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Sample records for bacteriocytes

  1. Ultrabithorax is essential for bacteriocyte development.

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    Matsuura, Yu; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Miura, Toru; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-07-28

    Symbiosis often entails the emergence of novel adaptive traits in organisms. Microbial symbionts are indispensable for diverse insects via provisioning of essential nutrients, wherein novel host cells and organs for harboring the microbes, called bacteriocytes and bacteriomes, have evolved repeatedly. Molecular and developmental mechanisms underpinning the emergence of novel symbiotic cells and organs comprise an unsolved question in evolutionary developmental biology. Here, we report that a conserved homeotic gene, Ultrabithorax, plays a pivotal role in the bacteriocyte differentiation in a hemipteran insect Nysius plebeius. During embryonic development, six pairs of aggregated presumptive bacteriocytes appear on both sides of six abdominal segments, incorporate the symbiotic bacteria at the stage of germband retraction, and fuse into a pair of lateral bacteriomes at the stage of germband flip, where bacteriocyte-associated Ultrabithorax expression coincides with the symbiont infection process. Suppression of Ultrabithorax expression by maternal RNA interference results in disappearance of the bacteriocytes and the symbiont localization therein, suggesting that Ultrabithorax is involved in differentiation of the host cells for symbiosis. Suppression of other homeotic genes abdominal-A and Antennapedia disturbs integrity and positioning of the bacteriomes, affecting the configuration of the host organs for symbiosis. Our findings unveil the molecular and developmental mechanisms underlying the bacteriocyte differentiation, which may have evolved either via cooption of the transcription factors for inducing the novel symbiotic cells, or via revival of the developmental pathway for the bacteriocytes that had existed in the ancestral hemipterans. PMID:26170303

  2. Developmental origin and evolution of bacteriocytes in the aphid-Buchnera symbiosis.

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    Christian Braendle

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic relationships between bacteria and insect hosts are common. Although the bacterial endosymbionts have been subjected to intense investigation, little is known of the host cells in which they reside, the bacteriocytes. We have studied the development and evolution of aphid bacteriocytes, the host cells that contain the endosymbiotic bacteria Buchnera aphidicola. We show that bacteriocytes of Acyrthosiphon pisum express several gene products (or their paralogues: Distal-less, Ultrabithorax/Abdominal-A, and Engrailed. Using these markers, we find that a subpopulation of the bacteriocytes is specified prior to the transmission of maternal bacteria to the embryo. In addition, we discovered that a second population of cells is recruited to the bacteriocyte fate later in development. We experimentally demonstrate that bacteriocyte induction and proliferation occur independently of B. aphidicola. Major features of bacteriocyte development, including the two-step recruitment of bacteriocytes, have been conserved in aphids for 80-150 million years. Furthermore, we have investigated two cases of evolutionary loss of bacterial symbionts: in one case, where novel extracellular, eukaryotic symbionts replaced the bacteria, the bacteriocyte is maintained; in another case, where symbionts are absent, the bacteriocytes are initiated but not maintained. The bacteriocyte represents an evolutionarily novel cell fate, which is developmentally determined independently of the bacteria. Three of five transcription factors we examined show novel expression patterns in bacteriocytes, suggesting that bacteriocytes may have evolved to express many additional transcription factors. The evolutionary transition to a symbiosis in which bacteria and an aphid cell form a functional unit, similar to the origin of plastids, has apparently involved extensive molecular adaptations on the part of the host cell.

  3. Developmental Origin and Evolution of Bacteriocytes in the Aphid-Buchnera Symbiosis

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    Braendle Christian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic relationships between bacteria and insect hosts are common. Although the bacterial endosymbionts have been subjected to intense investigation, little is known of the host cells in which they reside, the bacteriocytes. We have studied the development and evolution of aphid bacteriocytes, the host cells that contain the endosymbiotic bacteria Buchnera aphidicola. We show that bacteriocytes of Acyrthosiphon pisum express several gene products (or their paralogues: Distal-less, Ultrabithorax/Abdominal-A, and Engrailed. Using these markers, we find that a subpopulation of the bacteriocytes is specified prior to the transmission of maternal bacteria to the embryo. In addition, we discovered that a second population of cells is recruited to the bacteriocyte fate later in development. We experimentally demonstrate that bacteriocyte induction and proliferation occur independently of B. aphidicola. Major features of bacteriocyte development, including the two-step recruitment of bacteriocytes, have been conserved in aphids for 80-150 million years. Furthermore, we have investigated two cases of evolutionary loss of bacterial symbionts: in one case, where novel extracellular, eukaryotic symbionts replaced the bacteria, the bacteriocyte is maintained; in another case, where symbionts are absent, the bacteriocytes are initiated but not maintained. The bacteriocyte represents an evolutionarily novel cell fate, which is developmentally determined independently of the bacteria. Three of five transcription factors we examined show novel expression patterns in bacteriocytes, suggesting that bacteriocytes may have evolved to express many additional transcription factors. The evolutionary transition to a symbiosis in which bacteria and an aphid cell form a functional unit, similar to the origin of plastids, has apparently involved extensive molecular adaptations on the part of the host cell.

  4. Proton-dependent glutamine uptake by aphid bacteriocyte amino acid transporter ApGLNT1.

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    Price, Daniel R G; Wilson, Alex C C; Luetje, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    Aphids house large populations of the gammaproteobacterial symbiont Buchnera aphidicola in specialized bacteriocyte cells. The combined biosynthetic capability of the holobiont (Acyrthosiphon pisum and Buchnera) is sufficient for biosynthesis of all twenty protein coding amino acids, including amino acids that animals alone cannot synthesize; and that are present at low concentrations in A. pisum's plant phloem sap diet. Collaborative holobiont amino acid biosynthesis depends on glutamine import into bacteriocytes, which serves as a nitrogen-rich amino donor for biosynthesis of other amino acids. Recently, we characterized A. pisum glutamine transporter 1 (ApGLNT1), a member of the amino acid/auxin permease family, as the dominant bacteriocyte plasma membrane glutamine transporter. Here we show ApGLNT1 to be structurally and functionally related to mammalian proton-dependent amino acid transporters (PATs 1-4). Using functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, combined with two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology we demonstrate that ApGLNT1 is electrogenic and that glutamine induces large inward currents. ApGLNT1 glutamine induced currents are dependent on external glutamine concentration, proton (H+) gradient across the membrane, and membrane potential. Based on these transport properties, ApGLNT1-mediated glutamine uptake into A. pisum bacteriocytes can be regulated by changes in either proton gradients across the plasma membrane or membrane potential. PMID:26028424

