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Sample records for bacterium deinococcus radiodurans

  1. Effects of high LET radiation on radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that Deinococcus radiodurans is extremely resistant to ionizing and ultraviolet (UV) radiations, as well as chemical agents and hyperthermia (heat treatment) which cause DNA damage. It was reported in this paper that studies on the synergistic killing effect of high LET (linear energy transfer) radiation and hyperthermia in D. radiodurans were performed in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University as the Visiting Researcher's Program. The difference of cellular response in this bacterium against low LET (i.e. gamma) and high LET (i.e. BNC beam and heavy ion beam) radiations was analyzed by using Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) operated at 5 MW and AVF cyclotron in Takasaki Ion Accelerator for Radiation Application (TIARA). Also, The DNA sequence specificity (hot spot) for mutation on supF gene of a shuttle vector plasmid pZ189 induced by BNC beam is being researched using Escherichia coli DNA repair capability. (author)

  2. Enzymes involved in DNA ligation and end-healing in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

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    Shevelev Igor V

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes involved in DNA metabolic events of the highly radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans are currently examined to understand the mechanisms that protect and repair the Deinococcus radiodurans genome after extremely high doses of γ-irradiation. Although several Deinococcus radiodurans DNA repair enzymes have been characterised, no biochemical data is available for DNA ligation and DNA endhealing enzymes of Deinococcus radiodurans so far. DNA ligases are necessary to seal broken DNA backbones during replication, repair and recombination. In addition, ionizing radiation frequently leaves DNA strand-breaks that are not feasible for ligation and thus require end-healing by a 5'-polynucleotide kinase or a 3'-phosphatase. We expect that DNA ligases and end-processing enzymes play an important role in Deinococcus radiodurans DNA strand-break repair. Results In this report, we describe the cloning and expression of a Deinococcus radiodurans DNA ligase in Escherichia coli. This enzyme efficiently catalyses DNA ligation in the presence of Mn(II and NAD+ as cofactors and lysine 128 was found to be essential for its activity. We have also analysed a predicted second DNA ligase from Deinococcus radiodurans that is part of a putative DNA repair operon and shows sequence similarity to known ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We show that this enzyme possesses an adenylyltransferase activity using ATP, but is not functional as a DNA ligase by itself. Furthermore, we identified a 5'-polynucleotide kinase similar to human polynucleotide kinase that probably prepares DNA termini for subsequent ligation. Conclusion Deinococcus radiodurans contains a standard bacterial DNA ligase that uses NAD+ as a cofactor. Its enzymatic properties are similar to E. coli DNA ligase except for its preference for Mn(II as a metal cofactor. The function of a putative second DNA ligase remains unclear, but its adenylyltransferase activity classifies it as a

  3. Molecular cloning and expression of lexA gene from the radioresistant bacterium deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the role of lexA gene in the radioresistance of Deinococcus radiodurans, the expressing vector of lexA gene was constructed. The genomic DNA was extracted from wild type Deinococcus radiodurans KD8301. The lexA gene was isolated from the genomic DNA and sequenced. The Plasmid vector pUC19 was used to clone lexA gene and the electroporation was employed to transfer the recombinant plasmid into E. coli JM109. SDS-PAGE was used to check the expression of lexA gene. The ribosome binding site (RBS) of lexA gene was mutated by means of Site -Directed Mutagenesis technique for the optimum of gene expression. The results indicated that the lexA gene was located in the BlnI-AscI fragment of Deinococcus radiodurans genomic DNA, containing 630bp and coding 210 aa. The theoretically deduced molecular weight and the isoelectric point were 2.5KDa and 6.4 respectively. lexA gene inserted into pUC19 could be expressed in JM109, but at very low level. After optimizing the RBS of lexA gene, higher level of lexA expression was observed. The results make it possible to isolate and purify lexA protein, and further to investigate the function of lexA gene in Deinococcus radiodurans

  4. Gene fusions with lacZ by duplication insertion in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans is the most-studied species of a eubacterial family characterized by extreme resistance to DNA damage. We have focused on developing molecular biological techniques to investigate the genetics of this organism. We report construction of lacZ gene fusions by a method involving both in vitro splicing and the natural transformation of D. radiodurans. Numerous fusion strains were identified by expression of beta-galactosidase. Among these fusion strains, several were inducible by exposure to the DNA-damaging agent mitomycin C, and four of the inducible fusion constructs were cloned in Escherichia coli. Hybridization studies indicate that one of the damage-inducible genes contains a sequence reiterated throughout the D. radiodurans chromosome. Survival measurements show that two of the fusion strains have increased sensitivity to mitomycin C, suggesting that the fusions within these strains inactivate repair functions

  5. Non-coding RNA in Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researches on DNA damage and repair pathways of Deinococcus radiodurans show its extreme resistance to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species. Non-coding (ncRNA) RNAs are involved in a variety of processes such as transcriptional regulations, RNA processing and modification, mRNA translation, protein transportation and stability. The conserved secondary structures of intergenic regions of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 were predicted using Stochastic Context Free Grammar (SCFG) scan strategy. Results showed that 28 ncRNA families were present in the non-coding regions of the genome of Deinococcus radiodurans R1. Among these families, IRE is the largest family, followed by Histone3, tRNA, SECIS. DicF, ctRNA-pGA1 and tmRNA are one discovered in bacteria. Results from the comparison with other organisms showed that these ncRNA can be applied to the study of biological function of Deinococcus radiodurans and supply reference for the further study of DNA damage and repair mechanisms of this bacterium. (authors)

  6. Molecular cloning and analysis of DNA repair gene from the radioresistant bacterium deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans (Dr) possesses a prominent ability to repair DNA injury induced by various DNA-damaging agents including mitomycin C (MC), ultraviolet light (UV) and ionizing radiation. A DNA repair mutant Dr KH3111 is a streptomycin resistant (SmR) derivative of KH311 which is generated by treatment with nitrosoguanidine and is sensitive to MC, 8-trimethyl-psoralen, UV and γ-ray irradiation. Gene affected by a mutation in the mutant is identified and its nucleotide sequence is determined. A complete open reading frame (ORF) which encompassed the KH3111 mutation region is found and tentatively designated as orf144b. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of orf144b consists of 284 aa and has no significant homology to other known proteins. The exact KH3111 mutation site is one nucleotide altered (G to A) in the sequence of orf144b in the mutant. The KH3111 mutation causes the substitution of Gly for Glu at aa position 149 of Orf144b. Survival measurements of a revertant KH3112 which was produced by transforming with DNA containing a part of the orf144b gene of KD8301 showed that the resistances to MC, UV and γ-ray in the revertant were fully restored at a level equal to the wild type. Thus, the orf144b gene required for the multiple-DNA-damaging agent resistance of Dr was designated with the name of pprA (Pleiotropic gene promoting DNA repair). This new gene can express in E. coli at very high level, and make the host E. coli resistant to MC, UV and γ-ray. The pprA gene does not express in normal Dr, but it can be induced to express by treatment with MC, UV and γ-ray. It was thought that the PprA polypeptide is a cytoplasmic protein because of the absence of characteristics found in the aa sequence of membrane proteins

  7. DqsIR quorum sensing-mediated gene regulation of the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans in response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Dai, Shang; Tian, Bing; Li, Tao; Yu, Jiangliu; Liu, Chengzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Hong; Zhao, Ye; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that AHLs can be employed by Deinococcus radiodurans, which belongs to the unique phylum Deinococcus-Thermus and is known for its cellular resistance to environmental stresses. An AHL-mediated quorum-sensing system (DqsI/DqsR) was identified in D. radiodurans. We found that under non-stress conditions, the AHL level was "shielded" by quorum quenching enzymes, whereas AHLs accumulated when D. radiodurans was exposed to oxidative stress. Upon exposure to H2 O2 , AHL synthetic enzymes (DqsI) were immediately induced, while the expression of quorum-quenching enzymes began to increase approximately 30 min after exposure to H2 O2 , as shown by time-course analyses of gene expression. Both dqsI mutant (DMDqsI) and dqsR mutant (MDqsR) were more sensitive to oxidative stress compared with the wild-type strain. Exogenous AHLs (5 μM) could completely restore the survival fraction of DMDqsI under oxidative stress. RNA-seq analysis showed that a number of genes involved in stress-response, cellular cleansing, and DNA repair had altered transcriptional levels in MDqsR. The DqsR, acting as a regulator of quorum sensing, controls gene expression along with AHLs. Hence, the DqsIR-mediated quorum sensing that mediates gene regulation is an adaptive strategy for D. radiodurans in response to oxidative stresses and is conserved in the extremophilic Deinococcus bacteria. PMID:26789904

  8. Isolation and properties of plasmids from Deinococcus radiodurans Sark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioresistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans, can repair completely almost all of DNA damages including double strand breaks induced by gamma-rays up to about 5 kGy. In order to reveal the repair mechanism, it is necessary to develop a cloning vector available for the genetic analysis. We tried to isolate plasmids from D.radiodurans Sark strain. In the present paper the isolation and properties of plasmids were described. (author)

  9. Improved Complete Genome Sequence of the Extremely Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1 Obtained Using PacBio Single-Molecule Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xiaoting; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequence of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 was published in 1999. We resequenced D. radiodurans R1 using PacBio and compared the sequence with the published one. Large insertions and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were observed among the genome sequences. A more accurate genome sequence will be helpful to studies of D. radiodurans. PMID:27587813

  10. A PerR-like protein involved in response to oxidative stress in the extreme bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We report a novel PerR-like protein of Fur family in D. radiodurans that is not annotated in the current database. • drperR responses to H2O2 and functions as a negative regulator of katE and dps. • We provided implications on how to utilize sequenced genome data and the importance of genome data mining. • This study adds knowledge to complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans. - Abstract: Response and defense systems against reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the remarkable resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to oxidative stress induced by oxidants or radiation. However, mechanisms involved in ROS response and defense systems of D. radiodurans are not well understood. Fur family proteins are important in ROS response. Only a single Fur homolog is predicted by sequence similarity in the current D. radiodurans genome database. Our bioinformatics analysis demonstrated an additional guanine nucleotide in the genome of D. radiodurans that is not in the database, leading to the discovery of another Fur homolog DrPerR. Gene disruption mutant of DrPerR showed enhanced resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and increased catalase activity in cell extracts. Real-time PCR results indicated that DrPerR functions as a repressor of the catalase gene katE. Meanwhile, derepression of dps (DNA-binding proteins from starved cells) gene under H2O2 stress by DrPerR point to its regulatory role in metal ions hemostasis. Thus, DrPerR might function as a Fur homolog protein which is involved in ROS response and defense. These results help clarify the complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans

  11. A PerR-like protein involved in response to oxidative stress in the extreme bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chengzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Li, Tao; Lin, Lin; Dai, Shang; Tian, Bing, E-mail: tianbing@zju.edu.cn; Hua, Yuejin, E-mail: yjhua@zju.edu.cn

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We report a novel PerR-like protein of Fur family in D. radiodurans that is not annotated in the current database. • drperR responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and functions as a negative regulator of katE and dps. • We provided implications on how to utilize sequenced genome data and the importance of genome data mining. • This study adds knowledge to complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans. - Abstract: Response and defense systems against reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the remarkable resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to oxidative stress induced by oxidants or radiation. However, mechanisms involved in ROS response and defense systems of D. radiodurans are not well understood. Fur family proteins are important in ROS response. Only a single Fur homolog is predicted by sequence similarity in the current D. radiodurans genome database. Our bioinformatics analysis demonstrated an additional guanine nucleotide in the genome of D. radiodurans that is not in the database, leading to the discovery of another Fur homolog DrPerR. Gene disruption mutant of DrPerR showed enhanced resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and increased catalase activity in cell extracts. Real-time PCR results indicated that DrPerR functions as a repressor of the catalase gene katE. Meanwhile, derepression of dps (DNA-binding proteins from starved cells) gene under H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress by DrPerR point to its regulatory role in metal ions hemostasis. Thus, DrPerR might function as a Fur homolog protein which is involved in ROS response and defense. These results help clarify the complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans.

  12. Deinococcus radiodurans bacteria of extreme;Deinococcus radiodurans bacterie de l'extreme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellay, F.X.; Matic, I.

    2010-05-15

    Extreme levels of radiation, desiccation, oxidative stress, Deinococcus radiodurans can survive in environments that degrade or damage DNA, proteins and virtually all macromolecules of life. To survive these conditions, Deinococcus have developed systems of protection, repair and recycling of exceptional efficiency. (N.C.)

  13. The characteristics of micrococcus (deinococcus) radiodurans sark plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characterization of micrococcus (deinococcus) radiodurans sark plasmids. This bacterium has been classified as a new genus deinococcus radiodurans which is resistant to gamma-rays. It can repair itself completely almost all of DNA damages including double strand breaks induced by gamma-rays up to about 5 KGy. To reveal the repair mechanism, several investigations had been done to develop a cloning vector available for the genetic analysis. For this purpose D. radiodurans Sark are to be prepared as a vector by studying the characteristics of its plasmid. Plasmids were isolated by electrophoresis using 0.6% low-melting-temperature agarose in TAE and run for 5.5 hours, followed by the identification. An antibiotic marker was also carried out in this experiment to identify its location in the genetic materials of the cell, beside making a restriction map of the plasmid. Results have shown that D. radiodurans Sark has 4 plasmids (P1, P2, P3, and P4) and the refampicin resistant genes were not found in the plasmid. (authors). 14 refs; 4 figs

  14. In vivo damage and recA-dependent repair of plasmid and chromosomal DNA in the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, M J; Ouyang, L; Fuchs, P.; Minton, K W

    1994-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1 and other members of this genus share extraordinary resistance to the lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. We have recently identified a RecA homolog in strain R1 and have shown that mutation of the corresponding gene causes marked radiosensitivity. We show here that following high-level exposure to gamma irradiation (1.75 megarads, the dose required to yield 37% of CFU for plateau-phase wild-type R1), the wild-type strain repairs > 150 double-strand ...

  15. Single Strand Annealing Plays a Major Role in RecA-Independent Recombination between Repeated Sequences in the Radioresistant Deinococcus radiodurans Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ithurbide, Solenne; Bentchikou, Esma; Coste, Geneviève; Bost, Bruno; Servant, Pascale; Sommer, Suzanne

    2015-10-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is one of the most radioresistant organisms known. It is able to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Our work aims to highlight the genes involved in recombination between 438 bp direct repeats separated by intervening sequences of various lengths ranging from 1,479 bp to 10,500 bp to restore a functional tetA gene in the presence or absence of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. The frequency of spontaneous deletion events between the chromosomal direct repeats were the same in recA+ and in ΔrecA, ΔrecF, and ΔrecO bacteria, whereas recombination between chromosomal and plasmid DNA was shown to be strictly dependent on the RecA and RecF proteins. The presence of mutations in one of the repeated sequence reduced, in a MutS-dependent manner, the frequency of the deletion events. The distance between the repeats did not influence the frequencies of deletion events in recA+ as well in ΔrecA bacteria. The absence of the UvrD protein stimulated the recombination between the direct repeats whereas the absence of the DdrB protein, previously shown to be involved in DNA double strand break repair through a single strand annealing (SSA) pathway, strongly reduces the frequency of RecA- (and RecO-) independent deletions events. The absence of the DdrB protein also increased the lethal sectoring of cells devoid of RecA or RecO protein. γ-irradiation of recA+ cells increased about 10-fold the frequencies of the deletion events, but at a lesser extend in cells devoid of the DdrB protein. Altogether, our results suggest a major role of single strand annealing in DNA repeat deletion events in bacteria devoid of the RecA protein, and also in recA+ bacteria exposed to ionizing radiation. PMID:26517555

  16. Single Strand Annealing Plays a Major Role in RecA-Independent Recombination between Repeated Sequences in the Radioresistant Deinococcus radiodurans Bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solenne Ithurbide

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is one of the most radioresistant organisms known. It is able to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Our work aims to highlight the genes involved in recombination between 438 bp direct repeats separated by intervening sequences of various lengths ranging from 1,479 bp to 10,500 bp to restore a functional tetA gene in the presence or absence of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. The frequency of spontaneous deletion events between the chromosomal direct repeats were the same in recA+ and in ΔrecA, ΔrecF, and ΔrecO bacteria, whereas recombination between chromosomal and plasmid DNA was shown to be strictly dependent on the RecA and RecF proteins. The presence of mutations in one of the repeated sequence reduced, in a MutS-dependent manner, the frequency of the deletion events. The distance between the repeats did not influence the frequencies of deletion events in recA+ as well in ΔrecA bacteria. The absence of the UvrD protein stimulated the recombination between the direct repeats whereas the absence of the DdrB protein, previously shown to be involved in DNA double strand break repair through a single strand annealing (SSA pathway, strongly reduces the frequency of RecA- (and RecO- independent deletions events. The absence of the DdrB protein also increased the lethal sectoring of cells devoid of RecA or RecO protein. γ-irradiation of recA+ cells increased about 10-fold the frequencies of the deletion events, but at a lesser extend in cells devoid of the DdrB protein. Altogether, our results suggest a major role of single strand annealing in DNA repeat deletion events in bacteria devoid of the RecA protein, and also in recA+ bacteria exposed to ionizing radiation.

  17. Effects of heavy ions on inactivation and DNA double strand breaks in Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, H; Schafer, M; Schmitz, C; Bucker, H

    1994-10-01

    Inactivation and double strand break (dsb) induction after heavy ion irradiation were studied in stationary phase cells of the highly radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1. There is evidence that the radiation sensitivity of this bacterium is nearly independent on energy in the range of up to 15 MeV/u for lighter ions (Ar). The responses to dsb induction for charged particles show direct relationship between increasing radiation dose and residual intact DNA. PMID:11539954

  18. Identification of the methyltransferase targeting C2499 in Deinococcus radiodurans 23S ribosomal RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Julie Mundus; Flyvbjerg, Karen Freund; Kirpekar, Finn

    2016-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans-like all other organisms-introduces nucleotide modifications into its ribosomal RNA. We have previously found that the bacterium contains a Carbon-5 methylation on cytidine 2499 of its 23S ribosomal RNA, which is so far the only modified version of cytidine 2...

  19. Nutrition induced pleomorphism and budding mode of reproduction in Deinococcus radiodurans

    OpenAIRE

    Toleti Rao S; Joshi Hiren M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Morphological adaptation is an important biological function of a microorganism to cope with its environment. Pleomorphism (to exist in a number of morphological forms) took centre stage in many discussions wherein a bacterium exhibits morphological transition and altered mode of reproduction in response to an environmental condition. Findings To strengthen the concept on pleomorphism in bacteria, we report here different cell morphologies of Deinococcus radiodurans in res...

  20. Intrinsically disordered regions may lower the hydration free energy in proteins: a case study of nudix hydrolase in the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

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    Omar Awile

    Full Text Available The proteome of the radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacterium D. radiodurans features a group of proteins that contain significant intrinsically disordered regions that are not present in non-extremophile homologues. Interestingly, this group includes a number of housekeeping and repair proteins such as DNA polymerase III, nudix hydrolase and rotamase. Here, we focus on a member of the nudix hydrolase family from D. radiodurans possessing low-complexity N- and C-terminal tails, which exhibit sequence signatures of intrinsic disorder and have unknown function. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of oxidatively damaged and mutagenic nucleotides, and it is thought to play an important role in D. radiodurans during the recovery phase after exposure to ionizing radiation or desiccation. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the dynamics of the protein, and study its hydration free energy using the GB/SA formalism. We show that the presence of disordered tails significantly decreases the hydration free energy of the whole protein. We hypothesize that the tails increase the chances of the protein to be located in the remaining water patches in the desiccated cell, where it is protected from the desiccation effects and can function normally. We extrapolate this to other intrinsically disordered regions in proteins, and propose a novel function for them: intrinsically disordered regions increase the "surface-properties" of the folded domains they are attached to, making them on the whole more hydrophilic and potentially influencing, in this way, their localization and cellular activity.

  1. Biosorption of radiocesium by deinococcus radiodurans influenced by cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans has a strong ability to withstand high doses of radiation, which makes it as an ideal candidate for bioremediation of sites contaminated with radionuclides and toxic chemicals. However, no data is available on whether D. radiodurans has a specific sorption capacity to radiocesium for bioremediation purpose. The radiocesium biosorption capacity of live cells of D. radiodurans in the presence of other interfering cations was investigated. The maximum biosorption capacity of radiocesium by D. radiodurans in equilibrium state was about 2,100 kBq/kg (fresh weight basis). Among the tested monovalent cations, NH4+ had the strongest antagonism on 134Cs biosorption for D. radiodurans. However, this antagonism could only be observed at a concentration as high as 100 mmol/L. Divalent cations, such as Ca2+ and Pb2+ could reduced the biosorption of radiocesium by D. radiodurans. Al3+ and Cr3+ were cytotoxic to D. radiodurans cells, the growth of D. radiodurans cells was inhibited when the concentrations of these cations were greater than 1 mmol/L. (authors)

  2. SRM assay designing for Deinococcus radiodurans radiation responsive proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a robust organism, with extraordinary ability to tolerate various DNA damaging stresses such as exposure to ionizing radiation, desiccation, chemical mutagens etc. Gamma radiation stress responsive changes in gene expression have been well studies and detected by transcriptomic and proteomic based approaches. These approaches have revealed presence of an extraordinary and sequential DNA repair mechanism that utilizes both gamma-irradiation induced as well as constitutive proteins. However, response of the organism to the other DNA damaging stresses is not yet investigated in details. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics approach which measures the change in the abundance of selected proteins of user interest. Here, we have designed SRM assay for selected target proteins which are known to be differentially expressed in response to DNA damage inflicted by gamma irradiation. For SRM designing, MS/MS spectra for all Deinococcus radiodurans proteins were downloaded from the NIST mass spectrometry peptide library database and filtered using the SKYLINE tool to select best 3 transitions for each protein of interest, on the basis of the peak intensity ranking. SRM assay transition list was then used to design SRM method. The SRM assay, reported here, is an independent platform and can be used for further validation and refinement. It could be further applied to quantitate differential expression of selected proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans to other DNA damaging stresses. (author)

  3. Effect of Deinococcus radiodurans on speciation of radiocesium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical speciation of radiocesium which determines its environmental behavior could be affected by microbial processes in soil. However, the speciation of radiocesium in soil has not been well documented. The speciation of radiocesium in soil was investigated with the absence and presence of Deinococcus radiodurans and Pseudomonas sp., respectively. The content of radiocesium in residual phase was increased significantly (p<0.01) with the presence of bacteria in comparison to aseptic control, about 60% of adsorbed radiocesium existed in residual phase with the presence of bacteria. The proportions of radiocesium in different speciation were not significantly changed in the presence of D. radiodurans and Pseudomonas sp. with a longer incubation time. About 67.8% of the total absorbed radiocesium in D. radiodurans cells was extractable with ethanol. (author)

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a catalytic and ATP-binding domain of a putative PhoR histidine kinase from the γ-radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression, purification and crystallization of a catalytic and ATP-binding domain of PhoR histidine kinase from D. radiodurans is described. The gene product of histidine kinase DR2244 (putative phoR) encoded by Deinococcus radiodurans has been suggested to be involved in the PhoR–PhoB two-component regulatory system. This two-component signalling system is activated upon phosphate starvation in several bacteria, including D. radiodurans. Single crystals were obtained from a recombinant preparation of the catalytic/ATP-binding (CA) domain of D. radiodurans PhoR (79–224) overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The crystals belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.9, b = 81.8, c = 204.6 Å. The crystals contained six molecules in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution on beamline ID23-2 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

  5. The diversity of the radio-resistant bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans%抗辐射菌Deinococcus radiodurans 多样性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屠振力; 方俐晶; 王家刚

    2012-01-01

    Some terrestrial microorganisms can survive in extremely severe environments, such as high temperature, high salinity, strongly acidic, or strongly alkaline conditions. Elucidation of the adaptive mechanisms of these extremophiles to extreme environments will provide meaningful insights into the evolution and diversity of organisms. Deinococcus radiodurans , a representative radioresistant bacterium, are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging factors. The D37 of D. Radiodurans is 7 kGy, for example, while that of Escherichia coli is only 40 Gy. The tolerance of D. Radiodurans to radiation is due to high DNA repair rates, high antioxidant activity, specialized cell structures, and uncommon intracellular environments; this bacterium is considered a model organism in the study of DNA damage and repair. This paper summarizes the recent research on the diversity of radioresistant bacteria, including their environments, factors that influence resistance to DNA damage, mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, and central repair genes, which are associated with the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks in Deinococcus radiodurans. The potential applications of this knowledge to life sciences, agriculture, contaminative environmental biorepair, and medicine are also discussed.%抗辐射菌Deinococcus radiodurans是一种对电离辐射和其他DNA损伤因子具有极强抵抗能力的细菌,是研究DNA损伤与修复的模式生物.综述了国内外在抗辐射菌研究上取得的最新研究成果,从生存环境、对DNA损伤因子的抗性、抗性机理及其损伤修复关联基因等方面报道了抗辐射菌的多样性,并探讨了该细菌高效正确的DNA损伤修复机理的相关研究成果在生命科学、农业、环境修复及医学等领域的应用前景.

  6. Comparative Survival Analysis of Deinococcus Radiodurans and the Haloarchaea Natrialba Magadii and Haloferax Volcanii, Exposed to Vacuum Ultraviolet Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Abrevaya, Ximena C.; Paulino-Lima, Ivan G.; Galante, Douglas; Rodrigues, Fabio; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Corton, Eduardo; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

    2011-01-01

    The haloarchaea Natrialba magadii and Haloferax volcanii, as well as the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, were exposed to vacuum-UV (V-UV) radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Cell monolayers (containing 105 - 106 cells per sample) were prepared over polycarbonate filters and irradiated under high vacuum (10-5 Pa) with polychromatic synchrotron radiation. N. magadii was remarkably resistant to high vacuum with a survival fraction of ((3.77 \\pm ...

  7. Heavy metals-bioremediation by highly radioresistant Deinococcus radiodurans biofilm prospective use in nuclear reactor decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few decades, rapid growth of chemical industries have enhanced the heavy metal contamination in water, thereby raising environmental concerns. In the nuclear power industry, decontamination procedure also generates radioactive heavy metal containing wastes. Radio-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans R1 is reported to be a potential candidate for the treatment of low active waste material. To use any bacterium for bioremediation purpose, knowledge about its biofilm production characteristics is a prerequisite. This is because biofilm-mediated bioremediation processes are more efficient as compared to processes mediated by their planktonic counterparts. However, so far there are no reports on the biofilm producing capability of D. radiodurans. We observed that tagging of D. radiodurans by a plasmid harbouring gfp and kanR conferred significant biofilm producing property to the bacterium. Chemical analysis of biofilm matrix components produced by D. radiodurans showed that the matrix consists primarily of proteins and carbohydrates with small amount of extracellular DNA (eDNA). Further, we studied the effect of Ca2+ on D. radiodurans biofilm formation and it was observed that D. radiodurans biofilm formation was enhanced at higher concentrations of Ca2+. We investigated the capability of D. radiodurans biofilm to remove the heavy metals Co and Ni from synthetic waste streams. Results showed that Ca2+ enhanced the bioremediation of both heavy metals (Co, Ni) by D. radiodurans biofilms in a highly significant manner. In the presence of 50 mM Ca2+ 35% Co removal and 25% Ni removal was observed, when compared to biofilm grown in the absence of Ca2+, which showed mere 7% Co and 3% Ni removal, respectively. The results showed that the presence of Ca2+ significantly enhanced exopolysaccharide and eDNA (both negatively charged) production in the biofilm matrix. This indicated adsorption could be the major mechanism behind enhanced biofilm mediated removal of heavy

  8. UvrD in Deinococcus radiodurans is optimized for processing G-quadruplex DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1 is a radiation resistant Gram-positive bacterium capable of tolerating very high doses of DNA-damaging agents such as gamma radiation (D10 ∼ 12kGy) desiccation (∼ 5% relative humidity), UVC radiation (D10 ∼ 800J/m2) and hydrogen peroxide (40 mM). It achieves this by using a complex regulatory mechanism and novel proteins. Recently bioinformatic analysis showed several stretches of guanine runs in D.radiodurans genome, which could form G-quartets. The role of G-quartets in regulatory processes is well documented in various organisms. The presence of G -quartets in D. radiodurans means that there are regulatory or structural proteins which would bind to these elements. Several proteins are known to bind G-quartets. Finding the proteins which would bind to G4 DNA is difficult as no specific motifs are available for binding these elements. Also most of the known proteins that are shown to bind to G-quadruplex DNA are of eukaryotic nature. To overcome these challenges we defined a set of known G-quadruplex binding proteins and used a smith-waterman algorithm with our own scoring matrix to homologs of G-quadruplex binding proteins in D.radiodurans. Using bioinformatics analysis, we showed that UvrD (DR 1775) of D. radiodurans has ability to bind/translocate along G-quadruplex DNA, a novel feature in prokaryotes. The translocase activity of DR1775 is ATP specific and this ATPase activity is attenuated by ssDNA. Data supporting UvrD of D. radiodurans as a G-quadruplex DNA metabolizing proteins would be presented. (author)

  9. Investigation of DNA damage and repair mechanism using deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deninococcus Radiodurans, formerly known as Micrococcus Radiodurans, is a popular bacterium because of its high resistance to damage by carcinogens such as ionizing radiation (Dean et. al. 1966; Kitayama and Matsuyama 1968) and UV radiation (Gasvon et. al., 1995; Arrange et. al. 1993). In this report, we investigated the high resistance to ionizing radiation by this bacterium. The bacteria had been exposed from I to 5 kGy of gamma radiation and then incubated in TGY medium to study their ability to repair the broken DNA. The repair time was measured by Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) method. The repair time for each dose was determined. Also in order to ensure that the repair was perfect, the bacterium was subjected to a second exposure of ionizing radiation after it has fully repaired. It was found that the 'second' repair characteristic was similar to the first repair. This confirmed that the repair after the exposure to the ionizing radiation was perfect

  10. Radioprotective properties of a factor isolated from deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several organisms are capable of surviving high doses of ionizing radiation. Among the radioresistant organisms are some members of the Deinococcus family of bacteria, including D. radiodurans. It has been shown that an extract isolated from D. radiodurans confers radioprotection to a more radiosensitive strain of bacteria ia, E. coli. The authors' laboratory has investigated the radioprotective effects of a low molecular weight factor isolated from D. radiodurans in mice. Male CD2F1 mice were injected intraperitoneally with the factor 60 minutes prior to irradiation with 1000 rads (colbalt-60). Irradiated mice treated with 150 mg/kg of the factor showed increased survival and protection against weight loss compared to irradiated controls. When the dosage was increased, toxicity of the factor resulted in 30% mortality of the treated mice within 6 days after irradiation. These premature deaths were not observed in control mice. However, despite the toxicity at the higher dose, the 30-day survival of the remaining factor-treated mice was increased compared to controls

  11. Subterranean Microhabitat Dependent Intra Versus Extracellular Enzyme Secretion Capabilities of Deinococcus radiodurans

    OpenAIRE

    Jayant Biswas; Arvind Neral; Yogita Rajput

    2015-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is one of the most yet discovered extremophilic microbe, the isolation of which from the various habitats of Kotumsar cave is always a matter of enticement to discover its ecological economics. In the present work we studied the intra versus extracellular alkaline protease and glucose isomerase secretion capabilities of Deinococcus radiodurans; KCB21, KCB50, KCB93 isolated from three distinct subterranean niches of Kotumsar cave. The selected niches/zones were the entr...

  12. Extremes of Survival Achieved by the Radiophile Deinococcus Radiodurans: A Model for Microbial Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M.; Sridhar, R.; Richmond, R.

    1999-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an extremophile in more than one defined way. First it is extreme in its resistance to freeze drying. Second it is probably uniquely extreme on Earth in its resistance to ionizing radiation. The polyextremophilic capacity of D. radiodurans will be considered. The selection pressures on Mars will then be considered in relation to D. radiodurans in order to support a hypothesis that if microbial life exists on Mars, then it likely includes polyextremophiles.

  13. Preserving Genome Integrity: The DdrA Protein of Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Dennis R

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans can withstand extraordinary levels of ionizing radiation, reflecting an equally extraordinary capacity for DNA repair. The hypothetical gene product DR0423 has been implicated in the recovery of this organism from DNA damage, indicating that this protein is a novel component of the D. radiodurans DNA repair system. DR0423 is a homologue of the eukaryotic Rad52 protein. Following exposure to ionizing radiation, DR0423 expression is induced relative to an untreated control, and strains carrying a deletion of the DR0423 gene exhibit increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. When recovering from ionizing-radiation-induced DNA damage in the absence of nutrients, wild-type D. radiodurans reassembles its genome while the mutant lacking DR0423 function does not. In vitro, the purified DR0423 protein binds to single-stranded DNA with an apparent affinity for 3' ends, and protects those ends from nuclease degradation. We propose that DR0423 is part of a DNA end-protection system that helps to preserve genome integrity following exposure to ionizing radiation. We designate the DR0423 protein as DNA damage response A protein.

  14. The essential role of the Deinococcus radiodurans ssb gene in cell survival and radiation tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Scott Lockhart

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has implicated single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB expression level as an important factor in microbial radiation resistance. The genome of the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contains genes for two SSB homologs: the homodimeric, canonical Ssb, encoded by the gene ssb, and a novel pentameric protein encoded by the gene ddrB. ddrB is highly induced upon exposure to radiation, and deletions result in decreased radiation-resistance, suggesting an integral role of the protein in the extreme resistance exhibited by this organism. Although expression of ssb is also induced after irradiation, Ssb is thought to be involved primarily in replication. In this study, we demonstrate that Ssb in D. radiodurans is essential for cell survival. The lethality of an ssb deletion cannot be complemented by providing ddrB in trans. In addition, the radiation-sensitive phenotype conferred by a ddrB deletion is not alleviated by providing ssb in trans. By altering expression of the ssb gene, we also show that lower levels of transcription are required for optimal growth than are necessary for high radiation resistance. When expression is reduced to that of E. coli, ionizing radiation resistance is similarly reduced. UV resistance is also decreased under low ssb transcript levels where growth is unimpaired. These results indicate that the expression of ssb is a key component of both normal cellular metabolism as well as pathways responsible for the high radiation tolerance of D. radiodurans.

  15. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of Deinococcus radiodurans thioredoxin reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant D. radiodurans TrxR with a His tag at the N-terminus was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal-affinity chromatography. The protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of 35% PEG 4000, 0.2 M ammonium acetate and citric acid buffer pH 5.1 at 293 K. Deinococcus radiodurans, a Gram-positive bacterium capable of withstanding extreme ionizing radiation, contains two thioredoxins (Trx and Trx1) and a single thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) as part of its response to oxidative stress. Thioredoxin reductase is a member of the family of pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductase flavoenzymes. Recombinant D. radiodurans TrxR with a His tag at the N-terminus was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal-affinity chromatography. The protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of 35% PEG 4000, 0.2 M ammonium acetate and citric acid buffer pH 5.1 at 293 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected on a cryocooled crystal to a resolution of 1.9 Å using a synchrotron-radiation source. The space group was determined to be P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 84.33, c = 159.88 Å. The structure of the enzyme has been solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is in progress

  16. Characterization of radiation-induced proteins in Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction of proteins after gamma-irradiation in Deinococcus radiodurans were investigated. 10 proteins were induced and about 15 proteins were reduced after irradiation with 6kGy. These proteins were classified to four groups by responses to gamma-rays, UV light, mitomycin C(MMC) treatment and heating. Additional studies were carried out for the characterization of two induced proteins. One protein was induced by gamma-rays, UV light as well as heating. This protein appeared to be a glycoprotein from its reaction with lectin. From the amino acid sequences of N-terminal and internal region, it was found that this protein is homologous to EF-Tu protein of E. coli. Meanwhile the other protein was induced not only by gamma-rays but also by UV light and MMC treatment. This protein seems to be a new enzyme as it has no homology to the known proteins which have ever been analyzed. No accumulations of these two proteins were observed in radiation sensitive strain of D. radiodurans and in both of E. coli and Bacillus pumilus, suggesting that induction of these two proteins would be specific for high resistant strain. (author)

  17. Influence of LET on repair of DNA damages in Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inactivation caused by heavy ions was studied in dry cells of radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. All survival curves were characterized by a large shoulder of the curves. No final slopes of the exponential part of survival curves for heavy ion irradiation were steeper than that for 2.0 MeV electron irradiation. The plots of RBE versus LET showed no obvious peaks, suggesting that this bacterium can repair not only DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) but also clustered damage in DNA which may be induced by heavy ions. The genomic DNA of D. radiodurans was cleaved into large fragments with restriction enzyme Not I after post-irradiation incubation and the fragments were separated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). DSBs induction and rejoining process were analyzed by detection of the reappearance of ladder pattern of DNA fragments. The required repair time after heavy ions irradiation was longer than the repair time for electrons at the same dose of irradiation, however, the rate of repair enzyme induction was almost similar to each other between electrons and heavy ions, suggesting that the same repair system is likely to be used after both low and high LET irradiations. (author)

  18. Influence of LET on repair of DNA damages in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Tanaka, A.; Kikuchi, M.; Shimizu, T.; Watanabe, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Cao, J.P.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    1997-03-01

    Inactivation caused by heavy ions was studied in dry cells of radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. All survival curves were characterized by a large shoulder of the curves. No final slopes of the exponential part of survival curves for heavy ion irradiation were steeper than that for 2.0 MeV electron irradiation. The plots of RBE versus LET showed no obvious peaks, suggesting that this bacterium can repair not only DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) but also clustered damage in DNA which may be induced by heavy ions. The genomic DNA of D. radiodurans was cleaved into large fragments with restriction enzyme Not I after post-irradiation incubation and the fragments were separated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). DSBs induction and rejoining process were analyzed by detection of the reappearance of ladder pattern of DNA fragments. The required repair time after heavy ions irradiation was longer than the repair time for electrons at the same dose of irradiation, however, the rate of repair enzyme induction was almost similar to each other between electrons and heavy ions, suggesting that the same repair system is likely to be used after both low and high LET irradiations. (author)

  19. PprA phosphorylation by STPK of Deinococcus radiodurans changes its in vitro functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans shows amazing resistance to both ionizing and non-ionizing radiations. This phenotype is attributed also to its efficient DNA double strand breaks (DSB) repair capability of this bacterium. PprA (pleiotropic protein promoting DNA repair) is unique to D. radiodurans and its role in gamma radiation resistance and DSB repair has been shown in this bacterium. Recombinant PrA protects dsDNA from exonuclease degradation and stimulates the DNA ends joining activity of both T4 DNA ligase and E.coli NAD ligase in vitro. Phosphomotif search showed that PprA has putative phosphorylation site similar to that is characterized for Ser/Thr protein kinases in eukaryotic system. A eukaryotic type Ser/Thr protein kinase (DR2518) of D. radiodurans, could phosphorylate recombinant PprA at Thr amino acid in vitro and the phosphorylation of PprA was also observed in vivo. DR2518 kinase mediated protein phosphorylation of PprA, improves its DNA binding affinity by nearly four fold and stimulated T4 DNA ligase activity more towards intermolecular ligation, as compared to unphosphorylated PprA. Interestingly, the phospho-PprA showed lesser protection of dsDNA than unphospho-PprA when incubated with exonuclease III in solution. The putative Thr of PprA was replaced with Ala (T48A) by site directed mutagenesis, which resulted in significant reduction of PprA phosphorylation by DR2518 kinase. Detailed studies on PprA phosphorylation and its functional significance would be presented. (author)

  20. Expression of PprI from Deinococcus radiodurans Improves Lactic Acid Production and Stress Tolerance in Lactococcus lactis

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Xiangrong; Tian, Bing; Dai, Shang; Li, Tao; Guo, Linna; Tan, Zhongfang; JIAO, Zhen; Jin, Qingsheng; Wang, Yanping; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    PprI is a general switch protein that regulates the expression of certain proteins involved in pathways of cellular resistance in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In this study, we transformed pprI into Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 using the lactococcal shuttle vector pMG36e and investigated its effects on the tolerance and lactic acid production of L. lactis while under stress. PprI was stably expressed in L. lactis as confirmed by western blot assays. L. lactis expre...

  1. Deinococcus radiodurans PprI Switches on DNA Damage Response and Cellular Survival Networks after Radiation Damage*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Huiming; Gao, Guanjun; Xu, Guangzhi; Fan, Lu; Yin, Longfei; Shen, Binghui; Hua, Yuejin

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary findings indicate that PprI is a regulatory protein that stimulates transcription and translation of recA and other DNA repair genes in response to DNA damage in the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. To define the repertoire of proteins regulated by PprI and investigate the in vivo regulatory mechanism of PprI in response to γ radiation, we performed comparative proteomics analyses on wild type (R1) and a pprI knock-out strain (YR1) under conditions of io...

  2. Subterranean Microhabitat Dependent Intra Versus Extracellular Enzyme Secretion Capabilities of Deinococcus radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant Biswas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deinococcus radiodurans is one of the most yet discovered extremophilic microbe, the isolation of which from the various habitats of Kotumsar cave is always a matter of enticement to discover its ecological economics. In the present work we studied the intra versus extracellular alkaline protease and glucose isomerase secretion capabilities of Deinococcus radiodurans; KCB21, KCB50, KCB93 isolated from three distinct subterranean niches of Kotumsar cave. The selected niches/zones were the entrance zone, transient zone and the deep inner zone from where the soil sediments were collected to isolate the bacterial strains. The results revealed high extracellular alkaline protease activity from the Deinococcus radiodurans strain which was isolated from the deeper zones of the cave, whereas no such phenomenon was revealed for glucose isomerase. The possible reason for the obtained results has been discussed.

  3. Bioprecipitation of uranium from alkaline waste solutions using recombinant Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Deinococcus radiodurans was genetically engineered to overexpress alkaline phosphatase (PhoK). • Deino-PhoK bioprecipitated U efficiently over a wide range of input U concentration. • A maximal loading of 10.7 g U/g of biomass at 10 mM input U was observed. • Radioresistance and U precipitation by Deino-PhoK remained unaffected by γ radiation. • Immobilization of Deino-PhoK facilitated easy separation of precipitated U. -- Abstract: Bioremediation of uranium (U) from alkaline waste solutions remains inadequately explored. We engineered the phoK gene (encoding a novel alkaline phosphatase, PhoK) from Sphingomonas sp. for overexpression in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The recombinant strain thus obtained (Deino-PhoK) exhibited remarkably high alkaline phosphatase activity as evidenced by zymographic and enzyme activity assays. Deino-PhoK cells could efficiently precipitate uranium over a wide range of input U concentrations. At low uranyl concentrations (1 mM), the strain precipitated >90% of uranium within 2 h while a high loading capacity of around 10.7 g U/g of dry weight of cells was achieved at 10 mM U concentration. Uranium bioprecipitation by Deino-PhoK cells was not affected in the presence of Cs and Sr, commonly present in intermediate and low level liquid radioactive waste, or after exposure to very high doses of ionizing radiation. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the extracellular nature of bioprecipitated U, while X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis identified the precipitated uranyl phosphate species as chernikovite. When immobilized into calcium alginate beads, Deino-PhoK cells efficiently removed uranium, which remained trapped in beads, thus accomplishing physical separation of precipitated uranyl phosphate from solutions. The data demonstrate superior ability of Deino-PhoK, over earlier reported strains, in removal of uranium from alkaline solutions and its potential use in

  4. Bioprecipitation of uranium from alkaline waste solutions using recombinant Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Sayali; Ballal, Anand; Apte, Shree Kumar, E-mail: aptesk@barc.gov.in

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Deinococcus radiodurans was genetically engineered to overexpress alkaline phosphatase (PhoK). • Deino-PhoK bioprecipitated U efficiently over a wide range of input U concentration. • A maximal loading of 10.7 g U/g of biomass at 10 mM input U was observed. • Radioresistance and U precipitation by Deino-PhoK remained unaffected by γ radiation. • Immobilization of Deino-PhoK facilitated easy separation of precipitated U. -- Abstract: Bioremediation of uranium (U) from alkaline waste solutions remains inadequately explored. We engineered the phoK gene (encoding a novel alkaline phosphatase, PhoK) from Sphingomonas sp. for overexpression in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The recombinant strain thus obtained (Deino-PhoK) exhibited remarkably high alkaline phosphatase activity as evidenced by zymographic and enzyme activity assays. Deino-PhoK cells could efficiently precipitate uranium over a wide range of input U concentrations. At low uranyl concentrations (1 mM), the strain precipitated >90% of uranium within 2 h while a high loading capacity of around 10.7 g U/g of dry weight of cells was achieved at 10 mM U concentration. Uranium bioprecipitation by Deino-PhoK cells was not affected in the presence of Cs and Sr, commonly present in intermediate and low level liquid radioactive waste, or after exposure to very high doses of ionizing radiation. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the extracellular nature of bioprecipitated U, while X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis identified the precipitated uranyl phosphate species as chernikovite. When immobilized into calcium alginate beads, Deino-PhoK cells efficiently removed uranium, which remained trapped in beads, thus accomplishing physical separation of precipitated uranyl phosphate from solutions. The data demonstrate superior ability of Deino-PhoK, over earlier reported strains, in removal of uranium from alkaline solutions and its potential use in

  5. Whole cell Deinococcus radiodurans ameliorates salt stress in Indian mustard through pyrroloquinoline quinone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinity stress is considered as one of the major abiotic stresses limiting crop productivity. A variety of symbiotic and non-symbiotic bacteria are currently being used worldwide with the aim to boost built-in defense system in plants. Deinococcus radiodurans is a highly desiccation and radiation tolerant bacterium which synthesizes PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone) that has been shown to have a versatile role in crop productivity and as a general stress response regulator in bacteria and mammals. PQQ also acts as scavenger of reactive oxygen species and hence, can module redox signaling, one of the major regulator of stress tolerance in plants. In view of this, present research was conducted to evaluate the potential of whole cell D. radiodurans for ameliorating salt stress in plants. The soil colonization with wild-type cells led to partial amelioration of salt stress. The PQQ mutant showed an intermediate phenotype between wild-type seedlings and those grown on non-colonized soils which confirmed that the effects are largely associated with PQQ. The differential phenotype was also correlated with ROS level and ABA accumulation. The flame photometry data showed that there was no significant reduction in water soluble Na+ level in control plant and those treated with either wild-type or PQQ mutant. Further, the elevated levels of antioxidant enzymes and reduced ascorbate in the plants treated with bacterial cells indicated its positive role in oxidative stress management. Although, the exact molecular basis to these effects is yet to be understood, present findings support the use of whole cell D. radiodurans for managing the growth and productivity of Indian mustard in salt affected fields. (author)

  6. Effect of Deinococcus radiodurans on uptake of 134Cs by Brassica oleracea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans was inoculated into the soil which was spiked with 134Cs to investigate its effect on chemical speciation of 134Cs. The relationship between chemical speciation of 134Cs and its absorbtion capacity by cabbage (Brassica oleracea) in the presence of D. radiodurans was also investigated. The results showed that an increase of 28.64%-38.17 % in content of 134Cs in residual phase was observed with presence of D. radiodurans in comparison with the aseptic control. The amounts of radiocesium uptaken by cabbage were about 12100Bq/g under aseptic conditions, however, which were about 8500Bq/g with the presence of D. radiodurans. The proportion of 134Cs taken up by cabbage decreased about 29% in comparison with the aseptic control. The chemical speciation could be influenced by D. radiodurans so that its uptake by plants could be reduced. (authors)

  7. Construction of DNA damage response gene pprI function-deficient and function-complementary mutants in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Guanjun; LU Huiming; HUANG Lifen; HUA Yuejin

    2005-01-01

    PprI, a DNA damage response factor from the extraordinary radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, plays a central regulatory role in multiple DNA damage repair. In this study, a fusion DNA fragment carrying kanamycin resistance gene with the D. Radiodurans groEL promoter was cloned by PCR amplification and reversely inserted into the pprI locus in the genome of the wild-type strain R1. The resulting pprI-deficient strain, designated YR1, was very sensitive to ionizing radiation. Meanwhile, the re- combinant DNA fragment was cloned into the shuttle vector pRADZ3, and resulted in plasmid pRADK with kanamycin resistance in D. Radiodurans. The fragments containing complete pprI gene and 3'-terminal deletion pprI△ were cloned into plasmid pRADK. The resulted plasmids designated pRADKpprI and pRADKpprI△ were then transformed to YR1. Results show that YR1 carrying pRADKpprI was able to fully restore the extreme radioresistance to the same level as the wild-type D. Raiodurans R1, whereas YR1 pRADKpprI△ failed to do so. Construction of DNA repair switch PprI function-deficient and function-complementary mutants in D. Radiodurans is not only useful to elucidating the relationship between domains and functions of PprI protein, but also opens the door to the further studies of the biological functions of PprI protein in vivo.

  8. Comparative Survival Analysis of Deinococcus Radiodurans and the Haloarchaea Natrialba Magadii and Haloferax Volcanii, Exposed to Vacuum Ultraviolet Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Abrevaya, Ximena C; Galante, Douglas; Rodrigues, Fabio; Mauas, Pablo J D; Corton, Eduardo; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

    2011-01-01

    The haloarchaea Natrialba magadii and Haloferax volcanii, as well as the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, were exposed to vacuum-UV (V-UV) radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Cell monolayers (containing 105 - 106 cells per sample) were prepared over polycarbonate filters and irradiated under high vacuum (10-5 Pa) with polychromatic synchrotron radiation. N. magadii was remarkably resistant to high vacuum with a survival fraction of ((3.77 \\pm 0.76) x 10-2), larger than the one of D. radiodurans ((1.13 \\pm 0.23) x 10-2). The survival fraction of the haloarchaea H. volcanii, of ((3.60 \\pm 1.80) x 10-4), was much smaller. Radiation resistance profiles were similar between the haloarchaea and D. radiodurans for fluencies up to 150 J m-2. For fluencies larger than 150 J m-2 there was a significant decrease in the survival of haloarchaea, and in particular H. volcanii did not survive. Survival for D. radiodurans was 1% after exposure to the higher V-UV fluency (1350...

