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Sample records for bacterial walls viewed

  1. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  2. Immersion Refractometry of Isolated Bacterial Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Robert E.

    1973-01-01

    Immersion-refractometric and light-scattering measurements were adapted to determinations of average refractive indices and physical compactness of isolated bacterial cell walls. The structures were immersed in solutions containing various concentrations of polymer molecules that cannot penetrate into wall pores, and then an estimate was made of the polymer concentration or the refractive index of the polymer solution in which light scattering was reduced to zero. Because each wall preparation was heterogeneous, the refractive index of the medium for zero light scattering had to be estimated by extrapolation. Refractive indices for walls suspended in bovine serum albumin solutions ranged from 1.348 for walls of the rod form of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes to 1.382 for walls of the teichoic acid deficient, 52A5 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. These indices were used to calculate approximate values for solids content per milliliter, and the calculated values agreed closely with those estimated from a knowledge of dextran-impermeable volumes per gram, dry weight, of the walls. When large molecules such as dextrans or serum albumin were used for immersion refractometry, the refractive indices obtained were for entire walls, including both wall polymers and wall water. When smaller molecules that can penetrate wall pores to various extents were used with Micrococcus lysodeikticus walls, the average, apparent refractive index of the structures increased as the molecular size of probing molecules was decreased. It was possible to obtain an estimate of 1.45 to 1.46 for the refractive index of wall polymers, predominantly peptidoglycans in this case, by extrapolating the curve for refractive index versus molecular radius to a value of 0.2 nm, the approximate radius of a water molecule. This relatively low value for polymer refractive index was interpreted as evidence in favor of the amorphous, elastic model of peptidoglycan structure and against the crystalline, rigid

  3. Bacterial Cell Wall Growth, Shape and Division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derouaux, A.; Terrak, M.; den Blaauwen, T.; Vollmer, W.; Remaut, H.; Fronzes, R.

    2014-01-01

    The shape of a bacterial cell is maintained by its peptidoglycan sacculus that completely surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane. During growth the sacculus is enlarged by peptidoglycan synthesis complexes that are controlled by components linked to the cytoskeleton and, in Gram-negative bacteria, by

  4. Bending forces plastically deform growing bacterial cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ariel; Babaeipour, Farinaz; McIntosh, Dustin B.; Nelson, David R.; Jun, Suckjoon

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls define a cell’s shape in bacteria. The walls are rigid to resist large internal pressures, but remarkably plastic to adapt to a wide range of external forces and geometric constraints. Currently, it is unknown how bacteria maintain their shape. In this paper, we develop experimental and theoretical approaches and show that mechanical stresses regulate bacterial cell wall growth. By applying a precisely controllable hydrodynamic force to growing rod-shaped Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis cells, we demonstrate that the cells can exhibit two fundamentally different modes of deformation. The cells behave like elastic rods when subjected to transient forces, but deform plastically when significant cell wall synthesis occurs while the force is applied. The deformed cells always recover their shape. The experimental results are in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the theory of dislocation-mediated growth. In particular, we find that a single dimensionless parameter, which depends on a combination of independently measured physical properties of the cell, can describe the cell’s responses under various experimental conditions. These findings provide insight into how living cells robustly maintain their shape under varying physical environments. PMID:24711421

  5. Bacterial cell wall composition and the influence of antibiotics by cell-wall and whole-cell NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Romaniuk, Joseph A. H.; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterize bacterial cell-wall composition and structure is crucial to understanding the function of the bacterial cell wall, determining drug modes of action and developing new-generation therapeutics. Solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool to quantify chemical composition and to map cell-wall architecture in bacteria and plants, even in the context of unperturbed intact whole cells. In this review, we discuss solid-state NMR approaches to define pe...

  6. Effect of a small molecule Lipid II binder on bacterial cell wall stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jakob Malin,1,2 Amol C Shetty,3 Sean Daugherty,3 Erik PH de Leeuw,1,2 1Institute of Human Virology, 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 3Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: We have recently identified small molecule compounds that act as binders of Lipid II, an essential precursor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Lipid II comprised a hydrophilic head group that includes a peptidoglycan subunit composed of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc and N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc coupled to a short pentapeptide moiety. This headgroup is coupled to a long bactoprenol chain via a pyrophosphate group. Here, we report on the cell wall activity relationship of dimethyl-3-methyl(phenylamino-ethenylcyclohexylidene-propenyl-3-ethyl-1,3-benzothiazolium iodide (compound 5107930 obtained by functional and genetic analyses. Our results indicate that compounds bind to Lipid II and cause specific upregulation of the vancomycin-resistance associated gene vraX. vraX is implicated in the cell wall stress stimulon that confers glycopeptide resistance. Our small molecule Lipid II inhibitor retained activity against strains of Staphylococcus aureus mutated in genes encoding the cell wall stress stimulon. This suggests the feasibility of developing this new scaffold as a therapeutic agent in view of increasing glycopeptide resistance. Keywords: defensin, Lipid II, antibiotics, bacterial membrane, vancomycin

  7. The quest for a unified view of bacterial land colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Fang, Yongjun; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Exploring molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial water-to-land transition represents a critical start toward a better understanding of the functioning and stability of the terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we perform comprehensive analyses based on a large variety of bacteria by integrating taxonomic, phylogenetic and metagenomic data, in the quest for a unified view that elucidates genomic, evolutionary and ecological dynamics of the marine progenitors in adapting to nonaquatic environments. We hypothesize that bacterial land colonization is dominated by a single-gene sweep, that is, the emergence of dnaE2 derived from an early duplication event of the primordial dnaE, followed by a series of niche-specific genomic adaptations, including GC content increase, intensive horizontal gene transfer and constant genome expansion. In addition, early bacterial radiation may be stimulated by an explosion of land-borne hosts (for example, plants and animals) after initial land colonization events.

  8. Bacterial cell wall composition and the influence of antibiotics by cell-wall and whole-cell NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Joseph A H; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-10-05

    The ability to characterize bacterial cell-wall composition and structure is crucial to understanding the function of the bacterial cell wall, determining drug modes of action and developing new-generation therapeutics. Solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool to quantify chemical composition and to map cell-wall architecture in bacteria and plants, even in the context of unperturbed intact whole cells. In this review, we discuss solid-state NMR approaches to define peptidoglycan composition and to characterize the modes of action of old and new antibiotics, focusing on examples in Staphylococcus aureus. We provide perspectives regarding the selected NMR strategies as we describe the exciting and still-developing cell-wall and whole-cell NMR toolkit. We also discuss specific discoveries regarding the modes of action of vancomycin analogues, including oritavancin, and briefly address the reconsideration of the killing action of β-lactam antibiotics. In such chemical genetics approaches, there is still much to be learned from perturbations enacted by cell-wall assembly inhibitors, and solid-state NMR approaches are poised to address questions of cell-wall composition and assembly in S. aureus and other organisms. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. Osmotic Pressure, Bacterial Cell Walls, and Penicillin: A Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, John E.

    1984-01-01

    An easily constructed apparatus that models the effect of penicillin on the structure of bacterial cells is described. Background information and procedures for using the apparatus during a classroom demonstration are included. (JN)

  10. The innate immune protein Nod2 binds directly to MDP, a bacterial cell wall fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler; Ariyananda, Lushanti De Zoysa; Melnyk, James E; O'Shea, Erin K

    2012-08-22

    Mammalian Nod2 is an intracellular protein that is implicated in the innate immune response to the bacterial cell wall and is associated with the development of Crohn's disease, Blau syndrome, and gastrointestinal cancers. Nod2 is required for an immune response to muramyl dipeptide (MDP), an immunostimulatory fragment of bacterial cell wall, but it is not known whether MDP binds directly to Nod2. We report the expression and purification of human Nod2 from insect cells. Using novel MDP self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), we provide the first biochemical evidence for a direct, high-affinity interaction between Nod2 and MDP.

  11. MECHANISM OF ACTION OF ANTIBIOTICS WHICH INHIBIT SYNTHESIS OF BACTERIAL CELL WALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Mujezinović

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell possess a cell wall, which is a main difference from mammalian cells. Its basic function is to provide the strength of bacteria, keeps its shape and provides an unusually high internal osmotic pressure. Synthesis of (construction of bacterial cell wall occurs in at least three phases. All of these three phases can be influence by a variety of antibiotics in way to inhibit its synthesis. The most important drugs that act in this manner are ß-lactam antibiotics (penicillins, cephalosporins, cephamycins and other ß-lactams. They interfere with the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan. After attachment to penicillin binding proteins (PBP on bacteria, they inhibit the transpeptidation enzyme that cross-links the peptide chain attached to the backbone of the peptidoglycan. The final bactericidal event is the inactivation of an inhibitor of autolytic enzymes in the cell wall, wich leads to lysis of the bacteria. Vancomycin inhibits the release of the building block unit from the carrier, thus preventing its addition to the growing end of the peptidoglycan. Cycloserine, which is a structural analogue of D-alanine, prevents the addition of the two terminal alanine residue to the initial tripeptide side-chain on N-acetylmuramic acid by competitive inhibition. Bacitracin interferes with the regeneration of the lipid carrier by blocking its dephosphorylation. Key words: bacterial cell wall, paptidoglycan, antibiotics, ß-lactams

  12. Structural constraints and dynamics of bacterial cell wall architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel De Pedro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The peptidoglycan wall (PG is a unique structure which confers physical strength and defined shape to bacteria. It consists of a net-like macromolecule of peptide interlinked glycan chains overlying the cell membrane. The structure and layout of the PG dictates that the wall has to be continuously modified as bacteria go through division, morphological differentiation and adaptive responses. The PG is poorly known in structural terms. However, to understand morphogenesis a precise knowledge of glycan strand arrangement and of local effects of the different kinds of subunits is essential. The scarcity of data led to a conception of the PG as a regular, highly ordered structure which strongly influenced growth models. Here, we review the structure of the PG to define a more realistic conceptual framework. We discuss the consequences of the plasticity of murein architecture in morphogenesis and try to define a set of minimal structural constraints that must be fulfilled by any model to be compatible with present day information.

  13. Plectasin, a Fungal Defensin, Targets the Bacterial Cell Wall Precursor Lipid II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Tanja; Kruse, Thomas; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Host defense peptides such as defensins are components of innate immunity and have retained antibiotic activity throughout evolution. Their activity is thought to be due to amphipathic structures, which enable binding and disruption of microbial cytoplasmic membranes. Contrary to this, we show...... that plectasin, a fungal defensin, acts by directly binding the bacterial cell-wall precursor Lipid II. A wide range of genetic and biochemical approaches identify cell-wall biosynthesis as the pathway targeted by plectasin. In vitro assays for cell-wall synthesis identified Lipid II as the specific cellular...

  14. Bacterial cell wall preservation during organic matter diagenesis in sediments off Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Niggemann, Jutta; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    BACTERIAL CELL WALL PRESERVATION DURING ORGANIC MATTER DIAGENESIS IN SEDIMENTS OFF PERU The spatial distribution of total hydrolysable amino acids, total hydrolysable amino sugars and amino acid enantiomers (D- and L-forms) were investigated in surface sediments at 20 stations in the Peru margin: 9...

  15. Structural Insights into Protein-Protein Interactions Involved in Bacterial Cell Wall Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Laddomada

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial cell wall is essential for survival, and proteins that participate in its biosynthesis have been the targets of antibiotic development efforts for decades. The biosynthesis of its main component, the peptidoglycan, involves the coordinated action of proteins that are involved in multi-member complexes which are essential for cell division (the “divisome” and/or cell wall elongation (the “elongasome”, in the case of rod-shaped cells. Our knowledge regarding these interactions has greatly benefitted from the visualization of different aspects of the bacterial cell wall and its cytoskeleton by cryoelectron microscopy and tomography, as well as genetic and biochemical screens that have complemented information from high resolution crystal structures of protein complexes involved in divisome or elongasome formation. This review summarizes structural and functional aspects of protein complexes involved in the cytoplasmic and membrane-related steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, with a particular focus on protein-protein interactions whereby disruption could lead to the development of novel antibacterial strategies.

  16. The Disruptive Effect of Lysozyme on the Bacterial Cell Wall Explored by an "In-Silico" Structural Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primo, Emiliano D.; Otero, Lisandro H.; Ruiz, Francisco; Klinke, Sebastián; Giordano, Walter

    2018-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall, a structural unit of peptidoglycan polymer comprised of glycan strands consisting of a repeating disaccharide motif [N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) and N-acetylmuramylpentapeptide (NAM pentapeptide)], encases bacteria and provides structural integrity and protection. Lysozymes are enzymes that break down the bacterial cell wall…

  17. A new view of the bacterial cytosol environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Cossins

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The cytosol is the major environment in all bacterial cells. The true physical and dynamical nature of the cytosol solution is not fully understood and here a modeling approach is applied. Using recent and detailed data on metabolite concentrations, we have created a molecular mechanical model of the prokaryotic cytosol environment of Escherichia coli, containing proteins, metabolites and monatomic ions. We use 200 ns molecular dynamics simulations to compute diffusion rates, the extent of contact between molecules and dielectric constants. Large metabolites spend ∼80% of their time in contact with other molecules while small metabolites vary with some only spending 20% of time in contact. Large non-covalently interacting metabolite structures mediated by hydrogen-bonds, ionic and π stacking interactions are common and often associate with proteins. Mg(2+ ions were prominent in NIMS and almost absent free in solution. Κ(+ is generally not involved in NIMSs and populates the solvent fairly uniformly, hence its important role as an osmolyte. In simulations containing ubiquitin, to represent a protein component, metabolite diffusion was reduced owing to long lasting protein-metabolite interactions. Hence, it is likely that with larger proteins metabolites would diffuse even more slowly. The dielectric constant of these simulations was found to differ from that of pure water only through a large contribution from ubiquitin as metabolite and monatomic ion effects cancel. These findings suggest regions of influence specific to particular proteins affecting metabolite diffusion and electrostatics. Also some proteins may have a higher propensity for associations with metabolites owing to their larger electrostatic fields. We hope that future studies may be able to accurately predict how binding interactions differ in the cytosol relative to dilute aqueous solution.

  18. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States); Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance.

  19. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J.; Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian; Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance

  20. Bacterial community radial-spatial distribution in biofilms along pipe wall in chlorinated drinking water distribution system of East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingqing; Ren, Hongxing; Ye, Xianbei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yan; Lou, Liping; Cheng, Dongqing; He, Xiaofang; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Shangde; Fu, Liusong; Hu, Baolan

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms in the pipe wall may lead to water quality deterioration and biological instability in drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs). In this study, bacterial community radial-spatial distribution in biofilms along the pipe wall in a chlorinated DWDS of East China was investigated. Three pipes of large diameter (300, 600, and 600 mm) were sampled in this DWDS, including a ductile cast iron pipe (DCIP) with pipe age of 11 years and two gray cast iron pipes (GCIP) with pipe ages of 17 and 19 years, and biofilms in the upper, middle, and lower parts of each pipe wall were collected. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and culture-based method were used to quantify bacteria. 454 pyrosequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. The results showed that the biofilm density and total solid (TS) and volatile solid (VS) contents increased gradually from the top to the bottom along the pipe wall. Microorganisms were concentrated in the upper and lower parts of the pipe wall, together accounting for more than 80 % of the total biomass in the biofilms. The bacterial communities in biofilms were significantly different in different areas of the pipe wall and had no strong interaction. Compared with the upper and lower parts of the pipe wall, the bacterial community in the middle of the pipe wall was distributed evenly and had the highest diversity. The 16S rRNA genes of various possible pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella enterica, were detected in the biofilms, and the abundances of these possible pathogens were highest in the middle of the pipe wall among three areas. The detachment of the biofilms is the main reason for the deterioration of the water quality in DWDSs. The results of this study suggest that the biofilms in the middle of the pipe wall have highly potential risk for drinking water safety, which provides new ideas for the study of the microbial ecology in

  1. X-ray crystallography and its impact on understanding bacterial cell wall remodeling processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Felix Michael; Renner-Schneck, Michaela; Stehle, Thilo

    2015-02-01

    The molecular structure of matter defines its properties and function. This is especially true for biological macromolecules such as proteins, which participate in virtually all biochemical processes. A three dimensional structural model of a protein is thus essential for the detailed understanding of its physiological function and the characterization of essential properties such as ligand binding and reaction mechanism. X-ray crystallography is a well-established technique that has been used for many years, but it is still by far the most widely used method for structure determination. A particular strength of this technique is the elucidation of atomic details of molecular interactions, thus providing an invaluable tool for a multitude of scientific projects ranging from the structural classification of macromolecules over the validation of enzymatic mechanisms or the understanding of host-pathogen interactions to structure-guided drug design. In the first part of this review, we describe essential methodological and practical aspects of X-ray crystallography. We provide some pointers that should allow researchers without a background in structural biology to assess the overall quality and reliability of a crystal structure. To highlight its potential, we then survey the impact X-ray crystallography has had on advancing an understanding of a class of enzymes that modify the bacterial cell wall. A substantial number of different bacterial amidase structures have been solved, mostly by X-ray crystallography. Comparison of these structures highlights conserved as well as divergent features. In combination with functional analyses, structural information on these enzymes has therefore proven to be a valuable template not only for understanding their mechanism of catalysis, but also for targeted interference with substrate binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Biosynthesis of Bacterial Cellulose/Carboxylic Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Enzymatic Biofuel Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Lv

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Novel nanocomposites comprised of bacterial cellulose (BC with carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNTs incorporated into the BC matrix were prepared through a simple method of biosynthesis. The biocathode and bioanode for the enzyme biological fuel cell (EBFC were prepared using BC/c-MWCNTs composite injected by laccase (Lac and glucose oxidase (GOD with the aid of glutaraldehyde (GA crosslinking. Biosynthesis of BC/c-MWCNTs composite was characterized by digital photos, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR. The experimental results indicated the successful incorporation of c-MWCNTs into the BC. The electrochemical and biofuel performance were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV. The power density and current density of EBFCs were recorded at 32.98 µW/cm3 and 0.29 mA/cm3, respectively. Additionally, the EBFCs also showed acceptable stability. Preliminary tests on double cells indicated that renewable BC have great potential in the application field of EBFCs.