  5. Midgut and fat body bacteriocytes in neotropical cerambycid beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

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    Calderon, Olga; Berkov, Amy

    2012-02-01

    Xylophagous insects derive nutrients from intractable substrates by producing or ingesting cellulolytic enzymes, or by maintaining associations with symbiotic microbes. Wood-boring cerambycid beetle larvae sometimes house maternally-transmitted endosymbiotic yeasts that are presumed to provide their hosts with nutritional benefits. These are thought to be absent from species in the large subfamily Lamiinae; nevertheless yeasts have been repeatedly isolated from the guts of neotropical lamiines. The objective of this study was to conduct transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of cerambycid larval midgut tissues to determine if gut yeasts were intracellular, or simply present in the gut lumen. Nine cerambycid larvae were harvested from two trees in the Brazil nut family (Lecythidaceae) in the rain forest of SE Peru; seven were identified using mtDNA sequence data and processed for TEM. Yeasts cultured from larval frass or exuvia, and identified with rDNA sequence data, were identical or similar to yeasts previously isolated from beetles. In TEM analyses yeast cells were found only in the gut lumens, sometimes associated with fragments of thick-walled xylem cells. Apparent bacteriocytes were found in either midgut or fat body tissue of three larval specimens, including two lamiines. This is the first report of a potential fat body symbiosis in a cerambycid beetle. Future studies of cerambycid symbiosis should distinguish the identities and potential roles of free-living organisms in the gut lumen from those of organisms harbored within gut epithelial or fat body tissue. PMID:22525065

  6. Exclusive localization of carbonic anhydrase in bacteriocytes of the deep-sea clam Calyptogena okutanii with thioautotrophic symbiotic bacteria.

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    Hongo, Yuki; Nakamura, Yoshimitsu; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Toyofuku, Takashi; Hirayama, Hisako; Takai, Ken; Nakazawa, Masatoshi; Maruyama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Takao

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea Calyptogena clams harbor thioautotrophic intracellular symbiotic bacteria in their gill epithelial cells. The symbiont fixes CO2 to synthesize organic compounds. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the host catalyzes the reaction CO2 + H2O ↔ HCO3(-) + H(+), and is assumed to facilitate inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake and transport to the symbiont. However, the localization of CA in gill tissue remains unknown. We therefore analyzed mRNA sequences, proteins and CA activity in Calyptogena okutanii using expression sequence tag, SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. We found that acetazolamide-sensitive soluble CA was abundantly expressed in the gill tissue of C. okutanii, and the enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against the CA of C. okutanii were used in western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of the gill tissues of C. okutanii, which showed that CA was exclusively localized in the symbiont-harboring cells (bacteriocytes) in gill epithelial cells. Western blot analysis and measurement of activity showed that CA was abundantly (26-72% of total soluble protein) detected in the gill tissues of not only Calyptogena clams but also deep-sea Bathymodiolus mussels that harbor thioautotrophic or methanotrophic symbiotic bacteria, but was not detected in a non-symbiotic mussel, Mytilus sp. The present study showed that CA is abundant in the gill tissues of deep-sea symbiotic bivalves and specifically localizes in the cytoplasm of bacteriocytes of C. okutanii. This indicates that the Ci supply process to symbionts in the vacuole (symbiosome) in bacteriocytes is essential for symbiosis. PMID:24031050

  7. Cellular and molecular remodelling of a host cell for vertical transmission of bacterial symbionts

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    Luan, Jun-Bo; Shan, Hong-Wei; Isermann, Philipp; Huang, Jia-Hsin; Lammerding, Jan; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Douglas, Angela E.

    2016-01-01

    Various insects require intracellular bacteria that are restricted to specialized cells (bacteriocytes) and are transmitted vertically via the female ovary, but the transmission mechanisms are obscure. We hypothesized that, in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, where intact bacteriocytes (and not isolated bacteria) are transferred to oocytes, the transmission mechanism would be evident as cellular and molecular differences between the nymph (pre-adult) and adult bacteriocytes. We demonstrate dramatic remodelling of bacteriocytes at the developmental transition from nymph to adulthood. This transition involves the loss of cell–cell adhesion, high division rates to constant cell size and onset of cell mobility, enabling the bacteriocytes to crawl to the ovaries. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeleton reorganization and changes in gene expression: genes functioning in cell–cell adhesion display reduced expression and genes involved in cell division, cell motility and endocytosis/exocytosis have elevated expression in adult bacteriocytes, relative to nymph bacteriocytes. This study demonstrates, for the first time, how developmentally orchestrated remodelling of gene expression and correlated changes in cell behaviour underpin the capacity of bacteriocytes to mediate the vertical transmission and persistence of the symbiotic bacteria on which the insect host depends. PMID:27358364

  8. Distribution of the Primary Endosymbiont (Candidatus Uzinura Diaspidicola Within Host Insects from the Scale Insect Family Diaspididae

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    Katharina Dittmar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that armored scale insects harbor endosymbiotic bacteria inside specialized cells called bacteriocytes. Originally, these endosymbionts were thought to be fungal symbionts but they are now known to be bacterial and have been named Uzinura diaspidicola. Bacteriocyte and endosymbiont distribution patterns within host insects were visualized using in situ hybridization via 16S rRNA specific probes. Images of scale insect embryos, eggs and adult scale insects show patterns of localized bacteriocytes in embryos and randomly distributed bacteriocytes in adults. The symbiont pocket was not found in the armored scale insect eggs that were tested. The pattern of dispersed bacteriocytes in adult scale insects suggest that Uzinura and Blattabacteria may share some homologous traits that coincide with similar life style requirements, such as dispersal in fat bodies and uric acid recycling.

