other morphological changes. Here, we demonstrate that a peptidoglycan-modifying enzyme in Bradyrhizobium strains, a DD-carboxypeptidase that contains a peptidoglycan-binding SPOR domain, is essential for normal bacteroid differentiation in Aeschynomene species. The corresponding mutants formed bacteroids that are malformed and hypertrophied. However, in soybean, a plant that does not induce morphological differentiation of its symbiont, the mutation does not affect the bacteroids. Remarkably, the mutation also leads to necrosis in a large fraction of the Aeschynomene nodules, indicating that a normally formed peptidoglycan layer is essential for avoiding the induction of plant immune responses by the invading bacteria. In addition to exopolysaccharides, capsular polysaccharides, and lipopolysaccharides, whose role during symbiosis is well defined, our work demonstrates an essential role in symbiosis for yet another rhizobial envelope component, the peptidoglycan layer. PMID:26959836

  2. Novel Bacteroides host strains for detection of human- and animal-specific bacteriophages in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicki, Melanie; Auckenthaler, Adrian; Felleisen, Richard; Tanner, Marcel; Baumgartner, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Bacteriophages active against specific Bacteroides host strains were shown to be suitable for detection of human faecal pollution. However, the practical application of this finding is limited because some specific host strains were restricted to certain geographic regions. In this study, novel Bacteroides host strains were isolated that discriminate human and animal faecal pollution in Switzerland. Two strains specific for bacteriophages present in human faecal contamination and three strains specific for bacteriophages indicating animal faecal contamination were evaluated. Bacteriophages infecting human strains were exclusively found in human wastewater, whereas animal strains detected bacteriophages only in animal waste. The newly isolated host strains could be used to determine the source of surface and spring water faecal contamination in field situations. Applying the newly isolated host Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ARABA 84 for detection of bacteriophages allowed the detection of human faecal contamination in spring water.

  3. The gut bacterial communities associated with lab-raised and field-collected ants of Camponotus fragilis (Formicidae: Formicinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong; Wei, Cong; Wheeler, Diana E

    2014-09-01

    Camponotus is the second largest ant genus and known to harbor the primary endosymbiotic bacteria of the genus Blochmannia. However, little is known about the effect of diet and environment changes on the gut bacterial communities of these ants. We investigated the intestinal bacterial communities in the lab-raised and field-collected ants of Camponotus fragilis which is found in the southwestern United States and northern reaches of Mexico. We determined the difference of gut bacterial composition and distribution among the crop, midgut, and hindgut of the two types of colonies. Number of bacterial species varied with the methods of detection and the source of the ants. Lab-raised ants yielded 12 and 11 species using classical microbial culture methods and small-subunit rRNA genes (16S rRNAs) polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis, respectively. Field-collected ants yielded just 4 and 1-3 species using the same methods. Most gut bacterial species from the lab-raised ants were unevenly distributed among the crop, midgut, and hindgut, and each section had its own dominant bacterial species. Acetobacter was the prominent bacteria group in crop, accounting for about 55 % of the crop clone library. Blochmannia was the dominant species in midgut, nearly reaching 90 % of the midgut clone library. Pseudomonas aeruginosa dominated the hindgut, accounting for over 98 % of the hindgut clone library. P. aeruginosa was the only species common to all three sections. A comparison between lab-raised and field-collected ants, and comparison with other species, shows that gut bacterial communities vary with local environment and diet. The bacterial species identified here were most likely commensals with little effect on their hosts or mild pathogens deleterious to colony health. PMID:24748441

  4. Complete genome sequence of Bacteroides salanitronis type strain (BL78T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lucas, Susan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Lapidus, Alla L. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Nolan, Matt [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Tice, Hope [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Deshpande, Shweta [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Cheng, Jan-Fang [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Pitluck, Sam [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Liolios, Konstantinos [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Pagani, Ioanna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Palaniappan, Krishna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Woyke, Tanja [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Bristow, James [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Markowitz, Victor [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Eisen, Jonathan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides salanitronis Lan et al. 2006 is a species of the genus Bacteroides, which belongs to the family Bacteroidaceae. The species is of interest because it was isolated from the gut of a chicken and the growing awareness that the anaerobic microflora of the cecum is of benefit for the host and may impact poultry farming. The 4,308,663 bp long genome consists of a 4.24 Mbp chromosome and three plasmids (6 kbp, 19 kbp, 40 kbp) containing 3,737 protein-coding and 101 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Current Status of Marker Genes of Bacteroides and Related Taxa for Identifying Sewage Pollution in Environmental Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warish Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial source tracking (MST endeavors to determine sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters by capitalizing on the association of certain microorganisms with the gastrointestinal tract and feces of specific animal groups. Several decades of research have shown that bacteria belonging to the gut-associated order Bacteroidales, and particularly the genus Bacteroides, tend to co-evolve with the host, and are, therefore, particularly suitable candidates for MST applications. This review summarizes the current research on MST methods that employ genes belonging to Bacteroidales/Bacteroides as tracers or “markers” of sewage pollution, including known advantages and deficiencies of the many polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based methods that have been published since 2000. Host specificity is a paramount criterion for confidence that detection of a marker is a true indicator of the target host. Host sensitivity, or the prevalence of the marker in feces/waste from the target host, is necessary for confidence that absence of the marker is indicative of the absence of the pollution source. Each of these parameters can vary widely depending on the type of waste assessed and the geographic location. Differential decay characteristics of bacterial targets and their associated DNA contribute to challenges in interpreting MST results in the context of human health risks. The HF183 marker, derived from the 16S rRNA gene of Bacteroides dorei and closely related taxa, has been used for almost two decades in MST studies, and is well characterized regarding host sensitivity and specificity, and in prevalence and concentration in sewage in many countries. Other markers such as HumM2 and HumM3 show promise, but require further performance testing to demonstrate their widespread utility. An important limitation of the one-marker-one-assay approach commonly used for MST is that given the complexities of microbial persistence in environmental waters, and

  6. Effects of Ephedrine and Ephedra fragilis Crude Extracts on Human Peripheral Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Attard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ephedra fragilis Desf. (Ephedraceae, a locally cultivated medicinal plant, is a source of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, two important alkaloids, which have long played an important pharmacological role. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of ephedrine and the Ephedra branch extract on unstimulated lymphocytes. Ephedra alkaloids were extracted from various plant parts and after phytochemical analysis, the brine shrimp lethality test was used to determine the activity of the extracts. The LC 50 of the branch extract was 581.395 μg/ml, showing no statistical difference from that of ephedrine (208.203 μg/ml. The ephedrine and extract did not show toxic effects on lymphocytes but exhibited immunostimulant activity. Although ephedrine cannot be used as an immune booster, it can be used as a lead drug for further immunological research.

  7. Fragilisinins A–L, new briarane-type diterpenoids from gorgonian Junceella fragilis

    KAUST Repository

    Lei, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Our continuous study on the South China Sea gorgonian Junceella fragilis led to the isolation of twelve new briarane type diterpenoids, fragilisinins A-L (1-12), along with seven known analogues (13-19), including four naturally produced organoiodides (9-12), they are the first four iodine-containing briarane diterpenoids from this gorgonian species. Their structures were determined by MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectra analyses and by comparison with those reported in the literature. The configuration of 1 was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The antifouling test showed that compounds 5, 6, 10, 13, and 15 had potent antifouling activities at nontoxic concentrations with EC50 values of 14.0, 12.6, 11.9, 5.6, and 10.0 μM, respectively. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. Neuraminidase-enhanced attachment of Bacteroides intermedius to human erythrocytes and buccal epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, K; Ono, M.; Kato, T.

    1989-01-01

    Bacteroides intermedius strains strongly agglutinated only neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes. The neuraminidase-dependent hemagglutinating activity of B. intermedius was abolished by heating or treating with protease. The adherence of these microorganisms to human buccal epithelial cells was enhanced by neuraminidase pretreatment of the cells (P less than 0.01).

  9. Growth inhibitory effects of endotoxins from Bacteroides gingivalis and intermedius on human gingival fibroblasts in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layman, D.L.; Diedrich, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    Purified endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide from Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius caused a similar dose-dependent inhibition of growth of cultured human gingival fibroblasts as determined by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation and direct cell count. Approximately 200 micrograms/ml endotoxin caused a 50% reduction in /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake of logarithmically growing cells. Inhibition of growth was similar in cultures of fibroblasts derived from either healthy or diseased human gingiva. When examining the change in cell number with time of exposure in culture, the rate of proliferation was significantly suppressed during the logarithmic phase of growth. However, the cells recovered so that the rate of proliferation, although reduced, was sufficient to produce a cell density similar to the control cells with prolonged culture. The endotoxins were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The profiles of the Bacteroides endotoxins were different. B. gingivalis endotoxin showed a wide range of distinct bands indicating a heterogeneous distribution of molecular species. Endotoxin from B. intermedius exhibited a few discrete low molecular weight bands, but the majority of the lipopolysaccharides electrophoresed as a diffuse band of high molecular weight material. The apparent heterogeneity of the two Bacteroides endotoxins and the similarity in growth inhibitory capacity suggest that growth inhibitory effects of these substances cannot be attributed to any polysaccharide species of endotoxin.

  10. Extensive Mobilome-Driven Genome Diversification in Mouse Gut-Associated Bacteroides vulgatus mpk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Anna; Beier, Sina; Steimle, Alex; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Huson, Daniel H; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Like many other Bacteroides species, Bacteroides vulgatus strain mpk, a mouse fecal isolate which was shown to promote intestinal homeostasis, utilizes a variety of mobile elements for genome evolution. Based on sequences collected by Pacific Biosciences SMRT sequencing technology, we discuss the challenges of assembling and studying a bacterial genome of high plasticity. Additionally, we conducted comparative genomics comparing this commensal strain with the B. vulgatus type strain ATCC 8482 as well as multiple other Bacteroides and Parabacteroides strains to reveal the most important differences and identify the unique features of B. vulgatus mpk. The genome of B. vulgatus mpk harbors a large and diverse set of mobile element proteins compared with other sequenced Bacteroides strains. We found evidence of a number of different horizontal gene transfer events and a genome landscape that has been extensively altered by different mobilization events. A CRISPR/Cas system could be identified that provides a possible mechanism for preventing the integration of invading external DNA. We propose that the high genome plasticity and the introduced genome instabilities of B. vulgatus mpk arising from the various mobilization events might play an important role not only in its adaptation to the challenging intestinal environment in general, but also in its ability to interact with the gut microbiota.

  11. Silting up and development of anoxic conditions enhanced by high abundance of the geoengineer species Ophiothrix fragilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murat, A.; Méar, Y.; Poizot, E.; Dauvin, J. C.; Beryouni, K.

    2016-04-01

    In the English Channel, the brittle-star Ophiothrix fragilis is a common epifaunal species typically found on pebbles in habitats with strong tidal currents. This species forms dense aggregations on the seafloor, supporting populations that can reach up to 7500 ind m-2 in the eastern part of the Baie de Seine, offshore from Antifer harbour. Here, O. fragilis occurs in an area with unexpected amounts of fine-grained sediment. Some of these mud deposits are made up of unusually compact black muds, an indication of the development of anoxic conditions in surficial sediments. To highlight a potential link between silting up and dense O. fragilis populations, and identify the interactions between environmental conditions and the population dynamics of this species, we analyse the data from three surveys corresponding to exceptional situations: (1) just after a Seine flood; (2) just after a storm and (3) after a period of ten months without any flood or storm. Four parameters are taken into account: number of brittle stars per 0.25 m2, Fine Fraction percentage, Total Organic Carbon and Total Sulphur. The main environmental forcings appear to be Seine river inflow, regional circulation dependent on tidal currents and the occurrence of storms. O. fragilis is able to geoengineer its environment in various ways and at different rates. Silting up is enhanced by increasing abundance of O. fragilis and takes place at a very fast rate. As a result, floods and storms reflecting instantaneous events give rise to a steady-state situation established between the abundance of this species and the fine fraction percentage. Anoxic conditions are dependent on the degradation of organic matter and require more time to be established. After many months in the absence of any disturbing events, anoxic conditions are developed in non-compacted muddy sediments (stability situation) and represent the normal surficial situation when the sediment becomes compacted (compact black muds). The

  12. Bacteroides gingivalis antigens and bone resorbing activity in root surface fractions of periodontally involved teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patters, M.R.; Landsberg, R.L.; Johansson, L.A.; Trummel, C.L.; Robertson, P.R. (Department of Periodontology, University of Connecticut, School of Dental Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut, U.S.A.)

    1982-01-01

    Bone resorbing activity and the presence of antigens of Bacteroides gingivalis were assessed in plaque, calculus, cementum, and dentin obtained from roots of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis. Each fraction was obtained by scaling the root surface. The fraction were extracted by stirring and sonication, and the soluble centrifuged, sterilized, dialyzed, and adjusted to equivalent protein concentrations. Cementum and dentin extracts from impacted teeth were prepared similarly and served as controls. Stimulation of bone resorption by each extract was assessed in organ cultures of fetal rat bones by measurement of release of previously-incorporated /sup 45/Ca from the bone into the medium. In some groups of teeth, calculus and cementum were treated with acid prior to scaling. Citric acid washes were recovered and dialyzed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess the extracts for the presence of antigens reactive with an antiserum to B. gingivalis. Significant stimulation of bone resorption was found in all calculus and periodontally-involved cementum preparations. ELISA showed significant levels of B.gingivalis antigens in plaque, calculus, and cementum of periodontally-involved teeth, but not in involved dentin nor in cementum or dentin of impact teeth. Treatment with citric acid removed essentially all B.gingivalis antigens from cementum but not calculus. The results suggest that substances which stimulate bone resorption and substances which react with B. gingivalis antiserum are present in surface plaque, calculus, and cementum or periodontally-involved teeth. These substances are not present in cementum and dentin of impacted teeth nor in dentin of periodontally-involved teeth. Treatment by both scaling and citric demineralization will remove most of these substances from cementum of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis.

  13. Activity of benzimidazoles against Dientamoeba fragilis (Trichomonadida, Monocercomonadidae in vitro and correlation of beta-tubulin sequences as an indicator of resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stark Damien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Dientamoeba fragilis has emerged as a significant and common enteropathogen. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints and chronic symptoms are common. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Despite this, there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism. Benzimidazoles are a class of antiparasitic drugs that are commonly used for the treatment of protozoan and helminthic infections. Susceptibility testing was undertaken on four D. fragilis clinical isolates against the following benzimidazoles: albendazole, flubendazole, mebendazole, nocodazole, triclabendazole and thiabendazole. The activities of the antiprotozoal compounds at concentrations ranging from 2 μg/mL to 500 μg/mL were determined via cell counts of D. fragilis grown in xenic culture. All tested drugs showed no efficacy. The beta-tubulin transcript was sequenced from two of the D. fragilis isolates and amino acid sequences predicted a susceptibility to benzimidazoles. This is the first study to report susceptibility profiles for benzimidazoles against D. fragilis, all of which were not active against the organism. This study also found that beta-tubulin sequences cannot be used as a reliable marker for resistance of benzimidazoles in D. fragilis.

  14. Detection of Dientamoeba fragilis in patients with HIV/AIDS by using a simplified iron hematoxylin technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Alves Garcia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Studies strongly indicate Dientamoeba fragilis as one of the causes of diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients. METHODS: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of D. fragilis associated with the causes of diarrhea in 82 HIV/ AIDS patients hospitalized at the Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas from September 2006 to November 2008. RESULTS: In total, 105 samples were collected from 82 patients. Unprotected sex was the most frequent cause of HIV infection (46.3%, followed by the use of injectable or non-injectable drugs (14.6%. Patients presented with viral loads of 49-750,000 copies/ mL (average: 73,849 ± 124,850 copies/mL and CD4 counts ranging of 2-1,306 cells/mm³ (average: 159 ± 250 cells/mm³. On an average, the odds of obtaining a positive result by using the other techniques (Hoffman, Pons and Janer or Lutz; Ritchie were 2.7 times higher than the chance of obtaining a positive result by using the simplified iron hematoxylin method. Significant differences were found between the methods (p = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS: The other techniques can detect a significantly greater amount of parasites than the simplified iron hematoxylin method, especially with respect to Isospora belli, Cryptosporidium sp., Schistosoma mansoni, and Strongyloides stercoralis, which were not detected using hematoxylin. Endolimax nana and D. fragilis were detected more frequently on using hematoxylin, and the only parasite not found by the other methods was D. fragilis.

  15. Physiological compensation for environmental acidification is limited in the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis

    OpenAIRE

    J. R. Taylor; C. Lovera; P. J. Whaling; Buck, K.R.; E. F. Pane; Barry, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is now reaching depths over 1000 m in the Eastern Pacific, overlapping the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Deep-sea animals – particularly, calcifiers – are suspected to be especially sensitive to environmental acidification associated with global climate change. We have investigated the effects of hypercapnia and hypoxia on the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis, during two long-term exposure experiments (1 month and 4 month) at three levels of reduced pH at in ...

  16. Relationship between heavy fuel oil phytotoxicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in Salicornia fragilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meudec, Anna; Poupart, Nathalie; Deslandes, Eric [Laboratoire d' Ecophysiologie et de Biotechnologie des Halophytes et des Algues Marines (LEBHAM), UPRES EA 3877, Institut Universitaire Europeen de la Mer, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Technopole Brest Iroise, Place Nicolas Copernic, 29280 Plouzane (France); Dussauze, Jacques [Institut Departemental d' analyses, de conseil et d' expertise en Hygiene alimentaire, Eau et environnement et Sante Animale (IDHESA), 120 rue Alexis de Rochon, BP52, 29280 Plouzane (France)

    2007-08-01

    Greenhouse experiments were carried out to study the effects of heavy fuel oil contamination on the growth and the development of Salicornia fragilis Ball and Tutin, a salt-marsh edible species. Plants were sampled in spring at the 'Aber du Conquet' (Finistere, France), and artificially exposed by coating shoot sections with N 6 fuel oil or by mixing it in their substratum. The impact of petroleum on plant development was followed by phytotoxicity assessments and PAH shoots assays. The plants exhibited visual symptoms of stress, i.e. chlorosis, yellowing, growth reduction and perturbations in developmental parameters. The contamination of plants by shoot coating appeared to be less than through soil. Moreover, the increase of the degree of pollution induced more marked effects on plants, likely because of the physical effects of fuel. However, bioaccumulation of PAHs in shoot tissues was also found to be significant, even at very low levels of contamination, and highly related to the conditions of exposure to oil. The strong relationships between the PAH contents of Salicornia plants and growth reduction suggest a chemical toxicity of fuel oil, compounds like PAHs being known to inhibit physiological processes in plants. (author)

  17. Oral implantation of Bacteroides asaccharolyticus and Eikenella corrodens in conventional hamsters.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagahata, T; Kiyoshige, T; Tomono, S; Abe, R; Sasaki, S.; Takazoe, I

    1982-01-01

    Oral implantation of Bacteroides asaccharolyticus 381-R' and Eikenella corrodens 1073S-R, which are highly resistant to streptomycin, was examined in conventional hamsters. The hamsters' first molars were ligatured with cotton threads preimmersed in bacterial suspensions. Bacterial inoculation was performed daily for 1 week, followed by a single weekly inoculation for 7 more weeks. Hamsters were fed Keyes' diet no. 2000 or ordinary powdered diet. Bacterial recovery, gingival histological chan...

  18. A Novel Tightly Regulated Gene Expression System for the Human Intestinal Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Nikki; Carvalho, Ana L.; Overweg, Karin; Wegmann, Udo; Carding, Simon R.; Stentz, Régis

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in studying the function of Bacteroides species resident in the human gastrointestinal (GI)-tract and the contribution they make to host health. Reverse genetics and protein expression techniques, such as those developed for well-characterized Escherichia coli cannot be applied to Bacteroides species as they and other members of the Bacteriodetes phylum have unique promoter structures. The availability of useful Bacteroides-specific genetic tools is therefore limited. Here we describe the development of an effective mannan-controlled gene expression system for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron containing the mannan-inducible promoter–region of an α-1,2-mannosidase gene (BT_3784), a ribosomal binding site designed to modulate expression, a multiple cloning site to facilitate the cloning of genes of interest, and a transcriptional terminator. Using the Lactobacillus pepI as a reporter gene, mannan induction resulted in an increase of reporter activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with a wide range of activity. The endogenous BtcepA cephalosporinase gene was used to demonstrate the suitability of this novel expression system, enabling the isolation of a His-tagged version of BtCepA. We have also shown with experiments performed in mice that the system can be induced in vivo in the presence of an exogenous source of mannan. By enabling the controlled expression of endogenous and exogenous genes in B. thetaiotaomicron this novel inducer-dependent expression system will aid in defining the physiological role of individual genes and the functional analyses of their products. PMID:27468280

  19. Genetic evidence that outer membrane binding of starch is required for starch utilization by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, K.L.; Salyers, A A

    1989-01-01

    Mutagenesis of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron with the transposon Tn4351 produced five classes of mutants that were not able to grow on amylose or amylopectin. These classes of mutants differed in their ability to grow on maltoheptaose (G7) and in the level of starch-degrading enzymes produced when bacteria were grown on maltose. All of the mutants were deficient in starch binding. Since one class of mutants retained normal levels of starch-degrading enzymes, this indicates that binding of the ...

  20. Development of new host-specific Bacteroides qPCRs for the identification of fecal contamination sources in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Doñate, Marta; Casanovas-Massana, Arnau; Muniesa, Maite; Blanch, Anicet R

    2016-02-01

    Bacteroides spp. have been proposed as indicators of fecal contamination in microbial source tracking (MST) methodologies. The aim of this study was to develop new qPCR assays that target host-specific Bacteroidal 16S ribosomal RNA genes, to determine the source of fecal contamination in water. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to select for host-specific bands of Bacteroides associated with a fecal pollution source and later to design four qPCR host-specific assays. A set of common primers for Bacteroides spp., four different Bacteroides spp. host-associated hydrolysis probes (human, cattle, pig, and poultry), and one hydrolysis probe for the Bacteroides genus were designed. This set of qPCR assays together with other previously developed Bacteroidetes MST targets were used to analyze water samples with fecal contamination from the four sources studied. The host-specific Bacteroides qPCRs designed for human (HMprobeBac), pig (PGprobeBac), and poultry (PLprobeBac) were highly specific for its sources (1.0, 0.97, and 1.0, respectively) although its sensitivity was lower (0.45, 0.50, and 0.73, respectively). The cattle-specific qPCR was totally unspecific and was discarded for future experiments. When compared to previously designed assays, the human and pig qPCRs showed better accuracies (0.86 and 0.84) than their counterparts HF183 and Pig-2-Bac (0.38 and 0.65). Thus, the newly designed human, pig, and poultry qPCR assays outperform other methods developed until date and may be useful for source tracking purposes. PMID:26763626

  1. Physiological effects of environmental acidification in the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis

    OpenAIRE

    J. R. Taylor; C. Lovera; P. J. Whaling; Buck, K.R.; E. F. Pane; Barry, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is now reaching depths over 1000 m in the Eastern Pacific, overlapping the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Deep-sea animals are suspected to be especially sensitive to environmental acidification associated with global climate change. We have investigated the effects of elevated pCO2 and variable O2 on the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis, a species whose range of 200–1200 m depth includes the OMZ and spans a pCO2 range of approx. 600–1200 μatm (ap...

  2. Purification and properties of Bacteroides heparinolyticus heparinase (heparin lyase, EC 4.2.2.7).

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, T.(International Center for Elementary Particle Physics and Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan); Shibata, Y.; Fujimura, S.

    1988-01-01

    Heparinase (heparin lyase, EC 4.2.2.7) was isolated from the cell extract of an oral bacterium, Bacteroides heparinolyticus. It was a basic protein with an isoelectric point of 9.5. Its molecular weight was 63,000. The enzyme was the most active against heparin among the tested mucopolysaccharides. Catalytic properties may be similar to those of heparinase of Flavobacterium heparinum, since the enzymatic degradation products obtained by using the two enzymes were the same on the basis of pape...

  3. Intracellular glycosidases of human colon Bacteroides ovatus B4-11.

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, N R; Palmer, J K; Pierson, M. D.; Bothast, R J

    1984-01-01

    Activity of various glycosidases in the intracellular enzyme fraction of Bacteroides ovatus B4-11 was investigated. During 120 h of incubation at 37 degrees C, ca. 30% of the crude hemicellulose was hydrolyzed by an intracellular enzyme fraction of strain B4-11. Xylose was the major sugar released from crude hemicellulose. Glycosidases (alpha-1,6-glucosidase, alpha-1,4-glucosidase, beta-1,4-glucosidase, and beta-1,4-xylosidase) were induced in B. ovatus B4-11 by crude hemicellulose and hetero...

  4. Fermentation of fenugreek fiber, psyllium husk, and wheat bran by Bacteroides ovatus V975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaldi, S F; Martin, S A; Prakash, L

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the human colonic bacterium Bacteroides ovatus V975 to ferment fenugreek fiber (Fenufibers), psyllium husk (Metamucil), and wheat bran (Wheat Chex). Strain V975 was incubated in basal medium that contained 0.1 g of each fiber source for 0, 24, or 48 h. Little digestion of either fiber source was detected over 48 h, and little acetate or succinate was produced. From the lack of significant fiber digestion and fermentation by B. ovatus, it seems that all three fiber sources could be used as dietary supplements to increase roughage in the human diet. PMID:10486060

  5. Molecular cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis.

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, D P; Kubiniec, M A; Yoshimura, F; Genco, R J

    1988-01-01

    The gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis 381, fimbrilin, has been cloned and sequenced. The gene was present as a single copy on the bacterial chromosome, and the codon usage in the gene conformed closely to that expected for an abundant protein. The predicted size of the mature protein was 35,924 daltons, and the secretory form may have had a 10-amino-acid, hydrophilic leader sequence similar to the leader sequences of the MePhe fimbriae family. The protein se...

  6. The methylome of the gut microbiome: disparate Dam methylation patterns in intestinal Bacteroides dorei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Leonard

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large interest in the human microbiome in recent years, there are no reports of bacterial DNA methylation in the microbiome. Here metagenomic sequencing using the Pacific Biosciences platform allowed for rapid identification of bacterial GATC methylation status of a bacterial species in human stool samples. For this work, two stool samples were chosen that were dominated by a single species, Bacteroides dorei. Based on 16S rRNA analysis, this species represented over 45% of the bacteria present in these two samples. The B. dorei genome sequence from these samples was determined and the GATC methylation sites mapped. The Bacteroides dorei genome from one subject lacked any GATC methylation and lacked the DNA adenine methyltransferase genes. In contrast, B. dorei from another subject contained 20,551 methylated GATC sites. Of the 4,970 open reading frames identified in the GATC methylated B. dorei genome, 3,184 genes were methylated as well as 1,735 GATC methylations in intergenic regions. These results suggest that DNA methylation patterns are important to consider in multi-omic analyses of microbiome samples seeking to discover the diversity of bacterial functions and may differ between disease states.

  7. Terminal Bacteroid Differentiation Is Associated With Variable Morphological Changes in Legume Species Belonging to the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Jesús; Szűcs, Attila; Boboescu, Iulian Z; Gherman, Vasile D; Kondorosi, Éva; Kereszt, Attila

    2016-03-01

    Medicago and closely related legume species from the inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) impose terminal differentiation onto their bacterial endosymbionts, manifested in genome endoreduplication, cell enlargement, and loss of cell-division capacity. Nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) secreted host peptides are plant effectors of this process. As bacteroids in other IRLC legumes, such as Cicer arietinum and Glycyrrhiza lepidota, were reported not to display features of terminal differentiation, we investigated the fate of bacteroids in species from these genera as well as in four other species representing distinct genera of the phylogenetic tree for this clade. Bacteroids in all tested legumes proved to be larger in size and DNA content than cultured cells; however, the degree of cell elongation was rather variable in the different species. In addition, the reproductive ability of the bacteroids isolated from these legumes was remarkably reduced. In all IRLC species with available sequence data, the existence of NCR genes was found. These results indicate that IRLC legumes provoke terminal differentiation of their endosymbionts with different morphotypes, probably with the help of NCR peptides.

  8. Prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, and Cryptosporidium spp in Da Nang, Vietnam, detected by a multiplex real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ögren, Jessica; Van Nguyen, Song; Nguyen, Minh Khac; Dimberg, Jan; Matussek, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We surveyed the prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Cryptosporidium spp in individuals with and without gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms residing in and around Da Nang city, Vietnam. Fecal samples were collected from children (n = 100) and adults (n = 80) with GI symptoms and from healthy individuals (n = 88) reporting no GI symptoms. Parasite detection was performed by multiplex real-time PCR. Overall, except for G. duodenalis, we found a low prevalence (histolytica and C. spp in all participants with GI symptoms. Specifically for D. fragilis this contrasts with findings in European populations of children with GI symptoms showing prevalence up to 73%. Moreover, our results indicate that the prevalence of G. duodenalis is higher in patients with GI symptoms compared to asymptomatic individuals and this difference is most obvious in young patients. PMID:27102222

  9. Co-existence of zebra mussels and freshwater unionids: Population dynamics of Leptodea fragilis in a coastal wetland infested with zebra mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Amberg, Jon

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, thousands of live Leptodea fragilis were collected from a marsh located in the western basin of Lake Erie that was infested with zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha). Despite the presence of zebra mussels at this site for a number of years, this L. fragilis population showed no signs of competition-induced changes in population dynamics. Biofouling was limited: fewer than 1% of the L. fragilis showed evidence of recent or past zebra mussel colonization. Successful recruitment occurred yearly, with multiple year classes collected that ranged in age from 1 to 12 years. However, age and shell length were not well correlated. Seventy-one percent of the individuals collected were 51-80 mm long, but ranged in age from 2 to 4.5 years. Three different patterns of growth or shell deposition were found. Some individuals grew rapidly, reaching 105 mm in 3.5 years, while others grew only 4.5 mm over the same time period. A few grew poorly during some years but very rapidly in others. Individuals with a shell length of 41 mm or more were sexually mature and females were more common than males. The strong recruitment and steady growth of this population showed no change between the years before and after the zebra mussel invasion, indicating that this marsh is functioning as a natural refugium from potential problems caused by zebra mussels.