  3. Role of Sulfhydryl Sites on Bacterial Cell Walls in the Biosorption, Mobility and Bioavailability of Mercury and Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myneni, Satish C. B. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences; Fein, Jeremy [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences; Mishra, Bhoopesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-16

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in a wide-range of low temperature aqueous systems, and can strongly affect the distribution and transport of metals and radionuclides in the environment. However, the role of metal adsorption onto bacteria, via the reactive cell wall functional groups, has been largely overlooked. Previous macroscale metal sorption, and XAS studies have shown that carboxyl and phosphoryl functional groups to be the important metal binding groups on bacterial cell walls and the sulfhydryl groups were not considered. The goal of our investigation was to evaluate the density of the sulfhydryl sites on different bacterial cell membranes that are common to soil systems, the binding affinities of these reactive groups towards Hg, and how this binding modifies the speciation of Hg in the natural waters.

  4. Softness of the bacterial cell wall of Streptococcus mitis as probed by microelectrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, VV; Busscher, HJ; Norde, W; van der Mei, HC

    Chemical and structural complexity of bacterial cell surfaces complicate accurate quantification of cell surfaces properties. The presence of fibrils, fimbriae or other surface appendages on bacterial cell surfaces largely influence those properties and would therefore play a major function in

  5. Softness of the bacterial cell wall of Streptococcus mitis as probed by micro-electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vadillo-Rodriguez, V.; Busscher, H.J.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2002-01-01

    Chemical and structural complexity of bacterial cell surfaces complicate accurate quantification of cell surfaces properties. The presence of fibrils, fimbriae or other surface appendages on bacterial cell surfaces largely influence those properties and would therefore play a major function in

  6. Sensing the Structural Differences in Cellulose from Apple and Bacterial Cell Wall Materials by Raman and FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska-Chargot, Monika; Cybulska, Justyna; Zdunek, Artur

    2011-01-01

    Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used for assessment of structural differences of celluloses of various origins. Investigated celluloses were: bacterial celluloses cultured in presence of pectin and/or xyloglucan, as well as commercial celluloses and cellulose extracted from apple parenchyma. FT-IR spectra were used to estimate of the Iβ content, whereas Raman spectra were used to evaluate the degree of crystallinity of the cellulose. The crystallinity index (XCRAMAN%) varied from −25% for apple cellulose to 53% for microcrystalline commercial cellulose. Considering bacterial cellulose, addition of xyloglucan has an impact on the percentage content of cellulose Iβ. However, addition of only xyloglucan or only pectins to pure bacterial cellulose both resulted in a slight decrease of crystallinity. However, culturing bacterial cellulose in the presence of mixtures of xyloglucan and pectins results in an increase of crystallinity. The results confirmed that the higher degree of crystallinity, the broader the peak around 913 cm−1. Among all bacterial celluloses the bacterial cellulose cultured in presence of xyloglucan and pectin (BCPX) has the most similar structure to those observed in natural primary cell walls. PMID:22163913

  7. Hierarchical architecture of bacterial cellulose and composite plant cell wall polysaccharide hydrogels using small angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sanz, Marta; Gidley, Michael J; Gilbert, Elliot P

    2016-02-07

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been applied to characterise the structure of pure bacterial cellulose hydrogels, and composites thereof, with two plant cell wall polysaccharides (arabinoxylan and xyloglucan). Conventional published models, which assume that bacterial cellulose ribbons are solid one-phase systems, fail to adequately describe the SANS data of pure bacterial cellulose. Fitting of the neutron scattering profiles instead suggests that the sub-structure of cellulose microfibrils contained within the ribbons results in the creation of regions with distinct values of neutron scattering length density, when the hydrogels are subjected to H2O/D2O exchange. This may be represented within a core-shell formalism that considers the cellulose ribbons to comprise a core containing impermeable crystallites surrounded by a network of paracrystalline cellulose and tightly bound water, and a shell containing only paracrystalline cellulose and water. Accordingly, a fitting function comprising the sum of a power-law term to account for the large scale structure of intertwined ribbons, plus a core-shell cylinder with polydisperse radius, has been applied; it is demonstrated to simultaneously describe all SANS contrast variation data of pure and composite bacterial cellulose hydrogels. In addition, the resultant fitting parameters indicate distinct interaction mechanisms of arabinoxylan and xyloglucan with cellulose, revealing the potential of this approach to investigate the role of different plant cell wall polysaccharides on the biosynthesis process of cellulose.

  8. Response Mechanisms of Bacterial Degraders to Environmental Contaminants on the Level of Cell Walls and Cytoplasmic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomíra Murínová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial strains living in the environment must cope with the toxic compounds originating from humans production. Surface bacterial structures, cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, surround each bacterial cell and create selective barriers between the cell interior and the outside world. They are a first site of contact between the cell and toxic compounds. Organic pollutants are able to penetrate into cytoplasmic membrane and affect membrane physiological functions. Bacteria had to evolve adaptation mechanisms to counteract the damage originated from toxic contaminants and to prevent their accumulation in cell. This review deals with various adaptation mechanisms of bacterial cell concerning primarily the changes in cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall. Cell adaptation maintains the membrane fluidity status and ratio between bilayer/nonbilayer phospholipids as well as the efflux of toxic compounds, protein repair mechanisms, and degradation of contaminants. Low energy consumption of cell adaptation is required to provide other physiological functions. Bacteria able to survive in toxic environment could help us to clean contaminated areas when they are used in bioremediation technologies.

  9. Response mechanisms of bacterial degraders to environmental contaminants on the level of cell walls and cytoplasmic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murínová, Slavomíra; Dercová, Katarína

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial strains living in the environment must cope with the toxic compounds originating from humans production. Surface bacterial structures, cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, surround each bacterial cell and create selective barriers between the cell interior and the outside world. They are a first site of contact between the cell and toxic compounds. Organic pollutants are able to penetrate into cytoplasmic membrane and affect membrane physiological functions. Bacteria had to evolve adaptation mechanisms to counteract the damage originated from toxic contaminants and to prevent their accumulation in cell. This review deals with various adaptation mechanisms of bacterial cell concerning primarily the changes in cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall. Cell adaptation maintains the membrane fluidity status and ratio between bilayer/nonbilayer phospholipids as well as the efflux of toxic compounds, protein repair mechanisms, and degradation of contaminants. Low energy consumption of cell adaptation is required to provide other physiological functions. Bacteria able to survive in toxic environment could help us to clean contaminated areas when they are used in bioremediation technologies.

  10. softinex, inlib, exlib, ourex, ioda, g4view, g4exa, wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrand, Guy

    2014-06-01

    Softinex names a software environment targeted to do data analysis and visualization. It covers the C++ inlib and exlib "header only" libraries that permit, through GL-ES and a maximum of common code, to build applications deliverable on the Apple AppStore (iOS), GooglePlay (Android), traditional laptops/desktops under MacOSX, Linux and Windows, but also deliverable as a web service able to display in various web browsers compatible with WebGL. In this paper we explain the coarse graining ideas, choices, code organization of softinex along a short presentation of some applications done so far (ioda, g4view, etc...). At end we present the "wall" programs that permit to visualize HEP data (plots, geometries, events) on a large display surface done with an assembly of screens driven by a set of computers. The web portal for softinex is http://softinex.lal.in2p3.fr.

  11. Role of Sulfhydryl Sites on Bacterial Cell Walls in the Biosorption, Mobility and Bioavailability of Mercury and Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myneni, Satish C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Mishra, Bhoopesh [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Fein, Jeremy [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2009-04-01

    almost complete removal of Hg from the experimental solutions at relatively low bacterial concentrations. Synchrotron based X-ray spectroscopic studies of these samples indicate that the structure and the coordination environment of Hg surface complexes on bacterial cell walls change dramatically- with sulfhydryls as the dominant Hg-binding groups in the micromolar and submicromolar range, and carboxyls and phosphoryls dominating at high micromolar concentrations. Hg interactions change from a trigonal or T-shaped HgS{sub 3} complex to HgS or HgS{sub 2} type complexes as the Hg concentration increases in the submicromolar range. Although all bacterial species studied exhibited the same types of coordination environments for Hg, the relative concentrations of the complexes change as a function of Hg concentration.

  12. Sub-hectare crop area mapped wall-to-wall in Tigray Ethiopia with HEC processing of WorldView sub-meter panchromatic image texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neigh, C. S. R.; Carroll, M.; Wooten, M.; McCarty, J. L.; Powell, B.; Husak, G. J.; Enenkel, M.; Hain, C.

    2017-12-01

    Global food production in the developing world occurs within sub-hectare fields that are difficult to identify with moderate resolution satellite imagery. Knowledge about the distribution of these fields is critical in food security programs. We developed a semi-automated image segmentation approach using wall-to-wall sub-meter imagery with high-end computing (HEC) to map crop area (CA) throughout Tigray, Ethiopia that encompasses over 41,000 km2. Our approach tested multiple HEC processing streams to reduce processing time and minimize mapping error. We applied multiple resolution smoothing kernels to capture differences in land surface texture associated to CA. Typically, very-small fields (mean food security programs. We produced a 2011 ‒ 2015 CA map using over 3,000 WorldView-1 panchromatic images wall-to-wall in 1/2° mosaics for Tigray, Ethiopia in 1 week. We evaluated CA estimates with nearly 3,000 WorldView-2 2 m multispectral 250 × 250 m image subsets, with seven expert interpretations, and with in-situ global positioning system (GPS) photography. Our CA estimates ranged from 32 to 41% in sub-regions of Tigray with median maximum per bin commission and omission errors of 11% and 1% respectively, with most of the error occurring in bins less than 15%. This empirical, simple, and low direct cost approach via U.S. government license agreement and HEC could be a viable big-data methodology to extract wall-to-wall CA for other regions of the world that have very-small agriculture fields with similar image texture.

  13. Insights into Substrate Specificity of NlpC/P60 Cell Wall Hydrolases Containing Bacterial SH3 Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-09-15

    ABSTRACT

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. These enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting of two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.

    IMPORTANCEPeptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural

  14. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Narusaka

    Full Text Available Housaku Monogatari (HM is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods.

  15. Pectin and Xyloglucan Influence the Attachment of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes to Bacterial Cellulose-Derived Plant Cell Wall Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michelle S F; Rahman, Sadequr; Dykes, Gary A

    2016-01-15

    Minimally processed fresh produce has been implicated as a major source of foodborne microbial pathogens globally. These pathogens must attach to the produce in order to be transmitted. Cut surfaces of produce that expose cell walls are particularly vulnerable. Little is known about the roles that different structural components (cellulose, pectin, and xyloglucan) of plant cell walls play in the attachment of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Using bacterial cellulose-derived plant cell wall models, we showed that the presence of pectin alone or xyloglucan alone affected the attachment of three Salmonella enterica strains (Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 13076, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and Salmonella enterica subsp. indica M4) and Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644. In addition, we showed that this effect was modulated in the presence of both polysaccharides. Assays using pairwise combinations of S. Typhimurium ATCC 14028 and L. monocytogenes ATCC 7644 showed that bacterial attachment to all plant cell wall models was dependent on the characteristics of the individual bacterial strains and was not directly proportional to the initial concentration of the bacterial inoculum. This work showed that bacterial attachment was not determined directly by the plant cell wall model or bacterial physicochemical properties. We suggest that attachment of the Salmonella strains may be influenced by the effects of these polysaccharides on physical and structural properties of the plant cell wall model. Our findings improve the understanding of how Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes attach to plant cell walls, which may facilitate the development of better ways to prevent the attachment of these pathogens to such surfaces. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Mechanosensitive channels and bacterial cell wall integrity: Does life end with a bang or a whimper?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Reuter (Marcel); N.J. Hayward (Nicholas); S.S. Black (Susan); S. Miller (Samantha); D.T.F. Dryden (David); I.R. Booth (Ian)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMechanogated channels are fundamental components of bacterial cells that enable retention of physical integrity during extreme increases in cell turgor. Optical tweezers combined with microfluidics have been used to study the fate of individual Escherichia coli cells lacking such

  17. The writing is on the wall: medical students express their views and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students often write messages on toilet walls. Some of these messages are derogatory, but some express their anguish, and reflect the challenges that they face while training. In this brief report, three messages, chosen from many which were written on public bathroom walls by medical students at one of the universities in ...

  18. Murein and pseudomurein cell wall binding domains of bacteria and archaea-a comparative view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visweswaran, Ganesh Ram R.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Kok, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall, a major barrier protecting cells from their environment, is an essential compartment of both bacteria and archaea. It protects the organism from internal turgor pressure and gives a defined shape to the cell. The cell wall serves also as an anchoring surface for various proteins and

  19. Substrate Shift Reveals Roles for Members of Bacterial Consortia in Degradation of Plant Cell Wall Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Camila; Fan, Huan; Currie, Cameron R

    2018-01-01

    Deconstructing the intricate matrix of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin poses a major challenge in biofuel production. In diverse environments in nature, some microbial communities, are able to overcome plant biomass recalcitrance. Identifying key degraders of each component of plant cell wall can help improve biological degradation of plant feedstock. Here, we sequenced the metagenome of lignocellulose-adapted microbial consortia sub-cultured on xylan and alkali lignin media. We observed a drastic shift on community composition after sub-culturing, independently of the original consortia. Proteobacteria relative abundance increased after growth in alkali lignin medium, while Bacteroidetes abundance increased after growth in xylan medium. At the genus level, Pseudomonas was more abundant in the communities growing on alkali lignin, Sphingobacterium in the communities growing on xylan and Cellulomonas abundance was the highest in the original microbial consortia. We also observed functional convergence of microbial communities after incubation in alkali lignin, due to an enrichment of genes involved in benzoate degradation and catechol ortho-cleavage pathways. Our results represent an important step toward the elucidation of key members of microbial communities on lignocellulose degradation and may aide the design of novel lignocellulolytic microbial consortia that are able to efficiently degrade plant cell wall polymers.

  20. Substrate Shift Reveals Roles for Members of Bacterial Consortia in Degradation of Plant Cell Wall Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Carlos

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Deconstructing the intricate matrix of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin poses a major challenge in biofuel production. In diverse environments in nature, some microbial communities, are able to overcome plant biomass recalcitrance. Identifying key degraders of each component of plant cell wall can help improve biological degradation of plant feedstock. Here, we sequenced the metagenome of lignocellulose-adapted microbial consortia sub-cultured on xylan and alkali lignin media. We observed a drastic shift on community composition after sub-culturing, independently of the original consortia. Proteobacteria relative abundance increased after growth in alkali lignin medium, while Bacteroidetes abundance increased after growth in xylan medium. At the genus level, Pseudomonas was more abundant in the communities growing on alkali lignin, Sphingobacterium in the communities growing on xylan and Cellulomonas abundance was the highest in the original microbial consortia. We also observed functional convergence of microbial communities after incubation in alkali lignin, due to an enrichment of genes involved in benzoate degradation and catechol ortho-cleavage pathways. Our results represent an important step toward the elucidation of key members of microbial communities on lignocellulose degradation and may aide the design of novel lignocellulolytic microbial consortia that are able to efficiently degrade plant cell wall polymers.