  9. Dynamic recruitment of amino acid transporters to the insect/symbiont interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duncan, R.P.; Husník, Filip; Van Leuven, J.T.; Gilbert, D.G.; Dávalos, L.M.; McCutcheon, J.P.; Wilson, A.C.C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 6 (2014), s. 1608-1623. ISSN 0962-1083 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-01878S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : aphid * bacteriocyte * functional evolution * gene duplication * mealybug * sap-feeding insect Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.494, year: 2014

  10. Antimicrobial peptides and cell processes tracking endosymbiont dynamics.

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    Masson, Florent; Zaidman-Rémy, Anna; Heddi, Abdelaziz

    2016-05-26

    Many insects sustain long-term relationships with intracellular symbiotic bacteria that provide them with essential nutrients. Such endosymbiotic relationships likely emerged from ancestral infections of the host by free-living bacteria, the genomes of which experience drastic gene losses and rearrangements during the host-symbiont coevolution. While it is well documented that endosymbiont genome shrinkage results in the loss of bacterial virulence genes, whether and how the host immune system evolves towards the tolerance and control of bacterial partners remains elusive. Remarkably, many insects rely on a 'compartmentalization strategy' that consists in secluding endosymbionts within specialized host cells, the bacteriocytes, thus preventing direct symbiont contact with the host systemic immune system. In this review, we compile recent advances in the understanding of the bacteriocyte immune and cellular regulators involved in endosymbiont maintenance and control. We focus on the cereal weevils Sitophilus spp., in which bacteriocytes form bacteriome organs that strikingly evolve in structure and number according to insect development and physiological needs. We discuss how weevils track endosymbiont dynamics through at least two mechanisms: (i) a bacteriome local antimicrobial peptide synthesis that regulates endosymbiont cell cytokinesis and helps to maintain a homeostatic state within bacteriocytes and (ii) some cellular processes such as apoptosis and autophagy which adjust endosymbiont load to the host developmental requirements, hence ensuring a fine-tuned integration of symbiosis costs and benefits.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160600

  11. Expression of genes involved in the uptake of inorganic carbon in the gill of a deep-sea vesicomyid clam harboring intracellular thioautotrophic bacteria.

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    Hongo, Yuki; Ikuta, Tetsuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Shimamura, Shigeru; Shigenobu, Shuji; Maruyama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Takao

    2016-07-10

    Deep-sea vesicomyid clams, including the genus Phreagena (formerly Calyptogena), harbor thioautotrophic bacterial symbionts in the host symbiosome, which consists of cytoplasmic vacuoles in gill epithelial cells called bacteriocytes. The symbiont requires inorganic carbon (Ci), such as CO2, HCO3(-), and CO3(2-), to synthesize organic compounds, which are utilized by the host clam. The dominant Ci in seawater is HCO3(-), which is impermeable to cell membranes. Within the bacteriocyte, cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the host, which catalyzes the inter-conversion between CO2 and HCO3(-), has been shown to be abundant and is thought to supply intracellular CO2 to symbionts in the symbiosome. However, the mechanism of Ci uptake by the host gill from seawater is poorly understood. To elucidate the influx pathway of Ci into the bacteriocyte, we isolated the genes related to Ci uptake via the pyrosequencing of cDNA from the gill of Phreagena okutanii, and investigated their expression patterns. Using phylogenetic and amino acid sequence analyses, three solute carrier family 4 (SLC4) bicarbonate transporters (slc4co1, slc4co2, and slc4co4) and two membrane-associated CAs (mcaco1 and mcaco2) were identified as candidate genes for Ci uptake. In an in situ hybridization analysis of gill sections, the expression of mcaco1 and mcaco2 was detected in the bacteriocytes and asymbiotic non-ciliated cells, respectively, and the expression of slc4co1 and slc4co2 was detected in the asymbiotic cells, including the intermediate cells of the inner area and the non-ciliated cells of the external area. Although subcellular localizations of the products of these genes have not been fully elucidated, they may play an important role in the uptake of Ci into the bacteriocytes. These findings will improve our understanding of the Ci transport system in the symbiotic relationships of chemosynthetic bivalves. PMID:27016297

  12. Molecular and Histological Characterization of Primary (Betaproteobacteria) and Secondary (Gammaproteobacteria) Endosymbionts of Three Mealybug Species

    OpenAIRE

    Gatehouse, Laurence N; Sutherland, Paul; Forgie, Shaun A.; Kaji, Ryohei; Christeller, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic localization of endosymbiotic bacteria in three species of mealybug (Pseudococcus longispinus, the long-tailed mealybug; Pseudococcus calceolariae, the citrophilus mealybug; and Pseudococcus viburni, the obscure mealybug) showed these organisms were confined to bacteriocyte cells within a bacteriome centrally located within the hemocoel. Two species of bacteria were present, with the secondary endosymbiont, in all cases, living within the primary endosymbiont. DNA from the dissect...

  13. GroEL from the endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola betrays the aphid by triggering plant defense

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Atamian, Hagop S.; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2014-01-01

    Aphids are sap-feeding plant pests of great agricultural importance. Aphid saliva is known to modulate plant immune responses, but limited information exists about the composition of aphid saliva. By means of mass spectrometry, we identified 105 proteins in the saliva of the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae. Among these proteins were some originating from the proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola, which lives endosymbiotically within bacteriocytes in the hemocoel of the aphid. We demonstrate...

  14. Two Intracellular Symbiotic Bacteria from the Mulberry Psyllid Anomoneura mori (Insecta, Homoptera)

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    Fukatsu, Takema; Nikoh, Naruo

    1998-01-01

    We characterized the intracellular symbiotic bacteria of the mulberry psyllid Anomoneura mori by performing a molecular phylogenetic analysis combined with in situ hybridization. In its abdomen, the psyllid has a large, yellow, bilobed mycetome (or bacteriome) which consists of many round uninucleated mycetocytes (or bacteriocytes) enclosing syncytial tissue. The mycetocytes and syncytium harbor specific intracellular bacteria, the X-symbionts and Y-symbionts, respectively. Almost the entire ...