  9. Identifying the Proteins that Mediate the Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus Radiodurans R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battista, John R

    2010-02-22

    The primary objectives of this proposal was to define the subset of proteins required for the ionizing radiation (IR) resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans R1, characterize the activities of those proteins, and apply what was learned to problems of interest to the Department of Energy.

  10. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yang

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in response to oxidative stress. By constructing all CRP single knockout mutants, we found that the dr0997 mutant showed the lowest tolerance toward H2O2, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, and mitomycin C, while the phenotypes of the dr2362, dr0834, and dr1646 mutants showed slight or no significant differences from those of the wild-type strain. Taking advantage of the conservation of the CRP-binding site in many bacteria, we found that transcription of 18 genes, including genes encoding chromosome-partitioning protein (dr0998, Lon proteases (dr0349 and dr1974, NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (dr1506, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (dr2531, the DNA repair protein UvsE (dr1819, PprA (dra0346, and RecN (dr1447, are directly regulated by DR0997. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analyses showed that certain genes involved in anti-oxidative responses, DNA repair, and various cellular pathways are transcriptionally attenuated in the dr0997 mutant. Interestingly, DR0997 also regulate the transcriptional levels of all CRP genes in this bacterium. These data suggest that DR0997 contributes to the extreme stress resistance of D. radiodurans via its regulatory role in multiple cellular pathways, such as anti-oxidation and DNA repair pathways.

  11. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    OpenAIRE

    Fredrickson, J. K.; Kostandarithes, H. M.; Li, S. W.; Plymale, A. E.; Daly, M J

    2000-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO2 and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfo...

  12. RecBC enzyme overproduction affects UV and gamma radiation survival of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Kamble, Vidya A; Misra, Hari S

    2008-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans recovering from the effect of acute dose of gamma (gamma) radiation shows a biphasic mechanism of DNA double strands breaks repair that involves an efficient homologous recombination. However, it shows higher sensitivity to near-UV (NUV) than Escherichia coli and lacks RecBC, a DNA strand break (DSB) repair enzyme in some bacteria. Recombinant Deinococcus expressing the recBC genes of E. coli showed nearly three-fold improvements in near-UV tolerance and nearly 2 log cycle reductions in wild type gamma radiation resistance. RecBC over expression effect on radiation response of D. radiodurans was independent of indigenous RecD. Loss of gamma radiation tolerance was attributed to the enhanced rate of in vivo degradation of radiation damaged DNA and delayed kinetics of DSB repair during post-irradiation recovery. RecBC expressing cells of Deinococcus showed wild type response to Far-UV. These results suggest that the overproduction of RecBC competes with the indigenous mechanism of gamma radiation damaged DNA repair while it supports near-UV tolerance in D. radiodurans. PMID:17720630

  13. Characteristics of dr1790 disruptant and its functional analysis in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Deinococcus radiodurans (DR is an extremophile that is well known for its resistance to radiation, oxidants and desiccation. The gene dr1790 of D. radiodurans was predicted to encode a yellow-related protein. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize the biological function of the DR1790 protein, which is a member of the ancient yellow/major royal jelly (MRJ protein family, in prokaryotes. Fluorescence labeling demonstrated that the yellow-related protein encoded by dr1790 is a membrane protein. The deletion of the dr1790 gene decreased the cell growth rate and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and radiation and increased the membrane permeability of D. radiodurans. Transcript profiling by microarray and RT-PCR analyses of the dr1790 deletion mutant suggested that some genes that are involved in protein secretion and transport were strongly suppressed, while other genes that are involved in protein quality control, such as chaperones and proteases, were induced. In addition, the expression of genes with predicted functions that are involved in antioxidant systems, electron transport, and energy metabolism was significantly altered through the disruption of dr1790. Moreover, the results of proteomic analyses using 2-DE and MS also demonstrated that DR1790 contributed to D. radiodurans survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the DR1790 protein from the ancient yellow protein family plays a pleiotropic role in the survival of prokaryotic cells and contributes to the extraordinary resistance of D. radiodurans against oxidative and radiation stresses.

  14. Understanding the role of RecN in DSB repair pathway in Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a Gram-positive bacterium known for its extreme resistance to a broad variety of DNA damaging agents. Among these, Ionizing Radiations and desiccation are the most harmful for the cell, since they introduce breaks in the genome. Double Strand Breaks (DSB) are particularly hazardous for the cell and they need to be repaired very efficiently, in order to avoid mutations leading to altered, if not lethal, phenotypes. Homologous Recombination (HR) is the most efficient mechanism by which DSBs are repaired. D. radiodurans is able to completely restore its genome in only 3 hours, and it accomplishes the entire process through the RecFOR pathway. In order to be repaired, DSBs first need to be recognized. The protein believed to be responsible for this important step that takes place soon after the damage occurs in the cell, is RecN. RecN is recruited at the early stages of DNA repair and in vivo studies have demonstrated its propensity to localize to discrete foci. In vitro studies also suggest that RecN possesses a DNA end-joining activity previously observed for SMC proteins (such as cohesin), which are structurally related to RecN. Several structural studies have been carried out on the SMC-like protein, Rad50, but so far no structural information is available for RecN. The work presented here focused on the structural characterization of RecN and its constitutive domains. We obtained crystal structures of three partially overlapping constructs of RecN and Small Angle X-ray Scattering was performed on the individual domains and the full-length protein. The study of RecN in solution complemented our crystallographic study and enabled us to build a reliable, atomic model of the full-length protein. Mutations were designed and the mutant RecN proteins were produced in order to characterize the ATP hydrolysis activity of RecN, which is a conserved feature of this family of proteins. Extensive biochemical studies were carried out on wild-type and

  15. Structural and functional studies of MutS2 from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Lu, Meihua; Xu, Xin; Wang, Yunguang; Wang, Liangyan; Zhao, Ye; Hua, Yuejin

    2014-09-01

    The MutS2 homologues have been found widespread in most prokaryotes, which are involved in DNA repair and reactive oxygen species detoxification. The C-terminal small mutS-related (Smr) domain is critical for its endonucleolytic activity. However, the detailed catalytic mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we first investigated the in vivo role of drMutS2 in Deinococcus radiodurans, the most radiation-resistant organism exhibits the remarkable DNA repair capacity. mutS2 and recA mutS2 double knockout mutants were constructed because the phenotype was strongly masked by the predominant homologous recombination DNA repair pathway in this bacterium. Compared with the recA mutant, cells devoid of both genes showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation and oxidative agents, suggesting that drMutS2 is involved in RecA-independent mechanisms that enhance cellular resistance to oxidative stress-induced DNA damage. Moreover, the basal level of reductase activity and thiamine biosynthesis was induced in the absence of mutS2. To characterize its catalytic residues, the Smr domain was crystallized and soaked in buffer containing manganese ions. In contrast to native crystals, the space group of manganese-derivative crystals transformed from monoclinic to orthorhombic unexpectedly. This type of crystals showed improved diffraction resolution to 1.2 Å, which has the highest resolution of currently known Smr structures. Structural comparison revealed that three acidic amino-acid residues, which are all located in the α1 helix, changed the rotamer states after metal soaking. Mutational analysis of conserved residue glutamic acid 710 to alanine yielded a drMutS2 variant with impaired nuclease activity, and could only partially rescue the radiosensitive phenotype of the mutS2 null strain, indicating that glutamic acid 710 is the catalytic residue. PMID:24811920

  16. Final Report for Grant No. DE-FG02-98ER62583 ''Functional Analysis of the Genome Sequence of Deinococcus radiodurans''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extremophiles are nearly always defined with singular characteristics that allow existence within a singular extreme environment. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans qualifies as a polyextremeophile, showing remarkable resistance to a range of damage caused by ionizing radiation, dessication, ultraviolet radiation, oxidizing agents, and electrophilic mutagens. D. radiodurans is most famous for its extreme resistance to ionizing radiation; it not only can grow continuously in the presence of chronic radiation (6,000 rad per hour), but it can survive acute exposures to gamma radiation that exceed 1,500,000 rads without lethality or induced mutation. These characteristics were the impetus for sequencing its genome. We completed an extensive comparative sequence analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans (strain R1) genome. Deinococcus is the first representative with a completely sequenced genome from a bacterial branch of extremophiles - the Thermus/Deinococcus group. Phylogenetic tree analysis, combined with the identification of several synapomorphies between Thermus and Deinococcus, support that it is a very ancient branch localized in the vicinity of the bacterial tree root. Distinctive features of the Deinoccoccus genome as well as features shared with other free-living bacteria were revealed by comparison of its proteome to a collection of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs). Analysis of paralogs in Deinococcus has revealed some unique protein families. In addition, specific expansions of several protein families including phosphatases, proteases, acyl transferases and MutT pyrophosphohydrolases, were detected. Genes that potentially affect DNA repair and recombination were investigated in detail. Some proteins appear to have been horizontally transferred from eukaryotes, and are not present in other bacteria. For example, three proteins homologous to plant desiccation-resistance proteins were identified and these are particularly interesting

  17. Surface (S)-layer proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans and their utility as vehicles for surface localization of functional proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Basu, Bhakti; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The radiation resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans contains two major surface (S)-layer proteins, Hpi and SlpA. The Hpi protein was shown to (a) undergo specific in vivo cleavage, and (b) closely associate with the SlpA protein. Using a non-specific acid phosphatase from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, PhoN as a reporter, the Surface Layer Homology (SLH) domain of SlpA was shown to bind deinococcal peptidoglycan-containing cell wall sacculi. The association of SlpA with Hpi on one side and peptidoglycan on the other, localizes this protein in the 'interstitial' layer of the deinoccocal cell wall. Gene chimeras of hpi-phoN and slh-phoN were constructed to test efficacy of S-layer proteins, as vehicles for cell surface localization in D. radiodurans. The Hpi-PhoN protein localized exclusively in the membrane fraction, and displayed cell-based phosphatase activity in vivo. The SLH-PhoN, which localized to both cytosolic and membrane fractions, displayed in vitro activity but no cell-based in vivo activity. Hpi, therefore, emerged as an efficient surface localizing protein and can be exploited for suitable applications of this superbug. PMID:26450150

  18. ParA encoded on chromosome II of Deinococcus radiodurans binds to nucleoid and inhibits cell division in Escherichia coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijaya Kumar Charaka; Kruti P Mehta; H S Misra

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial genome segregation and cell division has been studied mostly in bacteria harbouring single circular chromosome and low-copy plasmids. Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacterium, harbours multipartite genome system. Chromosome I encodes majority of the functions required for normal growth while other replicons encode mostly the proteins involved in secondary functions. Here, we report the characterization of putative P-loop ATPase (ParA2) encoded on chromosome II of D. radiodurans. Recombinant ParA2 was found to be a DNA-binding ATPase. E. coli cells expressing ParA2 showed cell division inhibition and mislocalization of FtsZ-YFP and those expressing ParA2-CFP showed multiple CFP foci formation on the nucleoid. Although, in trans expression of ParA2 failed to complement SlmA loss per se, it could induce unequal cell division in slmAminCDE double mutant. These results suggested that ParA2 is a nucleoid-binding protein, which could inhibits cell division in E. coli by affecting the correct localization of FtsZ and thereby cytokinesis. Helping slmAminCDE mutant to produce minicells, a phenotype associated with mutations in the `Min’ proteins, further indicated the possibility of ParA2 regulating cell division by bringing nucleoid compaction at the vicinity of septum growth.

  19. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone synthesized in Escherichia coli by pyrroloquinoline-quinone synthase of Deinococcus radiodurans plays a role beyond mineral phosphate solubilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Misra, Hari S; Apte, Shree K

    2003-12-12

    Deinococcus radiodurans, an extremely radioresistant bacterium, synthesizes coenzyme pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) but exhibits a negative phenotype for mineral phosphate solubilization. Gene for the putative PQQ synthesizing protein was PCR amplified and cloned from Deinococcus, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli, under an inducible E. coli promoter. The transgenic E. coli expressed PQQ synthase protein of 42kDa and complemented the mineral phosphate solubilization phenotype of E. coli, suggesting the synthesis of an active protein. The cells expressing high levels of this protein showed increased protection against photodynamically produced reactive oxygen species. The effect could be attributed to the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and superoxide dismutase by PQQ in transgenic E. coli through an unknown mechanism. The study elucidates a hitherto unknown possible function of PQQ in bacteria. PMID:14637137

  20. Dose Effects of Ion Beam Exposure on Deinococcus Radiodurans: Survival and Dose Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To explore the survival and dose response of organism for different radiation sources is of great importance in the research of radiobiology. In this study, the survival-dose response of Deinococcus radiodurans (E.coli, as the control) for ultra-violet (UV), γ-rays radiation and ion beam exposure was investigated. The shoulder type of survival curves were found for both UV and γ-ray ionizing radiation, but the saddle type of survival curves were shown for H+ 、 N+( 20keV and 30keV) and Ar+ beam exposure. This dose effect of the survival initially decreased withthe increase in dose and then increased in the high dose range and finally decreased again in thehigher dose range. Our experimental results suggest that D. radiodurans, which is considerablyradio-resistant to UV and x-ray and γ-ray ionizing radiation, do not resist ion beam exposure.

  1. Final Report for Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER62492 ''Engineering Deinococcus radiodurans for Metal Remediation in Radioactive Mixed Waste Sites''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The groundwater and sediments of numerous U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) field sites are contaminated with mixtures of heavy metals (e.g., Hg, Cr, Pd) and radionuclides (e.g., U, Tc), as well as the fuel hydrocarbons benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX); chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as trichloroethylene (TCE); and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The remediation of such mixed wastes constitutes an immediate and complex waste management challenge for DOE, particularly in light of the costliness and limited efficacy of current physical and chemical strategies for treating mixed wastes. In situ bioremediation via natural microbial processes (e.g., metal reduction) remains a potent, potentially cost-effective approach to the reductive immobilization or detoxification of environmental contaminants. Seventy million cubic meters of soil and three trillion liters of groundwater have been contaminated by leaking radioactive waste generated in the United States during the Cold War. A cleanup technology is being developed based on the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Our recent isolation and characterization of D. radiodurans from a variety of DOE environments, including highly radioactive sediments beneath one of the leaking tanks (SX-108) at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington state, underscores the potential for this species to survive in such extreme environments. Research aimed at developing D. radiodurans for metal remediation in radioactive waste sites was started by this group in September 1997 with support from DOE NABIR grant DE-FG02-97ER62492. Our grant was renewed for the period 2000-2003, which includes work on the thermophilic radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus geothermalis. Work funded by the existing grant contributed to 18 papers in the period 1997-2004 on the fundamental biology of D. radiodurans and its design for bioremediation of radioactive waste environments. Our progress since September

  2. Crystallization of the DdrB–DNA complex from Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DdrB from D. radiodurans has been crystallized in complex with ssDNA and diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The remarkable ability of members of the Deinococcus family to recover from extreme DNA damage is in part owing to their robust DNA-repair mechanisms. Of particular interest is their ability to repair hundreds of double-strand DNA breakages through a rapid and efficient mechanism involving novel proteins that are uniquely found in Deinococcus spp. One such protein, DdrB, which is thought to play a role early in DSB repair, has been crystallized in complex with ssDNA and data have been collected to 2.3 Å resolution

  3. Interaction of double-stranded DNA with polymerized PprA protein from Deinococcus radiodurans

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, Motoyasu; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Rumi; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay; Kuroki, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Pleiotropic protein promoting DNA repair A (PprA) is a key protein that facilitates the extreme radioresistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. To clarify the role of PprA in the radioresistance mechanism, the interaction between recombinant PprA expressed in Escherichia coli with several double-stranded DNAs (i.e., super coiled, linear, or nicked circular dsDNA) was investigated. In a gel-shift assay, the band shift of supercoiled pUC19 DNA caused by the binding of PprA showed a bimodal distribu...

  4. Design of Deinococcus radiodurans thioredoxin reductase with altered thioredoxin specificity using computational alanine mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Obiero, Josiah; Sanders, David AR

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the X-ray crystal structure of the complex between Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase (EC TrxR) and its substrate thioredoxin (Trx) was used as a guide to design a Deinococcus radiodurans TrxR (DR TrxR) mutant with altered Trx specificity. Previous studies have shown that TrxRs have higher affinity for cognate Trxs (same species) than that for Trxs from different species. Computational alanine scanning mutagenesis and visual inspection of the EC TrxR–Trx interface suggested...

  5. Structural and Mechanistic Insight into DNA Unwinding by Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD

    OpenAIRE

    Meike Stelter; Samira Acajjaoui; Sean McSweeney; Joanna Timmins

    2013-01-01

    International audience DNA helicases are responsible for unwinding the duplex DNA, a key step in many biological processes. UvrD is a DNA helicase involved in several DNA repair pathways. We report here crystal structures of Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD (drUvrD) in complex with DNA in different nucleotide-free and bound states. These structures provide us with three distinct snapshots of drUvrD in action and for the first time trap a DNA helicase undergoing a large-scale spiral movement ar...

  6. The S-layer Protein DR_2577 Binds Deinoxanthin and under Desiccation Conditions Protects against UV-Radiation in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farci, Domenica; Slavov, Chavdar; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans has the puzzling ability to withstand over a broad range of extreme conditions including high doses of ultraviolet radiation and deep desiccation. This bacterium is surrounded by a surface layer (S-layer) built of a regular repetition of several proteins, assembled to form a paracrystalline structure. Here we report that the deletion of a main constituent of this S-layer, the gene DR_2577, causes a decrease in the UVC resistance, especially in desiccated cells. Moreover, we show that the DR_2577 protein binds the carotenoid deinoxanthin, a strong protective antioxidant specific of this bacterium. A further spectroscopical characterization of the deinoxanthin-DR_2577 complex revealed features which could suggest a protective role of DR_2577. We propose that, especially under desiccation, the S-layer shields the bacterium from incident ultraviolet light and could behave as a first lane of defense against UV radiation. PMID:26909071

  7. The S-layer protein DR_2577 binds deinoxanthin and under desiccation conditions protect against UV-radiation in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica eFarci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Deinococcus radiodurans has the puzzling ability to withstand over a broad range of extreme conditions including high doses of ultraviolet radiation and deep desiccation. This bacterium is surrounded by a surface layer (S-layer built of a regular repetition of several proteins, assembled to form a paracrystalline structure. Here we report that the deletion of a main constituent of this S-layer, the gene DR_2577, causes a decrease in the UVC resistance, especially in dessicated cells. Moreover, we show that the DR_2577 protein binds the carotenoid deinoxanthin, a strong protective antioxidant specific of this bacterium. A further spectroscopical characterization of the deinoxanthin-DR_2577 complex revealed features which could suggest a protective role of DR_2577. We propose that, especially under dessication, the S-layer shields the bacterium from incident ultraviolet light and could behave as a first lane of defence against UV radiation.

  8. High-resolution structure of the antibiotic resistance protein NimA from Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the 1.2 Å atomic resolution crystal structure of the 5-nitroimidazole antibiotic resistance protein NimA from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrNimA) is presented. Many anaerobic human pathogenic bacteria are treated using 5-nitroimidazole-based (5-Ni) antibiotics, a class of inactive prodrugs that contain a nitro group. The nitro group must be activated in an anaerobic one-electron reduction and is therefore dependent on the redox system in the target cells. Antibiotic resistance towards 5-Ni drugs is found to be related to the nim genes (nimA, nimB, nimC, nimD, nimE and nimF), which are proposed to encode a reductase that is responsible for converting the nitro group of the antibiotic into a nonbactericidal amine. A mechanism for the Nim enzyme has been proposed in which two-electron reduction of the nitro group leads to the generation of nontoxic derivatives and confers resistance against these antibiotics. The cofactor was found to be important in the mechanism and was found to be covalently linked to the reactive His71. In this paper, the 1.2 Å atomic resolution crystal structure of the 5-nitroimidazole antibiotic resistance protein NimA from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrNimA) is presented. A planar cofactor is clearly visible and well defined in the electron-density map adjacent to His71, the identification of the cofactor and its properties are discussed

  9. Functional analysis of helicase and three tandem HRDC domains of RecQ in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Li-fen; HUA Xiao-ting; LU Hui-ming; GAO Guan-jun; TIAN Bing; SHEN Bing-hui; HUA Yue-jin

    2006-01-01

    RecQ is a highly conserved helicase necessary for maintaining genome stability in all organisms. Genome comparison showed that a homologue of RecQ in Deinococcus radiodurans designated as DR1289 is a member of RecQ family with unusual domain arrangement: a helicase domain, an RecQ C-terminal domain, and surprisingly three HRDC domain repeats, whose function, however, remains obscure currently. Using an insertion deletion, we discovered that the DRRecQ mutation causes an increase in gamma radiation, hydroxyurea and mitomycine C and UV sensitivity. Using the shuttle plasmid pRADK, we complemented various domains of the D. Radiodurans RecQ (DRRecQ) to the mutant in vivo. Results suggested that both the helicase and helicase-and-Rnase-D-C-terminal (HRDC) domains are essential for complementing several phenotypes. The complementation and biochemical function of DRRecQ variants with different domains truncated in vitro suggested that both the helicase and three HRDC domains are necessary for RecQ functions in D. Radiodurans, while three HRDC domains have a synergistic effect on the whole function. Our finding leads to the hypothesis that the RecF recombination pathway is likely a primary path of double strand break repair in this well-known radioresistant organism.

  10. Metabolic engineering of deinococcus radiodurans based on computational analysis and functional genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Jeremy, S.

    2005-02-02

    The objective of our work is to develop novel computational tools to analyze the Deinococcus radiodurans DNA repair pathways and the influence of the metabolic flux distribution on DNA repair. These tools will be applied to provide insights for metabolic engineering of strains capable of growing under nutrient poor conditions similar to those found in mixed contaminant sites of interest to the DOE. Over the entire grant period we accomplished all our specific aims and were also able to pursue new directions of research. Below, I will list the major accomplishments over the previous 3 years. (1) Performed Monte Carlo Simulations of RecA Mediated Pairing of Homologous DNA Molecules. (2) Developed a statistical approach to study the gene expression data from D. radiodurans. We have been studying the data from John Batista's. (3) Developed an expression profiling technology to generate very accurate and precise expression data. We followed up on results from John Batista's group using this approach. (4) Developed and put online a database for metabolic reconstructions. (5) We have developed and applied new Monte Carlo algorithms that are optimized for studying biological systems. (6) We developed a flux balance model for the D. radiodurans metabolic network

  11. Characterization of a Nudix hydrolase from Deinococcus radiodurans with a marked specificity for (deoxyribonucleoside 5'-diphosphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamiya Hiroyuki

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nudix hydrolases form a protein family whose function is to hydrolyse intracellular nucleotides and so regulate their levels and eliminate potentially toxic derivatives. The genome of the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans encodes 25 nudix hydrolases, an unexpectedly large number. These may contribute to radioresistance by removing mutagenic oxidised and otherwise damaged nucleotides. Characterisation of these hydrolases is necessary to understand the reason for their presence. Here, we report the cloning and characterisation of the DR0975 gene product, a nudix hydrolase that appears to be unique to this organism. Results The DR0975 gene was cloned and expressed as a 20 kDa histidine-tagged recombinant product in Escherichia coli. Substrate analysis of the purified enzyme showed it to act primarily as a phosphatase with a marked preference for (deoxynucleoside 5'-diphosphates (dGDP > ADP > dADP > GDP > dTDP > UDP > dCDP > CDP. Km for dGDP was 110 μM and kcat was 0.18 s-1 under optimal assay conditions (pH 9.4, 7.5 mM Mg2+. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-diphosphate (8-OH-dGDP was also a substrate with a Km of 170 μM and kcat of 0.13 s-1. Thus, DR0975 showed no preference for 8-OH-dGDP over dGDP. Limited pyrophosphatase activity was also observed with NADH and some (diadenosine polyphosphates but no other substrates. Expression of the DR0975 gene was undetectable in logarithmic phase cells but was induced at least 30-fold in stationary phase. Superoxide, but not peroxide, stress and slow, but not rapid, dehydration both caused a slight induction of the DR0975 gene. Conclusion Nucleotide substrates for nudix hydrolases conform to the structure NDP-X, where X can be one of several moieties. Thus, a preference for (dNDPs themselves is most unusual. The lack of preference for 8-OH-dGDP over dGDP as a substrate combined with the induction in stationary phase, but not by peroxide or superoxide, suggests that the

  12. Topoisomerase IB of Deinococcus radiodurans resolves guanine quadruplex DNA structures in vitro

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swathi Kota; Hari S Misra

    2015-12-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans genome contains a large number of guanine repeats interrupted by a few non-guanine bases, termed G motifs. Some of these G motifs were shown forming guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA structure in vitro. How is the formation and relaxation of G4 DNA regulated in the genome of D. radiodurans is not known and is worth investigating. Here, we showed that the topoisomerase lb of D. radiodurans (DraTopolB) could change the electrophoretic mobility of fast migrating intramolecular rec-G4 DNA into the slow migrating species. DraTopolB also reduced the positive ellipticity in circular diachroism (CD) spectra of intramolecular rec-G4 DNA structures stabilized by K+. On the contrary, when DraTopolB is incubated with G-motifs annealed without K+, it showed neither any change in electrophoretic mobility nor was ellipticity of the CD spectra affected. DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase through G4 DNA structure was attenuated in the presence of G4 DNA binding drugs, which was abrogated by DraTopolB. This implies that DraTopolB could destabilize the G4 DNA structure, which is required for G4 drugs binding and stabilization. Camptothecin treatment inhibited DraTopolB activity on intramolecular G4 DNA structures. These results suggested that DraTopolB can relax intramolecular G4 DNA structure in vitro and it may be one such protein that could resolve G4 DNA under normal growth conditions in D. radiodurans.

  13. Residual restoration of DNA lesions in Deinococcus radiodurans mutants indicate presence of a bypass UV-repair process

    OpenAIRE

    Pogoda de la Vega, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    The differing UV-susceptibility and UV-damage repair capability of the Deinococcus radiodurans strains and the hypothesis of a bypass repair system have been investigated. The results obtained provide evidence that UV radiation engenders synergistic effects in combination with other stressors like temperature, humidity, desiccation and vacuum. A post-0.5 h-recovery phase was sufficient for wild-type strain to repair up to 80% of the total induced DNA photoproducts. Nucleotide excision repair ...

  14. In situ real-time evaluation of radiation-responsive promoters in the extremely radioresistant microbe Deinococcus radiodurans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narasimha Anaganti; Bhakti Basu; Shree Kumar Apte

    2016-06-01

    A third generation promoter probe shuttle vector pKG was constructed, using the green fluorescent protein as a reporter, for in situ evaluation of Deinococcal promoter activity in Escherichia coli or Deinococcus radiodurans. The construct yielded zero background fluorescence in both the organisms, in the absence of promoter sequences. Fifteen deinococcal promoters, either harbouring Radiation and Desiccation Response Motif (RDRM) or not, were cloned in vector pKG. Only the RDRM-promoter constructs displayed (i) gamma radiation inducible GFP expression in D. radiodurans, following gamma irradiation, (ii) DdrO-mediated repression of GFP expression in heterologous E. coli, or (iii) abolition in GFP induction following gamma irradiation, in pprI mutant of D. radiodurans. Utility of pKG vector for real-time in situ assessment of deinococcal promoter function was, thus, successfully demonstrated.

  15. Synthesis and extracellular accumulation of silver nanoparticles by employing radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans, their characterization, and determination of bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni RR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasika R Kulkarni, Nayana S Shaiwale, Dileep N Deobagkar, Deepti D Deobagkar Molecular Biology Research Laboratory, Center of Advanced Studies, Department of Zoology, University of Pune, Pune, India Abstract: There has been rapid progress in exploring microorganisms for green synthesis of nanoparticles since microbes show extraordinary diversity in terms of species richness and niche localization. Microorganisms are easy to culture using relatively inexpensive and simple nutrients under varied conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, etc. In this work, Deinococcus radiodurans that possesses the ability to withstand extremely high radiation and desiccation stress has been employed for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs. D. radiodurans was able to accumulate AgNPs in medium under various conditions, and process optimization was carried out with respect to time, temperature, pH, and concentration of silver salt. AgNPs were characterized using UV/vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The microbially synthesized AgNPs exhibited good antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and anti-biofouling activity. Their ability to inhibit growth and proliferation of cancer cell line was also examined, and it could be seen that AgNPs synthesized using D. radiodurans exhibited excellent anticancer activity. Keywords: Deinococcus radiodurans, silver nanoparticles, anticancer, radiation resistance, antibacterial, anti-biofouling 

  16. The effects of space travel to Deinococcus radiodurans and the carotenoid Deinoxanthin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, Petra; De Vera, Jean-Pierre; Bohmeier, Maria; Leuko, Stefan; Boettger, Ute; Hanke, Franziska

    Carotenoids are common, vital components of many organisms. They (1) protect chlorophyll from oxidative damage; (2) create harmless products from toxic singlet oxygen; (3) assist light absorption in chloroplasts as they collect energy in the spectrum where chlorophyll cannot; (4) transport harvested light energy to retinal based proton pumps; and (5) provide structure via the polyene chain to plastid membranes (Winters et al. 2013). More than 600 carotenoids have been isolated from natural sources and there is a rising interest in the use of carotenoids as possible biomarkers for life on other planets. It is therefore of great interest to investigate if the harboring organisms and the associated carotenoids are able to cope with simulated and real space conditions. These questions are addressed by the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) experiment Biology and Mars experiment (BIOMEX). BIOMEX is an interdisciplinary and international space research project and the prime objective is to measure to what extent biomarkers are resistant to and able to maintain their stability under space and Mars-like conditions. Part of the research focusses on the extreme radiation resistant Deinococcus radiodurans and the effect and influence of Deinoxanthin to fitness and survival following exposure to space conditions. Furthermore, the resistance of crude extracted Deinoxanthin to space conditions is of great interest and was tested. As part of environmental verification tests (EVT’s), D. radiodurans and D. radiodurans ΔcrtB (a mutant not able to produce Deinoxanthin) were exposed to several space relevant environmental factors. Interestingly, both strains showed similar survival abilities. To investigate if the carotenoid within the cell took damage, samples were investigated by RAMAN spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a non-destructive technique, the feasibility of this method which is able to detect carotenoids is well known and has been proposed to be onboard the ExoMars mission

  17. PprA Contributes to Deinococcus radiodurans Resistance to Nalidixic Acid, Genome Maintenance after DNA Damage and Interacts with Deinococcal Topoisomerases

    OpenAIRE

    Kota, Swathi; Vijaya K Charaka; Ringgaard, Simon; Matthew K Waldor; Misra, Hari S.

    2014-01-01

    PprA is known to contribute to Deinococcus radiodurans' remarkable capacity to survive a variety of genotoxic assaults. The molecular bases for PprA's role(s) in the maintenance of the damaged D. radiodurans genome are incompletely understood, but PprA is thought to promote D. radiodurans's capacity for DSB repair. PprA is found in a multiprotein DNA processing complex along with an ATP type DNA ligase, and the D. radiodurans toposiomerase IB (DraTopoIB) as well as other proteins. Here, we sh...

  18. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, J K; Kostandarithes, H M; Li, S W; Plymale, A E; Daly, M J

    2000-05-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO(2) and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH(2)DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml(-1)) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms. PMID:10788374

  19. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Kostandarithes, H.M.; Li, S.W.; Plymake, A.E.; Daly, M.J.

    2000-05-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO{sub 2} and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH{sub 2}DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml{sup {minus}1}) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms.

  20. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO2 and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH2DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml-1) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms

  1. PprA, a pleiotropic protein for radioresistance, works through DNA gyrase and shows cellular dynamics during postirradiation recovery in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swathi Kota; Vijaya Kumar Charaka; H. S. Misra

    2014-08-01

    PprA, a pleiotropic protein involved in radioresistance of Deinococcus radiodurans was detected in multiprotein DNA processing complex identified from this bacterium. pprA mutant expressing GFP-PprA could restore its wild type resistance of radiation. Under normal conditions, GFP-PprA expressing cells showed PprA localization on both septum trapped nucleoids (STN) and nucleoids located elsewhere (MCN). Cell exposed to 4 kGy radiation showed nearly 2 h growth lag and during this growth arrest phase, the majority of the cells had GFP-PprA located on MCN. While in late phase (∼120 min) PIR cells, when cells are nearly out of growth arrest, PprA was maximally found with STN. These cells when treated with nalidixic acid showed diffused localization of PprA across the septum. gyrA disruption mutant of D. radiodurans showed growth inhibition, which increased further in gyrA pprA mutant. Interestingly, gyrA mutant showed ∼20-fold less resistance to radiation as compared to wild type, which did increase further in gyrA pprA mutant. These results suggested that PprA localization undergoes a dynamic change during PIR, and its localization on nucleoid near septum and functional interaction with gyrase A might suggest a mechanism that could explain PprA role in genome segregation possibly through topoisomerase II.

  2. An exonuclease I-sensitive DNA repair pathway in Deinococcus radiodurans: a major determinant of radiation resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Hari S; Khairnar, Nivedita P; Kota, Swathi; Shrivastava, Smriti; Joshi, Vasudha P; Apte, Shree K

    2006-02-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1 recovering from acute dose of gamma radiation shows a biphasic mechanism of DNA double-strand break repair. The possible involvement of microsequence homology-dependent, or non-homologous end joining type mechanisms during initial period followed by RecA-dependent homologous recombination pathways has been suggested for the reconstruction of complete genomes in this microbe. We have exploited the known roles of exonuclease I in DNA recombination to elucidate the nature of recombination involved in DNA double-strand break repair during post-irradiation recovery of D. radiodurans. Transgenic Deinococcus cells expressing exonuclease I functions of Escherichia coli showed significant reduction in gamma radiation radioresistance, while the resistance to far-UV and hydrogen peroxide remained unaffected. The overexpression of E. coli exonuclease I in Deinococcus inhibited DNA double-strand break repair. Such cells exhibited normal post-irradiation expression kinetics of RecA, PprA and single-stranded DNA-binding proteins but lacked the divalent cation manganese [(Mn(II)]-dependent protection from gamma radiation. The results strongly suggest that 3' (rho) 5' single-stranded DNA ends constitute an important component in recombination pathway involved in DNA double-strand break repair and that absence of sbcB from deinococcal genome may significantly aid its extreme radioresistance phenotype. PMID:16430702

  3. Effects of Low-Temperature Plasma-Sterilization on Mars Analog Soil Samples Mixed with Deinococcus radiodurans

    OpenAIRE

    Janosch Schirmack; Marcel Fiebrandt; Katharina Stapelmann; Dirk Schulze-Makuch

    2016-01-01

    We used Ar plasma-sterilization at a temperature below 80 °C to examine its effects on the viability of microorganisms when intermixed with tested soil. Due to a relatively low temperature, this method is not thought to affect the properties of a soil, particularly its organic component, to a significant degree. The method has previously been shown to work well on spacecraft parts. The selected microorganism for this test was Deinococcus radiodurans R1, which is known for its remarkable resis...

  4. Structural and mechanistic insight into DNA unwinding by Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelter, Meike; Acajjaoui, Samira; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    DNA helicases are responsible for unwinding the duplex DNA, a key step in many biological processes. UvrD is a DNA helicase involved in several DNA repair pathways. We report here crystal structures of Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD (drUvrD) in complex with DNA in different nucleotide-free and bound states. These structures provide us with three distinct snapshots of drUvrD in action and for the first time trap a DNA helicase undergoing a large-scale spiral movement around duplexed DNA. Our structural data also improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate DNA unwinding by Superfamily 1A (SF1A) helicases. Our biochemical data reveal that drUvrD is a DNA-stimulated ATPase, can translocate along ssDNA in the 3'-5' direction and shows ATP-dependent 3'-5', and surprisingly also, 5'-3' helicase activity. Interestingly, we find that these translocase and helicase activities of drUvrD are modulated by the ssDNA binding protein. Analysis of drUvrD mutants indicate that the conserved β-hairpin structure of drUvrD that functions as a separation pin is critical for both drUvrD's 3'-5' and 5'-3' helicase activities, whereas the GIG motif of drUvrD involved in binding to the DNA duplex is essential for the 5'-3' helicase activity only. These special features of drUvrD may reflect its involvement in a wide range of DNA repair processes in vivo. PMID:24143224

  5. Structural and mechanistic insight into DNA unwinding by Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Stelter

    Full Text Available DNA helicases are responsible for unwinding the duplex DNA, a key step in many biological processes. UvrD is a DNA helicase involved in several DNA repair pathways. We report here crystal structures of Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD (drUvrD in complex with DNA in different nucleotide-free and bound states. These structures provide us with three distinct snapshots of drUvrD in action and for the first time trap a DNA helicase undergoing a large-scale spiral movement around duplexed DNA. Our structural data also improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate DNA unwinding by Superfamily 1A (SF1A helicases. Our biochemical data reveal that drUvrD is a DNA-stimulated ATPase, can translocate along ssDNA in the 3'-5' direction and shows ATP-dependent 3'-5', and surprisingly also, 5'-3' helicase activity. Interestingly, we find that these translocase and helicase activities of drUvrD are modulated by the ssDNA binding protein. Analysis of drUvrD mutants indicate that the conserved β-hairpin structure of drUvrD that functions as a separation pin is critical for both drUvrD's 3'-5' and 5'-3' helicase activities, whereas the GIG motif of drUvrD involved in binding to the DNA duplex is essential for the 5'-3' helicase activity only. These special features of drUvrD may reflect its involvement in a wide range of DNA repair processes in vivo.

  6. The study of the extreme radiation tolerance mechanisms of the bacterium Deinococcus deserti by a functional genomics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genome of Deinococcus deserti, a highly radiation-tolerant bacterium, was analyzed and compared to those of D. radiodurans and D. geothermalis. About 230 proteins are specifically conserved in these 3 species, including IrrE, a regulator protein essential for radio tolerance. D.deserti has several supplementary DNA repair genes, like imuY and dnaE2 (trans-lesion DNA polymerases). Moreover, D. deserti has 3 recA that code for 2 different RecA proteins (RecAC et RecAP). To study these genes, genetic tools were developed for D. deserti. Different results suggest that IrrE, required for the induction of several genes after irradiation, has peptidase activity. The 2 RecA proteins are functional for DNA repair. D. deserti is mutable by UV, which requires ImuY, DnaE2 and RecAC, but not RecAP. (author)

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus grandis, Isolated from Freshwater Fish in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Takefumi; Omoso, Kota; Takeda-Yano, Kiyoko; Katayama, Takeshi; Oono, Yutaka; Narumi, Issay

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus grandis is a radioresistant bacterium isolated from freshwater fish in Japan. Here we reported the draft genome sequence of D. grandis (4.1 Mb), which will be useful for elucidating the common principles of radioresistance in Deinococcus species through the comparative analysis of genomic sequences. PMID:26868384

  8. DR1769, a Protein with N-Terminal Beta Propeller Repeats and a Low-Complexity Hydrophilic Tail, Plays a Role in Desiccation Tolerance of Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S.

    2013-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes five putative quinoproteins. Among these, the Δdr2518 and Δdr1769 mutants became sensitive to gamma radiation. DR2518 with beta propeller repeats in the C-terminal domain was characterized as a radiation-responsive serine/threonine protein kinase in this bacterium. DR1769 contains beta propeller repeats at the N terminus, while its C-terminal domain is a proline-rich disordered structure and constitutes a low-complexity hydrophilic region with aliphatic-proline dipeptide motifs. The Δdr1769 mutant showed nearly a 3-log cycle sensitivity to desiccation at 5% humidity compared to that of the wild type. Interestingly, the gamma radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) resistance in mutant cells also dropped by ∼1-log cycle at 10 kGy and ∼1.5-fold, respectively, compared to those in wild-type cells. But there was no effect of UV (254 nm) exposure up to 800 J · m−2. These cells showed defective DNA double-strand break repair, and the average size of the nucleoid in desiccated wild-type and Δdr1769 cells was reduced by approximately 2-fold compared to that of respective controls. However, the nucleoid in wild-type cells returned to a size almost similar to that of the untreated control, which did not happen in mutant cells, at least up to 24 h postdesiccation. These results suggest that DR1769 plays an important role in desiccation and radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, possibly by protecting genome integrity under extreme conditions. PMID:23794625

  9. Disruption and characterization of the excision repair pathway in the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus SP. BR501

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus sp. BR501, an extremely radioresistant bacterium may contain two nucleotide excision repair pathways: the UV damage endonuclease β (UvsE)-dependent excision repair pathway and the UvrABC-dependent pathway. And the UvsE (coded by dr1819) and UvrABC(Unit A coded by dr1771) are their key enzymes respectively. PCR primers were designed and homologous genes were cloned and disrupted in vitro according to the completely nucleotide sequence of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 genome. Then PCR production was transformed to BR501, and the disrupted mutants (triangle open dr1771, triangle open dr1819 and triangle open dr1771dr1819) were checked and confirmed by homologous recombination. These mutants and the wild type were irradiated by UV light and exposed to the DNA-damaging agents MMC and H2O2. The results showed that these pathways were existed in BR501 and only the two pathway losses could result in increased sensitivity to UV and MMC. (authors)

  10. Effects of Low-Temperature Plasma-Sterilization on Mars Analog Soil Samples Mixed with Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmack, Janosch; Fiebrandt, Marcel; Stapelmann, Katharina; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    We used Ar plasma-sterilization at a temperature below 80 °C to examine its effects on the viability of microorganisms when intermixed with tested soil. Due to a relatively low temperature, this method is not thought to affect the properties of a soil, particularly its organic component, to a significant degree. The method has previously been shown to work well on spacecraft parts. The selected microorganism for this test was Deinococcus radiodurans R1, which is known for its remarkable resistance to radiation effects. Our results showed a reduction in microbial counts after applying a low temperature plasma, but not to a degree suitable for a sterilization of the soil. Even an increase of the treatment duration from 1.5 to 45 min did not achieve satisfying results, but only resulted in in a mean cell reduction rate of 75% compared to the untreated control samples. PMID:27240407

  11. Method for detecting DNA strand breaks in mammalian cells using the Deinococcus radiodurans PprA protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous study, we identified the novel protein PprA that plays a critical role in the radiation resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. In this study, we focussed on the ability of PprA protein to recognize and bind to double-stranded DNA carrying strand breaks, and attempted to visualize radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in mammalian cultured cells by employing PprA protein using an immunofluorescence technique. Increased PprA protein binding to CHO-K1 nuclei immediately following irradiation suggests the protein is binding to DNA strand breaks. By altering the cell permeabilization conditions, PprA protein binding to CHO-K1 mitochondria, which is probably resulted from DNA strand break immediately following irradiation, was also detected. The method developed and detailed in this study will be useful in evaluating DNA damage responses in cultured cells, and could also be applicable to genotoxic tests in the environmental and pharmaceutical fields

  12. Effects of Low-Temperature Plasma-Sterilization on Mars Analog Soil Samples Mixed with Deinococcus radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janosch Schirmack

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We used Ar plasma-sterilization at a temperature below 80 °C to examine its effects on the viability of microorganisms when intermixed with tested soil. Due to a relatively low temperature, this method is not thought to affect the properties of a soil, particularly its organic component, to a significant degree. The method has previously been shown to work well on spacecraft parts. The selected microorganism for this test was Deinococcus radiodurans R1, which is known for its remarkable resistance to radiation effects. Our results showed a reduction in microbial counts after applying a low temperature plasma, but not to a degree suitable for a sterilization of the soil. Even an increase of the treatment duration from 1.5 to 45 min did not achieve satisfying results, but only resulted in in a mean cell reduction rate of 75% compared to the untreated control samples.

  13. Effect of the lexA gene of deinococcus radiodurans on the resistance of escherichia coli to γ-rays and MMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work is to study the effect of lexA gene of Deinococcus radiodurans expressed in Escherichia coli on its resistance to γ-rays and MMC. Recombinant plasmid pZA172 was constructed by cloning the lexA gene of Deinococcus radiodurans into the vector plasmid PUC 19 in the downstream of lacZ promoter. Transfected Escherichia coli strain JM109 (pZA172) was obtained through transfection of JM109 strain with pZA172 by electroporation. Expression of the lexA protein in the IPTG-INDUCED JM109 (Pza172) was checked by SDS-PAGE, and survival curve of the strain was measured using colony formation assay after treatment with different doses of radiation and different concentrations of MMC. After IPTG induction, the lexA protein was significantly expressed in the strain JM109 (pZA172), and the survival rate of the strain was higher than that of the control. The expression of Deinococcus radiodurans lexA gene in Escherichia coli resulted in the increase of sensitivity of the latter to γ-rays and MMC. Mechanism of the effect remains to be further investigated

  14. Expression, purification and preliminary structural analysis of the head domain of Deinococcus radiodurans RecN

    OpenAIRE

    Pellegrino, Simone; Radzimanowski, Jens; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The head domain of the DNA-repair protein RecN from D. radiodurans, composed of the amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, was crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 3.0 Å resolution and the crystals belonged to space group P21.

  15. The structure of amylosucrase from Deinococcus radiodurans has an unusual open active-site topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Lars K; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Remaud-Simeon, Magali;

    2013-01-01

    Amylosucrases (ASes) catalyze the formation of an α-1,4-glucosidic linkage by transferring a glucosyl unit from sucrose onto an acceptor α-1,4-glucan. To date, several ligand-bound crystal structures of wild-type and mutant ASes from Neisseria polysaccharea and Deinococcus geothermalis have been...

  16. Laboratory-evolved mutants of an exogenous global regulator, IrrE from Deinococcus radiodurans, enhance stress tolerances of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingjian Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tolerance of cells toward different stresses is very important for industrial strains of microbes, but difficult to improve by the manipulation of single genes. Traditional methods for enhancing cellular tolerances are inefficient and time-consuming. Recently, approaches employing global transcriptional or translational engineering methods have been increasingly explored. We found that an exogenous global regulator, irrE from an extremely radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans, has the potential to act as a global regulator in Escherichia coli, and that laboratory-evolution might be applied to alter this regulator to elicit different phenotypes for E. coli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To extend the methodology for strain improvement and to obtain higher tolerances toward different stresses, we here describe an approach of engineering irrE gene in E. coli. An irrE library was constructed by randomly mutating the gene, and this library was then selected for tolerance to ethanol, butanol and acetate stresses. Several mutants showing significant tolerances were obtained and characterized. The tolerances of E. coli cells containing these mutants were enhanced 2 to 50-fold, based on cell growth tests using different concentrations of alcohols or acetate, and enhanced 10 to 100-fold based on ethanol or butanol shock experiments. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS assays showed that intracellular ROS levels were sharply reduced for cells containing the irrE mutants. Sequence analysis of the mutants revealed that the mutations distribute cross all three domains of the protein. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first time that an exogenous global regulator has been artificially evolved to suit its new host. The successes suggest the possibility of improving tolerances of industrial strains by introducing and engineering exogenous global regulators, such as those from extremophiles. This new approach can

  17. Regulation of MntH by a dual Mn(II- and Fe(II-dependent transcriptional repressor (DR2539 in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Sun

    Full Text Available The high intracellular Mn/Fe ratio observed within the bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans may contribute to its remarkable resistance to environmental stresses. We isolated DR2539, a novel regulator of intracellular Mn/Fe homeostasis in D. radiodurans. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays (EMSAs revealed that DR2539 binds specifically to the promoter of the manganese acquisition transporter (MntH gene, and that DR0865, the only Fur homologue in D. radiodurans, cannot bind to the promoter of mntH, but it can bind to the promoter of another manganese acquisition transporter, MntABC. β-galactosidase expression analysis indicated that DR2539 acts as a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor. Further sequence alignment analysis revealed that DR2539 has evolved some special characteristics. Site-directed mutagenesis suggested that His98 plays an important role in the activities of DR2539, and further protein-DNA binding activity assays showed that the activity of H98Y mutants decreased dramatically relative to wild type DR2539. Our study suggests that D. radiodurans has evolved a very efficient manganese regulation mechanism that involves its high intracellular Mn/Fe ratio and permits resistance to extreme conditions.

  18. DR2539 is a novel DtxR-like regulator of Mn/Fe ion homeostasis and antioxidant enzyme in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huan [Key Laboratory for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture and Zhejiang Province, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zhejiang Institute of Microbiology, Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Wu, Rongrong [Department of Cardiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Xu, Guangzhi [Key Laboratory for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture and Zhejiang Province, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Fang, Xu; Qiu, Xiaoli; Guo, Hongyin [Zhejiang Institute of Microbiology, Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Tian, Bing, E-mail: tianbing@zju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture and Zhejiang Province, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Hua, Yuejin, E-mail: yjhua@zju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture and Zhejiang Province, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2010-05-28

    Transcriptional regulators of the diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) family control the expression of genes involved in the uptake of iron and manganese, which is not only necessitous nutrients but also was suggested to be essential for intracellular redox cycling of microorganisms. We identified a unique DtxR homologue (DR2539) with special characteristics from Deinococcus radiodurans, which is known for its extreme resistance to radiation and oxidants. The dr2539 mutant showed higher resistance to hydrogen peroxide than the wild-type strain R1. Intracellular catalase activity assay and semiquantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that this DtxR is a negative regulator of catalase (katE). Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR, global transcription profile and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis showed that the DtxR is involved in the regulation of antioxidant system by maintaining the intracellular Mn/Fe ion homeostasis of D. radiodurans. However, unlike the other DtxR homologues, the DtxR of D. radiodurans acts as a negative regulator of a Mn transporter gene (dr2283) and as a positive regulator of Fe-dependent transporter genes (dr1219, drb0125) in D. radiodurans.

  19. Design and construction of deinococcus radiodurans for biodegradation of organic toxins at radioactive DOE waste sites. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'A 1992 survey of DOE waste sites indicates that about 32% of soils and 45% of groundwaters at these sites contain radionuclides and metals plus an organic toxin class. The most commonly reported combinations of these hazardous compounds being radionuclides and metals (e.g., U, Pu, Cs, Pb, Cr, As) plus chlorinated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene), fuel hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene), or polychlorinated biphenyls (e.g., Arochlor 1248). These wastes are some of the most hazardous pollutants and pose an increasing risk to human health as they leach into the environment. The objective of this research is to develop novel organisms, that are highly resistant to radiation and the toxic effects of metals and radionuclides, for in-situ bioremediation of organic toxins. Few organisms exist that are able to remediate such environmental organic pollutants, and among those that can, the bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas are the most characterized. Unfortunately, these bacteria are very radiation sensitive. For example, Pseudomonas spp. is even more sensitive than Escherichia coli and, thus, is not suitable as a bioremediation host in environments subjected to radiation. By contrast, D. radiodurans, a natural soil bacterium, is the most radiation resistant organism yet discovered; it is several thousand times more resistant to ionizing radiation than Pseudomonas. The sophisticated gene transfer and expression systems the authors have developed for D. radiodurans over the last eight years make this organism an ideal candidate for high-level expression of genes that degrade organic toxins, in radioactive environments. The authors ultimate aim is to develop organisms and approaches that will be useful for remediating the large variety of toxic organic compounds found in DOE waste sites that are too radioactive to support other bioremediation organisms. This report summarizes work after the first 6 months of a 3-year project.'