  1. The effect of radurization on the bacterial flora, safety and keeping quality of rough washed bovine ruminal wall (offal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heever, L.W. van den

    1977-01-01

    Rough washed bovine ruminal wall is available at low cost in many African countries to traditional consumers of such offal. The consumers consistently oppose any further cleaning or processing which would alter its appearance or elevate its cost. Such offal undoubtedly possesses high nutritional value but is highly perishable product contaminated with numerous bacteria some of which are potential pathogens or toxigens. A preliminary investigation showed that the bacterial counts could be reduced by more that 90% by gamma radiation of such offal with doses of 100-200 krad. Such radiation doubled or trebled the keeping quality of the offal at 4 0 C. Some of the organisms present in offal survive low doses of radiation. They were mainly species of the genera Bacillus, Micrococcus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus and Clostridium, some of which survived 600 krad. Irradiation doses of 600 krad were in any event necessary to numerically reduce experimental contamination of minced ruminal wall with Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella dublin and Clostridium perfringens to a level where these organisms could not be recovered by ordinary cultural procedures (the two strains of S. aureus tested varied in their radiation resistance). (orig.) [de

  2. Lateral flow assay-based bacterial detection using engineered cell wall binding domains of a phage endolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Minsuk; Shin, Joong Ho; Heu, Sunggi; Park, Je-Kyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2017-10-15

    The development of a cost-effective and efficient bacterial detection assay is essential for diagnostic fields, particularly in resource-poor settings. Although antibodies have been widely used for bacterial capture, the production of soluble antibodies is still expensive and time-consuming. Here, we developed a nitrocellulose-based lateral flow assay using cell wall binding domains (CBDs) from phage as a recognition element and colloidal gold nanoparticles as a colorimetric signal for the detection of a model pathogenic bacterium, Bacillus cereus (B. cereus). To improve conjugation efficiency and detection sensitivity, cysteine-glutathione-S-transferase-tagged CBDs and maltose-binding protein-tagged CBDs were produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and incorporated in our assays. The sensitivity of the strip to detect B. cereus was 1×10 4 CFU/mL and the overall assay time was 20min. The assay showed superior results compared to the antibody-based approach, and did not show any significant cross-reactivity. This proof of concept study indicates that the lateral flow assay using engineered CBDs hold considerable promise as simple, rapid, and cost-effective biosensors for whole cell detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Membrane Steps of Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis as Antibiotic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan is the major component of the cell envelope of virtually all bacteria. It has structural roles and acts as a selective sieve for molecules from the outer environment. Peptidoglycan synthesis is therefore one of the most important biogenesis pathways in bacteria and has been studied extensively over the last twenty years. The pathway starts in the cytoplasm, continues in the cytoplasmic membrane and finishes in the periplasmic space, where the precursor is polymerized into the peptidoglycan layer. A number of proteins involved in this pathway, such as the Mur enzymes and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs, have been studied and regarded as good targets for antibiotics. The present review focuses on the membrane steps of peptidoglycan synthesis that involve two enzymes, MraY and MurG, the inhibitors of these enzymes and the inhibition mechanisms. We also discuss the challenges of targeting these two cytoplasmic membrane (associated proteins in bacterial cells and the perspectives on how to overcome the issues.

  4. Detection of antibodies to bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan in human sera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heymer, B.; Schleifer, K.H.; Read, S.; Zabriskie, J.B.; Krause, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the measurement of antibodies to peptidoglycan in human sera including patients with rheumatic feaver and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The assay is based on the percentage of binding of the hapten 125 I-L-Ala-γ-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, the major peptide determinant of peptidoglycan. Because of differences in the avidity of the antibodies in different sera, the amount of antibody was expressed as pentapeptide hapten-binding capacity (pentapeptide-HBC in ng/ml of serum). Fourteen out of 105 normal blood donors had a pentapeptide-HBC value greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml serum. Values in healthy children 5 to 18 years of age were less than or equal to 50 ng/ml. Sixty-eight percent of the individuals with rheumatic fever had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml, an indication that streptococcal infections can stimulate an immune response to peptidoglycan. Thirty-five percent of the patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml. Such a finding points to a possible association between bacterial infections and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

  5. A Clostridium difficile Cell Wall Glycopolymer Locus Influences Bacterial Shape, Polysaccharide Production and Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Chu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a diarrheagenic pathogen associated with significant mortality and morbidity. While its glucosylating toxins are primary virulence determinants, there is increasing appreciation of important roles for non-toxin factors in C. difficile pathogenesis. Cell wall glycopolymers (CWGs influence the virulence of various pathogens. Five C. difficile CWGs, including PSII, have been structurally characterized, but their biosynthesis and significance in C. difficile infection is unknown. We explored the contribution of a conserved CWG locus to C. difficile cell-surface integrity and virulence. Attempts at disrupting multiple genes in the locus, including one encoding a predicted CWG exporter mviN, were unsuccessful, suggesting essentiality of the respective gene products. However, antisense RNA-mediated mviN downregulation resulted in slight morphology defects, retarded growth, and decreased surface PSII deposition. Two other genes, lcpA and lcpB, with putative roles in CWG anchoring, could be disrupted by insertional inactivation. lcpA- and lcpB- mutants had distinct phenotypes, implying non-redundant roles for the respective proteins. The lcpB- mutant was defective in surface PSII deposition and shedding, and exhibited a remodeled cell surface characterized by elongated and helical morphology, aberrantly-localized cell septae, and an altered surface-anchored protein profile. Both lcpA- and lcpB- strains also displayed heightened virulence in a hamster model of C. difficile disease. We propose that gene products of the C. difficile CWG locus are essential, that they direct the production/assembly of key antigenic surface polysaccharides, and thereby have complex roles in virulence.

  6. The bacterial tubulin FtsZ requires its intrinsically disordered linker to direct robust cell wall construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Kousik; Miguel, Amanda; Desmarais, Samantha M; Meier, Elizabeth L; Casey Huang, Kerwyn; Goley, Erin D

    2015-06-23

    The bacterial GTPase FtsZ forms a cytokinetic ring at midcell, recruits the division machinery and orchestrates membrane and peptidoglycan cell wall invagination. However, the mechanism for FtsZ regulation of peptidoglycan metabolism is unknown. The FtsZ GTPase domain is separated from its membrane-anchoring C-terminal conserved (CTC) peptide by a disordered C-terminal linker (CTL). Here we investigate CTL function in Caulobacter crescentus. Strikingly, production of FtsZ lacking the CTL (ΔCTL) is lethal: cells become filamentous, form envelope bulges and lyse, resembling treatment with β-lactam antibiotics. This phenotype is produced by FtsZ polymers bearing the CTC and a CTL shorter than 14 residues. Peptidoglycan synthesis still occurs downstream of ΔCTL; however, cells expressing ΔCTL exhibit reduced peptidoglycan crosslinking and longer glycan strands than wild type. Importantly, midcell proteins are still recruited to sites of ΔCTL assembly. We propose that FtsZ regulates peptidoglycan metabolism through a CTL-dependent mechanism that extends beyond simple protein recruitment.

  7. A comparison of multi-view 3D reconstruction of a rock wall using several cameras and a laser scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Thoeni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a comparative study between multi-view 3D reconstruction using various digital cameras and a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS. Five different digital cameras were used in order to estimate the limits related to the camera type and to establish the minimum camera requirements to obtain comparable results to the ones of the TLS. The cameras used for this study range from commercial grade to professional grade and included a GoPro Hero 1080 (5 Mp, iPhone 4S (8 Mp, Panasonic Lumix LX5 (9.5 Mp, Panasonic Lumix ZS20 (14.1 Mp and Canon EOS 7D (18 Mp. The TLS used for this work was a FARO Focus 3D laser scanner with a range accuracy of ±2 mm. The study area is a small rock wall of about 6 m height and 20 m length. The wall is partly smooth with some evident geological features, such as non-persistent joints and sharp edges. Eight control points were placed on the wall and their coordinates were measured by using a total station. These coordinates were then used to georeference all models. A similar number of images was acquired from a distance of between approximately 5 to 10 m, depending on field of view of each camera. The commercial software package PhotoScan was used to process the images, georeference and scale the models, and to generate the dense point clouds. Finally, the open-source package CloudCompare was used to assess the accuracy of the multi-view results. Each point cloud obtained from a specific camera was compared to the point cloud obtained with the TLS. The latter is taken as ground truth. The result is a coloured point cloud for each camera showing the deviation in relation to the TLS data. The main goal of this study is to quantify the quality of the multi-view 3D reconstruction results obtained with various cameras as objectively as possible and to evaluate its applicability to geotechnical problems.

  8. Pyrosequencing Reveals Bacterial Communities in Unchlorinated Drinking Water Distribution System: An Integral Study of Bulk Water, Suspended Solids, Loose Deposits, and Pipe Wall Biofilm

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, G.

    2014-05-20

    The current understanding of drinking water distribution system (DWDS) microbiology is limited to pipe wall biofilm and bulk water; the contributions of particle-associated bacteria (from suspended solids and loose deposits) have long been neglected. Analyzing the composition and correlation of bacterial communities from different phases helped us to locate where most of the bacteria are and understand the interactions among these phases. In the present study, the bacteria from four critical phases of an unchlorinated DWDS, including bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, suspended solids, and loose deposits, were quantified and identified by adenosine triphosphate analysis and pyrosequencing, respectively. The results showed that the bulk water bacteria (including the contribution of suspended solids) contributed less than 2% of the total bacteria. The bacteria associated with loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm that accumulated in the DWDS accounted for over 98% of the total bacteria, and the contributions of bacteria in loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm were comparable. Depending on the amount of loose deposits, its contribution can be 7-fold higher than the pipe wall biofilm. Pyrosequencing revealed relatively stable bacterial communities in bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, and suspended solids throughout the distribution system; however, the communities present in loose deposits were dependent on the amount of loose deposits locally. Bacteria within the phases of suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm were similar in phylogenetic composition. The bulk water bacteria (dominated by Polaromonas spp.) were clearly different from the bacteria from the other three phases (dominated by Sphingomonas spp.). This study highlighted that the integral DWDS ecology should include contributions from all of the four phases, especially the bacteria harbored by loose deposits. The accumulation of loose deposits and the aging process create variable microenvironments

  9. Pyrosequencing reveals bacterial communities in unchlorinated drinking water distribution system: an integral study of bulk water, suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Bakker, G L; Li, S; Vreeburg, J H G; Verberk, J Q J C; Medema, G J; Liu, W T; Van Dijk, J C

    2014-05-20

    The current understanding of drinking water distribution system (DWDS) microbiology is limited to pipe wall biofilm and bulk water; the contributions of particle-associated bacteria (from suspended solids and loose deposits) have long been neglected. Analyzing the composition and correlation of bacterial communities from different phases helped us to locate where most of the bacteria are and understand the interactions among these phases. In the present study, the bacteria from four critical phases of an unchlorinated DWDS, including bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, suspended solids, and loose deposits, were quantified and identified by adenosine triphosphate analysis and pyrosequencing, respectively. The results showed that the bulk water bacteria (including the contribution of suspended solids) contributed less than 2% of the total bacteria. The bacteria associated with loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm that accumulated in the DWDS accounted for over 98% of the total bacteria, and the contributions of bacteria in loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm were comparable. Depending on the amount of loose deposits, its contribution can be 7-fold higher than the pipe wall biofilm. Pyrosequencing revealed relatively stable bacterial communities in bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, and suspended solids throughout the distribution system; however, the communities present in loose deposits were dependent on the amount of loose deposits locally. Bacteria within the phases of suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm were similar in phylogenetic composition. The bulk water bacteria (dominated by Polaromonas spp.) were clearly different from the bacteria from the other three phases (dominated by Sphingomonas spp.). This study highlighted that the integral DWDS ecology should include contributions from all of the four phases, especially the bacteria harbored by loose deposits. The accumulation of loose deposits and the aging process create variable microenvironments

  10. Bacterial wall products induce downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors on endothelial cells via a CD14-dependent mechanism: implications for surgical wound healing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogenic cytokine which has been identified as the principal polypeptide growth factor influencing endothelial cell (EC) migration and proliferation. Ordered progression of these two processes is an absolute prerequisite for initiating and maintaining the proliferative phase of wound healing. The response of ECs to circulating VEGF is determined by, and directly proportional to, the functional expression of VEGF receptors (KDR\\/Flt-1) on the EC surface membrane. Systemic sepsis and wound contamination due to bacterial infection are associated with significant retardation of the proliferative phase of wound repair. The effects of the Gram-negative bacterial wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) on VEGF receptor function and expression are unknown and may represent an important biological mechanism predisposing to delayed wound healing in the presence of localized or systemic sepsis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a series of in vitro experiments investigating this phenomenon and its potential implications for infective wound repair. VEGF receptor density on ECs in the presence of LPS and BLP was assessed using flow cytometry. These parameters were assessed in hypoxic conditions as well as in normoxia. The contribution of CD14 was evaluated using recombinant human (rh) CD14. EC proliferation in response to VEGF was quantified in the presence and absence of LPS and BLP. RESULTS: Flow cytometric analysis revealed that LPS and BLP have profoundly repressive effects on VEGF receptor density in normoxic and, more pertinently, hypoxic conditions. The observed downregulation of constitutive and inducible VEGF receptor expression on ECs was not due to any directly cytotoxic effect of LPS and BLP on ECs, as measured by cell viability and apoptosis assays. We identified a pivotal role for soluble\\/serum CD14, a highly specific bacterial wall product receptor, in

  11. Multi-view multi-class classification for identification of pathogenic bacterial strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsivtsivadze, E.; Heskes, T.; Paauw, A.

    2013-01-01

    In various learning problems data can be available in different representations, often referred to as views. We propose multi-class classification method that is particularly suitable for multi-view learning setting. The algorithm uses co-regularization and error-correcting techniques to leverage

  12. G(ANH)MTETRA, A NATURAL BACTERIAL-CELL WALL BREAKDOWN PRODUCT, INDUCES INTERLEUKIN-1-BETA AND INTERLEUKIN-6 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN MONOCYTES - A STUDY OF THE MOLECULAR MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINE EXPRESSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOKTER, WHA; DIJKSTRA, AJ; KOOPMANS, SB; STULP, BK; KECK, W; HALIE, MR; VELLENGA, E

    1994-01-01

    It is believed that induction of cytokine expression by bacterial cell wall components plays a role in the development and course of sepsis. However, most attention has been focused on lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We studied the ability of

  13. Dissecting Bacterial Cell Wall Entry and Signaling in Eukaryotic Cells: an Actin-Dependent Pathway Parallels Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Lip Nam; Gao, Geli; Tuomanen, Elaine I

    2017-01-03

    The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall (CW) peptidoglycan-teichoic acid complex is released into the host environment during bacterial metabolism or death. It is a highly inflammatory Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand, and previous in vivo studies have demonstrated its ability to recapitulate pathological features of pneumonia and meningitis. We report that an actin-dependent pathway is involved in the internalization of the CW by epithelial and endothelial cells, in addition to the previously described platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr)-dependent uptake pathway. Unlike the PAFr-dependent pathway, which is mediated by clathrin and dynamin and does not lead to signaling, the alternative pathway is sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and engenders Rac1, Cdc42, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Upon internalization by this macropinocytosis-like pathway, CW is trafficked to lysosomes. Intracellular CW trafficking is more complex than previously recognized and suggests multiple points of interaction with and without innate immune signaling. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen infecting the respiratory tract and brain. It is an established model organism for understanding how infection injures the host. During infection or bacterial growth, bacteria shed their cell wall (CW) into the host environment and trigger inflammation. A previous study has shown that CW enters and crosses cell barriers by interacting with a receptor on the surfaces of host cells, termed platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr). In the present study, by using cells that are depleted of PAFr, we identified a second pathway with features of macropinocytosis, which is a receptor-independent fluid uptake mechanism by cells. Each pathway contributes approximately the same amount of cell wall trafficking, but the PAFr pathway is silent, while the new pathway appears to contribute to the host inflammatory response to CW insult. Copyright © 2017

  14. Disinfectants - bacterial cells interactions in the view of hygiene and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Książczyk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of biocides has increased rapidly. One common example is triclosan, with wide application in households as well as medical and industrial fields, especially food industry and animal husbandry. Chemical disinfection is a major mean to control and eliminate pathogenic bacteria, particularly those with multidrug resistance (MDR phenotype. However, exposition to biocides results in an adaptive response in microorganisms, causing them to display a wide range of resistance mechanisms. Numerous microorganisms are characterized by either natural resistance to chemical compounds or an ability to adapt to biocides using various strategies, such as: modification of cell surface structures (lipopolisaccharide, membrane fatty acids, over-expression of efflux pumps (a system for active transport of toxic compounds out of bacterial cell, enzymatic inactivation of biocides or altering biocide targets. For instance, it was shown that in vitro exposition of Salmonella Typhimurium to subinhibitory concentration of biocides (triclosan, quaternary ammonium compounds [QACs] resulted in selection of variants resistant to tested biocides and, additionally, to acridine dyes and antibiotics. Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus strains isolated from chlorine dioxide containing disinfection devices were found to be resistant to chlorine dioxide and also to other oxidizing compounds, such as peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Interaction between chemical compounds, including disinfectants and microbial cells, can create a serious threat to public health and sanitary-hygienic security. This phenomenon is connected with factor risk that intensify the probability of selection and dissemination of multidrug resistance among pathogenic bacteria.