  15. Aspects of the life history strategies of the Teredinidae

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    Shipway, John Reuben

    2013-01-01

    The Teredinidae are a major economic pest of wooden coastal structures, causing billions of Dollars worth of damage per annum. To fully understand the threat posed by teredinids it is necessary to examine their biology at a number of different levels. These include: the anatomical adaptations which facilitate their wood-boring and wood- feeding life-style; the mechanism of cellulose digestion, which is aided by cellulolytic symbionts retained in bacteriocytes on the teredinid gill; the early ...

  16. Symbiotic Bacteria Associated with Stomach Discs of Human Lice▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki-Fukatsu, Kayoko ; Koga, Ryuichi; Nikoh, Naruo; Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Kasai, Shinji; Mihara, Minoru; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Tomita, Takashi; Fukatsu, Takema

    2006-01-01

    The symbiotic bacteria associated with the stomach disc, a large aggregate of bacteriocytes on the ventral side of the midgut, of human body and head lice were characterized. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the symbionts formed a distinct and well-defined clade in the Gammaproteobacteria. The sequences exhibited AT-biased nucleotide composition and accelerated molecular evolution. In situ hybridization revealed that in nymphs and adult males, the symbion...

  17. Symbiotic bacteria associated with stomach discs of human lice

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki-Fukatsu, Kayoko; Koga, Ryuichi; Nikoh, Naruo; Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Kasai, Shinji; Mihara, Minoru; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Tomita, Takashi; Fukatsu, Takema

    2006-01-01

    The symbiotic bacteria associated with the stomach disc, a large aggregate of bacteriocytes on the ventral side of the midgut, of human body and head lice were characterized. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the symbionts formed a distinct and well-defined clade in the Gammaproteobacteria. The sequences exhibited AT-biased nucleotide composition and accelerated molecular evolution. In situ hybridization revealed that in nymphs and adult males, the symbion...

  18. Relative Abundance of Carsonella ruddii (Gamma Proteobacterium) in Females and Males of Cacopsylla pyricola (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) and Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae).

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    Cooper, W Rodney; Garczynski, Stephen F; Horton, David R

    2015-01-01

    Carsonella ruddii (Gamma Proteobacterium) is an obligate bacterial endosymbiont of psyllids that produces essential amino acids that are lacking in the insect's diet. Accurate estimations of Carsonella populations are important to studies of Carsonella-psyllid interactions and to developing ways to target Carsonella for control of psyllid pests including pear psylla, Cacopsylla pyricola (Förster) (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) and potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae). We used two methods, namely fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), to estimate relative abundance of Carsonella in bacteriocytes and whole bodies of psyllids, respectively. Using these two methods, we compared Carsonella populations between female and male insects. Estimations using fluorescence in situ hybridization indicated that Carsonella was more abundant in bacteriocytes of female C. pyricola than in those of males, but Carsonella abundance in bacteriocytes did not differ between sexes of B. cockerelli. Analyses by qPCR using whole-body specimens indicated Carsonella was more abundant in females than in males of both psyllids. Neither fluorescence in situ hybridization nor qPCR indicated that Carsonella populations differed in abundance among adults of different ages (0-3 wk after adult eclosion). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, Carsonella was observed in ovarioles of newly emerged females and formed an aggregation in the posterior end of mature oocytes. Results of our study indicate that female psyllids harbor greater populations of Carsonella than do males and that sex should be controlled for in studies which require estimations of Carsonella populations. PMID:26056318

  19. Characterization of the symbiosis between chemoautotrophic bacteria and the bivalve Lucinoma aequizonata: morphology, biochemistry, and phylogeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low magnification electron microscopy and light microscopy were performed on plastic embedded and fresh samples of bacteriocyte tissues from L. annulata, L. aequizonata and L. floridana. Serial sectioning was used to determine the three dimensional relationship between host tissues, symbiont cells, and the external environment. Possible effects of structure on the exchange of metabolites and inorganic molecules are discussed. Density gradient centrifugation was used to purify symbiotic bacteria from homogenates of host bacteriocyte tissue. The results demonstrate that bacteria can be recovered intact, biologically active and nearly free of contaminants from host tissue. Incorporation of H14CO3- into acid soluble metabolic intermediates by either whole gills, isolated bacteria or bacteria isolated from gills previously exposed to label was examined in L. aequizonata. HPLC, paper chromatography and enzymatic techniques were used to identify and quantify labeled products. The initial fixation product in whole gills is malate. In the symbionts aspartate and 3-phosphoglycerate are the major labeled compounds. Possible pathways of carbon exchange between hosts and symbionts are discussed

  20. Bacterial symbionts of the leafhopper Evacanthus interruptus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Insecta, Hemiptera, Cicadellidae: Evacanthinae).

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    Szklarzewicz, Teresa; Grzywacz, Beata; Szwedo, Jacek; Michalik, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Plant sap-feeding hemipterans harbor obligate symbiotic microorganisms which are responsible for the synthesis of amino acids missing in their diet. In this study, we characterized the obligate symbionts hosted in the body of the xylem-feeding leafhopper Evacanthus interruptus (Cicadellidae: Evacanthinae: Evacanthini) by means of histological, ultrastructural and molecular methods. We observed that E. interruptus is associated with two types of symbiotic microorganisms: bacterium 'Candidatus Sulcia muelleri' (Bacteroidetes) and betaproteobacterium that is closely related to symbionts which reside in two other Cicadellidae representatives: Pagaronia tredecimpunctata (Evacanthinae: Pagaronini) and Hylaius oregonensis (Bathysmatophorinae: Bathysmatophorini). Both symbionts are harbored in their own bacteriocytes which are localized between the body wall and ovaries. In E. interruptus, both Sulcia and betaproteobacterial symbionts are transovarially transmitted from one generation to the next. In the mature female, symbionts leave the bacteriocytes and gather around the posterior pole of the terminal oocytes. Then, they gradually pass through the cytoplasm of follicular cells surrounding the posterior pole of the oocyte and enter the space between them and the oocyte. The bacteria accumulate in the deep depression of the oolemma and form a characteristic 'symbiont ball'. In the light of the results obtained, the phylogenetic relationships within modern Cicadomorpha and some Cicadellidae subfamilies are discussed. PMID:25900723