  10. Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 bacteroids are not terminally differentiated and show altered O-antigen in nodules of the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade legume Glycyrrhiza uralensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Rivas, Juan C; Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Mok, Kenny C; Villaécija-Aguilar, José A; Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Pierre, Olivier; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Taga, Michiko E; Mergaert, Peter; Vinardell, José M

    2016-09-01

    In rhizobial species that nodulate inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) legumes, such as the interaction between Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago, bacteroid differentiation is driven by an endoreduplication event that is induced by host nodule-specific cysteine rich (NCR) antimicrobial peptides and requires the participation of the bacterial protein BacA. We have studied bacteroid differentiation of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 in three host plants: Glycine max, Cajanus cajan and the IRLC legume Glycyrrhiza uralensis. Flow cytometry, microscopy analyses and viability studies of bacteroids as well as confocal microscopy studies carried out in nodules showed that S. fredii HH103 bacteroids, regardless of the host plant, had deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contents, cellular sizes and survival rates similar to those of free-living bacteria. Contrary to S. meliloti, S. fredii HH103 showed little or no sensitivity to Medicago NCR247 and NCR335 peptides. Inactivation of S. fredii HH103 bacA neither affected symbiosis with Glycyrrhiza nor increased bacterial sensitivity to Medicago NCRs. Finally, HH103 bacteroids isolated from Glycyrrhiza, but not those isolated from Cajanus or Glycine, showed an altered lipopolysaccharide. Our studies indicate that, in contrast to the S. meliloti-Medicago model symbiosis, bacteroids in the S. fredii HH103-Glycyrrhiza symbiosis do not undergo NCR-induced and bacA-dependent terminal differentiation. PMID:26521863

  11. Characterization of Four Outer Membrane Proteins Involved in Binding Starch to the Cell Surface of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    OpenAIRE

    Shipman, Joseph A.; Berleman, James E.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a gram-negative obligate anaerobe, utilizes polysaccharides by binding them to its cell surface and allowing cell-associated enzymes to hydrolyze them into digestible fragments. We use the starch utilization system as a model to analyze the initial steps involved in polysaccharide binding and breakdown. In a recent paper, we reported that one of the outer membrane proteins involved, SusG, had starch-degrading activity but was not sufficient for growth on starch. ...

  12. Physiological Characterization of SusG, an Outer Membrane Protein Essential for Starch Utilization by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    OpenAIRE

    Shipman, Joseph A.; Cho, Kyu Hong; Siegel, Hilary A.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    1999-01-01

    Results from previous studies had suggested that Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron utilizes starch by binding the polysaccharide to the bacterial surface and subsequently degrading the polymer by using cell-associated enzymes. Most of the starch-degrading activity was localized to the periplasm, but a portion appeared to be membrane associated. This raised the possibility that some breakdown might occur in the outer membrane prior to exposure of the polysaccharide to the periplasmic polysaccharide...

  13. A Closer Look at Bacteroides: Phylogenetic Relationship and Genomic Implications of a Life in the Human Gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Fredrik H.; Ussery, David; Nielsen, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    The human gut is extremely densely inhabited by bacteria mainly from two phyla, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and there is a great interest in analyzing whole-genome sequences for these species because of their relation to human health and disease. Here, we do whole-genome comparison of 105 Bacte...... of members of the Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi phylum by whole genome comparison. Gut living Bacteroides have an enriched set of glycan, vitamin, and cofactor enzymes important for diet digestion.......The human gut is extremely densely inhabited by bacteria mainly from two phyla, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and there is a great interest in analyzing whole-genome sequences for these species because of their relation to human health and disease. Here, we do whole-genome comparison of 105...... Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi genomes to elucidate their phylogenetic relationship and to gain insight into what is separating the gut living Bacteroides and Parabacteroides genera from other Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi species. A comprehensive analysis shows that Bacteroides species have a higher number...

  14. Decrease in anaerobe-related bacteraemias and increase in Bacteroides species isolation rate from 1998 to 2007: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Freimann, Sarit; Shapira, Galina; Blank, Helena

    2010-06-01

    Conflicting data have accumulated in recent years regarding the incidence of anaerobic bacteraemias. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of bacteraemias due to anaerobic bacteria and evaluate the importance of anaerobic blood cultures in a university hospital in Israel. A retrospective survey which focused on anaerobic blood culture bottles was performed on blood cultures received in our laboratory during the decade from January 1998 to December 2007. Anaerobic-related bacteraemias decreased during that period, whereas a significant increase was observed in Bacteroides species isolated from the blood cultures (from 18% during 1998-2002 to 43% during 2003-2007). Comparison of the medical records of 54 patients with Bacteroides-related bacteraemia during the two end periods (1998-1999 and 2006-2007) revealed a marked increase in complex underlying diseases. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus type II were found in 29% of the patients in 1998-1999 and increased to 43-45% of the patients in 2006-2007. Ischemic heart disease also increased from 14% of the patients in 1998-1999 to 43% in 2006-2007. We conclude that although positive anaerobic blood cultures account for a small percentage of positive blood samples, the growing involvement of Bacteroides species-related bacteraemias together with an increase in complex underlying diseases in these patients emphasize the importance of anaerobic blood cultures, particularly in patients with co-morbidities.

  15. Use of abundance ratios of somatic coliphages and bacteriophages of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron GA17 for microbial source identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniesa, Maite; Lucena, Francisco; Blanch, Anicet R; Payán, Andrey; Jofre, Juan

    2012-12-01

    Water contaminated with human faeces is a risk to human health and management of water bodies can be improved by determining the sources of faecal pollution. Field studies show that existing methods are insufficient and that different markers are required. This study proposes the combined use of two microbial indicators, the concentrations of which are presented as ratios. This provides a more reliable approach to identifying faecal sources as it avoids variation due to treatment or ageing of the contamination. Among other indicators, bacteriophages have been proposed as rapid and cheap indicators of faecal pollution. Samples analysed in this study were derived from wastewater treatment plants (raw sewage, secondary and tertiary effluents and raw sewage sludge) river water, seawater and animal related wastewater. The abundance ratios of faecal coliforms and Bacteroides phages, either strain RYC2056 (non-specific for faecal origin) or strain GA17 (specific for human pollution), and among somatic coliphages and phages infecting both Bacteroides strains, were evaluated. The results indicate that the ratio of somatic coliphages and phages infecting Bacteroides strain GA17, which is specific to human faecal sources, provides a robust method for discriminating samples, even those presenting different levels and ages of pollution, and allows samples polluted with human faeces to be distinguished from those containing animal faecal pollution. This method allows the generation of numerical data that can be further applied to numerical methods for faecal pollution discrimination. PMID:23039916

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the tetracycline-degrading monooxygenase TetX2 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the tetracycline-degrading monooxygenase TetX2 from B. thetaiotaomicron are reported. The flavin-dependent monooxygenase TetX2 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron confers resistance against tetracyclines in aerobically grown Escherichia coli. TetX2 modifies several tetracycline antibiotics by regioselective hydroxylation of the substrates to 11a-hydroxy-tetracyclines. X-ray diffraction data were collected from a native TetX2 crystal and a TetX2 crystal with incorporated selenomethionine to resolutions of 2.5 and 3.0 Å, respectively. The native crystal belonged to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.55, b = 80.88, c = 87.53 Å, α = 111.09, β = 98.98, γ = 93.38°, whereas the selenomethionine-labelled TetX2 crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 87.34, b = 68.66, c = 152.48 Å, β = 101.08°

  17. Two New Xylanases with Different Substrate Specificities from the Human Gut Bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2014-01-24

    Xylan is an abundant plant cell wall polysaccharide and is a dominant component of dietary fiber. Bacteria in the distal human gastrointestinal tract produce xylanase enzymes to initiate the degradation of this complex heteropolymer. These xylanases typically derive from glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 10 and 11; however, analysis of the genome sequence of the xylan-degrading human gut bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393 revealed the presence of two putative GH8 xylanases. In the current study, we demonstrate that the two genes encode enzymes that differ in activity. The xyn8A gene encodes an endoxylanase (Xyn8A), and rex8A encodes a reducing-end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanase (Rex8A). Xyn8A hydrolyzed both xylopentaose (X5) and xylohexaose (X6) to a mixture of xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3), while Rex8A hydrolyzed X3 through X6 to a mixture of xylose (X1) and X2. Moreover, rex8A is located downstream of a GH3 gene (xyl3A) that was demonstrated to exhibit β-xylosidase activity and would be able to further hydrolyze X2 to X1. Mutational analyses of putative active site residues of both Xyn8A and Rex8A confirm their importance in catalysis by these enzymes. Recent genome sequences of gut bacteria reveal an increase in GH8 Rex enzymes, especially among the Bacteroidetes, indicating that these genes contribute to xylan utilization in the human gut.

  18. Characterization of certain proteinase isoenzymes produced by benign and virulent strains of Bacteroides nodosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R S

    1985-11-01

    Three proteinase isoenzymes from one benign strain of Bacteroides nodosus and five proteinase isoenzymes from each of two virulent strains of B. nodosus were purified by horizontal slab polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified isoenzymes hydrolysed casein, collagen I, collagen III, elastin, alpha-elastin, fibrinogen, gelatin, haemoglobin and alpha-keratin. The pH optima of all the isoenzymes lay between 7.25 and 9.5, the range of 8.75-9.25 being common to all. The isoenzymes were inhibited by phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, diphenylcarbamyl chloride, L-(1-tosylamide-2-phenyl)ethyl chloromethyl ketone, EGTA and EDTA, indicating that they were chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases that require a metal ion for stability or activity. EDTA inhibition was not reversed by addition of Ca2+ or Mg2+. Some isoenzymes were activated by Mg2+, Ca2+, Cr3+ and Se4+ and all were inhibited by Fe2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+. Isoenzymes from benign strains had a lower temperature stability, losing all activity at 55 degrees C, whereas those from virulent strains lost all activity at 60 degrees C.

  19. Levan Enhances Associated Growth of Bacteroides, Escherichia, Streptococcus and Faecalibacterium in Fecal Microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaarel Adamberg

    Full Text Available The role of dietary fiber in supporting healthy gut microbiota and overall well-being of the host has been revealed in several studies. Here, we show the effect of a bacterial polyfructan levan on the growth dynamics and metabolism of fecal microbiota in vitro by using isothermal microcalorimetry. Eleven fecal samples from healthy donors were incubated in phosphate-buffered defined medium with or without levan supplementation and varying presence of amino acids. The generation of heat, changes in pH and microbiota composition, concentrations of produced and consumed metabolites during the growth were determined. The composition of fecal microbiota and profile of metabolites changed in response to substrate (levan and amino acids availability. The main products of levan metabolism were acetic, lactic, butyric, propionic and succinic acids and carbon dioxide. Associated growth of levan-degrading (e.g. Bacteroides and butyric acid-producing (e.g. Faecalibacterium taxa was observed in levan-supplemented media. The study shows that the capacity of levan and possibly also other dietary fibers/prebiotics to modulate the composition and function of colon microbiota can be predicted by using isothermal microcalorimetry of fecal samples linked to metabolite and consortia analyses.

  20. Levan Enhances Associated Growth of Bacteroides, Escherichia, Streptococcus and Faecalibacterium in Fecal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamberg, Kaarel; Tomson, Katrin; Talve, Tiina; Pudova, Ksenia; Puurand, Marju; Visnapuu, Triinu; Alamäe, Tiina; Adamberg, Signe

    2015-01-01

    The role of dietary fiber in supporting healthy gut microbiota and overall well-being of the host has been revealed in several studies. Here, we show the effect of a bacterial polyfructan levan on the growth dynamics and metabolism of fecal microbiota in vitro by using isothermal microcalorimetry. Eleven fecal samples from healthy donors were incubated in phosphate-buffered defined medium with or without levan supplementation and varying presence of amino acids. The generation of heat, changes in pH and microbiota composition, concentrations of produced and consumed metabolites during the growth were determined. The composition of fecal microbiota and profile of metabolites changed in response to substrate (levan and amino acids) availability. The main products of levan metabolism were acetic, lactic, butyric, propionic and succinic acids and carbon dioxide. Associated growth of levan-degrading (e.g. Bacteroides) and butyric acid-producing (e.g. Faecalibacterium) taxa was observed in levan-supplemented media. The study shows that the capacity of levan and possibly also other dietary fibers/prebiotics to modulate the composition and function of colon microbiota can be predicted by using isothermal microcalorimetry of fecal samples linked to metabolite and consortia analyses. PMID:26629816

  1. How does oxygen inhibit central metabolism in the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, N; Imlay, J A

    2001-03-01

    The molecular basis of obligate anaerobiosis is not well established. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is an opportunistic pathogen that cannot grow in fully aerobic habitats. Because microbial niches reflect features of energy-producing strategies, we suspected that aeration would interfere with its central metabolism. In anaerobic medium, this bacterium fermented carbohydrates to a mixture of succinate, propionate and acetate. When cultures were exposed to air, the formation of succinate and propionate ceased abruptly. In vitro analysis demonstrated that the fumarase of the succinate-propionate pathway contains an iron-sulphur cluster that is sensitive to superoxide. In vivo, fumarase activity fell to PFOR), the first enzyme in the acetate fermentation branch, to 3% of its anaerobic activity. This cluster-containing enzyme was damaged in vitro by molecular oxygen but not by superoxide. Thus, aerobic growth is precluded by the vulnerability of these iron-sulphur cluster enzymes to oxidation. Importantly, both enzymes were maintained in a stable, inactive form for long periods in aerobic cells; they were then rapidly repaired when the bacterium was returned to anaerobic medium. This result explains how this pathogen can easily recover from occasional exposure to oxygen. PMID:11260473

  2. Coculture fermentations of Bifidobacterium species and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron reveal a mechanistic insight into the prebiotic effect of inulin-type fructans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falony, Gwen; Calmeyn, Thomas; Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2009-04-01

    Four bifidobacteria, each representing a cluster of strains with specific inulin-type-fructan degradation capacities, were grown in coculture fermentations with Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262, a strain able to metabolize both oligofructose and inulin. In a medium for colon bacteria with inulin as the sole added energy source, the ability of the bifidobacteria to compete for this substrate reflected phenotypical variation. Bifidobacterium breve Yakult, a strain that was not able to degrade oligofructose or inulin, was outcompeted by B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262. Bifidobacterium adolescentis LMG 10734, a strain that could degrade oligofructose (displaying a preferential breakdown mechanism) but that did not grow on inulin, managed to become competitive when oligofructose and short fractions of inulin started to accumulate in the fermentation medium. Bifidobacterium angulatum LMG 11039(T), a strain that was previously shown to degrade all oligofructose fractions simultaneously and to be able to partially break down inulin, was competitive from the beginning of the fermentation, consuming short fractions of inulin from the moment they appeared. Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047, representing a cluster of bifidobacteria that shared both high fructose consumption and oligofructose degradation rates and were able to perform partial breakdown of inulin, was the dominating strain in a coculture with B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262. These observations indicate that distinct subgroups within the large-intestinal Bifidobacterium population will be stimulated by different groups of prebiotic inulin-type fructans, a variation that could be reflected in differences concerning their health-promoting effects.

  3. Loss of NHE3 alters gut microbiota composition and influences Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engevik, Melinda A; Aihara, Eitaro; Montrose, Marshall H; Shull, Gary E; Hassett, Daniel J; Worrell, Roger T

    2013-11-15

    Changes in the intestinal microbiota have been linked to diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and Clostridium difficile (C. difficile)-associated disease. Despite this, it remains unclear how the intestinal environment, set by ion transport, affects luminal and mucosa-associated bacterial composition. Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3), a target of C. difficile toxin B, plays an integral role in intestinal Na(+) absorption. Thus the NHE3-deficient mouse model was chosen to examine the effect of pH and ion composition on bacterial growth. We hypothesized that ion transport-induced change in the intestinal environment would lead to alteration of the microbiota. Region-specific changes in ion composition and pH correlated with region-specific alteration of luminal and mucosal-associated bacteria with general decreases in Firmicutes and increases in Bacteroidetes members. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. thetaiotaomicron) increased in NHE3(-/-) terminal ileum and was examined in vitro to determine whether altered Na(+) was sufficient to affect growth. Increased in vitro growth of B. thetaiotaomicron occurred in 43 mM Na(+) correlating with the NHE3(-/-) mouse terminal ileum [Na(+)]. NHE3(-/-) terminal ileum displayed increased fut2 mRNA and fucosylation correlating with B. thetaiotaomicron growth. Inoculation of B. thetaiotaomicron in wild-type and NHE3(-/-) terminal ileum organoids displayed increased fut2 and fucosylation, indicating that B. thetaiotaomicron alone is sufficient for the increased fucosylation seen in vivo. These data demonstrate that loss of NHE3 alters the intestinal environment, leading to region-specific changes in bacteria, and shed light on the growth requirements of some gut microbiota members, which is vital for creating better treatments of complex diseases with an altered gut microbiota.

  4. Estabishment of techniques for gene replacement in Kluyveromyces fragilis%脆壁克鲁维酵母基因置换技术的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杰; 曹宇婷; 徐欣; 张旭; 李璐; 吕洋; 卢松冲

    2013-01-01

    To estibish the homologous recombination and electroporation system in Kluyverom-yces fragilis, we constructed the plasmid pPkan was coustucted which with Homologous arms of the UAS of lactase gene from lactase product strain. Paper studied the effects of growth phase of cel s, electric para-meters, cultured time after electroporation on transformation efficiency. At the same time, we studied the relation that combined the electroporation with REMI. The result indicated that an efficient and stable system of electroporation in Kluyveromyces fragilis had been developed, providing a powerful tool for the transgenic research of Kluyveromyces fragilis. The results showed that a high transformation efficiency was achieved in Kluyveromyces fragilis cels at mid-log growth phase electroporated with voltage, electric intensity 7.5 kV·cm-1 and cultured time after electroporation was 90 min. However, when restriction enzyme was added to electroporation system at 10 μL, the transformation efficiency was not increased. And 87.5% of positive transformants was homologous recombination.%  以中性乳糖酶生产菌脆壁克鲁维酵母为材料,构建以kan基因为筛选标记、以脆壁克鲁维酵母乳糖酶基因上游调控区为同源臂的质粒pPkan.将质粒pPkan电击转化脆壁克鲁维酵母,对受体菌生长时期、电场强度、电击后培养时间等条件进行优化.结果表明,以OD600为0.8的脆壁克鲁维酵母为受体、电压1.5 kV、电场强度为7.5 kV·cm-1、电击后培养时间为90 min,可获得较高的转化率,最高转化效率为2.37×102转化子·μgDNA.在电击转化的同时加入限制性内切酶10μL,对电击转化的转化率无显著影响.经PCR筛选证实87.5%的转化子为同源重组,从而建立一套有效的脆壁克鲁维酵母基因置换技术.

  5. Effect of extracellular pH on growth and proton motive force of Bacteroides succinogenes, a cellulolytic ruminal bacterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, J B

    1987-01-01

    The utilization of cellulose or cellobiose by Bacteroides succinogenes S85 was severely inhibited at pH values of less than 5.7. Since low pH inhibited the utilization of both cellobiose and cellulose, changes in cellulase activity could not explain the effect. At an extracellular pH of 6.9, the pH gradient (delta pH) across the cell membrane was only 0.07 U. As extracellular pH declined from 6.9 to 5.7, intracellular pH decreased to a smaller extent than extracellular pH and delta pH increas...

  6. Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393, a member of the human colonic microbiome, upregulates multiple endoxylanases during growth on xylan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Pereira, Gabriel V.; Cavalcante, Janaina J. V.; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick; Cann, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Many human diets contain arabinoxylan, and the ease of genome sequencing coupled with reduced cost have led to unraveling the arsenal of genes utilized by the colonic Bacteroidetes to depolymerize this polysaccharide. The colonic Bacteroidetes with potential to ferment arabinoxylans include Bacteroides intestinalis. In this study, we analyzed the hydrolytic activities of members of a xylan degradation cluster encoded on the genome of Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393. Here, it is demonstrated that a cocktail of the xylanolytic enzymes completely hydrolyze arabinoxylans found in human diets. We show that this bacterium and relatives have evolved and secrete a unique bifunctional endoxylanase/arabinofuranosidase in the same polypeptide. The bifunctional enzyme and other secreted enzymes attack the polysaccharides extracellularly to remove the side-chains, exposing the xylan backbone for cleavage to xylo-oligosaccharides and xylose. These end products are transported into the cell where a β-xylosidase cleaves the oligosaccharides to fermentable sugars. While our experiments focused on B. intestinalis, it is likely that the extracellular enzymes also release nutrients to members of the colonic microbial community that practice cross-feeding. The presence of the genes characterized in this study in other colonic Bacteroidetes suggests a conserved strategy for energy acquisition from arabinoxylan, a component of human diets. PMID:27681607

  7. Structures of complexes of a metal-independent glycosyltransferase GT6 from Bacteroides ovatus with UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (UDP-GalNAc) and its hydrolysis products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tram T K; Stinson, Brittany; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Brew, Keith; Acharya, K Ravi

    2014-03-21

    Mammalian members of glycosyltransferase family 6 (GT6) of the CAZy database have a GT-A fold containing a conserved Asp-X-Asp (DXD) sequence that binds an essential metal cofactor. Bacteroides ovatus GT6a represents a GT6 clade found in more than 30 Gram-negative bacteria that is similar in sequence to the catalytic domains of mammalian GT6, but has an Asn(95)-Ala-Asn(97) (NXN) sequence substituted for the DXD motif and metal-independent catalytic activity. Co-crystals of a low activity mutant of BoGT6a (E192Q) with UDP-GalNAc contained protein complexes with intact UDP-GalNAc and two forms with hydrolysis products (UDP plus GalNAc) representing an initial closed complex and later open form primed for product release. Two cationic residues near the C terminus of BoGT6a, Lys(231) and Arg(243), interact with the diphosphate moiety of UDP-GalNAc, but only Lys(231) interacts with the UDP product and may function in leaving group stabilization. The amide group of Asn(95), the first Asn of the NXN motif, interacts with the ribose moiety of the substrate. This metal-independent GT6 resembles its metal-dependent homologs in undergoing conformational changes on binding UDP-GalNAc that arise from structuring the C terminus to cover this substrate. It appears that in the GT6 family, the metal cofactor functions specifically in binding the UDP moiety in the donor substrate and transition state, actions that can be efficiently performed by components of the polypeptide chain.

  8. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien Andersen, L; Karim, A B; Roager, H M; Vigsnæs, L K; Krogfelt, K A; Licht, T R; Stensvold, C R

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis-positive (D+)/negative (D-), and split into four groups of 21 samples (B+ D+, B+ D-, B- D+, and B- D-). Quantitative PCR targeting the six bacterial taxa Bacteroides, Prevotella, the butyrate-producing clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, the mucin-degrading Akkermansia muciniphila, and the indigenous group of Bifidobacterium was subsequently performed, and the relative abundance of these bacteria across the four groups was compared. The relative abundance of Bacteroides in B- D- samples was significantly higher compared with B+ D- and B+ D+ samples (P Blastocystis alone or combined with D. fragilis is associated with gut microbiota characterized by low relative abundances of Bacteroides and Clostridial cluster XIVa and high levels of Prevotella. PMID:27230509

  9. Probabilistic analysis showing that a combination of bacteroides and methanobrevibacter source tracking markers is effective for identifying waters contaminated by human fecal pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald; Ufnar, Jennifer A.; Whitman, Richard L.; Stewart, Jill R.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial source tracking assays to identify sources of waterborne contamination typically target genetic markers of host-specific microorganisms. However, no bacterial marker has been shown to be 100% host-specific, and cross-reactivity has been noted in studies evaluating known source samples. Using 485 challenge samples from 20 different human and animal fecal sources, this study evaluated microbial source tracking markers including the Bacteroides HF183 16S rRNA, M. smithii nifH, and Enterococcus esp gene targets that have been proposed as potential indicators of human fecal contamination. Bayes' Theorem was used to calculate the conditional probability that these markers or a combination of markers can correctly identify human sources of fecal pollution. All three human-associated markers were detected in 100% of the sewage samples analyzed. Bacteroides HF183 was the most effective marker for determining whether contamination was specifically from a human source, and greater than 98% certainty that contamination was from a human source was shown when both Bacteroides HF183 and M. smithii nifH markers were present. A high degree of certainty was attained even in cases where the prior probability of human fecal contamination was as low as 8.5%. The combination of Bacteroides HF183 and M. smithii nifH source tracking markers can help identify surface waters impacted by human fecal contamination, information useful for prioritizing restoration activities or assessing health risks from exposure to contaminated waters.

  10. Identification of a GH110 subfamily of alpha 1,3-galactosidases: novel enzymes for removal of the alpha 3Gal xenotransplantation antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qiyong P; Yuan, Huaiping; Bennett, Eric P;

    2008-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis had exquisite substrate specificity for the branched blood group B structure Galalpha1-3(Fucalpha1-2)Gal, whereas linear oligosaccharides terminated by alpha1,3-linked galactose such as the immunodominant xenotransplantation epitope Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAc did not serve as substrates...... mechanism. The novel GH110 subfamily offers enzymes with highly improved performance in enzymatic removal of the immunodominant alpha3Gal xenotransplantation epitope....

  11. The structure of BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus reveals a superfamily of bacterial periplasmic proteins with possible inhibitory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of the BVU2987 gene product from B. vulgatus (UniProt A6L4L1) reveals that members of the new Pfam family PF11396 (domain of unknown function; DUF2874) are similar to β-lactamase inhibitor protein and YpmB. Proteins that contain the DUF2874 domain constitute a new Pfam family PF11396. Members of this family have predominantly been identified in microbes found in the human gut and oral cavity. The crystal structure of one member of this family, BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus, has been determined, revealing a β-lactamase inhibitor protein-like structure with a tandem repeat of domains. Sequence analysis and structural comparisons reveal that BVU2987 and other DUF2874 proteins are related to β-lactamase inhibitor protein, PepSY and SmpA-OmlA proteins and hence are likely to function as inhibitory proteins

  12. A method of obtaining dietary data for slow worms (Anguis fragilis) by means of non-harmful cooling and results from a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Iben; Jensen, Jan Kjærgaard; Toft, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Diet composition of slow worms (Anguis fragilis) from a Danish population was recorded from May to September 2006. Slow worms were maintained in cool conditions (at 8°C) for a maximum of 126 h, which made approximately half of the animals regurgitate. The method worked equally well on juveniles...... and adults. The regurgitations revealed that the slow worms preyed on small snails, slugs, pill millipedes (Glomeris marginata), earthworms and Lepidoptera larvae. There were seasonal changes in taxon composition of the diet but no ontogenetic or sex-related differences. The food quality of selected prey...... types was tested on juveniles in a laboratory experiment. Mealworms gave a significantly lower gain in mass and snout-vent length than slugs, earthworms and a mix of all three prey types. A supplementary experiment revealed that slow worms from the present population completely rejected mealworms...

  13. Hymenobacter roseosalivarius gen. nov., sp. nov. from continental Antartica soils and sandstone: bacteria of the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides line of phylogenetic descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, P; Ludwig, W; Hethke, C; Sittig, M; Hoffmann, B; Gallikowski, C A

    1998-08-01

    Aseptically collected sandstone and soil samples from the antarctic Dry Valleys were inoculated into oligotrophic media and incubated under low light intensities. A total of 41 Gram-negative isolates were obtained with reddish colonies spreading on agar. A sandstone isolate and four soil strains were characterized further. They were nearly identical in morphological, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic properties. They produced large amounts of extracellular polymer and utilized for growth: glucose, saccharose, mannitol, sorbitol, L-aspartate, malate and acetate, but not D-ribose, adonitol, DL-alanine, glutamate, glycolate, lactate or succinate. All strains hydrolyzed gelatin, starch, casein, xylan, Tweens 80 or 60 and dead or living yeast cells, but not cellulose or pectin. Nitrate was not reduced, ethanol was not oxidized and acid was not produced from maltose, mannitol or dulcitol. Ammonia was not produced from peptone. They were strictly aerobic. Major fatty acids were n 16:1 d 9, n 16:1 d 11, n 17:1 d 11, and i 15:0. The strains contained the quinone MK-7 and phosphatidylethanolamine as the main phospholipid. The base ratio ranged from 55 to 61 mol% G+C. A 16S rRNA sequence analysis of strains AA-688 and AA-718 showed these to be identical and to represent a special phylogenetic group within the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides major line of descent. Three soil strains labeled "Taxeobacter" Txc1, Txg1, and Txo1 (Reichenbach, 1992) belonged to the same group but had lower sequence similarities (<95%). Some of their characteristics were different from those of the antarctic strains: the utilization of C-compounds, hydrolysis of polymers, temperature tolerances, major fatty acids and base ratios. Txc1 and Txg1 may later have to be considered as members of this group, possibly on the species level, while Txo1 could represent a different related genus. It is concluded that the five antarctic strains represent a new genus and species for which the name

  14. A PCR Assay To Discriminate Human and Ruminant Feces on the Basis of Host Differences in Bacteroides-Prevotella Genes Encoding 16S rRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhard, Anne E.; Field, Katharine G.

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to develop a rapid, inexpensive method of diagnosing the source of fecal pollution in water. In previous research, we identified Bacteroides-Prevotella ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR markers based on analysis. These markers length heterogeneity PCR and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism distinguish cow from human feces. Here, we recovered 16S rDNA clones from natural waters that were close phylogenetic relatives of the markers. From the sequence data, we designed spec...