  15. A bacterial view of the periodic table: genes and proteins for toxic inorganic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Simon; Phung, Le T

    2005-12-01

    Essentially all bacteria have genes for toxic metal ion resistances and these include those for Ag+, AsO2-, AsO4(3-), Cd2+ Co2+, CrO4(2-), Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, TeO3(2-), Tl+ and Zn2+. The largest group of resistance systems functions by energy-dependent efflux of toxic ions. Fewer involve enzymatic transformations (oxidation, reduction, methylation, and demethylation) or metal-binding proteins (for example, metallothionein SmtA, chaperone CopZ and periplasmic silver binding protein SilE). Some of the efflux resistance systems are ATPases and others are chemiosmotic ion/proton exchangers. For example, Cd2+-efflux pumps of bacteria are either inner membrane P-type ATPases or three polypeptide RND chemiosmotic complexes consisting of an inner membrane pump, a periplasmic-bridging protein and an outer membrane channel. In addition to the best studied three-polypeptide chemiosmotic system, Czc (Cd2+, Zn2+, and Co2), others are known that efflux Ag+, Cu+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Resistance to inorganic mercury, Hg2+ (and to organomercurials, such as CH3Hg+ and phenylmercury) involve a series of metal-binding and membrane transport proteins as well as the enzymes mercuric reductase and organomercurial lyase, which overall convert more toxic to less toxic forms. Arsenic resistance and metabolizing systems occur in three patterns, the widely-found ars operon that is present in most bacterial genomes and many plasmids, the more recently recognized arr genes for the periplasmic arsenate reductase that functions in anaerobic respiration as a terminal electron acceptor, and the aso genes for the periplasmic arsenite oxidase that functions as an initial electron donor in aerobic resistance to arsenite.

  16. N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Primes Plants for Cell Wall Reinforcement and Induces Resistance to Bacterial Pathogens via the Salicylic Acid/Oxylipin Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Sebastian T; Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Samans, Birgit; Stein, Elke; Neumann, Christina; Schikora, Marek; Reichelt, Michael; Mithöfer, Axel; Becker, Annette; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2014-06-01

    The ability of plants to monitor their surroundings, for instance the perception of bacteria, is of crucial importance. The perception of microorganism-derived molecules and their effector proteins is the best understood of these monitoring processes. In addition, plants perceive bacterial quorum sensing (QS) molecules used for cell-to-cell communication between bacteria. Here, we propose a mechanism for how N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), a group of QS molecules, influence host defense and fortify resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against bacterial pathogens. N-3-oxo-tetradecanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (oxo-C14-HSL) primed plants for enhanced callose deposition, accumulation of phenolic compounds, and lignification of cell walls. Moreover, increased levels of oxylipins and salicylic acid favored closure of stomata in response to Pseudomonas syringae infection. The AHL-induced resistance seems to differ from the systemic acquired and the induced systemic resistances, providing new insight into inter-kingdom communication. Consistent with the observation that short-chain AHLs, unlike oxo-C14-HSL, promote plant growth, treatments with C6-HSL, oxo-C10-HSL, or oxo-C14-HSL resulted in different transcriptional profiles in Arabidopsis. Understanding the priming induced by bacterial QS molecules augments our knowledge of plant reactions to bacteria and suggests strategies for using beneficial bacteria in plant protection. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Mitigation of membrane biofouling by d-amino acids: Effect of bacterial cell-wall property and d-amino acid type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si-Yu; Sun, Xue-Fei; Gao, Wen-Jing; Wang, Yi-Fu; Jiang, Bei-Bei; Afzal, Muhammad Zaheer; Song, Chao; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2018-04-01

    Development of novel approaches for biofouling mitigation is of crucial importance for membrane-based technologies. d-amino acids (d-AAs) have been proposed as a potential strategy to mitigate biofouling. However, the effect of bacterial cell-wall properties and d-AAs type on biofouling mitigation remains unclear. This study assesses the effect of d-AAs type on membrane biofouling control, towards Gram positive (G+) and Gram negative (G-) bacteria. Three kinds of d-AAs were found to inhibit both G+ and G- bacterial attachment in short-term attachment and dead-end filtration experiments. The existence of d-AAs reduces extracellular polysaccharides and proteins on the membrane, which may decrease membrane biofouling. Cross-flow filtration tests further indicated that d-AAs could effectively reduce membrane biofouling. The permeate flux recovery post chemical cleaning, improved for both P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis treated with d-AAs. The results obtained from this study enable better understanding of the role of d-AAs species on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. This may provide a new way to regulate biofilm formation by manipulating the species of d-AAs membrane systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Unprecedented high-resolution view of bacterial operon architecture revealed by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Tyrrell; Creecy, James P; Maddox, Scott M; Grissom, Joe E; Conkle, Trevor L; Shadid, Tyler M; Teramoto, Jun; San Miguel, Phillip; Shimada, Tomohiro; Ishihama, Akira; Mori, Hirotada; Wanner, Barry L

    2014-07-08

    We analyzed the transcriptome of Escherichia coli K-12 by strand-specific RNA sequencing at single-nucleotide resolution during steady-state (logarithmic-phase) growth and upon entry into stationary phase in glucose minimal medium. To generate high-resolution transcriptome maps, we developed an organizational schema which showed that in practice only three features are required to define operon architecture: the promoter, terminator, and deep RNA sequence read coverage. We precisely annotated 2,122 promoters and 1,774 terminators, defining 1,510 operons with an average of 1.98 genes per operon. Our analyses revealed an unprecedented view of E. coli operon architecture. A large proportion (36%) of operons are complex with internal promoters or terminators that generate multiple transcription units. For 43% of operons, we observed differential expression of polycistronic genes, despite being in the same operons, indicating that E. coli operon architecture allows fine-tuning of gene expression. We found that 276 of 370 convergent operons terminate inefficiently, generating complementary 3' transcript ends which overlap on average by 286 nucleotides, and 136 of 388 divergent operons have promoters arranged such that their 5' ends overlap on average by 168 nucleotides. We found 89 antisense transcripts of 397-nucleotide average length, 7 unannotated transcripts within intergenic regions, and 18 sense transcripts that completely overlap operons on the opposite strand. Of 519 overlapping transcripts, 75% correspond to sequences that are highly conserved in E. coli (>50 genomes). Our data extend recent studies showing unexpected transcriptome complexity in several bacteria and suggest that antisense RNA regulation is widespread. Importance: We precisely mapped the 5' and 3' ends of RNA transcripts across the E. coli K-12 genome by using a single-nucleotide analytical approach. Our resulting high-resolution transcriptome maps show that ca. one-third of E. coli operons are

  19. Antibacterial compounds of Canadian honeys target bacterial cell wall inducing phenotype changes, growth inhibition and cell lysis that resemble action of β-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2014-01-01

    Honeys show a desirable broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive and negative bacteria making antibacterial activity an intrinsic property of honey and a desirable source for new drug development. The cellular targets and underlying mechanism of action of honey antibacterial compounds remain largely unknown. To facilitate the target discovery, we employed a method of phenotypic profiling by directly comparing morphological changes in Escherichia coli induced by honeys to that of ampicillin, the cell wall-active β-lactam of known mechanism of action. Firstly, we demonstrated the purity of tested honeys from potential β-lactam contaminations using quantitative LC-ESI-MS. Exposure of log-phase E. coli to honey or ampicillin resulted in time- and concentration-dependent changes in bacterial cell shape with the appearance of filamentous phenotypes at sub-inhibitory concentrations and spheroplasts at the MBC. Cell wall destruction by both agents, clearly visible on microscopic micrographs, was accompanied by increased permeability of the lipopolysaccharide outer membrane as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). More than 90% E. coli exposed to honey or ampicillin became permeable to propidium iodide. Consistently with the FACS results, both honey-treated and ampicillin-treated E. coli cells released lipopolysaccharide endotoxins at comparable levels, which were significantly higher than controls (ptransformed with the ampicillin-resistance gene (β-lactamase) remained sensitive to honey, displayed the same level of cytotoxicity, cell shape changes and endotoxin release as ampicillin-sensitive cells. As expected, β-lactamase protected the host cell from antibacterial action of ampicillin. Thus, both honey and ampicillin induced similar structural changes to the cell wall and LPS and that this ability underlies antibacterial activities of both agents. Since the cell wall is critical for cell growth and survival, honey active compounds would be

  20. Overexpression of Rice Wall-Associated Kinase 25 (OsWAK25) Alters Resistance to Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkenrider, Mitch; Sharma, Rita; De Vleesschauwer, David; Tsao, Li; Zhang, Xuting; Chern, Mawsheng; Canlas, Patrick; Zuo, Shimin; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2016-01-01

    Wall-associated kinases comprise a sub-family of receptor-like kinases that function in plant growth and stress responses. Previous studies have shown that the rice wall-associated kinase, OsWAK25, interacts with a diverse set of proteins associated with both biotic and abiotic stress responses. Here, we show that wounding and BTH treatments induce OsWAK25 transcript expression in rice. We generated OsWAK25 overexpression lines and show that these lines exhibit a lesion mimic phenotype and enhanced expression of rice NH1 (NPR1 homolog 1), OsPAL2, PBZ1 and PR10. Furthermore, these lines show resistance to the hemibiotrophic pathogens, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and Magnaporthe oryzae, yet display increased susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Cochliobolus miyabeanus. PMID:26795719

  1. Bacterial Cell Wall Precursor Phosphatase Assays Using Thin-layer Chromatography (TLC) and High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Manuel; Otten, Christian; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2018-03-20

    Peptidoglycan encases the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane to protect the cell from lysis due to the turgor. The final steps of peptidoglycan synthesis require a membrane-anchored substrate called lipid II, in which the peptidoglycan subunit is linked to the carrier lipid undecaprenol via a pyrophosphate moiety. Lipid II is the target of glycopeptide antibiotics and several antimicrobial peptides, and is degraded by 'attacking' enzymes involved in bacterial competition to induce lysis. Here we describe two protocols using thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively, to assay the digestion of lipid II by phosphatases such as Colicin M or the LXG toxin protein TelC from Streptococcus intermedius . The TLC method can also monitor the digestion of undecaprenyl (pyro)phosphate, whereas the HPLC method allows to separate the di-, mono- or unphosphorylated disaccharide pentapeptide products of lipid II.

  2. Bacteria and bacterial DNA in atherosclerotic plaque and aneurysmal wall biopsies from patients with and without periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Armingohar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have reported an association between chronic periodontitis (CP and cardiovascular diseases. Detection of periodontopathogens, including red complex bacteria (RCB, in vascular lesions has suggested these bacteria to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms. Objective: In this study, we investigate bacteria and their DNA in vascular biopsies from patients with vascular diseases (VD; i.e. abdominal aortic aneurysms, atherosclerotic carotid, and common femoral arteries, with and without CP. Methods: DNA was extracted from vascular biopsies selected from 40 VD patients: 30 with CP and 10 without CP. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rDNA (V3-V5 was polymerase chain reaction (PCR-amplified, and the amplicons were cloned into Escherichia coli, sequenced, and classified (GenBank and the Human Oral Microbiome database. Species-specific primers were used for the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis. In addition, 10 randomly selected vascular biopsies from the CP group were subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM for visualization of bacteria. Checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization was performed to assess the presence of RCB in 10 randomly selected subgingival plaque samples from CP patients. Results: A higher load and mean diversity of bacteria were detected in vascular biopsies from VD patients with CP compared to those without CP. Enterobacteriaceae were frequently detected in vascular biopsies together with cultivable, commensal oral, and not-yet-cultured bacterial species. While 70% of the subgingival plaque samples from CP patients showed presence of RCB, only P. gingivalis was detected in one vascular biopsy. Bacterial cells were seen in all 10 vascular biopsies examined by SEM. Conclusions: A higher bacterial load and more diverse colonization were detected in VD lesions of CP patients as compared to patients without CP. This indicated that a multitude of bacterial species both

  3. Precision and sensitivity of the measurement of 15N enrichment in D-alanine from bacterial cell walls using positive/negative ion mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunlid, A.; Odham, G.; Findlay, R. H.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitive detection of cellular components from specific groups of microbes can be utilized as 'signatures' in the examination of microbial consortia from soils, sediments or biofilms. Utilizing capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and stereospecific derivatizing agents, D-alanine, a component localized in the prokaryotic (bacterial) cell wall, can be detected reproducibly. Enrichments of D-[15N]alanine determined in E. coli grown with [15N]ammonia can be determined with precision at 1.0 atom%. Chemical ionization with methane gas and the detection of negative ions (M - HF)- and (M - F or M + H - HF)- formed from the heptafluorobutyryl D-2 butanol ester of D-alanine allowed as little as 8 pg (90 fmol) to be detected reproducibly. This method can be utilized to define the metabolic activity in terms of 15N incorporation at the level of 10(3)-10(4) cells, as a function of the 15N-14N ratio.

  4. Atomic model of a cell-wall cross-linking enzyme in complex with an intact bacterial peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanda, Paul; Triboulet, Sébastien; Laguri, Cédric; Bougault, Catherine M; Ayala, Isabel; Callon, Morgane; Arthur, Michel; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-24

    The maintenance of bacterial cell shape and integrity is largely attributed to peptidoglycan, a highly cross-linked biopolymer. The transpeptidases that perform this cross-linking are important targets for antibiotics. Despite this biomedical importance, to date no structure of a protein in complex with an intact bacterial peptidoglycan has been resolved, primarily due to the large size and flexibility of peptidoglycan sacculi. Here we use solid-state NMR spectroscopy to derive for the first time an atomic model of an l,d-transpeptidase from Bacillus subtilis bound to its natural substrate, the intact B. subtilis peptidoglycan. Importantly, the model obtained from protein chemical shift perturbation data shows that both domains-the catalytic domain as well as the proposed peptidoglycan recognition domain-are important for the interaction and reveals a novel binding motif that involves residues outside of the classical enzymatic pocket. Experiments on mutants and truncated protein constructs independently confirm the binding site and the implication of both domains. Through measurements of dipolar-coupling derived order parameters of bond motion we show that protein binding reduces the flexibility of peptidoglycan. This first report of an atomic model of a protein-peptidoglycan complex paves the way for the design of new antibiotic drugs targeting l,d-transpeptidases. The strategy developed here can be extended to the study of a large variety of enzymes involved in peptidoglycan morphogenesis.

  5. Bacterial communities in pigmented biofilms formed on the sandstone bas-relief walls of the Bayon Temple, Angkor Thom, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumi, Asako; Li, Xianshu; Osuga, Yu; Kawashima, Arata; Gu, Ji-Dong; Nasu, Masao; Katayama, Yoko

    2013-01-01

    The Bayon temple in Angkor Thom, Cambodia has shown serious deterioration and is subject to the formation of various pigmented biofilms. Because biofilms are damaging the bas-reliefs, low reliefs engraved on the surface of sandstone, information about the microbial community within them is indispensable to control biofilm colonization. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of biofilm samples from the pigmented sandstone surfaces showed that the bacterial community members in the biofilms differed clearly from those in the air and had low sequence similarity to database sequences. Non-destructive sampling of biofilm revealed novel bacterial groups of predominantly Rubrobacter in salmon pink biofilm, Cyanobacteria in chrome green biofilm, Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi in signal violet biofilm, Chloroflexi in black gray biofilm, and Deinococcus-Thermus, Cyanobacteria, and Rubrobacter in blue green biofilm. Serial peeling-off of a thick biofilm by layers with adhesive sheets revealed a stratified structure: the blue-green biofilm, around which there was serious deterioration, was very rich in Cyanobacteria near the surface and Chloroflexi in deep layer below. Nitrate ion concentrations were high in the blue-green biofilm. The characteristic distribution of bacteria at different biofilm depths provides valuable information on not only the biofilm formation process but also the sandstone weathering process in the tropics.

  6. Dissecting Bacterial Cell Wall Entry and Signaling in Eukaryotic Cells: an Actin-Dependent Pathway Parallels Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lip Nam Loh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall (CW peptidoglycan-teichoic acid complex is released into the host environment during bacterial metabolism or death. It is a highly inflammatory Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 ligand, and previous in vivo studies have demonstrated its ability to recapitulate pathological features of pneumonia and meningitis. We report that an actin-dependent pathway is involved in the internalization of the CW by epithelial and endothelial cells, in addition to the previously described platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr-dependent uptake pathway. Unlike the PAFr-dependent pathway, which is mediated by clathrin and dynamin and does not lead to signaling, the alternative pathway is sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl amiloride (EIPA and engenders Rac1, Cdc42, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K signaling. Upon internalization by this macropinocytosis-like pathway, CW is trafficked to lysosomes. Intracellular CW trafficking is more complex than previously recognized and suggests multiple points of interaction with and without innate immune signaling.