  1. Co-infection and localization of secondary symbionts in two whitefly species

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    Kontsedalov Svetlana

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whiteflies are cosmopolitan phloem-feeding pests that cause serious damage to many crops worldwide due to direct feeding and vectoring of many plant viruses. The sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius and the greenhouse whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood are two of the most widespread and damaging whitefly species. To complete their unbalanced diet, whiteflies harbor the obligatory bacterium Portiera aleyrodidarum. B. tabaci further harbors a diverse array of secondary symbionts, including Hamiltonella, Arsenophonus, Cardinium, Wolbachia, Rickettsia and Fritschea. T. vaporariorum is only known to harbor P. aleyrodidarum and Arsenophonus. We conducted a study to survey the distribution of whitefly species in Croatia, their infection status by secondary symbionts, and the spatial distribution of these symbionts in the developmental stages of the two whitefly species. Results T. vaporariorum was found to be the predominant whitefly species across Croatia, while only the Q biotype of B. tabaci was found across the coastal part of the country. Arsenophonus and Hamiltonella were detected in collected T. vaporariorum populations, however, not all populations harbored both symbionts, and both symbionts showed 100% infection rate in some of the populations. Only the Q biotype of B. tabaci was found in the populations tested and they harbored Hamiltonella, Rickettsia, Wolbachia and Cardinium, while Arsenophonus and Fritschea were not detected in any B. tabaci populations. None of the detected symbionts appeared in all populations tested, and multiple infections were detected in some of the populations. All endosymbionts tested were localized inside the bacteriocyte in both species, but only Rickettsia and Cardinium in B. tabaci showed additional localization outside the bacteriocyte. Conclusions Our study revealed unique co-infection patterns by secondary symbionts in B. tabaci and T. vaporariorum. Co-sharing of the

  2. LNA probes substantially improve the detection of bacterial endosymbionts in whole mount of insects by fluorescent in-situ hybridization

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    Priya Natarajan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of unculturable bacteria and their localization in the host, by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH, is a powerful technique in the study of host-bacteria interaction. FISH probes are designed to target the 16 s rRNA region of the bacteria to be detected. LNA probes have recently been used in FISH studies and proven to be more efficient. To date no report has employed LNA probes for FISH detection of bacterial endosymbiont in the whole mount tissues. Further, though speculated, bacteriocytes have not been reported from males of Bemisia tabaci. Results In this study, we compared the efficiency in detecting bacteria by fluorescent DNA oligonucleotides versus modified probes containing Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA substitution in their structure. We used the insect Bemisia tabaci as the experimental material since it carried simultaneous infection by two bacteria: one a primary endosymbiont, Portiera (and present in more numbers while the other a secondary endosymbiont Arsenophonus (and present in less numbers. Thus a variation in the abundance of bacteria was expected. While detecting both the bacteria, we found a significant increase in the signal whenever LNA probes were used. However, the difference was more pronounced in detecting the secondary endosymbiont, wherein DNA probes gave weak signals when compared to LNA probes. Also, signal to noise ratio for LNA probes was higher than DNA probes. We found that LNA considerably improved sensitivity of FISH, as compared to the commonly used DNA oligonucleotide probe. Conclusion By employing LNA probes we could detect endosymbiotic bacteria in males, which have never been reported previously. We were able to detect bacteriocytes containing Portiera and Arsenophonus in the males of B. tabaci. Thus, employing LNA probes at optimized conditions will help to significantly improve detection of bacteria at the lowest concentration and may give a comprehensible depiction

  3. Molecular and histological characterization of primary (betaproteobacteria) and secondary (gammaproteobacteria) endosymbionts of three mealybug species.

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    Gatehouse, Laurence N; Sutherland, Paul; Forgie, Shaun A; Kaji, Ryohei; Christeller, John T

    2012-02-01

    Microscopic localization of endosymbiotic bacteria in three species of mealybug (Pseudococcus longispinus, the long-tailed mealybug; Pseudococcus calceolariae, the citrophilus mealybug; and Pseudococcus viburni, the obscure mealybug) showed these organisms were confined to bacteriocyte cells within a bacteriome centrally located within the hemocoel. Two species of bacteria were present, with the secondary endosymbiont, in all cases, living within the primary endosymbiont. DNA from the dissected bacteriomes of all three species of mealybug was extracted for analysis. Sequence data from selected 16S rRNA genes confirmed identification of the primary endosymbiont as "Candidatus Tremblaya princeps," a betaproteobacterium, and the secondary endosymbionts as gammaproteobacteria closely related to Sodalis glossinidius. A single 16S rRNA sequence of the primary endosymbiont was found in all individuals of each mealybug species. In contrast, the presence of multiple divergent strains of secondary endosymbionts in each individual mealybug suggests different evolutionary and transmission histories of the two endosymbionts. Mealybugs are known vectors of the plant pathogen Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3. To examine the possible role of either endosymbiont in virus transmission, an extension of the model for interaction of proteins with bacterial chaperonins, i.e., GroEL protein homologs, based on mobile-loop amino acid sequences of their GroES homologs, was developed and used for analyses of viral coat protein interactions. The data from this model are consistent with a role for the primary endosymbiont in mealybug transmission of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3. PMID:22156418

  4. Exploration for facultative endosymbionts of glassy-wingedsharpshooter (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

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    Montllor-Curley, C.; Brodie, E.L.; Lechner, M.G.; Purcell, A.H.

    2006-07-01

    Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae),glassy-winged sharpshooter, was collected in California and severalstates in the southeastern United States in 2002 and 2003 and analyzedfor endosymbiotic bacteria. Hemolymph, eggs, and bacteriomes wereexamined for the presence of bacteria by polymerase chain reaction. Asubset of hemolymph and egg samples had their 16S rRNA gene ampliconscloned and sequenced or analyzed by restriction digest patterns ofsamples compared with known bacterial DNA. Baumannia cicadellinicola, oneof the primary symbionts of glassy-winged sharpshooter, was found in themajority of hemolymph samples, although it has been considered until nowto reside primarily inside the specialized host bacteriocytes. Wolbachiasp., a common secondary symbiont in many insect taxa investigated todate, was the second most frequently detected bacterium in hemolymphsamples. In addition, we detected bacteria that were most closely related(by 16S rRNA gene sequence) to Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, andAcinetobacter in hemolymph samples of one and/or two glassy-wingedsharpshooters, but their origin is uncertain.