  20. Deinococcus mumbaiensis sp. nov., a radiation-resistant pleomorphic bacterium isolated from Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashidhar, Ravindranath; Bandekar, Jayant R

    2006-01-01

    A radiation-resistant, Gram-negative and pleomorphic bacterium (CON-1) was isolated from a contaminated tryptone glucose yeast extract agar plate in the laboratory. It was red pigmented, nonmotile, nonsporulating, and aerobic, and contained MK-8 as respiratory quinone. The cell wall of this bacterium contained ornithine. The major fatty acids were C16:0, C16:1, C17:0, C18:1 and iso C18:0. The DNA of CON-1 had a G+C content of 70 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that CON-1 exhibited a maximum similarity (94.72%) with Deinococcus grandis. Based on the genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, the bacterium CON-1 was identified as a new species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus mumbaiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of D. mumbaiensis is CON-1 (MTCC 7297(T)=DSM 17424(T)). PMID:16445756

  1. Final Report for Grant No. DE-FG02-01ER63220 "The Dynamics of Cellular Stress Responses in Deinococcus radiodurans"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PI: Michael J. Daly, Ph.D., Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences; Co-Investigators: James K. Fredrickson, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richard D. Smith, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Eugene Koonin, Ph.D., National Center for Biotechnology Information; Jizhong Zhou, Ph.D.\t, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Mary S. Lipton, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-03-06

    Bacteria belonging to the family Deinococcaceae are some of the most ionizing radiation (IR) resistant organisms yet discovered. Deinococcus radiodurans is obligate aerobic, capable of growth under chronic IR (60 Gy/hour) and relatively resistant to many DNA damaging conditions including exposure to desiccation, ultraviolet radiation and hydrogen peroxide. The genes and cellular pathways underlying the survival strategies of D. radiodurans have been under investigation for fifty years. In the last decade, D. radiodurans was subjected to whole-genome sequencing, annotation and comparative analysis, whole-transcriptome and whole-proteome analyses, and numerous DNA repair studies. Collectively, published reports support that the key to survival of D. radiodurans resides in its ability to repair DNA, but the mechanisms responsible remain poorly defined. Unexpectedly, many novel genes implicated in recovery from IR by transcriptome and proteome profiling have had little effect on survival when disrupted, and there is reason to ask if something is missing from classical models of radiation resistance. The prevailing dogma of radiation toxicity has been that the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of radiation are principally the result of DNA damage that occurs during IR. However, in light of available whole genome sequences, one broad observation that is difficult to reconcile with this view is that many organisms that encode a compliment of DNA repair and protection functions are killed at radiation doses that cause little DNA damage. This indicates that there are cellular targets involved in recovery that are more vulnerable to IR damage than DNA. It has been reported that D. radiodurans and other resistant organisms accumulate very high intracellular concentrations of Mn(II), and restricting the amount of Mn(II) during recovery from IR substantially reduced survival of D. radiodurans. At high intracellular concentrations, Mn(II) is known to act as a true catalyst of the

  2. Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of DNA double-strand breakage and repair in Deinococcus radiodurans and a radiosensitive mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double-strand break (dsb) induction and rejoining after ionizing radiation was analysed in Deinococcus radiodurans and a radiosensitive mutant by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Following 2 kGy, migration of genomic DNA (not restriction cleaved) from the plug into the gel was extensive, but was not observed after 90 min postirradiation recovery. By this time D. radiodurans chromosomes were intact, as demonstrated by restoration of the Not I restriction cleavage pattern of 11 bands, which we found to be the characteristic pattern in unirradiated cells. Following the higher exposure of 4 kGy, dsb rejoining took approximately 180 min. twice as long as required following the 2 kGy exposure. Restoration of dsb in the radiosensitive mutant strain 112, which appears to be defective in recombination, was markedly retarded at both 2 and 4 kGy. The Not I restriction fragments of wild-type D. radiodurans and the radiosensitive mutant were identical, totaling 3.58 Mbp, equivalent to 2.36 x 109 daltons per chromosome. (author)

  3. DNA polymerase X from Deinococcus radiodurans implicated in bacterial tolerance to DNA damage is characterized as a short patch base excision repair polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Misra, Hari S

    2009-09-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans R1 genome encodes an X-family DNA repair polymerase homologous to eukaryotic DNA polymerase beta. The recombinant deinococcal polymerase X (PolX) purified from transgenic Escherichia coli showed deoxynucleotidyltransferase activity. Unlike the Klenow fragment of E. coli, this enzyme showed short patch DNA synthesis activity on heteropolymeric DNA substrate. The recombinant enzyme showed 5'-deoxyribose phosphate (5'-dRP) lyase activity and base excision repair function in vitro, with the help of externally supplied glycosylase and AP endonuclease functions. A polX disruption mutant of D. radiodurans expressing 5'-dRP lyase and a truncated polymerase domain was comparatively less sensitive to gamma-radiation than a polX deletion mutant. Both mutants showed higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Excision repair mutants of E. coli expressing this polymerase showed functional complementation of UV sensitivity. These results suggest the involvement of deinococcal polymerase X in DNA-damage tolerance of D. radiodurans, possibly by contributing to DNA double-strand break repair and base excision repair. PMID:19542005

  4. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene encoding the Deinococcus radiodurans surface protein, derived amino acid sequence, and complementary protein chemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, J.; Peters, M.; Lottspeich, F.; Schaefer, W.; Baumeister, W.

    1987-11-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the surface (hexagonally packed intermediate (HPI))-layer polypeptide of Deinococcus radiodurans Sark was determined and found to encode a polypeptide of 1036 amino acids. Amino acid sequence analysis of about 30% of the residues revealed that the mature polypeptide consists of at least 978 amino acids. The N terminus was blocked to Edman degradation. The results of proteolytic modification of the HPI layer in situ and M/sub r/ estimations of the HPI polypeptide expressed in Escherichia coli indicated that there is a leader sequence. The N-terminal region contained a very high percentage (29%) of threonine and serine, including a cluster of nine consecutive serine or threonine residues, whereas a stretch near the C terminus was extremely rich in aromatic amino acids (29%). The protein contained at least two disulfide bridges, as well as tightly bound reducing sugars and fatty acids.

  5. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene encoding the Deinococcus radiodurans surface protein, derived amino acid sequence, and complementary protein chemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the surface (hexagonally packed intermediate [HPI])-layer polypeptide of Deinococcus radiodurans Sark was determined and found to encode a polypeptide of 1036 amino acids. Amino acid sequence analysis of about 30% of the residues revealed that the mature polypeptide consists of at least 978 amino acids. The N terminus was blocked to Edman degradation. The results of proteolytic modification of the HPI layer in situ and M/sub r/ estimations of the HPI polypeptide expressed in Escherichia coli indicated that there is a leader sequence. The N-terminal region contained a very high percentage (29%) of threonine and serine, including a cluster of nine consecutive serine or threonine residues, whereas a stretch near the C terminus was extremely rich in aromatic amino acids (29%). The protein contained at least two disulfide bridges, as well as tightly bound reducing sugars and fatty acids

  6. FrnE, a Cadmium-Inducible Protein in Deinococcus radiodurans, Is Characterized as a Disulfide Isomerase Chaperone In Vitro and for Its Role in Oxidative Stress Tolerance In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Khairnar, Nivedita P.; Joe, Min-Ho; Misra, H. S.; Lim, Sang-Yong; Kim, Dong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1 exposed to a lethal dose of cadmium shows differential expression of a large number of genes, including frnE (drfrnE) and some of those involved in DNA repair and oxidative stress tolerance. The drfrnE::nptII mutant of D. radiodurans showed growth similar to that of the wild type, but its tolerance to 10 mM cadmium and 10 mM diamide decreased by ∼15- and ∼3-fold, respectively. These cells also showed nearly 6 times less resistance to gamma radiation at 12 kGy and ∼2...

  7. Engineered Deinococcus radiodurans R1 with NiCoT genes for bioremoval of trace cobalt from spent decontamination solutions of nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogada, Raghu; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana; Lunavat, Shanti Kumari; Pamarthi, Maruthi Mohan; Rodrigue, Agnes; Vadivelu, Balaji; Phanithi, Prakash-Babu; Gopala, Venkateswaran; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to engineer bacteria for the removal of Co in contaminated effluents. Radioactive cobalt ((60)Co) is known as a major contributor for person-sievert budgetary because of its long half-life and high γ-energy values. Some bacterial Ni/Co transporter (NiCoT) genes were described to have preferential uptake for cobalt. In this study, the NiCoT genes nxiA and nvoA from Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 (RP) and Novosphingobium aromaticivorans F-199 (NA), respectively, were cloned under the control of the groESL promoter. These genes were expressed in Deinococcus radiodurans in reason of its high resistance to radiation as compared to other bacterial strains. Using qualitative real time-PCR, we showed that the expression of NiCoT-RP and NiCoT-NA is induced by cobalt and nickel. The functional expression of these genes in bioengineered D. radiodurans R1 strains resulted in >60 % removal of (60)Co (≥5.1 nM) within 90 min from simulated spent decontamination solution containing 8.5 nM of Co, even in the presence of >10 mM of Fe, Cr, and Ni. D. radiodurans R1 (DR-RP and DR-NA) showed superior survival to recombinant E. coli (ARY023) expressing NiCoT-RP and NA and efficiency in Co remediation up to 6.4 kGy. Thus, the present study reports a remarkable reduction in biomass requirements (2 kg) compared to previous studies using wild-type bacteria (50 kg) or ion-exchanger resins (8000 kg) for treatment of ~10(5)-l spent decontamination solutions (SDS). PMID:26112211

  8. Alliance of proteomics and genomics to unravel the specificities of Sahara bacterium Deinococcus deserti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan de Groot

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To better understand adaptation to harsh conditions encountered in hot arid deserts, we report the first complete genome sequence and proteome analysis of a bacterium, Deinococcus deserti VCD115, isolated from Sahara surface sand. Its genome consists of a 2.8-Mb chromosome and three large plasmids of 324 kb, 314 kb, and 396 kb. Accurate primary genome annotation of its 3,455 genes was guided by extensive proteome shotgun analysis. From the large corpus of MS/MS spectra recorded, 1,348 proteins were uncovered and semiquantified by spectral counting. Among the highly detected proteins are several orphans and Deinococcus-specific proteins of unknown function. The alliance of proteomics and genomics high-throughput techniques allowed identification of 15 unpredicted genes and, surprisingly, reversal of incorrectly predicted orientation of 11 genes. Reversal of orientation of two Deinococcus-specific radiation-induced genes, ddrC and ddrH, and identification in D. deserti of supplementary genes involved in manganese import extend our knowledge of the radiotolerance toolbox of Deinococcaceae. Additional genes involved in nutrient import and in DNA repair (i.e., two extra recA, three translesion DNA polymerases, a photolyase were also identified and found to be expressed under standard growth conditions, and, for these DNA repair genes, after exposure of the cells to UV. The supplementary nutrient import and DNA repair genes are likely important for survival and adaptation of D. deserti to its nutrient-poor, dry, and UV-exposed extreme environment.

  9. Research on pprI gene of deinococcus radiodurans transfered by electroporation in vivo for remedy of the γ-rays radiation injury with mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the effects of pprI gene from Deinococcus radiodurans transfered by electroporation in vivo on acute radiation injury of a mammalian had been investigated and clarified. After injecting the pCMV-HA plasmid into the muscle of mice exposed to γ-rays irradiation, pprI gene was transferred into the cell of mice with electroporation technology in vivo. The deaths of mice, blood cell count and the apoptotic rates of bone marrow cells, spleen cells and thymocyte cells on the 1st, 7th, 14th, 28th, and 35th day after irradiation were investigated. The results show 6 Gy γ-rays can cause acute lethal radiation injury of mice and the death rate of transfer pCMV-HA-pprI group (1/10) is obvious lower than that of radiation group (4/10). Compared with the radiation irradiated group and transfer pCMV-HA group, the leucocyte number and the erythrocyte number in peripheral blood of the mice transferred with pCMV-HA-pprI group is significantly higher on the 7th day after irradiation (p<0.05) meanwhile the platelet number is obvious higher on the 7th day and the 14th day (p<0.05). On the other hand,the lymphocyte ratio get right on the 35th day, the apoptotic rate of spleen cells is significantly lower on the 7th, 14th, and 28th day(p<0.05), the apoptotic rate of thymocytes is significantly lower on the 1st, 7th, 14th and 35th day (p <0.05), the apoptotic rate of bone marrow cells is significantly lower on the 1st, 7th, 14th and 28th day (p<0.05), the apoptotic rates of thymocytes and bone marrow cells are return to normal level on the 28th day after irradiation had also been observed in the group transferred with pCMV-HA-pprI. The result indicates that the pprI gene of Deinococcus radiodurans transfered by electroporation in vivo can prevent and cure the acute radiation injure for animals apparently. (authors)

  10. Isolation and properties of strains of Micrococcus (Deinococcus) radiodurans unable to excise ultraviolet light-induced pyrimidine dimers from DNA: evidence for two excision pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mutant of Deinococcus (formerly Micrococcus) radiodurans sensitive to both the lethal effect of mitomycin C and the mutagenic effect of simple alkylating agents, but having wild-type resistance to UV light, was treated with the mutagen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Three strains were isolated that were UV-sensitive, but had wild-type resistance to the lethal effect of methyl methanesulphonate and all were shown to be unable to excise pyrimidine dimers. The three strains UVS9, UVS25 and UVS78 had, in addition to the mutation in mtcA, mutations in loci designated uvsC, uvsD and uvsE, respectively. When the mutant mtcA gene was replaced by its wild-type allele in all three strains they became UV- and mitomycin C-resistant. On incubating the double mutants UVS9, UVS25 and UVS78 with wild-type DNA about 50% of the transformants selected for UV resistance were mitomycin C-sensitive and about 50% resistant depending on whether the mutant mtcA or the uvsC, D or E genes had been replaced by their wild-type alleles. Although strains mutant singly in uvsC, D or E were UV-resistant the rates of excision of pyrimidine dimers differed between them and was slower in all of them than in the wild-type and strain 302. (author)

  11. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of UDP-galactopyranose mutase from Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UDP-galactopyranose mutase was crystallized using the microbatch method. The crystals diffracted to 2.36 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) catalyzes the interconversion of UDP-galactopyranose and UDP-galactofuranose. A UGM–substrate complex from Deinococccus radiodurans has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained by the microbatch-under-oil method at room temperature. The crystals diffracted to 2.36 Å resolution at the Canadian Light Source The space group was found to be P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 134.0, b = 176.6, c = 221.6 Å. The initial structure solution was determined by molecular replacement using UGM from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a template model

  12. FrnE, a cadmium-inducible protein in Deinococcus radiodurans, is characterized as a disulfide isomerase chaperone in vitro and for its role in oxidative stress tolerance in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Joe, Min-Ho; Misra, H S; Lim, Sang-Yong; Kim, Dong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1 exposed to a lethal dose of cadmium shows differential expression of a large number of genes, including frnE (drfrnE) and some of those involved in DNA repair and oxidative stress tolerance. The drfrnE::nptII mutant of D. radiodurans showed growth similar to that of the wild type, but its tolerance to 10 mM cadmium and 10 mM diamide decreased by ~15- and ~3-fold, respectively. These cells also showed nearly 6 times less resistance to gamma radiation at 12 kGy and ~2-fold-higher sensitivity to 40 mM hydrogen peroxide than the wild type. In trans expression of drFrnE increased cytotoxicity of dithiothreitol (DTT) in the dsbA mutant of Escherichia coli. Recombinant drFrnE showed disulfide isomerase activity and could maintain insulin in its reduced form in the presence of DTT. While an equimolar ratio of wild-type protein could protect malate dehydrogenase completely from thermal denaturation at 42 °C, the C22S mutant of drFrnE provided reduced protection to malate dehydrogenase from thermal inactivation. These results suggested that drFrnE is a protein disulfide isomerase in vitro and has a role in oxidative stress tolerance of D. radiodurans possibly by protecting the damaged cellular proteins from inactivation. PMID:23603741

  13. A major role of the RecFOR pathway in DNA double-strand-break repair through ESDSA in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentchikou, Esma; Servant, Pascale; Coste, Geneviève; Sommer, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    In Deinococcus radiodurans, the extreme resistance to DNA-shattering treatments such as ionizing radiation or desiccation is correlated with its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of chromosomal fragments. The rapid reconstitution of an intact genome is thought to occur through an extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing process (ESDSA) followed by DNA recombination. Here, we investigated the role of key components of the RecF pathway in ESDSA in this organism naturally devoid of RecB and RecC proteins. We demonstrate that inactivation of RecJ exonuclease results in cell lethality, indicating that this protein plays a key role in genome maintenance. Cells devoid of RecF, RecO, or RecR proteins also display greatly impaired growth and an important lethal sectoring as bacteria devoid of RecA protein. Other aspects of the phenotype of recFOR knock-out mutants paralleled that of a DeltarecA mutant: DeltarecFOR mutants are extremely radiosensitive and show a slow assembly of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments, not accompanied by DNA synthesis, and reduced DNA degradation. Cells devoid of RecQ, the major helicase implicated in repair through the RecF pathway in E. coli, are resistant to gamma-irradiation and have a wild-type DNA repair capacity as also shown for cells devoid of the RecD helicase; in contrast, DeltauvrD mutants show a markedly decreased radioresistance, an increased latent period in the kinetics of DNA double-strand-break repair, and a slow rate of fragment assembly correlated with a slow rate of DNA synthesis. Combining RecQ or RecD deficiency with UvrD deficiency did not significantly accentuate the phenotype of DeltauvrD mutants. In conclusion, RecFOR proteins are essential for DNA double-strand-break repair through ESDSA whereas RecJ protein is essential for cell viability and UvrD helicase might be involved in the processing of double stranded DNA ends and/or in the DNA synthesis step of ESDSA. PMID:20090937

  14. A major role of the RecFOR pathway in DNA double-strand-break repair through ESDSA in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esma Bentchikou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In Deinococcus radiodurans, the extreme resistance to DNA-shattering treatments such as ionizing radiation or desiccation is correlated with its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of chromosomal fragments. The rapid reconstitution of an intact genome is thought to occur through an extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing process (ESDSA followed by DNA recombination. Here, we investigated the role of key components of the RecF pathway in ESDSA in this organism naturally devoid of RecB and RecC proteins. We demonstrate that inactivation of RecJ exonuclease results in cell lethality, indicating that this protein plays a key role in genome maintenance. Cells devoid of RecF, RecO, or RecR proteins also display greatly impaired growth and an important lethal sectoring as bacteria devoid of RecA protein. Other aspects of the phenotype of recFOR knock-out mutants paralleled that of a DeltarecA mutant: DeltarecFOR mutants are extremely radiosensitive and show a slow assembly of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments, not accompanied by DNA synthesis, and reduced DNA degradation. Cells devoid of RecQ, the major helicase implicated in repair through the RecF pathway in E. coli, are resistant to gamma-irradiation and have a wild-type DNA repair capacity as also shown for cells devoid of the RecD helicase; in contrast, DeltauvrD mutants show a markedly decreased radioresistance, an increased latent period in the kinetics of DNA double-strand-break repair, and a slow rate of fragment assembly correlated with a slow rate of DNA synthesis. Combining RecQ or RecD deficiency with UvrD deficiency did not significantly accentuate the phenotype of DeltauvrD mutants. In conclusion, RecFOR proteins are essential for DNA double-strand-break repair through ESDSA whereas RecJ protein is essential for cell viability and UvrD helicase might be involved in the processing of double stranded DNA ends and/or in the DNA synthesis step of ESDSA.

  15. The death mechanism of the harmful algal bloom species Alexandrium tamarense induced by algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Harmful algal blooms (HABs cause a variety of deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems, especially the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, which poses a serious threat to marine economic and human health based on releasing paralytic shellfish poison into the environment. The algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35 which can induce growth inhibition on A. tamarense was used to investigate the functional mechanism. The growth status, reactive oxygen species (ROS content, photosynthetic system and the nuclear system of algal cells were determined under algicidal activity. A culture of strain Y35 not only induced overproduction of ROS in algal cells within only 0.5 h of treatment, also decrease the total protein content as well as the response of the antioxidant enzyme. Meanwhile, lipid peroxidation was induced and cell membrane integrity was lost. Photosynthetic pigments including chlorophyll a and carotenoid decreased along with the photosynthetic efficiency being significantly inhibited. At the same time, photosynthesis-related gene expression showed down-regulation. More than, the destruction of cell nuclear structure and inhibition of proliferating cell nuclear antigen related gene expression were confirmed. The potential functional mechanism of the algicidal bacterium on A. tamarense was investigated and provided a novel viewpoint which could be used in HABs control.

  16. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  17. Complete genome sequence of Deinococcus actinosclerus BM2(T), a bacterium with Gamma-radiation resistance isolated from soil in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung Kyum; Kang, Myung Suk; Lee, Do Hee; Joo, Eun Sun; Kim, Eun Bit; Jeon, Seon Hwa; Jung, Hee-Young; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj

    2016-04-20

    A Gram-positive, short-rod shaped and non-motile bacterium Deinococcus actinosclerus BM2(T), resistant to gamma and UV radiation, was isolated from a soil sample collected in South Korea. Strain BM2(T) showed high resistance to gamma radiation with D10 value of 9 kGy. The complete genome of D. actinosclerus BM2(T) consists of a single chromosome (3,264,334bp). The genome features showed the presence of intracellular proteases that help to eliminate radiation-induced ROS during recovery from ionizing radiation damage. PMID:26953742

  18. Deinococcus antarcticus sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ning; Li, Hui-Rong; Yuan, Meng; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Yong

    2015-02-01

    A pink-pigmented, non-motile, coccoid bacterial strain, designated G3-6-20(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected in the Grove Mountains, East Antarctica. This strain was resistant to UV irradiation (810 J m(-2)) and slightly more sensitive to desiccation as compared with Deinococcus radiodurans. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that the organism belongs to the genus Deinococcus. Highest sequence similarities were with Deinococcus ficus CC-FR2-10(T) (93.5 %), Deinococcus xinjiangensis X-82(T) (92.8 %), Deinococcus indicus Wt/1a(T) (92.5 %), Deinococcus daejeonensis MJ27(T) (92.3 %), Deinococcus wulumuqiensis R-12(T) (92.3 %), Deinococcus aquaticus PB314(T) (92.2 %) and Deinococcus radiodurans DSM 20539(T) (92.2 %). Major fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c), anteiso-C15 : 0 and C16 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain G3-6-20(T) was 63.1 mol%. Menaquinone 8 (MK-8) was the predominant respiratory quinone. Based on its phylogenetic position, and chemotaxonomic and phenotypic characteristics, strain G3-6-20(T) represents a novel species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus antarcticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is G3-6-20(T) ( = DSM 27864(T) = CCTCC AB 2013263(T)). PMID:25351880

  19. Separation and characterization of a radioresistant bacterium strain BR501 from radiation polluted soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain BR501, an extremely radioresistant bacterium isolated from the radioactive experimental soil. The optimal temperature for the growth of strain BR501 was 30 degree C. The UV radiation and γ-radiation survival curves showed the strain BR501 had highly radio-resistance. The strain was sensitive to Amp, Km, Rif, Cm and Tc. The 16S rDNA of the BR501 shared highly similarity to those of species in genus Deinococcus, especially to that of D.radiodurans r1(99%). Based on the 16S rDNA sequence analysis and the phenotype characteristics, the BR501 belongs to the evolution branch of Deinococcus and was designated Deinococcus sp. BR501. (authors)

  20. Study of resistance of D. radiodurans to the combined action of ionizing radiation with an electric or magnetic fields exogenous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The key goal in radiotherapy is to maximize damages in a tumor while minimizing them in nearby health tissues. Several strategies have been worked out toward the enhancement of cellular radiosensitivity, as the use of exogenous fields. It is studied in this work the resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to the combined action of conventional and non conventional radiations, with external agents (electric and magnetic fields). D. radiodurans is a bacterium having an extraordinary ability to cope with lethal and mutagenic agents harmful to the DNA, particularly ionizing radiations as gammas and UV. Given its high radioresistance and fast growing, D. radiodurans has been used as solid tumors simulators. Peculiarities associated with radioresistance at the exponential and stationary phases were delineated from growing curves. By measuring survival curves information on radiosensitivity was obtained. In gamma irradiation D. radiodurans exhibited repairing shoulders of 2 and 8 kGy at the exponential and stationary phases, respectively. When gamma irradiations were combined with expositions to the electric field the repairing shoulders were reduced to 1 and 4 kGy at the exponential and stationary phases, respectively. Radioresistance was similar in both growing phases when the number of cells were approximately equalized in these two processes. On the other hand, when gamma irradiations were combined with expositions to the magnetic field the repairing shoulders were reduced to 4 and 6 kGy at the exponential and stationary phases, respectively. In irradiations with electron beams the repairing shoulder at the exponential phase was totally depleted, while at the stationary phase it was only 1 kGy. The findings of this work revealed new and important information on the radioresistance of D. radiodurans, while providing hints to the improvement of radiotherapy protocols in association with exogenous physical agents. (author)

  1. Deinococcus ficus sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of Ficus religiosa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-An; Kämpfer, Peter; Arun, A B; Shen, Fo-Ting; Huber, Birgit; Rekha, P D; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2006-04-01

    A pale-pink strain (CC-FR2-10T) from the rhizosphere of the sacred tree Ficus religiosa L. in Taiwan was investigated by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The cells were Gram-positive, rod-shaped and non-spore-forming. Phylogenetic analyses using the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that the organism belongs to the genus Deinococcus, the highest sequence similarities being found with Deinococcus grandis (96.1 %), Deinococcus radiodurans (94.3 %), Deinococcus radiopugnans (93.2 %), Deinococcus indicus (93.0 %), Deinococcus proteolyticus (92.5 %), Deinococcus murrayi (92.4 %) and Deinococcus geothermalis (90.7 %). The DNA-DNA relatedness with respect to D. grandis DSM 3963T was 17.9 %. Chemotaxonomic data revealed that strain CC-FR2-10T contains only menaquinone MK-8 as the respiratory quinone, unknown phosphoglycolipids as the predominant polar lipids and 16 : 1omega7c, 17 : 1omega8c and 17 : 1omega9c iso as the predominant fatty acids. The biochemical and chemotaxonomic properties demonstrate that strain CC-FR2-10T represents a novel species, for which the name Deinococcus ficus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-FR2-10T (=CCUG 51391T [corrected] = CIP 108832T). PMID:16585695

  2. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-23

    Progress is briefly summarized in these areas: ionizing radiation resistance in bacteria; a hypothesis regarding ionizing radiation resistance emerging for bacterial cells; transcriptome analysis of irradiated D. radiodurans and Shewanella oneidensis; the role of metal reduction in Mn-dependnet Deinococcal species; and engineered Deinococcus strains as models for bioremediation. Key findings are also reported regarding protein oxidation as a possible key to bacterial desiccation resistance, and the whole-genome sequence of the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis.

  3. Comment on "Stress induction in the bacteria Shewanella oneidensis and Deinococcus radiodurans in response to below-background ionizing radiation", Castillo, et al. Int. J. Rad. Biol., 2015; Early Online DOI:10.3109/09553002.2015.1062571

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2015-01-01

    Castillo, et al. report hormesis by background levels of radiation, at which there is $< 10^{-3}$ ionization per bacterium in a replication time. This suggests radiation products accumulate in the growth medium over much longer times. Experiments are proposed to test this hypothesis.

  4. Genetic Engineering of a Radiation-Resistant Bacterium for Biodegradation of Mixed Wastes. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous mixed low level wastes (MLLW) containing radionuclides, solvents, and/or heavy metals represent a serious current and future problem for DOE environmental management and cleanup. In order to provide low-cost treatment alternatives under mild conditions for such contained wastes, we have proposed to use the radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans. This project has focused on developing D. radiodurans strains for dual purpose processes: cometabolic treatment of haloorganics and other solvents and removal of heavy metals from waste streams in an above-ground reactor system. The characteristics of effective treatment strains that must be attained are: (a) high biodegradative and metal binding activity; (b) stable treatment characteristics in the absence of selection and in the presence of physiological stress; (c) survival and activity under harsh chemical conditions, including radiation. The result of this project has been a suite of strains with high biodegradative capabilities that are candidates for pilot stage treatment systems. In addition, we have determined how to create conditions to precipitate heavy metals on the surface of the bacterium, as the first step towards creating dual-use treatment strains for contained mixed wastes of importance to the DOE. Finally, we have analyzed stress response in this bacterium, to create the foundation for developing treatment processes that maximize degradation while optimizing survival under high stress conditions

  5. Genetic Engineering of a Radiation-Resistant Bacterium for Biodegradation of Mixed Wastes--Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary E. Lidstrom

    2003-12-26

    Aqueous mixed low level wastes (MLLW) containing radionuclides, solvents, and/or heavy metals represent a serious current and future problem for DOE environmental management and cleanup. In order to provide low-cost treatment alternatives under mild conditions for such contained wastes, we have proposed to use the radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans. This project has focused on developing D. radiodurans strains for dual purpose processes: cometabolic treatment of haloorganics and other solvents and removal of heavy metals from waste streams in an above-ground reactor system. The characteristics of effective treatment strains that must be attained are: (a) high biodegradative and metal binding activity; (b) stable treatment characteristics in the absence of selection and in the presence of physiological stress; (c) survival and activity under harsh chemical conditions, including radiation. The result of this project has been a suite of strains with high biodegradative capabilities that are candidates for pilot stage treatment systems. In addition, we have determined how to create conditions to precipitate heavy metals on the surface of the bacterium, as the first step towards creating dual-use treatment strains for contained mixed wastes of importance to the DOE. Finally, we have analyzed stress response in this bacterium, to create the foundation for developing treatment processes that maximize degradation while optimizing survival under high stress conditions.

  6. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  7. 一株新的耐辐射菌Deinococcus guangxiensis sp.nov.的分离鉴定及耐辐射特性分析%Isolation and identification of a new radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus guangxiensis sp.nov. and analysis of its radioresistant character

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙继华; 申佩弘; 晁红军; 武波

    2009-01-01

    [目的]从广西大学辐射中心辐射源附近被常年辐射的水样中分离并鉴定出新的耐辐射菌株,并对其耐辐射特性进行研究.[方法]通过GBM培养基分离培养得到一株新的耐辐射菌株,命名为WGR700T.应用生理生化试验,脂肪酸含量,(G+C)mol%含量测定以及16S rRNA序列同源性分析等方法对菌株进行鉴定,同时对WGRT00T的耐辐射特性进行分析.[结果]菌株WGR700T为革兰氏阴性,杆状,没有鞭毛,不能运动,厌氧并能产生红色素.最佳生长温度和PH分别为37~C和pH7.0,主要的呼吸醌是MK-8,细胞壁内还有鸟氨酸,主要脂肪酸为16:lω7c,16:0,15:lω6c,iso.15:0和iso-17:0.G+C含量为64.7mol%.菌株WGR700T具有很强的uV(>728 J/m2)和电离辐射抗性(Dm=9.8 kGy).菌株WGR700T和奇异球菌属(Deinococcus)内其它菌种16S rRNA有很高的相似性(87.1-95.6%).[结论]根据16S rRNA及生理生化特征区别,菌株WGR700T应是奇异球菌属的一个新种,命名为Deinococcus guangxiensis sp.nov.模式菌株为WGR700T(=CGMCCI.7045T:CICC 10360T=JCM 15082T).%[Objective] To isolate and identify a new ionizing-radiation resistant strain capable of surviving under highly ionizing radiation conditions as UV and gamol/La radiation and to characterize its radioresistant properties. [Methods] The isolates were sampled from Radiation Centre of Guangxi University, Nanning, China, and the medium used for isolation and cultivation of the bacterium was General Bacterial Medium (GBM). The new ionizing-radiation resistant strain WGR700T was identified by its morphology, biochemical and physiological characteristics, fatty acids, G+ C content of DNA, UV and gamol/La radiation resistance and 16S rRNA gene sequence homology. [Results] The strain WGR700T is of rod-shape, Gram-negative, non- spore-forming, non motile, aerobic and red-pigmented. The optimum temperature and pH for strain WGR700T growth is 37℃ and pH7.0, respectively. The predominant respiratory quinone is MK-8

  8. Genetic engineering of a radiation-resistant bacterium for biodegradation of mixed wastes. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Because of their tolerance to very high levels of ionizing radiation, members of the genus Deinococcus have received considerable attention over the past years. The type species of the genus, Deinococcus radiodurans, has been studied extensively in several labs. Although researchers are only beginning to understand the mechanisms by which this Gram-positive bacterium is able to repair massive DNA damage after radiation dosages as high as 5 Mrad, it has become evident that its recombination machinery has several unique characteristics (1--4). The aim of the present studies is to engineer D. radiodurans into a detoxifier for bioremediation of complex waste mixtures, containing heavy metals, halo-organics and radionuclides, making use of its ability to be biologically active in environments where they will be exposed to high levels of radiation. For that purpose, the authors aim to clone and express several broad spectrum oxygenases and heavy metal resistance determinants, and test survival and activities of these strains in artificial mixtures of contaminants, designed to simulate DOE mixed waste streams. This report summarizes work after 0.5 year of a 3-year project. The initial studies have focused on the development of an insertional expression system for D. radiodurans R1. This effort has involved two parts, namely: (1) promoter analysis, and (2) development of insertion systems. Several studies have shown that the expression signals used by D. radiodurans differ considerably from those found in other bacteria. Although D. radiodurans contains a typical eubacterial RNA polymerase core enzyme (based on TBLASTN searches on the genome sequence), Escherichia coli promoters are not recognized in D. radiodurans and vice versa (5). To expand the basic understanding of the requirements for transcription, and to optimize expression of (heterologous) genes, they will follow two strategies. First, a promoter-probe vector is being developed for the selection of promoter

  9. Major soluble proteome changes in Deinococcus deserti over the earliest stages following gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus deserti VCD115 has been isolated from Sahara surface sand. This radio-tolerant bacterium represents an experimental model of choice to understand adaptation to harsh conditions encountered in hot arid deserts. We analysed the soluble proteome dynamics in this environmentally relevant model after exposure to 3 kGy gamma radiation, a non-lethal dose that generates massive DNA damages. For this, cells were harvested at different time lapses after irradiation and their soluble proteome contents have been analysed by 2-DE and mass spectrometry. In the first stage of the time course we observed accumulation of DNA damage response protein DdrB (that shows the highest fold change ∼11), SSB, and two different RecA proteins (RecAP and RecAC). Induction of DNA repair protein PprA, DNA damage response protein DdrD and the two gyrase subunits (GyrA and GyrB) was also detected. A response regulator of the SarP family, a type II site-specific deoxyribonuclease and a putative N-acetyltransferase are three new proteins found to be induced. In a more delayed stage, we observed accumulation of several proteins related to central metabolism and protein turn-over, as well as helicase UvrD and novel forms of both gyrase subunits differing in terms of isoelectric point and molecular weight. Conclusions: Post-translational modifications of GyrA (N-terminal methionine removal and acetylation) have been evidenced and their significance discussed. We found that the Deide-02842 restriction enzyme, which is specifically found in D. deserti, is a new potential member of the radiation/desiccation response regulon, highlighting the specificities of D. deserti compared to the D. radiodurans model. (authors)

  10. Major soluble proteome changes in Deinococcus deserti over the earliest stages following gamma-ray irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedieu Alain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deinococcus deserti VCD115 has been isolated from Sahara surface sand. This radiotolerant bacterium represents an experimental model of choice to understand adaptation to harsh conditions encountered in hot arid deserts. We analysed the soluble proteome dynamics in this environmentally relevant model after exposure to 3 kGy gamma radiation, a non-lethal dose that generates massive DNA damages. For this, cells were harvested at different time lapses after irradiation and their soluble proteome contents have been analysed by 2-DE and mass spectrometry. Results In the first stage of the time course we observed accumulation of DNA damage response protein DdrB (that shows the highest fold change ~11, SSB, and two different RecA proteins (RecAP and RecAC. Induction of DNA repair protein PprA, DNA damage response protein DdrD and the two gyrase subunits (GyrA and GyrB was also detected. A response regulator of the SarP family, a type II site-specific deoxyribonuclease and a putative N-acetyltransferase are three new proteins found to be induced. In a more delayed stage, we observed accumulation of several proteins related to central metabolism and protein turn-over, as well as helicase UvrD and novel forms of both gyrase subunits differing in terms of isoelectric point and molecular weight. Conclusions Post-translational modifications of GyrA (N-terminal methionine removal and acetylation have been evidenced and their significance discussed. We found that the Deide_02842 restriction enzyme, which is specifically found in D. deserti, is a new potential member of the radiation/desiccation response regulon, highlighting the specificities of D. deserti compared to the D. radiodurans model.

  11. Comparative proteomics reveals key proteins recruited at the nucleoid of Deinococcus after irradiation-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nucleoids of radiation-resistant Deinococcus species show a high degree of compaction maintained after ionizing irradiation. We identified proteins recruited after irradiation in nucleoids of Deinococcus radiodurans and Deinococcus deserti by means of comparative proteomics. Proteins in nucleoid-enriched fractions from unirradiated and irradiated Deinococcus were identified and semi quantified by shotgun proteomics. The ssDNA-binding protein SSB, DNA gyrase subunits GyrA and GyrB, DNA topoisomerase I, RecA recombinase, UvrA excinuclease, RecQ helicase, DdrA, DdrB, and DdrD proteins were found in significantly higher amounts in irradiated nucleoids of both Deinococcus species. We observed, by immunofluorescence microscopy, the subcellular localization of these proteins in D. radiodurans, showing for the first time the recruitment of the DdrD protein into the D. radiodurans nucleoid. We specifically followed the kinetics of recruitment of RecA, DdrA, and DdrD to the nucleoid after irradiation. Remarkably, RecA proteins formed irregular filament-like structures 1 h after irradiation, before being redistributed throughout the cells by 3 h post-irradiation. Comparable dynamics of DdrD localization were observed, suggesting a possible functional interaction between RecA and DdrD. Several proteins involved in nucleotide synthesis were also seen in higher quantities in the nucleoids of irradiated cells, indicative of the existence of a mechanism for orchestrating the presence of proteins involved in DNA metabolism in nucleoids in response to massive DNA damage. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD00196. (authors)

  12. Proteomics of post-irradiation recovery in D. radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans is bestowed with an extraordinary DNA repair ability that renders it virtually resistant to all known forms of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiations (10 kGy of gamma rays), UV (1 kJ/m2) or weeks of desiccation etc. The genome of D. radiodurans encodes a unique combination of DNA repair pathways such as prokaryotic type RecFOR mediated homologous recombination (HR) and nucleotide/base excision repair along with eukaryotic type strand annealing (SA) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), but is devoid of universal prokaryotic DNA repair pathways such as RecBCD mediated HR, photo-reactivation and SOS response. Collective evidence obtained so far from multiple approaches, have indicated (i) that all genes essential for DNA repair are not necessarily induced following radiation stress (ii) early RecA independent DNA assembly occurs, and (iii) absolute necessity of RecA dependent HR for final genome restitution. The 6 kGy gamma irradiation inducible proteome dynamics were mapped during the post-irradiation growth arrest phase by 2D protein electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. Radiation inducible expression of at least 33 proteins was evident in the first 1h of post irradiation recovery

  13. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing Radiation (IR) Resistance in Bacteria. Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR) and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus and Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR

  14. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.

    2006-05-01

    Ionizing Radiation (IR) Resistance in Bacteria. Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR) and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus & Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella & Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR.

  15. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Daly, Michael J.

    2006-06-01

    Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR), desiccation, and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus & Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella & Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR (http://cfyn.ifas.ufl.edu/radiation.pdf).

  16. RNA-Seq analysis of D. radiodurans find non coding RNAs expressed in response to radiation stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In bacteria discovery of functional RNA molecules that are not translated into protein, noncoding RNAs, became possible with advent of Next Generation Sequencing technology. Bacterial non coding RNAs are typically 50-300 nucleotides long and work as internal signals controlling various levels of gene expression. Deep sequencing of total cellular RNA captures all coding and noncoding transcripts with their differential levels of expression in the transcriptome. It provides a powerful approach to study bacterial gene expression and mechanisms of gene regulation. We subjected the 3 h transcriptome of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 cells post exposure to 6 KGy gamma radiation to 100 x 2 cycles of deep sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq 2000 to look for ncRNA transcripts. Bioinformatics pipeline for analysis and interpretation of RNA Seq data was done in house using Softwares available in public domains. Our sequence data aligned with 21 putative ncRNAs expressed in the intergenic regions of annotated genome of D radiodurans. Verification of 2 ncRNA candidates and 3 transcription factor genes by Real Time PCR confirmed presence of these transcripts in the 3 h transcriptome sequenced by us. Any relationship between ncRNAs and control of radiation induced gene expression in D radiodurans can be proved only after specific gene knock outs in future. (author)

  17. Adhesion,Presence and Antifouling of Deinococcus geothermalis in Paper Machine Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Peltola, Minna

    2011-01-01

    This thesis has two items: biofouling and antifouling in paper industry. Biofouling means unwanted microbial accumulation on surfaces causing e.g. disturbances in industrial processes, contamination of medical devices or of water distribution networks. Antifouling focuses on preventing accumulation of the biofilms in undesired places. Deinococcus geothermalis is a pink-pigmented, thermophilic bacterium, and extremely resistant towards radiation, UV-light and desiccation and known as a bi...

  18. The in vivo association of manganese with the chromosome of Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extremely high levels of paramagnetic manganese (Mn2+) which quench phosphorescent reactions have been found to inhibit the formation of thymine-containing dimers in M. radiodurans. Lowering the concentration of Mn2+ in the culture medium resulted in a lower intracellular concentration of Mn2+, an increase in the UV-sensitivity of this bacterium, and a larger photochemical yield of thymine-containing dimers. High levels of paramagnetic Mn2+ were not found in other test organisms which are more sensitive to UV-irradiation. One interpretation of this data is that in Micrococcus radiodurans Mn2++ may bind to the chromosome and thereby reduce the photochemical yield of thymine-containing dimers. (author)

  19. Mechanism for accurate, protein-assisted DNA annealing by Deinococcus radiodurans DdrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji N; Weiss, Yoni M; Junop, Murray S

    2016-04-19

    Accurate pairing of DNA strands is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). How cells achieve accurate annealing when large regions of single-strand DNA are unpaired has remained unclear despite many efforts focused on understanding proteins, which mediate this process. Here we report the crystal structure of a single-strand annealing protein [DdrB (DNA damage response B)] in complex with a partially annealed DNA intermediate to 2.2 Å. This structure and supporting biochemical data reveal a mechanism for accurate annealing involving DdrB-mediated proofreading of strand complementarity. DdrB promotes high-fidelity annealing by constraining specific bases from unauthorized association and only releases annealed duplex when bound strands are fully complementary. To our knowledge, this mechanism provides the first understanding for how cells achieve accurate, protein-assisted strand annealing under biological conditions that would otherwise favor misannealing. PMID:27044084

  20. Studies on the Mechanism of Radiation Resistance in Micrococcus Radiodurans and its Sensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient and accurate repair of radiation-induced lesions in M. radiodurans was investigated as to the cause of its extreme radioresistance. The cells were made permeable to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate by treatment with non-ionic detergent, Triton X-100. After irradiation with 2 krad gamma rays more than 80% of the single-strand scissions were rejoined in the permeable cells within 10 min at 37°C. This fast repair process requires the presence of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates and NAD. However, rejoining of DNA strand scission was incomplete after prolonged incubation in the permeable cells. This suggests that alternate repair reaction(s) is necessary for complete recovery. The other type of radiation lesion was found by postirradiation incubation at non-permissive temperature, which markedly sensitizes this bacterium to radiation. Postincubation at this temperature also sensitizes the cells to chemicals that damage DNA. The extreme radioresistance of this bacterium was also lost by mutation and an isolated radiosensitive mutant showed almost the same radiosensitivity as E. coli K12 or B/r. These results are discussed in connection with the extreme radioresistance of M. radiodurans. (author)

  1. Studies on the mechanism of radiation resistance in Micrococcus radiodurans and its sensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient and accurate repair of radiation-induced lesions in M. radiodurans was investigated as to the cause of its extreme radioresistance. The cells were made permeable to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate by treatment with non-ionic detergent, Triton X-100. After irradiation with 2 krad gamma rays more than 80% of the single-strand scissions were rejoined in the permeable cells within 10 min at 370C. This fast repair process requires the presence of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates and NAD. However, rejoining of DNA strand scission was incomplete after prolonged incubation in the permeable cells. This suggests that alternate repair reaction(s) is necessary for complete recovery. The other type of radiation lesion was found by post-irradiation incubation at non-permissive temperature, which markedly sensitizes this bacterium to radiation. Postincubation at this temperature also sensitizes the cells to chemicals that damage DNA. The extreme radioresistance of this bacterium was also lost by mutation and an isolated radiosensitive mutant showed almost the same radiosensitivity as E. coli K12 or B/r. These results are discussed in connection with the extreme radioresistance of M. radiodurans. (author)

  2. The mechanisms of Micrococcus radiodurans radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern representations on molecular mechanisms of Micrococcus radiodurans viability under the effect of ionizing radiation have been considered. Factors conditioning a high level of micrococcus cell radiostability have been analyzed: peculiarities of structure of a cell wall, DNA, membranes; excess of genetic information; multiplicity of DNA implantation points to a membrane; high level of antioxidation and antiradical systems. It has been shown that on efficiency of accurate, properly balanced system of DNA repair combined with above Micrococcus radiodurant properties provide a high microorganism radioresistance

  3. Understanding extreme resistance to DNA damage in D. radiodurans: genomic inputs and proteomic insights into extraordinary DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans, a model extremophile, tolerates very high doses of virtually all DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiations, UV, desiccation or mutagenic chemicals. It repairs its damaged DNA, from hundreds of fragments to intact chromosome, with absolute fidelity. Its genome displays acquisition of eukaryotic DNA repair pathways and deletion of universal prokaryotic DNA repair pathways, along with several ORFs that encode proteins with unusual domain combinations, expanded gene families and uncharacterized proteins. Yet, it is one of the most DNA repair efficient organism known today. To understand gamma radiation responsive global modifications in the proteome, respective proteome profiles were resolved by 2D electrophoresis and the gamma radiation responsive differentially expressed proteins were identified by MALDI mass spectrometry. Exposure to gamma irradiation set in immediate growth arrest, a phase during which the organism reassembles its shattered genome and recycles the radiation-damaged biomolecules. A proteomic investigation of this phase revealed highest up-regulation of DNA repair proteins involved in strand annealing, nucleotide excision repair, non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination pathways. Another set of differentially expressed proteins were metabolic enzymes that appeared to modulate metabolism to utilize stored glycogen and slow down amino acid biosynthesis. Oxidative stress alleviation machinery, which was constitutively present in abundance, displayed minor modulation. The gamma radiation responsive proteome modulations emphasize focused multi-factorial DNA repair and metabolic modulations, during post-irradiation recovery. (author)

  4. Repair of double-strand breaks in Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micrococcus radiodurans has been shown to sustain double-strand breaks in its DNA after exposure to x-radiation. Following sublethal doses of x-rays (200 krad in oxygen or less), the cells were able to repair these breaks, and an intermediate fast-sedimenting DNA component seemed to be involved in the repair process

  5. Effect of speciation of uranium on localisation of uranyl phosphate precipitate in recombinant D. radiodurans expressing PhoN/PhoK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphatase mediated enzymatic bioprecipitation of uranium (U) as insoluble uranyl phosphate is an attractive bioremediation strategy. Earlier PhoN (a non specific acid phosphatase) was cloned and over-expressed in Deinococcus radiodurans to achieve bioprecipitation of U from acidic to neutral conditions. Similarly, a PhoK gene encoding an alkaline phosphatase has now been cloned and overexpressed in this microbe for bioprecipitation of U from alkaline waste solutions. In case of Deino-PhoK strain, a high phosphatase activity was detected in the spent medium, while Deino-PhoN cells did not show any activity in the spent medium, suggesting that PhoK is extracellular in nature while PhoN is not. Deino-PhoN cells, when incubated with 1 mM uranyl nitrate (pH 6.8) and 5 mM β-GP as substrate, showed cell surface bound spicule-like precipitate in SEM/TEM. In contrast Deino-PhoK cells, exposed to 1 mM uranyl carbonate (pH 9) and 5 mM β-GP, showed extracellular precipitate in solution. Localisation of uranyl phosphate precipitate depended on the precipitation conditions and Deino-PhoN cells displayed distinct extracellular precipitate crystals with uranyl carbonate (pH 9), while Deino-PhoK cells clearly displayed cell surface bound crystals of uranyl phosphate, when employed with uranyl nitrate (pH 6.8). These results suggest that differential localisation of precipitate may not be affected by localisation of the enzyme alone, but is mainly governed by the species of uranium being used (which is also dependent on pH). This work provides a graphic understanding of pH-dependent interactions of uranium with D. radiodurans cell surfaces. (author)

  6. γ-irradiated ribosomes from Micrococcus radiodurans in a cell-free protein synthesizing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    γ-irradiation inactivation of isolated ribosomes of Micrococcus radiodurans was studied by examining poly U directed synthesis of polyphenylalanine. Ribosomes of M. radiodurans did not show significant γ-radiation sensitivity up to a dose of approx. 11.6 k Gy. Cells of M. radiodurans take up more magnesium than E. coli cells under the same conditions. The magnesium content of ribosomes of M. radiodurans was 18% higher than that of E.coli ribosomes. A possible relation between Mg2+-content and γ-resistance is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Detection of DNA strand breaks in mammalian cells using the radioresistant bacterium PprA protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously found that the PprA protein from Deinococcus radiodurans possesses ability to recognize DNA carrying strand breaks. In the present study, we attempted to visualize radiation-induced DNA strand breaks with PprA protein using immunofluorescence technique to elucidate the DNA damage response mechanism in mammalian cultured cells. As a result, colocalization of Cy2 and DAPI fluorescent signals was observed. This observation suggests that DNA strand breaks in the nucleus of CHO-K1 cells were effectively detected using the PprA protein. The amount of DNA strand breaks (integrated density of Cy2 fluorescent signals) was increased with the increase in the radiation dose. (author)

  8. Separation of DNA-dependent polymerate activities in Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA polymerase activities in Micrococcus radiodurans were separated into two fractions after purification more than 2000 fold. They differ in pH optimum and residual activities in the absence of a full deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates complement. NAD partly inhibited one of the activities. Both activities were eluted as a single peak on gel filtration and sedimented at the same rate on glycerol gradient centrifugation. Molecular weight 140000 was calculated from Stokes radius and sedimentation constant. Deoxyribonuclease activity was detected on one of the polymerase activities which preferentially degraded double-stranded DNA. Priming activity of nicked DNA was reduced by γ-radiation. These results have been related to the possible roles in repair synthesis in vivo or DNA synthesis in permeable cells of M. radiodurans

  9. Loss of characteristic radiation resistance by mutation of Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exceptional radioresistance of M. radiodurans was lost by a mutation, and the isolated mutant, KH840, had almost the same radiosensitivity as E. coli K12 AB1157 or B/r. DNA-strand scissions in this mutant were rejoined partly during post-irradiation incubation. Reduced DNA polymerizing activity and extensive degradation of the product was observed in vitro in the crude extract from the sensitive strain. The lower repair capability is not accompanied by the reduced transformation frequency

  10. Ionizing radiation damage in Micrococcus radiodurans cell wall: release of polysaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublethal 60Co γ-irradiation of the bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans in aqueous suspension results in a loss of up to 6 percent of its cellular dry weight and 30 percent of its wet weight. In the process some specific cell wall polysaccharides, including a polymer of glucose and N-acylated glucosamine, are released into the surrounding medium. These polysaccharides appear to originate from a hydrophobic site in the middle, lipid-rich, cell wall layer. The damage to this layer which results in the release of these and other polymers may be due to a disruption of this hydrophobic site. The polysaccharide containing glucose and N-acylated glucosamine exists as a high molecular weight polymer in unirradiated cells, but irradiation causes some degradation prior to release. In a free state this polysaccharide is considerably less sensitive to radiolytic degradation than in a bound state. Free radicals generated from surrounding water by ionizing radiation initiate the release, hydroxyl radicals being the most important species. Oxygen protects the cell wall against loss of the polysaccharides, apparently by a mechanism which does not depend on the ability of O2 to scavenge hydrogen atoms and aqueous electrons

  11. Engineering radiation-resistant bacteria for environmental biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M J

    2000-06-01

    Seventy million cubic meters of ground and three trillion liters of groundwater have been contaminated by leaking radioactive waste generated in the United States during the Cold War. A cleanup technology is being developed based on the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is being engineered to express bioremediating functions. PMID:10851141

  12. Na+-induced structural change of a soil bacterium, S34, and Ca2+ requirement for preserving its original structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsui, H.; Hattori, R.; Watanabe, H.(Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117, Heidelberg, Germany); Tonosaki, A; Hattori, T.