  15. Structure of a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) family protein from the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of a novel MACPF protein, which may play a role in the adaptation of commensal bacteria to host environments in the human gut, was determined and analyzed. Membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) proteins are transmembrane pore-forming proteins that are important in both human immunity and the virulence of pathogens. Bacterial MACPFs are found in diverse bacterial species, including most human gut-associated Bacteroides species. The crystal structure of a bacterial MACPF-domain-containing protein BT-3439 (Bth-MACPF) from B. thetaiotaomicron, a predominant member of the mammalian intestinal microbiota, has been determined. Bth-MACPF contains a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain and two novel C-terminal domains that resemble ribonuclease H and interleukin 8, respectively. The entire protein adopts a flat crescent shape, characteristic of other MACPF proteins, that may be important for oligomerization. This Bth-MACPF structure provides new features and insights not observed in two previous MACPF structures. Genomic context analysis infers that Bth-MACPF may be involved in a novel protein-transport or nutrient-uptake system, suggesting an important role for these MACPF proteins, which were likely to have been inherited from eukaryotes via horizontal gene transfer, in the adaptation of commensal bacteria to the host environment

  16. The reduction of murine norovirus 1, B. fragilis HSP40 infecting phage B40-8 and E. coli after a mild thermal pasteurization process of raspberry puree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, L; Uyttendaele, M; Van Coillie, E; Debevere, J

    2008-10-01

    Pasteurization processes of raspberry puree are nowadays limited to short times and rather low temperatures to maintain flavor and nutritional quality. Norovirus (NoV) outbreaks associated with raspberries highlight the need to determine the survival of NoV on this type of soft fruit. Therefore, resistance of murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate for human NoV, B. fragilis HSP40 infecting phage B40-8, and E. coli towards mild pasteurization was tested. Raspberry puree heat treated at 65 degrees C for 30s showed a 1.86, 2.77, and 3.89 log reduction of, respectively, MNV-1, E. coli, and B40-8. Heating at 75 degrees C for 15s established a 2.81 log reduction of MNV-1 while a 3.44 and 3.61 log reduction of B40-8 and E. coli was observed. No supplementary lethal effect of holding the heat-treated raspberry puree at 4 degrees C overnight was noticed. B40-8 failed to be useful as a tool to monitor NoV inactivation during mild pasteurization processes. Moreover, pasteurized raspberry puree.

  17. A zymodeme study of Entamoeba histolytica in a group of South African schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeaunt, P G; Williams, J E; Jackson, T F; Simjee, A E

    1982-01-01

    Using a biphasic culture medium, stocks of intestinal amoebae were isolated from a group of children attending school in Durban, South Africa. These were compared with stocks collected in other areas of the world already characterized using the electrophoretic patterns of four enzymes: glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI), phosphoglucomutase (PGM) L-malate: NADP+ oxido-reductase (oxalacetate-decarboxylating) (ME) and hexokinase (HK). 33% of 94 samples grew Entamoeba histolytica, only one of which gave a pattern indicative of a pathogenic stock. Entamoeba hartmanni, Dientamoeba fragilis and Entamoeba coli were also grown from some samples, increasing the total positive samples for all species isolated to 40%. PMID:6287686

  18. Structure of the GH76 α-mannanase homolog, BT2949, from the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-resolution structure of a noncanonical α-mannanase relevant to human health and nutrition has been solved via heavy-atom phasing of a selenomethionine derivative. The large bowel microbiota, a complex ecosystem resident within the gastrointestinal tract of all human beings and large mammals, functions as an essential, nonsomatic metabolic organ, hydrolysing complex dietary polysaccharides and modulating the host immune system to adequately tolerate ingested antigens. A significant member of this community, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, has evolved a complex system for sensing and processing a wide variety of natural glycoproducts in such a way as to provide maximum benefit to itself, the wider microbial community and the host. The immense ability of B. thetaiotaomicron as a ‘glycan specialist’ resides in its enormous array of carbohydrate-active enzymes, many of which are arranged into polysaccharide-utilization loci (PULs) that are able to degrade sugar polymers that are often inaccessible to other gut residents, notably α-mannan. The B. thetaiotaomicron genome encodes ten putative α-mannanases spread across various PULs; however, little is known about the activity of these enzymes or the wider implications of α-mannan metabolism for the health of both the microbiota and the host. In this study, SAD phasing of a selenomethionine derivative has been used to investigate the structure of one such B. thetaiotaomicron enzyme, BT2949, which belongs to the GH76 family of α-mannanases. BT2949 presents a classical (α/α)6-barrel structure comprising a large extended surface cleft common to other GH76 family members. Analysis of the structure in conjunction with sequence alignments reveals the likely location of the catalytic active site of this noncanonical GH76

  19. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta. Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation. METHODS: Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene. RESULTS: B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats. CONCLUSIONS: B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to

  20. Fermentable non-starch polysaccharides increases the abundance of Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas in ileal microbial community of growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, E; Roos, S; Liu, H Y; Lindberg, J E

    2014-11-01

    Most plant-origin fiber sources used in pig production contains a mixture of soluble and insoluble non-starch polysaccharides (NSP). The knowledge about effects of these sources of NSP on the gut microbiota and its fermentation products is still scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of feeding diets with native sources of NSP on the ileal and fecal microbial composition and the dietary impact on the concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and lactic acid. The experiment comprised four diets and four periods in a change-over design with seven post valve t-cecum cannulated growing pigs. The four diets were balanced to be similar in NSP content and included one of four fiber sources, two diets were rich in pectins, through inclusion of chicory forage (CFO) and sugar beet pulp, and two were rich in arabinoxylan, through inclusion of wheat bran (WB) and grass meal. The gut microbial composition was assessed with terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length polymorphism and the abundance of Lactobacillus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas and the β-xylosidase gene, xynB, were assessed with quantitative PCR. The gut microbiota did not cluster based on NSP structure (arabinoxylan or pectin) rather, the effect was to a high degree ingredient specific. In pigs fed diet CFO, three TRFs related to Prevotellaceae together consisted of more than 25% of the fecal microbiota, which is about 3 to 23 times higher (Pchicory pectin increased the acetic acid proportion in both ileal digesta and feces. PMID:25046106

  1. Degradation of fructans and production of propionic acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are enhanced by shortage of amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe eAdamberg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is commonly found in the human colon and stabilizes its ecosystem by the catabolism of various polysaccharides. A model of cross-talk between the metabolism of amino acids and fructans in B. thetaiotaomicron was proposed. The growth of B. thetaiotaomicron DSM 2079 in two defined media containing mineral salts and vitamins, and supplemented with either 20 or 2 amino acids, was studied in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The polyfructans inulin (from chicory and levan (synthesized using levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae, two fructooligosaccharide preparations with different composition, sucrose and fructose were tested as substrates. The calorimetric power-time curves were substrate specific and typically multiauxic. A surplus of amino acids reduced the consumption of longer oligosaccharides (DP > 3. Bacterial growth was not detected either in the carbohydrate free medium containing amino acids or in the medium with inulin as a sole carbohydrate. In amino acid-restricted medium, fermentation leading to acetic acid formation was dominant at the beginning of growth (up to 24 h, followed by increased lactic acid production, and mainly propionic and succinic acids were produced at the end of fermentation. In the medium supplemented with 20 amino acids, the highest production of D-lactate (82 ± 33 mmol/gDW occurred in parallel with extensive consumption (up to 17 mmol/gDW of amino acids, especially Ser, Thr and Asp. The production of Ala and Glu was observed at growth on all substrates, and the production was enhanced under amino acid deficiency. The study revealed the influence of amino acids on fructan metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and showed that defined growth media are invaluable in elucidating quantitative metabolic profiles of the bacteria. Levan was shown to act as an easily degradable substrate for B. thetaiotaomicron. The effect of levan on balancing or modifying colon microbiota will be studied in

  2. Structure of the GH76 α-mannanase homolog, BT2949, from the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Andrew J. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Cuskin, Fiona [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Spears, Richard J.; Dabin, Jerome; Turkenburg, Johan P. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gilbert, Harry J., E-mail: harry.gilbert@newcastle.ac.uk [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Davies, Gideon J., E-mail: harry.gilbert@newcastle.ac.uk [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    A high-resolution structure of a noncanonical α-mannanase relevant to human health and nutrition has been solved via heavy-atom phasing of a selenomethionine derivative. The large bowel microbiota, a complex ecosystem resident within the gastrointestinal tract of all human beings and large mammals, functions as an essential, nonsomatic metabolic organ, hydrolysing complex dietary polysaccharides and modulating the host immune system to adequately tolerate ingested antigens. A significant member of this community, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, has evolved a complex system for sensing and processing a wide variety of natural glycoproducts in such a way as to provide maximum benefit to itself, the wider microbial community and the host. The immense ability of B. thetaiotaomicron as a ‘glycan specialist’ resides in its enormous array of carbohydrate-active enzymes, many of which are arranged into polysaccharide-utilization loci (PULs) that are able to degrade sugar polymers that are often inaccessible to other gut residents, notably α-mannan. The B. thetaiotaomicron genome encodes ten putative α-mannanases spread across various PULs; however, little is known about the activity of these enzymes or the wider implications of α-mannan metabolism for the health of both the microbiota and the host. In this study, SAD phasing of a selenomethionine derivative has been used to investigate the structure of one such B. thetaiotaomicron enzyme, BT2949, which belongs to the GH76 family of α-mannanases. BT2949 presents a classical (α/α){sub 6}-barrel structure comprising a large extended surface cleft common to other GH76 family members. Analysis of the structure in conjunction with sequence alignments reveals the likely location of the catalytic active site of this noncanonical GH76.

  3. Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 ameliorates metabolic and immunological dysfunction in mice with high-fat-diet induced obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Gauffin Cano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Associations have been made between obesity and reduced intestinal numbers of members of the phylum Bacteroidetes, but there is no direct evidence of the role these bacteria play in obesity. Herein, the effects of Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 on obesity-related metabolic and immune alterations have been evaluated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Adult (6-8 week male wild-type C57BL-6 mice were fed a standard diet or a high-fat-diet HFD to induce obesity, supplemented or not with B. uniformis CECT 7771 for seven weeks. Animal weight was monitored and histologic, biochemical, immunocompetent cell functions, and features of the faecal microbiota were analysed after intervention. The oral administration of B. uniformis CECT 7771 reduced body weight gain, liver steatosis and liver cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and increased small adipocyte numbers in HFD-fed mice. The strain also reduced serum cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, insulin and leptin levels, and improved oral tolerance to glucose in HFD fed mice. The bacterial strain also reduced dietary fat absorption, as indicated by the reduced number of fat micelles detected in enterocytes. Moreover, B. uniformis CECT 7771 improved immune defence mechanisms, impaired in obesity. HFD-induced obesity led to a decrease in TNF-α production by peritoneal macrophages stimulated with LPS, conversely, the administration of B. uniformis CECT 7771 increased TNF-α production and phagocytosis. Administering this strain also increased TNF-α production by dendritic cells (DCs in response to LPS stimulation, which was significantly reduced by HFD. B. uniformis CECT 7771 also restored the capacity of DCs to induce a T-cell proliferation response, which was impaired in obese mice. HFD induced marked changes in gut microbiota composition, which were partially restored by the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, the findings indicate that administration of B. uniformis CECT 7771 ameliorates HFD

  4. Pglyrp-Regulated Gut Microflora Prevotella falsenii, Parabacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides eggerthii Enhance and Alistipes finegoldii Attenuates Colitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziarski, Roman; Park, Shin Yong; Kashyap, Des Raj; Dowd, Scot E; Gupta, Dipika

    2016-01-01

    Dysbiosis is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is unclear which specific intestinal bacteria predispose to and which protect from IBD and how they are regulated. Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (Pglyrps) are antibacterial, participate in maintaining intestinal microflora, and modulate inflammatory responses. Mice deficient in any one of the four Pglyrp genes are more sensitive to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, and stools from Pglyrp-deficient mice transferred to wild type (WT) germ-free mice predispose them to much more severe colitis than stools from WT mice. However, the identities of these Pglyrp-regulated bacteria that predispose Pglyrp-deficient mice to colitis or protect WT mice from colitis are not known. Here we identified significant changes in β-diversity of stool bacteria in Pglyrp-deficient mice compared with WT mice. The most consistent changes in microbiome in all Pglyrp-deficient mice were in Bacteroidales, from which we selected four species, two with increased abundance (Prevotella falsenii and Parabacteroides distasonis) and two with decreased abundance (Bacteroides eggerthii and Alistipes finegoldii). We then gavaged WT mice with stock type strains of these species to test the hypothesis that they predispose to or protect from DSS-induced colitis. P. falsenii, P. distasonis, and B. eggerthii all enhanced DSS-induced colitis in both WT mice with otherwise undisturbed intestinal microflora and in WT mice with antibiotic-depleted intestinal microflora. By contrast, A. finegoldii (which is the most abundant species in WT mice) attenuated DSS-induced colitis both in WT mice with otherwise undisturbed intestinal microflora and in WT mice with antibiotic-depleted intestinal microflora, similar to the colitis protective effect of the entire normal microflora. These results identify P. falsenii, P. distasonis, and B. eggerthii as colitis-promoting species and A. finegoldii as colitis-protective species.

  5. Infection with bacteroides thetaiotaomicron during posterior decompression and dynamic stabilization of the lumbar spine: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Hansberry, David R; Goldstein, Ira M

    2014-08-01

    Patient and surgical risk factors have often been implicated for postoperative posterior spinal wound infection. A 56-year-old male with widely disseminated multiple myeloma presented with severe back pain and lower extremity weakness as a result of fracture and collapse of the L4 vertebral body. Posterior decompression involving bilateral pedicle resection and partial L4 corpectomy was performed. Stabilization was performed by Dynesys instrumentation of L3-5, screw supplementation with polymethylmethacrylate, and posterolateral fusion was performed. Postoperatively, the patient suffered from multiple infections, including Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which were eventually resolved with antibiotic as well as incision and debridement treatment regimens. In cases with numerous perioperative risk factors for infections, the best therapeutic approach may be a preventative one. An understanding of the relevant risk factors may enable the physician to facilitate a perioperative condition best suited for optimal treatment. A case report of infection with Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron during lumbar decompression and dynamic stabilization as well as a review of the literature regarding infection risk factors are presented.

  6. [Tracing the Fecal Contamination Sources Based on Bacteroides 16S rRNA PCR- DGGE in Karst Groundwater: Taking Laolongdong Underground River System, Nanshan, Chongqing as an Example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Jiang, Yong-jun; Zhang, Yuan-zhu; Duan, Yi-fan; Lü, Xian-fu; He, Qiu-fang

    2016-05-15

    Microbial contamination in karst groundwater continually increases and tracing the source researches has become a hot topic for international researchers. In this study, Laolongdong underground river at Nanshan, Chongqing was chosen as an example to adopt filter membrane methods to monitor the fecal microbial contaminations including the total bacterial concentration (TB), the total E. coli concentration (TE), the total fecal coliform (FC) and the total fecal Streptocoocci (FS). Bacteriodes was used as an indicator and PCR-DGGE analysis was used to trace fecal contamination sources in karst groundwater. The results suggested that groundwater in this area was seriously polluted by microbes from feces. The concentrations of microbial parameters exceeded limited levels greatly and the total bacterial amounts ranged 10-2.9 x 10⁷ CFU · mL⁻¹, the concentrations of E. coli were between 4.3-4.0 x 10⁵ CFU · mL⁻¹, the max concentration of FC was 1.1 x 10⁶ CFU · (100 mL)⁻¹ and the max concentration of FS was 1.1 x 10⁵ CFU · (100 mL)⁻¹. The FC/FS ratios were mostly over 2 which suggested that the main fecal source in groundwater was human feces. In addition, PCR-DGGE contrastive analysis of Bacteroides communities showed that the similarities between groundwater samples and human feces were in range of 7. 1% -69. 1% , and the similarity of the groundwater sample from Laolongdong underground river outlet was 69.1% . Bacteroides community similarities between groundwater samples and swine feces were in range of 1.1%-53.4%, and the similarity of Laolongdong underground river outlet was merely 1.5%. The similarity data implied that groundwater contamination resulted mainly from human feces, swine feces contamination composed part of animals' fecal contamination, and other animals' feces participated too. Furthermore, sequencing results of PCR-DGGE products revealed that most Bacteroides in groundwater originated from human intestinal tract and human feces

  7. Scientific Opinion on the safety of ‘heat-treated milk products fermented with Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964’ as a novel food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA NDA Panel was asked to carry out the additional assessment for ‘pasteurised milk products fermented with Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964’ as a novel food (NF) in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97. Pasteurised or ultra...... of vitamins B2 and B12 and furosine in heat-treated fermented milk products does not give rise to concerns regarding disadvantageous nutritional effects. The Panel considers that the microbiological data provided do not give rise to safety concerns. The Panel also notes that a pilot study and a RCT over six...... weeks with 140 volunteers receiving daily doses of a spray-dried heat-treated fermented milk product containing intakes of up to 1 ´ 1012 inactivated bacterial cells of B. xylanisolvens DSM 23964 were provided. No clinical effects related to the treatment were observed in the two studies. Although...

  8. Structural characteristics of polysaccharides that induce protection against intra-abdominal abscess formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Tzianabos, A O; Onderdonk, A B; Zaleznik, D F; Smith, R. S.; Kasper, D L

    1994-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the anaerobe most commonly isolated from clinical cases of intra-abdominal sepsis. In a rodent model of this disease process, intraperitoneal injection of the capsular polysaccharide complex (CPC) from B. fragilis provokes abscess formation, while subcutaneous administration of this complex confers protection against B. fragilis-induced intra-abdominal abscesses. The CPC consists of two discrete polysaccharides, polysaccharides A and B (PS A and PS B), each possessing ...

  9. A soluble suppressor T cell factor protects against experimental intraabdominal abscesses.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaleznik, D F; Finberg, R W; Shapiro, M E; Onderdonk, A B; Kasper, D L

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a suppressor T cell factor which protects mice against intraabdominal abscesses caused by Bacteroides fragilis. This soluble cell-free factor (ITF) is derived from splenic T cells from mice immunized with capsular polysaccharide (CP) of B. fragilis. Mice receiving ITF are protected from developing abscesses caused by B. fragilis to the same degree as animals receiving intact immune splenic T cells. The factor appears to be small in molecular size as protective activity is...

  10. Monitoring Bacteroides spp. markers, nutrients, metals and Escherichia coli in soil and leachate after land application of three types of municipal biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Crystal A; Jordan, Katerina S; Habash, Marc B; Dunfield, Kari E

    2015-03-01

    A lysimeter-based field study was done to monitor the transfer of culturable Escherichia coli, general (ALLBAC), human (Hf183) and swine (PIG-BAC-1) specific 16S rRNA Bacteroides spp. markers, nutrients and metals through soils and leachate over time following land application of a CP1/Class A as well as two CP2/Class B municipal biosolids (MBs). Hf183 markers were detected up to six days following application in soils receiving dewatered and liquid MBs, but not in leachate, suggesting their use in source tracking is better suited for recent pollution events. The CP2/Class B biosolids and swine manure contributed the highest microbial load with E. coli loads (between 2.5 and 3.7 log CFU (100 mL)(-1)) being greater than North American concentration recommendations for safe recreational water. ALLBAC persisted in soils and leachate receiving all treatments and was detected prior to amendment application demonstrating its unsuitability for identifying the presence of fecal pollution. A significant increase in NO₃-N (for Lystek and dewatered MBs) and total-P (for dewatered and liquid MBs) in leachate was observed in plots receiving the CP1/Class A and CP2/Class B type MBs which exceeded North American guidelines, suggesting impact to surface water. Metal (As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Pb, Mo, Ni, Se, Zn and Hg) transfer was negligible in soil and leachate samples receiving all treatments. This study is one of the first to examine the fate of E. coli and Bacteroides spp. markers in situ following the land application of MBs where surface runoff does not apply. PMID:25540839

  11. Reduced Carbon Availability to Bacteroids and Elevated Ureides in Nodules, But Not in Shoots, Are Involved in the Nitrogen Fixation Response to Early Drought in Soybean1[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladrera, Rubén; Marino, Daniel; Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; González, Esther M.; Arrese-Igor, Cesar

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation (NF) in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) is highly sensitive to soil drying. This sensitivity has been related to an accumulation of nitrogen compounds, either in shoots or in nodules, and a nodular carbon flux shortage under drought. To assess the relative importance of carbon and nitrogen status on NF regulation, the responses to the early stages of drought were monitored with two soybean cultivars with known contrasting tolerance to drought. In the sensitive cultivar (‘Biloxi’), NF inhibition occurred earlier and was more dramatic than in the tolerant cultivar (‘Jackson’). The carbon flux to bacteroids was also more affected in ‘Biloxi’ than in ‘Jackson’, due to an earlier inhibition of sucrose synthase activity and a larger decrease of malate concentration in the former. Drought provoked ureide accumulation in nodules of both cultivars, but this accumulation was higher and occurred earlier in ‘Biloxi’. However, at this early stage of drought, there was no accumulation of ureides in the leaves of either cultivar. These results indicate that a combination of both reduced carbon flux and nitrogen accumulation in nodules, but not in shoots, is involved in the inhibition of NF in soybean under early drought. PMID:17720761

  12. Effects of Diet on Resource Utilization by a Model Human Gut Microbiota Containing Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, a Symbiont with an Extensive Glycobiome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNulty, Nathan [Washington University, St. Louis; Wu, Meng [Washington University, St. Louis; Erickson, Alison L [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Martens, Eric C [University of Michigan; Pudlo, Nicholas A [University of Michigan; Muegge, Brian [Washington University, St. Louis; Henrissat, Bernard [Universite d' Aix-Marseille I & II; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Gordon, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis

    2013-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is an important metabolic organ, yet little is known about how its individual species interact, establish dominant positions, and respond to changes in environmental factors such as diet. In this study, gnotobiotic mice were colonized with an artificial microbiota comprising 12 sequenced human gut bacterial species and fed oscillating diets of disparate composition. Rapid, reproducible, and reversible changes in the structure of this assemblage were observed. Time-series microbial RNA-Seq analyses revealed staggered functional responses to diet shifts throughout the assemblage that were heavily focused on carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. High-resolution shotgun metaproteomics confirmed many of these responses at a protein level. One member, Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, proved exceptionally fit regardless of diet. Its genome encoded more carbohydrate active enzymes than any previously sequenced member of the Bacteroidetes. Transcriptional profiling indicated that B. cellulosilyticus WH2 is an adaptive forager that tailors its versatile carbohydrate utilization strategy to available dietary polysaccharides, with a strong emphasis on plant-derived xylans abundant in dietary staples like cereal grains. Two highly expressed, diet-specific polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) in B. cellulosilyticus WH2 were identified, one with characteristics of xylan utilization systems. Introduction of a B. cellulosilyticus WH2 library comprising .90,000 isogenic transposon mutants into gnotobiotic mice, along with the other artificial community members, confirmed that these loci represent critical diet-specific fitness determinants. Carbohydrates that trigger dramatic increases in expression of these two loci and many of the organism s 111 other predicted PULs were identified by RNA-Seq during in vitro growth on 31 distinct carbohydrate substrates, allowing us to better interpret in vivo RNA-Seq and proteomics data. These results offer insight

  13. Scientific Opinion on the safety of ?heat-treated milk products fermented with Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964? as a novel food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA NDA Panel was asked to carry out the additional assessment for ‘pasteurised milk products fermented with Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964’ as a novel food (NF in the context of Regulation (EC No 258/97. Pasteurised or ultra-high-temperature-treated milk is used for the fermentation process with B. xylanisolvens DSM 23964. After fermentation the product is heat treated for one hour at 75 °C to ensure the absence of viable B. xylanisolvens DSM 23964. The Panel considers the information provided on the identity and characterisation of B. xylanisolvens DSM 23964 to be sufficient. The production process encompasses standard techniques used by the dairy industry, is sufficiently described by the applicant and does not give rise to safety concerns. The Panel considers that the information provided on the production process and on the content of vitamins B2 and B12 and furosine in heat-treated fermented milk products does not give rise to concerns regarding disadvantageous nutritional effects. The Panel considers that the microbiological data provided do not give rise to safety concerns. The Panel also notes that a pilot study and a RCT over six weeks with 140 volunteers receiving daily doses of a spray-dried heat-treated fermented milk product containing intakes of up to 1 ´ 1012 inactivated bacterial cells of B. xylanisolvens DSM 23964 were provided. No clinical effects related to the treatment were observed in the two studies. Although no information has been provided to conclude on the risk of allergic reactions caused by the NF, the Panel considers that it is unlikely that its allergenic potential is dissimilar to that of other fermented dairy products. The Panel concludes that the NF ‘heat-treated milk products fermented with B. xylanisolvens DSM 23964’ is safe for the proposed uses and at the proposed use levels.

  14. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  15. The gut microbial community in metabolic syndrome patients is modified by diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Carmen; Garcia-Carpintero, Sonia; Alcala-Diaz, Juan F; Gomez-Delgado, Francisco; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Rangel Zuñiga, Oriol A; Quintana-Navarro, Gracia M; Landa, Blanca B; Clemente, Jose C; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Camargo, Antonio; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota changes may be involved in the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is a multicomponent disorder frequently associated with obesity. The aim of this study was to test the effect of consuming two healthy diets: a Mediterranean diet and a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet, for 2years in the gut microbiota of MetS patients and those in the control group. We analyzed the differences in the bacterial community structure between the groups after 2years of dietary intervention (Mediterranean or low-fat diet) through quantitative polymerase chain reaction using primers, targeting specific bacterial taxa. We observed, at basal time, that the abundance of Bacteroides, Eubacterium and Lactobacillus genera is lower in the control group than in MetS patients, while Bacteroides fragilis group, Parabacteroides distasonis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Ruminococcus flavefaciens subgroup and Eubacterium rectale are depleted in MetS patients (all P values diet partially restores the population of P. distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, F. prausnitzii, B. adolescentis and B. longum in MetS patients (all P values diet could be a useful tool to restore potentially beneficial members of the gut microbiota, although the stability of these changes over time still remains to be assessed.

  16. Hot Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Collaborators sparked by creative ideas and obsessed by a common task may not realize they're part of a "hot group"--a term coined by business professors Harold J. Leavitt and Jean Lipman-Blumen. Spawned by group decision making and employee empowerment, hot groups can flourish in education settings. They're typically small, short lived, and goal…

  17. Abelian Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, A.P.

    1995-10-15

    This fifth survey of reviews on abelian groups comprises papers reviewed in 1985-1992. Just as in the preceding surveys, the issues concerning finite abelian groups, topological groups, ordered groups, group algebras, modules (with rare exceptions), and topics on logic are not considered. The issues on the lattice of subgroups of an abelian group are included in Section 11. In contrast to the fourth survey, this one does not contain Sections 6 (N-high subgroups), 9 (rings with a given additive group), and 10 (valuated groups); since only a few papers treated these topics, the material discussed earlier in Sections 9, and 10 is now included in Section 11 and the material of the former Section 6 will be found in Sections 1, 7, 8, and 11 of this survey. On the other hand, the fifth survey has three new sections devoted to separable groups (a new Sect. 5), Butler groups (a new Sect. 6), and the endormorphism rings and automorphism groups of abelian groups (a new Sect. 9).

  18. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion group

  19. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  20. Galaxy Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, R. Brent

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times {{10}12}{{M}⊙ } are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of {{Ω}matter}˜ 0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  1. Galaxy groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Tully, R. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  2. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients. PMID:26682545

  3. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients.

  4. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihiro Morita

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25, including restrictive (ANR, n = 14 and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11 subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21 using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients.

  5. Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Tully, R Brent

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10^12 Msun are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosi...

  6. A metapopulation of the lizard Anguis fragilis (Squamata: Anguidae on a local scale in Dorset, Great Britain, as indicated by spatial distribution and movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Haley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A metapopulation is a group of spatially structured populations, consisting of distinct units (subpopulations that are separated by space or barriers, and connected by dispersal movements. Evidence derived from Gaussian finite-mixture models and dispersal events suggests that slow-worms may exist in a metapopulation. The Gaussian finite-mixture models showed that slow-worms are aggregated into individual subpopulations; the movement data revealed that males are more likely to migrate than females and that they have the ability to travel sufficiently far to bridge subpopulations. Therefore, the evidence supports the metapopulation theory and that slow-worms exist in multiple small subpopulations instead of one large homogenous population.

  7. The cryptic tetracycline resistance determinant on Tn4400 mediates tetracycline degradation as well as tetracycline efflux.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, B. H.; Levy, S. B.

    1988-01-01

    Escherichia coli containing the cryptic tetracycline resistance determinant (class F) from the Bacteroides fragilis transposon Tn4400 on plasmid pGAT400 expressed a detoxification of tetracycline as well as an active efflux of tetracycline. This finding concurs with the report of detoxification for a related tetracycline resistance determinant from B. fragilis on Tn4351 (B. S. Speer and A. Salyers, J. Bacteriol. 170:1423-1429, 1987), which specifies a 10-fold-higher resistance than Tn4400. In...

  8. Mpi recombinase globally modulates the surface architecture of a human commensal bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Coyne, Michael J.; Weinacht, Katja G.; Krinos, Corinna M.; Comstock, Laurie E.

    2003-01-01

    The mammalian gut represents a complex and diverse ecosystem, consisting of unique interactions between the host and microbial residents. Bacterial surfaces serve as an interface that promotes and responds to this dynamic exchange, a process essential to the biology of both symbionts. The human intestinal microorganism, Bacteroides fragilis, is able to extensively modulate its surface. Analysis of the B. fragilis genomic sequence, together with genetic conservation ana...

  9. Hydra groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dison, Will

    2010-01-01

    We give examples of CAT(0), biautomatic, free-by-cyclic, one-relator groups which have finite-rank free subgroups of huge (Ackermannian) distortion. This leads to elementary examples of groups whose Dehn functions are similarly extravagant. This behaviour originates in manifestations of Hercules-versus-the-hydra battles in string-rewriting.

  10. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  11. MUYANG GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ With its headquarters in the historic city of Yangzhou,Jiangsu Muyang Group Co.,Ltd has since its founding in 1967 grown into a well-known group corporation whose activities cover research&development.project design,manufacturing,installation and services in a multitude of industries including feed machinery and engineering,storage engineering,grain machinery and engineering,environmental protection,conveying equipment and automatic control systems.