  5. Hessian fly-associated bacteria: transmission, essentiality, and composition.

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    Raman Bansal

    Full Text Available Plant-feeding insects have been recently found to use microbes to manipulate host plant physiology and morphology. Gall midges are one of the largest groups of insects that manipulate host plants extensively. Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor is an important pest of wheat and a model system for studying gall midges. To examine the role of bacteria in parasitism, a systematic analysis of bacteria associated with HF was performed for the first time. Diverse bacteria were found in different developmental HF stages. Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected a bacteriocyte-like structure in developing eggs. Bacterial DNA was also detected in eggs by PCR using primers targeted to different bacterial groups. These results indicated that HF hosted different types of bacteria that were maternally transmitted to the next generation. Eliminating bacteria from the insect with antibiotics resulted in high mortality of HF larvae, indicating that symbiotic bacteria are essential for the insect to survive on wheat seedlings. A preliminary survey identified various types of bacteria associated with different HF stages, including the genera Enterobacter, Pantoea, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Ochrobactrum, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Nitrosomonas, Arcanobacterium, Microbacterium, Paenibacillus, and Klebsiella. Similar bacteria were also found specifically in HF-infested susceptible wheat, suggesting that HF larvae had either transmitted bacteria into plant tissue or brought secondary infection of bacteria to the wheat host. The bacteria associated with wheat seedlings may play an essential role in the wheat-HF interaction.

  6. Horizontal gene acquisition of Liberibacter plant pathogens from a bacteriome-confined endosymbiont of their psyllid vector.

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    Atsushi Nakabachi

    Full Text Available he Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri is a notorious agricultural pest that transmits the phloem-inhabiting alphaproteobacterial 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' and allied plant pathogens, which cause the devastating citrus disease called Huanglongbing or greening disease. D. citri harbors two distinct bacterial mutualists in the symbiotic organ called bacteriome: the betaproteobacterium 'Candidatus Profftella armatura' in the syncytial cytoplasm at the center of the bacteriome, and the gammaproteobacterium 'Candidatus Carsonella ruddii' in uninucleate bacteriocytes. Here we report that a putative amino acid transporter LysE of Profftella forms a highly supported clade with proteins of L. asiaticus, L. americanus, and L. solanacearum. L. crescens, the most basal Liberibacter lineage currently known, lacked the corresponding gene. The Profftella-Liberibacter subclade of LysE formed a clade with proteins from betaproteobacteria of the order Burkholderiales, to which Profftella belongs. This phylogenetic pattern favors the hypothesis that the Liberibacter lineage acquired the gene from the Profftella lineage via horizontal gene transfer (HGT after L. crescens diverged from other Liberibacter lineages. K A/K S analyses further supported the hypothesis that the genes encoded in the Liberibacter genomes are functional. These findings highlight the possible evolutionary importance of HGT between plant pathogens and their insect vector's symbionts that are confined in the symbiotic organ and seemingly sequestered from external microbial populations.

  7. Identification and expression analysis of aquaporins in the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli.

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    Freddy Ibanez

    Full Text Available Aquaporin (AQPs proteins transport water and uncharged low molecular-weight solutes across biological membranes. Six to 8 AQP genes have been identified in many insect species, but presently only three aquaporins have been characterized in phloem feeding insects. The objective of this study was to identify candidate AQPs in the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli. Herein, we identified four candidate aquaporin cDNAs in B. cockerelli transcriptome. Phylogenetic analysis showed that candidate BcAQP2-like had high similarity to PRIP aquaporins; while candidates BcAQP4-like, BcAQP5-like and BcAQP9-like clustered within clade B. In particular, candidates BcAQP4-like and BcAQP5-like clustered with functionally validated insect aquaglyceroporin proteins. Expression analyses using RT-qPCR showed that all candidates were expressed in all life stages and tissues. Candidates BcAQP4-like and BcAQP5-like were highly expressed in bacteriocytes, while BcAQP9-like appeared to be expressed at high levels in whole body but not in the assayed tissues. This study is the first global attempt to identify putative aquaporins in a phloem feeding insect.

  8. Microbial distribution and abundance in the digestive system of five shipworm species (Bivalvia: Teredinidae.

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    Meghan A Betcher

    Full Text Available Marine bivalves of the family Teredinidae (shipworms are voracious consumers of wood in marine environments. In several shipworm species, dense communities of intracellular bacterial endosymbionts have been observed within specialized cells (bacteriocytes of the gills (ctenidia. These bacteria are proposed to contribute to digestion of wood by the host. While the microbes of shipworm gills have been studied extensively in several species, the abundance and distribution of microbes in the digestive system have not been adequately addressed. Here we use Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH and laser scanning confocal microscopy with 16S rRNA directed oligonucleotide probes targeting all domains, domains Bacteria and Archaea, and other taxonomic groups to examine the digestive microbiota of 17 specimens from 5 shipworm species (Bankia setacea, Lyrodus pedicellatus, Lyrodus massa, Lyrodus sp. and Teredo aff. triangularis. These data reveal that the caecum, a large sac-like appendage of the stomach that typically contains large quantities of wood particles and is considered the primary site of wood digestion, harbors only very sparse microbial populations. However, a significant number of bacterial cells were observed in fecal pellets within the intestines. These results suggest that due to low abundance, bacteria in the caecum may contribute little to lignocellulose degradation. In contrast, the comparatively high population density of bacteria in the intestine suggests a possible role for intestinal bacteria in the degradation of lignocellulose.

  9. Microbial Distribution and Abundance in the Digestive System of Five Shipworm Species (Bivalvia: Teredinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betcher, Meghan A.; Fung, Jennifer M.; Han, Andrew W.; O’Connor, Roberta; Seronay, Romell; Concepcion, Gisela P.; Distel, Daniel L.; Haygood, Margo G.