    1997-01-01

    A drastic change in the outer membrane structure of a salt-sensitive soil bacterium, S34, related to the genus Deinococcus was induced by 0.2 to 0.4% (wt/vol) NaCl. The change was relieved by 6 mM CaCl2 and induced by 1 mM EGTA. The results indicate the strong dependence of the organism on calcium.

  13. The resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to killing and mutation by agents which damage DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to the lethal and mutagenic action of ultraviolet (UV) light, ionising (γ) radiation, mitomycin C (MTC), nitrous acid (NA), hydroxylamine (HA), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NG), ethylmethanesulphonate (EMS) and β-propiolactone (βPL) has been compared with that of Escherichia coli B/r. M. radiodurans was much more resistant than E. coli B/r to the lethal effects of UV light (by a factor of 33), γ-radiation (55), NG (15) and NA (62), showed intermediate resistance to MTC (4) and HA (7), but was sensitive to EMS (1) and βPL (2). M. radiodurans was very resistant to mutagens producing damage which can be repaired by a recombination system, indicating that it possesses an extremely efficient recombination repair mechanism. Both species were equally sensitive to mutation to trimethoprim resistance by NG, but M. radiodurans was more resistant than E. coli B/r to the other mutagens tested, being non-mutable by UV light, γ-radiation, MTC and HA, and only slightly sensitive to mutation by NA, EMS, and βPL. The resistance of M. radiodurans to mutation by UV light, γ-radiation and MTC is consistent with an hypothesis that recombination repair in M. radiodurans is accurate since these mutagens may depend on an 'error-prone' recombination system for their mutagenic effect in E. coli B/r. However, because M. radiodurans is also resistant to mutagens such as HA and EMS, which are mutagenic in E. coli in the absence of an 'error-prone' system, we propose that all the mutagens tested may have a common mode of action in E. coli B/r, but that this mutagenic pathway is missing in M. radiodurans

  14. Role of manganese in the resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micrococcus radiodurans possesses a very high level of intracellular manganese compared to other organisms. This manganese content has previously been shown to participate in the exceptional ulraviolet radiation resistance of M. radiodurans. This study was undertaken to determine the role of manganese in the ionizing radiation resistant of M. radiodurans. The results indicate that manganese is essential for DNA degradation to occur during irradiation. Manganese has also proven essential for the second phase of post-irradiation thymine base damage removal. These factors work together to increase the rate of recovery from radiation damage, which is reflected in a larger Dq, D37 and exponential portion of the survival curve of high Mn-grown cells

  15. Effects of oxygen during γ-irradiation of Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been made of the effects of oxygen on the yield of double strand breaks in the DNA of Micrococcus radiodurans, and of the relation of these effects to cell death. The o.e.r. values for cell survival were considerably smaller than those for the yield of double strand breaks, although they showed similar trends after irradiation in different media. The o.e.r. values for the inhibition of post-irradiation enzymatic repair were similar to those for cell survival. The o.e.r. for radiation-induced breaks in DNA therefore seems to depend on radiochemical reactions that are occurring during irradiation rather than on a preferential enzymatic repair of those strand breaks that are produced by anoxic irradiation. Cell survival depends less on the number of double strand breaks produced than on the ability of the cell to repair the double strand breaks. The maximum yield of double strand breaks after oxic γ-irradiation was approximately 1.7 breaks/krad/1010Daltons, corresponding to 1 break per 610 eV. (U.K.)

  16. Formation and repair of γ-radiation induced DNA breaks in micrococcus radiodurans cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the yield of single- and double-strand DNA breaks in γ-irradiated M. radiodurans cells. It was shown that the system of superfast and fast repair of single-strand breaks of the studied bacteria is more effective than that of E.coli. The two studied strains of M. radiodurans differing in radiosensitivity exhibited similar effectiveness of the superfast and fast repair of single-strand breaks but the radioresistant strain possessed a better capacity for postirradiation repair of doublestrand breaks than the radiosensitive strain

  17. Genetic control over the processes of postirradiation recovery of a compact chromosome in micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-irradiation of Micrococcus radiodurans cells with sublethal doses caused disturbances in the structure of a membrane-bound compact chromosome. Recovery of the compact chromosome occurred during the postirradiation incubation of the wild type cells and cells of the UVS-17 mutant deficient in DNA-polymerase. This process was blocked in cells of rec-30 mutant with the impaired system of genetic recombination: this is indicative of an important role played by rec-30 gene product in the postirradiation recovery of the compact chromosome in M. radiodurans cells

  18. Response of respiratory components in x-irradiated Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron-containing cytochromes provide energy to repair radiation damage. The cytochromes of Micrococcus radiodurans are atypical in that they strongly resist reduction by sodium hydrosulfite or oxidation by potassium ferricyanide, but are typically highly sensitive to potassium cyanide inhibition of respiration. Respiration in this organism is highly resistant to radiation damage, being reduced to 60% of the control level 2 hours after an exposure of 600 kR, whereas other bacteria, such as E. coli, are reduced to near zero. This reduction in respiration may be due either to a defect produced in existing cytochromes or to a decrease in synthesis of new cytochromes. Growth in low iron medium yields reductions in growth rate, oxygen consumption per cell and radioresistance, the shoulder of the survival curve being obliterated. Analysis of 59Fe-labeled cell contents on Sephadex G-200 immediately following exposure shows little change in elution patterns of the cytochromes. Only about 7% of 59Fe label is lost from cells after 3 hours of incubation in YHC following 600 kR. No immediate loss of label is detected up to total exposures of 750 kR. The uptake of iron following x-ray exposure shows a depression of 40% of control at 600 kR. Incubation of labeled cells in Triton X-100 (0.25%, v/v) releases 20% of the total activity in 5 minutes. Spectral analysis of this material reveals the presence of both pigmentation and cytochrome. These observations suggest that very high doses of radiation do not produce gross structural changes in existing cytochromes, but their respiratory function is depressed. The delay exhibited in the depression of respiratory function may be the result of initial protein damage followed by some type of proteolytic degradation since there is an immediate decrease in iron uptake post-irradiation with no subsequent recovery even at sublethal exposures

  19. Studies on Post-Irradiation DNA Degradation in Micrococcus Radiodurans, Strain RII51

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auda, H.; Emborg, C.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of irradiation condition on post-irradiation DNA degradation was studied in a radiation resistant mutant of M. radiodurans, strain ${\\rm R}_{{\\rm II}}5$. After irradiation with 1 Mrad or higher more DNA is degraded in cells irradiated in wet condition than in cells irradiated with t...

  20. Biofilms and planktonic cells of Deinococcus geothermalis in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Guenther; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost; Froesler, Jan

    In addition to the several extreme environments on Earth, Space can be considered as just another exceptional environment with a unique mixture of stress factors comprising UV radiation, vacuum, desiccation, temperature, ionizing radiation and microgravity. Life that processes in these environments can depend on the life forms and their state of living. The question is whether there are different strategies for individual microorganisms compared to communities of the same organisms to cope with the different factors of their surroundings. Comparative studies of the survi-val of these communities called biofilms and planktonic cell samples of Deinococcus geothermalis stand at the focal point of the presented investigations. A biofilm is a structured community of microorganisms that live encapsulated in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances on a surface. Microorganisms living in a biofilm usually have significantly different properties to cooperate than individually living microorganisms of the same species. An advantage of the biofilm is increased resistance to various chemical and physical effects, while the dense extracellular matrix and the outer layer of the cells protect the interior of the microbial consortium. The space experiment BOSS (Biofilm organisms surfing Space) as part the ESA experimental unit EXPOSE R-2 with a planned launch date in July 2014 will be subsequently mounted on the Russian Svesda module outside the ISS. An international team of scientists coordinated by Dr. P. Rettberg will investigate the hypothesis whether microorganisms organized as biofilm outmatch the same microorganisms exposed individually in the long-term survival of the harsh environmental conditions as they occur in space and on Mars. Another protective function in the samples could be dust par-ticles for instance Mars regolith simulant contained inside the biofilms or mixed with the planktonic cells, as additional shelter especially against the extraterrestrial UV

  1. Deinococcus arenae sp. nov., a novel species isolated from sand in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwook; Cha, Seho; Jang, Jun Hyeong; Seo, Taegun

    2016-07-01

    A Gram-negative strain, designated SA1(T), was isolated from a sand specimen from Yangyang Beach, South Korea. The cells of SA1(T) were observed to be red pigmented, strictly aerobic, non-motile rods. Strain SA1(T) was found to grow optimally at 30 °C and pH 7 (pH growth range, pH 7-9). Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of SA1(T) showed that the organism belongs to the phylum Deinococcus-Thermus and forms a branch within the genus Deinococcus, with Deinococcus actinosclerus BM2(T) as a close relative (99.8   % sequence similarity). The strain was found to be catalase positive and oxidase negative and to metabolise 2-ketogluconate, acetate, D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate, D-glucose, D-maltose, D-mannitol, D-mannose, D-melibiose, D-sorbitol, D-sucrose, glycogen, L-alanine, L-histidine, L-malate, L-proline and n-valerate. The guanine plus cytosine (G + C) base composition of the DNA was 69.5 mol %, as determined by the thermal denaturation method. The predominant respiratory quinone was identified as menaquinone with eight isoprene units (MK-8). The polar lipid profile of strain SA1(T) showed the presence of several unidentified glycolipids, phosphoglycolipids, phospholipids, aminophospholipids and unidentified lipids. In addition, the most abundant fatty acids of strain SA1(T) were identified as C15:1 ω6c, C16:1 ω7c and C17:0. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses, DNA-DNA hybridisation and biochemical characteristics, strain SA1(T) (=KCTC 33741(T) = JCM 31047(T)) is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus arenae sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:27147067

  2. Excision repair of 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine from the DNA of Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major ionizing radiation products, 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine (thymine glycol), was measured in the DNA of Micrococcus radiodurans following exposure of cells to 6.8-MeV electrons or 254-nm ultraviolet light. Removal of 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine was measured in both an ionizing radiation-sensitive strain (262) and a highly radioresistant strain (the wild type W+) of Micrococcus radiodurans. Within 30 min of incubation (330C) following exposure to ultraviolet light (2400 J/m2) approximately 60% of the thymine glycols were excised, whereas in the case of ionizing radiation (250 krad) only 35% were removed from the cellular DNA of the wild-type strain. In contrast less than 50% of the thymine glycols were excised from the sensitive strain. The amount of DNA degradation induced by radiation was less than 10% in both strains. The results suggest a possible correlation between reduced excision repair of base damage and increased radiation sensitivity

  3. Four proteins synthesized in response to deoxyribonucleic acid damage in Micrococcus radiodurans.

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, M T

    1980-01-01

    Four proteins, alpha beta, gamma, and delta, preferentially synthesized in ultraviolet light-treated cells of Micrococcus radiodurans, were characterized in terms of their molecular weights and isoelectric points. Within the sublethal-dose range, the differential rate of synthesis for these proteins increased linearly with the inducing UV dose. The degree of induction reached 100-fold, and the most abundant protein beta, amounted to approximately 2% of the total newly synthesized protein afte...

  4. 宇宙船内における重粒子線による線量計測とその生物効果実験(RADIATION):D. radioduransのDNA修復能に対する微小重力の影響

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; HARADA, KAZUKI; Nagaoka, Shunji; 渡辺 宏; 小林 泰彦; 菊地 正博; 原田 和樹; 長岡 俊治

    1996-01-01

    Effect of microgravity on DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) repair system was examined on the IML (International Microgravity Laboratory)-2 mission (STS-65, July 8-23, 1994) using extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans so that influence of cosmic radiation can be neglected. Cells were lyophilized and exposed to Co-60 gamma-rays with doses up to 12 kGy before the space flight. Almost at the end of the mission, the cells were mixed on board with liquid nutrient medium to activate ...

  5. Complete genome sequence of the orange-red pigmented, radioresistant Deinococcus proteolyticus type strain (MRPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Zeytun, Ahmet [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2012-01-01

    Deinococcus proteolyticus (ex Kobatake et al. 1973) Brook and Murray 1981 is one of currently 47 species in the genus Deinococcus within the family Deinococcaceae. Strain MRPTT was isolated from faeces of Lama glama; it shares with various other species of the genus the extreme radiation resistance, with D. proteolyticus being resistant up to 1.5 Mrad of gamma radiation. Strain MRPT{sup T} is of further interest for its carotenoid pigment. The genome presented here is only the fifth completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Deinococcus (and the forth type strain) to be published, and will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of how members of this genus adapted to high gamma- or UV ionizing-radiation. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,886,836 bp long genome with its four large plasmids of 97 kbp, 132 kbp, 196 kbp and 315 kbp harbours 2,741 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Four Proteins Synthesized in Response to Deoxyribonucleic Acid Damage in Micrococcus Radiodurans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M. T.

    1980-01-01

    Four proteins, alpha beta, gamma, and delta, preferentially synthesized in ultraviolet light-treated cells of Micrococcus radiodurans, were characterized in terms of their molecular weights and isoelectric points. Within the sublethal-dose range, the differential rate of synthesis for these...... proteins increased linearly with the inducing UV dose. The degree of induction reached 100-fold, and the most abundant protein beta, amounted to approximately 2% of the total newly synthesized protein after irradiation. Damage caused by ionizing radiation or by treatment with mitomycin C also provoked the...

  7. Origin of cell surface proteins released from Micrococcus radiodurans by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exposure of Micrococcus radiodurans to sublethal doses of ionizing radiation causes the release of certain proteins into the surrounding medium. As estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, these proteins range from approximately 20,000 to 125,000 daltons. At least some of the proteins, including an exonuclease, have a surface location and appear to originate from the lipid-rich midwall layer. The exonuclease has two functionally distinct locations, one with its active site available to external substrate and a second with the active site masked from the exterior. Ionizing radiation releases both the masked and unmasked activity into the surrounding medium

  8. The mechanism of the extreme radioresistance in Deinococcus radiodulance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As for the mechanism of the extreme radioresistance of the title bacterium (Dr), authors reviewed recent findings on its DNA repair enzyme genes together with its biological character. In evolution, Dr is close to Thermus bacteria. Radiation energy necessary for breakage of intracellular DNA strand is similar to each other in Dr and E.coli, however, Dr can repair such breakage as lethal in other bacteria. Genes of recA, pprA, lexA homologue, recA/pprA expression-inducing, recN, ruvB, polA, recRDNA, uvrA and uvde homologue were identified as those concerning the DNA repair enzyme in wild type and mutant strains of Dr. Authors found the presence of polymeric structure of its genome, which suggesting that Dr highly evolved the DNA recombination capability. Dr would have the additional ones as well as the DNA repair mechanisms known in other bacteria like E. coli. Analyses of recA and pprA genes which were found in the highly radiation-sensitive strain, and of their regulator genes would bring about the further new knowledge. (K.H.)

  9. Rescue of Mitomycin C- or Psoralen-Inactivated Micrococcus Radiodurans by Additional Exposure to Radiation or Alkylating Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M. Trier

    1982-01-01

    The processing of damaged DNA was altered in a mitomycin C-sensitive mutant (mtcA) of Micrococcus radiodurans. Even though the mutant retained resistance to 254-nm UV radiation, it did not, in contrast to the wild-type strain, show any excessive DNA degradation or cell death when incubated with...

  10. Comparison of the degradation of the DNA of Micrococcus radiodurans and Micrococcus radioproteolyticus cells after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of the acid-soluble fraction of cellular DNA into the cytoplasm and incubation medium after irradiation of M.radiodurans and M.radioproteolyticus cells with a dose of 2 kGy in liquid medium in the absence of oxygen was studied. While the time dependence of the release of DNA into the medium showed no significant difference between the two species, a difference in time dependence was recorded in case of concentration of the acid-soluble fraction of DNA in the cytoplasm. There was no accumulation of DNA degradation products in the cytoplasm of M.radioproteolyticus, while in case of M.radiodurans there was in the initial stages an increase of the concentration of degraded DNA with a subsequent decrease. The possible causes of this phenomenon are discussed. (author)

  11. Repair of the double-strand breaks produced by 125I disintegrations in the DNA of micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild-type M. radiodurans and two radiosensitive mutants were used to study the lethal effects of 125I disintegrations in their DNA. The relative sensitivities of these three strains to inactivation by γ-radiation were reflected in their relative sensitivities to inactivation by 125I decay. The number of double-strand (ds) breaks in the DNA appeared to be similar at levels of γ-radiation and of 125I decay that reduced survival to 10%. All three strains of M. radiodurans rapidly repaired ds breaks produced in their DNA by either γ-radiation or 125I disintegrations. If one ds break per cell is a lethal event [Krisch. et al., 1975], cells of the three strains tested would die when they had left unrepaired one ds break out of an initial 45, 600 or 1800 ds breaks per single cell. (Auth.)

  12. DNA-membrane complex restoration in Micrococcus radiodurans after X-irradiation: relation to repair, DNA synthesis and DNA degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DNA-membrane complex in Micrococcus radiodurans was shown to be essentially constituted of proteins, lipids and DNA. The complex was dissociated immediately after X-irradiation of cells and restored during post-incubation in complete medium. In X-irradiated protoplasts some DNA remained associated with the complex. Restoration of the complex during post-incubation was only seen in a medium favouring DNA polymerase and ligase activities. Under this condition no DNA synthesis occurred, suggesting that complex restoration may involve ligase activity. The complex restoration in the wild type and the X-ray sensitive mutant UV17 of M. radiodurans was strictly dependent on the X-ray dose. It was correlated with survival and DNA degradation but always preceded the onset of DNA synthesis after X-irradiation. At the same dose the complex restoration was about 2 fold lower in mutant than in wild type cells indicating that the restoration of the complex is related to repair capacity. The results are consistent with the idea that the complex protects X-irradiated DNA of M. radiodurans from further breakdown and, subsequently, permits DNA synthesis and repair to occur. (author)

  13. Radiation-induced enhancement of enzymatic cell lysis of Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intact cells of M. radiodurans were rendered sensitive to the action of lytic enzyme (P2-2 enzyme) by irradiation. The radiation-induced enhancement of cell lysis with P2-2 enzyme was completely prevented by the addition of t-butanol and irradiation at liquid nitrogen temperature. These results indicate that the enhancement is due to indirect action resulting from OH radicals. Cell lysis by lysozyme was enhanced only when the cells were irradiated under N2O. The enhancement of cell lysis with lysozyme was also prevented by adding alcohols. On the other hand, when lipid components in cells were removed by extraction with n-butanol, the radiation-induced enhancement of cell lysis with P2-2 enzyme and lysozyme was not observed. From these results it is concluded that the enhancement of enzymatic cell lysis by irradiation is attributable to alteration in the lipid-rich layer of the cell wall caused by OH radicals

  14. Effect of cordycepin(3'-deoxyadenosine) on excision repair of 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine-type products from the DNA of Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordycepin(3'-deoxyadenosine), a nucleoside analog, has been shown to enhance radiation-induced cell killing. In an effort to elucidate the possible mechanism for enhancement of cell killing, the effect of cordycepin on the excision repair of radiation-induced 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine-type (t') products from the DNA of wild type Micrococcus radiodurans was investigated. The capacity of M. radiodurans to excise nondimeric (t') products from its DNA was significantly impaired after cordycepin treatment. The results suggest that the increased radiation sensitivity of cordycepin-treated cells could be due to alterations in cellular processes that repair DNA damage

  15. Lactococcus lactis - a diploid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    In contrast to higher eukaryotes, bacteria are haploid, i.e. they store their genetic information in a single chromosome, which is then duplicated during the cell cycle. If the growth rate is sufficiently low, the bacterium is born with only a single copy of the chromosome, which gets duplicated...... before the bacterium divides. Fast-growing bacteria have overlapping rounds of replication, and can contain DNA corresponding to more than four genome equivalents. However, the terminus region of the chromosome is still present in just one copy after division, and is not duplicated until right before...... the next division. Thus, the regions of the chromosome that are the last to be replicated are haploid even in fast-growing bacteria. In contrast to this general rule for bacteria, we found that Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium which has been exploited for thousands of years for the production of fermented...

  16. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  17. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.

    2005-06-01

    Natural selection in highly radioactive waste sites may yield bacteria with favorable bioremediating characteristics. However, until recently the microbial ecology of such environments has remained unexplored because of the high costs and technical complexities associated with extracting and characterizing samples from such sites. We have examined the bacterial ecology within radioactive sediments from a high-level nuclear waste plume in the vadose zone on the DOE?s Hanford Site in south-central Washington state (Fredrickson et al, 2004). Manganese-dependent, radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from this contaminated site including the highly Mn-dependent Deinococcus and Arthrobacter spp.

  18. Synthesis of Hyperbranched Glycoconjugates by the Combined Action of Potato Phosphorylase and Glycogen Branching Enzyme from Deinococcus geothermalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Loos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Potato phosphorylase is able to synthesize linear polyglucans from maltoheptaose primers. By coupling maltoheptaose to butane diamine, tris(2-aminoethylamine and amine functionalized amine functionalized poly ethyleneglycol (PEG, new primer molecules became available. The resulting di-, tri- and macro-primers were incubated with potato phosphorylase and glycogen branching enzyme from Deinococcus geothermalis. Due to the action of both enzymes, hyperbranched polyglucan arms were grown from the maltoheptaose derivatives with a maximum degree of branching of 11%. The size of the synthesized hyperbranched polyglucans could be controlled by the ratio monomer over primer. About 60%–80% of the monomers were incorporated in the glycoconjugates. The resulting hyperbranched glycoconjugates were subjected to Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS measurements in order to determine the hydrodynamic radius and it became obvious that the structures formed agglomerates in the range of 14–32 nm.

  19. Four mutants of Micrococcus radiodurans defective in the ability to repair DNA damaged by mitomycin-C, two of which have wild-type resistance to ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four genes concerned with the resistance of wild-type Micrococcus radiodurans to the lethal action of mitomycin-C (MTC) mtcA, mtcB, uvsA and uvsB, have been identified by isolating mutants sensitive to MTC. Two strains of M. radiodurans, 302 and 262 respectively, are between forty and sixty times as sensitive as the wild-type to MTC, only slightly more sensitive than the wild-type to ionizing (γ) radiation and have the same resistance as the wild-type to ultraviolet (u.v.) radiation. Strain 302 can be transformed at a high frequency to wild-type resistance to MTC with DNA from strain 262, and vice versa, indicating that mtcA and mtcB have different genetic locations. Two further strains of M. radiodurans, 303 and 263 having mutations in uvsA and uvsB respectively are only from four to eight times as sensitive as the wild-type to MTC, seven to thirteen times as sensitive to γ-radiation but between twenty to thirty-three times as sensitive to u.v. radiation. Strain 303 can be transformed with DNA from strain 263, or vice versa, to wild-type resistance to u.v. radiation, implying that uvsA and uvsB also have different genetic locations. M.radiodurans strain 301 which is mutant in both mtcA and uvsA, and strain 261 which is mutant in mtcB and uvsB are twenty to forty times as sensitive as the wild-type to both MTC and u.v. radiation and seven to ten times as sensitive to γ radiation. Neither mtcA and uvsA nor mtcB and uvsB are closely linked. None of the mutant strains is deficient in recombination, as measured by transformation. The repair of MTC-induced DNA damage in M.radiodurans must be different from that described for Escherichia coli. (orig.)

  20. Protease activity of PprI facilitates DNA damage response: Mn2+-dependence and substrate sequence-specificity of the proteolytic reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Wang

    Full Text Available The extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extraordinary resistance to ionizing radiation. Previous studies established that a protein named PprI, which exists only in the Deinococcus-Thermus family, acts as a general switch to orchestrate the expression of a number of DNA damage response (DDR proteins involved in cellular radio-resistance. Here we show that the regulatory mechanism of PprI depends on its Mn(2+-dependent protease activity toward DdrO, a transcription factor that suppresses DDR genes' expression. Recognition sequence-specificity around the PprI cleavage site is essential for DNA damage repair in vivo. PprI and DdrO mediate a novel DNA damage response pathway differing from the classic LexA-mediated SOS response system found in radiation-sensitive bacterium Escherichia coli. This PprI-mediated pathway in D. radiodurans is indispensable for its extreme radio-resistance and therefore its elucidation significantly advances our understanding of the DNA damage repair mechanism in this amazing organism.

  1. Novel 16S rRNA based PCR method targeting Deinococcus spp. and its application to assess the diversity of deinococcal populations in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Ruchi; Archana, G

    2012-09-01

    The members of the genus Deinococcus are extensively studied because of their exemplary radiation resistance. Both ionizing and non-ionizing rays are routinely employed to select upon the radiation resistant deinococcal population and isolate them from the majority of radiation sensitive population. There are no studies on the development of molecular tools for the rapid detection and identification of deinococci from a mixed population without causing the bias of radiation enrichment. Here we present a Deinococcus specific two-step hemi-nested PCR for the rapid detection of deinococci from environmental samples. The method is sensitive and specific to detect deinococci without radiation exposure of the sample. The new protocol was successfully employed to detect deinococci from several soil samples from different geographical regions of India. The PCR method could be adapted to a three-step protocol to study the diversity of the environmental deinococcal population by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Sequence analysis of the DGGE bands revealed that the samples harbor diverse populations of deinococci, many of which were not recovered by culturing and may represent novel clades. We demonstrate that the genus specific primers are also suitable for the rapid identification of the bacterial isolates that are obtained from a typical radiation enrichment isolation technique. Therefore the primers and the protocols described in this study can be used to study deinococcal diversity from environmental samples and can be employed for the rapid detection of deinococci in samples or identifying pure culture isolates as Deinococcus species. PMID:22609328

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF THE BACTERIUM TOMATO STEM CANKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goner A. Shaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseased tomato samples were collected from green house was evaluated for isolation, pathogenicity and biochemical tests. The symptoms of the infected tomato plants were as sudden wilting after curled on leaves and necrotic streak regions developed at the crown and base of the stem and the cavities deepen and expand up and down, brown discoloration and necrosis occurring on xylem and phloem vasculer. All of ages of tomato plant were susceptible to bacteria when the weather condition favorable and immediately, seen collapse symptom on tomato plant at once fail and die. The bacterium was isolated from diseased plant in all regions on nutrient Agar; a yellow bacterium was isolated from infected tomato plant in green houses and fields in Abu-Ghraib, Rashiedia and Qanat Al-Geiaysh nurseries in Baghdad provinces of Iraq. The bacterium was found gram positive, rod-shaped, non-motile and capable an aerobic growth and based on the morphological and biochemical characteristics revealed that this bacterium belongs to: Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. (smith pathogenicity and hypersensitivity of the bacterium Cmm showed the disease index were 18.33, 6.66, 16.66, 5, 0% for tomato seedlings were inoculated treatments as the wounding roots, without wounding roots, crown of the stem, petiole and control respectively.

  3. Expression and purification of PprI protein from D.radiodurans R1 in escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to express and purify PprI protein from D.radiodurans R1 in E. coli, the full length of pprI gene was gained by PCR amplification using pCMV-HA-pprI as a template. The gene segment was inserted into vector pET-28a after digested by two restriction endonucleases Nco I and EcoR I. Then the recombinant vector pET-28a-His-pprI was transfected into E. coli BL21(DE3) RP. The PprI protein expression was induced by IPTG and the fusion protein was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The expressive conditions of the protein such as E. coli' A600, concentration of IPTG, time and temperature of culture, were optimized. Finally the fusion protein was purified by Ni-NTA His Bind Resins and molecule boult. The experimental results show the fusion protein confirmed by Western blotting is 6 x His-PprI and its molecular weight is 37 kDa. The ladders of PprI protein at molecular weight 37 kDa were different due to difference of the PprI protein expression conditions if E. coli. The PprI protein exists both in supernatant and precipitation. The concentration of purified protein is about 0.15 mg/mL which was measured by BCA method. It is concluded that the recombinant plasmid pET-28a-His-pprI is constructed and the PprI fusion protein is expressed and purified. The results lay a solid foundation for studying the radio-resistance and immunity of PprI protein. (authors)

  4. Identification of 5-hydroxycytidine at position 2501 concludes characterization of modified nucleotides in E. coli 23S rRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper Foged; Giessing, Anders Michael Bernth; Hansen, Trine Møller;

    2011-01-01

    modification as 5-hydroxycytidine-a novel modification in RNA. Identification of 5-hydroxycytidine was completed by liquid chromatography under nonoxidizing conditions using a graphitized carbon stationary phase in combination with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry and by comparing the fragmentation behavior...... rRNA-has previously been characterized in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Despite a first report nearly 20 years ago, the chemical nature of the modification at position 2501 has remained elusive, and attempts to isolate it have so far been unsuccessful. We unambiguously identify this last unknown...... of the natural nucleoside with that of a chemically synthesized ditto. Furthermore, we show that 5-hydroxycytidine is also present in the equivalent position of 23S rRNA from the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Given the unstable nature of 5-hydroxycytidine, this modification might be found in...

  5. Microflora of urogenital tract in pregnancy with asymptomatic bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article contains results of research interrelationship from colonization of vagina and urinary tract diseases. E.coli one of the main factors in development asymptomatic bacterium. Presented high effects of penicillin medicaments and nitrofurans in treatment of asymptomatic bacterium

  6. Quantitative Characterization of the Growth of Deinococcus geothermalis DSM-11302: Effect of Inoculum Size, Growth Medium and Culture Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Bornot

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to their remarkable resistance to extreme conditions, Deinococcaceae strains are of great interest to biotechnological prospects. However, the physiology of the extremophile strain Deinococcus geothermalis has scarcely been studied and is not well understood. The physiological behaviour was then studied in well-controlled conditions in flask and bioreactor cultures. The growth of D. geothermalis type strains was compared. Among the strains tested, the strain from the German Collection of Microorganisms (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen DSM DSM-11302 was found to give the highest biomass concentration and growth rate: in a complex medium with glucose, the growth rate reached 0.75 h−1 at 45 °C. Yeast extract concentration in the medium had significant constitutive and catalytic effects. Furthermore, the results showed that the physiological descriptors were not affected by the inoculum preparation steps. A batch culture of D. geothermalis DSM-11302 on defined medium was carried out: cells grew exponentially with a maximal growth rate of 0.28 h−1 and D. geothermalis DSM-11302 biomass reached 1.4 g·L−1 in 20 h. Then, 1.4 gDryCellWeight of biomass (X was obtained from 5.6 g glucose (Glc consumed as carbon source, corresponding to a yield of 0.3 CmolX·CmolGlc−1; cell specific oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production rates reached 216 and 226 mmol.CmolX−1·h−1, respectively, and the respiratory quotient (QR value varied from 1.1 to 1.7. This is the first time that kinetic parameters and yields are reported for D. geothermalis DSM-11302 grown on a mineral medium in well-controlled batch culture.

  7. Loss of covalently linked lipid as the mechanism for radiation-induced release of membrane-bound polysaccharide and exonuclease from Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of γ-radiation-induced release of polysaccharide and exonuclease from the midwall membrane of Micrococcus radiodurans has been examined. These two components appear to be released independently, but by very similar processes. Direct analysis of radiation-released polysaccharide indicated the absence of an alkali-labile neutral lipid normally present in the native material. Radiation-induced release therefore probably results from the radiolytic cleavage of a covalently linked lipid which normally serves to anchor these substances to the membrane. The absence of a natural membrane-bound carotenoid had no effect on the rate of release of these components. Likewise, the absence of exonuclease in an exonuclease minus mutant did not influence the release of polysaccharide. It is suggested that the major pathway of radical transfer from the initiating .OH and culminating in the cleavage of the neutral lipid anchor may not be via the membrane

  8. Isolation of a Bacterium Strain Degraded Agar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    One in 58 strains of bacteria isolated from the compost showed clear colonies after a few days of growth on the plates containing medium made of only agar and water.Water suspension contained only agar (2 and 8g·L -1 ) with two controls (normal saline,LB medium) was inoculated with the bacterium BR5-1 to see whether there was an increasement of the alive bacteria concentration after 48 h of the growth.The results showed that there was a significant rising of the alive bacteria concentration in the agar susp...

  9. Biodegradation of heavy oils by halophilic bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixia Hao; Anhuai Lu

    2009-01-01

    A halophilic bacterial strain TM-1 was isolated from the reservoir of the Shengli oil field in East China. Strain TM-1, which was found to be able to degrade crude oils, is a gram-positive non-motile bacterium with a coccus shape that can grow at temperatures of up to 58 ℃ and in 18% NaCl solution. Depending on the culture conditions, the organism may occur in tetrads. In addition, strain TM-1 pro-duced acid from glucose without gas formation and was catalase-negative. Furthermore, strain TM-I was found to be a facultative aer-obe capable of growth under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, it produced butylated hydroxytoluene, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid-bis ester and dibutyl phthalate and could use different organic substrates. Laboratory studies indicated that strain TM-1 affected different heavy oils by degrading various components and by changing the chemical properties of the oils. In addition, growth of the bacterium in heavy oils resulted in the loss of aromatic hydrocarbons, resins and asphaltenes, and enrichment with light hydrocarbons and an overall redistribution of these hydrocarbons.

  10. Ratoon stunting disease of sugarcane: isolation of the causal bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M J; Gillaspie, A G; Harris, R W; Lawson, R H

    1980-12-19

    A small coryneform bacterium was consistently isolated from sugarcane with ratoon stunting disease and shown to be the causal agent. A similar bacterium was isolated from Bermuda grass. Both strains multiplied in sugarcane and Bermuda grass, but the Bermuda grass strain did not incite the symptoms of ratoon stunting disease in sugarcane. Shoot growth in Bermuda grass was retarded by both strains. PMID:17817853

  11. Adaptability and variability of the cell functions to the environmental factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaptive phenomenon of the cells to the environmental factors is one of the most important functions of cells. In the initial research program, yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as model species of eukaryote was selected to use for the experiments and copper sulfate was adopted as one of the ideal environmental factors, and then adaptation mechanisms of yeast cells in the environment surrounded by copper ions were analyzed metabolically and morphologically. Furthermore, in the relationships between environmental factors and the cells, the researches performed were as follows: (1) Induced mutation in the extranuclear-inheritable system: Mutagenic effect of ethidium bromide on mitochondria and plastids. (2) Induction of gene expression by light exposure in the early development of chloroplast in Chlamydomonas reinhardi. (3) Some features of RNA and protein syntheses in thermophilic alga Cyanidium caldarium. (4) Satellite DNA of Ochromonas danica. (5) Analyses of cell functions using various kinds of radiations. (6) Novel methionine requirement of radiation resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans. (author)

  12. High resistance of some oligotrophic bacteria to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resistance of seven cultures of eutrophic and oligotrophic bacteria to gamma radiation (at doses up to 360 Gy) was investigated. The bacteria under study were divided into three groups according to their survival ability after irradiation. Methylobacterium organophilum and open-quotes Pedodermatophilus halotoleransclose quotes (LD50 = 270 Gy) were highly tolerant. By their tolerance, these organisms approached Deinococcus radiodurans. Aquatic ring-shaped (toroidal) bacteria Flectobacillus major and open-quotes Arcocella aquaticaclose quotes (LD5 = 173 and 210 Gy, respectively) were moderately tolerant. Eutrophic Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli (LD50 = 43 and 38 Gy, respectively) were the most sensitive. X-ray microanalysis showed that in tolerant bacteria the intracellular content of potassium increased and the content of calcium decreased after irradiation. No changes in the element composition of the eutrophic bacterium E. coli were detected. Possible mechanisms of the resistance of oligotrophic bacteria to gamma radiation are discussed

  13. Adaptability and variability of the cell functions to the environmental factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Tadatoshi [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1995-02-01

    Adaptive phenomenon of the cells to the environmental factors is one of the most important functions of cells. In the initial research program, yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as model species of eukaryote was selected to use for the experiments and copper sulfate was adopted as one of the ideal environmental factors, and then adaptation mechanisms of yeast cells in the environment surrounded by copper ions were analyzed metabolically and morphologically. Furthermore, in the relationships between environmental factors and the cells, the researches performed were as follows: (1) Induced mutation in the extranuclear-inheritable system: Mutagenic effect of ethidium bromide on mitochondria and plastids. (2) Induction of gene expression by light exposure in the early development of chloroplast in Chlamydomonas reinhardi. (3) Some features of RNA and protein syntheses in thermophilic alga Cyanidium caldarium. (4) Satellite DNA of Ochromonas danica. (5) Analyses of cell functions using various kinds of radiations. (6) Novel methionine requirement of radiation resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans. (author).

  14. Fluctuation-Enhanced Sensing of Bacterium Odors

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Hung-Chih; King, Maria D; Kwan, Chiman

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the possibility to detect and identify bacteria by sensing their odor via fluctuation-enhanced sensing with commercial Taguchi sensors. The fluctuations of the electrical resistance during exposure to different bacterial odors, Escherichia coli and anthrax-surrogate Bacillus subtilis, have been measured and analyzed. In the present study, the simplest method, the measurement and analysis of power density spectra was used. The sensors were run in the normal heated and the sampling-and-hold working modes, respectively. The results indicate that Taguchi sensors used in these fluctuation-enhanced modes are effective tools of bacterium detection and identification even when they are utilizing only the power density spectrum of the stochastic sensor signal.

  15. Comparative studies on the effect of ionizing and nonionizing radiations on the kinetics of DNA synthesis and postirradiation degradation in Micrococcus radiodurans R115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of degradation and synthesis of DNA and the nature of radioactive substances released from M. radiodurans R115 labeled with thymidine-methyl-3H after UV and gamma irradiations were investigated. The release of labeled material from the DNA began immediately upon incubation and terminated in due time 90 min and 180 min for UV and gamma irradiations, respectively. When acriflavine was added to the medium, post-irradiation degradation process did not terminate even after 9 h in the case of UV exposure. However, it terminated after 6 h in the case of gamma irradiation. In the presence of acriflavine, DNA synthesis resumed after termination of DNA degradation in the case of gamma irradiation and this was not observed in the case of UV irradiation. Degradation products were chromatographed and it was found that they were located in one major radioactive peak. However their locations were different for UV and gamma radiations. For UV irradiation, the peak fell in the thymine region, while for gamma irradiation it fell in the thymidine region. (author)

  16. Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711

    OpenAIRE

    Shoemaker, William R.; Muscarella, Mario E.; Lennon, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    We present a draft genome of Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711 that was isolated from agricultural soil. The genome provides insight into the ecological strategies of this bacterium in free-living and host-associated environments.

  17. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine...

  18. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phelps, T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  19. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    S. A. Ahmad; Shukor, M. Y.; Shamaan, N. A.; W. P. Mac Cormack; Syed, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spe...

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Oral Bacterium Streptococcus mutans JH1140

    OpenAIRE

    Escano, Jerome; Deng, Peng; Lu, Shi-En; Smith, Lief

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans JH1140 is an oral bacterium known to produce the bacteriocin mutacin 1140, and the strain has been genetically engineered to combat dental caries. Here, we report the 2.0-Mb draft genome of S. mutans JH1140. This genome provides new insights into the strain’s superior colonization properties and its utility in replacement therapy.

  1. Genome of a mosquito-killing bacterium decoded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Researchers with the CAS Wuhan Institute of Virology (WHIOV) recently completed the genome sequencing of a mosquitocidal bacterium Bacillus shaericus C3-41. The feat, first of its kind in China, is expected to further promote the bio-control studies of mosquitoes.

  2. Rnf Genes in Purple Sulfur Bacterium Allochromatium vinosum

    OpenAIRE

    DİNÇTÜRK, H. Benan; DEMİR, Volkan

    2006-01-01

    Allochromatium vinosum is a photosynthetic, diazotrophic purple sulfur bacterium that oxidizes reduced sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, elemental sulfur and thiosulfide. In this article, we report the presence of rnf genes in Allochromatium vinosum, some of which have been reported to take part in nitrogen fixation in some species.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Oral Bacterium Streptococcus mutans JH1140

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escano, Jerome; Deng, Peng; Lu, Shi-En

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans JH1140 is an oral bacterium known to produce the bacteriocin mutacin 1140, and the strain has been genetically engineered to combat dental caries. Here, we report the 2.0-Mb draft genome of S. mutans JH1140. This genome provides new insights into the strain’s superior colonization properties and its utility in replacement therapy. PMID:27257196

  4. Shotgun Genome Sequence of the Large Purple Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodospirillum photometricum DSM122

    OpenAIRE

    Duquesne, K.; Sturgis, James N.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present the shotgun genome sequence of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum photometricum DSM122. The photosynthetic apparatus of this bacterium has been particularly well studied by microscopy. The knowledge of the genome of this oversize bacterium will allow us to compare it with the other purple bacterial organisms to follow the evolution of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  5. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Wall, Judy D. [University of Missouri; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R. [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Begemann, Matthew B [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, biohydrogen production remains inefficient and heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium strain sapolanicus, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. sapolanicus ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen and acetate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  6. Rock Phosphate Solubilization Mechanisms of One Fungus and One Bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qi-mei; ZHAO Xiao-rong; ZHAO Zi-juan; LI Bao-guo

    2002-01-01

    Many microorganisms can dissolve the insoluble phosphates like apatite. However, the mechanisms are still not clear. This study was an attempt to investigate the mechanisms of rock phosphate solubilization by an Aspergillus 2TCiF2 and an Arthrobacter1TCRi7. The results indicated that the fungus produced a large amount of organic acids, mainly oxalic acid. The total quantity of the organic acids produced by the fungus was 550 times higher than that by the bacterium. Different organic acids had completely different capacities to solubilize the rock. Oxalic acid and citric acid had stronger capacity to dissolve the rock than malic acid, tartaric acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, malonic acid and succinic acid. The fungus solubilized the rock through excreting both proton and organic acids. The rock solubilization of the bacterium depended on only proton.

  7. A physical map of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex pyrophilus chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Z; Mages, W; Schmitt, R.

    1994-01-01

    A genomic map of the hyperthermophilic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium Aquifex pyrophilus was established with NotI (GC/GGCCGC), SpeI (A/CTAGT), and XbaI (T/CTAGA). Linking clones and cross-hybridization of restriction fragments revealed a single circular chromosome of 1.6 Mbp. A single flagellin gene and six rRNA gene units were located on this map by Southern hybridization.

  8. Isolation of a Bacterium Capable of Degrading Peanut Hull Lignin

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Thomas J.; Kerr, Robert D.; Benner, Ronald

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-seven bacterial strains capable of degrading peanut hull lignin were isolated by using four types of lignin preparations and hot-water-extracted peanut hulls. One of the isolates, tentatively identified as Arthrobacter sp., was capable of utilizing all four lignin preparations as well as extracted peanut hulls as a sole source of carbon. The bacterium was also capable of degrading specifically labeled [14C]lignin-labeled lignocellulose and [14C]cellulose-labeled lignocellulose from the...

  9. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a re

  10. Research Progress and Perspectives of Nitrogen Fixing Bacterium, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, in Monocot Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eskin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen fixing bacterium originally found in monocotyledon sugarcane plants in which the bacterium actively fixes atmosphere nitrogen and provides significant amounts of nitrogen to plants. This bacterium mainly colonizes intercellular spaces within the roots and stems of plants and does not require the formation of the complex root organ like nodule. The bacterium is less plant/crop specific and indeed G. diazotrophicus has been found in a number of unrelated plant species. Importantly, as the bacterium was of monocot plant origin, there exists a possibility that the nitrogen fixation feature of the bacterium may be used in many other monocot crops. This paper reviews and updates the research progress of G. diazotrophicus for the past 25 years but focuses on the recent research development.

  11. Phosphate enhances levan production in the endophytic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal5

    OpenAIRE

    Idogawa, Nao; Amamoto, Ryuta; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a gram-negative and endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacterium that has several beneficial effects in host plants; thus, utilization of this bacterium as a biofertilizer in agriculture may be possible. G. diazotrophicus synthesizes levan, a D-fructofuranosyl polymer with β-(2→6) linkages, as an exopolysaccharide and the synthesized levan improves the stress tolerance of the bacterium. In this study, we found that phosphate enhances levan production by G. diazotro...

  12. A Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium That Decreases Nickel Toxicity in Seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Burd, Genrich I.; Dixon, D. George; Glick, Bernard R.

    1998-01-01

    A plant growth-promoting bacterium, Kluyvera ascorbata SUD165, that contained high levels of heavy metals was isolated from soil collected near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The bacterium was resistant to the toxic effects of Ni2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and CrO4−, produced a siderophore(s), and displayed 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity. Canola seeds inoculated with this bacterium and then grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the presence of high concentrations of nickel chloride w...

  13. Magnetic guidance of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Schüler, Dirk; Fischer, Thomas M

    2016-04-21

    Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense is a magnetotactic bacterium with a permanent magnetic moment capable of swimming using two bipolarly located flagella. In their natural environment these bacteria swim along the field lines of the homogeneous geomagnetic field in a typical run and reversal pattern and thereby create non-differentiable trajectories with sharp edges. In the current work we nevertheless achieve stable guidance along curved lines of mechanical instability by using a heterogeneous magnetic field of a garnet film. The successful guidance of the bacteria depends on the right balance between motility and the magnetic moment of the magnetosome chain. PMID:26972517

  14. Intracellular iron minerals in a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, Susan; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    Among prokaryotes, there are few examples of controlled mineral formation; the formation of crystalline iron oxides and sulfides [magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4)] by magnetotactic bacteria is an exception. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium that is capable of dissimilatory iron reduction, produced microscopic intracellular grains of iron oxide minerals during growth on two-line ferrihydrite in a hydrogen-argon atmosphere. The minerals, formed at iron concentrations found in the soil and sedimentary environments where these bacteria are active, could represent an unexplored pathway for the cycling of iron by bacteria. PMID:11778045

  15. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  16. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  17. Screening, identification and desilication of a silicate bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hong-bo; ZENG Xiao-xi; LIU Fei-fei; QIU Guan-zhou; HU Yue-hua

    2006-01-01

    The strain Lv1-2 isolated from the Henan bauxite was characterized by morphological observation, biochemical and physiological identification, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The influences of temperature, initial pH value, the volume of medium, shaking speed and illite concentration on the desilicating ability of the strain Lv1-2 were investigated. The results show that the bacterium is a Gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium with oval endspores and thick capsule, but without flagellum. The biochemical and physiological tests indicate that the strain Lv1-2 is similar to Bacillus mucilaginosus. In GenBank the 16S rDNA sequence similarity of the strain Lv1-2 and the B. mucilaginosus YNUCC0001 (AY571332) is more than 99 %. Based on the above results, the strain Lv1-2 is identified as B. mucilaginosus. The optimum conditions for the strain Lv1-2 to remove silicon from illite are as follows: temperature is 30℃ ;initial pH value is 7.5; medium volume in 200 mL bottle is 60 mL; shaking speed of rotary shaker is 220 r/m; illite concentration is 1%.