  12. Influence of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 intake on faecal microbiota in individuals with Japanese cedar pollinosis during the pollen season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odamaki, Toshitaka; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Noritoshi; Kondo, Shizuki; Miyaji, Kazuhiro; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Togashi, Hideo; Enomoto, Tadao; Benno, Yoshimi

    2007-10-01

    It has been reported that intake of yogurt or powder supplemented with the Bifidobacterium longum BB536 probiotic strain alleviated subjective symptoms and affected blood markers of allergy in individuals with Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCPsis) during the pollen seasons of 2004 and 2005, based on randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Furthermore, the 2004 study found that intestinal bacteria such as the Bacteroides fragilis group significantly fluctuated during the pollen season in JCPsis individuals and intake of BB536 yogurt tended to suppress these fluctuations. The present study investigated faecal microbiota to examine whether any changes occurred during the pollen season and whether any influence was exerted by intake of BB536 powder in the 2005 pollen season, which happened to be a heavy season, to confirm the 2004 findings and to evaluate the relationship of microbiota with symptom development. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 44 JCPsis subjects received BB536 or a placebo for 13 weeks during the pollen season. Another 14 Japanese cedar pollen (JCP)-specific IgE negative healthy subjects received placebo for the same period. Faecal samples were collected before (week 0), during (weeks 4, 8 and 13) and after (week 17) intervention, and out of JCP season (week 28). Faecal microbiota were analysed using terminal-RFLP (T-RFLP) and real-time PCR methods. Principal component analysis based on T-RFLP indicated distinct patterns of microbiota between healthy subjects and JCPsis subjects in the placebo group, but an intermediate pattern in the BB536 group at week 13, the last stage of the pollen season. The coordinate of principal component 1 at week 13 correlated with composite scores of JCPsis symptoms recorded during the pollen season. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and the Bacteroides fragilis group were identified as the main contributors to microbiotal fluctuations. Real-time PCR indicated that BB536 intake suppressed

  13. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  14. Group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  15. Group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  16. Group Anonymity

    CERN Document Server

    Chertov, Oleg; 10.1007/978-3-642-14058-7_61

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the amount of digital data in the world has risen immensely. But, the more information exists, the greater is the possibility of its unwanted disclosure. Thus, the data privacy protection has become a pressing problem of the present time. The task of individual privacy-preserving is being thoroughly studied nowadays. At the same time, the problem of statistical disclosure control for collective (or group) data is still open. In this paper we propose an effective and relatively simple (wavelet-based) way to provide group anonymity in collective data. We also provide a real-life example to illustrate the method.

  17. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence......, the management had, among many initiatives, decided to offshore and outsource a major chunk of its production to Flextronics. In this pursuit of rapid cost-cutting sourcing advantages, the LEGO Group planned to license out as much as 80 per cent of its production besides closing down major parts...

  18. Effect of oligosaccharides on the adhesion of gut bacteria to human HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamimi, M; Abdelhay, O; Rastall, R A

    2016-06-01

    The influence of five oligosaccharides (cellobiose, stachyose, raffinose, lactulose and chito-oligosaccharides) on the adhesion of eight gut bacteria (Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ATCC 29148D-5, Clostridium leptum ATCC 29065, Blautia coccoides ATCC 29236, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii ATCC 27766, Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 23745, Clostridium difficile ATCC 43255 and Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393) to mucous secreting and non-mucous secreting HT-29 human epithelial cells, was investigated. In pure culture, the bacteria showed variations in their ability to adhere to epithelial cells. The effect of oligosaccharides diminished adhesion and the presence of mucus played a major factor in adhesion, likely due to high adhesiveness to mucins present in the native human mucus layer covering the whole cell surface. However, clostridia displayed almost the same level of adhesion either with or without mucus being present. Bl. coccoides adhesion was decreased by stachyose and cellobiose in non-mucus-secreting cells in pure culture, while in mixed faecal culture cellobiose displayed the highest antiadhesive activity with an overall average of 65% inhibition amongst tested oligomers and lactulose displayed the lowest with an average of 47.4%. Bifidobacteria, Bacteroides, lactobacilli and clostridia were inhibited within the following ranges 47-78%, 32-65%, 11.7-58% and 64-85% respectively. This means that clostridia were the most strongly influenced members of the microflora amongst the bacterial groups tested in mixed culture. In conclusion, introducing oligosaccharides which are candidate prebiotics into pure or mixed cultures has affected bacterial adhesion. PMID:27018325

  19. Group Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Research suggests that cooperative learning works best when students are first taught group-processing skills, such as leadership, decision making, communication, trust building, and conflict management. Inadequate teacher training and boring assignments can torpedo cooperative learning efforts. Administrators should reassure teachers with…

  20. Tectaria group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holttum, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Polypodiaceae subfam. Dryopteridoideae section A, auct.: C. Chr. in Verdoorn, Man. Pteridol. (1938) 543, p.p. Aspidiaceae tribe Aspidieae auct.: Ching, Sunyatsenia 5 (1940) 250, excl. Lomariopsis and related genera. — Aspidiaceae, group of Ctenitis Copel., Gen. Fil. (1947) 153. Aspidiaceae auct.: Pi

  1. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  2. Group therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In his review 'Genesis of Unified Gauge Theories' at the symposium in Honour of Abdus Salam (June, page 23), Tom Kibble of Imperial College, London, looked back to the physics events around Salam from 1959-67. He described how, in the early 1960s, people were pushing to enlarge the symmetry of strong interactions beyond the SU(2) of isospin and incorporate the additional strangeness quantum number. Kibble wrote - 'Salam had students working on every conceivable symmetry group. One of these was Yuval Ne'eman, who had the good fortune and/or prescience to work on SU(3). From that work, and of course from the independent work of Murray Gell- Mann, stemmed the Eightfold Way, with its triumphant vindication in the discovery of the omega-minus in 1964.' Yuval Ne'eman writes - 'I was the Defence Attaché at the Israeli Embassy in London and was admitted by Salam as a part-time graduate student when I arrived in 1958. I started research after resigning from the Embassy in May 1960. Salam suggested a problem: provide vector mesons with mass - the problem which was eventually solved by Higgs, Guralnik, Kibble,.... (as described by Kibble in his article). I explained to Salam that I had become interested in symmetry. Nobody at Imperial College at the time, other than Salam himself, was doing anything in groups, and attention further afield was focused on the rotation - SO(N) - groups. Reacting to my own half-baked schemes, Salam told me to forget about the rotation groups he taught us, and study group theory in depth, directing me to Eugene Dynkin's classification of Lie subalgebras, about which he had heard from Morton Hamermesh. I found Dynkin incomprehensible without first learning about Lie algebras from Henri Cartan's thesis, which luckily had been reproduced by Dynkin in his 1946 thesis, using his diagram method. From a copy of a translation of Dynkin's thesis which I found in the British Museum Library, I

  3. Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Not long after EDWIN HUBBLE established that galaxies are `island universes' similar to our home galaxy, the MILKY WAY, he realized that a few of these external galaxies are considerably closer to us than any others. In 1936 he first coined the term `Local Group' in his famous book The Realm of the Nebulae to identify our nearest galactic neighbors. More than 60 yr later, the galaxies of the Loca...

  4. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  5. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  6. 肉桂水提物对大鼠肠道梭菌属IV簇细菌和拟杆菌的影响%Effect of aqueous Cinnamomum cassia extracts on gastrointestinal Clostridium cluster IV and Bacteroides in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄丽珠; 詹宏林; 王聪; 彭喜春; 张宁; 刘柳

    2012-01-01

    目的:肉桂水提物对大鼠结肠和直肠梭菌属IV簇和拟杆菌的影响。方法:给SD大鼠灌胃一个月后分别取结肠和直肠内容物,针对肠道梭菌属IV簇和拟杆菌的16SrRNA基因应用末端限制性片段多态性分析技术对这两类菌的多样性及分布进行分析。结果:研究发现肉桂水提物能降低梭菌属IV簇细菌在结肠和直肠中的数量,增加拟杆菌属细菌在结肠和直肠中的数量;该水提物对结肠和直肠的结构均产生影响,但影响并不相同,其中对直肠的影响更大。结论:肉桂水提物对大鼠肠道菌群的这种影响可能与肉桂治疗肥胖和糖尿病有功效有关。%Objective:To explore the impact of aqueous Cinnamomum cassia(C.cassia) extracts on gut microbiota.Methods:The colon and rectal contents were sampled after rats had been orally administrated the aqueous extracts for one month.Clostridium cluster IV and Bacteroides in the samples were analyzed by the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism(tRFLP) method based on the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and nucleotide sequencing.Result:The aqueous C.cassia extracts could down-regulate the amount of microbiota of Clostridium cluster IV in rat gut,along with the increase of microbiota of Bacteroides.Various effects were exerted by the extracts on microbiota in colon and rectum,and the impact presented heavier in rectum.Conclusion:These variations of rat gut microbiota induced by the aqueous C.cassia extracts may reflect the functions of anti-obese and anti-dyspepsia of C.cassia.

  7. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  8. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  9. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  10. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  11. Structure of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron BT2081 at 2.05 Å resolution: the first structural representative of a new protein family that may play a role in carbohydrate metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of BT2081 from B. thetaiotaomicron reveals a two-domain protein with a putative carbohydrate-binding site in the C-terminal domain. BT2081 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (GenBank accession code NP-810994.1) is a member of a novel protein family consisting of over 160 members, most of which are found in the different classes of Bacteroidetes. Genome-context analysis lends support to the involvement of this family in carbohydrate metabolism, which plays a key role in B. thetaiotaomicron as a predominant bacterial symbiont in the human distal gut microbiome. The crystal structure of BT2081 at 2.05 Å resolution represents the first structure from this new protein family. BT2081 consists of an N-terminal domain, which adopts a β-sandwich immunoglobulin-like fold, and a larger C-terminal domain with a β-sandwich jelly-roll fold. Structural analyses reveal that both domains are similar to those found in various carbohydrate-active enzymes. The C-terminal β-jelly-roll domain contains a potential carbohydrate-binding site that is highly conserved among BT2081 homologs and is situated in the same location as the carbohydrate-binding sites that are found in structurally similar glycoside hydrolases (GHs). However, in BT2081 this site is partially occluded by surrounding loops, which results in a deep solvent-accessible pocket rather than a shallower solvent-exposed cleft

  12. Experimental peritonitis in horses: peritoneal fluid composition Peritonite experimental em eqüinos: composição do líquido peritoneal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C.N. Mendes

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen adult horses were randomly divided into four equal groups of four animals and each group was injected intraperitoneally with one of the following suspension: Group I, 100×10(7 colony-forming units (CFU of E. coli diluted in 500ml of 0.9% saline; Group II, 100×10(7 CFU of Bacteroides fragilis in 500ml of 0.9% saline; Group III, 100×10(7 CFU of E. coli in combination with 100×10(7 CFU of B. fragilis in 500ml of 0.9% saline; Group IV, 500ml of 0.9% saline. A significant increase in leukocyte number was observed in the peritoneal fluid by four hours after the inoculations in animals of Group I and II, and by eight hours in animals of Group III. The highest cell count observed was 516×10³ leukocytes/mm³. Significant increases in peritoneal fluid fibrinogen (1g/dl and total protein (9.1% concentrations were also observed. Horses inoculated with pure cultures of either E. coli or B. fragilis demonstrated mild and self-limiting peritonitis, while those inoculated with a combination of both bacteria demonstrated laboratory findings of higher intensity and duration.Dezesseis eqüinos adultos foram aleatoriamente divididos em quatro grupos de quatro animais que receberam inoculação intraperitoneal das seguintes suspenções: grupo I, 100×10(7 unidades formadoras de colônias (CFU de E. coli diluídas em 500ml de solução salina a 0,9%; grupo II, 100×10(7 CFU de Bacteroides fragilis em 500ml de solução salina a 0,9%; grupo III, 100×10(7 CFU de E. coli combinados com 100×10(7 CFU de B. fragilis em 500ml de solução salina a 0,9%; grupo IV, 500ml de solução salina a 0,9%. Observou-se aumento significativo do número de leucócitos no líquido peritoneal quatro horas após as inoculações dos animais dos grupos I e II, e oito horas após as inoculações dos animais do grupo III. A contagem mais elevada foi de 516×10³ leucócitos/mm³. Aumentos significativos nas concentrações de fibrinogênio (1g/dl e proteína total (9

  13. An antibacterial assay of aqueous extract of garlic against anaerobic/microaerophilic and aerobic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Elsom, Giles K.; Hide, Denis; Salmon, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Both the minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentration (expressed in terms of thiosulphinate concentration) of an aqueous extract of garlic was determined against nine species of bacteria. Helicobacter pylori proved to be extremely sensitive to garlic extract, whilst Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus all were moderately sensitive to the garlic extract treat...

  14. [Comparative study of the antimicrobial effect of various cavity liners used in conservative dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumarola Suñé, J; Espias Gómez, A; Canalda Sahli, C

    1989-01-01

    We have compared the microbiological activity of the following cavity liners: Life, Dycal II, Calcipulpe, Pure calcium hydroxide and Cavitec; against five different bacterial strains: Veillonella parvula, Bacteroides fragilis, Peptococcus s.p., Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus beta hemolytic: The results demonstrate the higher antimicrobial activity of the manufactured cavity liners with calcium hydroxide base in comparison with the pure calcium hydroxide. PMID:2638022

  15. [Comparative study of the antimicrobial effect of various cavity liners used in conservative dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumarola Suñé, J; Espias Gómez, A; Canalda Sahli, C

    1989-01-01

    We have compared the microbiological activity of the following cavity liners: Life, Dycal II, Calcipulpe, Pure calcium hydroxide and Cavitec; against five different bacterial strains: Veillonella parvula, Bacteroides fragilis, Peptococcus s.p., Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus beta hemolytic: The results demonstrate the higher antimicrobial activity of the manufactured cavity liners with calcium hydroxide base in comparison with the pure calcium hydroxide.

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U00799-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 626927 |pid:none) Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343,... 68 5e-10 AM279412_1( AM279412 |pid:none) Apis mellifera carnica...16( AB012956 |pid:none) Vibrio cholerae genes for O-antig... 51 7e-05 AM279411_1( AM279411 |pid:none) Apis mellifera carnica

  17. GenBank blastx search result: AK058859 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058859 001-005-E08 AF129406.1 Bacteroides fragilis alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C (ahp...C) and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit F (ahpF) genes, complete cds.|BCT BCT 4e-11 +1 ...

  18. GenBank blastx search result: AK104317 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104317 001-024-C03 AF129406.1 Bacteroides fragilis alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C (ahp...C) and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit F (ahpF) genes, complete cds.|BCT BCT 8e-19 +3 ...

  19. GenBank blastx search result: AK104703 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104703 001-037-D02 AF129406.1 Bacteroides fragilis alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C (ahp...C) and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit F (ahpF) genes, complete cds.|BCT BCT 8e-36 +3 ...

  20. [Epidemiology of the resistance to antibiotics at the Hospital Center of Aulnay-sous-Bois].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pennec, M P; Caron, I; Chevallier, P; Giacomini, T

    1989-04-01

    Over the 14 month period (1/6/87-1/8/88) the majority of the bacteremia observed in the intensive unit (C.H. d'Aulnay) was due to Gram-positive bacteria (16/23 cases). The incidence of resistant to methicillin Staphylococcus aureus (SAMR) in blood culture was 10% in 1986 and 14% in 1987. Resistance of S. pneumoniae to penicillin was not detected; 30% of the 72 strains were resistant to erythromycin and 26% to tetracycline. Among Enterobacteriaceae, third generation cephalosporin is uncommon (2.8%) as gentamicin resistance (4.5%). Among the anaerobes, 57% of non Bacteroides fragilis group are resistant to penicillin. Nitroimidazole resistance was not detected. PMID:2789482

  1. Normal luminal bacteria, especially Bacteroides species, mediate chronic colitis, gastritis, and arthritis in HLA-B27/human beta2 microglobulin transgenic rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Rath, H C; Herfarth, H H; Ikeda, J S; Grenther, W B; Hamm, T E; Balish, E; Taurog, J D; Hammer, R. E.; Wilson, K H; Sartor, R B

    1996-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis of clinical and experimental chronic intestinal inflammation. We investigated the influence of normal luminal bacteria and several groups of selected bacterial strains on spontaneous gastrointestinal and systemic inflammation in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Rats maintained germfree for 3-9 mo were compared with littermates conventionalized with specific pathogen-free bacteria. Subsequently, germfree transgenic rats were colonized...

  2. Integrated Groups and Smooth Distribution Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro J. MIANA

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we prove directly that α-times integrated groups define algebra homo-morphisms. We also give a theorem of equivalence between smooth distribution groups and α-times integrated groups.

  3. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur as...... unit groups. We deduce this classification from a more general result, which holds for groups G with no non-trivial normal 2-subgroup....

  4. Group Composition, Group Interaction and Achievement in Cooperative Small Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Noreen M.

    This study investigated interaction and achievement in cooperative small groups in four junior high school mathematics classrooms. Ninety-six students learned a one-week unit on consumer mathematics in mixed-ability or uniform-ability groups. Students in mixed-ability groups scored higher on a problem-solving test than students in uniform-ability…

  5. Group Work Publication-1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  6. Group dynamic processes in email groups

    OpenAIRE

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed provide insight into email group interactions, but that...

  7. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  8. Probability groups as orbits of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The set of double cosets of a group with respect to a subgroup and the set of orbits of a group with respect to a group of automorphisms have structures which can be studied as multigroups, hypergroups or Pasch geometries. When the subgroup or the group of automorphisms are finite, the multivalued products can be provided with some weightages forming so-called Probability Groups. It is shown in this paper that some abstract probability groups can be realized as orbit spaces of groups. (author)

  9. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended. PMID:24441299

  10. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  11. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  12. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  13. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  14. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Boya, Luis J

    2011-01-01

    This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the $1+1+16=18$ families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated "pariah" groups. The (old) five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group $\\mathbb M$, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the $5+7+8+6=26$ sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  15. Effects of low levels of ciprofloxacin on a chemostat model of the human colonic microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, R J; Woodburn, M A

    2001-06-01

    To study the utility of an in vitro model system for assessing the effect of low concentrations of a fluoroquinolone (FQ) drug on the ecology of the human intestinal microflora, chemostats containing human fecal flora were exposed to 0.43, 4.3, and 43microg of ciprofloxacin (CI) per milliliter. Prior to and during drug exposure, we assayed short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), bacterial populations, and the relative levels of susceptibility of these populations to CI and trovafloxacin (TV), a newer related FQ with increased activity against anaerobes. The degree to which CI affected the chemostat ecology was measured statistically by comparing observed data with the corresponding predicted "no effect" level. No changes in total SCFA were observed; only butyrate was significantly higher at the intermediate and high-dose levels. Enterococci counts and the levels of susceptibility to CI among enterococci were also unaffected. Escherichia coli counts decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Susceptibility levels in E. coli followed no interpretable pattern. Bacteroides fragilis group (BfG) counts decreased significantly following exposure to 43 and 4.3microg/mL CI. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility among the BfG in these chemostats was not determined because the BfG counts were too low (less than 30 colonies per plate) when undiluted chemostat samples were plated. However, within 2 days of exposure to 0.43microg/mL CI, the percentage of BfG resistant to 4microg/mL CI increased to over 95%. Before exposure, all BfG were susceptible to both CI (2microg/mL) and TV (0.25microg/mL). All BfG isolated during exposure were resistant to both CI (4microg/mL) and TV (2microg/mL). Resistance selection in the BfG was unexpected as the MIC(90) of CI for B. fragilis is 8microg/mL. Since the average colon flora is about 20% B. fragilis and other bacteroides, CI may impact the human gut flora even at subtherapeutic levels.

  16. Free Boolean Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol’ga Sipacheva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Known and new results on free Boolean topological groups are collected. An account of the properties that these groups share with free or free Abelian topological groups and properties specific to free Boolean groups is given. Special emphasis is placed on the application of set-theoretic methods to the study of Boolean topological groups.

  17. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  18. MSUD Family Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Group The MSUD Family Support Group is a non-profit 501 (c)(3) organization for those with MSUD ... Family Support Group is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with no paid staff. Funds are needed ...

  19. Homomorphisms of quantum groups

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Ralf; Woronowicz, Stanisław Lech

    2010-01-01

    We introduce some equivalent notions of homomorphisms between quantum groups that behave well with respect to duality of quantum groups. Our equivalent definitions are based on bicharacters, coactions, and universal quantum groups, respectively.

  20. Redefining Cohesiveness in Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyton, Joann; Springston, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Attempted to replicate and extend research on work of Kelly and Duran in assessing relationship of group member perceptions of group interaction to group effectiveness. Concludes perceived similarity may not always align with perceptions of cohesiveness. (Author/ABL)

  1. Ordered groups and infinite permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    The subjects of ordered groups and of infinite permutation groups have long en­ joyed a symbiotic relationship. Although the two subjects come from very different sources, they have in certain ways come together, and each has derived considerable benefit from the other. My own personal contact with this interaction began in 1961. I had done Ph. D. work on sequence convergence in totally ordered groups under the direction of Paul Conrad. In the process, I had encountered "pseudo-convergent" sequences in an ordered group G, which are like Cauchy sequences, except that the differences be­ tween terms of large index approach not 0 but a convex subgroup G of G. If G is normal, then such sequences are conveniently described as Cauchy sequences in the quotient ordered group GIG. If G is not normal, of course GIG has no group structure, though it is still a totally ordered set. The best that can be said is that the elements of G permute GIG in an order-preserving fashion. In independent investigations around that t...

  2. Assertive Training in Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansbury, David L.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a group approach to helping the nonassertive client. After describing the group composition and goals, he presents a session by session description for conducting the assertive training group. In addition, he presents suggestions based on experiences in leading the group. (Author)

  3. Robust Group Linkage

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Pei; Dong, Xin Luna; Guo, Songtao; Maurino, Andrea; Srivastava, Divesh

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of group linkage: linking records that refer to entities in the same group. Applications for group linkage include finding businesses in the same chain, finding conference attendees from the same affiliation, finding players from the same team, etc. Group linkage faces challenges not present for traditional record linkage. First, although different members in the same group can share some similar global values of an attribute, they represent different entities so can also...

  4. Characterization of the gut microbiota of Papua New Guineans using reverse transcription quantitative PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Greenhill

    Full Text Available There has been considerable interest in composition of gut microbiota in recent years, leading to a better understanding of the role the gut microbiota plays in health and disease. Most studies have been limited in their geographical and socioeconomic diversity to high-income settings, and have been conducted using small sample sizes. To date, few analyses have been conducted in low-income settings, where a better understanding of the gut microbiome could lead to the greatest return in terms of health benefits. Here, we have used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction targeting dominant and sub-dominant groups of microorganisms associated with human gut microbiome in 115 people living a subsistence lifestyle in rural areas of Papua New Guinea. Quantification of Clostridium coccoides group, C. leptum subgroup, C. perfringens, Bacteroides fragilis group, Bifidobacterium, Atopobium cluster, Prevotella, Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus, Staphylococcus, and Lactobacillus spp. was conducted. Principle coordinates analysis (PCoA revealed two dimensions with Prevotella, clostridia, Atopobium, Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus grouping in one dimension, while B. fragilis, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus grouping in the second dimension. Highland people had higher numbers of most groups of bacteria detected, and this is likely a key factor for the differences revealed by PCoA between highland and lowland study participants. Age and sex were not major determinants in microbial population composition. The study demonstrates a gut microbial composition with some similarities to those observed in other low-income settings where traditional diets are consumed, which have previously been suggested to favor energy extraction from a carbohydrate rich diet.

  5. Characterization of the gut microbiota of Papua New Guineans using reverse transcription quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhill, Andrew R; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Ogata, Kiyohito; Natsuhara, Kazumi; Morita, Ayako; Soli, Kevin; Larkins, Jo-Ann; Tadokoro, Kiyoshi; Odani, Shingo; Baba, Jun; Naito, Yuichi; Tomitsuka, Eriko; Nomoto, Koji; Siba, Peter M; Horwood, Paul F; Umezaki, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in composition of gut microbiota in recent years, leading to a better understanding of the role the gut microbiota plays in health and disease. Most studies have been limited in their geographical and socioeconomic diversity to high-income settings, and have been conducted using small sample sizes. To date, few analyses have been conducted in low-income settings, where a better understanding of the gut microbiome could lead to the greatest return in terms of health benefits. Here, we have used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction targeting dominant and sub-dominant groups of microorganisms associated with human gut microbiome in 115 people living a subsistence lifestyle in rural areas of Papua New Guinea. Quantification of Clostridium coccoides group, C. leptum subgroup, C. perfringens, Bacteroides fragilis group, Bifidobacterium, Atopobium cluster, Prevotella, Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus, Staphylococcus, and Lactobacillus spp. was conducted. Principle coordinates analysis (PCoA) revealed two dimensions with Prevotella, clostridia, Atopobium, Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus grouping in one dimension, while B. fragilis, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus grouping in the second dimension. Highland people had higher numbers of most groups of bacteria detected, and this is likely a key factor for the differences revealed by PCoA between highland and lowland study participants. Age and sex were not major determinants in microbial population composition. The study demonstrates a gut microbial composition with some similarities to those observed in other low-income settings where traditional diets are consumed, which have previously been suggested to favor energy extraction from a carbohydrate rich diet.

  6. Groups as Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Kandasamy, W B Vasantha

    2009-01-01

    For the first time we represent every finite group in the form of a graph in this book. The authors choose to call these graphs as identity graph, since the main role in obtaining the graph is played by the identity element of the group. This study is innovative because through this description one can immediately look at the graph and say the number of elements in the group G which are self-inversed. Also study of different properties, like the subgroups of a group, normal subgroups of a group, p-sylow subgroups of a group and conjugate elements of a group are carried out using the identity graph of the group in this book. This book has four chapters. The first chapter is introductory. The second chapter represents groups as graphs. In the third chapter, we have defined similar types of graphs for algebraic structures like commutative semigroups, loops, commutative groupoids and commutative rings. The final chapter poses 52 problems.

  7. Higher arithmetic Chow groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gil, J I Burgos

    2009-01-01

    We give a new construction of higher arithmetic Chow groups for quasi-projective arithmetic varieties over a field. Our definition agrees with the higher arithmetic Chow groups defined by Goncharov for projective arithmetic varieties over a field. These groups are the analogue, in the Arakelov context, of the higher algebraic Chow groups defined by Bloch. The degree zero group agrees with the arithmetic Chow groups of Burgos. Our new construction is shown to be a contravariant functor and is endowed with a product structure, which is commutative and associative.

  8. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that ...

  9. Fast Overlapping Group Lasso

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The group Lasso is an extension of the Lasso for feature selection on (predefined) non-overlapping groups of features. The non-overlapping group structure limits its applicability in practice. There have been several recent attempts to study a more general formulation, where groups of features are given, potentially with overlaps between the groups. The resulting optimization is, however, much more challenging to solve due to the group overlaps. In this paper, we consider the efficient optimization of the overlapping group Lasso penalized problem. We reveal several key properties of the proximal operator associated with the overlapping group Lasso, and compute the proximal operator by solving the smooth and convex dual problem, which allows the use of the gradient descent type of algorithms for the optimization. We have performed empirical evaluations using the breast cancer gene expression data set, which consists of 8,141 genes organized into (overlapping) gene sets. Experimental results demonstrate the eff...

  10. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  11. Group Wage Curves

    OpenAIRE

    Bartik, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Using panel data on U.S. MSAs, this paper estimates how a typical MSA's wages of different demographic groups, and prices, are affected by overall MSA unemployment, the distribution of unemployment among different groups, and national prices and wages. MSA unemployment has strong effects on MSA wages and prices, but the distribution of unemployment among different groups has weak effects on wages and prices. Using these estimates, simulations show that targeting high-unemployment groups for u...

  12. Introduction to quantum groups

    OpenAIRE

    Podles, P.; Muller, E.

    1997-01-01

    We give an elementary introduction to the theory of algebraic and topological quantum groups (in the spirit of S. L. Woronowicz). In particular, we recall the basic facts from Hopf (*-) algebra theory, theory of compact (matrix) quantum groups and the theory of their actions on compact quantum spaces. We also provide the most important examples, including the classification of quantum SL(2)-groups, their real forms and quantum spheres. We also consider quantum SL_q(N)-groups and quantum Loren...

  13. Multicultural group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds.......Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds....

  14. Higher arithmetic Chow groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, J. I. Burgos; Feliu, Elisenda

    2012-01-01

    We give a new construction of higher arithmetic Chow groups for quasi-projective arithmetic varieties over a field. Our definition agrees with the higher arithmetic Chow groups defined by Goncharov for projective arithmetic varieties over a field. These groups are the analogue, in the Arakelov co...... and is endowed with a product structure, which is commutative and associative....

  15. Chemical and physical differentiation of superoxide dismutases in anaerobes.

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, E M; Dapper, C H

    1980-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase activity in crude or partially purified cell extracts from several species and strains of obligate anaerobe Bacteroides was inhibited instantaneously by NaN3 and was inactivated rapidly upon incubation with H2O2. The extent of NaN3 inhibition varied from 41 to 93%, and the half-life of the enzymatic activity in 5 mM H2O2 ranged from 1.2 to 6.1 min, depending upon the organism tests. When grown in a defined medium containing 59Fe, Bacteroides fragilis (VPI 2393) incorporat...

  16. CHAOTIC GROUP ACTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShiEnhui; ZhouLizhen; ZhouYoucheng

    2003-01-01

    It is proved that there is no chaotic group actions on any topological space with free arc.In this paper the chaotic actions of the group like G×F,where F is a finite group,are studied.In particular,under a suitable assumption ,if F is a cyclic group,then the topological space which admits a chaotic action of Z×F must admit a chatotic homeomorphism.A topological space which admits a chaotic group action but admits no chaotic horneomorphism is constructed.

  17. Group theory I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Group Theory I includes sets and mapping, groupoids and semi-groups, groups, isomorphisms and homomorphisms, cyclic groups, the Sylow theorems, and finite p-groups.

  18. Splittings of knot groups

    OpenAIRE

    Friedl, Stefan; Silver, Daniel S.; Williams, Susan G.

    2013-01-01

    Let K be a knot of genus g. If K is fibered, then it is well known that the knot group pi(K) splits only over a free group of rank 2g. We show that if K is not fibered, then pi(K) splits over non-free groups of arbitrarily large rank. Furthermore, if K is not fibered, then pi(K) splits over every free group of rank at least 2g. However, pi(K) cannot split over a group of rank less than 2g. The last statement is proved using the recent results of Agol, Przytycki-Wise and Wise.