    2012-01-01

    Marine bivalves of the family Teredinidae (shipworms) are voracious consumers of wood in marine environments. In several shipworm species, dense communities of intracellular bacterial endosymbionts have been observed within specialized cells (bacteriocytes) of the gills (ctenidia). These bacteria are proposed to contribute to digestion of wood by the host. While the microbes of shipworm gills have been studied extensively in several species, the abundance and distribution of microbes in the digestive system have not been adequately addressed. Here we use Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) and laser scanning confocal microscopy with 16S rRNA directed oligonucleotide probes targeting all domains, domains Bacteria and Archaea, and other taxonomic groups to examine the digestive microbiota of 17 specimens from 5 shipworm species (Bankia setacea, Lyrodus pedicellatus, Lyrodus massa, Lyrodus sp. and Teredo aff. triangularis). These data reveal that the caecum, a large sac-like appendage of the stomach that typically contains large quantities of wood particles and is considered the primary site of wood digestion, harbors only very sparse microbial populations. However, a significant number of bacterial cells were observed in fecal pellets within the intestines. These results suggest that due to low abundance, bacteria in the caecum may contribute little to lignocellulose degradation. In contrast, the comparatively high population density of bacteria in the intestine suggests a possible role for intestinal bacteria in the degradation of lignocellulose. PMID:23028923

  10. Unexpected co-occurrence of six bacterial symbionts in the gills of the cold seep mussel Idas sp. (Bivalvia: Mytilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperron, Sébastien; Halary, Sébastien; Lorion, Julien; Sibuet, Myriam; Gaill, Françoise

    2008-02-01

    Bathymodioline mussels occur in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems such as cold seeps, hydrothermal vents and organic debris worldwide. Their key adaptation to these environments is their association with bacterial endosymbionts which ensure a chemosynthetic primary production based on the oxidation of reduced compounds such as methane and sulfide. We herein report a multiple symbiosis involving six distinct bacterial 16S rRNA phylotypes, including two belonging to groups not yet reported as symbionts in mytilids, in a small Idas mussel found on carbonate crusts in a cold seep area located north to the Nile deep-sea fan (Eastern Mediterranean). Symbionts co-occur within hosts bacteriocytes based on fluorescence in situ hybridizations, and sequencing of functional genes suggests they have the potential to perform autotrophy, and sulfide and methane oxidation. Previous studies indicated the presence of only one or two symbiont 16S rRNA phylotypes in bathymodioline mussels. Together with the recent discovery of four bacterial symbionts in the large seep species Bathymodiolus heckerae, this study shows that symbiont diversity has probably been underestimated, and questions whether the common ancestor of bathymodioline mussels was associated with multiple bacteria. PMID:18093159

  11. Populations of Stored Product Mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae Differ in Their Bacterial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erban, Tomas; Klimov, Pavel B.; Smrz, Jaroslav; Phillips, Thomas W.; Nesvorna, Marta; Kopecky, Jan; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tyrophagus putrescentiae colonizes different human-related habitats and feeds on various post-harvest foods. The microbiota acquired by these mites can influence the nutritional plasticity in different populations. We compared the bacterial communities of five populations of T. putrescentiae and one mixed population of T. putrescentiae and T. fanetzhangorum collected from different habitats. Material: The bacterial communities of the six mite populations from different habitats and diets were compared by Sanger sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA obtained from amplification with universal eubacterial primers and using bacterial taxon-specific primers on the samples of adults/juveniles or eggs. Microscopic techniques were used to localize bacteria in food boli and mite bodies. The morphological determination of the mite populations was confirmed by analyses of CO1 and ITS fragment genes. Results: The following symbiotic bacteria were found in compared mite populations: Wolbachia (two populations), Cardinium (five populations), Bartonella-like (five populations), Blattabacterium-like symbiont (three populations), and Solitalea-like (six populations). From 35 identified OTUs97, only Solitalea was identified in all populations. The next most frequent and abundant sequences were Bacillus, Moraxella, Staphylococcus, Kocuria, and Microbacterium. We suggest that some bacterial species may occasionally be ingested with food. The bacteriocytes were observed in some individuals in all mite populations. Bacteria were not visualized in food boli by staining, but bacteria were found by histological means in ovaria of Wolbachia-infested populations. Conclusion: The presence of Blattabacterium-like, Cardinium, Wolbachia, and Solitalea-like in the eggs of T. putrescentiae indicates mother to offspring (vertical) transmission. Results of this study indicate that diet and habitats influence not only the ingested bacteria but also the symbiotic bacteria of T. putrescentiae. PMID

  12. Host PGRP gene expression and bacterial release in endosymbiosis of the weevil Sitophilus zeamais.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselme, Caroline; Vallier, Agnès; Balmand, Séverine; Fauvarque, Marie-Odile; Heddi, Abdelaziz

    2006-10-01

    Intracellular symbiosis (endosymbiosis) with gram-negative bacteria is common in insects, yet little is known about how the host immune system perceives the endosymbionts and controls their growth and invasion without complete bacterial clearance. In this study, we have explored the expression of a peptidoglycan recognition protein gene of the weevil Sitophilus zeamais (wPGRP); an ortholog in Drosophila (i.e., PGRP-LB) was recently shown to downregulate the Imd pathway (A. Zaidman-Remy, M. Herve, M. Poidevin, S. Pili-Floury, M. S. Kim, D. Blanot, B. H. Oh, R. Ueda, D. Mengin-Lecreulx, and B. Lemaitre, Immunity 24:463-473, 2006). Insect challenges with bacteria have demonstrated that wPGRP is induced by gram-negative bacteria and that the level of induction depends on bacterial growth. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR quantification of the wPGRP gene transcript performed at different points in insect development has shown a high steady-state level in the bacteria-bearing organ (the bacteriome) of larvae and a high level of wPGRP up-regulation in the symbiotic nymphal phase. Concomitantly, during this stage fluorescence in situ hybridization has revealed an endosymbiont release from the host bacteriocytes. Together with the previously described high induction level of endosymbiont virulence genes at the nymphal phase (C. Dale, G. R. Plague, B. Wang, H. Ochman, and N. A. Moran, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:12397-12402, 2002), these findings indicate that insect mutualistic relationships evolve through an interplay between bacterial virulence and host immune defense and that the host immunity engages the PGRP gene family in that interplay. PMID:17021229