  18. Biological Control of Meloidogyne hapla Using an Antagonistic Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyeong Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined the efficacy of a bacterium for biocontrol of the root-knot nematode (RKN Meloidogyne hapla in carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum. Among 542 bacterial isolates from various soils and plants, the highest nematode mortality was observed for treatments with isolate C1-7, which was identified as Bacillus cereus based on cultural and morphological characteristics, the Biolog program, and 16S rRNA sequencing analyses. The population density and the nematicidal activity of B. cereus C1-7 remained high until the end of culture in brain heart infusion broth, suggesting that it may have sustainable biocontrol potential. In pot experiments, the biocontrol efficacy of B. cereus C1-7 was high, showing complete inhibition of root gall or egg mass formation by RKN in carrot and tomato plants, and subsequently reducing RKN damage and suppressing nematode population growth, respectively. Light microscopy of RKN-infected carrot root tissues treated with C1-7 showed reduced formation of gall cells and fully developed giant cells, while extensive gall cells and fully mature giant cells with prominent cell wall ingrowths formed in the untreated control plants infected with RKNs. These histopathological characteristics may be the result of residual or systemic biocontrol activity of the bacterium, which may coincide with the biocontrol efficacies of nematodes in pots. These results suggest that B. cereus C1-7 can be used as a biocontrol agent for M. hapla.

  19. Isolation and characterization of luminescent bacterium for sludge biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahaba, Maryam; Halmi, Mohd Izuan Effendi; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Syed, Mohd Arif

    2015-11-01

    Microtox is based on the inhibition of luminescence of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri by the toxicants. This technique has been accepted by the USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) as a biomonitoring tool for remediation of toxicants such as hydrocarbon sludge. In the present study, a luminescent bacterium was isolated from yellow striped scad (Selaroides leptolepis) and was tentatively identified as Vibrio sp. isolate MZ. This aerobic isolate showed high luminescence activity in a broad range of temperature from 25 to 35 °C. In addition, optimal conditions for high bioluminescence activity in range of pH 7.5 to 8.5 and 10 gl(-1) of sodium chloride, 10 gl(-1) of peptone and 10 gl(-1) of sucrose as carbon source. Bench scale biodegradation 1% sludge (w/v) was set up and degradation was determined using gas chromatography with flame ionised detector (GC-FID). In this study, Rhodococcus sp. strain AQ5NOL2 was used to degrade the sludge. Based on the preliminary results obtained, Vibrio sp. isolate MZwas able to monitor the biodegradation of sludge. Therefore, Vibrio sp. isolate MZ has the potential to be used as a biomonitoring agent for biomonitoring of sludge biodegradation particularly in the tropical ranged environment. PMID:26688958

  20. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jeffrey G

    2016-07-01

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. This review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkable ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications. PMID:27263016

  1. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  2. DNA repair mechanism in radioresistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from various sources which are not in high background field. Since Deinococcus radiodurans had been isolated first in 1956, studies on the mechanism for radioresistance were carried out mostly using this bacterium. DNA in this bacterium isn't protected against injury induced by not only ionizing radiation but also ultraviolet light. Therefore, DNA damages induced by various treatments are efficiently and accurately repaired in this cells. Damages in base and/or sugar in DNA are removed by endonucleases which, if not all, are synthesized during postirradiation incubation. Following the endonucleolytic cleavage the strand scissions in DNA are seemed to be rejoined by a process common for the repair of strand scissions induced by such as ionizing radiations. Induce protein(s) is also involved in this rejoining process of strand scissions. DNA repair genes were classified into three phenotypic groups. (1)Genes which are responsible for the endonucleolytic activities. (2) Genes involved in the rejoining of DNA strand scissions. (3) Genes which participate in genetic recombination and repair. Three genes belong to (1) and (2) were cloned onto approximately 1 kbp DNA fragments which base sequences have been determined. (author)

  3. Treatment of common warts with the immune stimulant Propionium bacterium parvum Tratamento das verrugas vulgares com o imunoestimulante Propionium bacterium parvum

    OpenAIRE

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warts are epithelial proliferations in the skin and mucous membrane caused by various types of HPV. They can decrease spontaneously or increase in size and number according to the patient's immune status. The Propionium bacterium parvum is a strong immune stimulant and immune modulator and has important effects in the immune system and it is able to produce antibodies in the skin. OBJECTIVE: To show the efficacy of the Propionium bacterium parvum in saline solution in the treatmen...

  4. Dense populations of a giant sulfur bacterium in Namibian shelf sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Brinkhoff, T.; Ferdelman, TG;

    1999-01-01

    A previously unknown giant sulfur bacterium is abundant in sediments underlying the oxygen minimum zone of the Benguela Current upwelling system. The bacterium has a spherical cell that exceeds by up to 100-fold the biovolume of the largest known prokaryotes. On the basis of 16S ribosomal DNA...

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium. PMID:27609930

  6. Burkholderia phytofirmans sp. nov., a novel plant-associated bacterium with plant-beneficial properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sessitsch, A; Coenye, T; Sturz, AV; Vandamme, P; Barka, EA; Salles, JF; Van Elsas, JD; Faure, D; Reiter, B; Glick, BR; Wang-Pruski, G; Nowak, J

    2005-01-01

    A Gram-negative, non-sporulating, rod-shaped, motile bacterium, with a single polar flagellum, designated strain PsJNT, was isolated from surface-sterilized onion roots. This isolate proved to be a highly effective plant-beneficial bacterium, and was able to establish rhizosphere and endophytic popu

  7. Genome analysis of the Anerobic Thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Hooper, Sean D.; Sun, Hui; Kunin, Victor; Lapidus, Alla; Hugenholtz, Philip; Patel, Bharat; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2008-11-03

    Halothermothirx orenii is a strictly anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium isolated from sediment of a Tunisian salt lake. It belongs to the order Halanaerobiales in the phylum Firmicutes. The complete sequence revealed that the genome consists of one circular chromosome of 2578146 bps encoding 2451 predicted genes. This is the first genome sequence of an organism belonging to the Haloanaerobiales. Features of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were identified with the presence of both a sporulating mechanism typical of Firmicutes and a characteristic Gram negative lipopolysaccharide being the most prominent. Protein sequence analyses and metabolic reconstruction reveal a unique combination of strategies for thermophilic and halophilic adaptation. H. orenii can serve as a model organism for the study of the evolution of the Gram negative phenotype as well as the adaptation under thermohalophilic conditions and the development of biotechnological applications under conditions that require high temperatures and high salt concentrations.

  8. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. PMID:26965627

  9. Algicidal lactones from the marine Roseobacter clade bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Riclea

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Volatiles released by the marine Roseobacter clade bacterium Rugeria pomeroyi were collected by use of a closed-loop stripping headspace apparatus (CLSA and analysed by GC–MS. Several lactones were found for which structural proposals were derived from their mass spectra and unambiguously verified by the synthesis of reference compounds. An enantioselective synthesis of two exemplary lactones was performed to establish the enantiomeric compositions of the natural products by enantioselective GC–MS analyses. The lactones were subjected to biotests to investigate their activity against several bacteria, fungi, and algae. A specific algicidal activity was observed that may be important in the interaction between the bacteria and their algal hosts in fading algal blooms.

  10. The capacity of phototrophic sulfur bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina for chemosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratieva, E N; Zhukov, V G; Ivanovsky, R N; Petushkova, U P; Monosov, E Z

    1976-07-01

    Purple sulfur bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina strain BBS requiring vitamin B12 may grow in the dark in media containing no other organic compounds. Under such conditions the cells oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate with the use of O2 and assimilate carbon dioxide. After 10--30s assimilation of NaH14CO3 about 60% of radioactivity is found in phosphorylated compounds characteristic for the reductive pentose phosphate cycle. The possibility of the function of this cycle in the dark in the presence of O2 is confirmed by the capacity of cells grown under such conditions to synthesize ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase. All this evidence suggests the ability of T. roseopersicina to change from phototrophy to aerobic chemolithoautotrophy. PMID:942280

  11. Moritella viscosa, a pathogenic bacterium affecting the fillet quality in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2011-01-01

    Moritella viscosa is a bacterium belonging to the family Moritellaceae and was formerly known as Vibrio viscosus. The name ‘viscosa’ originates from the slimy nature of the bacterium. M. viscosa is considered to be the main causative agent of the phenomenon ‘winter ulcer’ or ‘cold-water ulcer......’ which affects various fish species in seawater during cold periods (Lunder et al. 1995). The bacterium is mainly a problem for farmed salmonid species, such as Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), but has also been isolated from other fish species, including Atlantic...

  12. Treatment of common warts with the immune stimulant Propionium bacterium parvum Tratamento das verrugas vulgares com o imunoestimulante Propionium bacterium parvum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Warts are epithelial proliferations in the skin and mucous membrane caused by various types of HPV. They can decrease spontaneously or increase in size and number according to the patient's immune status. The Propionium bacterium parvum is a strong immune stimulant and immune modulator and has important effects in the immune system and it is able to produce antibodies in the skin. OBJECTIVE: To show the efficacy of the Propionium bacterium parvum in saline solution in the treatment of skin warts. METHODS: A randomized double-blind study. Twenty patients with multiple warts were divided into two groups: one received 0,1ml intradermal injection of placebo solution in just one of the warts and the other received 0,1 ml of saline solution of Propionium bacterium parvum, one dose a month, for 3 to 5 months. RESULTS: Among the 20 patients who participated in the study, ten received the placebo and ten received the saline solution with Propionium bacterium parvum. In 9 patients treated with the Propionium bacterium parvum solution the warts disappeared without scars and in 1 patient it decreased in size. In 9 patients who received the placebo no change to the warts was observed and in 1 it decreased in size. CONCLUSIONS: The immune modulator and immune stimulant Propionium bacterium parvum produced antibodies in the skin which destroyed the warts without scars, with statistically significant results (PFUNDAMENTOS: Verrugas são proliferações epiteliais na pele e mucosas causadas por diversos tipos de HPV. Elas podem involuir espontaneameme ou aumentar em número e tamanho de acordo com estado imunitário do paciente. O Propionium bacterium parvum é urn potente imunoestimulador e imunomodulador e tem efeitos importantes no sistema imune e é capaz de produzir anticorpos na pele. OBJETIVO: Mostrar a eficácia do Propionium bacterium parvum diluído em solução salina no tratamento de verrugas cutâneas. MÊTODOS: Estudo duplo

  13. High cell density cultivation of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Benedek; Török, Tibor; Sándor, Erzsébet; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-05-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotrophic nitrifier, a gram-negative bacterium that can obtain all energy required for growth from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and this may be beneficial for various biotechnological and environmental applications. However, compared to other bacteria, growth of ammonia oxidizing bacteria is very slow. A prerequisite to produce high cell density N. europaea cultures is to minimize the concentrations of inhibitory metabolic by-products. During growth on ammonia nitrite accumulates, as a consequence, N. europaea cannot grow to high cell concentrations under conventional batch conditions. Here, we show that single-vessel dialysis membrane bioreactors can be used to obtain substantially increased N. europaea biomasses and substantially reduced nitrite levels in media initially containing high amounts of the substrate. Dialysis membrane bioreactor fermentations were run in batch as well as in continuous mode. Growth was monitored with cell concentration determinations, by assessing dry cell mass and by monitoring ammonium consumption as well as nitrite formation. In addition, metabolic activity was probed with in vivo acridine orange staining. Under continuous substrate feed, the maximal cell concentration (2.79 × 10(12)/L) and maximal dry cell mass (0.895 g/L) achieved more than doubled the highest values reported for N. europaea cultivations to date. PMID:26358065

  14. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resulted in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels. PMID:26902345

  15. Presence of an unusual methanogenic bacterium in coal gasification waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomei, F.A.; Rouse, D.; Maki, J.S.; Mitchell, R.

    1988-12-01

    Methanogenic bacteria growing on a pilot-scale, anaerobic filter processing coal gasification waste were enriched in a mineral salts medium containing hydrogen and acetate as potential energy sources. Transfer of the enrichments to methanol medium resulted in the initial growth of a strain of Methanosarcina barkeri, but eventually small cocci became dominant. The cocci growing on methanol produced methane and exhibited the typical fluorescence of methanogenic bacteria. They grew in the presence of the cell wall synthesis-inhibiting antibiotics D-cycloserine, fosfomycin, penicillin G, and vancomycin as well as in the presence of kanamycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis in eubacteria. The optimal growth temperature was 37 degrees C, and the doubling time was 7.5 h. The strain lysed after reaching stationary phase. The bacterium grew poorly with hydrogen as the energy source and failed to grow on acetate. Morphologically, the coccus shared similarities with Methanosarcina sp. Cells were 1 ..mu..m wide, exhibited the typical thick cell wall and cross-wall formation, and formed tetrads. Packets and cysts were not formed. 62 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henard, Calvin A; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Pienkos, Philip T; Guarnieri, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resulted in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to "green" chemicals and fuels. PMID:26902345

  17. Electromicrobiology of Dissimilatory Sulfur Reducing Bacterium Desulfuromonas acetexigens

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Bandar, Khaled

    2014-12-01

    Bioelectrochmical systems (BES) are engineered electrochemical devices that harness hidden chemical energy of the wastewater in to the form of electricity or hydrogen. Unique microbial communities enrich in these systems for oxidation of organic matter as well as transfer of resulted electron to anode, known them as “electricigens” communities. Exploring novel electricigenesis microbial communities in the nature and understanding their electromicrobiology is one the important aspect for BES systems scale up. Herein, we report first time the electricigenesis property of an anaerobic, fresh water sediment, sulfur reducing bacterium Desulfuromona acetexigens. The electrochemical behavior of D. acetexigens biofilms grown on graphite-rod electrodes in batch-fed mode under an applied potential was investigated with traditional electroanalytical tools, and correlate the electron transfer from biofilms to electrode with a model electricigen Geobacter sulfurreducens electrochemical behavior. Research findings suggest that D. acetexigens has the ability to use electrode as electron acceptor in BES systems through establishing the direct contact with anode by expressing the membrane bound redox proteins, but not due to the secretion of soluble redox mediators. Preliminary results revealed that D. acetexigens express three distinct redox proteins in their membranes for turnover of the electrons from biofilm to electrode, and the 4 whole electricigenesis process observed to be unique in the D. acetexigens compared to that of well-studied model organism G. sulfurreducens.

  18. Molecular study on cloned endoglucanase gene from rumen bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkose, Emin; Akyol, Ismail; Ekinci, Mehmet Sait

    2004-01-01

    An endoglucanase gene was subcloned from anaerobic rumen bacterium Ruminococcus flavefaciens strain 17. To express endoglucanase gene in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus bovis JB1, an endoglucanase gene fragment was inserted into pVA838-based shuttle vectors. Removal of endoglucanase gene promoter and expression of endoglucanase by promoter of S. bovis JB1 alpha-amylase gene (pACMCS) was also achieved. Survival of constructs pVACMCI, pTACMC and pACMCS, which carry endoglucanase gene, and stability of endoglucanase gene in S. bovis JB1, were observed. Maximal endoglucanase activities from S. bovis JB1/pVACMCI were 2- to 3-fold higher than from E. coli/pVACMCI. Specific cell activity of E. coli/pACMCS was found to be approximately 2- to -3 fold higher than the both E. coli/pVACMCI and E. coli/pTACMC. Specific cell activity of S. bovis JB1/pACMCS was also found to be approximately 2-fold higher than the both S. bovis/pVACMCI and S. bovis JB1/pTACMC. PMID:15925902

  19. Denitrification characteristics of a marine origin psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haiyan; Liu, Ying; Sun, Guangdong; Gao, Xiyan; Zhang, Qingling; Liu, Zhipei

    2011-01-01

    A psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium, strain S1-1, was isolated from a biological aerated filter conducted for treatment of recirculating water in a marine aquaculture system. Strain S1-1 was preliminarily identified as Psychrobacter sp. based on the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, which showed 100% sequence similarity to that of Psychrobacter sp. TSBY-70. Strain S1-1 grew well either in high nitrate or high nitrite conditions with a removal of 100% nitrate or 63.50% nitrite, and the total nitrogen removal rates could reach to 46.48% and 31.89%, respectively. The results indicated that nitrate was mainly reduced in its logarithmic growth phase with a very low level accumulation of nitrite, suggesting that the aerobic denitrification process of strain S1-1 occurred mainly in this phase. The GC-MS results showed that N2O was formed as the major intermediate during the aerobic denitrifying process of strain S1-1. Finally, factors affecting the growth of strain S1-1 and its aerobic denitrifying ability were also investigated. Results showed that the optimum aerobic denitrification conditions for strain S1-1 were sodium succinate as carbon source, C/N ratio15, salinity 10 g/L NaCl, incubation temperature 20 degrees C and initial pH 6.5. PMID:22432315

  20. Denitrification characteristics of a marine origin psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan Zheng; Ying Liu; Guangdong Sun; Xiyan Gao; Qingling Zhang; Zhipei Liu

    2011-01-01

    A psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium,strain S1-1,was isolated from a biological aerated filter conducted for treatment of recirculating water in a marine aquaculture system.Strain S1-1 was preliminarily identified as Psychrobacter sp.based on the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence,which showed 100% sequence similarity to that of Psychrobacter sp.TSBY-70.Strain S 1-1 grew well either in high nitrate or high nitrite conditions with a removal of 100% nitrate or 63.50% nitrite,and the total nitrogen removal rates could reach to 46.48% and 31.89%,respectively.The results indicated that nitrate was mainly reduced in its logarithmic growth phase with a very low leve 1 accumulation of nitrite,suggesting that the aerobic denitrification process of strain S l-1 occurred mainly in this phase.The GC-MS results showed that N2O was formed as the major intermediate during the aerobic denitrifying process of strain S1-1.Finally,factors affecting the growth of strain Sl-1 and its aerobic denitrifying ability were also investigated.Results showed that the optimum aerobic denitrification conditions for strain S1-1 were sodium succinate as carbon source,C/N ratio15,salinity 10 g/L NaCl,incubation temperature 20℃ and initial pH 6.5.

  1. Isolation and characterization of Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus sp. nov., an extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic, anaerobic bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana; Mathrani, Indra M.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1995-01-01

    An anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic, non-spore-forming bacterium, strain 6A, was isolated from an alkaline hot spring in Hverageroi, Iceland. The bacterium was non-motile, rod-shaped (1.5-3.5 x 0.7 mu m) and occurred singly, in pairs or in chains and stained gram-negative. The growth...... temperature was between 50 and 78 degrees C with a temperature optimum near 68 degrees C. Growth occurred between pH 5.8 and 8.2 with an optimum mum near 7.0. The bacterium fermented microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) and produced lactate, acetate and H-2 as the major fermentation products, and CO2...... and ethanol occurred as minor fermentation products. Only a restricted number of carbon sources (cellulose, xylan, starch, pectin, cellobiose, xylose, maltose and lactose) were used as substrates. During growth on Avicel, the bacterium produced free cellulases with carboxymethylcellulase and avicelase...

  2. Dinoroseobacter shibae gen. nov., sp. nov., a new aerobic phototrophic bacterium isolated from dinoflagellates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biebl, H.; Allgaier, M.; Tindall, B. J.; Koblížek, Michal; Lünsdorf, H.; Pukall, R.; Wagner-Döbler, I.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 55, - (2005), s. 1089-1096. ISSN 1466-5026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Dinoroseobacter shibae * phototrophic bacterium Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2005

  3. Carbohydrate utilization patterns for the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus reveal broad growth substrate preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanfossen, A.L.; Verhaart, M.R.A.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Kelly, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    Co-utilization of hexoses and pentoses derived from lignocellulose is an attractive trait in microorganisms considered for consolidated biomass processing to biofuels. This issue was examined for the H2-producing, extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus growing on indiv

  4. Genome Sequence of the Haloalkaliphilic Methanotrophic Bacterium Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z

    OpenAIRE

    Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Bringel, Françoise; Reshetnikov, Alexandr S.; Lajus, Aurélie; Mangenot, Sophie; Rouy, Zoé; Op Den Camp, Huub J M; Jetten, Mike S. M.; DiSpirito, Alan A.; Dunfield, Peter; Klotz, Martin G.; Semrau, Jeremy D.; Stein, Lisa Y.; Barbe, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Methylomicrobium strains are widespread in saline environments. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, a haloalkaliphilic methanotrophic bacterium, which will provide the basis for detailed characterization of the core pathways of both single-carbon metabolism and responses to osmotic and high-pH stresses. Final assembly of the genome sequence revealed that this bacterium contains a 128-kb plasmid, making M. alcaliphilum 20Z the first methanotrophic...

  5. Effect of alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the growth of Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG You; TANG Xue-xi; YANG Zhen; YU Zhi-ming

    2006-01-01

    We collected the diseased blades of Laminaria japonica from Yantai Sea Farm from October to December 2002, and the alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the diseased blade was isolated and purified, and was identified as Alteromonas espejiana. This bacterium was applied as the causative pathogen to infect the blades of L. japonica under laboratory conditions. The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of the bacterium on the growth of L. japonica, and to find the possibly effective mechanism. Results showed that: (1)The blades of L.japonica exhibited symptoms of lesion,bleaching and deterioration when infected by the bacterium,and their growth and photosynthesis were dramatically suppressed. At the same time, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation enhanced obviously, and the relative membrane permeability increased significantly. The contents of malonaldehyde (MDA) and free fatty acid in the microsomol membrane greatly elevated, but the phospholipid content decreased. Result suggested an obvious peroxidation and deesterrification in the blades of L. japonica when infected by the bacterium. (2) The simultaneous assay on the antioxidant enzyme activities demonstrated that superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) increased greatly when infected by the bacterium, but glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) did not exhibit active responses to the bacterium throughout the experiment. (3) The histomorphological observations gave a distinctive evidence of the severity of the lesions as well as the relative abundance in the bacterial population on the blades after infection. The bacterium firstly invaded into the endodermis of L. japonica and gathered around there, and then resulted in the membrane damage, cells corruption and ultimately, the death of L.japonica.

  6. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio)

    OpenAIRE

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papi...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of DLB, a Dyella-Like Bacterium from the Planthopper Hyalesthes obsoletus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, Tamar; Zchori-Fein, Einat; Naor, Vered; Freilich, Shiri

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Dyella-like bacterium (DLB) isolated from Hyalesthes obsoletus, the insect vector of the uncultivable mollicute bacterium “Candidatus Phytoplasma.” This isolate inhibits Spiroplasma melliferum, a cultivable mollicute. The draft genome of DLB consists of 4,196,214 bp, with a 68.6% G+C content, and 3,757 genes were predicted. PMID:27445378

  8. Biosynthesis Of Gold Nanoparticles By Marine Purple Non Sulphur Bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas Sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Abirami. G; Asmathunisha. N; Kathiresan. K

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes for the first time that an anaerobic marine bacterium is capable of producing gold nanoparticles. A marine purple non-sulphur bacterium was isolated from mangrove sediment and identified as Rhodopseudomonas sp. . The bacterial culture was tested for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles by using aqueous HAuCl4 solution as substrate in darkness. The gold nanoparticles synthesized were found to be of cubical structure in the size range of 10–20 nm.

  9. Carbonate biomineralization induced by soil bacterium Bacillus megaterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Bin; Hu, Qiaona; Chen, Jun; Ji, Junfeng; Teng, H. Henry

    2006-11-01

    Biogenic carbonates spawned from microbial activities are common occurrences in soils. Here, we investigate the carbonate biomineralization mediated by the bacterium Bacillus megaterium, a dominant strain separated from a loess profile in China. Upon completing bacterial cultivation, the ensuring products are centrifuged, and the resultant supernatant and the concentrated bacterial sludge as well as the un-separated culture are added separately into a Ca-CO 3 containing solution for crystallization experiments. Results of XRD and SEM analysis indicate that calcite is the dominant mineral phase formed when the bacteria are present. When the supernatant alone is used, however, a significant portion of vaterite is also precipitated. Experimental results further reveal that the bacteria have a strong tendency to colonize the center area of the calcite {1 0 1¯ 4} faces. Observed crystal morphology suggests that the bacterial colony may promote the growth normal to each individual {1 0 1¯ 4} face of calcite when the cell concentration is high, but may retard it or even cause dissolution of the immediate substrate surfaces when the concentration is low. SEM images taken at earlier stages of the crystallization experiments demonstrate the nucleation of calcite on the bacterial cell walls but do not show obvious morphological changes on the nanometer- to submicron-sized nuclei. δ 13C measurements unveil that the crystals grown in the presence of bacteria are further enriched in the heavy carbon isotope, implying that the bacterial metabolism may not be the carbon sources for the mineralization. Based upon these findings, we propose a mechanism for the B. megaterium mediated calcite mineralization and conclude that the whole process involves epi- and inter-cellular growth in the local microenvironments whose conditions may be controlled by cell sequestration and proton pumping during bacterial respiration.

  10. Metabolic evolution of a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakman, Rogier; Smith, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium restricted to hydrothermal vents and hot springs. These characteristics make it an excellent model system for studying the early evolution of metabolism. Here we present the whole-genome metabolic network of this organism and examine in detail the driving forces that have shaped it. We make extensive use of phylometabolic analysis, a method we recently introduced that generates trees of metabolic phenotypes by integrating phylogenetic and metabolic constraints. We reconstruct the evolution of a range of metabolic sub-systems, including the reductive citric acid (rTCA) cycle, as well as the biosynthesis and functional roles of several amino acids and cofactors. We show that A. aeolicus uses the reconstructed ancestral pathways within many of these sub-systems, and highlight how the evolutionary interconnections between sub-systems facilitated several key innovations. Our analyses further highlight three general classes of driving forces in metabolic evolution. One is the duplication and divergence of genes for enzymes as these progress from lower to higher substrate specificity, improving the kinetics of certain sub-systems. A second is the kinetic optimization of established pathways through fusion of enzymes, or their organization into larger complexes. The third is the minimization of the ATP unit cost to synthesize biomass, improving thermodynamic efficiency. Quantifying the distribution of these classes of innovations across metabolic sub-systems and across the tree of life will allow us to assess how a tradeoff between maximizing growth rate and growth efficiency has shaped the long-term metabolic evolution of the biosphere. PMID:24516572

  11. Interaction of Cadmium With the Aerobic Bacterium Pseudomonas Mendocina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, P. J.; Haack, E. A.; Maurice, P. A.

    2006-05-01

    The fate of toxic metals in the environment can be heavily influenced by interaction with bacteria in the vadose zone. This research focuses on the interactions of cadmium with the strict aerobe Pseudomonas mendocina. P. mendocina is a gram-negative bacterium that has shown potential in the bioremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds. Cadmium is a common environmental contaminant of wide-spread ecological consequence. In batch experiments P. mendocina shows typical bacterial growth curves, with an initial lag phase followed by an exponential phase and a stationary to death phase; concomitant with growth was an increase in pH from initial values of 7 to final values at 96 hours of 8.8. Cd both delays the onset of the exponential phase and decreases the maximum population size, as quantified by optical density and microscopic cell counts (DAPI). The total amount of Cd removed from solution increases over time, as does the amount of Cd removed from solution normalized per bacterial cell. Images obtained with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the production of a cadmium, phosphorus, and iron containing precipitate that was similar in form and composition to precipitates formed abiotically at elevated pH. However, by late stationary phase, the precipitate had been re-dissolved, perhaps by biotic processes in order to obtain Fe. Stressed conditions are suggested by TEM images showing the formation of pili, or nanowires, when 20ppm Cd was present and a marked decrease in exopolysaccharide and biofilm material in comparison to control cells (no cadmium added).

  12. Metabolic evolution of a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier Braakman

    Full Text Available Aquifex aeolicus is a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium restricted to hydrothermal vents and hot springs. These characteristics make it an excellent model system for studying the early evolution of metabolism. Here we present the whole-genome metabolic network of this organism and examine in detail the driving forces that have shaped it. We make extensive use of phylometabolic analysis, a method we recently introduced that generates trees of metabolic phenotypes by integrating phylogenetic and metabolic constraints. We reconstruct the evolution of a range of metabolic sub-systems, including the reductive citric acid (rTCA cycle, as well as the biosynthesis and functional roles of several amino acids and cofactors. We show that A. aeolicus uses the reconstructed ancestral pathways within many of these sub-systems, and highlight how the evolutionary interconnections between sub-systems facilitated several key innovations. Our analyses further highlight three general classes of driving forces in metabolic evolution. One is the duplication and divergence of genes for enzymes as these progress from lower to higher substrate specificity, improving the kinetics of certain sub-systems. A second is the kinetic optimization of established pathways through fusion of enzymes, or their organization into larger complexes. The third is the minimization of the ATP unit cost to synthesize biomass, improving thermodynamic efficiency. Quantifying the distribution of these classes of innovations across metabolic sub-systems and across the tree of life will allow us to assess how a tradeoff between maximizing growth rate and growth efficiency has shaped the long-term metabolic evolution of the biosphere.

  13. Paenibacillus xylanilyticus sp. nov., an airborne xylanolytic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Raúl; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2005-01-01

    During a search for xylan-degrading micro-organisms, a sporulating bacterium was recovered from xylan-containing agar plates exposed to air in a research laboratory (Salamanca University, Spain). The airborne isolate (designated strain XIL14T) was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as representing a Paenibacillus species most closely related to Paenibacillus illinoisensis JCM 9907T (99.3 % sequence similarity) and Paenibacillus pabuli DSM 3036T (98 % sequence similarity). Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and DNA-DNA hybridization data indicated that the isolate belongs to a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus. Cells of strain XIL14T were motile, sporulating, rod-shaped, Gram-positive and facultatively anaerobic. The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0) and C(16 : 0). The DNA G+C content of strain XIL14T was 50.5 mol%. Growth was observed with many carbohydrates, including xylan, as the only carbon source and gas production was not observed from glucose. Catalase was positive and oxidase was negative. The airborne isolate produced a variety of hydrolytic enzymes, including xylanases, amylases, gelatinase and beta-galactosidase. DNA-DNA hybridization levels between strain XIL14T and P. illinoisensis DSM 11733T and P. pabuli DSM 3036T were 43.3 and 36.3 %, respectively. According to the data obtained, strain XIL14T is considered to represent a novel species for which the name Paenibacillus xylanilyticus sp. nov. is proposed (=LMG 21957T=CECT 5839T). PMID:15653909

  14. The Kdp-ATPase system and its regulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anand Ballal; Bhakti Basu; Shree Kumar Apte

    2007-04-01

    K+, the dominant intracellular cation, is required for various physiological processes like turgor homeostasis, pH regulation etc. Bacterial cells have evolved many diverse K+ transporters to maintain the desired concentration of internal K+. In E. coli, the KdpATPase (comprising of the KdpFABC complex), encoded by the kdpFABC operon, is an inducible high-affinity K+ transporter that is synthesised under conditions of severe K+ limitation or osmotic upshift. The E. coli kdp expression is transcriptionally regulated by the KdpD and KdpE proteins, which together constitute a typical bacterial two-component signal transduction system. The Kdp system is widely dispersed among the different classes of bacteria including the cyanobacteria. The ordering of the kdpA, kdpB and kdpC is relatively fixed but the kdpD/E genes show different arrangements in distantly related bacteria. Our studies have shown that the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain L-31 possesses two kdp operons, kdp1 and kdp2, of which, the later is expressed under K+ deficiency and desiccation. Among the regulatory genes, the kdpD ORF of Anabaena L-31 is truncated when compared to the kdpD of other bacteria, while a kdpE-like gene is absent. The extremely radio-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1, also shows the presence of a naturally short kdpD ORF similar to Anabaena in its kdp operon. The review elaborates the expression of bacterial kdp operons in response to various environmental stress conditions, with special emphasis on Anabaena. The possible mechanism(s) of regulation of the unique kdp operons from Anabaena and Deinococcus are also discussed.

  15. Regulation of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in the Soil Bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelas, J I; Mesa, S; Mongiardini, E J; Jendrossek, D; Lodeiro, A R

    2016-07-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a carbon and energy reserve polymer in various prokaryotic species. We determined that, when grown with mannitol as the sole carbon source, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens produces a homopolymer composed only of 3-hydroxybutyrate units (PHB). Conditions of oxygen limitation (such as microoxia, oxic stationary phase, and bacteroids inside legume nodules) were permissive for the synthesis of PHB, which was observed as cytoplasmic granules. To study the regulation of PHB synthesis, we generated mutations in the regulator gene phaR and the phasin genes phaP1 and phaP4 Under permissive conditions, mutation of phaR impaired PHB accumulation, and a phaP1 phaP4 double mutant produced more PHB than the wild type, which was accumulated in a single, large cytoplasmic granule. Moreover, PhaR negatively regulated the expression of phaP1 and phaP4 as well as the expression of phaA1 and phaA2 (encoding a 3-ketoacyl coenzyme A [CoA] thiolases), phaC1 and phaC2 (encoding PHB synthases), and fixK2 (encoding a cyclic AMP receptor protein [CRP]/fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator [FNR]-type transcription factor of genes for microoxic lifestyle). In addition to the depressed PHB cycling, phaR mutants accumulated more extracellular polysaccharides and promoted higher plant shoot dry weight and competitiveness for nodulation than the wild type, in contrast to the phaC1 mutant strain, which is defective in PHB synthesis. These results suggest that phaR not only regulates PHB granule formation by controlling the expression of phasins and biosynthetic enzymes but also acts as a global regulator of excess carbon allocation and symbiosis by controlling fixK2 IMPORTANCE: In this work, we investigated the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis in the soybean-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens and its influence in bacterial free-living and symbiotic lifestyles. We uncovered a new interplay between the synthesis of this carbon reserve polymer

  16. Photoactive yellow protein from the halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmi, Samy; Kyndt, John; Meyer, Terry; Devreese, Bart; Cusanovich, Michael; Van Beeumen, Jozef

    2008-02-19

    A gene for photoactive yellow protein (PYP) was identified from the genome sequence of the extremely halophilic aerobic bacterium Salinibacter ruber (Sr). The sequence is distantly related to the prototypic PYP from Halorhodospira halophila (Hh) (37% identity) and contains most of the amino acid residues identified as necessary for function. However, the Sr pyp gene is not flanked by its two biosynthetic genes as in other species. To determine as to whether the Sr pyp gene encodes a functional protein, we cloned and expressed it in Escherichia coli, along with the genes for chromophore biosynthesis from Rhodobacter capsulatus. The Sr PYP has a 31-residue N-terminal extension as compared to other PYPs that appears to be important for dimerization; however, truncation of these extra residues did not change the spectral and photokinetic properties. Sr PYP has an absorption maximum at 431 nm, which is at shorter wavelengths than the prototypical Hh PYP (at 446 nm). It is also photoactive, being reversibly bleached by either blue or white light. The kinetics of dark recovery is slower than any of the PYPs reported to date (4.27 x 10(-4) s(-1) at pH 7.5). Sr PYP appears to have a normal photocycle with the I1 and I2 intermediates. The presence of the I2' intermediate is also inferred on the basis of the effects of temperature and alchohol on recovery. Sr PYP has an intermediate spectral form in equilibrium with the 431 nm form, similar to R. capsulatus PYP and the Y42F mutant of Hh PYP. Increasing ionic strength stabilizes the 431 nm form at the expense of the intermediate spectral form, and the kinetics of recovery is accelerated 6.4-fold between 0 and 3.5 M salt. This is observed with ions from both the chaotropic and the kosmotropic series. Ionic strength also stabilizes PYP against thermal denaturation, as the melting temperature is increased from 74 degrees C in buffer alone to 92 degrees C in 2 M KCl. Sr accumulates KCl in the cytoplasm, like Halobacterium, to

  17. A plant growth-promoting bacterium that decreases nickel toxicity in seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burd, G.I.; Dixon, D.G.; Glick, B.R. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology

    1998-10-01

    A plant growth-promoting bacterium, Kluyvera ascorbata SUD165, that contained high levels of heavy metals was isolated from soil collected near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The bacterium was resistant to the toxic effects of Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and CrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, produced a siderophore(s), and displayed 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity. Canola seeds inoculated with this bacterium and then grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the presence of high concentrations of nickel chloride were partially protected against nickel toxicity. In addition, protection by the bacterium against nickel toxicity was evident in pot experiments with canola and tomato seeds. The presence of K. ascorbata SUD165 had no measurable influence on the amount of nickel accumulated per milligram (dry weight) of either roots or shoots of canola plants. Therefore, the bacterial plant growth-promoting effect in the presence of nickel was probably not attributable to the reduction of nickel uptake by seedlings. Rather, it may reflect the ability of the bacterium to lower the level of stress ethylene induced by the nickel.

  18. Action of the Selenomorpholine Compounds on the Bacterium Growth by Microcalorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Xi(李曦); LIU,Yi(刘义); WU,Jun(吴军); QU,Song-Sheng(屈松生)

    2002-01-01

    The action of β-(N-selenomorpholine) ethyl phenyl ketone hy drochloride and 4-(N-selenomorpholine)-2-butanone hydrochloride on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was studied by microcalorimetry. Differences in their capacities to affect the metabolism of this bacterium were observed. The kinetics shows that the selenomorphline compounds had action on the metabolism process of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The rate constant (k) of the studied bacterium in the presence of the drugs are concentration-dependant. The growth rate constants decrease with an increase in the mass of the selenomorpholine compounds, but their relationship is different. As deduced from the rate constant (k) of the studied bacterium (in log phase) and the half inhibitory concentration (IC50), the experimental results reveal that the studied selenomorphline compounds all have good antibiotic activity and better antibacterial activity on Staphylococcus aureus than on Escherichia coli.

  19. Studies on the pathogenic bacterium of ulcer disease in Epinephelus awoara

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the cause of the acute mortality of cage-cultured Epinephelus awoara in the Tong'an Bay of Xiamen, China during the summer of 2002. Predominant bacteria strain TS-628 was isolated from the diseased grouper. The virulence test confirmed that TS-628 was the pathogenic bacterium. Biochemical characteristics of the isolates were determined using the automatic bacterial identification system and standard tube tests. To further confirm the identification, a 1 121 bp 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate was amplified by PCR, which had been deposited into Genbank (accession number: AY747308). According to the biochemical characteristics and by comparing the 16S rRNA gene homology of the isolate, the pathogenic bacterium was identified as Vibrio harveyi. Drug sensitivity tests showed that this pathogenic bacterium was sensitive to 16 antibacterials, especially to chloramphenicol and actinospectacin, but completely resistant to antibacterials likes vancomycin, penicillin, lincomycin, and so on.

  20. Action of the Selenomorpholine Compounds on the Bacterium Growth by Microcalorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李曦; 刘义; 等

    2002-01-01

    The action of β-(N-selenomorpholine) ethyl phenyl ketone hydrochloride and 4-(N-selenomorpholine)-2-butanone hydro-chloride on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was studied by microcalorimetry,Differences in their capacities to affect the metabolism of this bacterium were observed.The kinetics shows that the selenomorpholine compounds had action on the metabolism process of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.The rate constant (k) of the studied bacterium in the presence of the drugs are concentration-dependant.The growth rate constants decrease with an increase in the mass of the selenomorpholine compounds ,but their relationship is different.As deduced from the rate constant(k) of the studied bacterium(in log phase )and the half inhibitory concentration (IC50),the experimental results reveal that the studied selenomorpholine compounds all have good antibiotic activity and better antibacterial activity on Staphylcoccus aureus than on Escherichia coli.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Mun Su [University of Florida, Gainesville; Moritz, Brelan E. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Patel, Milind [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ou, Mark [University of Florida, Gainesville; Harbrucker, Roberta [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ingram, Lonnie O. [University of Florida; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T. [University of Florida

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  3. Cloning, Expression and Characterization of PprI gene in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Mirzaie; Jalil Fallah Mehrabadi; Noor Amirmozafari; Taher Nejadsattari

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: PprI is one of newly gene identified in Deinococcus radiodurans and plays a critical role in DNA repair and protection against ultraviolet radiation stress. The aim of this study was to clone, express and characterize PprI gene in Escherichia coli.Materials and Methods: The PprI gene of D. radiodurans was constructed in pGEM-B1 vector and the cloned gene was subcloned into pET21a expression vector. The pET21a-PprI was expressed in E. coli (Origami strain). Expressio...

  4. Removal of corper(II) Ions from aqueous solution by a lactic acid bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    M. Yilmaz(Department of Physics, Gazi University, Ankara); T. Tay; M. Kivanc; H. Turk

    2010-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium, a lactic acid bacterium (LAB), was evaluated for its ability to remove copper(II) ions from water. The effects of the pH, contact time, initial concentration of copper(II) ions, and temperature on the biosorption rate and capacity were studied. The initial concentrations of copper(II) ions used to determine the maximum amount of biosorbed copper(II) ions onto lyophilised lactic acid bacterium varied from 25 mg L-1 to 500 mg L-1. Maximum biosorption capacities were attain...

  5. Sensitivity of the bacterium Bacillus Thuringiensis as an insect disease agent to gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of gamma radiation on the viability of the entomopathogenic spore-forming bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis, was tested. The different gamma doses varied much in their effect on such bacterium. All irradiated Bacillus suspensions with doses below 85 krad showed different degrees of inhibitory activity. However, bacterial suspensions irradiated at a dose of 90 krad. proved to promote spore germination. Changes in the physiological, and morphological characters of the irradiated Bacillus at these levels were detected. The new observed characters were induced at a particular dose level of 90 krad. These new characters are assumed to be due to genetic changes induced at this particular gamma dose

  6. Physiological and taxonomic description of the novel autotrophic, metal oxidizing bacterium, Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Karrie A; Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Thrash, J. Cameron; White, David C.; Achenbach, Laurie A.; Coates, John D.

    2009-01-01

    A lithoautotrophic, Fe(II) oxidizing, nitrate-reducing bacterium, strain 2002 (ATCC BAA-1479; =DSM 18807), was isolated as part of a study on nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation in freshwater lake sediments. Here we provide an in-depth phenotypic and phylogenetic description of the isolate. Strain 2002 is a gram-negative, non-spore forming, motile, rod-shaped bacterium which tested positive for oxidase, catalase, and urease. Analysis of the complete 16S rRNA gene sequence placed strain 2002 in...

  7. Aminomonas paucivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a mesophilic, anaerobic, amino-acid-utilizing bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Baena, S.; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard; Labat, Marc; Thomas, P; Garcia, Jean-Louis; Patel, B.K.C.

    1999-01-01

    A novel, asaccharolytic, amino-acid-degrading bacterium, designated strain GLU-3T, was isolated from an anaerobic lagoon of a dairy wastewater treatment plant. Strain GLU-3T stained Gram-negative and was an obligately anaerobic, non-spore-forming, slightly curved, rod-shaped bacterium (0.3 x 4.0-6.0 micrometers) which existed singly or in pairs. The DNA G+C content was 43 mol%. Optimum growth occurred at 35°C and pH 7.5 on arginine, histidine, threonine and glycine. Acetate was the end-produc...

  8. Genome sequence of Symbiobacterium thermophilum, an uncultivable bacterium that depends on microbial commensalism

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Kenji; YAMASHITA Atsushi; Ishikawa, Jun; Shimada, Masafumi; Watsuji, Tomo-o; Morimura, Kohji; Ikeda, Haruo; Hattori, Masahira; Beppu, Teruhiko

    2004-01-01

    Symbiobacterium thermophilum is an uncultivable bacterium isolated from compost that depends on microbial commensalism. The 16S ribosomal DNA-based phylogeny suggests that this bacterium belongs to an unknown taxon in the Gram-positive bacterial cluster. Here, we describe the 3.57 Mb genome sequence of S.thermophilum. The genome consists of 3338 protein-coding sequences, out of which 2082 have functional assignments. Despite the high G + C content (68.7%), the genome is closest to that of Fir...

  9. Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus NY-4, a novel denitrifying, moderately halophilic marine bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Rongpeng; Zi, Xiaoli; Wang, Xinfeng; Zhang, Xia; Gao, Haofeng; Hu, Nan

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of a novel halophilic denitrifying marine bacterium is described. The halophilic bacterium, designated as NY-4, was isolated from soil in Yancheng City, China, and identified as Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus by 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogenetic analysis. This organism can grow in NaCl concentrations ranging from 20 to 120 g/L. Optimum growth occurs at 80 g/L NaCl and pH 8.0. The organism can grow on a broad range of carbon sources and demonstrated eff...

  10. Purification and Characterization of Haloalkaline, Organic Solvent Stable Xylanase from Newly Isolated Halophilic Bacterium-OKH

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghvi, Gaurav; Jivrajani, Mehul; Patel, Nirav; Jivrajani, Heta; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Patel, Shivani

    2014-01-01

    A novel, alkali-tolerant halophilic bacterium-OKH with an ability to produce extracellular halophilic, alkali-tolerant, organic solvent stable, and moderately thermostable xylanase was isolated from salt salterns of Mithapur region, Gujarat, India. Identification of the bacterium was done based upon biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence. Maximum xylanase production was achieved at pH 9.0 and 37°C temperature in the medium containing 15% NaCl and 1% (w/v) corn cobs. Sugarcane bagasse and whe...

  11. Enhanced Cadmium (Cd) Phytoextraction from Contaminated Soil using Cd-Resistant Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Kunchaya Setkit; Acharaporn Kumsopa; Jaruwan Wongthanate; Benjaphorn Prapagdee

    2014-01-01

    A cadmium (Cd)-resistant bacterium, Micrococcus sp. MU1, is able to produce indole-3-acetic acid and promotes root elongation and plant growth. The potential of this bacterium on enhancement of Cd uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd in Helianthus annuus L. planted in Cd-contaminated soil was evaluated in greenhouse condition. The results showed that Micrococcus sp. MU1promoted the growth of H. annuus L. by increasing the root length, stem height, dry biomass, root to shoot ratio and also signifi...

  12. Isolation from swine feces of a bacterium which decarboxylates p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid to 4-methylphenol (p-cresol).

    OpenAIRE

    L. A. Ward; Johnson, K A; Robinson, I.M.; Yokoyama, M T

    1987-01-01

    An obligate anaerobe has been isolated from swine feces which decarboxylates p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid to 4-methylphenol (p-cresol). The bacterium was an ovoid rod, gram positive, nonsporeforming, and nonmotile. Lactate and acetate were major end products of glucose fermentation. Based on its characteristics, the bacterium is tentatively assigned to the genus Lactobacillus.

  13. New recombinant bacterium comprises a heterologous gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and/or an up-regulated native gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase, useful for producing ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY FOCUS - BIOTECHNOLOGY - Preparation (claimed): Producing recombinant bacterium having enhanced ethanol production characteristics when cultivated in growth medium comprising glycerol comprises: (a) transforming a parental bacterium by (i) the insertion of a heterologous gene encoding...... glycerol dehydrogenase; and/or (ii) up-regulating a native gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase; and (b) obtaining the recombinant bacterium. Preferred Bacterium: In the recombinant bacterium above, the inserted heterologous gene and/or the up-regulated native gene is encoding a glycerol dehydrogenase...... dehydrogenase encoding region of the bacterium, or is inserted into a phosphotransacetylase encoding region of the bacterium, or is inserted into an acetate kinase encoding region of the bacterium. It is operably linked to an inducible, a regulated or a constitutive promoter. The up-regulated glycerol...

  14. Isolation and Structure Elucidation of a Novel Yellow Pigment from the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kumar

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment is a major source for many novel natural compounds. A new yellow pigment has been isolated from the marine bacterium P. tunicata and identified as a new member of the tambjamine class of compounds. The structural identification was achieved by a combination of 1D and 2D-NMR spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry data.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, a Chromium-Resistant Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Aminur; Nahar, Noor; Olsson, Björn; Mandal, Abul

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported a chromium-resistant bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, isolated from the landfills of tannery industries in Bangladesh. Here, we investigated its genetic composition using massively parallel sequencing and comparative analysis with other known Enterobacter genomes. Assembly of the sequencing reads revealed a genome of ~4.21 Mb in size. PMID:27257201

  16. Identification and Characterization of Clostridium paraputrificum, a Chitinolytic Bacterium of Human Digestive Tract

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimůnek, Jiří; Kopečný, Jan; Hodrová, Blanka; Bartoňová, Hana

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2002), s. 559-564. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK5020115; GA ČR GA525/00/0984; GA AV ČR KSK5052113 Keywords : Clostridium paraputrificum * Chitinolytic bacterium * digestive tract Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.979, year: 2002

  17. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments. PMID:26853478

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Schleiferia thermophila Strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes)

    OpenAIRE

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Ramaley, Robert F.; Stephan C Schuster; Steinke, Laurey; Bryant, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic bacterium Schleiferia thermophila strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes), isolated from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 2,617,694 bp in 35 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 2,457 protein coding genes and 37 tRNA encoding genes and two rRNA operons.

  19. Genome Sequence of the Acetogenic Bacterium Moorella mulderi DSM 14980T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Villamizar, Genis Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Moorella mulderi DSM 14980T, a thermophilic acetogenic bacterium, which is able to grow autotrophically on H2 plus CO2 using the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (2.99 Mb). PMID:27231372

  20. Removal of zinc from aqueous solution by metal resistant symbiotic bacterium Mesorhizobium amorphae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Xiuli; Mohamad, Osama Abdalla; Xie, Pin;

    2014-01-01

    Biosorption of zinc by living biomasses of metal resistant symbiotic bacterium Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 was investigated under optimal conditions at pH 5.0, initial metal concentrations of 100 mg L-1, and a dose of 1.0 g L-1. M. amorphae exhibited an efficient removal of Zn2+ from aqueous...

  1. Cloning, sequencing, and sequence analysis of two novel plasmids from the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Anaerocellum thermophilum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Schrøder, I.;

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of two novel plasmids isolated from the extreme thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM6725 (A. thermophilum), growing optimally at 70degreesC, has been determined. pBAS2 was found to be a 3653 bp plasmid with a GC content of 43%, and the sequence...

  2. Thermaerobacter litoralis sp. nov., a strictly aerobic and thermophilic bacterium isolated from a coastal hydrothermal field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanaka, Reiji; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Hiroshi;

    2006-01-01

    A novel thermophilic bacterium, strain KW1T, was isolated from a coastal hydrothermal field on the Satsuma Peninsula, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. The variably Gram-stained cells were motile rods with flagella, did not form spores and proliferated at 52-78°C (optimum, 70°C), pH 5-8 (optimum, pH 7...