  7. Arabidopsis wat1 (walls are thin1)-mediated resistance to the bacterial vascular pathogen, Ralstonia solanacearum, is accompanied by cross-regulation of salicylic acid and tryptophan metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denancé, Nicolas; Ranocha, Philippe; Oria, Nicolas; Barlet, Xavier; Rivière, Marie-Pierre; Yadeta, Koste A; Hoffmann, Laurent; Perreau, François; Clément, Gilles; Maia-Grondard, Alessandra; van den Berg, Grardy C M; Savelli, Bruno; Fournier, Sylvie; Aubert, Yann; Pelletier, Sandra; Thomma, Bart P H J; Molina, Antonio; Jouanin, Lise; Marco, Yves; Goffner, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of Arabidopsis WAT1 (Walls Are Thin1), a gene required for secondary cell-wall deposition, conferred broad-spectrum resistance to vascular pathogens, including the bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and the fungi Verticillium dahliae and Verticillium albo-atrum. Introduction of NahG, the bacterial salicylic acid (SA)-degrading salicylate hydroxylase gene, into the wat1 mutant restored full susceptibility to both R. solanacearum and X. campestris pv. campestris. Moreover, SA content was constitutively higher in wat1 roots, further supporting a role for SA in wat1-mediated resistance to vascular pathogens. By combining transcriptomic and metabolomic data, we demonstrated a general repression of indole metabolism in wat1-1 roots as shown by constitutive down-regulation of several genes encoding proteins of the indole glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway and reduced amounts of tryptophan (Trp), indole-3-acetic acid and neoglucobrassicin, the major form of indole glucosinolate in roots. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the wat1 mutant to R. solanacearum was partially restored when crossed with either the trp5 mutant, an over-accumulator of Trp, or Pro35S:AFB1-myc, in which indole-3-acetic acid signaling is constitutively activated. Our original hypothesis placed cell-wall modifications at the heart of the wat1 resistance phenotype. However, the results presented here suggest a mechanism involving root-localized metabolic channeling away from indole metabolites to SA as a central feature of wat1 resistance to R. solanacearum. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Women's Views and Experiences of the Triggers for Onset of Bacterial Vaginosis and Exacerbating Factors Associated with Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardi, Jade; Walker, Sandra; Mooney-Somers, Julie; Temple-Smith, Meredith; McNair, Ruth; Bellhouse, Clare; Fairley, Christopher; Chen, Marcus; Bradshaw, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection affecting women of childbearing age. While the aetiology and transmissibility of BV remain unclear, there is strong evidence to suggest an association between BV and sexual activity. This study explored women's views and experiences of the triggers for BV onset and factors associated with recurrence. A descriptive, social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty five women of varying sexual orientation who had experienced recurrent BV in the past five years took part in semi-structured interviews. The majority of women predominantly reported sexual contact triggered the onset of BV and sexual and non-sexual factors precipitated recurrence. Recurrence was most commonly referred to in terms of a 'flare-up' of symptoms. The majority of women did not think BV was a sexually transmitted infection however many reported being informed this by their clinician. Single women who attributed BV onset to sex with casual partners were most likely to display self-blame tendencies and to consider changing their future sexual behaviour. Women who have sex with women (WSW) were more inclined to believe their partner was responsible for the transmission of or reinfection with BV and seek partner treatment or change their sexual practices. Findings from this study strongly suggest women believe that BV onset is associated with sexual activity, concurring with epidemiological data which increasingly suggest BV may be sexually transmitted. Exacerbating factors associated with recurrence were largely heterogeneous and may reflect the fact it is difficult to determine whether recurrence is due to persistent BV or a new infection in women. There was however evidence to suggest possible transmission and reinfection among WSW, reinforcing the need for new approaches to treatment and management strategies including male and female partner treatment trials.

  9. Post-translational modifications of plant cell wall proteins and peptides: A survey from a proteomics point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) and peptides are important players in cell walls contributing to their assembly and their remodeling during development and in response to environmental constraints. Since the rise of proteomics technologies at the beginning of the 2000's, the knowledge of CWPs has greatly increased leading to the discovery of new CWP families and to the description of the cell wall proteomes of different organs of many plants. Conversely, cell wall peptidomics data are still lacking. In addition to the identification of CWPs and peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics, proteomics has allowed to describe their post-translational modifications (PTMs). At present, the best known PTMs consist in proteolytic cleavage, N-glycosylation, hydroxylation of P residues into hydroxyproline residues (O), O-glycosylation and glypiation. In this review, the methods allowing the capture of the modified proteins based on the specific properties of their PTMs as well as the MS technologies used for their characterization are briefly described. A focus is done on proteolytic cleavage leading to protein maturation or release of signaling peptides and on O-glycosylation. Some new technologies, like top-down proteomics and terminomics, are described. They aim at a finer description of proteoforms resulting from PTMs or degradation mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antibacterial compounds of Canadian honeys target bacterial cell wall inducing phenotype changes, growth inhibition and cell lysis that resemble action of β-lactam antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Brudzynski

    Full Text Available Honeys show a desirable broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive and negative bacteria making antibacterial activity an intrinsic property of honey and a desirable source for new drug development. The cellular targets and underlying mechanism of action of honey antibacterial compounds remain largely unknown. To facilitate the target discovery, we employed a method of phenotypic profiling by directly comparing morphological changes in Escherichia coli induced by honeys to that of ampicillin, the cell wall-active β-lactam of known mechanism of action. Firstly, we demonstrated the purity of tested honeys from potential β-lactam contaminations using quantitative LC-ESI-MS. Exposure of log-phase E. coli to honey or ampicillin resulted in time- and concentration-dependent changes in bacterial cell shape with the appearance of filamentous phenotypes at sub-inhibitory concentrations and spheroplasts at the MBC. Cell wall destruction by both agents, clearly visible on microscopic micrographs, was accompanied by increased permeability of the lipopolysaccharide outer membrane as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. More than 90% E. coli exposed to honey or ampicillin became permeable to propidium iodide. Consistently with the FACS results, both honey-treated and ampicillin-treated E. coli cells released lipopolysaccharide endotoxins at comparable levels, which were significantly higher than controls (p<0.0001. E. coli cells transformed with the ampicillin-resistance gene (β-lactamase remained sensitive to honey, displayed the same level of cytotoxicity, cell shape changes and endotoxin release as ampicillin-sensitive cells. As expected, β-lactamase protected the host cell from antibacterial action of ampicillin. Thus, both honey and ampicillin induced similar structural changes to the cell wall and LPS and that this ability underlies antibacterial activities of both agents. Since the cell wall is critical for cell growth and

  11. Phage “delay” towards enhancing bacterial escape from biofilms: a more comprehensive way of viewing resistance to bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Abedon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In exploring bacterial resistance to bacteriophages, emphasis typically is placed on those mechanisms which completely prevent phage replication. Such resistance can be detected as extensive reductions in phage ability to form plaques, that is, reduced efficiency of plating. Mechanisms include restriction-modification systems, CRISPR/Cas systems, and abortive infection systems. Alternatively, phages may be reduced in their “vigor” when infecting certain bacterial hosts, that is, with phages displaying smaller burst sizes or extended latent periods rather than being outright inactivated. It is well known, as well, that most phages poorly infect bacteria that are less metabolically active. Extracellular polymers such as biofilm matrix material also may at least slow phage penetration to bacterial surfaces. Here I suggest that such “less-robust” mechanisms of resistance to bacteriophages could serve bacteria by slowing phage propagation within bacterial biofilms, that is, delaying phage impact on multiple bacteria rather than necessarily outright preventing such impact. Related bacteria, ones that are relatively near to infected bacteria, e.g., roughly 10+ µm away, consequently may be able to escape from biofilms with greater likelihood via standard dissemination-initiating mechanisms including erosion from biofilm surfaces or seeding dispersal/central hollowing. That is, given localized areas of phage infection, so long as phage spread can be reduced in rate from initial points of contact with susceptible bacteria, then bacterial survival may be enhanced due to bacteria metaphorically “running away” to more phage-free locations. Delay mechanisms—to the extent that they are less specific in terms of what phages are targeted—collectively could represent broader bacterial strategies of phage resistance versus outright phage killing, the latter especially as require specific, evolved molecular recognition of phage presence. The

  12. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that coats the walls of the vagina Vaginal discharge with an unpleasant or fishlike odor Vaginal pain or itching Burning during urination Doctors are unsure of the incubation period for bacterial vaginosis. How Is the Diagnosis Made? Your child’s pediatrician can make the diagnosis ...

  13. Genes for all metals--a bacterial view of the periodic table. The 1996 Thom Award Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, S

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes have genes for transport proteins for inorganic nutrient cations and oxyanions, such as NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Co2+, Fe3+, Mn2+, Zn2+ and other trace cations, and PO4(3-), SO4(2-) and less abundant oxyanions. Together these account for perhaps a few hundred genes in many bacteria. Bacterial plasmids encode resistance systems for toxic metal and metalloid ions including Ag+, AsO2-, AsO4(3-), Cd2+, Co2+, CrO4(2-), Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, TeO3(2-), Tl+ and Zn2+. Most resistance systems function by energy-dependent efflux of toxic ions. A few involve enzymatic (mostly redox) transformations. Some of the efflux resistance systems are ATPases and others are chemiosmotic ion/proton exchangers. The Cd(2+)-resistance cation pump of Gram-positive bacteria is membrane P-type ATPase, which has been labeled with 32P from [gamma-32P]ATP and drives ATP-dependent Cd2+ (and Zn2+) transport by membrane vesicles. The genes defective in the human hereditary diseases of copper metabolism, Menkes syndrome and Wilson's disease, encode P-type ATPases that are similar to bacterial cadmium ATPases. The arsenic resistance system transports arsenite [As(III)], alternatively with the ArsB polypeptide functioning as a chemiosmotic efflux transporter or with two polypeptides, ArsB and ArsA, functioning as an ATPase. The third protein of the arsenic resistance system is an enzyme that reduces intracellular arsenate [As(V)] to arsenite [As(III)], the substrate of the efflux system. In Gram-negative cells, a three polypeptide complex functions as a chemiosmotic cation/protein exchanger to efflux Cd2+, Zn2+ and Co2+. This pump consists of an inner membrane (CzcA), an outer membrane (CzcC) and a membrane-spanning (CzcB) protein that function together.

  14. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Longoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  15. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  16. Involvement of bacterial TonB-dependent signaling in the generation of an oligogalacturonide damage-associated molecular pattern from plant cell walls exposed to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris pectate lyases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Efficient perception of attacking pathogens is essential for plants. Plant defense is evoked by molecules termed elicitors. Endogenous elicitors or damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) originate from plant materials upon injury or pathogen activity. While there are comparably well-characterized examples for DAMPs, often oligogalacturonides (OGAs), generated by the activity of fungal pathogens, endogenous elicitors evoked by bacterial pathogens have been rarely described. In particular, the signal perception and transduction processes involved in DAMP generation are poorly characterized. Results A mutant strain of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris deficient in exbD2, which encodes a component of its unusual elaborate TonB system, had impaired pectate lyase activity and caused no visible symptoms for defense on the non-host plant pepper (Capsicum annuum). A co-incubation of X. campestris pv. campestris with isolated cell wall material from C. annuum led to the release of compounds which induced an oxidative burst in cell suspension cultures of the non-host plant. Lipopolysaccharides and proteins were ruled out as elicitors by polymyxin B and heat treatment, respectively. After hydrolysis with trifluoroacetic acid and subsequent HPAE chromatography, the elicitor preparation contained galacturonic acid, the monosaccharide constituent of pectate. OGAs were isolated from this crude elicitor preparation by HPAEC and tested for their biological activity. While small OGAs were unable to induce an oxidative burst, the elicitor activity in cell suspension cultures of the non-host plants tobacco and pepper increased with the degree of polymerization (DP). Maximal elicitor activity was observed for DPs exceeding 8. In contrast to the X. campestris pv. campestris wild type B100, the exbD2 mutant was unable to generate elicitor activity from plant cell wall material or from pectin. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the

  17. Bacterial communities in urban aerosols collected with wetted-wall cyclonic samplers and seasonal fluctuations of live and culturable airborne bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravva, Subbarao V; Hernlem, Bradley J; Sarreal, Chester Z; Mandrell, Robert E

    2012-02-01

    Airborne transmission of bacterial pathogens from point sources (e.g., ranches, dairy waste treatment facilities) to areas of food production (farms) has been suspected. Determining the incidence, transport and viability of extremely low levels of pathogens require collection of high volumes of air and characterization of live bacteria from aerosols. We monitored the numbers of culturable bacteria in urban aerosols on 21 separate days during a 9 month period using high volume cyclonic samplers at an elevation of 6 m above ground level. Culturable bacteria in aerosols fluctuated from 3 CFU to 6 million CFU/L of air per hour and correlated significantly with changes in seasonal temperatures, but not with humidity or wind speed. Concentrations of viable bacteria determined by fluorescence staining and flow cytometry correlated significantly with culturable bacteria. Members of the phylum Proteobacteria constituted 98% of the bacterial community, which was characterized using 16S rRNA gene sequencing using DNA from aerosols. Aquabacterium sp., previously characterized from aquatic environments, represented 63% of all clones and the second most common were Burkholderia sp; these are ubiquitous in nature and some are potential human pathogens. Whole genome amplification prior to sequencing resulted in a substantial decrease in species diversity compared to characterizing culturable bacteria sorted by flow cytometry based on scatter signals. Although 27 isolated colonies were characterized, we were able to culture 38% of bacteria characterized by sequencing. The whole genome amplification method amplified DNA preferentially from Phyllobacterium myrsinacearum, a minor member of the bacterial communities, whereas Variovorax paradoxus dominated the cultured organisms.

  18. Ultra-Sensitive, High-Resolution Liquid Chromatography Methods for the High-Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Bacterial Cell Wall Chemistry and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Laura; Hernandez, Sara B; de Pedro, Miguel A; Cava, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis has been critical for determining the structural and chemical complexity of the cell wall. However this method is very time consuming in terms of sample preparation and chromatographic separation. Here we describe (1) optimized methods for peptidoglycan isolation from both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria that dramatically reduce the sample preparation time, and (2) the application of the fast and highly efficient ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) technology to muropeptide separation and quantification. The advances in both analytical instrumentation and stationary-phase chemistry have allowed for evolved protocols which cut run time from hours (2-3 h) to minutes (10-20 min), and sample demands by at least one order of magnitude. Furthermore, development of methods based on organic solvents permits in-line mass spectrometry (MS) of the UPLC-resolved muropeptides. Application of these technologies to high-throughput analysis will expedite the better understanding of the cell wall biology.

  19. Bacterial Cell Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, George K; Weibel, Douglas B

    2017-07-25

    Cellular mechanical properties play an integral role in bacterial survival and adaptation. Historically, the bacterial cell wall and, in particular, the layer of polymeric material called the peptidoglycan were the elements to which cell mechanics could be primarily attributed. Disrupting the biochemical machinery that assembles the peptidoglycan (e.g., using the β-lactam family of antibiotics) alters the structure of this material, leads to mechanical defects, and results in cell lysis. Decades after the discovery of peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes, the mechanisms that underlie their positioning and regulation are still not entirely understood. In addition, recent evidence suggests a diverse group of other biochemical elements influence bacterial cell mechanics, may be regulated by new cellular mechanisms, and may be triggered in different environmental contexts to enable cell adaptation and survival. This review summarizes the contributions that different biomolecular components of the cell wall (e.g., lipopolysaccharides, wall and lipoteichoic acids, lipid bilayers, peptidoglycan, and proteins) make to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cell mechanics. We discuss the contribution of individual proteins and macromolecular complexes in cell mechanics and the tools that make it possible to quantitatively decipher the biochemical machinery that contributes to bacterial cell mechanics. Advances in this area may provide insight into new biology and influence the development of antibacterial chemotherapies.

  20. Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bacterial Keratitis Sections What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ... Lens Care Bacterial Keratitis Treatment What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es la Queratitis Bacteriana? ...

  1. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how walls...

  2. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how walls...... have encouraged architectural thinking of enclosure, materiality, construction and inhabitation in architectural history, the paper’s aim is to define new directions for the integration of LEDs in walls, challenging the thinking of inhabitation and program. This paper introduces the notion...... of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...

  3. View of the bacterial strains of Escherichia coli M-17 and its interaction with the nanoparticles of zinc oxide by means of atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagitova, A; Yaminsky, I; Meshkov, G

    2016-01-01

    Visualization of the structure of biological objects plays a key role in medicine, biotechnology, nanotechnology and IT-technology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a promising method of studying of objects’ morphology and structure. In this work, AFM was used to determine the size and shape of the bacterial strains of Escherichia coli M-17 and visualization its interaction with the nanoparticles of zinc oxide. The suspension of E.coli bacteria was applied to natural mica and studied by contact mode using the FemtoScan multifunctional scanning probe microscope. (paper)

  4. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  5. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  6. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  7. Bacterial Proteasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrab, Jordan B; Darwin, K Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology.