  19. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  20. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, ML); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  1. On -nilpotent abelian groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Mehdi Nasrabadi; Ali Gholamian

    2014-11-01

    Let be a group and $A = \\text{Aut}(G)$ be the group of automorphisms of . Then, the element $[g, ] = g^{-1}(g)$ is an autocommutator of $g \\in G$ and $ \\in A$. Hence, for any natural number the -th autocommutator subgroup of is defined as $K_{m}(G)=\\langle [g,_{1},\\ldots,_{m}]|g\\in G,_{1},\\ldots,_{m}\\in A\\rangle$, where $[g, _{1}, _{2},\\ldots, _{m}] = [[g,_{1},\\ldots,_{m−1}], _{m}]$. In this paper, we introduce the new notion of -nilpotent groups and classify all abelian groups which are -nilpotent groups.

  2. Toleration, Groups, and Multiculturalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2014-01-01

    to the political and social relationship between the subject and the objects of toleration. Finally, toleration is often argued to be a normative requirement on the basis of the way it affects the object or receiver of toleration, e.g. on the basis of the good of or right to freedom from non-interference which....... The chapter relates the different possible meanings of groups toleration to widespread criticisms of multiculturalism for being excessively 'groupist' (e.g. to essentialise or reify groups), to promote group rights over individual rights, or to deny or ignore the internal heterogeneity of groups...... or the multiple identity affiliations of individuals. The chapter suggests that some of these standard criticisms of multiculturalism for being overly tolerant of minority groups, or being so in a way elevating groups over individuals, are less pressing on some understandings of the meaning of 'group...

  3. E-groups training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    There will be an e-groups training course on 16 March 2012 which will cover the main e-groups functionalities i.e.: creating and managing e-groups, difference between static and dynamic e-groups, configuring posting restrictions and archives, examples of where e-groups can be used in daily work. Even if you have already worked with e-groups, this may be a good opportunity to learn about the best practices and security related recommendations when using e-groups. You can find more details as well as enrolment form for the training (it’s free) here. The number of places is limited, so enrolling early is recommended.   Technical Training Tel. 72844

  4. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress. PMID:26401793

  5. Blood groups systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranadhir Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system.

  6. Blood groups systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ranadhir; Mishra, Nitasha; Rath, Girija Prasad

    2014-09-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system. PMID:25535412

  7. Stochastic Lie group integrators

    CERN Document Server

    Malham, Simon J A

    2007-01-01

    We present Lie group integrators for nonlinear stochastic differential equations with non-commutative vector fields whose solution evolves on a smooth finite dimensional manifold. Given a Lie group action that generates transport along the manifold, we pull back the stochastic flow on the manifold to the Lie group via the action, and subsequently pull back the flow to the corresponding Lie algebra via the exponential map. We construct an approximation to the stochastic flow in the Lie algebra via closed operations and then push back to the Lie group and then to the manifold, thus ensuring our approximation lies in the manifold. We call such schemes stochastic Munthe-Kaas methods after their deterministic counterparts. We also present stochastic Lie group integration schemes based on Castell--Gaines methods. These involve using an underlying ordinary differential integrator to approximate the flow generated by a truncated stochastic exponential Lie series. They become stochastic Lie group integrator schemes if...

  8. Blood groups systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ranadhir Mitra; Nitasha Mishra; Girija Prasad Rath

    2014-01-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importa...

  9. Group therapy for adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Nada Hribar

    2001-01-01

    The group included adolescents from secondary school and some students. The group had weekly sessions or twice on mounth. The adolescents had varied simptoms: depressive, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, learning difficulties, cunduct problems. All of adolescents were common on many problems in social interactions. The goal of therapeutic work were: to increase assertiveness skills and to reduce the anxious in social situations. The adolescents in group raised a self-esteem and developed som...

  10. Group Problem Solving

    CERN Document Server

    Laughlin, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    Experimental research by social and cognitive psychologists has established that cooperative groups solve a wide range of problems better than individuals. Cooperative problem solving groups of scientific researchers, auditors, financial analysts, air crash investigators, and forensic art experts are increasingly important in our complex and interdependent society. This comprehensive textbook--the first of its kind in decades--presents important theories and experimental research about group problem solving. The book focuses on tasks that have demonstrably correct solutions within mathematical

  11. Bayesian Group Factor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Virtanen, Seppo; Klami, Arto; Khan, Suleiman A; Kaski, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a factor analysis model that summarizes the dependencies between observed variable groups, instead of dependencies between individual variables as standard factor analysis does. A group may correspond to one view of the same set of objects, one of many data sets tied by co-occurrence, or a set of alternative variables collected from statistics tables to measure one property of interest. We show that by assuming group-wise sparse factors, active in a subset of the sets, the variat...

  12. Semisimple Metacyclic Group Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gurmeet K Bakshi; Shalini Gupta; Inder Bir S Passi

    2011-11-01

    Given a group of order $p_1p_2$, where $p_1,p_2$ are primes, and $\\mathbb{F}_q$, a finite field of order coprime to $p_1p_2$, the object of this paper is to compute a complete set of primitive central idempotents of the semisimple group algebra $\\mathbb{F}_q[G]$. As a consequence, we obtain the structure of $\\mathbb{F}_q[G]$ and its group of automorphisms.

  13. Incentives and group identity

    OpenAIRE

    MASELLA, Paolo; Meier, Stephan; Zahn, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates in a principal-agent environment whether and how group membership influences the effectiveness of incentives and when incentives can have “hidden costs”, i.e., a detrimental effect. We show experimentally that in all interactions control mechanisms can have hidden costs for reasons specific to group membership. In within-group interactions control has detrimental effects because the agent does not expect to be controlled and reacts negatively when being controlled. In ...

  14. Presentations of groups

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, D L

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide an introduction to combinatorial group theory. Any reader who has completed first courses in linear algebra, group theory and ring theory will find this book accessible. The emphasis is on computational techniques but rigorous proofs of all theorems are supplied. This new edition has been revised throughout, including new exercises and an additional chapter on proving that certain groups are infinite.

  15. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  16. CLASSIFICATION OF CRIMINAL GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Romanova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available New types of criminal groups are emerging in modern society.  These types have their special criminal subculture. The research objective is to develop new parameters of classification of modern criminal groups, create a new typology of criminal groups and identify some features of their subculture. Research methodology is based on the system approach that includes using the method of analysis of documentary sources (materials of a criminal case, method of conversations with themembers of the criminal group, method of testing the members of the criminal group and method of observation. As a result of the conducted research, we have created a new classification of criminal groups. The first type is a lawful group in its form and criminal according to its content (i.e., its target is criminal enrichment. The second type is a criminal organization which is run by so-called "white-collars" that "remain in the shadow". The third type is traditional criminal groups.  The fourth type is the criminal group, which openly demonstrates its criminal activity.

  17. Ciprofloxacin, a quinolone carboxylic acid compound active against aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, N X; Neu, H C

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro activity of ciprofloxacin, a quinolone-carboxylic acid derivative, was compared with those of norfloxacin, cefotaxime, cephalexin, ceftazidime, moxalactam, amoxicillin, and methicillin and other agents, as appropriate. The MICs of ciprofloxacin for 90% of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Neisseria spp., and Bacteroides fragilis were between 0.005 and 0.8 micrograms/ml, whereas streptococci and staphylococci were all inhibited by less than o...

  18. Species Differences in Alternative Substrate Utilization by the Antibacterial Target Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Dodbele, Samantha; Martinez, Christina D.; Troutman, Jerry M.

    2014-01-01

    Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UPPS) is a critical enzyme required for the biosynthesis of polysaccharides essential for bacterial survival. In this report, we have tested the substrate selectivity of UPPS derived from the mammalian symbiont Bacteroides fragilis, the human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus, and the typically benign but opportunistic pathogen Escherichia coli. An anthranilamide-containing substrate, 2-amideanilinogeranyl diphosphate (2AA-GPP), was an effective substrate for onl...

  19. Cefotetan, a new cephamycin: comparison of in vitro antimicrobial activity with other cephems, beta-lactamase stability, and preliminary recommendations for disk diffusion testing.

    OpenAIRE

    Ayers, L W; Jones, R N; Barry, A. L.; Thornsberry, C; Fuchs, P C; Gavan, T L; Gerlach, E H; Sommers, H M

    1982-01-01

    Cefotetan is a new, potent, 7 alpha-methoxy cephalosporin (cephamycin). The in vitro activity of cefotetan tested in a multiphasic, collaborative study against 12,260 consecutive clinical isolates and 448 selected isolates showed 93% of Enterobacteriaceae, 90% of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (broth dilution), 83% of Bacteroides fragilis, and 72% of non-enterococcal streptococci to be inhibited by less than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml. Beta-Lactamase-producing and -nonproducin...

  20. Grouping for Inequity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macqueen, Suzanne Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The inequity of streaming as a method of organising classes was established by research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s. While the practice produces small advantages for limited groups of students, it hinders the academic and social advancement of the majority. Although streaming has declined, new forms of achievement grouping have emerged, with…

  1. Kaleidoscopical configurations in groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Protasov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A subset A of a group G is called a kaleidoscopical configuration if there exists a surjective coloring χ:X→κ such that the restriction χ|gA is a bijection for each g∈G . We give two topological constructions of kaleidoscopical configurations and show that each infinite subset of an Abelian group contains an infinite kaleidoscopical configuration.

  2. Group Work. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  3. Democratic Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Erik K.; Tate, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    For a century, democratic values have called for abandoning coercive approaches and teaching children and youth to be responsible citizens. The authors explore strategies for creating respectful environments and positive group cultures with challenging youth. They offer suggestions to adult group facilitators to support youth in developing…

  4. Fairness and Ability Grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strike, Kenneth A.

    1983-01-01

    A recent controversy regarding ability grouping is that it is often perceived as a means whereby racial or class bias can be subtly transformed into mechanisms of discrimination which exhibit the appearance of fairness and objectivity. This article addresses the question of fairness in ability grouping. (CJB)

  5. Small Group Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Martin M.

    Learning in small groups is a practical way to bring about behavior change. The inquiry learning process is perceived to be the most natural and scientific way of learning. Skills developed include those of problem-solving task analysis, decision-making, value formation and adaptability. The art of small group interaction is developed. Factual…

  6. CHINA INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The China International Publishing Group (CIPG) specializes in international communications. Its operationsencompass reporting, editing, translation, publishing, printing, distribution, and the Internet. It incorporates sevenpublishing companies, five magazines and 19 periodicals, published in over 20 languages. The ChinaInternational Book Trading Corporation, another group facet, distributes all of these to over 180 countries and

  7. Study Groups in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions....

  8. Group I intron ribozymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Group I intron ribozymes constitute one of the main classes of ribozymes and have been a particularly important model in the discovery of key concepts in RNA biology as well as in the development of new methods. Compared to other ribozyme classes, group I intron ribozymes display considerable...

  9. Natural analogue working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Natural Analogue Working Group was established by the Commission of the European Communities in 1985. The purpose of this group is to bring together modellers with earth scientists and others, so that maximum benefit can be obtained from natural analogue studies with a view to safe geological disposal of radioactive waste. The first meeting of this group was held in Brussels from November 5 to 7, 1985. The discussions mainly concerned the identification of the modellers' needs and of the earth scientists' capacity to provide for them. Following the debates, a written statement was produced by the Group; this document forms the core of the present Report. Notes and outlines of many of the presentations made are grouped in four appendixes. The valuable contribution of all those involved in the meeting is gratefully acknowledged

  10. Perceiving persons and groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D L; Sherman, S J

    1996-04-01

    This article analyzes the similarities and differences in forming impressions of individuals and in developing conceptions of groups. In both cases, the perceiver develops a mental conception of the target (individual or group) on the basis of available information and uses that information to make judgments about that person or group. However, a review of existing evidence reveals differences in the outcomes of impressions formed of individual and group targets, even when those impressions are based on the very same behavioral information. A model is proposed to account for these differences. The model emphasizes the role of differing expectancies of unity and coherence in individual and group targets, which in turn engage different mechanisms for processing information and making judgments. Implications of the model are discussed.

  11. Automorphism groups of Quandles

    CERN Document Server

    Elhamdadi, M; Restrepo, R

    2010-01-01

    We prove that the automorphism group of the dihedral quandle with n elements is isomorphic to the affine group of the integers mod n, and also obtain the inner automorphism group of this quandle. In [9], automorphism groups of quandles (up to isomorphisms) of order less than or equal to 5 were given. With the help of the software Maple, we compute the inner and automorphism groups of all seventy three quandles of order six listed in the appendix of [4]. Since computations of automorphisms of quandles relates to the problem of classification of quandles, we also describe an algorithm implemented in C for computing all quandles (up to isomorphism) of order less than or equal to nine.

  12. Perceiving persons and groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D L; Sherman, S J

    1996-04-01

    This article analyzes the similarities and differences in forming impressions of individuals and in developing conceptions of groups. In both cases, the perceiver develops a mental conception of the target (individual or group) on the basis of available information and uses that information to make judgments about that person or group. However, a review of existing evidence reveals differences in the outcomes of impressions formed of individual and group targets, even when those impressions are based on the very same behavioral information. A model is proposed to account for these differences. The model emphasizes the role of differing expectancies of unity and coherence in individual and group targets, which in turn engage different mechanisms for processing information and making judgments. Implications of the model are discussed. PMID:8637962

  13. Cyclic Soft Groups and Their Applications on Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Aktaş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In crisp environment the notions of order of group and cyclic group are well known due to many applications. In this paper, we introduce order of the soft groups, power of the soft sets, power of the soft groups, and cyclic soft group on a group. We also investigate the relationship between cyclic soft groups and classical groups.

  14. Critical groups - basic concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential exposure pathways from the land application site to man are presented. It is emphasised that the critical group is not necessary the population group closest to the source. It could be the group impact by the most significant pathways(s). Only by assessing the importance of each of these pathways and then combining them can a proper choice of critical group be made. It would be wrong to select a critical group on the basis that it seems the most probable one, before the pathways have been properly assessed. A calculation in Carter (1983) suggested that for the operating mine site, the annual doses to an Aboriginal person, a service worker and a local housewife, were all about the same and were in the range 0.1 to 0.2 mSv per year. Thus it may be that for the land application area, the critical group turns out to be non-Aboriginal rather than the expected Aboriginal group. 6 refs., 3 figs

  15. Impedance group summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Dooling, J.; Dyachkov, M.; Fedotov, A.; Gluckstern, R.; Hahn, H.; Huang, H.; Kurennoy, S.; Linnecar, T.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Stupakov, G.; Toyama, T.; Wang, J. G.; Weng, W. T.; Zhang, S. Y.; Zotter, B.

    1999-12-01

    The impedance working group was charged to reply to the following 8 questions relevant to the design of high-intensity proton machines such as the SNS or the FNAL driver. These questions were first discussed one by one in the whole group, then each ne of them assigned to one member to summarize. On the lst morning these contributions were publicly read, re-discussed and re-written where required—hence they are not the opinion of a particular person, but rather the averaged opinion of all members of the working group. (AIP)

  16. Group key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  17. Group ring cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Cryptographic systems are derived using units in group rings. Combinations of types of units in group rings give units not of any particular type. This includes cases of taking powers of units and products of such powers and adds the complexity of the {\\em discrete logarithm} problem to the system. The method enables encryption and (error-correcting) coding to be combined within one system. These group ring cryptographic systems may be combined in a neat way with existing cryptographic systems, such as RSA, and a combination has the combined strength of both systems. Examples are given.

  18. Group therapy for adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Hribar

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The group included adolescents from secondary school and some students. The group had weekly sessions or twice on mounth. The adolescents had varied simptoms: depressive, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, learning difficulties, cunduct problems. All of adolescents were common on many problems in social interactions. The goal of therapeutic work were: to increase assertiveness skills and to reduce the anxious in social situations. The adolescents in group raised a self-esteem and developed some assertiveness skills: eye contact" and effective communication skills, persistence, refusing and requesting, giving and receiving critism, etc. The methods of work and techniques were based on principles of cognitive-behaviour therapy.

  19. Homogeneous group, research, institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Natascia Vasta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The work outlines the complex connection among empiric research, therapeutic programs and host institution. It is considered the current research state in Italy. Italian research field is analyzed and critic data are outlined: lack of results regarding both the therapeutic processes and the effectiveness of eating disorders group analytic treatment. The work investigates on an eating disorders homogeneous group, led into an eating disorder outpatient service. First we present the methodological steps the research is based on including the strong connection among theory and clinical tools. Secondly clinical tools are described and the results commented. Finally, our results suggest the necessity of validating some more specifical hypothesis: verifying the relationship between clinical improvement (sense of exclusion and painful emotions reduction and specific group therapeutic processes; verifying the relationship between depressive feelings, relapses and transition trough a more differentiated groupal field.Keywords: Homogeneous group; Eating disorders; Institutional field; Therapeutic outcome

  20. Anxiety Disorders: Support Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guidelines Scientific Council Special Interest Groups Child & Adolescent Anxiety SIG Peer Consultation OCD & Related Disorders SIG Peer ... Jobs and Fellowships Journal & Multimedia Announcements Depression and Anxiety Podcasts & Videos Resources Clinical Practice Reviews & Teaching Tools ...

  1. Homogenous finitary symmetric groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto‎. ‎H‎. Kegel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We characterize strictly diagonal type of embeddings of finitary symmetric groups in terms of cardinality and the characteristic. Namely, we prove the following. Let kappa be an infinite cardinal. If G=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupG i , where G i =FSym(kappan i , (H=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupH i , where H i =Alt(kappan i , is a group of strictly diagonal type and xi=(p 1 ,p 2 ,ldots is an infinite sequence of primes, then G is isomorphic to the homogenous finitary symmetric group FSym(kappa(xi (H is isomorphic to the homogenous alternating group Alt(kappa(xi , where n 0 =1,n i =p 1 p 2 ldotsp i .

  2. RAS Laboratory Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Initiative uses multiple technologies to attack RAS-driven cancers. The resources of the Frederick National Lab allocated to the RAS Hub are organized into seven laboratory groups, each contributing to the collaborative effort.

  3. Groups – Additive Notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We translate the articles covering group theory already available in the Mizar Mathematical Library from multiplicative into additive notation. We adapt the works of Wojciech A. Trybulec [41, 42, 43] and Artur Korniłowicz [25].

  4. Radiation Protection Group

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Section of the Radiation Protection Group wishes to inform you that the Radioactive Waste Treatment Centre will be closed on the afternoon of Tuesday 19 December 2006. Thank-you for your understanding.

  5. Interocular grouping without awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, San-Yuan; Yeh, Su-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Interocular grouping occurs when different parts of an image presented to each eye bound into a coherent whole. Previous studies anticipated that these parts are visible to both eyes simultaneously (i.e., the images altered back and forth). Although this view is consistent with the general consensus of binocular rivalry (BR) that suppressed stimuli receive no processing beyond rudimentary level (i.e., adaptation), it is actually inconsistent with studies that use continuous flash suppression (CFS). CFS is a form of interocular suppression that is more stable and causes stronger suppression of stimuli than BR. In the present study, we examined whether or not interocular grouping needs to occur at a conscious level as prior studies suggested. The modified double-rectangle paradigm used by Egly, Driver, and Rafal (1994) was adopted, and object-based attention was directed for successful grouping. To induce interocular grouping, we presented complementary parts of two rectangles dichoptically for possible interocular grouping and a dynamic Mondrian in front of one eye (i.e., CFS). Two concurrent targets were presented after one of the visible parts of the rectangles was cued. Participants were asked to judge which target appeared first. We found that the target showed on the cued rectangle after interocular grouping was reported to appear first more frequently than the target on the uncued rectangle. This result was based on the majority of trials where the suppressed parts of the objects remained invisible, which indicates that interocular grouping can occur without all the to-be-grouped parts being visible and without awareness. PMID:26851342

  6. Genomics Research Group Session

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, D.; Chittur, S.V.; Raghavachari, N.; N Jafari; Aquino, C.; Perera, A; Reyero, N.G.

    2014-01-01

    The Genomics Research Group (GRG) presentation is intended to describe the current activities of the group in applying the latest tools and technologies for transcriptome analysis to determine the advantages and disadvantages of each of the platforms. We will present three ongoing projects. In the first project, we specifically evaluated microarrays, QPCR and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platforms for examining the sensitivity and specificity of microRNA detection using synthetic miRNA st...

  7. Group Factor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Klami, Arto; Virtanen, Seppo; Leppäaho, Eemeli; Kaski, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Factor analysis provides linear factors that describe relationships between individual variables of a data set. We extend this classical formulation into linear factors that describe relationships between groups of variables, where each group represents either a set of related variables or a data set. The model also naturally extends canonical correlation analysis to more than two sets, in a way that is more flexible than previous extensions. Our solution is formulated as variational inferenc...

  8. Fuzzy Soft Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nazmul

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Notions of Lowen type fuzzy soft topological space are introduced and some of their properties are established in the present paper. Besides this, a combined structure of a fuzzy soft topological space and a fuzzy soft group, which is termed here as fuzzy soft topological group is introduced. Homomorphic images and preimages are also examined. Finally, some definitions and results on fuzzy soft set are studied.

  9. Introduction to group theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canals B.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This chapter is a concise mathematical introduction into the algebra of groups. It is build up in the way that definitions are followed by propositions and proofs. The concepts and the terminology introduced here will serve as a basis for the following chapters that deal with group theory in the stricter sense and its application to problems in physics. The mathematical prerequisites are at the bachelor level.1

  10. Group Capability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  11. Groups, rings, modules

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  12. Membership in citizen groups

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri, Stefano; Mattozzi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the coordination problem of agents deciding to join a group that uses membership revenues to provide a discrete public good and excludable benefits. The public good and the benefits are jointly produced, so that benefits are valued only if the group succeeds in providing the public good. With asymmetric information about the cost of provision, the static membership game admits a unique equilibrium and we characterize the optimal membership fee. We show that heterogeneity in valuati...

  13. N-ary Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gal'mak, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    The book "N-ary Groups" (in Russian) consists of two Parts. It is intended on the one hand as an initial introduction to the theory of n-ary groups, and on the other hand it contains the published results by the author on this subject. At present, the theory of n-ary groups developing but slowly from group theory. Nonetheless, ternary and n-ary structures have recently been applied to modern models of elementary particle physics. One of the author's goals in this book is to draw the attention of mathematicians and theoretical physicists to the theory of n-ary groups, to some of its distinguishing features, and to details relevant to its further development and application. Part I: Theorems of Post and Gluskin-Hosszu. 1.1. Classical definitions of n-ary groups. Examples. 1.2. Analogies of identity and inverse elements. 1.3. Equivalent sequences. 1.4. Post's coset theorem. 1.5. Theorem of Gluskin-Hosszu. 1.6. Connection between the Post's coset theorem and theorem of Gluskin-Hosszu. Addition and comments. Part ...

  14. Characterization of adherent bacteroidales from intestinal biopsies of children and young adults with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naamah L Zitomersky

    Full Text Available There is extensive evidence implicating the intestinal microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], but no microbial agent has been identified as a sole causative agent. Bacteroidales are numerically dominant intestinal organisms that associate with the mucosal surface and have properties that both positively and negatively affect the host. To determine precise numbers and species of Bacteroidales adherent to the mucosal surface in IBD patients, we performed a comprehensive culture based analysis of intestinal biopsies from pediatric Crohn's disease [CD], ulcerative colitis [UC], and control subjects. We obtained biopsies from 94 patients and used multiplex PCR or 16S rDNA sequencing of Bacteroidales isolates for species identification. Eighteen different Bacteroidales species were identified in the study group, with up to ten different species per biopsy, a number higher than demonstrated using 16S rRNA gene sequencing methods. Species diversity was decreased in IBD compared to controls and with increasingly inflamed tissue. There were significant differences in predominant Bacteroidales species between biopsies from the three groups and from inflamed and uninflamed sites. Parabacteroides distasonis significantly decreased in inflamed tissue. All 373 Bacteroidales isolates collected in this study grew with mucin as the only utilizable carbon source suggesting this is a non-pathogenic feature of this bacterial order. Bacteroides fragilis isolates with the enterotoxin gene [bft], previously associated with flares of colitis, were not found more often at inflamed colonic sites or within IBD subjects. B. fragilis isolates with the ability to synthesize the immunomodulatory polysaccharide A [PSA], previously shown to be protective in murine models of colitis, were not detected more often from healthy versus inflamed tissue.

  15. Coordinating Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup

  16. Facilities removal working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  17. Linear algebraic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Springer, T A

    1998-01-01

    "[The first] ten chapters...are an efficient, accessible, and self-contained introduction to affine algebraic groups over an algebraically closed field. The author includes exercises and the book is certainly usable by graduate students as a text or for self-study...the author [has a] student-friendly style… [The following] seven chapters... would also be a good introduction to rationality issues for algebraic groups. A number of results from the literature…appear for the first time in a text." –Mathematical Reviews (Review of the Second Edition) "This book is a completely new version of the first edition. The aim of the old book was to present the theory of linear algebraic groups over an algebraically closed field. Reading that book, many people entered the research field of linear algebraic groups. The present book has a wider scope. Its aim is to treat the theory of linear algebraic groups over arbitrary fields. Again, the author keeps the treatment of prerequisites self-contained. The material of t...

  18. Group Psychotherapy in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlin, Göran

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of the national developments of group psychotherapy (GPS) in Sweden during the period from World War II until the present time. Methods and concepts, imported primarily from England and the United States, inspired trainings and widespread psychodynamic and group analytic applications in schools, health treatment, and social care. Education in psychotherapy and GPS at universities opened new therapeutic and vocational areas during the period 1970-2005. Increasing criticism of psychodynamics, as in other Western societies, but more radical in Sweden, has in the last decades made group analytic GPS diminish in favor of cognitive behavioral therapy models. Prospects for GPS further development may presently look bleak but, in a longer perspective, are promising. PMID:26401795

  19. Financial Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    carfí, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we see the evolution of a capitalized financial event e, with respect to a capitalization factor f, as the exponential map of a suitably defined Lie group G(f,e), supported by the half-space of capitalized financial events having the same capital sign of e. The Lie group G(f,e) depends upon the capitalization factor f and on the event e itself. After the extension of the definition of exponential map of a Lie group, we shall eliminate the dependence on the financial event e, recognizing the presence of essentially one unique financial Lie semigroup, supported by the entire space of capitalized financial events, determined by the capitalization factor f.

  20. Focus group discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Hennink, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    The Understanding Research series focuses on the process of writing up social research. The series is broken down into three categories: Understanding Statistics, Understanding Measurement, and Understanding Qualitative Research. The books provide researchers with guides to understanding, writing, and evaluating social research. Each volume demonstrates how research should be represented, including how to write up the methodology as well as the research findings. Each volume also reviews how to appropriately evaluate published research. Focus Group Discussions addresses the challenges associated with conducting and writing focus group research. It provides detailed guidance on the practical and theoretical considerations in conducting focus group discussions including: designing the discussion guide, recruiting participants, training a field team, moderating techniques and ethical considerations. Monique Hennink describes how a methodology section is read and evaluated by others, such as journal reviewers or ...

  1. Instructions to working groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foushee, H. Clayton

    1987-01-01

    The key to the success of this workshop is your active participation in the working group process. The goals of this workshop are to address four major questions regarding Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) Training. To some extent the working group topic areas parallel these issues, but in some cases they do not. However, it is important for all of the working groups to keep these general questions in mind during their deliberations: (1) What are the essential elements of an optimal CRM Training program; (2) What are the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches to CRM Training; (3) How can CRM Training best be implemented, and what barriers exist; and (4) Is CRM Training effective, do we know, and if not, how can we find out.

  2. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  3. Quantum threshold group signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In most situations, the signer is generally a single person. However, when the message is written on behalf of an organization, a valid message may require the approval or consent of several persons. Threshold signature is a solution to this problem. Generally speaking, as an authority which can be trusted by all members does not exist, a threshold signature scheme without a trusted party appears more attractive. Following some ideas of the classical Shamir’s threshold signature scheme, a quantum threshold group signature one is proposed. In the proposed scheme, only t or more of n persons in the group can generate the group signature and any t-1 or fewer ones cannot do that. In the verification phase, any t or more of n signature receivers can verify the message and any t-1 or fewer receivers cannot verify the validity of the signature.

  4. Colored Group Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gurau, Razvan

    2009-01-01

    Group field theories are higher dimensional generalizations of matrix models. Their Feynman graphs are fat and in addition to vertices, edges and faces, they also contain higher dimensional cells, called bubbles. In this paper, we propose a new, fermionic Group Field Theory, posessing a color symmetry, and take the first steps in a systematic study of the topological properties of its graphs. Unlike its bosonic counterpart, the bubbles of the Feynman graphs of this theory are well defined and readily identified. We prove that this graphs are combinatorial cellular complexes. We define and study the cellular homology of this graphs. Furthermore we define a homotopy transformation appropriate to this graphs. Finally, the amplitude of the Feynman graphs is shown to be related to the fundamental group of the cellular complex.

  5. Group theory and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, David M

    1993-01-01

    Group theoretical principles are an integral part of modern chemistry. Not only do they help account for a wide variety of chemical phenomena, they simplify quantum chemical calculations. Indeed, knowledge of their application to chemical problems is essential for students of chemistry. This complete, self-contained study, written for advanced undergraduate-level and graduate-level chemistry students, clearly and concisely introduces the subject of group theory and demonstrates its application to chemical problems.To assist chemistry students with the mathematics involved, Professor Bishop ha

  6. GroupFinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden; Skovsgaard, Anders; Jensen, Christian S.

    2013-01-01

    The notion of point-of-interest (PoI) has existed since paper road maps began to include markings of useful places such as gas stations, hotels, and tourist attractions. With the introduction of geopositioned mobile devices such as smartphones and mapping services such as Google Maps, the retrieval....... Such groups are relevant to users who wish to conveniently explore several options before making a decision such as to purchase a specific product. Specifically, we demonstrate a practical proposal for finding top-k PoI groups in response to a query. We show how problem parameter settings can be mapped...

  7. Fourier Analysis on Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rudin, Walter

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1950s, many of the more refined aspects of Fourier analysis were transferred from their original settings (the unit circle, the integers, the real line) to arbitrary locally compact abelian (LCA) groups. Rudin's book, published in 1962, was the first to give a systematic account of these developments and has come to be regarded as a classic in the field. The basic facts concerning Fourier analysis and the structure of LCA groups are proved in the opening chapters, in order to make the treatment relatively self-contained.