  3. The atherogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis evades circulating phagocytes by adhering to erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Damgaard, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    A relationship between periodontitis and coronary heart disease has been investigated intensively. A pathogenic role for the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been suggested for both diseases. We examined whether complement activation by P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 allows the bacter......A relationship between periodontitis and coronary heart disease has been investigated intensively. A pathogenic role for the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been suggested for both diseases. We examined whether complement activation by P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 allows...... the bacterium to adhere to human red blood cells (RBCs) and thereby evade attack by circulating phagocytes. On incubation with normal human serum, the P. gingivalis strain efficiently fixed complement component 3 (C3). Incubation of bacteria with washed whole blood cells suspended in autologous serum resulted......) and that by monocytes after between 15 min and 30 min of incubation (by 66% and 53%, respectively). The attachment of C3b/iC3b to bacterium-bearing RBCs decreased progressively after 15 min, indicating that conversion of C3 fragments into C3dg occurred, decreasing the affinity for CR1 on RBCs. We propose that P...

  4. Isolation and algae-lysing characteristics of the algicidal bacterium B5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Water blooms have become a worldwide environmental problem. Recently, algicidal bacteria have attracted wide attention as possible agents for inhibiting algal water blooms. In this study, one strain of algicidal bacterium B5 was isolated from activated sludge. On the basis of analysis of its physiological characteristics and 16S rDNA gene sequence, it was identified as Bacillus fusiformis. Its algae-lysing characteristics on Microcystis aeruginosa, Chlorella and Scenedesmus were tested. The results showed that: (1) the algicidal bacterium B5 is a Gram-negative bacterium. The 16S rDNA nucleotide sequence homology of strain B5 with 2 strains of B. fusiformis reached 99.86%, so B5 was identified as B. fusiformis; (2) the algal-lysing effects of the algicidal bacterium B5 on M. aeruginosa, Chlorella and Scenedesmus were pronounced. The initial bacterial and algal cell densities strongly influence the removal rates of chlorophyll-a. The greater the initial bacterial cell density, the faster the degradation of chlorophyll-a. The greater the initial algal cell density, the slower the degradation of chlorophyll-a. When the bacterial cell density was 3.6 × 107 cells/ml, nearly 90% of chlorophyll-a was removed. When the chlorophyll-a concentration was less than 550 μg/L, about 70 % was removed; (3) the strain B5 lysed algae not directly but by secreting metabolites and these metabolites could bear heat treatment.

  5. Engineering a predatory bacterium as a proficient killer agent for intracellular bio-products recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Virginia; Herencias, Cristina; Jurkevitch, Edouard;

    2016-01-01

    This work examines the potential of the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100, an obligate predator of other Gram-negative bacteria, as an external cell-lytic agent for recovering valuable intracellular bio-products produced by prey cultures. The bio-product targets to be recovered...

  6. The Mechanism and Usage for Enhanced Oil Recovery by Chemotaxis of Bacterium BS2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiYiqian; JingGuicheng; GaoShusheng; XungWei

    2005-01-01

    Due to its chemotaxis, the motion ability of bacterium BS2 is very strong, and under the microscope, the distribution grads of bacterium concentration can be seen at the oil-water interface. During the experiments in glass box, it can be observed, with eyes, because of the chemotaxis, that muddy gets thicker and thicker at the interface gradually, and it is measured there, from sampling, that the bacterium concentration is 109 cells/mL, pH value 4.4 and the concentration of bio-surfactant 2.87%; The microbial oil-displacement experiments are carried out in emulational network models, and the oil-displacement mechanism by the bacterium and its metabolizing production is studied. And, during oil-displacement experiments in the gravel-input glass models, because of the profile control of thalli and the production, the sweep area of subsequent waterflood becomes wider, which can be seen with eyes and the recovery is enhanced by 13.6%. Finally, the successful field test is introduced in brief: the ratio of response producers is 85.7%, and the water-cut degrades by 6.4%, while 20038t oil has increased in accumulative total in 2 years.

  7. Two-dimensional gel-based alkaline proteome of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majumder, Avishek; Cai, Liyang; Ejby, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) is a well‐documented probiotic bacterium isolated from human gut. Detailed 2D gel‐based NCFM proteomics addressed the so‐called alkaline range, i.e., pH 6–11. Proteins were identified in 150 of the 202 spots picked from the Coomassie Brilliant Blue stained 2D...

  8. Photobacterium galatheae sp. nov., a bioactive bacterium isolated from a mussel in the Solomon Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique; Giubergia, Sonia; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina;

    2015-01-01

    A novel, Gram-negative marine bacterium, S2753T, was isolated from a mussel of the Solomon Sea, Solomon Islands. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and whole genome sequence data placed strain S2753T in the genus Photobacterium with the closest relative being Photobacterium halotolerans...

  9. Design of semi industrial radium separator by a new bacterium MGF-48

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following of a research work which has been recently published in AEOI scientific Bulletin no. 14, a semi industrial bioreactor has been designed for separation of radium using a new bacterium MGF-48. This bioreactor could be utilized for a high rate separation of radium in semi industrial scale. (author)

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas sp. Strain NIC1, an Efficient Nicotine-Degrading Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiongyu; Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain NIC1, an efficient nicotine-degrading bacterium, was isolated from tobacco leaves. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of strain NIC1, which contains one circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. The genomic information will provide insights into its molecular mechanism for nicotine degradation. PMID:27417841

  11. First Insights into the Genome of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Clostridium tepidiprofundi SG 508T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlein, Anja; Friedrich, Ines; Krüger, Larissa; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The moderately thermophilic bacterium Clostridium tepidiprofundi is Gram-positive and belongs to clostridial cluster I. It was isolated from a hydrothermal vent chimney. Substrates utilized by C. tepidiprofundi include casein, peptone, tryptone, yeast extract, beef extract, starch, maltose, and glucose. The genome consists of one replicon (3.06 Mb). PMID:27174286

  12. First Insights into the Genome of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Clostridium tepidiprofundi SG 508T

    OpenAIRE

    Poehlein, Anja; Friedrich, Ines; Krüger, Larissa; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The moderately thermophilic bacterium Clostridium tepidiprofundi is Gram-positive and belongs to clostridial cluster I. It was isolated from a hydrothermal vent chimney. Substrates utilized by C. tepidiprofundi include casein, peptone, tryptone, yeast extract, beef extract, starch, maltose, and glucose. The genome consists of one replicon (3.06 Mb).

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M; Tisa, Louis S

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26988056

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M.; Tisa, Louis S.

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Ionic Liquid-Tolerant Bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens CMW1

    OpenAIRE

    Kurata, Atsushi; Hirose, Yuu; Misawa, Naomi; Hurunaka, Kohei; Kishimoto, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of an ionic liquid-tolerant bacterium, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens CMW1, which is newly isolated from a Japanese fermented soybean paste. The genome sequence will allow for a characterization of the molecular mechanism of its ionic liquid tolerance.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of a Bacillus Bacterium from the Atacama Desert Wetlands Metagenome

    OpenAIRE

    Vilo, Claudia; Galetovic, Alexandra; Araya, Jorge E.; Gómez-Silva, Benito; Dong, Qunfeng

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Bacillus bacterium isolated from the microflora of Nostoc colonies grown at the Andean wetlands in northern Chile. We consider this genome sequence to be a molecular tool for exploring microbial relationships and adaptation strategies to the prevailing extreme conditions at the Atacama Desert.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of a Bacillus Bacterium from the Atacama Desert Wetlands Metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilo, Claudia; Galetovic, Alexandra; Araya, Jorge E; Gómez-Silva, Benito; Dong, Qunfeng

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Bacillus bacterium isolated from the microflora of Nostoc colonies grown at the Andean wetlands in northern Chile. We consider this genome sequence to be a molecular tool for exploring microbial relationships and adaptation strategies to the prevailing extreme conditions at the Atacama Desert. PMID:26294639

  18. Genome Sequence of Bacillus mycoides B38V, a Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Adriana; Sant'Anna, Fernando Hayashi; de Souza, Rocheli; Tadra-Sfeir, Michele; Faoro, Helisson; Alvarenga, Samuel M; Pedrosa, Fabio Oliveira; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus mycoides B38V is a bacterium isolated from the sunflower rhizosphere that is able to promote plant growth and N uptake. The genome of the isolate has approximately 5.80 Mb and presents sequence codifiers for plant growth-promoting characteristics, such as nitrate reduction and ammonification and iron-siderophore uptake. PMID:25838494

  19. Genome Sequence of Bacillus mycoides B38V, a Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Sunflower

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrosini, Adriana; Sant’Anna, Fernando Hayashi; de Souza, Rocheli; Tadra-Sfeir, Michele; Faoro, Helisson; Alvarenga, Samuel M.; Pedrosa, Fabio Oliveira; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Passaglia, Luciane M. P.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus mycoides B38V is a bacterium isolated from the sunflower rhizosphere that is able to promote plant growth and N uptake. The genome of the isolate has approximately 5.80 Mb and presents sequence codifiers for plant growth-promoting characteristics, such as nitrate reduction and ammonification and iron-siderophore uptake.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Perfluorooctane Acid-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Langbo; Tang, Chongjian; Peng, Qingjing; Peng, Qingzhong; Chai, Liyuan

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1, isolated from perfluorinated compound-contaminated soil, has the ability to degrade perfluorooctane acid (PFOA) compound. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of the PFOA-degrading bacterium P. parafulva YAB-1. The data provide the basis to investigate the molecular mechanism of PFOA metabolism.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Perfluorooctane Acid-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chongjian; Peng, Qingjing; Peng, Qingzhong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1, isolated from perfluorinated compound-contaminated soil, has the ability to degrade perfluorooctane acid (PFOA) compound. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of the PFOA-degrading bacterium P. parafulva YAB-1. The data provide the basis to investigate the molecular mechanism of PFOA metabolism. PMID:26337877

  2. Comment on "A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate)".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Yang, Jun; Jiang, Lei

    2016-08-19

    Yoshida et al (Report, 11 March 2016, p. 1196) reported that the bacterium Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6 can degrade and assimilate poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). However, the authors exaggerated degradation efficiency using a low-crystallinity PET and presented no straightforward experiments to verify depolymerization and assimilation of PET. Thus, the authors' conclusions are rather misleading. PMID:27540159

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain 869T2, a Plant-Beneficial Endophytic Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ying-Ning; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    An endophytic bacterium, Burkholderia cenocepacia 869T2, isolated from vetiver grass, has shown its abilities for both in planta biocontrol and plant growth promotion. Its draft genome sequence was determined to provide insights into those metabolic pathways involved in plant-beneficial activity. This is the first genome report for endophytic B. cenocepacia. PMID:26564046

  4. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Ji-Bin; Yan, Wang-Ming; Bao, Xue-Zhen

    1994-01-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium yanoikuyae TJ, a Halotolerant Di-n-Butyl-Phthalate-Degrading Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Decai; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Xinxin; Kong, Xiao; Liu, Huijun; Wang, Yafeng

    2016-01-01

    Sphingobium yanoikuyae TJ is a halotolerant di-n-butyl-phthalate-degrading bacterium, isolated from the Haihe estuary in Bohai Bay, Tianjin, China. Here, we report the 5.1-Mb draft genome sequence of this strain, which will provide insights into the diversity of Sphingobium spp. and the mechanism of phthalate ester degradation in the estuary. PMID:27313307

  6. Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequence of Pseudomonas viridiflava, a Bacterium Species Pathogenic to Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Lefort, Francois; Calmin, Gautier; Crovadore, Julien; Osteras, Magne; Farinelli, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    We report here the first whole-genome shotgun sequence of Pseudomonas viridiflava strain UASWS38, a bacterium species pathogenic to the biological model plant Arabidopsis thaliana but also usable as a biological control agent and thus of great scientific interest for understanding the genetics of plant-microbe interactions.

  7. Biohydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus: Current Status and Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielen, A.A.M.; Verhaart, M.R.A.; Oost, van der J.; Kengen, S.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus is one of the most thermophilic cellulolytic organisms known to date. This Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium ferments a broad spectrum of mono-, di- and polysaccharides to mainly acetate, CO2 and hydrogen. With hydrogen yields approaching the theoretical limit fo

  8. Genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deveau, Aurelie [French National Insitute for Agricultural Research (INRA); Grob, Harald [University of Bonn, Germany; Morin, Emmanuelle [INRA, Nancy, France; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Mehnaz, Samina [University of the Punjab, Pakistan; Kurz, Sven [University of Bonn, Germany; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France; Frey-Klett, Pascale [INRA, Nancy, France; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8 . Several traits which could be involved in the mycorrhiza helper ability of the bacterial strain such as multiple secretion systems, auxin metabolism and phosphate mobilization were evidenced in the genome.

  9. Complete genome sequence of a novel chlorpyrifos degrading bacterium, Cupriavidus nantongensis X1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lian-Cheng; Chen, Yi-Fei; Zhou, Yan-Long; Wang, Dao-Sheng; Sun, Le-Ni; Tang, Xin-Yun; Hua, Ri-Mao

    2016-06-10

    Cupriavidus nantongensis X1 is a chlorpyrifos degrading bacterium, which was isolated from sludge collected at the drain outlet of a chlorpyrifos manufacture plant. It is the first time to report the complete genome sequence of C. nantongensis species, which has been reported as a novel species of Cupriavidus genus. It could provide further pathway information in chlorpyrifos degradation. PMID:27063140

  10. Toxicity of herbicides used in the sugarcane crop to diazotrophic bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio de Oliveira Procópio; Marcelo Ferreira Fernandes; Daniele Araújo Teles; José Guedes Sena Filho; Alberto Cargnelutti Filho; Marcelo Araújo Resende; Leandro Vargas

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to identify herbicides used in the sugarcane crop that affects neither the growth, the development, of nor the process of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) by the diazotrophic bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae. Eighteen herbicides (paraquat, ametryne, tebuthiuron, amicarbazone, diuron, metribuzin, [hexazinone + diuron], [hexazinone + clomazone], clomazone, isoxaflutole, sulfentrazone, oxyfluorfen, imazapic, imazapyr, [trifloxysulfuron sodium + ametryne], gly...

  11. An ATP transport system in the intracellular bacterium, Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruby, E G; McCabe, J B

    1986-01-01

    The intracellularly growing bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J transports intact ATP by a specific, energy-requiring process. ATP transport does not involve either an ADP-ATP or an AMP-ATP exchange mechanism but, instead, has characteristics of an active transport permease. Kinetically distinct systems for ATP transport are expressed by the two developmental stages of the bdellovibrio life cycle.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, a Chromium-Resistant Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Aminur; Nahar, Noor; Olsson, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported a chromium-resistant bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, isolated from the landfills of tannery industries in Bangladesh. Here, we investigated its genetic composition using massively parallel sequencing and comparative analysis with other known Enterobacter genomes. Assembly of the sequencing reads revealed a genome of ~4.21 Mb in size. PMID:27257201

  13. Genome Sequence of the Spinosyns-Producing Bacterium Saccharopolyspora spinosa NRRL 18395 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuanlong; Yang, Xi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Ruifen; Hu, Yongfei; Zhou, Yuguang; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Baoli

    2011-01-01

    Saccharopolyspora spinosa is a Gram-positive bacterium that produces spinosad, a well-known biodegradable insecticide that is used for agricultural pest control and has an excellent environmental and mammalian toxicological profile. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of the type strain Saccharopolyspora spinosa NRRL 18395, which consists of 22 scaffolds. PMID:21478350

  14. Genome Sequence of Marichromatium gracile YL-28, a Purple Sulfur Bacterium with Bioremediation Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Zhao, Chungui; Hong, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Marichromatium gracile YL-28 contains 3,840,251 bp, with a G+C content of 68.84%. The annotated genome sequence provides the genetic basis for revealing its role as a purple sulfur bacterium in the harvesting of energy and the development of bioremediation applications. PMID:27151789

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Oyster Larval Probiotic Bacterium Vibrio sp. Strain OY15

    OpenAIRE

    Harold J. Schreier; Schott, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Vibrio sp. strain OY15, a Gram-negative marine bacterium isolated from an oyster (Crassostrea virginica) digestive tract and shown to possess probiotic activity. The availability of this genome sequence will facilitate the study of the mechanisms of probiotic activity as well as virulence capacity.

  16. Genome Sequence of the Highly Efficient Arsenite-Oxidizing Bacterium Achromobacter arsenitoxydans SY8

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiangyang; Hu, Yao; Gong, Jing; Lin, Yanbing; Johnstone, Laurel; Rensing, Christopher; Wang, Gejiao

    2012-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Achromobacter arsenitoxydans SY8, the first reported arsenite-oxidizing bacterium belonging to the genus Achromobacter and containing a genomic arsenic island, an intact type III secretion system, and multiple metal(loid) transporters. The genome may be helpful to explore the mechanisms intertwining metal(loid) resistance and pathogenicity.

  17. A commensal symbiotic interrelationship for the growth of Symbiobacterium toebii with its partner bacterium, Geobacillus toebii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masui Ryoji

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symbiobacterium toebii is a commensal symbiotic thermophile that absolutely requires its partner bacterium Geobacillus toebii for growth. Despite development of an independent cultivation method using cell-free extracts, the growth of Symbiobacterium remains unknown due to our poor understanding of the symbiotic relationship with its partner bacterium. Here, we investigated the interrelationship between these two bacteria for growth of S. toebii using different cell-free extracts of G. toebii. Results Symbiobacterium toebii growth-supporting factors were constitutively produced through almost all growth phases and under different oxygen tensions in G. toebii, indicating that the factor may be essential components for growth of G. toebii as well as S. toebii. The growing conditions of G. toebii under different oxygen tension dramatically affected to the initial growth of S. toebii and the retarded lag phase was completely shortened by reducing agent, L-cysteine indicating an evidence of commensal interaction of microaerobic and anaerobic bacterium S. toebii with a facultative aerobic bacterium G. toebii. In addition, the growth curve of S. toebii showed a dependency on the protein concentration of cell-free extracts of G. toebii, demonstrating that the G. toebii-derived factors have nutrient-like characters but not quorum-sensing characters. Conclusions Not only the consistent existence of the factor in G. toebii during all growth stages and under different oxygen tensions but also the concentration dependency of the factor for proliferation and optimal growth of S. toebii, suggests that an important biosynthetic machinery lacks in S. toebii during evolution. The commensal symbiotic bacterium, S. toebii uptakes certain ubiquitous and essential compound for its growth from environment or neighboring bacteria that shares the equivalent compounds. Moreover, G. toebii grown under aerobic condition shortened the lag phase of S

  18. Effect of pprA transgene expression on the radiation response of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pprA is one of the uncharacterized deinococcal genes, which expresses 3.5 folds higher during early phase of post irradiation growth and has been suggested as an important protein for radiation tolerance of this organism. This gene has been cloned and expressed from Deinococcus radiodurans into E. coli and the response of transgenic E. coli to gamma and UV radiations was studied

  19. Role of Premature Stop Codons in Bacterial Evolution▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Tit-Yee; Fernandes, Sanjit; Sankhon, Naby; Leong, Patrick P.; Kuo, Jimmy; Liu, Jong-Kang

    2008-01-01

    When the stop codons TGA, TAA, and TAG are found in the second and third reading frames of a protein-encoding gene, they are considered premature stop codons (PSC). Deinococcus radiodurans disproportionately favored TGA more than the other two triplets as a PSC. The TGA triplet was also found more often in noncoding regions and as a stop codon, though the bias was less pronounced. We investigated this phenomenon in 72 bacterial species with widely differing chromosomal GC contents. Although T...

  20. Tapping-mode atomic force microscopy produces faithful high-resolution images of protein surfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Möller, C; Allen, M.; Elings, V; Engel, A.; Müller, D J

    1999-01-01

    Compared to contact-mode atomic force microscopy (CMAFM), tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) has the advantage of allowing imaging surfaces of macromolecules, even when they are only weakly attached to the support. In this study, TMAFM is applied to two different regular protein layers whose structures are known to great detail, the purple membrane from Halobacterium salinarum and the hexagonally packed intermediate (HPI) layer from Deinococcus radiodurans, to assess the faithfulnes...

  1. Biodegradation of naphthalene and anthracene by chemo-tactically active rhizobacteria of populus deltoides

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Bisht; Piyush Pandey; Anchal Sood; Shivesh Sharma; Bisht, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Several naphthalene and anthracene degrading bacteria were isolated from rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, which were growing in non-contaminated soil. Among these, four isolates, i.e. Kurthia sp., Micrococcus varians, Deinococcus radiodurans and Bacillus circulans utilized chrysene, benzene, toluene and xylene, in addition to anthracene and naphthalene. Kurthia sp and B. circulans showed positive chemotactic response for naphthalene and anthracene. The mean growth rate constant (K) of isolat...

  2. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathways of 2Н- and 13С-Labeled Amino Acids by an Obligate Methylotrophic Bacterium Methylobacillus Flagellatum and a Facultative Methylotrophic Bacterium Brevibacterium Methylicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Mosin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available By the method of electron impact mass-spectrometry was studied the pathways of biosynthesis of 2H, 13C-labeled amino acids of a facultative methylotrophic bacterium Brevibacterium methylicum and an obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatum obtained on growth media containing as a source of stable isotopes [2H]methanol, [13C]methanol and 2H2O. For mass-spectrometric analysis the multicomponential mixtures of 2H- and 13C-labeled amino acids, derived from cultural media and protein hydrolysates after hydrolysis in 6 M 2HСl (3 % phenol and 2 M Ва(OH2 were modified into N-benzyloxycarbonyl-derivatives of amino acids as well as into methyl esters of N-5-(dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl chloride (dansyl derivatives of [2H, 13С]amino acids, which were preparative separated using a method of reverse-phase HCLP. Biosynthetically obtained 2H- and 13C-labeled amino acids represented the mixtures differing in quantities of isotopes incorporated into molecule. The levels of 2H and 13С enrichment of secreted amino acids and amino acid resigues of protein were found to vary from 20,0 atom % to L-leucine/isoleucine up to 97,5 atom % for L-alanine depending on concentration of 2H- and 13C-labelled substrates.

  3. Influence of pH and Oxidant Ozone to Amount of Bacterium Coliform at Hospital Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of pH and oxidant ozone to amount of bacterium coliform at hospital waste have been done. As sample is liquid waste Public Hospital of town (RSUD) Yogyakarta. Sample waste processed by 3 kinds of treatment, that is first certain ozone waste during, that is waste given by the third and just chalk of waste given by the certain and ozonization chalk during. From third the treatment, in the reality third treatment which can give the maximal result, that is waste given the chalk until pH waste 8.5 and ozonization during 40 minute give the following result : bacterium coliform from 810.000 MPN become 0 MPN ( cell / 100 mL). This result have fulfilled the conditions as according to decision of Governor of DIY no. 65 year 1999 for the waste of faction II, that is waste used for the irrigation of fishery and agriculture. (author)

  4. Crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonova, E. Yu.; Tishchenko, S. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Shklyaeva, A. A.; Garber, M. B.; Nikonov, S. V.; Nevskaya, N. A.

    2011-07-01

    The crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus was solved by the molecular-replacement method and refined to R cryst = 19.4% and R free = 25.1% at 2.1 Å protein consists of two domains linked together by a flexible hinge region. In the structure under consideration, the domains are in close proximity and adopt a closed conformation. Earlier, this conformation has been found in the structure of protein L1 from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus, whereas the structures of archaeal L1 proteins and the structures of all L1 proteins in the RNA-bound form have an open conformation. The fact that a closed conformation was found in the structures of two L1 proteins which crystallize in different space groups and belong to different bacteria suggests that this conformation is a characteristic feature of L1 bacterial proteins in the free form.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a new arsenic methylating bacterium from soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honschopp, S. [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Mikrobiologie; Brunken, N. [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie; Nehrkorn, A. [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Mikrobiologie; Breunig, H.J. [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie

    1996-12-31

    An arsenic resistant and arsenic methylating bacterium belonging to the Flavobacterium-Cytophaga group was isolated from soil with an arsenic content of 1.5 ppm. The growth of the bacterium is enhanced in the presence of As compounds in concentrations up to 200 ppm in the cultural media with a stronger effect of As(V) than of As(III) compounds. As a volatile product of the methylation of both NaH{sub 2}AsO{sub 3} and NaH{sub 2}AsO{sub 4} exclusively, Me{sub 3}As was formed and detected by mass spectrometry. Quantitative aspects of the methylation were studied with GC/MS. The intracellular accumulation of arsenic in the methylating strain was compared with two non methylating strains from the same soil. (orig.)

  6. Effect of Sulfate Reduced Bacterium on Corrosion Behavior of 10CrMoAl Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; LIANG Cheng-hao

    2007-01-01

    The effects of sulfate reduced bacterium (SRB) on the corrosion behavior of 10CrMoAl steel in seawater were studied by chemical immersion, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement, and scanning electron microscope techniques. The results show that the content of element sulfur in the corrosion product of 10CrMoAl steel in seawater with SRB is up to 9.23%, which is higher than that of the same in sterile seawater. X-ray diffraction demonstrates that the main corrosion product is FeS. SRB increases the corrosion rate by anodic depolarization of the metabolized sulfide product. SEM observation indicates that the corrosion product is not distributed continuously; in addition, bacilliform sulfate-reduced bacterium accumulates on the local surface of 10CrMoAl steel. Hence, SRB enhances sensitivity to the localized corrosion of 10CrMoAl steel in seawater.

  7. Isolation and biological characteristics of aerobic marine magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jun; PAN Hongmiao; YUE Haidong; SONG Tao; ZHAO Yong; CHEN Guanjun; Wu Longfei; XIAO Tian

    2006-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have become a hot spot of research in microbiology attracting intensive interest of researchers in multiple disciplinary fields. However, the studies were limited in few fastidious bacteria. The objective of this study aims at isolating new marine magnetic bacteria and better comprehension of magnetotactic bacteria. In this study, an aerobic magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1 was isolated from sediments in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM). In TEM, magnetic cells have one or several circular magnetosomes in dimeter of 100nm, and consist of Fe and Co shown on energy dispersive X-ray spectrum. The biological and physiological characteristics of this bacterium were also described. The colour of YSC-1 colony is white in small rod. The gran stain is negative. Results showed that Strain YSC-1 differs from microaerophile magnetotactic bacteria MS-1 and WD-1 in biology.

  8. Microbiologically influenced corrosion of NiZn alloy coatings by Delftia acidovorans bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Delftia acidovorans isolated from water treatment pipe system. ► Bacterium attached to the alloy coatings. ► Ecorr exhibited cathodic shift. ► Mass loss reached highest value after inoculation. ► Crevice corrosion was observed on the surface due to bacterium. - Abstract: In this study, Delftia acidovorans was isolated from water treatment pipe system and used to demonstrate microbiologically influenced corrosion of NiZn alloy coatings using electrochemical techniques. The surface morphologies and the corrosion products were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) analysis. Results showed that when the metabolic activity reached maximum level, corrosion activity of NiZn alloy coatings significantly increased in correlation with Ecorr, Icorr, QCM and Rct. Furthermore, crevice corrosion which has been seen due to bacterial adhesion confirms that D. acidovorans plays an important role in corrosion of NiZn alloy coating.

  9. N-Acyl Dehydrotyrosines, Tyrosinase Inhibitors from the Marine Bacterium Thalassotalea sp. PP2-459.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, Robert W; Chen, Jianwei; Sun, Jiadong; Ma, Hang; Dubert, Javier; Barja, Juan L; Seeram, Navindra P; Wang, Hong; Rowley, David C

    2016-02-26

    Thalassotalic acids A-C and thalassotalamides A and B are new N-acyl dehydrotyrosine derivatives produced by Thalassotalea sp. PP2-459, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from a marine bivalve aquaculture facility. The structures were elucidated via a combination of spectroscopic analyses emphasizing two-dimensional NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometric data. Thalassotalic acid A (1) displays in vitro inhibition of the enzyme tyrosinase with an IC50 value (130 μM) that compares favorably to the commercially used control compounds kojic acid (46 μM) and arbutin (100 μM). These are the first natural products reported from a bacterium belonging to the genus Thalassotalea. PMID:26824128

  10. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria. PMID:27610355

  11. The bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila inhibits phospholipases A2 from insect, prokaryote, and vertebrate sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngjin; Kim, Yonggyun; Stanley, David

    The bacterium, Xenorhabdus nematophila, is a virulent insect pathogen. Part of its pathogenicity is due to impairing cellular immunity by blocking biosynthesis of eicosanoids, the major recognized signal transduction system in insect cellular immunity. X. nematophila inhibits the first step in eicosanoid biosynthesis, phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Here we report that the bacterium inhibits PLA2 from two insect immune tissues, hemocytes and fat body, as well as PLA2s selected to represent a wide range of organisms, including prokaryotes, insects, reptiles, and mammals. Our finding on a bacterial inhibitor of PLA2 activity contributes new insight into the chemical ecology of microbe-host interactions, which usually involve actions rather than inhibitors of PLA2s.

  12. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew eBegemann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, lignocellulosic biohydrogen production remains inefficient with pretreatments that are heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. hydrogeniformans ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen, acetate and formate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  13. Chlorhexidine resistance in a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from an aquatic source

    OpenAIRE

    Sekavec, Jeffrey G.; Moore, William T.; Gillock, Eric T.

    2013-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a Gram-negative bacterium of considerable importance in both clinical, especially nosocomial infections, and zoonotic respects, both aquatic and terrestrial infections. In addition to the ability to thrive in a wide range of conditions, A. hydrophila is resistant to numerous antibiotics and antimicrobials. In conjunction with Kansas State University and the Kansas Water Office, water samples from various locations within Kansas were screened for organisms resistant to ...

  14. Sensitivity of ribosomes of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex pyrophilus to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Bocchetta, M; Huber, R.; Cammarano, P

    1996-01-01

    A poly(U)-programmed cell-free system from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex pyrophilus has been developed, and the susceptibility of Aquifex ribosomes to the miscoding-inducing and inhibitory actions of all known classes of aminoglycoside antibiotics has been assayed at temperatures (75 to 80 degrees C) close to the physiological optimum for cell growth. Unlike Thermotoga maritima ribosomes, which are systematically refractory to all known classes of aminoglycoside compounds (P. Londei...

  15. Calcium-ion mediated assembly and function of glycosylated flagellar sheath of marine magnetotactic bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Santini, Claire-Lise; Bernadac, Alain; Zhang, Wei-Jia; Ying LI; Wu, Long-Fei

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Flagella of some pathogens or marine microbes are sheathed by an apparent extension of the outer cell membrane. Although flagellar sheath has been reported for almost 60 years, little is known about its function and the mechanism of its assembly. Recently, we have observed a novel type of sheath that encloses a flagellar bundle, instead of a single flagellum, in a marine magnetotactic bacterium MO-1. Here, we reported isolation and characterization of the sheath which can ...

  16. Campylobacter pylori, the spiral bacterium associated with human gastritis, is not a true Campylobacter sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Romaniuk, P J; Zoltowska, B; Trust, T J; Lane, D J; Olsen, G.J.; Pace, N R; Stahl, D A

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of partial 16S rRNA sequences from representative Campylobacter species indicates that the Campylobacter species form a previously undescribed basic eubacterial group, which is related to the other major groups only by very deep branching. This analysis was extended to include the spiral bacterium associated with human gastritis, Campylobacter pylori (formerly Campylobacter pyloridis). The distance between C. pylori and the other Campylobacter species is sufficient to exclude the p...

  17. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J.; Bernard R. Glick

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 gen...

  18. Physiological Adaptation of the Bacterium Lactococcus lactis in Response to the Production of Human CFTR*

    OpenAIRE

    A. Steen; Wiederhold, E.; T Gandhi; Breitling, R.; D. J. Slotboom

    2010-01-01

    Biochemical and biophysical characterization of CFTR (the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is thwarted by difficulties to obtain sufficient quantities of correctly folded and functional protein. Here we have produced human CFTR in the prokaryotic expression host Lactococcus lactis. The full-length protein was detected in the membrane of the bacterium, but the yields were too low (< 0.1% of membrane proteins) for in vitro functional and structural characterization, and indu...

  19. Bioinformatic Prediction of Gene Functions Regulated by Quorum Sensing in the Bioleaching Bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Banderas; Nicolas Guiliani

    2013-01-01

    The biomining bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans oxidizes sulfide ores and promotes metal solubilization. The efficiency of this process depends on the attachment of cells to surfaces, a process regulated by quorum sensing (QS) cell-to-cell signalling in many Gram-negative bacteria. At. ferrooxidans has a functional QS system and the presence of AHLs enhances its attachment to pyrite. However, direct targets of the QS transcription factor AfeR remain unknown. In this study, a bioinforma...

  20. Functional Genomic Analysis of Three Nitrogenase Isozymes in the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris‡

    OpenAIRE

    Oda, Yasuhiro; Samanta, Sudip K.; Rey, Federico E.; Wu, Liyou; Liu, Xiudan; Yan, Tingfen; Zhou, Jizhong; Harwood, Caroline S.

    2005-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris is one of just a few prokaryotes described so far that has vnf and anf genes for alternative vanadium cofactor (V) and iron cofactor (Fe) nitrogenases in addition to nif genes for a molybdenum cofactor (Mo) nitrogenase. Transcriptome data indicated that the 32 genes in the nif gene cluster, but not the anf or vnf genes, were induced in wild-type and Mo nitrogenase-expressing strains grown under nitrogen-fixing conditions in Mo-containing...

  1. Identifying the assembly pathway of cyanophage inside the marine bacterium using electron cryo-tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in electron cryo-tomography open up a new avenue to visualize the 3-D internal structure of a single bacterium before and after its infection by bacteriophages in its native environment, without using chemical fixatives, fluorescent dyes or negative stains. Such direct observation reveals the presence of assembly intermediates of the bacteriophage and thus allows us to map out the maturation pathway of the bacteriophage inside its host.

  2. Two New Cholic Acid Derivatives from the Marine Ascidian-Associated Bacterium Hasllibacter halocynthiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hun Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of secondary metabolites in liquid cultures of a recently discovered marine bacterium, Hasllibacter halocynthiae strain KME 002T, led to the isolation of two new cholic acid derivatives. The structures of these compounds were determined to be 3,3,12-trihydroxy-7-ketocholanic acid (1 and 3,3,12-trihydroxy-7-deoxycholanic acid (2 through HRFABMS and NMR data analyses.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Uncultured SAR324 Bacterium lautmerah10, Binned from a Red Sea Metagenome

    KAUST Repository

    Haroon, Mohamed F.

    2016-02-11

    A draft genome of SAR324 bacterium lautmerah10 was assembled from a metagenome of a surface water sample from the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. The genome is more complete and has a higher G+C content than that of previously sequenced SAR324 representatives. Its genomic information shows a versatile metabolism that confers an advantage to SAR324, which is reflected in its distribution throughout different depths of the marine water column.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Antitrypanosomally Active Sponge-Associated Bacterium Actinokineospora sp. Strain EG49

    KAUST Repository

    Harjes, Janno

    2014-03-06

    The marine sponge-associated bacterium Actinokineospora sp. strain EG49 produces the antitrypanosomal angucycline-like compound actinosporin A. The draft genome of Actinokineospora sp. EG49 has a size of 7.5 megabases and a GC content of 72.8% and contains 6,629 protein-coding sequences (CDS). antiSMASH predicted 996 genes residing in 36 secondary metabolite gene clusters.

  5. Encapsulated in silica: genome, proteome and physiology of the thermophilic bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus WK1

    OpenAIRE

    Saw, Jimmy H; Mountain, Bruce W; Feng, Lu; Omelchenko, Marina V; Hou, Shaobin; Saito, Jennifer A.; Stott, Matthew B.; Li, Dan; Zhao, Guang; Wu, Junli; Galperin, Michael Y.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Makarova, Kira S.; Wolf, Yuri I; Rigden, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Gram-positive bacteria of the genus Anoxybacillus have been found in diverse thermophilic habitats, such as geothermal hot springs and manure, and in processed foods such as gelatin and milk powder. Anoxybacillus flavithermus is a facultatively anaerobic bacterium found in super-saturated silica solutions and in opaline silica sinter. The ability of A. flavithermus to grow in super-saturated silica solutions makes it an ideal subject to study the processes of sinter formation, whic...

  6. The Genome Sequence of the Obligately Chemolithoautotrophic, Facultatively Anaerobic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    OpenAIRE

    Beller, Harry R.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Letain, Tracy E.; Chakicherla, Anu; Larimer, Frank W.; Richardson, Paul M.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Wood, Ann P.; Kelly, Donovan P.

    2006-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Thiobacillus denitrificans ATCC 25259 is the first to become available for an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-compound-oxidizing, β-proteobacterium. Analysis of the 2,909,809-bp genome will facilitate our molecular and biochemical understanding of the unusual metabolic repertoire of this bacterium, including its ability to couple denitrification to sulfur-compound oxidation, to catalyze anaerobic, nitrate-dependent oxidation of Fe(II) and U(IV), and to...

  7. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, a bacterium pathogenic for marine animals and humans

    OpenAIRE

    Amable J. Rivas; Lemos, Manuel L.; Osorio, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (formerly Vibrio damsela) is a pathogen of a variety of marine animals including fish, crustaceans, molluscs, and cetaceans. In humans, it can cause opportunistic infections that may evolve into necrotizing fasciitis with fatal outcome. Although the genetic basis of virulence in this bacterium is not completely elucidated, recent findings demonstrate that the phospholipase-D Dly (damselysin) and the pore-forming toxins HlyApl and HlyAch play a main role...

  8. A Highly Stable d-Amino Acid Oxidase of the Thermophilic Bacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Shouji; Furukawara, Makoto; Omae, Keishi; Tadokoro, Namiho; Saito, Yayoi; Abe, Katsumasa; Kera, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    d-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a biotechnologically attractive enzyme that can be used in a variety of applications, but its utility is limited by its relatively poor stability. A search of a bacterial genome database revealed a gene encoding a protein homologous to DAO in the thermophilic bacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus (RxDAO). The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was a monomeric protein containing noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide as a cofactor. This protei...

  9. Sexual transmission of a plant pathogenic bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, between conspecific insect vectors during mating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajinder S Mann

    Full Text Available Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is a fastidious, phloem-inhabiting, gram-negative bacterium transmitted by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae. The bacterium is the presumed causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB, one of the most destructive and economically important diseases of citrus. We investigated whether Las is transmitted between infected and uninfected D. citri adults during courtship. Our results indicate that Las was sexually transmitted from Las-infected male D. citri to uninfected females at a low rate (<4% during mating. Sexual transmission was not observed following mating of infected females and uninfected males or among adult pairs of the same sex. Las was detected in genitalia of both sexes and also in eggs of infected females. A latent period of 7 days or more was required to detect the bacterium in recipient females. Rod shaped as well as spherical structures resembling Las were observed in ovaries of Las-infected females with transmission electron microscopy, but were absent in ovaries from uninfected D. citri females. The size of the rod shaped structures varied from 0.39 to 0.67 µm in length and 0.19 to 0.39 µm in width. The spherical structures measured from 0.61 to 0.80 µm in diameter. This investigation provides convincing evidence that a plant pathogenic bacterium is sexually transmitted from male to female insects during courtship and established evidence that bacteria persist in reproductive organs. Moreover, these findings provide an alternative sexually horizontal mechanism for the spread of Las within populations of D. citri, even in the absence of infected host trees.

  10. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J B; Yan, W M; Bao, X Z

    1994-07-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host. PMID:16349341

  11. Physiological features of Halomonas lionensis sp. nov., a novel bacterium isolated from a Mediterranean Sea sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Gaboyer, Frederic; Vandenabeele-Trambouze, Odile; Cao, Junwei; Ciobanu, Maria-Cristina; Jebbar, Mohamed; Le Romancer, Marc; Alain, Karine

    2014-01-01

    A novel halophilic bacterium, strain RHS90T, was isolated from marine sediments from the Gulf of Lions, in the Mediterranean Sea. Its metabolic and physiological characteristics were examined under various cultural conditions, including exposure to stressful ones (oligotrophy, high pressure and high concentrations of metals). Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, the strain was found to belong to the genus Halomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. Its closest relatives are H....

  12. The Potential Biotechnological Applications of the Exopolysaccharide Produced by the Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas almeriensis

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria Béjar; Emilia Quesada; Juan Antonio Mata; Inmaculada Llamas; Hakima Amjres

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) produced by the type strain, M8T, of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas almeriensis, to ascertain whether it might have any biotechnological applications. All the cultural parameters tested influenced both bacterial growth and polysaccharide production. EPS production was mainly growth-associated and under optimum environmental and nutritional conditions M8T excreted about...

  13. Biohydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus: Current Status and Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Kengen, Servé W. M.; Verhaart, Marcel R. A.; John van der Oost; Abraham A. M. Bielen

    2013-01-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus is one of the most thermophilic cellulolytic organisms known to date. This Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium ferments a broad spectrum of mono-, di- and polysaccharides to mainly acetate, CO2 and hydrogen. With hydrogen yields approaching the theoretical limit for dark fermentation of 4 mol hydrogen per mol hexose, this organism has proven itself to be an excellent candidate for biological hydrogen production. This review provides an overview of the resear...

  14. Copper-induced production of copper-binding supernatant proteins by the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus.

    OpenAIRE

    Harwood-Sears, V; Gordon, A S

    1990-01-01

    Growth of the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus is temporarily inhibited by micromolar levels of copper. During the copper-induced lag phase, supernatant compounds which complex and detoxify copper are produced. In this study two copper-inducible supernatant proteins having molecular masses of ca. 21 and 19 kilodaltons (CuBP1 and CuBP2) were identified; these proteins were, respectively, 25 and 46 times amplified in supernatants of copper-challenged cultures compared with controls. Experi...

  15. Dynamic detection of a single bacterium: nonlinear rotation rate shifts of driven magnetic microsphere stages

    OpenAIRE

    McNaughton, Brandon H.; Agayan, Rodney R.; Kopelman, Raoul

    2006-01-01

    We report on a new technique which was used to detect single Escherichia coli that is based on the changes in the nonlinear rotation of a magnetic microsphere driven by an external magnetic field. The presence of one Escherichia Coli bacterium on the surface of a 2.0 micron magnetic microsphere caused an easily measurable change in the drag of the system and, therefore, in the nonlinear rotation rate. The straight-forward measurement uses standard microscopy techniques and the observed averag...

  16. Five new amicoumacins isolated from a marine-derived Bacterium bacillus subtilis

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yongxin

    2012-02-03

    Four novel amicoumacins, namely lipoamicoumacins A-D (1-4), and one new bacilosarcin analog (5) were isolated from culture broth of a marine-derived bacterium Bacillus subtilis, together with six known amicoumacins. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic (2D NNR, IR, CD and MS) analysis and in comparison with data in literature. 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  17. Novel Poly[(R)-3-Hydroxybutyratel-producing bacterium isolated from a bolivian hypersaline lake

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Contreras, Alejandra María; Koller, Martin; de Sousa Dias, Miranda; Calafell Monfort, Margarita; Braunegg, Gerhart; Marqués Calvo, M. Soledad

    2013-01-01

    Poly [ ( R )-3-hydroxybutyrate ] (PHB) constitutes a biopolymer synthesized from renew- able resources by various microorganisms. This work focuses on finding a new PHB-produc- ing bacterium capable of growing in conventional media used for industrial biopolymer production, its taxonomical identification, and characterization of its biopolymer. Thus, a bacterial isolation process was carried out from environmental samples of water and mud. Among the isolates, ...

  18. Purification and Characterization of a Feruloyl Esterase from the Intestinal Bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaokun; Geng, Xin; Egashira, Yukari; Sanada, Hiroo

    2004-01-01

    Dietary ferulic acid (FA), a significant antioxidant substance, is currently the subject of extensive research. FA in cereals exists mainly as feruloylated sugar ester. To release FA from food matrices, it is necessary to cleave ester cross-linking by feruloyl esterase (FAE) (hydroxycinnamoyl esterase; EC 3.1.1.73). In the present study, the FAE from a human typical intestinal bacterium, Lactobacillus acidophilus, was isolated, purified, and characterized for the first time. The enzyme was pu...

  19. Cadmium resistance and uptake by bacterium, Salmonella enterica 43C, isolated from industrial effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zaman; Rehman, Abdul; Hussain, Syed Z; Nisar, Muhammad A; Zulfiqar, Soumble; Shakoori, Abdul R

    2016-12-01

    Cadmium resistant bacterium, isolated from industrial wastewater, was characterized as Salmonella enterica 43C on the basis of biochemical and 16S rRNA ribotyping. It is first ever reported S. enterica 43C bared extreme resistance against heavy metal consortia in order of Pb(2+)>Cd(2+)>As(3+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(6+)>Cu(2+)>Hg(2+). Cd(2+) stress altered growth pattern of the bacterium in time dependent manner. It could remove nearly 57 % Cd(2+) from the medium over a period of 8 days. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies based on various adsorption isotherm models (Langmuir and Freundlich) depicted the Cd(2+) biosorption as spontaneous, feasible and endothermic in nature. Interestingly, the bacterium followed pseudo first order kinetics, making it a good biosorbent for heavy metal ions. The S. enterica 43C Cd(2+) processivity was significantly influenced by temperature, pH, initial Cd(2+) concentration, biomass dosage and co-metal ions. FTIR analysis of the bacterium revealed the active participation of amide and carbonyl moieties in Cd(2+) adsorption confirmed by EDX analysis. Electron micrographs beckoned further surface adsorption and increased bacterial size due to intracellular Cd(2+) accumulation. An overwhelming increase in glutathione and other non-protein thiols levels played a significant role in thriving oxidative stress generated by metal cations. Presence of metallothionein clearly depicted the role of such proteins in bacterial metal resistance mechanism. The present study results clearly declare S. enterica 43C a suitable candidate for green chemistry to bioremediate environmental Cd(2+). PMID:27491862

  20. Studies of the Extracellular Glycocalyx of the Anaerobic Cellulolytic Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7▿

    OpenAIRE

    Weimer, Paul J.; Price, Neil P. J.; Kroukamp, Otini; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.; Van Zyl, Willem H

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are thought to adhere to cellulose via several mechanisms, including production of a glycocalyx containing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). As the compositions and structures of these glycocalyces have not been elucidated, variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM) and chemical analysis were used to characterize the glycocalyx of the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus strain 7. VP-SEM revealed that growth of this strain was accompanied b...

  1. Purification and Characterization of EDTA Monooxygenase from the EDTA-Degrading Bacterium BNC1

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Jason W.; Bolton, Harvey; Campbell, James A.; XUN, Luying

    1998-01-01

    The synthetic chelating agent EDTA can mobilize radionuclides and heavy metals in the environment. Biodegradation of EDTA should reduce this mobilization. Although several bacteria have been reported to mineralize EDTA, little is known about the biochemistry of EDTA degradation. Understanding the biochemistry will facilitate the removal of EDTA from the environment. EDTA-degrading activities were detected in cell extracts of bacterium BNC1 when flavin mononucleotide (FMN), NADH, and O2 were p...

  2. Regulation of dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum

    OpenAIRE

    Frauke eGrimm; Bettina eFranz; Christiane eDahl

    2011-01-01

    In the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum, thiosulfate oxidation is strictly dependent on the presence of three periplasmic Sox proteins encoded by the soxBXAK and soxYZ genes. It is also well documented that proteins encoded in the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsr) operon, dsrABEFHCMKLJOPNRS, are essential for the oxidation of sulfur that is stored intracellularly as an obligatory intermediate during the oxidation of thiosulfate and sulfide. Until recently, detailed knowledge...

  3. Comprehensive insights into the response of Alexandrium tamarense to algicidal component secreted by a marine bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Xueqian; Li, Dong; Li, Yi; Chen, Zhangran; Chen, Yao; Cai, Guanjing; Yang, Xujun; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms occur throughout the world, threatening human health, and destroying marine ecosystems. Alexandrium tamarense is a globally distributed and notoriously toxic dinoflagellate that is responsible for most paralytic shellfish poisoning incidents. The culture supernatant of the marine algicidal bacterium BS02 showed potent algicidal effects on A. tamarense ATGD98-006. In this study, we investigated the effects of this supernatant on A. tamarense at physiological and biochemica...

  4. Isolation and characterization of an anaerobic ruminal bacterium capable of degrading hydrolyzable tannins.

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, K E; A. N. Pell; Schofield, P; Zinder, S

    1995-01-01

    An anaerobic diplococcoid bacterium able to degrade hydrolyzable tannins was isolated from the ruminal fluid of a goat fed desmodium (Desmodium ovalifolium), a tropical legume which contains levels as high as 17% condensed tannins. This strain grew under anaerobic conditions in the presence of up to 30 g of tannic acid per liter and tolerated a range of phenolic monomers, including gallic, ferulic, and p-coumaric acids. The predominant fermentation product from tannic acid breakdown was pyrog...

  5. Metabolism of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol in a Gram-positive bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA

    OpenAIRE

    Arora Pankaj; Sharma Ashutosh; Mehta Richa; Shenoy Belle; Srivastava Alok; Singh Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Chloronitrophenols (CNPs) are widely used in the synthesis of dyes, drugs and pesticides, and constitute a major group of environmental pollutants. 4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP) is an isomer of CNPs that has been detected in various industrial effluents. A number of physicochemical methods have been used for treatment of wastewater containing 4C2NP. These methods are not as effective as microbial degradation, however. Results A 4C2NP-degrading bacterium, Exiguobacterium s...

  6. Coregulation of beta-galactoside uptake and hydrolysis by the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    OpenAIRE

    Galperin, MY; Noll, KM; Romano, AH

    1997-01-01

    Regulation of the beta-galactoside transport system in response to growth substrates in the extremely thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana was studied with the nonmetabolizable analog methyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (TMG) as the transport substrate. T. neapolitana cells grown on galactose or lactose accumulated TMG against a concentration gradient in an intracellular free sugar pool that was exchangeable with external galactose or lactose and showed induced levels of be...

  7. Desulfotomaculum thermobenzoicum subsp. thermosyntrophicum subsp. nov., a thermophilic, syntrophic, propionate-oxidizing, spore-forming bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Plugge, C. M.; Balk, M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    From granular sludge from a laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor operated at 55 degrees C with a mixture of volatile fatty acids as feed, a novel anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, syntrophic, spore-forming bacterium, strain TPO, was enriched on propionate in co-culture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Z245. The axenic culture was obtained by using pyruvate as the sole source of carbon and energy. The cells were straight rods with pointed ends and became lens-shaped ...