  8. Bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    As mentioned in the introduction of this thesis bacterial adhesion has been studied from a variety of (mostly practice oriented) starting points. This has resulted in a range of widely divergent approaches. In order to elucidate general principles in bacterial adhesion phenomena, we felt it

  9. First wall of thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizawa, Makoto; Koizumi, Makoto; Nishihara, Yoshihiro.

    1990-01-01

    The first wall of a thermonuclear device is constituted with inner wall tiles, e.g. made of graphite and metal substrates for fixing them. However, since the heat expansion coefficient is different between the metal substrates and intermediate metal members, thermal stresses are caused to deteriorate the endurance of the inner wall tiles. In view of the above, low melting metals are disposed at the portion of contact between the inner wall tiles and the metal substrates and, further, a heat pipe structure is incorporated into the metal substrates. Under the thermal load, for example, during operation of the thermonuclear device, the low melting metals at the portion of contact are melted into liquid metals to enhance the state of contact between the inner wall tiles and the metal substrate to reduce the heat resistance and improve the heat conductivity. Even if there is a difference in the heat expansion coefficient between the inner wall tiles and the metal substrates, neither sharing stresses not thermal stresses are caused. Further, since the heat pipe structure is incorporated into the metal substrates, the lateral unevenness of the temperature in the metal substrates can be eliminated. Thus, the durability of the inner wall tiles can be improved. (N.H.)

  10. Domain wall diffusion and domain wall softening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W T; Salje, E K H; Bismayer, U

    2003-01-01

    A number of experimental and computational studies of materials have shown that transport rates in domain walls may significantly differ from those in the bulk. One possible explanation for enhanced transport in a domain wall is that the domain wall is elastically soft with respect to the bulk. We investigate the softening of a ferroelastic domain wall in a simple, generic model. We calculate saddle point energies of solute atoms in the bulk and domain wall, using a geometry such that variation in the saddle point energy cannot be attributed to the structural differences of the bulk and the wall, but must instead be attributed to softening of the wall. Our results show a reduction of the saddle point energy in the wall, thus indicating that, in this model at least, domain walls are elastically soft compared with the bulk. A simple analysis based on an Einstein model allows us to explain the observed softening of the wall

  11. to view fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    cause it corresponds to what our eye or an optical instru- ment sees as brightness. You can develop an intuitive feel for the invariance of surface brightness by carry- ing out the following experiment. Stand at a distance of about a metre from a plain white wall and view it through a cone made of a rolled-up piece of paper, ...

  12. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive STDs Home Page Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ( ... of getting other STDs, such as chlamydia and gonorrhea . These bacteria can sometimes cause pelvic inflammatory disease ( ...

  13. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  14. First wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Junji.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite and C/C composite are used recently for the first wall of a thermonuclear device since materials with small atom number have great impurity allowable capacity for plasmas. Among them, those materials having high thermal conduction are generally anisotropic and have an upper limit for the thickness upon production. Then, anisotropic materials are used for a heat receiving plate, such that the surfaces of the heat receiving plate on the side of lower heat conductivity are brought into contact with each other, and the side of higher thermal conductivity is arranged in parallel with small radius direction and the toroidal direction of the thermonuclear device. As a result, the incident heat on an edge portion can be transferred rapidly to the heat receiving plate, which can suppress the temperature elevation at the surface to thereby reduce the amount of abrasion. Since the heat expansion coefficient of the anisotropic materials is great in the direction of the lower heat conductivity and small in the direction of the higher heat conductivity, the gradient of a thermal load distribution in the direction of the higher heat expansion coefficient is small, and occurrence of thermal stresses due to temperature difference is reduced, to improve the reliability. (N.H.)

  15. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  16. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  17. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency. Vaccination against common pathogens has decreased the burden of disease. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy are vital. Therapy should be initiated as soon as blood cultures have been obtained,

  18. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation,

  19. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    , the production and oxidation of methane, nitrate reduction and fixation of atmospheric nitrogen are exclusively carried out by different groups of bacteria. Some bacterial species – ‘extremophiles’ – thrive in extreme environments in which no eukaryotic organisms can survive with respect to temperature, salinity...

  20. Bacterial stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Bacterial stress. Physicochemical and chemical parameters: temperature, pressure, pH, salt concentration, oxygen, irradiation. Nutritional depravation: nutrient starvation, water shortage. Toxic compounds: Antibiotics, heavy metals, toxins, mutagens. Interactions with other cells: ...

  1. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    reduce or delay bacterial biofilm formation of a range of urinary tract infectious E.coli and Klebsiella isolates. Several other proteinaceous coatings were also found to display anti-adhesive properties, possibly providing a measure for controlling the colonization of implant materials. Several other...... components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  2. Bacterial lipases

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, meaning a sharp increase in lipase activity observed when the substrate starts to form an emulsion, thereby presenting to the enzyme an interfacial area. As a consequence, the kinetics of a lipase rea...

  3. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...... also shares in vivo properties of assembly and dynamics with IF proteins by forming stable filamentous structures that continuously incorporate subunits along their length and that grow in a nonpolar fashion. De novo assembly of crescentin is biphasic and involves a cell size-dependent mechanism...... a new function for MreB and providing a parallel to the role of actin in IF assembly and organization in metazoan cells. Additionally, analysis of an MreB localization mutant suggests that cell wall insertion during cell elongation normally occurs along two helices of opposite handedness, each...

  4. Wall accumulation of bacteria with different motility patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Paolo; Chiarello, Enrico; Jayaswal, Gaurav; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Brun, Paola; Tiribocchi, Adriano; Orlandini, Enzo

    2018-02-01

    We systematically investigate the role of different swimming patterns on the concentration distribution of bacterial suspensions confined between two flat walls, by considering wild-type motility Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which perform Run and Tumble and Run and Reverse patterns, respectively. The experiments count motile bacteria at different distances from the bottom wall. In agreement with previous studies, an accumulation of motile bacteria close to the walls is observed. Different wall separations, ranging from 100 to 250 μ m , are tested. The concentration profiles result to be independent on the motility pattern and on the walls' separation. These results are confirmed by numerical simulations, based on a collection of self-propelled dumbbells-like particles interacting only through steric interactions. The good agreement with the simulations suggests that the behavior of the investigated bacterial suspensions is determined mainly by steric collisions and self-propulsion, as well as hydrodynamic interactions.

  5. Design, development, and demonstration of a fully LabVIEW controlled in situ electrochemical Fourier transform infrared setup combined with a wall-jet electrode to investigate the electrochemical interface of nanoparticulate electrocatalysts under reaction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesselberger, Markus; Ashton, Sean J; Wiberg, Gustav K H; Arenz, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    We present a detailed description of the construction of an in situ electrochemical ATR-FTIR setup combined with a wall-jet electrode to investigate the electrocatalytic properties of nanoparticulate catalysts in situ under controlled mass transport conditions. The presented setup allows the electrochemical interface to be probed in combination with the simultaneous determination of reaction rates. At the same time, the high level of automation allows it to be used as a standard tool in electrocatalysis research. The performance of the setup was demonstrated by probing the oxygen reduction reaction on a platinum black catalyst in sulfuric electrolyte.

  6. Bacterial mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...... movement is powered by insertional polymerization of ParM. Consistently, we find that segregating plasmids are positioned at the ends of extending ParM filaments. Thus, the process of R1 plasmid segregation in E. coli appears to be mechanistically analogous to the actin-based motility operating...

  7. Presence of bacterial DNA and bacterial peptidoglycans in joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other arthritides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, I. M.; Wilbrink, B.; Tchetverikov, I.; Schrijver, I. A.; Schouls, L. M.; Hazenberg, M. P.; Breedveld, F. C.; Tak, P. P.

    2000-01-01

    The continuous presence of bacteria or their degraded antigens in the synovium may be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to determine the presence of bacterial nucleic acids and bacterial cell wall constituents in the joints of patients with RA and

  8. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-06-19

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

  9. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER

  10. View relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the potential of using visual representations to support people in managing, organizing, and understanding relations between multiple visualization views. Multiple views can help people understand different facets of data and data processing, and are a crucial part of data...... analysis particularly when it is done collaboratively. Both the growing use of multiple views and the increasing display sizes have amplified the need to explore how to better help people to understand the relations between many views. To improve our understanding of how to visualize view relations, we...... invited visualization and interaction designers to critique and sketch representations of view relations. The participants provided design critiques, and sketched their own relation representations. Our findings expand the range and palette of ways of visually linking visualization views and suggest new...

  11. Computed tomography of chest wall abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Junpei; Morimoto, Shizuo; Akira, Masanori

    1986-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions of the chest wall become less common because of the improvement of antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents. Over a 5-year period, 7 patients with chest wall inflammatory diseases underwent chest computed tomography. These were 2 tuberculous pericostal abscesses, 2 empyema necessitatis, 1 spinal caries, and 2 bacterial chest wall abscesses (unknown organisms). Computed tomography (CT) helped in demonstrating the density, border, site, and extent of the lesions. CT images also demonstrated the accompaning abnormalities which included bone changes, pleural calcification, or old tuberculous changes of the lung. CT was very effective to demonstrate the communicating portions from the inside of the bony thorax to the outside of the bony thorax in 2 empyema necessitatis. (author)

  12. Production parameters of sand-lime bricks with a view to reduction of heat gaps in walls. Final report; Herstellparameter von Kalksand-Spezialbaustoffen fuer die Abschwaechung von Waermebruecken im Mauerwerksbau. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eden, W. [Forschungsvereinigung ' Kalk-Sand' e.V., Hannover (Germany); Buhl, J.C. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie

    2002-02-01

    Sand-lime bricks with special characteristics can reduce heat gaps in walls, thus reducing the heating energy consumption of a building. Special physical characteristics are required for this, i.e. high compressive strength and low thermal conductivity. The report describes the interdependences between raw material characteristics, production processes and the properties of the resulting sand-lime bricks. [German] Im Rahmen des energiesparenden Waermeschutzes gewinnen konstruktive Massnahmen zur Reduzierung von Waermeverlusten zunehmend an Bedeutung. Beispielsweise kann bei der Anwendung von Kalksandstein-Mauerwerk durch den gezielten Einsatz von speziell entwickelten Kalksand-Leichtsteinen ein erhoehter Waermestrom ueber Waermebruecken verringert werden. Auf diese Weise kann ein weiterer Beitrag zur Reduzierung des Heizenergiebedarfs geleistet werden. Mauersteine, die zur Abschwaechung von Waermebruecken verwendet werden, muessen besondere Anforderungen hinsichtlich ihrer physikalischen Eigenschaften erfuellen. So ist die Kombination aus einer ausreichend hohen Steindruckfestigkeit und einer gleichzeitig niedrigen Waermeleitfaehigkeit entscheidend. Die vorliegende Arbeit befasst sich mit den Zusammenhaengen zwischen den Rohstoffeigenschaften, den verfahrenstechnischen Herstellbedingungen und den Eigenschaftswerten von Kalksand-Leichtsteinen fuer die Abschwaechung von Waermebruecken. (orig.)

  13. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  14. MISR Views Hurricane Carlotta

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    With winds reaching 155 mph, this year's Hurricane Carlotta became the second strongest eastern Pacific June hurricane on record. These images from MISR show the hurricane on June 21, the day of its peak intensity. The pictures are oriented so that the spacecraft's flight path is from left to right; north is at the left.The top image is a color view from MISR's vertical (nadir) camera, showing Carlotta's location in the eastern Pacific Ocean, about 500 km south of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.The middle image is a stereoscopic 'anaglyph' created using MISR's nadir camera plus one of its aftward-viewing cameras, and shows a closer view of the area around the hurricane. Viewing with red/blue glasses (red filter over the left eye) is required to obtain a 3-D stereo effect.Near the center of the storm, the eye is about 25 km in diameter and partially obscured by a thin cloud. About 50 km to the left of the eye, the sharp drop-off from high-level to low-level cloud gives a sense of the vertical extent of the hidden eye wall. The low-level cloud is spiraling counterclockwise into the center of the cyclone. It then rises in the vicinity of the eye wall and emerges with a clockwise rotation at high altitude. Maximum surface winds are found near the eye wall.The bottom stereo image is a zoomed-in view of convective clouds in the hurricane's spiral arms. The arms are breeding grounds for severe thunderstorms, with associated heavy rain and flooding, frequent lightning, and tornadoes. Thunderstorms rise in dramatic fashion to about the same altitude as the high cloud near the hurricane's center, and are made up of individual cells that are typically less than 20 km in diameter. This image shows a number of these cells, some fairly isolated, and others connected together. Their three-dimensional structure is clearly apparent in this stereo view.MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The

  15. BACTERIAL PLASMIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dinic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids, extrachromosomal DNA, were identified in bacteria pertaining to family of Enterobacteriacae for the very first time. After that, they were discovered in almost every single observed strain. The structure of plasmids is made of circular double chain DNA molecules which are replicated autonomously in a host cell. Their length may vary from few up to several hundred kilobase (kb. Among the bacteria, plasmids are mostly transferred horizontally by conjugation process. Plasmid replication process can be divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The process involves DNA helicase I, DNA gyrase, DNA polymerase III, endonuclease, and ligase.Plasmids contain genes essential for plasmid function and their preservation in a host cell (the beginning and the control of replication. Some of them possess genes whichcontrol plasmid stability. There is a common opinion that plasmids are unnecessary fora growth of bacterial population and their vital functions; thus, in many cases they can be taken up or kicked out with no lethal effects to a plasmid host cell. However,there are numerous biological functions of bacteria related to plasmids. Plasmids identification and classification are based upon their genetic features which are presented permanently in all of them, and these are: abilities to preserve themselves in a host cell and to control a replication process. In this way, plasmids classification among incompatibility groups is performed. The method of replicon typing, which is based on genotype and not on phenotype characteristics, has the same results as in compatibility grouping.

  16. Concert Viewing Headphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Atsuta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An audiovisual interface equipped with a projector, an inclina-tion sensor, and a distance sensor for zoom control has been developed that enables a user to selectively view and listen to specific performers in a video-taped group performance. Dubbed Concert Viewing Headphones, it has both image and sound processing functions. The image processing extracts the portion of the image indicated by the user and projects it free of distortion on the front and side walls. The sound processing creates imaginary microphones for those performers without one so that the user can hear the sound from any performer. Testing using images and sounds captured using a fisheye-lens camera and 37 lavalier microphones showed that sound locali-zation was fastest when an inverse square function was used for the sound mixing and that the zoom function was useful for locating the desired sound performance.

  17. The mecillinam resistome reveals a role for peptidoglycan endopeptidases in stimulating cell wall synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghee Chuan Lai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cells are typically surrounded by an net-like macromolecule called the cell wall constructed from the heteropolymer peptidoglycan (PG. Biogenesis of this matrix is the target of penicillin and related beta-lactams. These drugs inhibit the transpeptidase activity of PG synthases called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, preventing the crosslinking of nascent wall material into the existing network. The beta-lactam mecillinam specifically targets the PBP2 enzyme in the cell elongation machinery of Escherichia coli. Low-throughput selections for mecillinam resistance have historically been useful in defining mechanisms involved in cell wall biogenesis and the killing activity of beta-lactam antibiotics. Here, we used transposon-sequencing (Tn-Seq as a high-throughput method to identify nearly all mecillinam resistance loci in the E. coli genome, providing a comprehensive resource for uncovering new mechanisms underlying PG assembly and drug resistance. Induction of the stringent response or the Rcs envelope stress response has been previously implicated in mecillinam resistance. We therefore also performed the Tn-Seq analysis in mutants defective for these responses in addition to wild-type cells. Thus, the utility of the dataset was greatly enhanced by determining the stress response dependence of each resistance locus in the resistome. Reasoning that stress response-independent resistance loci are those most likely to identify direct modulators of cell wall biogenesis, we focused our downstream analysis on this subset of the resistome. Characterization of one of these alleles led to the surprising discovery that the overproduction of endopeptidase enzymes that cleave crosslinks in the cell wall promotes mecillinam resistance by stimulating PG synthesis by a subset of PBPs. Our analysis of this activation mechanism suggests that, contrary to the prevailing view in the field, PG synthases and PG cleaving enzymes need not function in multi

  18. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  19. Probing the bacterial cell wall with chemical biology tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sminia, Tjerk J.

    2017-01-01

    After DNA and proteins, carbohydrates are the third language of life. Chapter 1 introduces the reader to this class of biomolecules, also called sugars or glycans, that can be found on the outer surface of almost all cells and plays a critical role as the social messengers of a

  20. Probing the bacterial cell wall with chemical biology tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sminia, Tjerk J.