  8. Hierarchies in student groups

    OpenAIRE

    Güntert, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This is a research about hierarchies in student groups. It shows how they are built und what sense they have. The position of a student in his student peer group is evaluated. The influence of the look, the style, the behaviour of the other sex, the gender, the origin, the prehistory, the appearance, achievement and their effect on hierarchies is analysed and the impact of charisma and organisation are compared. The meaning of this research is to indicate how a student must be to get the lead...

  9. Group B Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert H. Adriaanse

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Group B streptococcus (GBS, Streptococcus agalactiae is an important cause of neonatal sepsis. Prevention is possible by intrapartum screening for maternal GBS carriership and antimicrobial treatment of colonized women with risk factors during labor. The conflicting results of diagnostic performance are reported both for the newly developed rapid GBS antigen tests and Gram's stain.

  10. Teaching Badminton to Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan E.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous ideas for teaching badminton to large groups are presented. The focus is on drills and techniques for off the court instructional stations. Instead of having students waiting their turn to play, more students can participate actively as they rotate from one station to another. (JN)

  11. Abandoning wells working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  12. Supervision and group dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2004-01-01

    that many students are having difficulties with practical issues such as collaboration, communication, and project management. Most supervisors either ignore this demand, because they do not find it important or they find it frustrating, because they do not know, how to supervise group dynamics...

  13. With the Radiobiology Group

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The Radiobiology Group carries out experiments to study the effect of radiation on living cells. The photo shows the apparatus for growing broad beans which have been irradiated by 250 GeV protons. The roots are immersed in a tank of running water (CERN Weekly Bulletin 26 January 1981 and Annual Report 1980 p. 160). Karen Panman, Marilena Streit-Bianchi, Roger Paris.

  14. Cohomology of quantum groups

    CERN Document Server

    Frønsdal, Christian

    1995-01-01

    Lecture notes. Introduction to the cohomology of algebras, Lie algebras, Lie bialgebras and quantum groups. Contains a new derivation of the classification of classical r-matrices in terms of deformation cohomology, and a calculation of the esoteric forms of quantum gl(N) by deformation theory.

  15. Space Systems Academic Group

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The Space Systems Academic Group (SSAG) along with eight academic departments is an integral part of the Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. As an interdisciplinary association of professors it provides direction and guidance for two curricula: Space Systems Engineering and Space Systems Operations.

  16. Group theory in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cornwell, J F

    1989-01-01

    Recent devopments, particularly in high-energy physics, have projected group theory and symmetry consideration into a central position in theoretical physics. These developments have taken physicists increasingly deeper into the fascinating world of pure mathematics. This work presents important mathematical developments of the last fifteen years in a form that is easy to comprehend and appreciate.

  17. FAW Group Gorporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Feng

    2007-01-01

    @@ As the founder of China's automobile industry, FAW Group Corporation (FAW) has maintained a dominant position in the automotive industry since its founding in 1953 in terms of its total assets, Production capacity, domestic and international sales, market share, and brand recognition.

  18. Geodesic Renormalisation Group Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Brian P

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the renormalisation group flow in coupling constant space can be interpreted in terms of a dynamical equation for the couplings analogous to viscous fluid flow under the action of a potential. For free scalar field theory the flow is geodesic in two dimensions, while for $D \

  19. Functional Group Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  20. Nonequilibrium Renormalization Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal equilibrium properties of many-body or field theories are known to be efficiently classified in terms of renormalization group fixed points. A particularly powerful concept is the notion of infrared fixed points, which are characterized by universality. These correspond to critical phenomena in thermal equilibrium, where a characteristic large correlation length leads to independence of long-distance properties from details of the underlying microscopic theory. In contrast, a classification of properties of theories far from thermal equilibrium in terms of renormalization group fixed points is much less developed. The notion of universality or critical phenomena far from equilibrium is to a large extent unexplored, in particular, in relativistic quantum field theories. Here the strong interest is mainly driven by theoretical and experimental advances in our understanding of early universe cosmology as well as relativistic collision experiments of heavy nuclei in the laboratory. In these lectures I will introduce the functional renormalization group for the effective average action out of equilibrium. While in equilibrium typically a Euclidean formulation is adequate, nonequilibrium properties require real-time descriptions. For quantum systems a generating functional for nonequilibrium correlation functions with given density matrix at initial time can be written down using the Schwinger-Keldysh closed time path contour. In principle, this can be used to construct a nonequilibrium functional renormalization group along similar lines as for Euclidean field theories in thermal equilibrium. However, important differences include the absence of time-translation invariance for general out-of-equilibrium situations. The nonequilibrium renormalization group takes on a particularly simple form at a fixed point, since it becomes independent of the initial density matrix. I will discuss some simple examples for which I derive a hierarchy of fixed point solutions

  1. Investigation into the controversial association of Streptococcus gallolyticus with colorectal cancer and adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seroprevalence of IgG antibodies of Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus, CIP 105428, was evaluated to investigate the controversial association of S. gallolyticus with colorectal carcinoma and adenoma in attempt to investigate the nature of such association if any, by exploring the mRNA expression of NF-κB and IL-8. Moreover, the serological behavior of S. gallolyticus IgG antibodies was compared to that of an indicator bacterium of bowel, Bacteroides fragilis. ELISA was used to measure IgG antibodies of S. gallolyticus and B. fragilis in sera of 50 colorectal cancer, 14 colorectal adenoma patients, 30 age- and sex- matched apparently healthy volunteers (HV) and 30 age- and sex- matched colonoscopically-proven tumor-free control subjects. NF-κB and IL-8 mRNA expression was evaluated in tumorous and non-tumorous tissue sections of carcinoma and adenoma patients in comparison with that of control subjects by using in situ hybridization assay. Colorectal cancer and adenoma patients were associated with higher levels of serum S. gallolyticus IgG antibodies in comparison with HV and control subjects (P < 0.05) while no similar association was found with serum IgG antibodies of B. fragilis (P > 0.05). ELISA cutoff value for the seropositivity of S. gallolyticus IgG was calculated from tumor-free control group. The expression of NF-κB mRNA was higher in tumorous than non-tumorous tissue sections of adenoma and carcinoma, higher in carcinoma/adenoma sections than in control subjects, higher in tumorous sections of carcinoma than in adenoma patients, and higher in S. gallolyticus IgG seropositive than in seronegative groups in both tumorous and non-tumorous sections (P < 0.05). IL-8 mRNA expression in tumorous sections of adenoma and carcinoma was higher than in non-tumorous sections, higher in carcinoma/adenoma than in control subjects, and higher in S. gallolyticus IgG seropositive than in seronegative groups in tumorous rather than non

  2. Anti- CC-Groups and Anti-PC-Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Russo

    2007-01-01

    subgroup H of G. An anti-PC group G is a group in which each nonfinitely generated subgroup K has the quotient group G/coreG(NG(K which is a polycyclic-by-finite group. Anti-CC groups and anti-PC groups are the subject of the present article.

  3. Working group 4: Terrestrial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A working group at a Canada/USA symposium on climate change and the Arctic identified major concerns and issues related to terrestrial resources. The group examined the need for, and the means of, involving resource managers and users at local and territorial levels in the process of identifying and examining the impacts and consequences of climatic change. Climatic change will be important to the Arctic because of the magnitude of the change projected for northern latitudes; the apparent sensitivity of its terrestrial ecosystems, natural resources, and human support systems; and the dependence of the social, cultural, and economic welfare of Arctic communities, businesses, and industries on the health and quality of their environment. Impacts of climatic change on the physical, biological, and associated socio-economic environment are outlined. Gaps in knowledge needed to quantify these impacts are listed along with their relationships with resource management. Finally, potential actions for response and adaptation are presented

  4. Mindfulness for group facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Krohn, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that mindfulness techniques can be used for enhancing the outcome of group performance. The word mindfulness has different connotations in the academic literature. Broadly speaking there is ‘mindfulness without meditation’ or ‘Western’ mindfulness which involves active...... thinking and ‘Eastern’ mindfulness which refers to an open, accepting state of mind, as intended with Buddhist-inspired techniques such as meditation. In this paper, we are interested in the latter type of mindfulness and demonstrate how Eastern mindfulness techniques can be used as a tool for facilitation....... A brief introduction to the physiology and philosophy of Eastern mindfulness constitutes the basis for the arguments of the effect of mindfulness techniques. The use of mindfulness techniques for group facilitation is novel as it changes the focus from individuals’ mindfulness practice...

  5. Two Abelian group constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Let A be an Abelian group and n an integer >1. Let D be a divisible hull of A. Define A0sup((D))=A,Asub(r)sup((D)) = set containing x is an element of D|nx=y, for some y is an element of Asub(r=1)sup((D)), r=1,2,3,..., and Asub([n])sup((D))=Usub(r=0)sup(infinity)Asub(r)sup((D)). Then each Asub(r)sup((D)) is a subgroup of D and Asub([n])sup((D)) is the smallest n-divisible subgroup of D which contains A. Define Asub((D))sup([n])=Asub([n])sup((D))/A. A number of theorems and propositions are proved for the groups Asub([n])sup((D)) and Asub((D))sup([n])

  6. ST Quality Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Akhtar, S

    2000-01-01

    When CERN engages contractors or outside enterprises for supply and service contracts, a Quality certification is requested. CERN itself has no global certification. Nor are quality assurance systems well understood by the majority of CERN staff. This has not precluded successful activity but it is felt that a structured approach would have some benefits: elimination of occasional accelerator perturbations, improved documentation, efficient use of existing resources, enhanced sharing of experience and knowledge, avoidance of improper handover periods when staff leave CERN. In some cases talented staff spend too much time doing remedial jobs when they are capable of achieving much more. The ST quality working group was formed to address these problems. The goal of this quality working group is to help ST division maintain and continuously improve the quality of its services and operations, and give confidence to ST staff and clients that the requirements for quality are being fulfilled, maintained and improved...

  7. Group Formation in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Gabrielle; Wooders, Myrna

    2005-01-01

    Broad and diverse ranges of activities are conducted within and by organized groups of individuals, including political, economic and social activities. These activities have recently become a subject of intense interest in economics and game theory. Some of the topics investigated in this collection are models of networks of power and privilege, trade networks, co-authorship networks, buyer-seller networks with differentiated products, and networks of medical innovation and the adaptation of new information. Other topics are social norms on punctuality, clubs and the provision of club goods and public goods, research and development and collusive alliances among corporations, and international alliances and trading agreements. While relatively recent, the literature on game theoretic studies of group formation in economics is already vast. This volume provides an introduction to this important literature on game-theoretic treatments of situations with networks, clubs, and coalitions, including some applications.

  8. The Ombudperson Initiative Group

    CERN Document Server

    Laura Stewart

    Following many discussions that took place at some of the ATLAS Women's Network lunch gatherings, a few ATLAS women joined forces with similarly concerned CERN staff women to form a small group last Fall to discuss the need for a CERN-wide Ombudsperson. This has since evolved into the Ombudsperson Initiative Group (OIG) currently composed of the following members: Barbro Asman, Stockholm University; Pierre Charrue, CERN AB; Anna Cook, CERN IT; Catherine Delamare, CERN and IT Ombudsperson; Paula Eerola, Lund University; Pauline Gagnon, Indiana University; Eugenia Hatziangeli, CERN AB; Doreen Klem, CERN IT; Bertrand Nicquevert, CERN TS and Laura Stewart, CERN AT. On June 12, members of the OIG met with representatives of Human Resources (HR) and the Equal Opportunity Advisory Panel (EOAP) to discuss the proposal drafted by the OIG. The meeting was very positive. Everybody agreed that the current procedures at CERN applicable in the event of conflict required a thorough review, and that a professionnally trai...

  9. The Areva Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides information on the Areva Group, a world nuclear industry leader, offering solutions for nuclear power generation, electricity transmission and distribution and interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. It presents successively the front end division including the group business lines involved in producing nuclear fuel for electric power generation (uranium mining, concentration, conversion and enrichment and nuclear fuel fabrication); the reactors and services division which designs and builds PWR, BWR and research reactors; the back end division which encompasses the management of the fuel that has been used in nuclear power plants; the transmission and distribution division which provides products, systems and services to the medium and high voltage energy markets; the connectors division which designs and manufactures electrical, electronic and optical connectors, flexible micro circuitry and interconnection systems. Areva is implemented in Europe, north and south america, africa and asia-pacific. (A.L.B.)

  10. Communication from ST Group

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Please note that owing the preparations for the Open Days, the FM Group will not able to handle specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, nor removal or PC transport requests between the 31 March and 11 April. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of all types of waste and any urgent transport of office furniture or PCs before 31 March. Waste collection requests must be made by contacting FM Support on 77777 or at the e-mail address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form (select "Removals" or "PC transport" from the drop-down menu). For any question concerning the sorting of waste, please consult the following web site: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/ Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  11. Ocenenie Volkswagen Group

    OpenAIRE

    Šusták, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Objective of the thesis is determination of Volkswagen Group's equity intrinsic value. Basic starting point of the analysis is seggregation of consolidated financial statements into financial and production division, which are valuated separately. The production division is valuated using both enterprise discounted cashflow and discounted economic profit analysis. Equity cashflow valuation is used to derive value of the financial division. Results of valuation implied by income approach are t...

  12. Combinatorial group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lyndon, Roger C

    2001-01-01

    From the reviews: "This book (...) defines the boundaries of the subject now called combinatorial group theory. (...)it is a considerable achievement to have concentrated a survey of the subject into 339 pages. This includes a substantial and useful bibliography; (over 1100 ÄitemsÜ). ...the book is a valuable and welcome addition to the literature, containing many results not previously available in a book. It will undoubtedly become a standard reference." Mathematical Reviews, AMS, 1979.

  13. Equity valuation : Eurocash Group

    OpenAIRE

    Branco, Ana Isabel Antunes de Azevedo

    2015-01-01

    Equity valuation is an extremely complex and subjective process, it depends not only on the theoretical models but also on the analysis and assumptions used by the analyst. This thesis focuses on the valuation of Eurocash Group, a leading wholesale distributor of fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) in Poland. In order to present stronger conclusions we decided to use two different models: the discounted cash-flow (DCF) model and the multiples method as a complement. The combination of both l...

  14. KKG Group Paraffin Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-12-01

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

  15. Multibunch working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this working group was to foment discussions about the use and limitations of multi-bunch, representatives from most operating or in-project synchrotron radiation sources (ALS, SPEAR, BESSY-2, SPRING-8, ANKA, DELTA, PEP-2, DIAMOND, ESRF...) have presented their experience. The discussions have been led around 3 topics: 1) resistive wall instabilities and ion instabilities, 2) higher harmonic cavities, and 3) multibunch feedback systems

  16. Heavy flavors study group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavy flavor study group concentrated on three issues. First the investigation of an energy transverse trigger to be used to select out charm and beauty events. Second, in a dedicated high sensitivity two-body B experiment is it possible to ''tag'' the beauty particle. Third, the design of a photoproduction experiment that could accumulate 108 charm particles in a single Fermilab running period

  17. Finite groups with transitive semipermutability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lifang WANG; Yanming WANG

    2008-01-01

    A group G is said to be a T-group (resp. PT-group, PST-group), if normality (resp. permutability, S-permutability) is a transitive relation. In this paper, we get the characterization of finite solvable PST-groups. We also give a new characterization of finite solvable PT-groups.

  18. Group Milieu in systemic and psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    in a randomized study of systemic versus psychodynamic group therapy, that the short-term outcome for patients who received systemic group psychotherapy was significantly better than the outcome for patients who received psychodynamic group psychotherapy. The current study assessed the group milieu in both groups....... Methods: This randomized prospective study included 106 women: 52 assigned to psychodynamic group psychotherapy and 54 assigned to systemic group psychotherapy. The Group Environment Scale (GES) was filled in the mid phase of therapy and analysed in three dimensions and 10 subscales. Results: The systemic...... subscales: Cohesion (psystemic group turned out to be evaluated as the most structured therapy and also...

  19. Outer automorphism groups of certain 1-relator groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIM; Goansu

    2010-01-01

    Grossman first showed that outer automorphism groups of 1-relator groups given by orientable surface groups are residually finite,whence mapping class groups of orientable surfaces are residually finite.Allenby,Kim and Tang showed that outer automorphism groups of cyclically pinched 1-relator groups are residually finite,whence mapping class groups of orientable and non-orientable surfaces are residually finite.In this paper we show that outer automorphism groups of certain conjugacy separable 1-relator groups are residually finite.

  20. Social group utility maximization

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Xiaowen; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Junshan

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief explains how to leverage mobile users' social relationships to improve the interactions of mobile devices in mobile networks. It develops a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework that captures diverse social ties of mobile users and diverse physical coupling of mobile devices. Key topics include random access control, power control, spectrum access, and location privacy.This brief also investigates SGUM-based power control game and random access control game, for which it establishes the socially-aware Nash equilibrium (SNE). It then examines the critical SGUM-b

  1. Unilever Group : equity valuation

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Susana Sofia Castelo

    2014-01-01

    The following dissertation has the purpose to value the Unilever Group, but more specifically Unilever N.V. being publicly traded in the Amsterdam Exchange Index. Unilever is seen as a global player and one of most successful and competitive fast-moving consumer goods companies. In order to valuate Unilever’s equity, a Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) approach is first carried out, since it is believed to be the most reliable methodology. The value estimated was €36.39, advising one to buy its s...

  2. Applications of Quantum Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chryssomalakos, Chryssomalis

    The main theme of this thesis is the search for applications of Quantum Group and Hopf algebraic concepts and techniques in Physics. We investigate in particular the possibilities that exist in deforming, in a self consistent way, the symmetry structure of physical theories with the hope that the resulting scheme will be of relevance in the description of physical reality. Our choice of topics reflects this motivation: we discuss deformations of rotations and Lorentz boosts, search for integrals on the quantum plane and attempt to Fourier transform functions of non -commuting coordinates. Along the way, more formal considerations prompt us to revisit integration on finite dimensional Hopf algebras, explore the interconnections between various descriptions of the quantum double and derive the algebraic structure of the quantum plane from that of the underlying deformed symmetry group. The material is structured as follows. Chapter 1 introduces the language, basic concepts and notation employed throughout this thesis. Chapter 2 focuses on Hopf algebras viewed as universal envelopes of deformed Lie algebras and their duals. Bicovariant generators enter the discussion as analogues of the classical Lie algebra generators and some of their properties are given. We comment on the geometrical interpretation of the algebraic formulation and introduce computational tools. In chapter 3 we take a close look at the quantum Lorentz Hopf algebra. The basics of complex quantum groups are presented and applied in the derivation of the algebra of the quantum Lorentz generators and its Hopf and involutive structures. We point also to isomorphisms with previous related constructions. The subject of quantum integration is explored in chapter 4. We derive a formula for the integral on a finite dimensional Hopf algebra and show its equivalence to the formulation in terms of the trace of the square of the antipode. Integration on the quantum plane is also examined and a Fourier transform

  3. Renormalization Group Functional Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Curtright, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {\\sigma} functions, and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {\\beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {\\sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale, and zeroes of {\\beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow, but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

  4. Theory and modeling group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    The primary purpose of the Theory and Modeling Group meeting was to identify scientists engaged or interested in theoretical work pertinent to the Max '91 program, and to encourage theorists to pursue modeling which is directly relevant to data which can be expected to result from the program. A list of participants and their institutions is presented. Two solar flare paradigms were discussed during the meeting -- the importance of magnetic reconnection in flares and the applicability of numerical simulation results to solar flare studies.

  5. Statistical Group Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Tim Futing

    2011-01-01

    An incomparably useful examination of statistical methods for comparisonThe nature of doing science, be it natural or social, inevitably calls for comparison. Statistical methods are at the heart of such comparison, for they not only help us gain understanding of the world around us but often define how our research is to be carried out. The need to compare between groups is best exemplified by experiments, which have clearly defined statistical methods. However, true experiments are not always possible. What complicates the matter more is a great deal of diversity in factors that are not inde

  6. The technical review group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the formation of a technical review group (TRG) as an early application of the quality assurance program for high-level waste processing. The objectives and functions for a TRG are summarized. Organizational structure is presented. Interfaces for the TRG are described by a flow diagram following the review process from the originator's document submittal to the final approval. Interfacing organizations and their responsibilities during the review are shown. Experience to date with TRG activities are described and QA interaction is discussed

  7. Quantum Group $\\sigma$ Models

    CERN Document Server

    Frishman, Yitzhak; Zakrzewski, W J

    1993-01-01

    Field-theoretic models for fields taking values in quantum groups are investigated. First we consider $SU_q(2)$ $\\sigma$ model ($q$ real) expressed in terms of basic notions of noncommutative differential geometry. We discuss the case in which the $\\sigma$ models fields are represented as products of conventional $\\sigma$ fields and of the coordinate-independent algebra. An explicit example is provided by the $U_q(2)$ $\\sigma$ model with $q\\sp{N}=1$, in which case quantum matrices $U_q(2)$ are realised as $2N\\times 2N$ unitary matrices. Open problems are pointed out.

  8. Quantum Group $\\sigma$ Models

    OpenAIRE

    Frishman, Y.; Lukierski, J.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    Field-theoretic models for fields taking values in quantum groups are investigated. First we consider $SU_q(2)$ $\\sigma$ model ($q$ real) expressed in terms of basic notions of noncommutative differential geometry. We discuss the case in which the $\\sigma$ models fields are represented as products of conventional $\\sigma$ fields and of the coordinate-independent algebra. An explicit example is provided by the $U_q(2)$ $\\sigma$ model with $q\\sp{N}=1$, in which case quantum matrices $U_q(2)$ ar...

  9. Quality of Group Member Agendas and Group Session Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Jauquet, Carol A.

    1990-01-01

    Examined relationship between group members' (N=36) approach to group sessions and group session climate and relationship between length of time in group and agenda quality. Found average ratings of interpersonal and here-and-now dimensions of agendas were significantly related to average perception of group climate as more engaged and less…

  10. Group Life Insurance

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration would like to remind you that staff members and fellows have the possibility to take out a life insurance contract on favourable terms through a Group Life Insurance.   This insurance is provided by the company Helvetia and is available to you on a voluntary basis. The premium, which varies depending on the age and gender of the person insured, is calculated on the basis of the amount of the death benefit chosen by the staff member/fellow and can be purchased in slices of 10,000 CHF.    The contract normally ends at the retirement age (65/67 years) or when the staff member/fellow leaves the Organization. The premium is deducted monthly from the payroll.   Upon retirement, the staff member can opt to maintain his membership under certain conditions.   More information about Group Life Insurance can be found at: Regulations (in French) Table of premiums The Pension Fund Benefit Service &...

  11. On the Brauer group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For an arithmetic model X of a Fermat surface or a hyperkahler variety with Betti number b2(V otimes k-bar)>3 over a purely imaginary number field k, we prove the finiteness of the l-components of Br'(X) for all primes l>>0. This yields a variant of a conjecture of M. Artin. If V is a smooth projective irregular surface over a number field k and V(k)≠ nothing, then the l-primary component of Br(V)/Br(k) is an infinite group for every prime l. Let A1→M1 be the universal family of elliptic curves with a Jacobian structure of level N>=3 over a number field k supset of Q(e2πi/N). Assume that M1(k) ≠ nothing. If V is a smooth projective compactification of the surface A1, then the l-primary component of Br(V)/Br(M-bar1) is a finite group for each sufficiently large prime l

  12. Business working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop of 26-27 june 2000, on nuclear power Plant LIfe Management (PLIM), also included working groups in which major issues facing PLIM activities for nuclear power plants were identified and discussed. The third group was on Business. The discussion concerned the following points: There are concerns about retaining experienced/trained personnel, and maintaining a good working relationship among them, as well as about the closure of research facilities, the reduction in staff numbers under increasing economic pressure and the lack of new nuclear power plant constructions. The marginal cost of producing electricity is lower for most existing nuclear power plants than for almost all other energy sources. Refurbishment costs are usually relatively small compared with new investments. The ongoing regulatory reform of the electricity market will bring increasing competition. Although PLIM has been carried out in many countries with favourable results, there are still uncertainties which affect business decisions regarding financial and market risks in PLIM activities. Recommendations were made. (author)

  13. Social group and mobbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltezarević Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Our reality, having been subject to the numerous social crises during the last decades of the 20th century, is characterized by frequent incidences of powerlessness and alienation. The man is more frequently a subject to loneliness and overcomes the feeling of worthlessness, no matter whether he considers himself an individual or a part of a whole larger social. Such an environment leads to development of aggression in all fields of ones life. This paper has as an objective the pointing out of the mental harassment that is manifested in the working environment. There is a prevalence of mobbing cases, as a mode of pathological communication. The result of this is that a person, subjected to this kind of abuse, is soon faced with social isolation. This research also aspires to initiate the need for social groups self-organization of which victims are part of. The reaction modality of a social group directly conditions the outcome of the deliberate social drama, one is subjected to it as a result of mobbing.

  14. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  15. Communication from ST Group

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    In order to prepare the organization of the Open Days, please note that FM Group will not able to take into account either specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, either removal or PC transport requests between the 31st and the 11th of March. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of any type of waste and the urgent transport of office furniture or PC before the 31st of March. Waste collection requests shall be formulated contacting FM Support at 77777 or at the email address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form selecting the "Removals" or the "PC transport" category from the drop-down menu. For any question concerning the waste sorting, please consult the following web address: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/. Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  16. Structural characterization and MHCII-dependent immunological properties of the zwitterionic O-chain antigen of Morganella morganii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, N Martin; Kreisman, Lori S C; Stupak, Jacek; MacLean, Leann L; Cobb, Brian A; Richards, James C

    2011-10-01

    Morganella morganii is a commensal Gram-negative bacterium that has long been known to produce an antigen bearing phosphocholine groups. We determined the structure of this O-chain antigen and found that its repeating unit also contains a free amino group and a second phosphate: This alternating charge character places the M. morganii O-chain polysaccharide into a small family of zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPSs) known to induce T-cell-dependent immune responses via presentation by class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) molecules. In vitro binding assays demonstrate that this O-chain interacts with MHCII in a manner that competes with binding of the prototypical ZPS antigen PSA from Bacteroides fragilis, despite its lack of a helical structure. Cellular studies also showed that the M. morganii polysaccharide induces activation of CD4(+) T-cells. Antibody binding experiments using acid hydrolyzed fragments representing the monomer and higher oligomers of the repeating unit showed that the phosphocholine group was the dominant element of the epitope with an overall affinity (K(D)) of about 5 × 10(-5) M, a typical value for an IgM anti-carbohydrate antibody but much lower than the affinity for phosphocholine itself. These data show that the structure of the M. morganii polysaccharide contains a unique zwitterionic repeating unit which allows for immune recognition by T-cells, making it the first identified T-cell-dependent O-chain antigen.

  17. Representation Theory of Algebraic Groups and Quantum Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gyoja, A; Shinoda, K-I; Shoji, T; Tanisaki, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Invited articles by top notch expertsFocus is on topics in representation theory of algebraic groups and quantum groupsOf interest to graduate students and researchers in representation theory, group theory, algebraic geometry, quantum theory and math physics

  18. On Generalized PST-groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG JUN-XIN; Du Xian-kun

    2011-01-01

    A finite group G is called a generalized PST-group if every subgroup contained in F(G) permutes all Sylow subgroups of G,where F(G) is the Fitting subgroup of G.The class of generalized PST-groups is not subgroup and quotient group closed,and it properly contains the class of PST-groups.In this paper,the structure of generalized PST-groups is first investigated.Then,with its help,groups whose every subgroup (or every quotient group) is a generalized PST-group are determined,and it is shown that such groups are precisely PST-groups.As applications,T-groups and PT-groups are characterized.

  19. IgA production in the large intestine is modulated by a different mechanism than in the small intestine: Bacteroides acidifaciens promotes IgA production in the large intestine by inducing germinal center formation and increasing the number of IgA+ B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Hosono, Akira; Oyama, Akihito; Tsuda, Masato; Suzuki, Ami; Hachimura, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Momose, Yoshika; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2013-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that intestinal commensal bacteria induce immunoglobulin (Ig) A production by promoting the development of gut-associated lymphoid tissues in the small intestine. However, the precise mechanism whereby these bacteria modulate IgA production in the large intestine, which harbors the majority of intestinal commensals, is poorly understood. In addition, it is not known which commensal bacteria induce IgA production in the small intestine and which induce production in the large intestine. To address these issues, we generated gnotobiotic mice mono-associated with different murine commensal bacteria by inoculating germ-free (GF) mice with Lactobacillus johnsonii or Bacteroides acidifaciens. In GF mice, IgA production was barely detectable in the small intestine and was not detected in the large intestine. Interestingly, total IgA secretion in the large intestinal mucosa of B. acidifaciens mono-associated (BA) mice was significantly greater than that of GF and L. johnsonii mono-associated (LJ) mice. However, there was no difference in total IgA production in the small intestine of GF, LJ and BA mice. In addition, in the large intestine of BA mice, the expression of IgA(+) cells and germinal center formation were more remarkable than in GF and LJ mice. Furthermore, B. acidifaciens-specific IgA was detected in the large intestine of BA mice. These results suggest that the production of IgA in the large intestine may be modulated by a different mechanism than that in the small intestine, and that B. acidifaciens is one of the predominant bacteria responsible for promoting IgA production in the large intestine.

  20. Renormalization Group Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Tomboulis, E T

    2007-01-01

    We point out a general problem with the procedures commonly used to obtain improved actions from MCRG decimated configurations. Straightforward measurement of the couplings from the decimated configurations, by one of the known methods, can result into actions that do not correctly reproduce the physics on the undecimated lattice. This is because the decimated configurations are generally not representative of the equilibrium configurations of the assumed form of the effective action at the measured couplings. Curing this involves fine-tuning of the chosen MCRG decimation procedure, which is also dependent on the form assumed for the effective action. We illustrate this in decimation studies of the SU(2) LGT using Swendsen and Double Smeared Blocking decimation procedures. A single-plaquette improved action involving five group representations and free of this pathology is given.