  8. Direct bioconversion of brown algae into ethanol by thermophilic bacterium Defluviitalea phaphyphila

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Shi-Qi; Wang, Bing; Lu, Ming; Li, Fu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Brown algae are promising feedstocks for biofuel production with inherent advantages of no structural lignin, high growth rate, and no competition for land and fresh water. However, it is difficult for one microorganism to convert all components of brown algae with different oxidoreduction potentials to ethanol. Defluviitalea phaphyphila Alg1 is the first characterized thermophilic bacterium capable of direct utilization of brown algae. Results Defluviitalea phaphyphila Alg1 can si...

  9. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of intact cells of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Ristić, M.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Chernyshev, A. V.; Ignatov, V. V.

    1997-06-01

    The data of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements performed on intact cells of the soil nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense grown in a standard medium and under the conditions of an increased metal uptake are compared and discussed. The structural FTIR information obtained is considered together with atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) data on the content of metal cations in the bacterial cells. Some methodological aspects concerning preparation of bacterial cell samples for FTIR measurements are also discussed.

  10. Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis Strain KB1, a Potential Biocontrol Agent against Phytopathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Jo, Sung Hee; Hong, Chi Eun; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is the most widely known microbial pesticide used in agricultural applications. Herein, we report a draft genome sequence of the endophytic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis strain KB1, which exhibits antagonism against phytopathogens.

  11. Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis Strain KB1, a Potential Biocontrol Agent against Phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Jo, Sung Hee; Hong, Chi Eun; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-01-01

    ITALIC! Bacillus thuringiensisis the most widely known microbial pesticide used in agricultural applications. Herein, we report a draft genome sequence of the endophytic bacterium ITALIC! Bacillus thuringiensisstrain KB1, which exhibits antagonism against phytopathogens. PMID:27103716

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus polymyxa EBL06, a Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from Wheat Phyllosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Shengxian; Jin, Decai; Wang, Xinxin; Fan, Haiyan; Bai, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa strain EBL06 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium with high antifungal activity. The estimated genome of this strain is 5.68 Mb in size and harbors 4,792 coding sequences (CDSs).

  13. Phosphate enhances levan production in the endophytic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idogawa, Nao; Amamoto, Ryuta; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a gram-negative and endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacterium that has several beneficial effects in host plants; thus, utilization of this bacterium as a biofertilizer in agriculture may be possible. G. diazotrophicus synthesizes levan, a D-fructofuranosyl polymer with β-(2→6) linkages, as an exopolysaccharide and the synthesized levan improves the stress tolerance of the bacterium. In this study, we found that phosphate enhances levan production by G. diazotrophicus Pal5, a wild type strain that showed a stronger mucous phenotype on solid medium containing 28 mM phosphate than on solid medium containing 7 mM phosphate. A G. diazotrophicus Pal5 levansucrase disruptant showed only a weak mucous phenotype regardless of the phosphate concentration, indicating that the mucous phenotype observed on 28 mM phosphate medium was caused by levan. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of a high concentration of phosphate on exopolysaccharide production. PMID:24717418

  14. Studies on culture condition of new marine bacterium Zooshikella sp. SY01

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjian LAN; Linfeng MO; Chuanghua CAI; Yipin ZHOU; Junhua YAO; Houjin LI

    2008-01-01

    New marine bacterium Zooshikella sp. SY01, producer of prodigiosin, was isolated from the seawaters of Sanya Bay. The culture conditions of this bacterium were investigated. Zooshikella sp. SY01 was cultured in 2216E media which contained tryptophan, histidine, lac-tonic acid, camphor, limonene, casein, diphenyl guani-dine, coumarin and 1,3-dinitrobenzene, respectively. After 5 days cultivation, the extracts of different culture broths were detected by direct infusion mass spectroscopy using positive ESI mode. As the results, tryptophan, his-tidine and casein didn't show any observable influences on the biosynthesis of prodigiosin. Lactonic acid, camphor, limonene, diphenyl guanidine, coumarin could inhibit the bacterium growth and prodigiosin biosynthesis to a cer-tain extent, slower the culture broth to turn red. However, 1, 3-dinitrobenzene inhibited the bacteria to produce pro-digiosin completely. MS data suggested that various metabolites with chemodiversity were produced in differ-ent culture media. In particular, a series of high-molecu-lar-weight compounds with high relative abundances were observed in the medium containing limonene. To further optimize the culture condition, more new prodigiosin ana-logues and lead compounds can be obtained and the goal of "one strain-many compounds" can be achieved.

  15. Programmed cell death in Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyta) tissues infected with alginic acid decomposing bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gaoge; LIN Wei; ZHANG Lijing; YAN Xiaojun; DUAN Delin

    2004-01-01

    TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) is a sensitive and valid method for detecting DNA cleavage in programmed cell death (PCD). Using this method, DNA cleavage was observed in Laminaria japonica sporophytic tissues, which were infected with alginic acid decomposing bacterium. It was found that DNA cleavage occurred 5 min after the infection, the fragments with 3′-OH groups of cleaved nuclear DNA increased with time of infection and spread from the infection site. Although no typical DNA ladder (200 bp/180 bp) was detected by routine agarose gel electrophoresis, the cleavage of nuclear DNA fragments of 97~48.5 kb could be detected by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). By using CaspGLOWTM fluorescein active caspase-3 staining method, caspase-3 activity has been detected in response to the infection of alginic acid decomposing bacterium. Our results are similar to the observations in hypersensitive response (HR) of higher plant, suggesting that the rapid cell death of L. Japonica infected by alginic acid decomposing bacterium might be involved in PCD, and indicating that the occurrence of PCD is an active defense process against the pathogen's infection.

  16. Antagonism and Molecular Identification of an Antibiotic Bacterium BS04 Against Phytopathogenic Fungi and Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Jing(谢晶); Ge Shaorong; Tao Yong; Gao Ping; Liu Kun; Liu Shigui

    2004-01-01

    Through a modified agar well diffusion assay, antagonism of bacterium BS04 is tested. The data show that BS04 has antibiotic activity against phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria, including Phoma wasabiae Yokogi, Cochlibolus Heterostrophu, Exserohilum Turcicum, Curuvularia Lunata (Walk) Boed, Thantephorus cucumris, Fusarium graminearum, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Citri (Hasse) Dye and Xanthomonas zingiberi (Uyeda) Savulescu. The products of bacterium BS04 can endure the treatment of a wide range of pH, and maintain the antibiotic activity after treatment of 100℃ for 30 min. The result suggests that bacterium BS04 has the potential as a promising biocontrol agent. In order to determine the taxonomic placement, the molecular identification of BS04 is performed. The comparative analysis of 16s rDNA sequences indicates that the 16s rDNA sequence of BS04 is highly homologous with sequences of typical Paenibacillus bacteria from the RPD library (from 92% to 99%). And the constructed phylogenetic tree by using maximum-likelihood method with Bootstrap Trial 1000 proves that BS04 is subjected to Paenibacillus polymyxa.

  17. The effect of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacterium on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study investigated the role of manganese oxidizing bacterium (MOB), namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. This bacterium was isolated from sewage treatment plants and identified by biochemical and molecular methods. The electrochemical techniques such as open circuit potentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic and cyclic polarization were used to measure the corrosion rate and observe the corrosion mechanism. Also, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies were applied to surface analysis. This study revealed the strong adhesion of the biofilm on the metal surface in the presence of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. that enhanced the corrosion of carbon steel. X-ray diffraction patterns identified a high content of MnO2 deposition within these biofilms. This is the first report that discloses the involvement of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel. - Highlights: ► A new type of manganese oxidizing bacteria, namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. was indicated. ► This bacterium can create a biofilm on the part of metal surface and affect localized corrosion. ► In the presence of biofilm, the diffusion of oxygen vacancies and manganese ions has occurred.

  18. Chitin Degradation Proteins Produced by the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi Growing on Different Forms of Chitin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitil, A. L.; Chadhain, S.; Moore, J. A.; Kirchman, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the number, diversity, and function of chitinases produced by bacteria, even though chitin is one of the most abundant polymers in nature. Because of the importance of chitin, especially in marine environments, we examined chitin-degrading proteins in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. This bacterium had a higher growth rate and more chitinase activity when grown on (beta)-chitin (isolated from squid pen) than on (alpha)-chitin (isolated from snow crab), probably because of the more open structure of (beta)-chitin. When exposed to different types of chitin, V. harveyi excreted several chitin-degrading proteins into the culture media. Some chitinases were present with all of the tested chitins, while others were unique to a particular chitin. We cloned and identified six separate chitinase genes from V. harveyi. These chitinases appear to be unique based on DNA restriction patterns, immunological data, and enzyme activity. This marine bacterium and probably others appear to synthesize separate chitinases for efficient utilization of different forms of chitin and chitin by-products. PMID:16535505

  19. Antimicrobial activity and biosynthesis of nanoparticles by endophytic bacterium inhabiting Coffee arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Baker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The interface between endophytes and nanomaterials is a relatively new and unexplored area the present study evaluates screening of bacterial endophytes from surfaced sterilized leaf and stem segments of agro economical plant Coffee arabica L. towards synthesis of silver nanoparticles and antimicrobial metabolites. Among thirty two endophytes isolated nine isolates exhibited antimicrobial activity among which one bacterium was capable of extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles upon evaluation of supernatant with 1 mM of silver nitrate, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles were assessed by UV-Visible Spectroscopy and the bacterium was capable of secreting antimicrobial secondary metabolites upon crude ethyl acetate extract evaluated for antimicrobial activity against panel of both gram positive and gram negative as well as phytopathogenic fungi. Partial characterization was carried out via bioautographic technique with Rf value 0.3 and 0.6 exhibiting antimicrobial activity against MRSA strain. Further studies in this area will be promising enough for molecular characterization of endophytic bacterium and chemical profiling of antimicrobial metabolites at the same time physiochemical characterization of nanoparticles will be valuable to reveal the size and shape. 

  20. The Role of Exopolymers in Protection of Ralstonia sp., a Cadmium-resistant Bacterium, from Cadmium Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Anchulee Watcharamusik; Benjaphorn Prapagdee

    2008-01-01

    Production of exopolymers is one of heavy metal resistance mechanisms in bacteria. Ralstonia sp. TAK1, a cadmium-resistant bacterium, was isolated from a high cadmium (Cd) contaminated soil at the zinc mine, Tak province, Thailand. The bacterium was cultivated in LB broth and its growth was monitored. The yields of exopolymers were measured by the phenol-sulfuric method at different growth phases. The levels of Cd resistance were quantitatively determined by survival cell assay. The highest a...

  1. Photoproduction of hydrogen by a non-sulphur bacterium isolated from root zones of water fern Azolla pinnata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Pandey, K.D. (Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (IN). Centre of Advanced Study in Botany)

    1990-01-01

    A photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. BHU strain 1 was isolated from the root zone of water fern Azolla pinnata. The bacterium was found to produce hydrogen with potato starch under phototrophic conditions. The immobilized bacterial cells showed sustained hydrogen production with a more than 4-fold difference over free cell suspensions. The data have been discussed in the light of possible utilization of relatively cheaper raw materials by non-sulphur bacteria to evolve hydrogen. (author).

  2. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Oxidation of U(IV) Oxide Minerals by the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, H R

    2004-06-25

    Under anaerobic conditions and at circumneutral pH, cells of the widely-distributed, obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans oxidatively dissolved synthetic and biogenic U(IV) oxides (uraninite) in nitrate-dependent fashion: U(IV) oxidation required the presence of nitrate and was strongly correlated to nitrate consumption. This is the first report of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by an autotrophic bacterium.

  3. Pontibacter diazotrophicus sp. nov., a novel nitrogen-fixing bacterium of the family Cytophagaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linghua Xu

    Full Text Available Few diazotrophs have been found to belong to the family Cytophagaceae so far. In the present study, a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that forms red colonies, was isolated from sands of the Takalamakan desert. It was designated H4XT. Phylogenetic and biochemical analysis indicated that the isolate is a new species of the genus Pontibacter. The 16S rRNA gene of H4XT displays 94.2-96.8% sequence similarities to those of other strains in Pontibacter. The major respiratory quinone is menaquinone-7 (MK-7. The DNA G+C content is 46.6 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids are iso-C15∶0, C16∶1ω5c, summed feature 3 (containing C16∶1ω6c and/or C16∶1ω7c and summed feature 4 (comprising anteiso-C17∶1B and/or iso-C17∶1I. The major polar lipids are phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, one aminophospholipid (APL and some unknown phospholipids (PLs. It is interesting to see that this bacterium can grow very well in a nitrogen-free medium. PCR amplification suggested that the bacterium possesses at least one type of nitrogenase gene. Acetylene reduction assay showed that H4XT actually possesses nitrogen-fixing activity. Therefore, it can be concluded that H4XT is a new diazotroph. We thus referred it to as Pontibacter diazotrophicus sp. nov. The type strain is H4XT ( = CCTCC AB 2013049T = NRRL B-59974T.

  4. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mathew P; Khijniak, Tatiana V; Boothman, Christopher; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments. PMID:26048926

  5. Studies of the extracellular glycocalyx of the anaerobic cellulolytic bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Paul J; Price, Neil P J; Kroukamp, Otini; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Wolfaardt, Gideon M; Van Zyl, Willem H

    2006-12-01

    Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are thought to adhere to cellulose via several mechanisms, including production of a glycocalyx containing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). As the compositions and structures of these glycocalyces have not been elucidated, variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM) and chemical analysis were used to characterize the glycocalyx of the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus strain 7. VP-SEM revealed that growth of this strain was accompanied by the formation of thin cellular extensions that allowed the bacterium to adhere to cellulose, followed by formation of a ramifying network that interconnected individual cells to one another and to the unraveling cellulose microfibrils. Extraction of 48-h-old whole-culture pellets (bacterial cells plus glycocalyx [G] plus residual cellulose [C]) with 0.1 N NaOH released carbohydrate and protein in a ratio of 1:5. Boiling of the cellulose fermentation residue in a neutral detergent solution removed almost all of the adherent cells and protein while retaining a residual network of adhering noncellular material. Trifluoroacetic acid hydrolysis of this residue (G plus C) released primarily glucose, along with substantial amounts of xylose and mannose, but only traces of galactose, the most abundant sugar in most characterized bacterial exopolysaccharides. Linkage analysis and characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance suggested that most of the glucosyl units were not present as partially degraded cellulose. Calculations suggested that the energy demand for synthesis of the nonprotein fraction of EPS by this organism represents only a small fraction (<4%) of the anabolic ATP expenditure of the bacterium. PMID:17028224

  6. Adhesive properties of a symbolic bacterium from a wood-boreing marine shipworm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhesive properties of cellulolytic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from a marine shipworm are described. 35S-labeled cells of the shipworm bacterium bound preferentially Whatman no.1 cellulose filter paper, compared with its binding to other cellulose substrata or substrata lacking cellulose. The ability of the bacteria to bind to Whatman no. 1 filter paper was significantly reduced by glutaraldehyde or heat treatment of cells. Pretreatment of cells with azide, valinomycin, gramicidin-D, bis-hexafluoroacetylacetone (1799), or carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone inhibited adhesion activity. Cells pretreated with pronase or trypsin also exhibited reduced binding activity, but chymotrypsin and peptidase had no effect on adhesion activity. Cellodextrins and methyl cellulose 15 inhibited the adhesion of the shipworm bacteria to filter paper, whereas glucose, cellobiose, and soluble carboxymethyl cellulose had no significant effect. The divalent cation chelators EDTA and EGTA [ethylene hlycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid] had little or no effect on adhesive properties of shipworm bacteria. Also, preabsorbing the substratum with extracellular endoglucanase isolated from the ship worm bacterium or 1% bovine serum albumin had no apparent effect on bacterial binding. Low concentration (0.01%) of sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized a fraction from whole cells, which appeared to be involved in cellular binding activity. After removal of sodium dodecyl, sulfate, several proteins in this fraction associated with intact cells. These cells exhibited up to 50% enhanced binding to filter paper in comparison to cells which had not been exposed to the sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized fraction

  7. Biochemical Analyses of Multiple Endoxylanases from the Rumen Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 8 and Their Synergistic Activities with Accessory Hemicellulose-Degrading Enzymes ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Young Hwan; Iakiviak, Michael; Bauer, Stefan; Roderick I. Mackie; Cann, Isaac K. O.

    2011-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 8 is a ruminal bacterium capable of metabolizing hemicellulose and cellulose, the major components of the plant cell wall. The enzymes that allow this bacterium to capture energy from the two polysaccharides, therefore, have potential application in plant cell wall depolymerization, a process critical to biofuel production. For this purpose, a partial genome sequence of R. albus 8 was generated. The genomic data depicted a bacterium endowed with multiple forms of plant cell...

  8. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase from the ancestral bacterium Aquifex aeolicus contains relics of synthetase evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ming-Wei; Zhu, Bin; Hao, Rui; Xu, Min-Gang; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2005-01-01

    The editing reactions catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are critical for the faithful protein synthesis by correcting misactivated amino acids and misaminoacylated tRNAs. We report that the isolated editing domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase from the deep-rooted bacterium Aquifex aeolicus (αβ-LeuRS) catalyzes the hydrolytic editing of both mischarged tRNALeu and minihelixLeu. Within the domain, we have identified a crucial 20-amino-acid peptide that confers editing capacity when transplan...

  9. Microbial coal desulfurization in an airlift bioreactor by sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus ferooxidans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, H.W.; Chang, Y.K.; Kim, S.D. (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and BioProcess Engineering Research Center)

    1993-12-01

    Microbial desulfurization of a domestic anthracite coal by using an acidophilic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, [ital Thiobacillus ferrooxidans] has been studied in an airlift slurry reactor of 12 L volume. Effects of coal slurry density and CO[sub 2] supplement on microbial pyrite removal have been evaluated. High sulfur removal rates have been obtained even for very high coal slurry densities (up to 70% w/v). About 90-95% of the sulfur in the coal could be removed in 15-20 days. The efficiency of microbial desulfurization was significantly improved with CO[sub 2] enriched air supply for high coal slurry densities. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Biodegradation of bisphenol A and other bisphenols by a gram-negative aerobic bacterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Lobos, J. H.; Leib, T K; Su, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    A novel bacterium designated strain MV1 was isolated from a sludge enrichment taken from the wastewater treatment plant at a plastics manufacturing facility and shown to degrade 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane (4,4'-isopropylidenediphenol or bisphenol A). Strain MV1 is a gram-negative, aerobic bacillus that grows on bisphenol A as a sole source of carbon and energy. Total carbon analysis for bisphenol A degradation demonstrated that 60% of the carbon was mineralized to CO2, 20% was associated...

  11. Isolation and Characterization of a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium That Anaerobically Degrades Alkanes

    OpenAIRE

    So, Chi Ming; Young, L. Y.

    1999-01-01

    An alkane-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterial strain, AK-01, was isolated from an estuarine sediment with a history of chronic petroleum contamination. The bacterium is a short, nonmotile, non-spore-forming, gram-negative rod. It is mesophilic and grows optimally at pH 6.9 to 7.0 and at an NaCl concentration of 1%. Formate, fatty acids (C4 to C16) and hydrogen were readily utilized as electron donors. Sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate were used as electron acceptors, but sulfur, nitrite, an...

  12. Aggregation of the rhizospheric bacterium Azospirillum brasilense in response to oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoun, Hamid; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    Azospirillum brasilense spp. have ecological, scientific and agricultural importance. As model plant growth promoting rhizobacteria they interact with a large variety of plants, including important food and cash crops. Azospirillum strains are known for their production of plant growth hormones that enhance root systems and for their ability to fix nitrogen. Azospirillum cells transform in response to environmental cues. The production of exopolysaccharides and cell aggregation during cellular transformation are important steps in the attachment of Azospirillum to roots. We investigate signals that induce cellular transformation and aggregation in the Azospirillum and report on the importance of oxygen to the process of aggregation in this rhizospheric bacterium.

  13. Bisucaberin B, a Linear Hydroxamate Class Siderophore from the Marine Bacterium Tenacibaculum mesophilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichi Sakai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A siderophore, named bisucaberin B, was isolated from Tenacibaculum mesophilum bacteria separated from a marine sponge collected in the Republic of Palau. Using spectroscopic and chemical methods, the structure of bisucaberin B (1 was clearly determined to be a linear dimeric hydroxamate class siderophore. Although compound 1 is an open form of the known macrocyclic dimer bisucaberin (2, and was previously described as a bacterial degradation product of desferrioxamine B (4, the present report is the first description of the de novo biosynthesis of 1. To the best of our knowledge, compound 1 is the first chemically characterized siderophore isolated from a bacterium belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes.

  14. Bisucaberin B, a linear hydroxamate class siderophore from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum mesophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Masaki J; Nakano, Koji; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    A siderophore, named bisucaberin B, was isolated from Tenacibaculum mesophilum bacteria separated from a marine sponge collected in the Republic of Palau. Using spectroscopic and chemical methods, the structure of bisucaberin B (1) was clearly determined to be a linear dimeric hydroxamate class siderophore. Although compound 1 is an open form of the known macrocyclic dimer bisucaberin (2), and was previously described as a bacterial degradation product of desferrioxamine B (4), the present report is the first description of the de novo biosynthesis of 1. To the best of our knowledge, compound 1 is the first chemically characterized siderophore isolated from a bacterium belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. PMID:23549298

  15. Isolation and identification of a novel alginate-degrading bacterium, Ochrobactrum sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-wei Zhao

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An alginate-degrading bacterium, identified as Ochrobactrum sp. on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequencing, was isolated from brown algal samples collected from the waters in close vicinity to the Dongtou Isles in the East China Sea. The strain, designated WZUH09-1, is a short rod, gram-negative, obligatory aerobic, grows under the following conditions: 5-40oC, pH 3-9, and 0-2 times of the seawater concentration, and is able to depolymerize alginates with higher enzyme activity than that of others reported so far.

  16. Mutagenesis and reparation processes in the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas methanolica after UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resistance of cells of methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas methanolica to bactericidal and mutagenous effects of ultraviolet irradiation is shown as well as activity of reparation processes after UV irradiation. The presence of low photoreactivating activity in P. methanolica is shown as well. Observed recovery in innutritious medium and decrease of irradiated cells survival rates under effect of reparation inhibitors (coffeine and acriflavine) testify to activity of excision reparation and, perhaps, recombination branch of postreplicative reparation. No manifestation of inducible reparation system is discovered. It is concluded that increased resistance of P. methanolica cells to bactericidal and mutagenous effects of short-wave ultraviolet radiation is related to activity of exact reparation systems

  17. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  18. Acetylcholinesterase-Inhibiting Activity of Pyrrole Derivatives from a Novel Marine Gliding Bacterium, Rapidithrix thailandica

    OpenAIRE

    Khanit Suwanborirux; Anuchit Plubrukarn; Kornkanok Ingkaninan; Akkharawit Kanjana-opas; Supreeya Yuenyongsawad; Oraphan Sakulkeo; Yutthapong Sangnoi

    2008-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting activity of marinoquinoline A (1), a new pyrroloquinoline from a novel species of a marine gliding bacterium Rapidithrix thailandica, was assessed (IC50 4.9 mM). Two related pyrrole derivatives, 3-(2'-aminophenyl)-pyrrole (3) and 2,2-dimethyl-pyrrolo-1,2-dihydroquinoline (4), were also isolated from two other strains of R. thailandica. The isolation of 3 froma natural source is reported here for the first time. Compound 4 was proposed to be an isolation artifac...

  19. Acetylcholinesterase-Inhibiting Activity of Pyrrole Derivatives from a Novel Marine Gliding Bacterium, Rapidithrix thailandica

    OpenAIRE

    Sangnoi, Yutthapong; Sakulkeo, Oraphan; Yuenyongsawad, Supreeya; Kanjana-opas, Akkharawit; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Plubrukarn, Anuchit; Suwanborirux, Khanit

    2008-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting activity of marinoquinoline A (1), a new pyrroloquinoline from a novel species of a marine gliding bacterium Rapidithrix thailandica, was assessed (IC50 4.9 μM). Two related pyrrole derivatives, 3-(2′-aminophenyl)-pyrrole (3) and 2,2-dimethyl-pyrrolo-1,2-dihydroquinoline (4), were also isolated from two other strains of R. thailandica. The isolation of 3 from a natural source is reported here for the first time. Compound 4 was proposed to be an isolation artifa...

  20. Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas azotoformans S4, a potential biocontrol bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yang; Wu, Lijuan; Chen, Guoqing; Feng, Guozhong

    2016-06-10

    Pseudomonas azotoformans is a Gram-negative bacterium and infects cereal grains, especially rice. P. azotoformans S4 from soil sample derived from Lijiang, Yunnan Province, China, appeared to be strong inhibitory activity against Fusarium fujikurio, a serious rice fungal pathogen. Here, we present the complete genome of P. azotoformans S4, which consists of 6,859,618bp with a circle chromosome, 5991 coding DNA sequences, 70 tRNA and 19 rRNA. The genomic analysis revealed that 9 candidate gene clusters are involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. PMID:27080451

  1. Genome sequence of the marine bacterium Corynebacterium maris type strain Coryn-1T (= DSM 45190T)

    OpenAIRE

    Schaffert, Lena; Albersmeier, Andreas; Bednarz, Hanna; Niehaus, Karsten; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Corynebacterium maris Coryn-1T Ben-Dov et al. 2009 is a member of the genus Corynebacterium which contains Gram-positive, non-spore forming bacteria with a high G+C content. C. maris was isolated from the mucus of the Scleractinian coral Fungia granulosa and belongs to the aerobic and non-haemolytic corynebacteria. It displays tolerance to salts (up to 10%) and is related to the soil bacterium Corynebacterium halotolerans . As this is a type strain in a subgroup of Corynebacterium without com...

  2. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe-Simon, F; Blum, J S; Kulp, T R; Gordon, G W; Hoeft, S E; Pett-Ridge, J; Stolz, J F; Webb, S M; Weber, P K; Davies, P W; Anbar, A D; Oremland, R S

    2010-11-01

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, CA, which substitutes arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical significance.

  3. Characterization of Two New Glycosyl Hydrolases from the Lactic Acid Bacterium Carnobacterium piscicola Strain BA

    OpenAIRE

    Coombs, Jonna; Brenchley, Jean E.

    2001-01-01

    Three genes with homology to glycosyl hydrolases were detected on a DNA fragment cloned from a psychrophilic lactic acid bacterium isolate, Carnobacterium piscicola strain BA. A 2.2-kb region corresponding to an α-galactosidase gene, agaA, was followed by two genes in the same orientation, bgaB, encoding a 2-kb β-galactosidase, and bgaC, encoding a structurally distinct 1.76-kb β-galactosidase. This gene arrangement had not been observed in other lactic acid bacteria, including Lactococcus la...

  4. Role for Vitamin B12 in Light Induction of Gene Expression in the Bacterium Myxococcus xanthus

    OpenAIRE

    Cervantes, María; Murillo, Francisco J.

    2002-01-01

    A light-inducible promoter (PB) drives the carB operon (carotenoid genes) of the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. A gene encoding a regulator of carotenoid biosynthesis was identified by studying mutant strains carrying a transcriptional fusion to PB and deletions in three candidate genes. Our results prove that the identified gene, named carA, codes for a repressor of the PB promoter in the dark. They also show that the carA gene product does not participate in the light activation of two other...

  5. Halomonas olivaria sp nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from olive-processing effluents

    OpenAIRE

    Amouric, A.; Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Joseph, Manon; Brochier-Armanet, C; LORQUIN, Jean

    2014-01-01

    A moderately halophilic, Gram-stain-negative, non-sporulating bacterium designed as strain TYRC17(T) was isolated from olive-processing effluents. The organism was a straight rod, motile by means of peritrichous flagella and able to respire both oxygen and nitrate. Growth occurred with 0-25 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 7%), at pH 5-11 (optimum, pH 7.0) and at 4-50 degrees C (optimally at 35 degrees C). It accumulated poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoate granules and produced exopolysaccharides. The predomina...

  6. Sequencing and Characterization of the xyl Operon of a Gram-Positive Bacterium, Tetragenococcus halophila

    OpenAIRE

    TAKEDA, YASUO; Takase, Kazuma; Yamato, Ichiro; Abe, Keietsu

    1998-01-01

    The xyl operon of a gram-positive bacterium, Tetragenococcus halophila (previously called Pediococcus halophilus), was cloned and sequenced. The DNA was about 7.7 kb long and contained genes for a ribose binding protein and part of a ribose transporter, xylR (a putative regulatory gene), and the xyl operon, along with its regulatory region and transcription termination signal, in this order. The DNA was AT rich, the GC content being 35.8%, consistent with the GC content of this gram-positive ...

  7. Mageeibacillus indolicus gen. nov., sp. nov: A novel bacterium isolated from the female genital tract

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Michele N.; Rabe, Lorna K.; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fredricks, David N.; Wiesenfeld, Harold C.; Hillier, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Three isolates of a bacterium recovered from human endometrium using conventional culture methods were characterized biochemically and subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Isolates were non-motile, obligately anaerobic, non-spore forming, asaccharolytic, non-cellulolytic, indole positive, Gram positive rods. Cell wall fatty acid profiling revealed C14:0, C16:0, C18:2 ω6, 9c, C18:1 ω9c and C18:0 to be the major fatty acid composition. The DNA mol % G+C was determine...

  8. Ercella succinigenes gen. nov., sp. nov., ananaerobic succinate-producing bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Van Gelder, A.H.; Sousa, D.Z.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; J. S. Sinninghe Damsté; Stams, A. J. M.; Sánchez-Andrea, I.

    2014-01-01

    A novel anaerobic succinate-producing bacterium, strain ZWBT, was isolated from sludge collected from a biogas desulfurization bioreactor (Eerbeek, The Netherlands). Cells were non-spore forming, motile, slightly curved rods (0.4 to 0.5 µm in diameter and 2 to 3 µm in length), and stained Gram-negative. The temperature range for growth was 25 to 40°C, with an optimum at 37°C. The pH range for growth was 7.0 to 9.0, with an optimum at pH 7.5. Strain ZWBT ferments glycerol and several carbohydr...

  9. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5–0.8 μm in diameter, and 2–8 μm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37°C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H2/CO2 to acetate, usually as the only product. ...

  10. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, M.; Mehboob, F.; Gelder, van, M.; Rijpstra, I.; Sinninghe-Damsté, J.S.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually a...

  11. Pseudomonas chloritidismutans sp. nov., a non-denitrifying chlorate-reducing bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.; Jonker, A.B.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, dissimilatory chlorate-reducing bacterium, strain AW-1(T), was isolated from biomass of an anaerobic chlorate-reducing bioreactor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence showed 100␜equence similarity to Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM 50227 and 98.6␜equence similarity to the type strain of P. stutzeri (DSM 5190(T)). The species P. stutzeri possesses a high degree of genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Therefore, eight genomic groups, ...

  12. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, M.; Mehboob, F.; van Gelder, T; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; J. S. Sinninghe Damsté; Stams, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5–0.8 μm in diameter, and 2–8 μm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37°C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H2/CO2 to acetate, usually as the only product. ...

  13. Genome Sequence of the Boron-Tolerant and -Requiring Bacterium Bacillus boroniphilus

    OpenAIRE

    ÇÖL, Bekir; Özkeserli, Zeynep; Kumar, Dibyendu; ÖZDAĞ, Hilal; Alakoç, Yeşim D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus boroniphilus is a highly boron-tolerant bacterium that also requires this element for its growth. The complete genome sequence of B. boroniphilus was determined by a combination of shotgun sequencing and paired-end sequencing using 454 pyrosequencing technology. A total of 84,872,624 reads from shotgun sequencing and a total of 194,092,510 reads from paired-end sequencing were assembled using Newbler 2.3. The estimated size of the draft genome is 5.2 Mb.

  14. Clostridium peptidivorans sp. nov., a peptide-fermenting bacterium from an olive mill wastewater treatment digester

    OpenAIRE

    Mechichi, T.; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Labat, Marc; Garcia, Jean-Louis; Verhé, F.; Patel, B.K.C.

    2000-01-01

    A new peptid-degrading, strictly anaerobic bacterium, designated strain TMC4T, was isolated from an olive mill wastewater treatment digester. Cells of strain TMC4T were motile, rod-shaped (5-10 x 0.6-1.2 microns), stained Gram-positive and formed terminal to subterminal spores that distended the cells. Optimal growth occurred at 37°C and pH 7 in an anaerobic basal medium containing 0.5% Casamino acids. Arginine, lysine, cysteine, methionine, histidine, serine, isoleucine, yeast extract, pepto...

  15. p-cresol methylhydroxylase from a denitrifying bacterium involved in anaerobic degradation of p-cresol.

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, D. J.; Bossert, I D; Rhodes-Roberts, M E

    1991-01-01

    A bacterium, strain PC-07, previously isolated as part of a coculture capable of growing on p-cresol under anaerobic conditions with nitrate as the acceptor was identified as an Achromobacter sp. The first enzyme of the pathway, p-cresol methylhydroxylase, which converts its substrate into p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, was purified. The enzyme had an Mr of 130,000 and the spectrum of a flavocytochrome. It was composed of flavoprotein subunits of Mr 54,000 and cytochrome subunits of Mr 12,500. The ...

  16. Response to Comments on "A Bacterium That Can Grow Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe-Simon, F; Blum, J S; Kulp, T R; Gordon, G W; Hoeft, S E; Pett-Ridge, J; Stolz, J F; Webb, S M; Weber, P K; Davies, P W; Anbar, A D; Oremland, R S

    2011-03-07

    Concerns have been raised about our recent study describing a bacterium that can grow using arsenic (As) instead of phosphorus (P). Our data suggested that As could act as a substitute for P in major biomolecules in this organism. Although the issues raised are of investigative interest, we contend that they do not invalidate our conclusions. We argue that while no single line of evidence we presented was sufficient to support our interpretation of the data, taken as an entire dataset we find no plausible alternative to our conclusions. Here we reply to the critiques and provide additional arguments supporting the assessment of the data we reported.

  17. Coarse grained simulation reveals antifreeze properties of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Antarctic bacterium Colwellia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung; Van, Thanh Dac; Le, Ly

    2015-10-01

    The novel hyperactive antifreeze protein (AFP) of Antarctic sea ice bacterium Colwellia sp. provides a target for studying the protection of psychrophilic microgoranisms against freezing environment. Interestingly, the Colwellia sp. hyperactive antifreeze protein (ColAFP) was crystallized without the structural dynamic characteristics. Here, the result indicated, through coarse grained simulation of ColAFP under various subfreezing temperature, that ColAFP remains active at temperature of equal and greater than 275 K (∼2 °C). Extensive simulation analyses also revealed the adaptive mechanism of ColAFP in subfreezing environment. Our result provides a structural dynamic understanding of the ColAFP.

  18. Penetration of the Coral-Bleaching Bacterium Vibrio shiloi into Oculina patagonica

    OpenAIRE

    Banin, E.; Israely, T.; Kushmaro, A.; Y. Loya; Orr, E; Rosenberg, E

    2000-01-01

    Inoculation of the coral-bleaching bacterium Vibrio shiloi into seawater containing its host Oculina patagonica led to adhesion of the bacteria to the coral surface via a β-d-galactose receptor, followed by penetration of the bacteria into the coral tissue. The internalized V. shiloi cells were observed inside the exodermal layer of the coral by electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy using specific anti-V. shiloi antibodies to stain the intracellular bacteria. At 29°C, 80% of the bac...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang [Washington University, St. Louis; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Honchak, Barbara M [Washington University, St. Louis; Karbach, Lauren E [Washington University, St. Louis; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Pierson, Beverly K [University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA

    2011-01-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) bacterium, and can grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions or chemotrophically under aerobic and dark conditions. According to 16S rRNA analysis, Chloroflexi species are the earliest branching bacteria capable of photosynthesis, and Cfl. aurantiacus has been long regarded as a key organism to resolve the obscurity of the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. Cfl. aurantiacus contains a chimeric photosystem that comprises some characters of green sulfur bacteria and purple photosynthetic bacteria, and also has some unique electron transport proteins compared to other photosynthetic bacteria.

  20. Improved manganese-oxidizing activity of DypB, a peroxidase from a lignolytic bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rahul; Grigg, Jason C.; Qin, Wei; Kadla, John F.; Murphy, Michael E. P.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2013-01-01

    DypB, a dye-decolorizing peroxidase from the lignolytic soil bacterium Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, catalyzes the peroxide-dependent oxidation of divalent manganese (Mn2+), albeit less efficiently than fungal manganese peroxidases. Substitution of Asn246, a distal heme residue, with alanine, increased the enzyme’s apparent kcat and kcat/Km values for Mn2+ by 80- and 15-fold, respectively. A 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the N246A variant revealed the Mn2+ to be bound within a pocket...

  1. Inflammasomes Coordinate Pyroptosis and Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity to Clear Infection by a Ubiquitous Environmental Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltez, Vivien I; Tubbs, Alan L; Cook, Kevin D; Aachoui, Youssef; Falcone, E Liana; Holland, Steven M; Whitmire, Jason K; Miao, Edward A

    2015-11-17

    Defective neutrophils in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) cause susceptibility to extracellular and intracellular infections. Microbes must first be ejected from intracellular niches to expose them to neutrophil attack, so we hypothesized that inflammasomes detect certain CGD pathogens upstream of neutrophil killing. Here, we identified one such ubiquitous environmental bacterium, Chromobacterium violaceum, whose extreme virulence was fully counteracted by the NLRC4 inflammasome. Caspase-1 protected via two parallel pathways that eliminated intracellular replication niches. Pyroptosis was the primary bacterial clearance mechanism in the spleen, but both pyroptosis and interleukin-18 (IL-18)-driven natural killer (NK) cell responses were required for liver defense. NK cells cleared hepatocyte replication niches via perforin-dependent cytotoxicity, whereas interferon-γ was not required. These insights suggested a therapeutic approach: exogenous IL-18 restored perforin-dependent cytotoxicity during infection by the inflammasome-evasive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Therefore, inflammasomes can trigger complementary programmed cell death mechanisms, directing sterilizing immunity against intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:26572063

  2. Hyperthermostable and oxygen resistant hydrogenases from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus: Physicochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiral, Marianne; Tron, Pascale; Belle, Valerie; Aubert, Corinne; Leger, Christophe; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Therese [Laboratoire de Bioenergetique et Ingenierie des Proteines (BIP) IBSM, CNRS, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille cedex 20 (France)

    2006-09-15

    The discovery of hydrogenases in hyperthermophiles has important ramifications not only in microbial physiology and evolution but also in biotechnologies. These organisms are the source of extremely stable enzymes (regarding temperature, pressure, and O{sub 2}). Aquifex aeolicus is a microaerophilic, hyperthermophilic bacterium containing three [NiFe] hydrogenases. It is the most hyperthermophilic bacterium known to date and grows at 85{sup o}C under a H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. The Aquificales represent the earliest branching order of the bacterial domain indicating that they are the most ancient bacteria. Two Aquifex hydrogenases (one membrane-bound and one soluble) have been purified and characterized. In contrast to the majority of the [NiFe] hydrogenases, the hydrogenases from A. aeolicus are rather tolerant to oxygen. The molecular basis of the oxygen resistance of Aquifex hydrogenases has been investigated. The great stability of Aquifex hydrogenases with respect to oxygen and high temperatures make these enzymes good candidates for biotechnological uses. (author)

  3. Enrichment and physiological characterization of a novel Nitrospira-like bacterium obtained from a marine sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Off, Sandra; Alawi, Mashal; Spieck, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Members of the nitrite-oxidizing genus Nitrospira are most likely responsible for the second step of nitrification, the conversion of nitrite (NO(2)(-)) to nitrate (NO(3)(-)), within various sponges. We succeeded in obtaining an enrichment culture of Nitrospira derived from the mesohyl of the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba using a traditional cultivation approach. Electron microscopy gave first evidence of the shape and ultrastructure of this novel marine Nitrospira-like bacterium (culture Aa01). We characterized these bacteria physiologically with regard to optimal incubation conditions, especially the temperature and substrate range in comparison to other Nitrospira cultures. Best growth was obtained at temperatures between 28 degrees C and 30 degrees C in mineral medium with 70% North Sea water and a substrate concentration of 0.5 mM nitrite under microaerophilic conditions. The Nitrospira culture Aa01 is very sensitive against nitrite, because concentrations higher than 1.5 mM resulted in a complete inhibition of growth. Sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the novel Nitrospira-like bacterium is separated from the sponge-specific subcluster and falls together with an environmental clone from Mediterranean sediments (98.6% similarity). The next taxonomically described species Nitrospira marina is only distantly related, with 94.6% sequence similarity, and therefore the culture Aa01 represents a novel species of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:20511427

  4. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage.

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2010-08-03

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO(2). The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts.

  5. Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to intraperitoneal injection of bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junjie; Zou, Wenzheng; Yan, Qingpi

    2008-08-01

    Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila was studied to 60 individuals in two groups. Each bullfrog in bacterium-injected group was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 0.2 ml bacterial suspension at a density of 5.2 × 106 CFU/ml, while each one in control group injected i.p. with 0.2 ml sterile saline solution (0.85%, w/v). Three bullfrogs in both groups were sampled at 0, 1, 3, 7, 11, 15 and 20 days post-injection (dpi) for the evaluation of non-specific immune parameters. It was observed that intraperitoneal injection of A. hydrophila significantly increased the number of leucocytes and that of NBT-positive cells in peripheral blood. Significant increases in serum bactericidal activity and serum acid phosphatase activity were also observed in the bacterium-injected frogs when compared with those in the control group. However, a significant reduction was detected in vitro in phagocytosis activity of peripheral blood phagocytes. No significant difference in changes in the number of peripheral erythrocytes, serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and lysozyme activity was detected between the two groups. It is suggested that bullfrogs may produce a series of non-specific immune reactions in response to the A. hydrophila infection.

  6. Evaluation of nitrate removal by continuous culturing of an aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Paracoccus pantotrophus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa-Kurisu, K; Otani, Y; Hanaki, K

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate removal under aerobic conditions was investigated using pure cultures of Paracoccus pantotrophus, which is a well-known aerobic-denitrifying (AD) bacterium. When a high concentration of cultures with a high carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio was preserved at the beginning of batch experiments, subsequently added nitrate was completely removed. When continuous culturing was perpetuated, a high nitrate removal rate (66.5%) was observed on day 4 post-culture, although gradual decreases in AD ability with time were observed. The attenuation in AD ability was probably caused by carbon limitation, because when carbon concentration of inflow water was doubled, nitrate removal efficiency improved from 18.1% to 59.6%. Bacterial community analysis using the polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method showed that P. pantotrophus disappeared in the suspended medium on day 8 post-culture, whereas other bacterial communities dominated by Acidovorax sp. appeared. Interestingly, this replaced bacterial community also showed AD ability. As P. pantotrophus was detected as attached colonies around the membrane and bottom of the reactor, this bacterium can therefore be introduced in a fixed form for treatment of wastewater containing nitrate with a high C/N ratio. PMID:17163031

  7. Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to intraperitoneal injection of bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila was studied to 60 individuals in two groups. Each bullfrog in bacterium-injected group was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 0.2 ml bacterial suspension at a density of 5.2 × 106 CFU/ml, while each one in control group injected i.p. with 0.2 ml sterile saline solution (0.85%, w/v). Three bullfrogs in both groups were sampled at 0, 1, 3, 7, 11, 15 and 20 days post-injection (dpi) for the evaluation of non-specific immune parameters. It was observed that intraperitoneal injection of A. hydrophila significantly increased the number of leucocytes and that of NBT-positive cells in peripheral blood. Significant increases in serum bactericidal activity and serum acid phosphatase activity were also observed in the bacterium-injected frogs when compared with those in the control group. However, a significant reduction was detected in vitro in phagocytosis activity of peripheral blood phagocytes. No significant difference in changes in the number of peripheral erythrocytes, serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and lysozyme activity was detected between the two groups. It is suggested that bullfrogs may produce a series of non-specific immune reactions in response to the A. hydrophila infection.

  8. Biogenesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles using the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from Garcinia xanthochymus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Swetha Sunkar; C Valli Nachiyar

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To synthesize the ecofriendly nanoparticles, which is viewed as an alternative to the chemical method which initiated the use of microbes like bacteria and fungi in their synthesis. Methods: The current study uses the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from the Garcinia xanthochymus to synthesize the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNPs were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate solution by the endophytic bacterium after incubation for 3-5 d at room temperature. The synthesis was initially observed by colour change from pale white to brown which was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The AgNPs were further characterized using FTIR, SEM-EDX and TEM analyses. Results:The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be spherical with the size in the range of 20-40 nm which showed a slight aggregation. The energy-dispersive spectra of the nanoparticle dispersion confirmed the presence of elemental silver. The AgNPs were found to have antibacterial activity against a few pathogenic bacteria like Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusions:The endophytic bacteria identified as Bacillus cereus was able to synthesize silver nanoparticles with potential antibacterial activity.

  9. Production and characterization of bioemulsifier from a marine bacterium, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus SM7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulnaree Phetrong

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacterium strain SM7 was isolated as a bioemulsifier-producing bacterium from oil-spilled seawater in Songkhla lagoon, Thailand. It was identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus based on morphology, biochemicalcharacteristics and 16S rRNA sequence. A. calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus SM7 produced an extracellular emulsifying agent when grown in a minimal salt medium (pH 7.0 containing 0.3% (v/v n-heptadecane and 0.1% (w/v ammoniumhydrogen carbonate as carbon source and nitrogen source, respectively, at 30oC with agitation rate of 200 rpm. Crude bioemulsifier was recovered from the culture supernatant by ethanol precipitation with a yield of 2.94 g/l and had a criticalemulsifier concentration of 0.04 g/ml. The crude bioemulsifier was capable of emulsifying n-hexadecane in a broad pH range (6-12, temperatures (30-121oC and in the presence of NaCl up to 12% (w/v. The bioemulsifier was stable in saltsolution ranging from 0 to 0.1% (w/v of MgCl2 and CaCl2. The broad range of pH stability, thermostability and salt tolerance suggested that the bioemulsifier from A. calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus SM7 could be useful in environmentalapplication, especially bioremediation of oil-polluted seawater.

  10. Microfabrication of patterns of adherent marine bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens using soft lithography and scanning probe lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuan; Burchardt, Malte; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Beardsley, Christine; Simon, Meinhard; Wittstock, Gunther

    2010-06-01

    Two lithographic approaches have been explored for the microfabrication of cellular patterns based on the attachment of marine bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens strain T5. Strain T5 produces a new antibiotic that makes this bacterium potentially interesting for the pharmaceutical market and as a probiotic organism in aquacultures and in controlling biofouling. The microcontact printing (microCP) method is based on the micropatterning of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) terminated with adhesive end groups such as CH(3) and COOH and nonadhesive groups (e.g., short oligomers of ethylene glycol (OEG)) to form micropatterned substrates for the adhesion of strain T5. The scanning probe lithographic method is based on the surface modification of OEG SAM by using a microelectrode, the probe of a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). Oxidizing agents (e.g., Br(2)) were electrogenerated in situ at the microelectrodes from Br(-) in aqueous solution to remove OEG SAMs locally, which allows the subsequent adsorption of bacteria. Various micropatterns of bacteria could be formed in situ on the substrate without a prefabricated template. The fabricated cellular patterns may be applied to a variety of marine biological studies that require the analysis of biofilm formation, cell-cell and cell-surface interactions, and cell-based biosensors and bioelectronics. PMID:20397716

  11. INDISIM-Paracoccus, an individual-based and thermodynamic model for a denitrifying bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo Granda, Pablo; Gras, Anna; Ginovart, Marta; Moulton, Vincent

    2016-08-21

    We have developed an individual-based model for denitrifying bacteria. The model, called INDISIM-Paracoccus, embeds a thermodynamic model for bacterial yield prediction inside the individual-based model INDISIM, and is designed to simulate the bacterial cell population behavior and the product dynamics within the culture. The INDISIM-Paracoccus model assumes a culture medium containing succinate as a carbon source, ammonium as a nitrogen source and various electron acceptors such as oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide and nitrous oxide to simulate in continuous or batch culture the different nutrient-dependent cell growth kinetics of the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans. The individuals in the model represent microbes and the individual-based model INDISIM gives the behavior-rules that they use for their nutrient uptake and reproduction cycle. Three previously described metabolic pathways for P. denitrificans were selected and translated into balanced chemical equations using a thermodynamic model. These stoichiometric reactions are an intracellular model for the individual behavior-rules for metabolic maintenance and biomass synthesis and result in the release of different nitrogen oxides to the medium. The model was implemented using the NetLogo platform and it provides an interactive tool to investigate the different steps of denitrification carried out by a denitrifying bacterium. The simulator can be obtained from the authors on request. PMID:27179457

  12. Data supporting functional diversity of the marine bacterium Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanova, Larissa; Nedashkovskaya, Olga; Podvolotskaya, Anna; Slepchenko, Lubov; Golotin, Vasily; Belik, Alexey; Shevchenko, Ludmila; Son, Oksana; Rasskazov, Valery

    2016-09-01

    Data is presented in support of functionality of hyper-diverse protein families encoded by the Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296 (formerly Cobetia marina KMM 296) genome ("The genome of the marine bacterium Cobetia marina KMM 296 isolated from the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Dunker, 1853)" [1]) providing its nutritional versatility, adaptability and biocontrol that could be the basis of the marine bacterium evolutionary and application potential. Presented data include the information of growth and biofilm-forming properties of the food-associated isolates of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Listeria, Salmonella and Staphylococcus under the conditions of their co-culturing with C. amphilecti KMM 296 to confirm its high inter-species communication and anti-microbial activity. Also included are the experiments on the crude petroleum consumption by C. amphilecti KMM 296 as the sole source of carbon in the presence of sulfate or nitrate to ensure its bioremediation capacity. The multifunctional C. amphilecti KMM 296 genome is a promising source for the beneficial psychrophilic enzymes and essential secondary metabolites. PMID:27508225

  13. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, a bacterium pathogenic for marine animals and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amable J. Rivas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (formerly Vibrio damsela is a pathogen of a variety of marine animals including fish, crustaceans, molluscs and cetaceans. In humans, it can cause opportunistic infections that may evolve into necrotizing fasciitis with fatal outcome. Although the genetic basis of virulence in this bacterium is not completely elucidated, recent findings demonstrate that the phospholipase-D Dly (damselysin and the pore-forming toxins HlyApl and HlyAch play a main role in virulence for homeotherms and poikilotherms. The acquisition of the virulence plasmid pPHDD1 that encodes Dly and HlyApl has likely constituted a main driving force in the evolution of a highly hemolytic lineage within the subspecies. Interestingly, strains that naturally lack pPHDD1 show a strong pathogenic potential for a variety of fish species, indicating the existence of yet uncharacterized virulence factors. Future and deep analysis of the complete genome sequence of P. damselae subsp. damselae will surely provide a clearer picture of the virulence factors employed by this bacterium to cause disease in such a varied range of hosts.