    2017-01-01

    After DNA and proteins, carbohydrates are the third language of life. Chapter 1 introduces the reader to this class of biomolecules, also called sugars or glycans, that can be found on the outer surface of almost all cells and plays a critical role as the social messengers of a

  1. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...

  2. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  3. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  4. Wall Construction; Carpentry: 901892.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The curriculum guide outlines a course designed to provide instruction in floor and wall layout, and in the diverse methods and construction of walls. Upon completion of this course the students should have acquired a knowledge of construction plans and structural foundations in addition to a basic knowledge of mathematics. The course consists of…

  5. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, Lineke

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  6. Impact of hydrodynamic stresses on bacterial flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debasish; Riley, Emily; Lauga, Eric

    2017-11-01

    The locomotion of bacteria powered by helical filaments, such as Escherichia coli, critically involves the generation of flows and hydrodynamic stresses which lead to forces and moments balanced by the moment applied by the bacterial rotary motor (which is embedded in the cell wall) and the deformation of the short flexible hook. In this talk we use numerical computations to accurately compute these hydrodynamic stresses, to show how they critically lead to fluid-structure instabilities at the whole-cell level, and enquire if they can be used to rationalise experimental measurements of bacterial motor torques. ERC Consolidator Grant.

  7. Solar Walls in tsbi3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  8. Raman imaging of lignin and cellulose distribution in black spruce wood (Picea mariana) cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal

    2005-01-01

    A detailed understanding of wood cell wall structure and organization is important from both fundamental and practical point of views. A state-of- the-art 633-nm laser based confocal Raman microscope was used in situ to investigate the cell wall organization of black spruce wood. Chemical information on lignin and cellulose from morphologically distinct cell wall...

  9. Thermal shielding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Takenori.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the amount of heat released from a pressure vessel and reliably shield neutron fluxes and gamma rays from a reactor core by the addition of cooling ducts in a thermal shielding wall provided with a blower and an air cooling cooler. Constitution: A thermal shielding wall is located on a pedestal so as to surround a pressure vessel and the pressure vessel is located by way of a skirt in the same manner. Heat insulators are disposed between the pressure vessel and the shielding wall while closer to the skirt in the skirt portion and closer to the shielding wall in the vessel body portion. A plurality of cooling ducts are arranged side by side at the inner side in the shielding wall. A through-duct radially passing through the wall is provided in the lower portion thereof and a blower fan for cooling air and a cooler for cooling returned air are connected by way of a communication duct to the other end of the through-duct. This enables to provide a shielding wall capable of suppressing the amount of heat released from the pressure vessel as much as possible and giving more effective cooling. (Kawakami, Y.)

  10. Meleney's Ulcer; A Rare but Fatal Abdominal Wall Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meleney's ulcer or post operative synergistic bacterial gangrene is a rare form of abdominal wall gangrene but has well documented clinical entity. It develops following intra abdominal surgery in the immediate vicinity of the surgical wound. It is caused by synergistic interaction between microaerophilic nonhemolytic ...

  11. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...... is reduced. To investigate the possibilities, full-size wall elements with wooden cladding and different cavity design, type of cladding and type of wind barrier were exposed to natural climate on the outside and to a humid indoor climate on the inside. During the exposure period parts of the vapour barrier...

  12. Plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, Rainer

    1978-01-01

    The plasma wall interactions for two extreme cases, the 'vacuum model' and the 'cold gas blanket' are outlined. As a first step for understanding the plasma wall interactions the elementary interaction processes at the first wall are identified. These are energetic ion and neutral particle trapping and release, ion and neutral backscattering, ion sputtering, desorption by ions, photons and electrons and evaporation. These processes have only recently been started to be investigated in the parameter range of interest for fusion research. The few measured data and their extrapolation into regions not yet investigated are reviewed

  13. Layers in Crater Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    22 January 2004 This January 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows three distinct bands of layered material exposed in the wall of a south, middle-latitude meteor impact crater wall. Talus--debris shed from erosion of the wall--has piled up on the slopes below the layered outcrop. This picture is located near 45.5oS, 85.9oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the right/lower right.

  14. Bacterial Association with Particles: Aggregation to Dissolution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, M.J.B.D.

    an important role in the trophic dynamics of an ecosystem (Fig. 1) Bacterial role in aggregation formation and dissolution In aquatic systems particles are important components in the turnover, decomposition and sinking flux of both organic and inorganic... (Nicholas and Walling, 1998). Although bacteria are responsible for assimilating most of the DOC in aquatic ecosystem, yet the fluxes of DOC through bacteria include a wide variety of compounds derived from unknown sources and composition (Azam et al., 1993...

  15. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  16. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have you: Learn pelvic floor muscle exercises ( Kegel exercises ) Use estrogen cream in your vagina Try ... repair; Urinary incontinence - vaginal wall repair Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Suprapubic catheter ...

  17. Plasma-wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichle, R.

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the 43 slides presented in the framework of the week long lecture 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak. This document is divided into 4 parts: 1) thermal load on the wall, power extraction and particle recovery, 2) basic edge plasma physics, 3) processes that drive the plasma-solid interaction, and 4) material conditioning (surface treatment...) for ITER

  18. View presentation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bacterial Growth at –15ºC · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · STRATOSPHERE: Altitude & Temperature · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Slide 20 · Slide 21 · Slide 22 · Slide 23 · Slide 24 · Slide 25 · Slide 26 · Slide 27 · Slide 28 · Slide 29 · Slide 30.

  19. Flagella bending affects macroscopic properties of bacterial suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potomkin, M.; Tournus, M.; Berlyand, L. V.; Aranson, I. S.

    2017-05-01

    To survive in harsh conditions, motile bacteria swim in complex environments and respond to the surrounding flow. Here, we develop a mathematical model describing how flagella bending affects macroscopic properties of bacterial suspensions. First, we show how the flagella bending contributes to the decrease in the effective viscosity observed in dilute suspension. Our results do not impose tumbling (random reorientation) as was previously done to explain the viscosity reduction. Second, we demonstrate how a bacterium escapes from wall entrapment due to the self-induced buckling of flagella. Our results shed light on the role of flexible bacterial flagella in interactions of bacteria with shear flow and walls or obstacles.

  20. Zograscopic viewing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.; Wijntjes, M.; Van Doorn, A.

    2013-01-01

    The “zograscope” is a “visual aid” (commonly known as “optical machine” in the 18th century) invented in the mid-18th century, and in general use until the early 20th century. It was intended to view single pictures (thus not stereographic pairs) with both eyes. The optics approximately eliminates

  1. KETERASINGAN DALAM FILM WALL-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Putra Nugraha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern society nowadays technological advances at first create efficiency in human life. Further development of the technology thus drown human in a routine and automation of work created. The State is to be one of the causes of man separated from fellow or the outside world and eventually experiencing alienation. The movie as a mass media function to obtain the movie and entertainment can be informative or educative function is contained, even persuasive. The purpose of this research was conducted to find out the alienation in the movie Wall E. The concepts used to analyze the movie Wall E this is communication, movie, and alienation. The concept of alienation of human alienation from covering its own products of human alienation from its activities, the human alienation from nature of his humanity and human alienation from each other. Paradigm used is a critical paradigm with type a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The method used is the analysis of semiotics Roland Barthes to interpretation the scope of social alienation and fellow humans in the movie.This writing research results found that alienation of humans with other humans influenced the development of the technology and how the human it self represented of technology, not from our fellow human beings. Masyarakat modern saat ini kemajuan teknologi pada awalnya membuat efisiensi dalam kehidupan manusia. Perkembangan selanjutnya teknologi justru menenggelamkan manusia dalam suatu rutinitas dan otomatisasi kerja yang diciptakan. Keadaan itulah yang menjadi salah satu penyebab manusia terpisah dari sesama atau dunia luar dan akhirnya mengalami keterasingan. Film sebagai media massa berfungsi untuk memperoleh hiburan dan dalam film dapat terkandung fungsi informatif maupun edukatif, bahkan persuasif. Tujuan Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Keterasingan dalam film Wall E. Konsep-konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis film Wall E ini adalah komunikasi, film, dan

  2. Elastic Deformations During Bacterial Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K. C.

    2010-03-01

    The wide variety of shapes and sizes found in bacterial species is almost universally defined by the cell wall, which is a cross-linked network of the material peptidoglycan. In recent years, cell shape has been shown to play a critical role in regulating many important biological functions including attachment, dispersal, motility, polar differentiation, predation, and cellular differentiation. In previous work, we have shown that the spatial organization of the peptidoglycan network can change the mechanical equilibrium of the cell wall and result in changes in cell shape. However, experimental data on the mechanical properties of peptidoglycan is currently limited. Here, we describe a straightforward, inexpensive approach for extracting the mechanical properties of bacterial cells in gels of user-defined stiffness, using only optical microscopy to match growth kinetics to the predictions of a continuum model of cell growth. Using this simple yet general methodology, we have measured the Young's modulus for bacteria ranging across a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and cell wall thicknesses, and our method can easily be extended to other commonly studied bacteria. This method makes it possible to rapidly determine how changes in genotype and biochemistry affect the mechanical properties of the cell wall, and may be particularly relevant for studying the relationship between cell shape and structure, the genetic and molecular control of the mechanical properties of the cell wall, and the identification of antibiotics and other small molecules that affect and specifically modify the mechanical properties of the cell wall. Our work also suggests that bacteria may utilize peptidoglycan synthesis to transduce mechanosensory signals from local environment.

  3. Plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.; Jensen, B.; Tien, J.K.; Panayotou, N.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to provide information on important phenomena occurring when a hot, dense plasma containing a transverse magnetic field is brought into sudden contact with a cold metal wall. Computational simulation has been used to study the physics of the fusion plasma boundary layer which forms at the plasma-wall interface. Thermal, magnetic, and neutral gas boundary layers rapidly develop. The rate of energy transfer to the metal wall is computed and compared with experimental data. The agreement is rather good. Candidate fusion-reactor first wall materials have been exposed repeatedly to a warm (T/sub i/ approximately 600 eV) deuterium plasma containing a transverse 1.0 W/m 2 magnetic field. Polished samples were subjected to 6 x 10 21 eV cm -2 , the energy flux expected at the first wall in about one year operation of a tokamak fusion power reactor. Stainless steels show significant erosion at grain boundaries, formation of deuterium blisters on the surface, evidence of surface melting to a depth of 25 μm, and rapid resolidification. Some cracking is observed, which extends for about a grain size length along grain boundaries into the bulk material. Decrease in tensile ductility is also measured, indicative of possible hydrogen embrittlement

  4. Low Reynolds Number Bacterial Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbrecht, Grant; Ni, Katha; Vock, Isaac; Rodenborn, Bruce

    The dynamics of prokaryotic motility in a fluid is important in a wide range of fields. Our experiment models the locomotion of bacteria with a robotic swimmer made using a computer controlled DC motor that drives a helical flagellum formed from welding wire. Because of its small size, a bacterium swimming in water is like our robot swimming in corn syrup. We compensate for the size difference by placing the robot in highly viscous silicone oil. Previous research measured helical propulsion of a swimmer far from a boundary. However proximity to a boundary strongly affects bacterial swimming. We have designed a system to precisely control the distance from the flagellum to the tank wall, and have made some of the first macroscopic measurements of boundary effects on helical propulsion.

  5. Zograscopic viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenderink, Jan; Wijntjes, Maarten; van Doorn, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The "zograscope" is a "visual aid" (commonly known as "optical machine" in the 18th century) invented in the mid-18th century, and in general use until the early 20th century. It was intended to view single pictures (thus not stereographic pairs) with both eyes. The optics approximately eliminates the physiological cues (binocular disparity, vergence, accommodation, movement parallax, and image blur) that might indicate the flatness of the picture surface. The spatial structure of pictorial space is due to the remaining pictorial cues. As a consequence, many (or perhaps most) observers are aware of a heightened "plasticity" of the pictorial content for zograscopic as compared with natural viewing. We discuss the optics of the zograscope in some detail. Such an analysis is not available in the literature, whereas common "explanations" of the apparatus are evidently nonsensical. We constructed a zograscope, using modern parts, and present psychophysical data on its performance.

  6. Don't Forget the Abdominal Wall: Imaging Spectrum of Abdominal Wall Injuries after Nonpenetrating Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Shanna A; Askari, Reza; Gates, Jonathan D; Patel, Ketan; Sodickson, Aaron D; Khurana, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal wall injuries occur in nearly one of 10 patients coming to the emergency department after nonpenetrating trauma. Injuries range from minor, such as abdominal wall contusion, to severe, such as abdominal wall rupture with evisceration of abdominal contents. Examples of specific injuries that can be detected at cross-sectional imaging include abdominal muscle strain, tear, or hematoma, including rectus sheath hematoma (RSH); traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH); and Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) (closed degloving injury). These injuries are often overlooked clinically because of (a) a lack of findings at physical examination or (b) distraction by more-severe associated injuries. However, these injuries are important to detect because they are highly associated with potentially grave visceral and vascular injuries, such as aortic injury, and because their detection can lead to the diagnosis of these more clinically important grave traumatic injuries. Failure to make a timely diagnosis can result in delayed complications, such as bowel hernia with potential for obstruction or strangulation, or misdiagnosis of an abdominal wall neoplasm. Groin injuries, such as athletic pubalgia, and inferior costochondral injuries should also be considered in patients with abdominal pain after nonpenetrating trauma, because these conditions may manifest with referred abdominal pain and are often included within the field of view at cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Radiologists must recognize and report acute abdominal wall injuries and their associated intra-abdominal pathologic conditions to allow appropriate and timely treatment. © RSNA, 2017.

  7. Thermal treatment wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  8. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  9. Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Buckley, Julliette M

    2012-02-03

    LPS tolerance has been the focus of extensive scientific and clinical research over the last several decades in an attempt to elucidate the sequence of changes that occur at a molecular level in tolerized cells. Tolerance to components of gram-positive bacterial cell walls such as bacterial lipoprotein and lipoteichoic acid is a much lesser studied, although equally important, phenomenon. This review will focus on cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components and examines the alterations in cell surface receptor expression, changes in intracellular signaling, gene expression and cytokine production, and the phenomenon of cross-tolerance.

  10. Strengthening of Shear Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg

    -plane loaded walls and disks is however not included in any guidelines, and only a small fraction of scientists have initiated research within this topic. Furthermore, studies of the principal behavior and response of a strengthened disk has not yet been investigated satisfactorily, and this is the principal...

  11. Endometriosis Abdominal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M.; Carriquiry, L.

    2003-01-01

    Endometriosis of abdominal wall is a rare entity wi ch frequently appears after gynecological surgery. Case history includes three cases of parietal endometriosis wi ch were treated in Maciel Hospital of Montevideo. The report refers to etiological diagnostic aspects and highlights the importance of total resection in order to achieve definitive healing

  12. eWALL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriazakos, Sofoklis; Mihaylov, Mihail; Anggorojati, Bayu

    2016-01-01

    challenge with impact in multiple sectors. In this paper we present an innovative ICT solution, named eWALL, that aims to address these challenges by means of an advanced ICT infrastructure and home sensing environment; thus differentiating from existing eHealth and eCare solutions. The system of e...

  13. Zograscopic Viewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Koenderink

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The “zograscope” is a “visual aid” (commonly known as “optical machine” in the 18th century invented in the mid-18th century, and in general use until the early 20th century. It was intended to view single pictures (thus not stereographic pairs with both eyes. The optics approximately eliminates the physiological cues (binocular disparity, vergence, accommodation, movement parallax, and image blur that might indicate the flatness of the picture surface. The spatial structure of pictorial space is due to the remaining pictorial cues. As a consequence, many (or perhaps most observers are aware of a heightened “plasticity” of the pictorial content for zograscopic as compared with natural viewing. We discuss the optics of the zograscope in some detail. Such an analysis is not available in the literature, whereas common “explanations” of the apparatus are evidently nonsensical. We constructed a zograscope, using modern parts, and present psychophysical data on its performance.

  14. Fracture mechanics of the cell wall of Chara corallina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toole, G A; Gunning, P A; Parker, M L; Smith, A C; Waldron, K W

    2001-03-01

    Previous mechanical studies using algae have concentrated on cell extension and growth using creep-type experiments, but there appears to be no published study of their failure properties. The mechanical strength of single large internode cell walls (up to 2 mm diameter and 100 mm in length) of the charophyte (giant alga) Chara corallina was determined by dissecting cells to give sheets of cell wall, which were then notched and fractured under tension. Tensile tests, using a range of notch sizes, were conducted on cell walls of varying age and maturity to establish their notch sensitivity and to investigate the propagation of cracks in plant cell walls. The thickness and stiffness of the walls increased with age whereas their strength was little affected. The strength of unnotched walls was estimated as 47+/-13 MPa, comparable to that of some grasses but an order of magnitude higher than that published for model bacterial cellulose composite walls. The strength was notch-sensitive and the critical stress intensity factor K1c was estimated to be 0.63+/-0.19 MNm(-3/2), comparable to published values for grasses.