  13. Oogenesis in the Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-Yang; Wan, Fang-Hao; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-04-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 species complex has invaded several parts of the world in the past 30 years and replaced native whitefly populations in the invaded regions, including certain areas of China. One of the possible reasons for the invasion is that MEAM1 whiteflies are more fecund than native species. However, the factors that affect the reproduction of the B. tabaci cryptic species are not clearly known. The regulation of oogenesis is thought to be one of the essential processes for egg formation and ovary development and could affect its population dynamics. In this study, the ovariole structure and oogenesis of the MEAM1 species complex was examined using light and transmission electron microscopy. Telotrophic ovarioles were observed in the MEAM1 species complex. Each ovariole had two well defined regions: the tropharium and the vitellarium. The tropharium always had more than ten trophocytes. The development of a single oocyte in the vitellarium has four phases: oocyte formation, previtellogenesis, vitellogenesis and choriogenesis. Two arrested oocytes, follicular cells and uncompleted oocytes were separated from the tropharium by microtubule and microfilaments. Early previtellogenesis oocytes absorbed nutrients and endosymbiont bacteria through a nutritive cord. However, the vitellogenesis of oocytes transmitted Vg through both the nutritive cord and the space between follicular cells. Each mature oocyte with deposited yolk proteins had only one bacteriocyte and was surrounded by a single layer of follicular cells. The oogenesis in the B. tabaci MEAM1 species complex concluded with the differentiation of oocytes, the transport of yolk and endosymbionts as well as the development and maturation of oocytes. This result provides important information that further defines the regulation of oogenesis in the B. tabaci complex. PMID:26826802

  14. Reinventing the Wheel and Making It Round Again: Evolutionary Convergence in Buchnera–Serratia Symbiotic Consortia between the Distantly Related Lachninae Aphids Tuberolachnus salignus and Cinara cedri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano-Marín, Alejandro; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Latorre, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all aphids (Aphididae) harbor Buchnera aphidicola as an obligate endosymbiont to compensate nutritional deficiencies arising from their phloem diet. Many species within the Lachninae subfamily seem to be consistently associated also with Serratia symbiotica. We have previously shown that both Cinara (Cinara) cedri and Cinara (Cupressobium) tujafilina (Lachninae: Eulachnini tribe) have indeed established co-obligate associations with both Buchnera and S. symbiotica. However, while Buchnera genomes of both Cinara species are similar, genome degradation differs greatly between the two S. symbiotica strains. To gain insight into the essentiality and degree of integration of S. symbiotica within the Lachninae, we sequenced the genome of both Buchnera and S. symbiotica endosymbionts from the distantly related aphid Tuberolachnus salignus (Lachninae: Tuberolachnini tribe). We found a striking level of similarity between the endosymbiotic system of this aphid and that of C. cedri. In both aphid hosts, S. symbiotica possesses a highly reduced genome and is found exclusively intracellularly inside bacteriocytes. Interestingly, T. salignus’ endosymbionts present the same tryptophan biosynthetic metabolic complementation as C. cedri’s, which is not present in C. tujafilina’s. Moreover, we corroborate the riboflavin-biosynthetic-role take-over/rescue by S. symbiotica in T. salignus, and therefore, provide further evidence for the previously proposed establishment of a secondary co-obligate endosymbiont in the common ancestor of the Lachninae aphids. Finally, we propose that the putative convergent split of the tryptophan biosynthetic role between Buchnera and S. symbiotica could be behind the establishment of S. symbiotica as an obligate intracellular symbiont and the triggering of further genome degradation. PMID:27190007

  15. Influence of parasitism in controlling the health, reproduction and PAH body burden of petroleum seep mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Eric N.; Barber, Robert D.; Kennicutt, Mahlon C., II; Ford, Susan E.

    1999-12-01

    Petroleum seep mussels are often exposed to high hydrocarbon concentrations in their natural habitat and, thus, offer the opportunity to examine the relationship between parasitism, disease and contaminant exposure under natural conditions. This is the first report on the histopathology of cold-seep mussels. Seep mussels were collected by submersible from four primary sites in the Gulf of Mexico, lease blocks Green Canyon (GC) 184, GC-234, GC-233, and Garden Banks 425 in 550-650 m water depth. Five types of parasites were identified in section: (1) gill "rosettes" of unknown affinity associated with the gill bacteriocytes, (2) gill "inclusions" similar to chlamydia/rickettsia inclusions, (3) extracellular gill ciliates, (4) body "inclusions" that also resemble chlamydial/rickettsial inclusions, and (5) Bucephalus-like trematodes. Comparison to shallow-water mytilids demonstrates that: (1) both have similar parasite faunas; (2) seep mytilids are relatively heavily parasitized; and (3) infection intensities are extremely high in comparison to shallow-water mytilids for Bucephalus and chlamydia/rickettsia. In this study, the lowest prevalence for chlamydia/rickettsia was 67%. Prevalences of 100% were recorded from three populations. Bucephalus prevalence was ⩾70% in three of 10 populations. The parasite fauna was highly variable between populations. Some important parasites were not observed in some primary sites. Even within primary sites, some important parasites were not observed in some populations. Bucephalus may exert a significant influence on seep mussel population dynamics. Forty percent of the populations in this study are severely reproductively compromised by Bucephalus infection. Only a fraction of petroleum seep mussel populations are maintaining the entire beta-level population structure of this species. Variation in two parasites, gill ciliates and Bucephalus, explained most of the variation in PAH body burden between mussel populations. PAHs are

  16. Host gene response to endosymbiont and pathogen in the cereal weevil Sitophilus oryzae

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    Vigneron Aurélien

    2012-01-01

    wpgrp2, wpgrp3, coleoptericin-B, diptericin, and sarcotoxin genes in aposymbiotic insects. Conclusions Library sequencing significantly increased the number of unigenes, allowing for improved functional and genetic investigations in the cereal weevil S. oryzae. Transcriptomic analyses support selective and local immune gene expression in the bacteriome tissue and uncover cellular pathways that are of potential interest to bacteriocyte survival and homeostasis. Bacterial challenge experiments have revealed that the systemic immune response would be less induced in a symbiotic insect, thus highlighting new perspectives on host immunity in long-term invertebrate co-evolutionary associations.