  14. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, a bacterium pathogenic for marine animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Amable J; Lemos, Manuel L; Osorio, Carlos R

    2013-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (formerly Vibrio damsela) is a pathogen of a variety of marine animals including fish, crustaceans, molluscs, and cetaceans. In humans, it can cause opportunistic infections that may evolve into necrotizing fasciitis with fatal outcome. Although the genetic basis of virulence in this bacterium is not completely elucidated, recent findings demonstrate that the phospholipase-D Dly (damselysin) and the pore-forming toxins HlyApl and HlyAch play a main role in virulence for homeotherms and poikilotherms. The acquisition of the virulence plasmid pPHDD1 that encodes Dly and HlyApl has likely constituted a main driving force in the evolution of a highly hemolytic lineage within the subspecies. Interestingly, strains that naturally lack pPHDD1 show a strong pathogenic potential for a variety of fish species, indicating the existence of yet uncharacterized virulence factors. Future and deep analysis of the complete genome sequence of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae will surely provide a clearer picture of the virulence factors employed by this bacterium to cause disease in such a varied range of hosts. PMID:24093021

  15. The fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium in pharmaceutical wastewater treatment sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuan; Yang, Juan; Chen, Shaoyi

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium, Klebsiella oxytoca NBA-1, which was isolated from a pharmaceutical wastewater treatment facility. The 90-day survivability of strain NBA-1 after exposure to sludge under anaerobic and aerobic conditions was investigated. The bacterium was inoculated into sludge amended with glucose and p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) to compare the bacterial community variations between the modified sludge and nitrobenzene amendment. The results showed that glucose had no obvious effect on nitrobenzene biodegradation in the co-metabolism process, regardless of the presence/absence of oxygen. When p-CNB was added under anaerobic conditions, the biodegradation rate of nitrobenzene remained unchanged although p-CNB inhibited the production of aniline. The diversity of the microbial community increased and NBA-1 continued to be one of the dominant strains. Under aerobic conditions, the degradation rate of both nitrobenzene and p-CNB was only 20% of that under anaerobic conditions. p-CNB had a toxic effect on the microorganisms in the sludge so that most of the DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) bands, including that of NBA-1, began to disappear under aerobic conditions after 90days of exposure. These data show that the bacterial community was stable under anaerobic conditions and the microorganisms, including NBA-1, were more resistant to the adverse environment. PMID:26086561

  16. Structural characterization of the lipid A from the LPS of the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Halomonas pantelleriensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillo, Sara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Casillo, Angela; Lindner, Buko; Romano, Ida; Nicolaus, Barbara; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Giuliano, Mariateresa; Cammarota, Marcella; Lanzetta, Rosa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2016-09-01

    Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM9661(Τ) is a Gram-negative haloalkaliphilic bacterium isolated from the sand of the volcanic Venus mirror lake, closed to seashore in the Pantelleria Island in the south of Italy. It is able to optimally grow in media containing 3-15 % (w/v) total salt and at pH between 9 and 10. To survive in these harsh conditions, the bacterium has developed several strategies that probably concern the bacteria outer membrane, a barrier regulating the exchange with the environment. In such a context, the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), which are among the major constituent of the Gram-negative outer membrane, are thought to contribute to the restrictive membrane permeability properties. The structure of the lipid A family derived from the LPS of Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM 9661(T) is reported herein. The lipid A was obtained from the purified LPS by mild acid hydrolysis. The lipid A, which contains different numbers of fatty acids residues, and its partially deacylated derivatives were completely characterized by means of ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry and chemical analysis. Preliminary immunological assays were performed, and a comparison with the lipid A structure of the phylogenetic proximal Halomonas magadiensis is also reported. PMID:27329160

  17. Isolation, cloning and characterization of an azoreductase from the halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Maryam; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Asad, Sedigheh

    2016-04-01

    Azo dyes are a major class of colorants used in various industries including textile, paper and food. These dyes are regarded as pollutant since they are not readily reduced under aerobic conditions. Halomonas elongata, a halophilic bacterium, has the ability to decolorize different mono and di-azo dyes in anoxic conditions. In this study the putative azoreductase gene of H. elongata, formerly annotated as acp, was isolated, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterized. The gene product, AzoH, was found to have a molecular mass of 22 kDa. The enzyme requires NADH, as an electron donor for its activity. The apparent Km was 63 μM for NADH and 12 μM for methyl red as a mono-azo dye substrate. The specific activity for methyl red was 0.27 μmol min(-1)mg(-1). The optimum enzyme activity was achieved in 50mM sodium phosphate buffer at pH 6. Although increased salinity resulted in reduced activity, AzoH could decolorize azo dye at NaCl concentrations up to 15% (w/v). The enzyme was also shown to be able to decolorize remazol black B as a representative of di-azo dyes. This is the first report describing the sequence and activity of an azo-reducing enzyme from a halophilic bacterium. PMID:26724685

  18. Emulsification potential of a newly isolated biosurfactant-producing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain TA6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavandi, Mahmoud; Mohebali, Ghasemali; Haddadi, Azam; Shakarami, Heidar; Nuhi, Ashrafossadat

    2011-02-01

    An indigenous biosurfactant producing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain TA6 was isolated from Iranian oil contaminated soil using an efficient enrichment and screening method. During growth on sucrose and several hydrocarbon substrates as sole carbon source, the bacterium could produce biosurfactants. As a result of biosurfactant synthesis, the surface tension of the growth medium was reduced from 68mNm(-1) to values below 30mNm(-1). The biosurfactant was capable of forming stable emulsions with various hydrocarbons ranging from pentane to light motor oil. Preliminary chemical characterization revealed that the TA6 biosurfactant consisted of extracellular lipids and glycolipids. The biosurfactant was stable during exposure to high salinity (10% NaCl), elevated temperatures (120°C for 15min) and within a wide pH range (4.0-10.0). The culture broth was effective in recovering up to 70% of the residual oil from oil-saturated sand packs which indicates the potential value of the biosurfactant in enhanced oil recovery. PMID:21030223

  19. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; Mehboob, Farrakh; van Gelder, Antonie H; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Stams, Alfons J M

    2010-09-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO(2). The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts. PMID:20680263

  20. Enhanced Cadmium (Cd Phytoextraction from Contaminated Soil using Cd-Resistant Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunchaya Setkit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A cadmium (Cd-resistant bacterium, Micrococcus sp. MU1, is able to produce indole-3-acetic acid and promotes root elongation and plant growth. The potential of this bacterium on enhancement of Cd uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd in Helianthus annuus L. planted in Cd-contaminated soil was evaluated in greenhouse condition. The results showed that Micrococcus sp. MU1promoted the growth of H. annuus L. by increasing the root length, stem height, dry biomass, root to shoot ratio and also significantly increased Cd accumulation in the root and above-ground tissues of H. annuus L. compared to uninoculated control. Re-inoculation with Micrococcus sp. MU1in contaminated soil helped in promoting plant growth and Cd phytoextraction throughout the cultivation period. In addition, phytoextraction coefficient and translocation factor (TF of H. annuus L. inoculated with Micrococcus sp. MU1were higher than that of uninoculated control and TF continuously increased with time. Our results suggested that Micrococcus sp. MU1 has an ability to enhance plant growth and Cd uptake in H. annuus L. Synergistic interaction between Micrococcus sp. MU1 and H. annuus L. could be further applied for Cd phytoextraction in polluted areas.

  1. Melanin from the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum: a spectroscopic characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aulie Banerjee

    Full Text Available Melanins, the ubiquitous hetero-polymer pigments found widely dispersed among various life forms, are usually dark brown/black in colour. Although melanins have variety of biological functions, including protection against ultraviolet radiation of sunlight and are used in medicine, cosmetics, extraction of melanin from the animal and plant kingdoms is not an easy task. Using complementary physicochemical techniques (i.e. MALDI-TOF, FTIR absorption and cross-polarization magic angle spinning solid-state (13C NMR, we report here the characterization of melanins extracted from the nitrogen-fixing non-virulent bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum, a safe viable source. Moreover, considering dihydroxyindole moiety as the main constituent, an effort is made to propose the putative molecular structure of the melanin hetero-polymer extracted from the bacterium. Characterization of the melanin obtained from Azotobacter chroococcum would provide an inspiration in extending research activities on these hetero-polymers and their use as protective agent against UV radiation.

  2. Removal of corper(II Ions from aqueous solution by a lactic acid bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yilmaz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecium, a lactic acid bacterium (LAB, was evaluated for its ability to remove copper(II ions from water. The effects of the pH, contact time, initial concentration of copper(II ions, and temperature on the biosorption rate and capacity were studied. The initial concentrations of copper(II ions used to determine the maximum amount of biosorbed copper(II ions onto lyophilised lactic acid bacterium varied from 25 mg L-1 to 500 mg L-1. Maximum biosorption capacities were attained at pH 5.0 and 6.0. Temperature variation between 20°C and 40°C did not affect the biosorption capacity of the bacterial biomass. The highest copper(II ion removal capacity was 106.4 mg per g dry biomass. The correlation regression coefficients show that the biosorption process can be well defined by the Freundlich equation. The change in biosorption capacity with time was found to fit a pseudo-second-order equation.

  3. The algae-lytic ability of bacterium DC10 and the influence of environmental factors on the ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI; Shunyu; LIU; Yongding; SHEN; Yinwu; LI; Genbao

    2005-01-01

    A lysing-bacterium DC10, isolated from Dianchi Lake of Yunnan Province, was characterized to be Pseudomonas sp. It was able to lyse some algae well, such as Microcystis viridis, Selenastrum capricornutum, and so on. In this study, it was shown that the bacterium lysed the algae by releasing a substance; the best lytic effects were achieved at Iow temperatures and in the dark. Different concentrations of CaCI2 and NaNO3 influenced the lytic effects;the ability to lyse algae decreased in the following order: pH 4 > pH 9 > pH 7 > pH 5.5. It was significant to develop a special technology with this kind of bacterium for controlling the bloomforming planktonic microalgae.

  4. Cloning of the cnr operon into a strain of Bacillaceae bacterium for the development of a suitable biosorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosso-Kankeu, Elvis; Mulaba-Bafubiandi, Antoine F; Piater, Lizelle A; Tlou, Matsobane G

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a potential microbial biosorbent was engineered to improve its capacity to remediate heavy metal contaminated water resources. A Bacillaceae bacterium isolated from a mining area was transformed with a plasmid carrying the (pECD312)-based cnr operon that encodes nickel and cobalt resistance. The bioadsorption ability of the transformed strain was evaluated for removal of nickel from metallurgical water relative to the wildtype strain. Results showed that transformation improved the adsorption capacity of the bacterium by 37 % at nickel concentrations equivalent to 150 mg/L. Furthermore it was possible to apply prediction modelling to study the bioadsorption behaviour of the transformed strain. As such, this work may be extended to the design of a nickel bioremediation plant utilising the newly developed Bacillaceae bacterium as a biosorbent. PMID:27263009

  5. Antibacterial Property of a Coral-Associated Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea Against Shrimp Pathogenic Vibrio harveyi (In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OCKY KARNA RADJASA

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A coral-associated bacterium was successfully screened for secondary metabolites production based on PCR amplification of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene and was identified as closely related to Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea based on its 16S rDNA.The bacterium was found to inhibit the growth of shrimp pathogenic bacterium tested, Vibrio harveyi. To characterize the inhibiting metabolite, a 279 bp long DNA fragment was obtained and the deduced amino acid sequence showed conserved signature regions for peptide synthetases and revealed a high similarity to NosD (40% identity, a multifunctional peptide synthetase from Nostoc sp. GSV224, and NdaB (44% identity, a peptide synthetase module of Nodularia spumigena.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Bacterium Enterobacter spp. MR1, Isolated from Drought Tolerant Plant (Butea monosperma)

    OpenAIRE

    Parakhia, Manoj V.; Tomar, Rukam S.; Malaviya, Bipin J.; Dhingani, Rashmin M.; Rathod, Visha M.; Thakkar, Jalpa R.; Golakiya, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. MR1 an endophytic plant growth promoting bacterium was isolated from the roots of Butea monosperma, a drought tolerant plant. Genome sequencing of Enterobacter spp. MR1 was carried out in Ion Torrent (PGM), Next Generation Sequencer. The data obtained revealed 640 contigs with genome size of 4.58 Mb and G+C content of 52.8 %. This bacterium may contain genes responsible for inducing drought tolerance in plant, including genes for phosphate solubilization, growth hormones and ...

  7. Bacterium-like Particles for efficient immune stimulation of existing vaccines and new subunit vaccines in mucosal applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalija eVan Braeckel-Budimir

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The successful development of a mucosal vaccine critically depends on the use of a safe and effective immunostimulant and/or carrier system. This review describes the effectiveness and mode of action of an immunostimulating particle derived from bacteria in mucosal subunit vaccines. The non-living particles, designated Bacterium-like Particles (BLPs are based on the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis. The focus of the overview is on the development of intranasal BLP-based vaccines to prevent diseases caused by influenza and respiratory syncytial virus, and includes a selection of Phase I clinical data for the intranasal FluGEM vaccine.

  8. Bacterium-Like Particles for Efficient Immune Stimulation of Existing Vaccines and New Subunit Vaccines in Mucosal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Braeckel-Budimir, Natalija; Haijema, Bert Jan; Leenhouts, Kees

    2013-01-01

    The successful development of a mucosal vaccine depends critically on the use of a safe and effective immunostimulant and/or carrier system. This review describes the effectiveness and mode of action of an immunostimulating particle, derived from bacteria, used in mucosal subunit vaccines. The non-living particles, designated bacterium-like particles are based on the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis. The focus of the overview is on the development of intranasal BLP-based vaccines to prevent diseases caused by influenza and respiratory syncytial virus, and includes a selection of Phase I clinical data for the intranasal FluGEM vaccine. PMID:24062748

  9. Dehalobacter restrictus gen. nov. and sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic bacterium that reductively dechlorinates tetra- and trichloroethene in an anaerobic respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holliger, C; Hahn, D; Harmsen, H; Ludwig, W; Schumacher, W; Tindall, B; Vazquez, F; Weiss, N; Zehnder, AJB

    1998-01-01

    The highly enriched anaerobic bacterium that couples the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene to growth, previously referred to as PER-K23, was obtained in pure culture and characterized. The bacterium, which does not form spores, is a small, gram-negative rod with one lateral flagellum. It

  10. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Knauf

    Full Text Available The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum, yaws (ssp. pertenue, and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90% baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560 versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7. Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication

  11. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with

  12. Metabolism of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol in a Gram-positive bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Pankaj

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloronitrophenols (CNPs are widely used in the synthesis of dyes, drugs and pesticides, and constitute a major group of environmental pollutants. 4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP is an isomer of CNPs that has been detected in various industrial effluents. A number of physicochemical methods have been used for treatment of wastewater containing 4C2NP. These methods are not as effective as microbial degradation, however. Results A 4C2NP-degrading bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA, which uses 4C2NP as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from a chemically-contaminated site in India. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP with the release of stoichiometeric amounts of chloride and ammonium ions. The effects of different substrate concentrations and various inoculum sizes on degradation of 4C2NP were investigated. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP up to a concentration of 0.6 mM. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry identified 4-chloro-2-aminophenol (4C2AP and 2-aminophenol (2AP as possible metabolites of the 4C2NP degradation pathway. The crude extract of 4C2NP-induced PMA cells contained enzymatic activity for 4C2NP reductase and 4C2AP dehalogenase, suggesting the involvement of these enzymes in the degradation of 4C2NP. Microcosm studies using sterile and non-sterile soils spiked with 4C2NP were carried out to monitor the bioremediation potential of Exiguobacterium sp. PMA. The bioremediation of 4C2NP by Exiguobacterium sp. PMA was faster in non-sterilized soil than sterilized soil. Conclusions Our studies indicate that Exiguobacterium sp. PMA may be useful for the bioremediation of 4C2NP-contaminated sites. This is the first report of (i the formation of 2AP in the 4C2NP degradation pathway by any bacterium and (iii the bioremediation of 4C2NP by any bacterium.

  13. Isolation of pigmentation mutants of the green filamentous photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutants deficient in the production of bateriochlorophyll c (Bchl c) and one mutant lacking colored carotenoids were isolated from the filamentous gliding bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, Mutagenesis was achieved by using UV radiation or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Several clones were isolated that were deficient in Bchl c synthesis. All reverted. One double mutant deficient both in Bchl c synthesis and in the synthesis of colored carotenoids under anaerobic conditions was isolated. Isolation of a revertant in Bchl c synthesis from this double mutant produced a mutant strain of Chloroflexus that grew photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions and lacked colored carotenoids. Analysis of pigment contents and growth rates of the mutants revealed a positive association between growth rate and content of Bchl c under light-limiting conditions. 11 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  14. Two-dimensional gel-based alkaline proteome of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Avishek; Cai, Liyang; Ejby, Morten; Schmidt, Bjarne G; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Jacobsen, Susanne; Svensson, Birte

    2012-04-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) is a well-documented probiotic bacterium isolated from human gut. Detailed 2D gel-based NCFM proteomics addressed the so-called alkaline range, i.e., pH 6-11. Proteins were identified in 150 of the 202 spots picked from the Coomassie Brilliant Blue stained 2D gel using MALDI-TOF-MS. The 102 unique gene products among the 150 protein identifications were assigned to different functional categories, and evaluated by considering a calculated distribution of abundance as well as grand average of hydrophobicity values. None of the very few available lactic acid bacteria proteome reference maps included the range of pI >7.0. The present report of such data on the proteome of NCFM fundamentally complements current knowledge on protein profiles limited to the acid and neutral pH range. PMID:22522807

  15. A Mutant Strain of a Surfactant-Producing Bacterium with Increased Emulsification Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Qingmei; Yao Jianming; Pan Renrui; Yu Zengliang

    2005-01-01

    As reported in this paper, a strain of oil-degrading bacterium Sp- 5- 3 was determined to belong to Enterobacteriaceae, which would be useful for microbial enhanced oil recovery(MEOR). The aim of our study was to generate a mutant using low energy N+ beam implantation. With 10 keV of energy and 5.2 × 10TM N+/cm2 of dose - the optimum condition, a mutant,S - 34, was obtained, which had nearly a 5-fold higher surface and a 13-fold higher of emulsification activity than the wild type. The surface activity was measured by two methods, namely, a surface tension measuring instrument and a recording of the repulsive circle of the oil film; the emulsification activity was scaled through measuring the separating time of the oil-fermentation mixture. The metabolic acid was determined as methane by means of gas chromatography.

  16. A Mutant Strain of a Surfactant-Producing Bacterium with Increased Emulsification Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingmei; Yao, Jianming; Pan, Renrui; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-06-01

    As reported in this paper, a strain of oil-degrading bacterium Sp-5-3 was determined to belong to Enterobacteriaceae, which would be useful for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The aim of our study was to generate a mutant using low energy N+ beam implantation. With 10 keV of energy and 5.2 × 1014 N+/cm2 of dose - the optimum condition, a mutant, S-34, was obtained, which had nearly a 5-fold higher surface and a 13-fold higher of emulsification activity than the wild type. The surface activity was measured by two methods, namely, a surface tension measuring instrument and a recording of the repulsive circle of the oil film; the emulsification activity was scaled through measuring the separating time of the oil-fermentation mixture. The metabolic acid was determined as methane by means of gas chromatography.

  17. A Marine Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Producing Multiple Antibiotics: Biological and Chemical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Wang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A marine sulfate-reducing bacterium SRB-22 was isolated by means of the agar shake dilution method and identified as Desulfovibrio desulfuricans by morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA analysis. In the bioassay, its extract showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity using the paper disc agar diffusion method. This isolate showed a different antimicrobial profile than either ampicillin or nystatin and was found to produce at least eight antimicrobial components by bioautography. Suitable fermentation conditions for production of the active constituents were determined to be 28 day cultivation at 25 °C to 30 °C with a 10% inoculation ratio. Under these conditions, the SRB-22 was fermented, extracted and chemically investigated. So far an antimicrobial compound, mono-n-butyl phthalate, and an inactive compound, thymine, have been isolated and characterized.

  18. Genome sequence of the marine bacterium Corynebacterium maris type strain Coryn-1(T) (= DSM 45190(T)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffert, Lena; Albersmeier, Andreas; Bednarz, Hanna; Niehaus, Karsten; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian

    2013-07-30

    Corynebacterium maris Coryn-1(T) Ben-Dov et al. 2009 is a member of the genus Corynebacterium which contains Gram-positive, non-spore forming bacteria with a high G+C content. C. maris was isolated from the mucus of the Scleractinian coral Fungia granulosa and belongs to the aerobic and non-haemolytic corynebacteria. It displays tolerance to salts (up to 10%) and is related to the soil bacterium Corynebacterium halotolerans. As this is a type strain in a subgroup of Corynebacterium without complete genome sequences, this project, describing the 2.78 Mbp long chromosome and the 45.97 kbp plasmid pCmaris1, with their 2,584 protein-coding and 67 RNA genes, will aid the G enomic E ncyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:24501635

  19. The Antitumor Components from Marine-derived Bacterium Streptoverticillium luteoverticillatum 11014 Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dehai; ZHU Tianjiao; FANG Yuchun; LIU Hongbing; GU Qianqun; ZHU Weiming

    2007-01-01

    Eight known compounds were isolated from a marine-derived bacterium Streptoverticillium luteoverticillatum 11014 using bioassay-guided fractionations. Their structures were identified by spectral analysis as bis (4-hydroxybenzyl) ether (1), p-hydroxyphenylethyl alcohol (2), N-(4-hydroxyphenethyl) acetamide (3), indole-3 carboxylic acid methyl ester (4), dibenzo[b,e] [1,4]dioxine (5), thymine (6), cytosine deoxyribonucleoside (7) and 2, 3-butanediol (8). These compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against K562 cell line with the SRB method for the first time. Compounds 2 and 4 showed cytotoxcities with IC50 values of 101.1 and 165.3 μmolL-1, respectively. All compounds were isolated from S. luteoverticillatum 11014 for the first time.

  20. Analysis of convergent gene transcripts in the obligate intracellular bacterium Rickettsia prowazekii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Woodard

    Full Text Available Termination of transcription is an important component of bacterial gene expression. However, little is known concerning this process in the obligate intracellular pathogen and model for reductive evolution, Rickettsia prowazekii. To assess transcriptional termination in this bacterium, transcripts of convergent gene pairs, some containing predicted intrinsic terminators, were analyzed. These analyses revealed that, rather than terminating at a specific site within the intervening region between the convergent genes, most of the transcripts demonstrated either a lack of termination within this region, which generated antisense RNA, or a putative non-site-specific termination that occurred throughout the intervening sequence. Transcripts terminating at predicted intrinsic terminators, as well as at a putative Rho-dependant terminator, were also examined and found to vary based on the rickettsial host environment. These results suggest that transcriptional termination, or lack thereof, plays a role in rickettsial gene regulation.

  1. Identification of a denitrifying bacterium and verification of its anaerobic ammonium oxidation ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU; Baolan; ZHENG; Ping; LI; Jinye; XU; Xiangyang; JIN; Rencun

    2006-01-01

    A strain D3 of denitrifying bacterium was isolated from an anammox reactor, and identified as Pseudomonas mendocina based on the morphological and physiological assay, Vitek test,Biolog test, (G+C) mol% content, and 16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis. As a typical denitrifying bactration of 88.5 mg N/L. The optimal pH and growth temperature were 7.84 and 34.9℃, respectively.Strain D3 was able to oxidize ammonia under anaerobic condition. The maximum nitrate and ammoof ammonia to nitrate was 1:1.91. Electron microscopic observation revealed peculiar cell inclusions in strain D3. Because of its relation to anammox activity, strain D3 was presumed to be anammoxosome.The present investigation proved that denitrifying bacteria have the anammox ability, and the results have engorged the range of anammox populations.

  2. Plague bacterium as a transformer species in prairie dogs and the grasslands of western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David A; Biggins, Dean E

    2015-08-01

    Invasive transformer species change the character, condition, form, or nature of ecosystems and deserve considerable attention from conservation scientists. We applied the transformer species concept to the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis in western North America, where the pathogen was introduced around 1900. Y. pestis transforms grassland ecosystems by severely depleting the abundance of prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) and thereby causing declines in native species abundance and diversity, including threatened and endangered species; altering food web connections; altering the import and export of nutrients; causing a loss of ecosystem resilience to encroaching invasive plants; and modifying prairie dog burrows. Y. pestis poses an important challenge to conservation biologists because it causes trophic-level perturbations that affect the stability of ecosystems. Unfortunately, understanding of the effects of Y. pestis on ecosystems is rudimentary, highlighting an acute need for continued research. PMID:25817984

  3. The glucose transport system of the hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galperin, M.Y.; Noll, K.M.; Romano, A.H. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The glucose transport system of the extremely thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana was studied with the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DOG). T. neapolitana accumulated 2-DOG against a concentration gradient in an intracellular free sugar pool that was exchangeable with external D-glucose. This active transport of 2-DOG was dependent upon the presence of sodium ion and an external source of energy, such as pyruvate, and was inhibited by arsenate and gramicidin D. There was no phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphorylation of glucose, 2-DOG, or fructose by cell extracts or toluene-treated cells, indicating the absence of a phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system. These data indicate that D-glucose is taken up by T.neapolitana via an active transport system that is energized by an ion gradient generated by ATP, derived from substrate-level phosphorylation. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steel by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens: (I) Corrosion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Sha; Tian Jintao [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Chen Shougang, E-mail: sgchen@ouc.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Lei Yanhua; Chang Xueting; Liu Tao [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Yin Yansheng, E-mail: yys2006@ouc.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2009-04-30

    The microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steel (SS) by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens (V. natriegens) was investigated using surface analysis (atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA)) and electrochemical techniques (the open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization curves ). AFM images corroborated the results from the EIS models which show biofilm attachment and subsequent detachment over time. The SEM images revealed the occurrence of micro-pitting corrosion underneath the biofilms on the metal surface after the biofilm removal. The presence of carbon, oxygen, phosphor and sulfur obtained from EDXA proved the formation of biofilm. The electrochemical results showed that the corrosion of SS was accelerated in the presence of V. natriegens based on the decrease in the resistance of the charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}) obtained from EIS and the increase in corrosion current densities obtained from potentiodynamic polarization curves.

  5. Microbially influenced corrosion of 303 stainless steel by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens: (II) Corrosion mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Yansheng, E-mail: yys2006@ouc.edu.cn [Institute of Ocean Materials and Engineering, Shanghai Maritime University, Shanghai 200135 (China); Cheng Sha [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Chen Shougang, E-mail: sgchen@ouc.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Tian Jintao; Liu Tao; Chang Xueting [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2009-04-30

    Electrochemical techniques (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curves) and surface analysis (scanning electron microscopy (SEM)) were carried out to determine the possible mechanism of the microbially influenced corrosion of 303 stainless steel (303 SS) by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens (V. natriegens). In order to clarify the mechanism, 303 SS coupons were immersed in four different mediums. EIS results were interpreted with different equivalent circuits to model the physicoelectric characteristics of the electrode/biofilm/solution interface. The results showed that N{sub 2}-fixation actually promoted the corrosion of 303 SS; however, the influence of the produced NH{sub 3} was negligible. It can be speculated that the electron transfer and/or the nitrogenase catalyzing the process may influence the corrosion.

  6. Uncoupling effect of fatty acids in halo- and alkalotolerant bacterium Bacillus pseudofirmus FTU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, I V; Bodrova, M E; Mokhova, E N; Muntyan, M S

    2004-10-01

    Natural uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, long-chain non-esterified fatty acids, cause uncoupling in the alkalo- and halotolerant bacterium Bacillus pseudofirmus FTU. The uncoupling effect in the bacterial cells was manifested as decrease of membrane potential and increase of respiratory activity. The membrane potential decrease was detected only in bacterial cells exhausted by their endogenous substrates. In proteoliposomes containing reconstituted bacterial cytochrome c oxidase, fatty acids caused a "mild" uncoupling effect by reducing membrane potential only at low rate of membrane potential generation. "Free respiration" induced by the "mild" uncouplers, the fatty acids, can be considered as possible mechanism responsible for adaptation of the bacteria to a constantly changed environment. PMID:15527418

  7. Vibrio ruber (S2A1, a Marine Bacterium that Exhibits Significant Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Norhana, N.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential antimicrobial-producing marine bacterium, designated as S2A1, was isolated from a seagrass collected in Setiu Lagoon, Terengganu. S2A1 was a Gram negative rod that was motile by means of a polar flagellum. Phenotypic and genotypic characterisation indicated that strain S2A1 represented a species in the genus Vibrio. The antimicrobial activities of S2A1 against a number of test microorganisms showed a broad antimicrobial spectrum property with inhibition towards 25 out of 29 test microorganisms. The antimicrobial compound(s of S2A1 was more effective against Gram-positive bacteria with 100% inhibition, compared to yeast (88.8% and Gram-negative bacteria (75.0% tested. High activity scores were observed when using whole cells compared to cell free extract.

  8. Microbially influenced corrosion of 303 stainless steel by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens: (II) Corrosion mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical techniques (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curves) and surface analysis (scanning electron microscopy (SEM)) were carried out to determine the possible mechanism of the microbially influenced corrosion of 303 stainless steel (303 SS) by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens (V. natriegens). In order to clarify the mechanism, 303 SS coupons were immersed in four different mediums. EIS results were interpreted with different equivalent circuits to model the physicoelectric characteristics of the electrode/biofilm/solution interface. The results showed that N2-fixation actually promoted the corrosion of 303 SS; however, the influence of the produced NH3 was negligible. It can be speculated that the electron transfer and/or the nitrogenase catalyzing the process may influence the corrosion.

  9. Microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steel by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens: (I) Corrosion behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steel (SS) by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens (V. natriegens) was investigated using surface analysis (atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA)) and electrochemical techniques (the open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization curves ). AFM images corroborated the results from the EIS models which show biofilm attachment and subsequent detachment over time. The SEM images revealed the occurrence of micro-pitting corrosion underneath the biofilms on the metal surface after the biofilm removal. The presence of carbon, oxygen, phosphor and sulfur obtained from EDXA proved the formation of biofilm. The electrochemical results showed that the corrosion of SS was accelerated in the presence of V. natriegens based on the decrease in the resistance of the charge transfer resistance (Rct) obtained from EIS and the increase in corrosion current densities obtained from potentiodynamic polarization curves.

  10. A cultured greigite-producing magnetotactic bacterium in a novel group of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Menguy, Nicolas; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Pósfai, Mihály; Prozorov, Tanya; Pignol, David; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2011-12-23

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain magnetosomes--intracellular, membrane-bounded, magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) or greigite (Fe(3)S(4))--that cause the bacteria to swim along geomagnetic field lines. We isolated a greigite-producing magnetotactic bacterium from a brackish spring in Death Valley National Park, California, USA, strain BW-1, that is able to biomineralize greigite and magnetite depending on culture conditions. A phylogenetic comparison of BW-1 and similar uncultured greigite- and/or magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria from freshwater to hypersaline habitats shows that these organisms represent a previously unknown group of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the Deltaproteobacteria. Genomic analysis of BW-1 reveals the presence of two different magnetosome gene clusters, suggesting that one may be responsible for greigite biomineralization and the other for magnetite. PMID:22194580

  11. An outbreak in 1965 of severe respiratory illness caused by the Legionnaires' disease bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, S B; Bennett, J V; Tsai, T F; Fraser, D W; McDade, J E; Shepard, C C; Williams, K H; Stuart, W H; Dull, H B; Eickhoff, T C

    1978-10-01

    In January 1977 an unsolved outbreak of infection at St. Elizabeth's Hospital (Washington, D.C.) that occurred in 1965 was linked with Legionnaires' disease. The link was made by fluorescent antibody testing with the bacterium isolated from tissues of persons with Legionnaires' disease in the 1976 outbreak in Philadelphia. In July and August 1965, an epidemic of severe respiratory disease characterized by abrupt onset of high fever, weakness, malaise, and nonproductive cough, frequently accompanied by radiographic evidence of pneumonia, affected at least 81 patients at St. Elizabeth's Hospital, a general psychiatric hospital. Fourteen (17%) of the affected patients died. Intensive epidemiologic and laboratory investigations in 1965 did not determine the etiology. The etiologic organism may have become airborne from sites of soil excavation. PMID:361897

  12. DNA Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression in Antifungal Bacterium of Bacillus lenthmorbus WJ5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This simultaneous expression levels of antifungal activity related was analyzed by DNA microarray. We constructured DNA chips contained 2,000 randomly digested genome spots of the antifungal bacterium of Bacillus lentimorbus WJ5 and compared it squantitative aspect with 7 antifungal activity deficient mutants induced by gamma radiation . From the analysis of microarray hybridization by the Gene Cluster, totally 408 genes were expressed and 20 genes among them were significantly suppressed in mutants. pbuX, ywbA, ptsG,yufO, and ftsY were simultaneously down-regulated in all muatants. It suggested that they were supposed to be related to the antifungal activity of B. lentimorbus WJ5

  13. Brevibacterium rufescens nov. comb. , a facultative anaerobic methylotrophic bacterium from oil-bearing strata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazina, T.N.

    1981-03-01

    The paper presents the results of studying the bacterial population from the microaerophilic zone of oil-bearing strata of the Apsheron Peninsula. The incidence of bacteria capable of growing at the account of organic substances present in stratal water could reach dozens of thousands of cells in 1 ml. A bacterium predominant in the bacterial cenosis of the microaerophilic zone was islated as a pure culture. A new combination, Brevibacterium rufescens nov. comb. was created on the basis of morphological, physiologo-biochemical properties and the GC content in the DNA of the organism under study. The microorganism is adapted to its habitat in a number of properties. The necessity of recreating the genus Brevibacterium is discussed.

  14. UV-induced variability of the amylolytic thermophilic bacterium Bacillus diastaticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV-induced variability of a thermophilic bacterium Bacillus diastaticus 13 by amylase formation has been studied. It has been shown, that variability limits in amylase biosynthesis vary from 2.2 to 158.7% under UV irradiation. At 41.8x102 erg/mm2 UV dose a ''plus-variant'' designated as the UV1 mutant has been prepared. Its subsequent selection without using mutagene permitted to select the UV 1-25 variant, exceeding the initial strain in amylase biosynthesis by 43.3%. Under UV irradiation two low-active in biosynthesis amylases of the mutant were prepared. Demands for growth factors of some mutant have been studied as well

  15. Triplet excited state spectra and dynamics of carotenoids from the thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-13

    Light-harvesting complex 2 from the anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and flash photolysis spectroscopy. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements show that carotenoids play a negligible role as supportive energy donors and transfer excitation to bacteriochlorophyll-a with low energy transfer efficiency of ~30%. HPLC analysis determined that the dominant carotenoids in the complex are rhodopin and spirilloxanthin. Carotenoid excited triplet state formation upon direct (carotenoid) or indirect (bacteriochlorophyll-a Q{sub x} band) excitation shows that carotenoid triplets are mostly localized on spirilloxanthin. In addition, no triplet excitation transfer between carotenoids was observed. Such specific carotenoid composition and spectroscopic results strongly suggest that this organism optimized carotenoid composition in the light-harvesting complex 2 in order to maximize photoprotective capabilities of carotenoids but subsequently drastically suppressed their supporting role in light-harvesting process.

  16. Structure of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase from the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase has been determined to 1.72 Å resolution and is presented with a brief comparison to other known ribose 5-phosphate isomerase A structures. The structure of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase from the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus salivarius UCC188 has been determined at 1.72 Å resolution. The structure was solved by molecular replacement, which identified the functional homodimer in the asymmetric unit. Despite only showing 57% sequence identity to its closest homologue, the structure adopted the typical α and β d-ribose 5-phosphate isomerase fold. Comparison to other related structures revealed high homology in the active site, allowing a model of the substrate-bound protein to be proposed. The determination of the structure was expedited by the use of in situ crystallization-plate screening on beamline I04-1 at Diamond Light Source to identify well diffracting protein crystals prior to routine cryocrystallography

  17. Extraction and physicochemical characteristics of a red pigment produced by marine bacterium strain S-9801

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田黎; 何培青; 刘晨临; 边际; 苗金来

    2002-01-01

    -- A red pigment that has better biological properties is produced by marine bacterium strain S- 9801. The extraction methods, physicochemical and toxicity of the pigment have been studied.Dissolubility of pigment in the five organic solvent has been tested, and ethanol is optimally chosen for extraction. Physicochemical characteristics of this pigment was stable. The absorbance of the pigment solution was no losing when put under natural light for 10 days or treated by UV for 30 minutes, color of the pigment unchanged after 100 ℃ hythere for 1 h or 80 ℃ xerother for 2 h. The median lethal dose (LD50) of the rat by celiac injection was 670.04 mg/kg and minimum lethal dose of oral was greater than 2 000 mg/kg.

  18. Genetic manipulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Maresca, Julia A; Yunker, Colleen E;

    2004-01-01

    The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a strict anaerobe and an obligate photoautotroph. On the basis of sequence similarity with known enzymes or sequence motifs, nine open reading frames encoding putative enzymes of carotenoid biosynthesis were identified in the genome sequence of C....... tepidum, and all nine genes were inactivated. Analysis of the carotenoid composition in the resulting mutants allowed the genes encoding the following six enzymes to be identified: phytoene synthase (crtB/CT1386), phytoene desaturase (crtP/CT0807), zeta-carotene desaturase (crtQ/CT1414), gamma......-carotene desaturase (crtU/CT0323), carotenoid 1',2'-hydratase (crtC/CT0301), and carotenoid cis-trans isomerase (crtH/CT0649). Three mutants (CT0180, CT1357, and CT1416 mutants) did not exhibit a discernible phenotype. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in C. tepidum is similar to that in cyanobacteria and plants...

  19. Bioluminescent reporter bacterium for toxicity monitoring in biological wastewater treatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, C.J.; Lajoie, C.A.; Layton, A.C.; Sayler, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    Toxic shock due to certain chemical loads in biological wastewater treatment systems can result in death of microorganisms and loss of floc structure. To overcome the limitations of existing approaches to toxicity monitoring, genes encoding enzymes for light production were inserted to a bacterium (Shk 1) isolated from activated sludge. The Shk 1 bioreporter indicated a toxic response to concentrations of cadmium, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and hydroquinone by reductions in initial levels of bioluminescence on exposure to the toxicant. The decrease in bioluminescence was more severe with increasing toxicant concentration. Bioluminescence did not decrease in response to ethanol concentrations up to 1,000 mg/L or to pH conditions between 6.1 and 7.9. A continuous toxicity monitoring system using this bioreporter was developed for influent wastewater and tested with hydroquinone. The reporter exhibited a rapid and proportional decrease in bioluminescence in response to increasing hydroquinone concentrations.

  20. Genomic Sequence of Burkholderia multivorans NKI379, a Soil Bacterium That Inhibits the Growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, Pei-Tan; Liu, Jong-Kang; Chen, Ya-Lei; Liu, Pei-Ju; Ni, Wen-Fan; Chen, Yao-Shen; Wu, Keh-Ming; Lin, Hsi-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia multivorans NKI379 is a soil bacterium that exhibits an antagonistic effect against the growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of the infectious disease melioidosis. We report the draft genomic sequence of B. multivorans NKI379, which has a G+C content of 67% and 5,203 candidate protein-encoding genes.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus salivarius HSISS4, a Human Commensal Bacterium Highly Prevalent in the Digestive Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Mignolet, Johann; Fontaine, Laetitia; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hols, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius plays a major role in the equilibrium of microbial communities of the digestive tract. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Streptococcus salivarius strain isolated from the small intestine, namely, HSISS4. Its circular chromosome comprises 1,903 coding sequences and 2,100,988 nucleotides.

  2. Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus sp. nov., an anaerobic, extreme thermophilic, high ethanol-yielding bacterium isolated from household waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    An extremely thermophilic, xylanolytic, spore-forming and strict anaerobic bacterium DTU01(T) was isolated from a continuously stirred tank reactor fed with xylose and household waste. Cells stained Gram-negative and were rod-shaped (0.5-2 µm in length). Spores were terminal with a diameter...

  3. Marinimicrobium haloxylanilyticum sp. nov., a new moderately halophilic, polysaccharide-degrading bacterium isolated from Great Salt Lake, Utah

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh Møller, Mette; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    A new moderately halophilic, strictly aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium, strain SX15T, was isolated from hypersaline surface sediment of the southern arm of Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA). The strain grew on a number of carbohydrates and carbohydrate polymers such as xylan, starch, carboxymethyl...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bacterium Aalborg_AAW-1, Representing a Novel Family within the Candidate Phylum SR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Morten Simonsen; Albertsen, Mads; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel;

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the candidate phylum SR1 bacterium Aalborg_AAW-1. Its 16S rRNA gene is only 85.5% similar to that of the closest relative, RAAC1_SR1, and the genome of Aalborg_AAW-1 consequently represents the first of a novel family within the candidate phylum SR1....

  5. Concentration and Transport of Nitrate by the Mat-Forming Sulfur Bacterium Thioploca Rid E-1821-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    FOSSING, H.; GALLARDO, VA; JØRGENSEN, BB;

    1995-01-01

    , at between 40 and 280 m water depth. The metabolism of this marine bacterium(5,6) remained a mystery until long after its discovery(1,7). We report here that Thioploca cells are able to concentrate nitrate to up to 500 mM in a liquid vacuole that occupies >80% of the cell volume. Gliding filaments transport...

  6. Thermoregulation of N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Based Quorum Sensing in the Soft Rot Bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum▿

    OpenAIRE

    Latour, Xavier; Diallo, Stéphanie; Chevalier, Sylvie; Morin, Danièle; Smadja, Bruno; Burini, Jean-François; Haras, Dominique; Orange, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    The psychrotolerant bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum produces four N-acyl homoserine lactones under a wide range of temperatures. Their thermoregulation differs from that of the exoenzyme production, described as being under quorum-sensing control. A mechanism involved in this thermoregulation consists of controlling N-acyl homoserine lactones synthase production at a transcriptional level.

  7. Extraction of DNA from orange juice and detection of bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus by real-time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange juice processed from Huanglongbing (HLB) affected fruit is often associated with bitter taste and/or off-flavor. HLB disease in Florida is associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), a phloem limited bacterium. The current standard to confirm CLas for citrus trees is to take sam...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens Strain BA1, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes Found in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Hurst, Sheldon G; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Badr, Usama M; Hussein, Mona A; Abouzaied, Mohamed A; Khalil, Kamal M; Tisa, Louis S

    2014-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens strain BA1 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.0-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminscens strain BA1, with a G+C content of 42.46% and 4,250 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:24786955

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus temperata Strain Meg1, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Heterorhabditis megidis Nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    Hurst, Sheldon G.; Ghazal, Shimaa; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Badr, Usama M.; Hussein, Mona A.; AbouZaied, Mohamed A.; Khalil, Kamal M.; Tisa, Louis S.

    2014-01-01

    Photorhabdus temperata strain Meg1 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 4.9-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. temperata strain Meg1, with a G+C content of 43.18% and containing 4,340 candidate protein-coding genes.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus temperata Strain Meg1, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Heterorhabditis megidis Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Sheldon G; Ghazal, Shimaa; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Badr, Usama M; Hussein, Mona A; AbouZaied, Mohamed A; Khalil, Kamal M; Tisa, Louis S

    2014-01-01

    Photorhabdus temperata strain Meg1 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 4.9-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. temperata strain Meg1, with a G+C content of 43.18% and containing 4,340 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:25502670

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens Strain BA1, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes Found in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Hurst, Sheldon G.; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Badr, Usama M.; Hussein, Mona A.; AbouZaied, Mohamed A.; Khalil, Kamal M.; Tisa, Louis S.

    2014-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens strain BA1 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.0-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminscens strain BA1, with a G+C content of 42.46% and 4,250 candidate protein-coding genes.

  12. Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequence of the Keratinolytic Bacterium Lysobacter sp. A03, Isolated from the Antarctic Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Jamile Queiroz; Ambrosini, Adriana; Sant’Anna, Fernando Hayashi; Tadra-Sfeir, Michele; Faoro, Helisson; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Adriano BRANDELLI; Passaglia, Luciane M. P.

    2015-01-01

    Lysobacter sp. strain A03 is a protease-producing bacterium isolated from decomposing-penguin feathers collected in the Antarctic environment. This strain has the ability to degrade keratin at low temperatures. The A03 genome sequence provides the possibility of finding new genes with biotechnological potential to better understand its cold-adaptation mechanism and survival in cold environments.

  13. Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequence of the Keratinolytic Bacterium Lysobacter sp. A03, Isolated from the Antarctic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jamile Queiroz; Ambrosini, Adriana; Sant'Anna, Fernando Hayashi; Tadra-Sfeir, Michele; Faoro, Helisson; Pedrosa, Fábio Oliveira; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Brandelli, Adriano; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2015-01-01

    Lysobacter sp. strain A03 is a protease-producing bacterium isolated from decomposing-penguin feathers collected in the Antarctic environment. This strain has the ability to degrade keratin at low temperatures. The A03 genome sequence provides the possibility of finding new genes with biotechnological potential to better understand its cold-adaptation mechanism and survival in cold environments. PMID:25838495

  14. Thermoregulation of N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Based Quorum Sensing in the Soft Rot Bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Xavier; Diallo, Stéphanie; Chevalier, Sylvie; Morin, Danièle; Smadja, Bruno; Burini, Jean-François; Haras, Dominique; Orange, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    The psychrotolerant bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum produces four N-acyl homoserine lactones under a wide range of temperatures. Their thermoregulation differs from that of the exoenzyme production, described as being under quorum-sensing control. A mechanism involved in this thermoregulation consists of controlling N-acyl homoserine lactones synthase production at a transcriptional level. PMID:17468275

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus salivarius HSISS4, a Human Commensal Bacterium Highly Prevalent in the Digestive Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignolet, Johann; Fontaine, Laetitia; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hols, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius plays a major role in the equilibrium of microbial communities of the digestive tract. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Streptococcus salivarius strain isolated from the small intestine, namely, HSISS4. Its circular chromosome comprises 1,903 coding sequences and 2,100,988 nucleotides. PMID:26847886

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghel, Julie; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes. PMID:26941141

  17. Isolation and characterization of an Enterococcus-like bacterium causing muscle necrosis and mortality in Macrobrachium rosenbergii in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, W; Chen, J C

    1998-10-01

    A Gram-positive, ovoid, diplococoid bacterium tentatively identified as Enterococcus-like was isolated from diseased Macrobrachium rosenbergii in Taiwanese aquaculture ponds. The diseased prawns displayed poor growth, anorexia, inactivity, opaque and whitish musculature, and mortality. In histological preparations, melanized hemocytic granulomas were seen in the connective tissue around hemal sinuses together with hemocytic aggregation in necrotic musculature. Five isolates of diplococci were collected from diseased prawns at 4 farms and these were evaluated for 93 characteristics including morphology, physiology, biochemistry and sensitivity to antibiotics. The results indicated that the isolates belonged to a single species. They grew in 0.5 to 6.0% NaCl, at 10 to 40 degrees C, at pH 9.6 and on bile esculin medium, gave positive pyrrolidonylarylamidase, arginine dehydrolase and Voges-Proskauer tests, were resistant to bacitracin and SXT, and were CAMP-negative and non-hemolytic on sheep blood agar. These findings indicated an Enterococcus-like bacterium closely related to Enterococcus seriolicida (recently reduced to synonymy with Lactococcus garvieae). Experimental injection of 3 x 10(5) cells of strain KM002 of this Enterococcus-like bacterium into the ventral sinus of the prawn cephalothorax caused 100% mortality in 11 d, and induced muscular necrosis and hepatopancreatitis, gross signs and histopathology similar to those observed in the naturally infected prawns. It was concluded that this Enterococcus-like bacterium was the etiological agent associated with mortality of the farmed, diseased prawns. PMID:9828405

  18. Complete genome of Pandoraea pnomenusa RB-38, an oxalotrophic bacterium isolated from municipal solid waste landfill site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Yong, Delicia; Tee, Kok-Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-11-20

    Pandoraea pnomenusa RB-38 is a bacterium isolated from a former sanitary landfill site. Here, we present the complete genome of P. pnomenusa RB38 in which an oxalate utilization pathway was identified. The genome analysis suggested the potential of this strain as an effective biocontrol agent against oxalate-producing phytopathogens. PMID:26393955

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Extremely Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas salina Strain CIFRI1, Isolated from the East Coast of India

    OpenAIRE

    Behera, Bijay Kumar; Das, Priyanka; Maharana, Jitendra; Paria, Prasenjit; Mandal, Shambhu Nath; Meena, Dharmendra Kumar; Sharma, Anil Prakash; Jayarajan, Rijith; Dixit, Vishal; Verma, Ankit; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Rao, Atmakuri Ramakrishna; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2015-01-01

    Halomonas salina strain CIFRI1 is an extremely salt-stress-tolerant bacterium isolated from the salt crystals of the east coast of India. Here we report the annotated 3.45-Mb draft genome sequence of strain CIFRI1 having 86 contigs with 3,139 protein coding loci, including 62 RNA genes.

  20. Antioxidants keep the potentially probiotic but highly oxygen-sensitive human gut bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii alive at ambient air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M. Tanweer; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Harmsen, Hermie J M

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial human gut microbe Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is a 'probiotic of the future' since it produces high amounts of butyrate and anti-inflammatory compounds. However, this bacterium is highly oxygen-senstive, making it notoriously difficult to cultivate and preserve. This has so far precl