  1. Group life insurance

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration wishes to inform staff members and fellows having taken out optional life insurance under the group contract signed by CERN that the following changes to the rules and regulations entered into force on 1 January 2013:   The maximum age for an active member has been extended from 65 to 67 years. The beneficiary clause now allows insured persons to designate one or more persons of their choice to be their beneficiary(-ies), either at the time of taking out the insurance or at a later date, in which case the membership/modification form must be updated accordingly. Beneficiaries must be clearly identified (name, first name, date of birth, address).   The membership/modification form is available on the FP website: http://fp.web.cern.ch/helvetia-life-insurance For further information, please contact: Valentina Clavel (Tel. 73904) Peggy Pithioud (Tel. 72736)

  2. Graphs, groups and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    White, AT

    1985-01-01

    The field of topological graph theory has expanded greatly in the ten years since the first edition of this book appeared. The original nine chapters of this classic work have therefore been revised and updated. Six new chapters have been added, dealing with: voltage graphs, non-orientable imbeddings, block designs associated with graph imbeddings, hypergraph imbeddings, map automorphism groups and change ringing.Thirty-two new problems have been added to this new edition, so that there are now 181 in all; 22 of these have been designated as ``difficult'''' and 9 as ``unsolved''''. Three of the four unsolved problems from the first edition have been solved in the ten years between editions; they are now marked as ``difficult''''.

  3. Doing focus group research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Laura Bang

    2014-01-01

    interview data can be of some use if the distinction between natural and contrived data is given up and replaced with a distinction between interview data as topic or as resource. In greater detail, such scholars argue that interview data are perfectly adequate if the researcher wants to study the topic of......Scholars of ethnomethodologically informed discourse studies are often sceptical of the use of interview data such as focus group data. Some scholars quite simply reject interview data with reference to a general preference for so-called naturally occurring data. Other scholars acknowledge that...... interview interaction, but inadequate as data for studying phenomena that go beyond the phenomenon of interview interaction. Neither of these more and less sceptical positions are, on the face of it, surprising due to the ethnomethodological commitment to study social order as accomplished in situ, not as...

  4. Grouping Synonyms by Definitions

    CERN Document Server

    Falk, Ingrid; Jacquey, Evelyne; Venant, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for grouping the synonyms of a lemma according to its dictionary senses. The senses are defined by a large machine readable dictionary for French, the TLFi (Tr\\'esor de la langue fran\\c{c}aise informatis\\'e) and the synonyms are given by 5 synonym dictionaries (also for French). To evaluate the proposed method, we manually constructed a gold standard where for each (word, definition) pair and given the set of synonyms defined for that word by the 5 synonym dictionaries, 4 lexicographers specified the set of synonyms they judge adequate. While inter-annotator agreement ranges on that task from 67% to at best 88% depending on the annotator pair and on the synonym dictionary being considered, the automatic procedure we propose scores a precision of 67% and a recall of 71%. The proposed method is compared with related work namely, word sense disambiguation, synonym lexicon acquisition and WordNet construction.

  5. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  6. Gutzwiller renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanatà, Nicola; Yao, Yong-Xin; Deng, Xiaoyu; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We develop a variational scheme called the "Gutzwiller renormalization group" (GRG), which enables us to calculate the ground state of Anderson impurity models (AIM) with arbitrary numerical precision. Our method exploits the low-entanglement property of the ground state of local Hamiltonians in combination with the framework of the Gutzwiller wave function and indicates that the ground state of the AIM has a very simple structure, which can be represented very accurately in terms of a surprisingly small number of variational parameters. We perform benchmark calculations of the single-band AIM that validate our theory and suggest that the GRG might enable us to study complex systems beyond the reach of the other methods presently available and pave the way to interesting generalizations, e.g., to nonequilibrium transport in nanostructures.

  7. The analytic renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Finite temperature Euclidean two-point functions in quantum mechanics or quantum field theory are characterized by a discrete set of Fourier coefficients Gk, k ∈ Z, associated with the Matsubara frequencies νk = 2 πk / β. We show that analyticity implies that the coefficients Gk must satisfy an infinite number of model-independent linear equations that we write down explicitly. In particular, we construct "Analytic Renormalization Group" linear maps Aμ which, for any choice of cut-off μ, allow to express the low energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | algorithm, we show that the exact universal linear constraints on Gk can be used to systematically improve any random approximate data set obtained, for example, from Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results are illustrated on several explicit examples.

  8. Braided C*-quantum groups

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Sutanu

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general theory of braided quantum groups in the C*-algebraic framework. More precisely, we construct braided quantum groups using manageable braided multiplicative unitaries over a regular C*-quantum group. We show that braided C*-quantum groups are equivalent to C*-quantum groups with projection.

  9. Making Cooperative Learning Groups Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, James; De Jong, Cherie

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of cooperative-learning groups with middle school students. Describes cooperative-learning techniques, including group roles, peer evaluation, and observation and monitoring. Considers grouping options, including group size and configuration, dyads, the think-pair-share lecture, student teams achievement divisions, jigsaw groups,…

  10. Group and ring theoretic properties of polycyclic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Wehrfritz, BAF

    2009-01-01

    Polycyclic groups are built from cyclic groups in a specific way. They arise in many contexts within group theory itself but also more generally in algebra, for example in the theory of Noetherian rings. The first half of this book develops the standard group theoretic techniques for studying polycyclic groups and the basic properties of these groups. The second half then focuses specifically on the ring theoretic properties of polycyclic groups and their applications, often to purely group theoretic situations. The book is intended to be a study manual for graduate students and researchers co

  11. CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit Mr = –18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

  12. Modular Representations of Profinite Groups

    CERN Document Server

    MacQuarrie, John

    2010-01-01

    Our aim is to transfer several foundational results from the modular representation theory of finite groups to the wider context of profinite groups. We are thus interested in profinite modules over the completed group algebra k[[G

  13. Propionibacterium acidipropionici CRL1198 influences the production of acids and the growth of bacterial genera stimulated by inulin in a murine model of cecal slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Pisarello, M J; Gultemirian, M L; Nieto-Peñalver, C; Perez Chaia, A

    2010-08-01

    Different attempts have been made to improve the health status of humans and animals by increasing the intestinal production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) derived from non-digestible carbohydrates fermentation. In this paper we investigate the in vitro production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) after addition of inulin, propionibacteria or a combination of both in an experimental model of mice cecal slurries. The development of bacterial genera which are usually stimulated by inulin addition was also investigated. According to our experimental data, acetic acid and butyric acids concentrations increased after incubation in slurries that had no supplements. By contrast, butyric acid concentrations remained in the basal value when supplements were used. Fermentation of only inulin did not increase the concentration of total SCFA. Propionibacterium acidipropionici CRL1198 improved the production of propionic acid in cecal slurries when it was added alone, but the effect was more noticeable in the combination with inulin. A modulation of the global fermentative activity of the cecal microbiota was evidenced by the increase on the ratio propionic acid/SCFA in supplementations with propionibacteria. Statistical analysis of data demonstrated that samples from homogenates with propionibacteria alone or combined with inulin belong to the same cluster. The presence of propionibacteria limited the growth of Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium hystoliticum groups in slurries with and without inulin. The growth of Bifidobacterium was not modified and the stimulating effect of inulin on lactobacilli disappeared in the presence of propionibacteria. In conclusion, dairy propionibacteria are potential candidates to develop new functional foods helpful to ensure the intestinal production of SCFA during inulin supplementation and to control the overgrowth of bacteria belonging to Bacteroides and Clostridium genera.

  14. Harmonic Analysis and Group Representation

    CERN Document Server

    Figa-Talamanca, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    This title includes: Lectures - A. Auslander, R. Tolimeri - Nilpotent groups and abelian varieties, M Cowling - Unitary and uniformly bounded representations of some simple Lie groups, M. Duflo - Construction de representations unitaires d'un groupe de Lie, R. Howe - On a notion of rank for unitary representations of the classical groups, V.S. Varadarajan - Eigenfunction expansions of semisimple Lie groups, and R. Zimmer - Ergodic theory, group representations and rigidity; and, Seminars - A. Koranyi - Some applications of Gelfand pairs in classical analysis.

  15. Working Group Versus Team Work

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina-Vasilica Zaharia; Mirela-Mihaela Dogaru; Dan-Marin Boaja

    2014-01-01

    The cell organization is represented by the working group and not the individual, groups that are a major feature of life organization. Quality circles were designed as tools for building team spirit in Japanese companies as a tool to enhance group cohesion and the training of employees. The essential characteristic of human behavior and organizational performance is given by the working group and the influence on group members, so members of the group leader should use in order to achieve a ...

  16. Interagency Advanced Power Group -- Steering group meeting minutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-18

    This document contains the draft meeting minutes of the Steering Group of the Interagency Advanced Power Group. Included are the discussions resulting from the presentation of working group reports and the results of a discussion of IAPG policies and procedures. In the appendix are the reports of the following working groups: Electrical, Mechanical, Solar, and Systems.

  17. Group Leader Development: Effects of Personal Growth and Psychoeducational Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt, Jonathan H.; Robinson, E. H., III; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to compare the effects of personal growth groups and psychoeducational groups on counselor education students' (n = 74) empathy and group leader self-efficacy. Additionally, we compared the degree to which participants in each group valued: (a) cohesion, (b) catharsis, and (c) insight. There were no…

  18. Post-Disaster Social Justice Group Work and Group Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses post-disaster group counseling and group supervision using a social justice orientation for working with post-disaster survivors from underserved populations. The Disaster Cross-Cultural Counseling model is a culturally responsive group counseling model that infuses social justice into post-disaster group counseling and…

  19. Group Development and Situational Leadership: A Model for Managing Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carew, Donald K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    An integration of the concepts of situational leadership with what is known about group development and functioning of work groups is discussed as a tool in helping managers, trainers, and group members understand group development and determine the appropriate leader behaviors to use in various situations to build unified, cohesive, and…

  20. Oklo working group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural analogue studies have been carried out for several years in the framework of the European Community's R and D programme on radioactive waste; and within its recent fourth five-year programme on 'Management and storage of radioactive waste (1990-94)' the Community is participating in the Oklo study, natural analogue for transfer processes in a geological repository. The Oklo project is coordinated by CEA-IPSN (F) and involves laboratories from several CEA directorates (IPSN, DTA and DCC) which collaborate with other institutions from France: CREGU, Nancy; CNRS, Strasbourg and ENSMD, Fontainebleau. Moreover, institutes from non-EC member States are also taking part in the Oklo study. The second joint CEC-CEA progress meeting of the Oklo Working Group was held in April 1992 in Brussels and gave the possibility of reviewing and discussing progress made since its first meeting in February 1991 at CEA in Fontenay-aux-Roses. About 40 participants from 15 laboratories and organizations coming from France, Canada, Gabon, Japan, Sweden and the USA underline the great interest in the ongoing research activities. The meeting focused on the different tasks within the CEC-CEA Oklo project concerning (i) field survey and sampling, (ii) characterization of the source term, (iii) studies of the petrographical and geochemical system, and (iv) studies of the hydrogeological system and hydrodynamic modelling. (author) 17 papers are presented

  1. Reflexive Analysis of Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Vladimir A.

    This chapter develops further a model I previously introduced, of an agent facing a choice between the positive and the negative poles. Here I will consider agents whose individual behavior depends on a ‘society’ compounded by all of them. Four ideas underlie the theory. The first idea is to consider relationships between the subgroups of agents, not just pairs of agents; this idea allows us to represent a decomposable graph corresponding to an agent or a group of agents as a tree of subgraphs. The second idea is to establish a correspondence between decomposable graphs and polynomials, allowing us to replace a tree of subgraphs with a tree of polynomials representing a computational process. The third idea consists of the interpretation of the tree of polynomials as an agent who has images of the self, which can have images of the self, etc. Finally, the fourth idea is putting an equation into correspondence to the agent, allowing us to find out the agent’s state. The theory is illustrated here with several examples from modern geopolitics, including scenarios of current interest.

  2. Automorphism Groups of Finite p-Groups: Structure and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Helleloid, Geir T

    2007-01-01

    This thesis has three goals related to the automorphism groups of finite $p$-groups. The primary goal is to provide a complete proof of a theorem showing that, in some asymptotic sense, the automorphism group of almost every finite $p$-group is itself a $p$-group. We originally proved this theorem in a paper with Martin; the presentation of the proof here contains omitted proof details and revised exposition. We also give a survey of the extant results on automorphism groups of finite $p$-groups, focusing on the order of the automorphism groups and on known examples. Finally, we explore a connection between automorphisms of finite $p$-groups and Markov chains. Specifically, we define a family of Markov chains on an elementary abelian $p$-group and bound the convergence rate of some of those chains.

  3. High occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Clostridium difficile in the intestinal microbiota of colorectal carcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia H. Fukugaiti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractColorectal carcinoma is considered the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Several microorganisms have been associated with carcinogenesis, including Enterococcus spp., Helicobacter pylori, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, pathogenic E. coli strains and oral Fusobacterium. Here we qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the presence of oral and intestinal microorganisms in the fecal microbiota of colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls. Seventeen patients (between 49 and 70 years-old visiting the Cancer Institute of the Sao Paulo State were selected, 7 of whom were diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma. Bacterial detection was performed by qRT-PCR. Although all of the tested bacteria were detected in the majority of the fecal samples, quantitative differences between the Cancer Group and healthy controls were detected only for F. nucleatum and C. difficile. The three tested oral microorganisms were frequently observed, suggesting a need for furthers studies into a potential role for these bacteria during colorectal carcinoma pathogenesis. Despite the small number of patients included in this study, we were able to detect significantly more F. nucleatumand C. difficile in the Cancer Group patients compared to healthy controls, suggesting a possible role of these bacteria in colon carcinogenesis. This finding should be considered when screening for colorectal cancer.

  4. ON COLEMAN OUTER AUTOMORPHISM GROUPS OF FINITE GROUPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海进科; 李正兴

    2014-01-01

    Let G be a finite group and OutCol(G) the Coleman outer automorphism group of G(for the definition, see below). The question whether OutCol(G) is a p′-group naturally arises from the study of the normalizer problem for integral group rings, where p is a prime. In this article, some sufficient conditions for OutCol(G) to be a p′-group are obtained. Our results generalize some well-known theorems.

  5. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  6. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beier, Eugene; /Pennsylvania U.; Butler, Joel; /Fermilab; Dawson, Sally; /Brookhaven; Edwards, Helen; /Fermilab; Himel, Thomas; /SLAC; Holmes, Stephen; /Fermilab; Kim, Young-Kee; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Lankford, Andrew; /UC, Irvine; McGinnis, David; /Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOVA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the

  7. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steering Group, Fermilab; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOvA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the

  8. Holographic renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The holographic renormalization group (RG) is reviewed in a self-contained manner. The holographic RG is based on the idea that the radial coordinate of a space-time with asymptotically AdS geometry can be identified with the RG flow parameter of boundary field theory. After briefly discussing basic aspects of the AdS/CFT correspondence, we explain how the concept of the holographic GR emerges from this correspondence. We formulate the holographic RG on the basis of the Hamilton-Jacobi equations for bulk systems of gravity and scalar fields, as introduced by de Boer, Verlinde and Verlinde. We then show that the equations can be solved with a derivative expansion by carefully extracting local counterterms from the generating functional of the boundary field theory. The calculational methods used to obtain the Weyl anomaly and scaling dimensions are presented and applied to the RG flow from the N = 4 SYM to an N = 1 superconformal fixed point discovered by Leigh and Straussler. We further discuss the relation between the holographic RG and the noncritical string theory and show that the structure of the holographic RG should persist beyond the supergravity approximation as a consequence of the renormalizability of the nonlinear σ-model action of noncritical strings. As a check, we investigate the holographic RG structure of higher-derivative systems. We show that such systems can also be analyzed based on the Hamilton-Jacobi equations and that the behavior of bulk fields are determined solely by their boundary values. We also point out that higher-derivative gravity systems give rise to new multicritical points in the parameter space of boundary field theories. (author)

  9. ASYNCHRONOUS ELECTRONIC DISCUSSION GROUP:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Lim Swee KIM

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the practice of online discussion in a course specially tailored for in-service teachers who are pursuing their basic degree qualification at a teacher training institute. Analyses of postings to the asynchronous electronic discussion group were made according to the type of postings as proposed by Poole (2000. Four focus areas were looked into, that is, content, technical, procedural, or non-academic. Analyses were done for each quarter of the 12 weeks of interaction. At the end of the learners’ participation in the EDG and before their end-of-course examination, the participants were then given a paper-based questionnaire asking their perceptions on the use of EDG as part of their coursework on the whole. Six aspects of EDG were examined, these are;Ø technical aspects, Ø motivation to use the EDG, Ø quality of interaction, Ø tutor’s response, Ø perceived learning, and Ø attitude towards EDG. Analyses on postings for the EDG showed that the bulk of the postings were made in the last quarter of the online discussions. Further, 97.8% of the postings were on content and the types of content posting registered were predominantly questions (41.19% and those that sought clarification/elaboration (37.48%. Findings from this study suggest that overall the participants were satisfied with the six aspects of EDG examined. The aspect that recorded the highest mean was ‘motivation to read tutor’s responses’ whilst the lowest mean (and the only one with negative perception was for ‘worthiness of time spent on online discussions’.

  10. Marketing of Group Counseling Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, F. Robert; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Provides social marketing guidelines for attracting members of appropriate target groups and encouraging their participation in group activities. Includes examination of the personal and social framework of the group counselor, elements of social marketing theory, a case study illustrating difficulties encountered by novice group counselors in…

  11. 2010 Chemical Working Group Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2010-01-01

    The Steering Group for the Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG) held their business meeting on November 30-December 1st in McLean, Virginia. Status reports were presented from each of the IAPG's Working Groups. These charts contain a brief summary of the IAPG Chemical Working Group's activities during 2010 and its plans for 2011.

  12. Group B Streptococcus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ105 PREGNANCY Group B Strep and Pregnancy • What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? • What does it mean to be ... a planned cesarean birth? •Glossary What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? Group B streptococcus is one of ...

  13. About Hebei Jianxin Construction Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Hebei Jianxin Construction (Group) Ltd. was incorporated in August 1984. As the holding company, Hebei Jianxin Construction (Group)Ltd. along with five companies under its holding, such as Baoding New Generation Real Estate Development Co., Ltd. and Baoding New Generation Property Management Co., Ltd., formed Hebei Jianxin Architectural Group (hereafter, the Group).

  14. Graph-Constrained Group Testing

    OpenAIRE

    M. Cheraghchi; A. Karbasi; S. Mohajer; Saligrama, V.

    2012-01-01

    Non-adaptive group testing involves grouping arbitrary subsets of $n$ items into different pools. Each pool is then tested and defective items are identified. A fundamental question involves minimizing the number of pools required to identify at most $d$ defective items. Motivated by applications in network tomography, sensor networks and infection propagation, a variation of group testing problems on graphs is formulated. Unlike conventional group testing problems, each group here must confo...

  15. Moxibustion inhibits interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor alpha and modulates intestinal flora in rat with ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Mei Wang; Yuan Lu; Lu-Yi Wu; Shu-Guang Yu; Bai-Xiao Zhao; Hong-Yi Hu; Huan-Gan Wu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of moxibustion on intestinal flora and release of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from the colon in rat with ulcerative colitis (UC).METHODS:A rat model of UC was established by local stimulation of the intestine with supernatant from colonic contents harvested from human UC patients.A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following groups:normal (sham),model (UC),herb-partition moxibustion (HPM-treated),and positive control sulfasalazine (SA-treated).Rats treated with HPM received HPM at acupuncture points ST25 and RN6,once a day for 15 min,for a total of 8 d.Rats in the SA group were perfused with SA twice a day for 8 d.The colonic histopathology was observed by hematoxylin-eosin.The levels of intestinal flora,including Bifidobacterium,Lactobacillus,Escherichia coli (E.coli),and Bacteroides fragilis (B.fragilis),were tested by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to detect bacterial 16S rRNA/DNA in order to determine DNA copy numbers of each specific species.Immunohistochemical assays were used to observe the expression of TNF-α and IL-12 in the rat colons.RESULTS:HPM treatment inhibited immunopathology in colonic tissues of UC rats; the general morphological score and the immunopathological score were significantly decreased in the HPM and SA groups compared with the model group [3.5 (2.0-4.0),3.0 (1.5-3.5) vs 6.0 (5.5-7.0),P < 0.05 for the general morphological score,and 3.00 (2.00-3.50),3.00 (2.50-3.50) vs 5.00 (4.50-5.50),P < 0.01 for the immunopathological score].As measured by DNA copy number,we found that Bilidobacterium and Lactobacillus,which are associated with a healthy colon,were significantly higher in the HPM and SA groups than in the model group (1.395± 1.339,1.461 ± 1.152 vs 0.045 ± 0.036,P < 0.01 for Bifidobacterium,and 0.395 ± 0.325,0.851 ± 0.651 vs 0.0015 ± 0.0014,P < 0.01 for Lactobacillus).On the other hand,E.coli and B.fragilis

  16. What Is a Group? Young Children's Perceptions of Different Types of Groups and Group Entitativity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Plötner

    Full Text Available To date, developmental research on groups has focused mainly on in-group biases and intergroup relations. However, little is known about children's general understanding of social groups and their perceptions of different forms of group. In this study, 5- to 6-year-old children were asked to evaluate prototypes of four key types of groups: an intimacy group (friends, a task group (people who are collaborating, a social category (people who look alike, and a loose association (people who coincidently meet at a tram stop. In line with previous work with adults, the vast majority of children perceived the intimacy group, task group, and social category, but not the loose association, to possess entitativity, that is, to be a 'real group.' In addition, children evaluated group member properties, social relations, and social obligations differently in each type of group, demonstrating that young children are able to distinguish between different types of in-group relations. The origins of the general group typology used by adults thus appear early in development. These findings contribute to our knowledge about children's intuitive understanding of groups and group members' behavior.

  17. Does group efficacy increase group identification? Resolving their paradoxical relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, Martijn; Leach, Colin Wayne; Spears, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Although group identification and group efficacy are both important predictors of collective action against collective disadvantage, there is mixed evidence for their (causal) relationship. Meta-analytic and correlational evidence suggests an overall positive relationship that has been interpreted a

  18. Secure Group Communications for Large Dynamic Multicast Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jing; Zhou Mingtian

    2003-01-01

    As the major problem in multicast security, the group key management has been the focus of research But few results are satisfactory. In this paper, the problems of group key management and access control for large dynamic multicast group have been researched and a solution based on SubGroup Secure Controllers (SGSCs) is presented, which solves many problems in IOLUS system and WGL scheme.

  19. Infinitesimal group schemes as iterative differential Galois groups

    OpenAIRE

    Maurischat, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    This article is concerned with Galois theory for iterative differential fields (ID-fields) in positive characteristic. More precisely, we consider purely inseparable Picard-Vessiot extensions, because these are the ones having an infinitesimal group scheme as iterative differential Galois group. In this article we prove a necessary and sufficient condition to decide whether an infinitesimal group scheme occurs as Galois group scheme of a Picard-Vessiot extension over a given ID-field or not. ...

  20. Re-Examining Group Development in Adventure Therapy Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraaf, Don; Ashby, Jeff

    1998-01-01

    Small-group development is an important aspect of adventure therapy. Supplementing knowledge of sequential stages of group development with knowledge concerning within-stage nonsequential development yields a richer understanding of groups. Integrating elements of the individual counseling relationship (working alliance, transference, and real…

  1. Intensifying the Group Member's Experience Using the Group Log.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valine, Warren J.

    1983-01-01

    Presents the use of a group log in which members analyze the content and process of each session using a suggested format. The log promotes dialogue between the leader and each group member and involves members more fully in the group process. Feedback indicates the log is valuable. (JAC)

  2. Structuring the Group Experience: A Format for Designing Psychoeducational Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, Susan R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents six-step model for moving from a general statement of purpose to a psychoeducational group design that includes didactic content, experiential activities, and processing. By following this model the group facilitator will be able to develop a psychoeducational group that provides a logical sequence of learning activities fostering…

  3. An Exploration of Group and Member Development in Experiential Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt, Jonathan H.; Prochenko, Yulia; Stulmaker, Hayley; Huffman, David; Fernando, Delini; Swan, Karrie

    2014-01-01

    In this phenomenological study, we explored 52 group members' development in experiential groups. Specifically, participants completed 10 weekly journal reflections about their experiences as members and also reflected on the group's overall development. Four overall themes--exploration, transition, working, closure--as well as multiple…

  4. How Much "Group" Is There in Online Group Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The ability to work in groups across time and space has become a frequent requirement for the workplace and is increasingly common in higher education, but there is a surprising lack of research on how online groups work. This research applies analytic approaches used in studies of face-to-face classroom "talk" to multiple groups in two…

  5. Ornstein-Uhlenbeck semi-groups on stratified groups

    CERN Document Server

    Lust-Piquard, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    We consider, in the setting of stratified groups G, two analogues of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck semi-group, namely Markovian diffusion semi-groups acting on $L^q(pd g)$, whose invariant density $p$ is a heat kernel at time 1 on G.

  6. Group analysis of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ovsiannikov, L V

    1982-01-01

    Group Analysis of Differential Equations provides a systematic exposition of the theory of Lie groups and Lie algebras and its application to creating algorithms for solving the problems of the group analysis of differential equations.This text is organized into eight chapters. Chapters I to III describe the one-parameter group with its tangential field of vectors. The nonstandard treatment of the Banach Lie groups is reviewed in Chapter IV, including a discussion of the complete theory of Lie group transformations. Chapters V and VI cover the construction of partial solution classes for the g

  7. Quantization on nilpotent Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a consistent development of the Kohn-Nirenberg type global quantization theory in the setting of graded nilpotent Lie groups in terms of their representations. It contains a detailed exposition of related background topics on homogeneous Lie groups, nilpotent Lie groups, and the analysis of Rockland operators on graded Lie groups together with their associated Sobolev spaces. For the specific example of the Heisenberg group the theory is illustrated in detail. In addition, the book features a brief account of the corresponding quantization theory in the setting of compact Lie groups. The monograph is the winner of the 2014 Ferran Sunyer i Balaguer Prize.

  8. Saving Face and Group Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor; Mao, Lei; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    2015-01-01

    their self- but also other group members' image. This behavior is frequent even in the absence of group identity. When group identity is more salient, individuals help regardless of whether the least performer is an in-group or an out-group. This suggests that saving others' face is a strong social norm.......Are people willing to sacrifice resources to save one's and others' face? In a laboratory experiment, we study whether individuals forego resources to avoid the public exposure of the least performer in their group. We show that a majority of individuals are willing to pay to preserve not only...

  9. Group Lasso with Overlaps: the Latent Group Lasso approach

    CERN Document Server

    Obozinski, Guillaume; Vert, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We study a norm for structured sparsity which leads to sparse linear predictors whose supports are unions of prede ned overlapping groups of variables. We call the obtained formulation latent group Lasso, since it is based on applying the usual group Lasso penalty on a set of latent variables. A detailed analysis of the norm and its properties is presented and we characterize conditions under which the set of groups associated with latent variables are correctly identi ed. We motivate and discuss the delicate choice of weights associated to each group, and illustrate this approach on simulated data and on the problem of breast cancer prognosis from gene expression data.

  10. Riemannian means on special euclidean group and unipotent matrices group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaomin; Sun, Huafei; Peng, Linyu

    2013-01-01

    Among the noncompact matrix Lie groups, the special Euclidean group and the unipotent matrix group play important roles in both theoretic and applied studies. The Riemannian means of a finite set of the given points on the two matrix groups are investigated, respectively. Based on the left invariant metric on the matrix Lie groups, the geodesic between any two points is gotten. And the sum of the geodesic distances is taken as the cost function, whose minimizer is the Riemannian mean. Moreover, a Riemannian gradient algorithm for computing the Riemannian mean on the special Euclidean group and an iterative formula for that on the unipotent matrix group are proposed, respectively. Finally, several numerical simulations in the 3-dimensional case are given to illustrate our results.

  11. Two-transitive Lie groups

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Linus

    2001-01-01

    Using a characterization of parabolics in reductive Lie groups due to Furstenberg, elementary properties of buildings, and some algebraic topology, we give a new proof of Tits' classification of 2-transitive Lie groups.

  12. Cognitive Development and Group Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidla, Debie D.

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to integrate Perry's (1970) scheme of the cognitive development of college students with a model of group development adapted by Waldo (1985) based on Tuckman's (1965) formulation of developmental group stages. (Author)

  13. Group process among novice students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumkin, M K

    1996-03-01

    This paper explores the experiences of a group of registered nurses returning to graduate school. The organizing framework used is an integration of Tuckman and Jensen's group process theory and Benner's novice to expert model. PMID:8716180

  14. Alternating Quotients of Fuchsian Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Everitt, Brent

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that any finitely generated non-elementary Fuchsian group has among its homomorphic images all but finitely many of the alternating groups. This settles in the affirmative a conjecture of Graham Higman.

  15. On -supersolvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Izabela Agata Malinowska

    2015-05-01

    A number of authors have studied the structure of a group under the assumption that some subgroups of are well located in . We will obtain some new criteria of -supersolvability and -nilpotency of groups.

  16. Use of antibiotics in the management of postirradiation wound infection and sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing gamma irradiation depresses the host defenses and enhances the susceptibility of the immunocompromised host to local and systemic infection due to endogenous or exogenous microorganisms. Trauma and wounding act synergistically and decrease the survival after exposure to irradiation. The current antimicrobial agents suitable for controlling serious infections and their use in post irradiation local and systemic infection with and without trauma are discussed. The experience gained in managing immunocompromised patients following chemotherapy is reviewed. Empiric single agent or combination agent therapy should be directed at the eradication of potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens. The most important organisms known to cause these infections are Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacteriaceae. Management of intra-abdominal infections following trauma should include early surgical correlation and antimicrobials directed against the Bacteroides fragilis group and Enterobacteriaceae. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes cause most skin and soft tissue infections following trauma. Chemoprophylaxis of enteric sources of systemic infection can be achieved by antimicrobials that selectively inhibit the Enterobacteriaceae sp. and preserve the anaerobic flora. The management of infection in the injured and irradiated host includes supportive and restorative therapy. Supportive therapy includes debridement and cleansing of wounds, fluids, immunoglobulin, and antimicrobials. Restorative therapy includes definite surgery repair and replenishment of the immune system by use of immunomodulators, growth factors, and bone marrow transplantation. Further studies are needed to examine the usefulness of presently available drugs and experimental agents in the irradiated and traumatized host. 111 references

  17. Associations among Human-Associated Fecal Contamination, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Microcystin at Lake Erie Beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Marion, Jason W; Cheung, Melissa; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung

    2015-09-01

    Lake Erie beaches exhibit impaired water quality due to fecal contamination and cyanobacterial blooms, though few studies address potential relationships between these two public health hazards. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Microcystis aeruginosa was monitored in conjunction with a human-associated fecal marker (Bacteroides fragilis group; g-Bfra), microcystin, and water quality parameters at two beaches to evaluate their potential associations. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 32 times from both Euclid and Villa Angela beaches. The phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) and the microcystin-producing (mcyA) gene in M. aeruginosa were quantified with qPCR. PC-IGS and mcyA were detected in 50.0% and 39.1% of samples, respectively, and showed increased occurrences after mid-August. Correlation and regression analyses showed that water temperature was negatively correlated with M. aeruginosa markers and microcystin. The densities of mcyA and the g-Bfra were predicted by nitrate, implicating fecal contamination as contributing to the growth of M. aeruginosa by nitrate loading. Microcystin was correlated with mcyA (r = 0.413, p < 0.01), suggesting toxin-producing M. aeruginosa populations may significantly contribute to microcystin production. Additionally, microcystin was correlated with total phosphorus (r = 0.628, p < 0.001), which was higher at Euclid (p < 0.05), possibly contributing to higher microcystin concentrations at Euclid. PMID:26378564

  18. Associations among Human-Associated Fecal Contamination, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Microcystin at Lake Erie Beaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheonghoon Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lake Erie beaches exhibit impaired water quality due to fecal contamination and cyanobacterial blooms, though few studies address potential relationships between these two public health hazards. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, Microcystis aeruginosa was monitored in conjunction with a human-associated fecal marker (Bacteroides fragilis group; g-Bfra, microcystin, and water quality parameters at two beaches to evaluate their potential associations. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 32 times from both Euclid and Villa Angela beaches. The phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS and the microcystin-producing (mcyA gene in M. aeruginosa were quantified with qPCR. PC-IGS and mcyA were detected in 50.0% and 39.1% of samples, respectively, and showed increased occurrences after mid-August. Correlation and regression analyses showed that water temperature was negatively correlated with M. aeruginosa markers and microcystin. The densities of mcyA and the g-Bfra were predicted by nitrate, implicating fecal contamination as contributing to the growth of M. aeruginosa by nitrate loading. Microcystin was correlated with mcyA (r = 0.413, p < 0.01, suggesting toxin-producing M. aeruginosa populations may significantly contribute to microcystin production. Additionally, microcystin was correlated with total phosphorus (r = 0.628, p < 0.001, which was higher at Euclid (p < 0.05, possibly contributing to higher microcystin concentrations at Euclid.

  19. Expanded therapeutic potential in activity space of next-generation 5-nitroimidazole antimicrobials with broad structural diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Kalisiak, Jaroslaw; Korthals, Keith; Lauwaet, Tineke; Cheung, Dae Young; Lozano, Ricardo; Cobo, Eduardo R; Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A; Berg, Douglas E; Gillin, Frances D; Fokin, Valery V; Sharpless, K Barry; Eckmann, Lars

    2013-10-22

    Metronidazole and other 5-nitroimidazoles (5-NI) are among the most effective antimicrobials available against many important anaerobic pathogens, but evolving resistance is threatening their long-term clinical utility. The common 5-NIs were developed decades ago, yet little 5-NI drug development has since taken place, leaving the true potential of this important drug class unexplored. Here we report on a unique approach to the modular synthesis of diversified 5-NIs for broad exploration of their antimicrobial potential. Many of the more than 650 synthesized compounds, carrying structurally diverse functional groups, have vastly improved activity against a range of microbes, including the pathogenic protozoa Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, and the bacterial pathogens Helicobacter pylori, Clostridium difficile, and Bacteroides fragilis. Furthermore, they can overcome different forms of drug resistance, and are active and nontoxic in animal infection models. These findings provide impetus to the development of structurally diverse, next-generation 5-NI drugs as agents in the antimicrobial armamentarium, thus ensuring their future viability as primary therapeutic agents against many clinically important infections.

  20. Prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing anaerobic bacteria in chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtilaxmi Kenchappa Benachinmardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Due to the rampant use of antibiotics bacteria are acquiring resistance to penicillin group of drugs, which results in prescription failure in clinical practice. Beta-lactamase producing organisms are not only more virulent they also cause surrounding bacteria to become resistant. Hence, this study was undertaken to know the prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producing anaerobic bacteria in chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted for a period of 1 year from January to December 2010 at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Clinical samples were collected from the sub gingival pockets from cases of chronic periodontitis and transported to the laboratory in fluid thioglycollate medium. Gram′s staining was performed and anaerobic culture put up. All the anaerobic bacteria isolated were tested for beta-lactamase production by Nitrocefin disc method. Results: A total of 60 samples yielded 121 isolates, out of which 26% were ESBL producers. Bacteroides fragilis was the most common organism followed by Fusobacterium species. Conclusion: ESBL producing anaerobic bacteria exits in chronic periodontitis cases and the present study identified 26% of the isolates to be ESBL producers. Antibiotic resistance testing is essential before starting the therapy and in emergency cases drugs should be chosen to cover ESBL producers.

  1. Use of antibiotics in the management of postirradiation wound infection and sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, I.

    1988-07-01

    Ionizing gamma irradiation depresses the host defenses and enhances the susceptibility of the immunocompromised host to local and systemic infection due to endogenous or exogenous microorganisms. Trauma and wounding act synergistically and decrease the survival after exposure to irradiation. The current antimicrobial agents suitable for controlling serious infections and their use in post irradiation local and systemic infection with and without trauma are discussed. The experience gained in managing immunocompromised patients following chemotherapy is reviewed. Empiric single agent or combination agent therapy should be directed at the eradication of potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens. The most important organisms known to cause these infections are Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacteriaceae. Management of intra-abdominal infections following trauma should include early surgical correlation and antimicrobials directed against the Bacteroides fragilis group and Enterobacteriaceae. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes cause most skin and soft tissue infections following trauma. Chemoprophylaxis of enteric sources of systemic infection can be achieved by antimicrobials that selectively inhibit the Enterobacteriaceae sp. and preserve the anaerobic flora. The management of infection in the injured and irradiated host includes supportive and restorative therapy. Supportive therapy includes debridement and cleansing of wounds, fluids, immunoglobulin, and antimicrobials. Restorative therapy includes definite surgery repair and replenishment of the immune system by use of immunomodulators, growth factors, and bone marrow transplantation. Further studies are needed to examine the usefulness of presently available drugs and experimental agents in the irradiated and traumatized host. 111 references.

  2. Costs of Control in Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Riener, Gerhard; Wiederhold, Simon

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the role of social groups in explaining the reaction to control.We propose a simple model with a principal using control devices and a controlledagent, which incorporates the existence of social groups. Testing experimentally theconjectures derived from the model and related literature, we find that agents in socialgroups (i) perform more than other (no-group) agents; (ii) expect less control thanno-group agents; (iii) decrease their performance substantially when actual c...

  3. Group Norms and Consumer Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Pillai, Rajasekharan; Rajan, Jainey S.; Variyamveettil, Sunitha; Mathew, Dhanu E.; Nath, Subodh S.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of group norms on forming consumer behaviour is an important attribute of man’s social life. The market segmentation principles acknowledge the presence of this phenomenon. People belong to different age group, professional status, income levels, educational status etc. are seemed to display some specific consumer behaviour that can be attributed to a particular group. The present study attempts to find the influence of certain selected group norms on consumption pattern.

  4. Criminal groups and criminal subculture

    OpenAIRE

    Romanova N.M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a classification of criminal groups, structured by the following parameters: a) operation mode (secret/open), b) law-enforcement and administrative support (presence/absence). We describe four types of criminal groups: a) legitimized criminal organization, b) secret criminal organization engaged in illegal business, c) secret general crime group, and d) general crime group operating openly. The four types differ in the content of criminal subculture. Modern criminal subcult...

  5. R-groups and parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Ban, Dubravka; Goldberg, David

    2011-01-01

    For classical groups we show the isomorphism of the Knapp-Stein $R$-group, which describes the structure of parabolically induced representations, and the Arthur $R$-group of the parameter associated to the inducing representation by the local Langlands conjecture. We do this in the case of inducing from discrete series representations. In the case of unitary groups we show this isomorphism under a mild assumption on the parameter, which we show holds in at least half the cases.

  6. Designing for informed group formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh; Juel Jacobsen, Alice; Riis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    A new design ―project preparation‖ preparing for the group formation in problem based project work is proposed and investigated. The main problem is to overcome group formation based on existing relations. The hypothesis is that theme development and group formation are somewhat counterproductive...

  7. Vliv globalizace na Renault Group

    OpenAIRE

    Diviš, Petr

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor thesis describes the impact of globalization on Renault Group. The main target of the thesis is to confirm or disprove, whether Renault Group is impacted by globalization and shows it on particular examples. Firstly this bachelor thesis is occupied with general definition of globalization, afterwards with Renault Group. The final chapter interconnects knowledges from previous ones.

  8. The Variety of Group Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaoYanyan; YuZhihao

    2004-01-01

    With the rapid enrollment expansion in the recent years,the author feels it urgent to reform the traditional group work,and therefore to form a new and more effective pattern of group learning. The new of group word is based on the principles of cooperation and that of the task with the more flexible marking system.

  9. Hierarchical classification of social groups

    OpenAIRE

    Витковская, Мария

    2001-01-01

    Classification problems are important for every science, and for sociology as well. Social phenomena, examined from the aspect of classification of social groups, can be examined deeper. At present one common classification of groups does not exist. This article offers the hierarchical classification of social group.

  10. Internal communication in corporate groups

    OpenAIRE

    Grzesik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is dedicated to internal communication in corporate groups. It discusses internal communication systems operating in the explored corporate groups and their significance for effective human resources management in those organisations. The chapter presents both the theoretical analysis based on the results of literature studies, and empirical research carried out in the explored groups. Narodowe Centrum Nauki Katarzyna Grzesik

  11. Torsion units in group rings

    OpenAIRE

    Bist, Vikas

    1992-01-01

    Let U(RG) be the unit group of the group ring RG. In this paper we study group rings RG whose support elements of every torsion unit are torsion, where R is either the ring of integers Z or a field K.

  12. K-Kolmogorov homology groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work we use the idea of the K-groups to define the K-Kolmogorov homology groups, and their induced homomorphisms and boundary operators for the case of a pair of discrete coefficient groups, where K denotes a locally-finite simplicial complex. Moreover, we prove that our homology construction is exact. (author)

  13. Hyperbolic diagram groups are free

    OpenAIRE

    Genevois, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the so-called diagram groups. Our main result is that diagram groups are free if and only if they do not contain any subgroup isomorphic to $\\mathbb{Z}^2$. As an immediate corollary, we get that hyperbolic diagram groups are necessarily free, answering a question of Guba and Sapir.

  14. Group Music Therapy for Prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xi Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Xu, Kevin;

    2014-01-01

    study aims to investigate the effectiveness of group music therapy to reduce anxiety and depression, and raise self-esteem in prisoners. One hundred and ninety two inmates from a Chinese prison will be allocated to two groups through randomisation. The experimental group will participate in biweekly...... group music therapy for 10 weeks (20 sessions) while the control group will be placed on a waitlist. Anxiety, depression and self-esteem will be measured by self-report scales three times: before, at the middle, and at the end of the intervention. Logs by the participants and their daily routine...

  15. Invariant operators of inhomogeneous groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems concerning the invariant operators of the W(p, q) Weyl group of arbitrary dimension are considered. The Weyl group relative invariants, which do not contain the dilatation operators and which are the absolute invariants of the ISO (p, q) group, are searched for. The invariant operators of the Weyl group are represented in the form of the ratio of the Cazimir operators of the inhomogeneous pseudoorthogonal subgroup. It is shown that all the invariant operators of the W(p, q) Weyl group are rational and their number is [p+q-1/2

  16. Peritonite infecciosa com quantitativos e qualitativos bacterianos conhecidos: estudo experimental em ratos Infectious peritonitis with known bacterial concentration: experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilton Ângelo Guilgen

    1998-02-01

    altas concentrações bacterianas mostraram maior perda de peso, alterações clínicas de sepsis, peritonite difusa aguda, derrame pleural e óbito precoce.This study reveals development of difuse peritonitis model in rats with a known bacterial concentration. We analised 150 rats, adults, mate, Wistar race with medium weight of 150 grams. Solutions of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis in diferent concentrations were percutaneous inoculated into the peritoneal cavity in the following proportion: 1 ml of each suspension to each 100 grams of the total weight of the rato the animals were allocated in five groups of thirty rats. On - group I (control a solution of sodium cloride 0.9%. On the following groups the proportions were as follows: group II - 10(9; group III - 10(8; group 1V -10(7 and group V - 10(6. After a rat death, a necropsy was performed in order to evaluate macroscopic effects on peritoneal cavity as well collect samples of secretions for culture. The survival rats ofeach group were subdivided with no choice in two subgroups. The animals for subgroup A were sacrificed 24 hours after inoculation and the ones of subgroup B, 120 hours after inoculation. We observed that the rats of group 1 did not acquire peritonitis. On group II and III, 100% of subgroup A and 95.03% of subgroup B, developed acute peritonitis. On group II only 4.17% developed peritonitis and died 72 hours and on group V neither peritonitis or death developed. The animals which died on group II and III on an average of 96.67% showed macroscopic alterations with difused peritoneum exudate, adherences and no abscesses. The animals which developed peritonitis exhibited bilateral pleural effusion. On animals of group II and III which died, also were found the presence of Eschirichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis responsible for peritonitis and pleural effusion. This model shows that the animal which received the highest bacterial concentrations showed loss of weight, clinical alterations

  17. Little Groups of Preon Branes

    CERN Document Server

    Mkrtchyan, H G

    2003-01-01

    Little groups for preon branes (i.e. configurations of branes with maximal (n-1)/n fraction of survived supersymmetry) for dimensions d=2,3,...,11 are calculated for all massless, and partially for massive orbits. For massless orbits little groups are semidirect product of d-2 translational group $T_{d-2}$ on a subgroup of (SO(d-2) $\\times$ R-invariance) group. E.g. at d=9 the subgroup is exceptional $G_2$ group. It is also argued, that 11d Majorana spinor invariants, which distinguish orbits, are actually invariant under d=2+10 Lorentz group. Possible applications of these results include construction of field theories in generalized space-times with brane charges coordinates, different problems of group's representations decompositions, spin-statistics issues.

  18. Little Groups of Preon Branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MKRTCHYAN, H.; MKRTCHYAN, R.

    Little groups for preon branes (i.e. configurations of branes with maximal (n-1)/n fraction of survived supersymmetry) for dimensions d=2,3,…,11 are calculated for all massless, and partially for massive orbits. For massless orbits little groups are semidirect product of d-2 translational group Td-2 on a subgroup of (SO(d-2) × R-invariance) group. E.g. at d=9 the subgroup is exceptional G2 group. It is also argued, that 11D Majorana spinor invariants, which distinguish orbits, are actually invariant under d=2+10 Lorentz group. Possible applications of these results include construction of field theories in generalized spacetimes with brane charges coordinates, different problems of group's representations decompositions, spin-statistics issues.

  19. [Treatment of puerperal endometritis. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of clindamycin + gentamycin vs. penicillin + chloramphenicol + gentamycin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, C; Carrillo, C; Escudero, F; Caciano, S; García Hjarles, M

    1994-11-01

    This was a prospective, single-blind, comparative study in patients with diagnosis of puerperal endometritis, carried out at the Loayza Hospital in Lima, Peru. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of clindamycin and gentamicin in the management of endometritis vs. penicillin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin for 10 days. Sixty-five patients were enrolled and 62 were evaluable for efficacy. Both treatment groups were comparable in the pre-treatment period in terms of age, history of pregnancies, controls by gynecologist, days of disease and fever, clinical symptoms like fever, pelvic pain, pulse, uterine size and in laboratory, in hematocrit and leukocytes count. In the culture of endometrium tissue, 27/32 patients (84.4%) in Group A (penicillin + CAF + gentamicin) and 27/30 patients (90%) in Group B (clindamycin + gentamicin) had positive cultures at baseline; 18 and 22 patients showed anaerobes; 8 and 4 patients showed anaerobes plus aerobes and, one patient in each treatment group showed aerobes only. Peptostreptococcus and Bacteroides fragilis were the most frequently isolated pathogens. Improvement in lochia fetidity was more rapid in Group B, it turned transparent and not fetid since day 3. Complete cure was significantly better in Group B 24/30 (80%) in comparison with Group A 16/32 (50%) (p = 0.02). Partial response was found in 15 patients (43.3%) in Group A and 5 patients (16.6%) in Group B. Only one case was considered as bacteriological failure in Group A and only one patient in Group B was considered as failure and required an additional operation due to residual abscess.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7821833

  20. Isomorphic Commutative Group Algebras of p-Mixed Warfield Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter V.DANCHEV

    2005-01-01

    Let G be a p-mixed Warfield Abelian group and F a field of char F = p ≠ 0. It is proved that if for any group H the group algebras FH and FG are F-isomorphic, then H is isomorphic to G.This presentation enlarges a result of W. May argued when G is p-local Warfield Abelian and published in Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. (1988).

  1. Linear groups as right multiplication groups of quasifields

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Gábor P.

    2012-01-01

    For quasifields, the concept of parastrophy is slightly weaker than isotopy. Parastrophic quasifields yield isomorphic translation planes but not conversely. We investigate the right multiplication groups of finite quasifields. We classify all quasifields having an exceptional finite transitive linear group as right multiplication group. The classification is up to parastrophy, which turns out to be the same as up to the isomorphism of the corresponding translation planes.

  2. In-Group Versus Out-Group Source Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Michael; Franklin, Nancy; Klug, Jessica

    2016-06-01

    A common finding in the source monitoring literature is that greater similarity impairs source discriminability. Experiments traditionally manipulate similarity overtly by describing or showing sources with explicitly differentiable features. However, people may also infer source characteristics themselves, which should also affect discriminability. Two studies examined inferred source characteristics by capitalizing on the out-group homogeneity effect, whereby in-group members are conceptualized as more diverse than out-group members. Participants learned about two sources who were described only as members of an in-group or an out-group and whose actions did not have higher a priori association with either group. Source memory was superior when participants believed the sources to be in-group members. This demonstrates that people spontaneously include inferred features with source representations and can capitalize on these features during source monitoring. Interestingly, information suggesting membership in one's in-group improved performance even for sources who had previously been considered out-group members (Experiment 2).

  3. Duality group actions on fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Pantev, T

    2016-01-01

    In this short paper we look at the action of T-duality and string duality groups on fermions, in maximally-supersymmetric theories and related theories. Briefly, we argue that typical duality groups such as SL(2,Z) have sign ambiguities in their actions on fermions, and propose that pertinent duality groups be extended by Z_2, to groups such as the metaplectic group. Specifically, we look at duality groups arising from mapping class groups of tori in M theory compactifications, T-duality, ten-dimensional type IIB S-duality, and (briefly) four-dimensional N=4 super Yang-Mills, and in each case, propose that the full duality group is a nontrivial Z_2 extension of the duality group acting on bosonic degrees of freedom, to more accurately describe possible actions on fermions. We also walk through U-duality groups for toroidal compactifications to nine, eight, and seven dimensions, which enables us to perform cross-consistency tests of these proposals.

  4. Xylan degradation by the anaerobic bacterium Bacteroides xylanolyticus.

    OpenAIRE

    Schyns, P.J.Y.M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Plant cell walls are the major reservoir of fixed carbon in nature. The mineralization of the fiber material, the so called lignocellulosic complex, proceeds almost exclusively by microbial processes in both aerobic and anaerobic environments. In anaerobic microbial processes the energy of the plant polymers can be conserved in fermentation products. The valorization of agricultural waste plant materials can consist of low and high technological processes. These include the production of biog...

  5. Hematogenous Long Bone Osteomyelitis by Prevotella (Bacteroides) Melaninogenicus

    OpenAIRE

    Karabinas, Panagiotis K; Stergios, Evangelopoulos Dimitrios; Athanasopoulou, Marina G; Vlamis, John

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic infections are difficult to recognize and may lead to life threatening complications. We present the case of an acute Prevotella hematogenous infection of the humerus in a previously healthy adult patient, treated with a two-stage surgical treatment, emphasizing on the importance of the radical surgical debridement and the selection of the appropriate antimicrobial agents. To our knowledge, such an acute hematogenous infection has not been previously reported in the literature. Keyw...

  6. Xylose metabolism in Bacteroides xylanolyticus X5-1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesterveld, S.

    1994-01-01

    Plant cell walls represent a major part of the available biomass on earth. They are mainly composed of the energy-rich polymers lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose. For many decades, research is done to exploit agricultural and forestry wastes as renewable resources. Much research was focused on th

  7. Commensal Bacteria-Induced Inflammasome Activation in Mouse and Human Macrophages Is Dependent on Potassium Efflux but Does Not Require Phagocytosis or Bacterial Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejie; Shanmugam, Nanda Kumar N.; Pazos, Michael A.; Hurley, Bryan P.; Cherayil, Bobby J.

    2016-01-01

    Gut commensal bacteria contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, in part by activating the inflammasome and inducing secretion of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß). Although much has been learned about inflammasome activation by bacterial pathogens, little is known about how commensals carry out this process. Accordingly, we investigated the mechanism of inflammasome activation by representative commensal bacteria, the Gram-positive Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis and the Gram-negative Bacteroides fragilis. B. infantis and B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion by primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages after overnight incubation. IL-1ß secretion also occurred in response to heat-killed bacteria and was only partly reduced when phagocytosis was inhibited with cytochalasin D. Similar results were obtained with a wild-type immortalized mouse macrophage cell line but neither B. infantis nor B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion in a mouse macrophage line lacking the nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. IL-1ß secretion in response to B. infantis and B. fragilis was significantly reduced when the wild-type macrophage line was treated with inhibitors of potassium efflux, either increased extracellular potassium concentrations or the channel blocker ruthenium red. Both live and heat-killed B. infantis and B. fragilis also induced IL-1ß secretion by human macrophages (differentiated THP-1 cells or primary monocyte-derived macrophages) after 4 hours of infection, and the secretion was inhibited by raised extracellular potassium and ruthenium red but not by cytochalasin D. Taken together, our findings indicate that the commensal bacteria B. infantis and B. fragilis activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages by a mechanism that involves potassium efflux and that does not require bacterial viability or phagocytosis. PMID:27505062

  8. Group theory and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Thapa, Ram Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Every molecule possesses symmetry and hence has symmetry operations and symmetry elements. From symmetry properties of a system we can deduce its significant physical results. Consequently it is essential to operations of a system forms a group. Group theory is an abstract mathematical tool that underlies the study of symmetry and invariance. By using the concepts of symmetry and group theory, it is possible to obtain the members of complete set of known basis functions of the various irreducible representations of the group. I practice this is achieved by applying the projection operators to linear combinations of atomic orbital (LCAO) when the valence electrons are tightly bound to the ions, to orthogonalized plane waves (OPW) when valence electrons are nearly free and to the other given functions that are judged to the particular system under consideration. In solid state physics the group theory is indispensable in the context of finding the energy bands of electrons in solids. Group theory can be applied...

  9. Group discussion improves lie detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nadav; Epley, Nicholas

    2015-06-16

    Groups of individuals can sometimes make more accurate judgments than the average individual could make alone. We tested whether this group advantage extends to lie detection, an exceptionally challenging judgment with accuracy rates rarely exceeding chance. In four experiments, we find that groups are consistently more accurate than individuals in distinguishing truths from lies, an effect that comes primarily from an increased ability to correctly identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions (a "wisdom-of-crowds" effect) or of altering response biases (such as reducing the "truth bias"). Interventions to improve lie detection typically focus on improving individual judgment, a costly and generally ineffective endeavor. Our findings suggest a cheap and simple synergistic approach of enabling group discussion before rendering a judgment.

  10. Group discussion improves lie detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nadav; Epley, Nicholas

    2015-06-16

    Groups of individuals can sometimes make more accurate judgments than the average individual could make alone. We tested whether this group advantage extends to lie detection, an exceptionally challenging judgment with accuracy rates rarely exceeding chance. In four experiments, we find that groups are consistently more accurate than individuals in distinguishing truths from lies, an effect that comes primarily from an increased ability to correctly identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions (a "wisdom-of-crowds" effect) or of altering response biases (such as reducing the "truth bias"). Interventions to improve lie detection typically focus on improving individual judgment, a costly and generally ineffective endeavor. Our findings suggest a cheap and simple synergistic approach of enabling group discussion before rendering a judgment. PMID:26015581

  11. Countably determined compact abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dikranjan, Dikran

    2008-01-01

    For an abelian topological group G let G^* be the dual group of all continuous characters endowed with the compact open topology. A subgroup D of G determines G if the restriction homomorphism G^* --> D^* of the dual groups is a topological isomorphism. Given a scattered compact subset X of an infinite compact abelian group G such that |X|group, we show that the set of all characters which send X into U has the same size as G^*. (Here w(G) denotes the weight of G.) As an application, we prove that a compact abelian group determined by its countable subgroup must be metrizable. This gives a negative answer to questions of Comfort, Hernandez, Macario, Raczkowski and Trigos-Arrieta, as well as provides short proofs of main results established in three manuscripts by these authors.

  12. Group conflict and faculty engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Jonasson, Charlotte; Lauring, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    assessed the effect of group trust, group relational conflict and group task conflict on indicators of behavioural, cognitive and emotional engagement. Our findings show a strong positive association between group trust and all academic staff engagement variables as well as a strong negative association...... between group relational conflict and all staff engagement variables. Task conflict was negatively associated with indicators of staff cognitive engagement. However, surprisingly, group trust did not have any moderating effect. Implications for educational organisation managers and policy makers......In educational settings, substantial scholarly interest has focused on student engagement as an antecedent for educational development and positive school outcomes. Very limited research, however, has focused on the engagement of academic staff members. This may be a crucial oversight because...

  13. Statistics of sunspot group clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getko Ryszarda

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Zubrzycki method is utilized to find all sunspot groups which are close to each other during each Carrington rotation. The sunspot group areas and their positions for the years 1874–2008 are used. The descending, the ascending and the maximum phases of solar cycles for each solar hemisphere are considered separately. To establish the size of the region D where the clusters are searched, the correlation function dependent on the distance between two groups is applied. The method estimates the weighted area of each cluster. The weights dependent on the correlation function of distances between sunspot groups created each cluster. For each cluster the weighted position is also evaluated. The weights dependent on the areas of sunspot groups created a given cluster. The number distribution of the sunspot groups created each cluster and the cluster statistics within different phases of the 11-year cycle and within all considered solar cycles are also presented.

  14. Group Performance in Information Systems Project Groups: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahli, Bouchaib; Buyukkurt, Meral Demirbag

    2005-01-01

    The importance of teamwork in Information Systems Development (ISD) practice and education has been acknowledged but not studied extensively to date. This paper tests a model of how groups participating in ISD projects perform and examines the relationships between some antecedents of this performance based on group research theory well…

  15. Picard Groups and Class Groups of Monoid Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Jaret; Weibel, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We define and study the Picard group of a monoid scheme and the class group of a normal monoid scheme. To do so, we develop some ideal theory for (pointed abelian) noetherian monoids, including primary decomposition and discrete valuations. The normalization of a monoid turns out to be a monoid scheme, but not always a monoid.

  16. The Local Group and other neighboring galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Karachentsev, I D

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few years, rapid progress has been made in distance measurements for nearby galaxies based on the magnitude of the tip of red giant branch stars. Current CCD surveys with HST and large ground- based telescopes bring $\\sim$10%-accurate distances for roughly a hundred galaxies within 5 Mpc. The new data on distances to galaxies situated in (and around) the nearest groups: the Local Group, M81 group, CenA/M83 group, IC342/Maffei group, Sculptor filament, and Canes Venatici cloud allowed us to determine their total mass from the radius of the zero- velocity surface, $R_0$, which separates a group as bound against the homogeneous cosmic expansion. The values of $R_0$ for the virialized groups turn out to be close each other, in the range of 0.9 -- 1.3 Mpc. As a result, the total masses of the groups are close to each other, too, yielding total mass-to-blue luminosity ratios of 10 -- 40 $M_{\\sun}/L_{\\sun}$. The new total mass estimates are 3 -- 5 times lower than old virial mass estimates of these gro...

  17. Classifying Virtually Special Tubular Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Woodhouse, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    A group is tubular if it acts on a tree with $\\mathbb{Z}^2$ vertex stabilizers and $\\mathbb{Z}$ edge stabilizers. We prove that a tubular group is virtually special if and only if it acts freely on a locally finite CAT(0) cube complex. Furthermore, we prove that if a tubular group acts freely on a finite dimensional CAT(0) cube complex, then it virtually acts freely on a three dimensional CAT(0) cube complex.

  18. Complex cobordism and formal groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchstaber, Viktor M.

    2012-10-01

    This paper surveys the current state of the theory of cobordism, focusing on geometric and universal properties of complex cobordism, the Landweber-Novikov algebra, and the formal group law of geometric cobordisms. The relationships with K-theory, algebraic cycles, formal group laws, compact Lie group actions on manifolds, toric topology, infinite-dimensional Lie algebras, and nilmanifolds are described. The survey contains key results and open problems. Bibliography: 124 titles.

  19. Arithmetic Aspects of Bianchi Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    2012-01-01

    We discuss several arithmetic aspects of Bianchi groups, especially from a computational point of view. In particular, we consider computing the homology of Bianchi groups together with the Hecke action, connections with automorphic forms, abelian varieties, Galois representations and the torsion in the homology of Bianchi groups. Along the way, we list several open problems and conjectures, survey the related literature, presenting concrete examples and numerical data.

  20. Strategies of learning in groups

    OpenAIRE

    Göğüş, Aytaç; Gogus, Aytac; Arıkan, Huriye; Arikan, Huriye

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical bases and applications of learning in groups and the impact of a student support program on supporting the quality of learning in higher education. A student support program, Academic Support Program (ASP) that captures the basis for various ‘active learning’ methods by implementing ‘learning in groups and learning from peers’ strategies, is represented in this paper. The peer study discussion groups of ASP allow university students to have permanent and me...