  15. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  16. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    , but the identity and significance of interspecies bacterial interactions is neglected in these analyses. There is therefore an urgent need for bridging the gap between metagenomic analysis and in vitro models suitable for studies of bacterial interactions.Bacterial interactions and coadaptation are important......The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating...

  17. Rising damp in building walls: the wall base ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, A.S.; Delgado, J.M.P.Q.; Freitas, V.P. de [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Laboratorio de Fisica das Construcoes (LFC), Departamento de Engenharia Civil, Porto (Portugal)

    2012-12-15

    This work intends to validate a new system for treating rising damp in historic buildings walls. The results of laboratory experiments show that an efficient way of treating rising damp is by ventilating the wall base, using the HUMIVENT technique. The analytical model presented describes very well the observed features of rising damp in walls, verified by laboratory tests, who contributed for a simple sizing of the wall base ventilation system that will be implemented in historic buildings. (orig.)

  18. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  19. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  20. Magnetotactic Bacterial Cages as Safe and Smart Gene Delivery Vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaiari, Shahad K.

    2016-07-27

    In spite of the huge advances in the area of synthetic carriers, their efficiency still poorly compares to natural vectors. Herein, we report the use of unmodified magnetotactic bacteria as a guidable delivery vehicle for DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). High cargo loading is established under anaerobic conditions (bacteria is alive) through endocytosis where AuNPs are employed as transmembrane proteins mimics (facilitate endocytosis) as well as imaging agents to verify and quantify loading and release. The naturally bio-mineralized magnetosomes, within the bacteria, induce heat generation inside bacteria through magnetic hyperthermia. Most importantly after exposing the system to air (bacteria is dead) the cell wall stays intact providing an efficient bacterial vessel. Upon incubation with THP-1 cells, the magnetotactic bacterial cages (MBCs) adhere to the cell wall and are directly engulfed through the phagocytic activity of these cells. Applying magnetic hyperthermia leads to the dissociation of the bacterial microcarrier and eventual release of cargo.

  1. Wall Street vs. Main Street: An Evaluation of Probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Robin L. Lumsdaine; Rogier J.D. Potter van Loon

    2013-01-01

    This paper challenges recent conventional wisdom of a divide between Main Street (the average American consumer) and Wall Street (financial market participants). The views of survey respondents regarding the likelihood of stock index returns exceeding specific thresholds are compared to market views indicated by index options with strikes at analogous thresholds. The econometric specification explicitly addresses some important impediments to using elicited probabilities from survey data. We ...

  2. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  3. Fetal abdominal wall defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prefumo, Federico; Izzi, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    The most common fetal abdominal wall defects are gastroschisis and omphalocele, both with a prevalence of about three in 10,000 births. Prenatal ultrasound has a high sensitivity for these abnormalities already at the time of the first-trimester nuchal scan. Major unrelated defects are associated with gastroschisis in about 10% of cases, whereas omphalocele is associated with chromosomal or genetic abnormalities in a much higher proportion of cases. Challenges in management of gastroschisis are related to the prevention of late intrauterine death, and the prediction and treatment of complex forms. With omphalocele, the main difficulty is the exclusion of associated conditions, not all diagnosed prenatally. An outline of the postnatal treatment of abdominal wall defects is given. Other rarer forms of abdominal wall defects are pentalogy of Cantrell, omphalocele, bladder exstrophy, imperforate anus, spina bifida complex, prune-belly syndrome, body stalk anomaly, and bladder and cloacal exstrophy; they deserve multidisciplinary counselling and management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Light shining through walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Shining light through walls? At first glance this sounds crazy. However, very feeble gravitational and electroweak effects allow for this exotic possibility. Unfortunately, with present and near future technologies the opportunity to observe light shining through walls via these effects is completely out of question. Nevertheless there are quite a number of experimental collaborations around the globe involved in this quest. Why are they doing it? Are there additional ways of sending photons through opaque matter? Indeed, various extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of new particles called WISPs - extremely weakly interacting slim particles. Photons can convert into these hypothetical particles, which have no problems to penetrate very dense materials, and these can reconvert into photons after their passage - as if light was effectively traversing walls. We review this exciting field of research, describing the most important WISPs, the present and future experiments, the indirect hints from astrophysics and cosmology pointing to the existence of WISPs, and finally outlining the consequences that the discovery of WISPs would have. (orig.)

  5. Wall Street som kreationistisk forkynder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekman, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong......Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong...

  6. Domain Walls with Strings Attached

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmakova, Marina

    2001-08-20

    We have constructed a bulk and brane action of IIA theory which describes a pair of BPS domain walls on S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2}, with strings attached. The walls are given by two orientifold O8-planes with coincident D8-branes and F1-D0-strings are stretched between the walls. This static configuration satisfies all matching conditions for the string and domain wall sources and has 1/4 of unbroken supersymmetry.

  7. Microbial interactions chapter: binding and entry of DNA in bacterial transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    Genetic transformation of bacteria by DNA released from cells of a related strain is discussed. The mechanism by which the giant information-bearing molecules of DNA are transported into the bacterial cell was investigated. It was concluded that the overall process of DNA uptake consists of two main steps, binding of donor DNA to the outside of the cell and entry of the bound DNA into the cell. Each step is discussed in detail. Inasmuch as these phenomena occur at the cell surface, they are related to structures and functions of the cell wall and membrane. In addition, the development of competence, that is the formation of cell surface structures allowing DNA uptake, is examined from both a physiological and evolutionary point of view. Genetic transfer mediated by free DNA is an obvious and important form of cellular interaction. The development of competence involves another, quite distinct system of interaction between bacterial cells. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Bacillus subtilis, and Hemophilus influenzae were used as the test organisms. 259 references.

  8. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  9. Build an Interactive Word Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Julie

    2018-01-01

    Word walls visually display important vocabulary covered during class. Although teachers have often been encouraged to post word walls in their classrooms, little information is available to guide them. This article describes steps science teachers can follow to transform traditional word walls into interactive teaching tools. It also describes a…

  10. First wall for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Yoji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the thermal stresses resulted to tiles and suppress the temperature rise for mounting jigs in first walls for a thermonuclear device. Constitution: A support mounting rod as a tile mounting and fixing jig and a fixing support connected therewith are disposed to the inside of an armour tile composed of high melting material and, further, a spring is disposed between the lower portion of the tile and the base plate. The armour tile can easily be fixed to the base plate by means of the resilient member by rotating the support member and abutting the support member against the support member abutting portion of the base plate. Further, since the contact and fixing surface of the armour tile and the fixing jig is situated below the tile inside the cooled base plate, the temperature rise can be suppressed as compared with the usual case. Since screw or like other clamping portion is not used for fixing the tile, heat resistant ceramics can be used with no restriction only to metal members, to thereby moderate the restriction in view of the temperature. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Cell wall biology: perspectives from cell wall imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kieran J D; Marcus, Susan E; Knox, J Paul

    2011-03-01

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are important biomaterials that underpin plant growth, are major repositories for photosynthetically accumulated carbon, and, in addition, impact greatly on the human use of plants. Land plant cell walls contain in the region of a dozen major polysaccharide structures that are mostly encompassed by cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectic polysaccharides. During the evolution of land plants, polysaccharide diversification appears to have largely involved structural elaboration and diversification within these polysaccharide groups. Cell wall chemistry is well advanced and a current phase of cell wall science is aimed at placing the complex polysaccharide chemistry in cellular contexts and developing a detailed understanding of cell wall biology. Imaging cell wall glycomes is a challenging area but recent developments in the establishment of cell wall molecular probe panels and their use in high throughput procedures are leading to rapid advances in the molecular understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of individual cell walls and also cell wall differences at taxonomic levels. The challenge now is to integrate this knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity with an understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms that underpin cell wall properties and functions.

  12. Analysis of Bacterial Cell Surface Chemical Composition Using Cryogenic X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstedt, Madeleine; Shchukarev, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes a method for measuring the average surface chemical composition with respect to lipids, polysaccharides, and peptides (protein + peptidoglycan) for the outer part of the bacterial cell wall. Bacterial cultures grown over night are washed with a buffer or saline at controlled pH. The analysis is done on fast-frozen bacterial cell pellets obtained after centrifugation, and the analysis requires access to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy instrumentation that can perform analyses at cryogenic temperatures (for example using liquid nitrogen). The method can be used to monitor changes in the cell wall composition following environmental stimuli or genetic mutations. The data obtained originate from the outermost part of the cell wall. Thus, it is expected that for gram-negative bacteria only the outer membrane and part of the periplasmic peptidoglycan layer is probed during analysis, and for gram-positive bacteria only the top nanometers of the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall is monitored.

  13. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  14. Vibration improved the fluidity of aluminum alloys in thin wall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Misrun is a term used to describe the incomplete filling of the mould cavity. It is a major defect in the investment casting process when used to produce turbine blades, impellers and impulse blades for turbo pumps which have complex profiles, thin walls and sharp edges. From the casting engineering point of view, poor ...

  15. [Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Edna; Caly, Wanda Regina

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis occurs in 30% of patients with ascites due to cirrhosis leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. The pathogenesis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is related to altered host defenses observed in end-stage liver disease, overgrowth of microorganisms, and bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to mesenteric lymph nodes. Clinical manifestations vary from severe to slight or absent, demanding analysis of the ascitic fluid. The diagnosis is confirmed by a number of neutrophils over 250/mm3 associated or not to bacterial growth in culture of an ascites sample. Enterobacteriae prevail and Escherichia coli has been the most frequent bacterium reported. Mortality rates decreased markedly in the last two decades due to early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment. Third generation intravenous cephalosporins are effective in 70% to 95% of the cases. Recurrence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is common and can be prevented by the continuous use of oral norfloxacin. The development of bacterial resistance demands the search for new options in the prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis; probiotics are a promising new approach, but deserve further evaluation. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for patients with cirrhosis and ascites shortly after an acute episode of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  16. Occupy Wall Street

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael J.; Bang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the political form of Occupy Wall Street on Twitter. Drawing on evidence contained within the profiles of over 50,000 Twitter users, political identities of participants are characterized using natural language processing. The results find evidence of a traditional...... oppositional social movement alongside a legitimizing countermovement, but also a new notion of political community as an ensemble of discursive practices that are endogenous to the constitution of political regimes from the “inside out.” These new political identities are bound by thin ties of political...

  17. Three-dimensional, three-component wall-PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthe, André; Kondermann, Daniel; Christensen, Carolyn; Goubergrits, Leonid; Garbe, Christoph; Affeld, Klaus; Kertzscher, Ulrich

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a new time-resolved three-dimensional, three-component (3D-3C) measurement technique called wall-PIV. It was developed to assess near wall flow fields and shear rates near non-planar surfaces. The method is based on light absorption according to Beer-Lambert’s law. The fluid containing a molecular dye and seeded with buoyant particles is illuminated by a monochromatic, diffuse light. Due to the dye, the depth of view is limited to the near wall layer. The three-dimensional particle positions can be reconstructed by the intensities of the particle’s projection on an image sensor. The flow estimation is performed by a new algorithm, based on learned particle trajectories. Possible sources of measurement errors related to the wall-PIV technique are analyzed. The accuracy analysis was based on single particle experiments and a three-dimensional artificial data set simulating a rotating sphere.

  18. Walls talk: Microbial biogeography of homes spanning urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Calderon, Jean F; Cavallin, Humberto; Song, Se Jin; Novoselac, Atila; Pericchi, Luis R; Hernandez, Jean N; Rios, Rafael; Branch, Oralee H; Pereira, Henrique; Paulino, Luciana C; Blaser, Martin J; Knight, Rob; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G

    2016-02-01

    Westernization has propelled changes in urbanization and architecture, altering our exposure to the outdoor environment from that experienced during most of human evolution. These changes might affect the developmental exposure of infants to bacteria, immune development, and human microbiome diversity. Contemporary urban humans spend most of their time indoors, and little is known about the microbes associated with different designs of the built environment and their interaction with the human immune system. This study addresses the associations between architectural design and the microbial biogeography of households across a gradient of urbanization in South America. Urbanization was associated with households' increased isolation from outdoor environments, with additional indoor space isolation by walls. Microbes from house walls and floors segregate by location, and urban indoor walls contain human bacterial markers of space use. Urbanized spaces uniquely increase the content of human-associated microbes-which could increase transmission of potential pathogens-and decrease exposure to the environmental microbes with which humans have coevolved.

  19. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria....

  20. The role of the hemicelluloses in the nanobiology of wood cell walls : a systems theoretic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajai H. Atalla

    2005-01-01

    The hemicelluloses have not received adequate attention in studies of wood cell walls because the complexity of their structures does not admit easy interpretation within the paradigms of polymer science. Two-phase composite models of the cell wall have led many to view their primary function as one of coupling cellulose and lignin to enhance the mechanical properties...

  1. Bacterial surface adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  2. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  3. Factitious Bacterial Meningitis Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, E.; Thrupp, L.; Uchiyama, N.; Hawkins, B.; Wolvin, B.; Greene, G.

    1982-01-01

    Nonviable gram-negative bacilli were seen in smears of cerebrospinal fluid from eight infants in whom bacterial meningitis was ruled out. Tubes from commercial kits were the source of the factitious organisms. PMID:7153328

  4. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...... about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria......-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial...

  5. Interactions of the cell-wall glycopolymers of lactic acid bacteria with their bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre eChapot-Chartier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram positive bacteria widely used in the production of fermented food in particular cheese and yoghurts. Bacteriophage infections during fermentation processes have been for many years a major industrial concern and have stimulated numerous research efforts. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of bacteriophage interactions with their host bacteria is required for the development of efficient strategies to fight against infections. The bacterial cell wall plays key roles in these interactions. First, bacteriophages must adsorb at the bacterial surface through specific interactions with receptors that are cell wall components. At next step, phages must overcome the barrier constituted by cell wall peptidoglycan to inject DNA inside bacterial cell. Also at the end of the infection cycle, phages synthesize endolysins able to hydrolyze peptidoglycan and lyse bacterial cells to release phage progeny. In the last decade, concomitant development of genomics and structural analysis of cell wall components allowed considerable advances in the knowledge of their structure and function in several model LAB. Here, we describe the present knowledge on the structure of the cell wall glycopolymers of the best characterized LAB emphasizing their structural variations and we present the available data regarding their role in bacteria-phage specific interactions at the different steps of the infection cycle.

  6. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  7. The role of beneficial bacteria wall elasticity in regulating innate immune response

    OpenAIRE

    ?okrozub, Viktoria V.; Lazarenko, Liudmyla M.; Sichel, Liubov M.; Babenko, Lidia P.; Lytvyn, Petro M.; Demchenko, Olga M.; Melnichenko, Yulia O.; Boyko, Nadiya V.; Biavati, Bruno; DiGioia, Diana; Bubnov, Rostyslav V.; Spivak, Mykola Ya

    2015-01-01

    Background Probiotics have great potential to contribute to development of healthy dietary regimes, preventive care, and an integrated approach to immunity-related disease management. The bacterial wall is a dynamic entity, depending on many components and playing an essential role in modulating immune response. The impact of cell wall elasticity on the beneficial effects of probiotic strains has not been sufficiently studied. The aim was to investigate the effect of lactic acid bacteria (LAB...

  8. Congenital lateral abdominal wall hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Tapia, Fernando; Cura-Esquivel, Idalia; Gutiérrez, Susana; Rodríguez-Balderrama, Isaías; de la O-Cavazos, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Congenital abdominal wall defects that are located outside of the anterior wall are extremely rare and difficult to classify because there are no well accepted guidelines. There are two regions outside of the anterior wall: the flank or lateral wall; and the lumbar region. We report the case of a patient with an oval 3 cm-diameter hernia defect located above the anterior axillary line, which affects all layers of the muscular wall. An anorectal malformation consisting of a recto-vestibular fistula was also identified, and chest X-ray showed dextrocardia. The suggested treatment is repair of the defect before 1 year of age. Given that the anomalies described may accompany lateral abdominal wall hernia, it is important to diagnose and treat the associated defects. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Dynamics of monopole walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, R., E-mail: rafael.maldonado@durham.ac.uk; Ward, R.S., E-mail: richard.ward@durham.ac.uk

    2014-06-27

    The moduli space of centred Bogomolny–Prasad–Sommerfield 2-monopole fields is a 4-dimensional manifold M with a natural metric, and the geodesics on M correspond to slow-motion monopole dynamics. The best-known case is that of monopoles on R{sup 3}, where M is the Atiyah–Hitchin space. More recently, the case of monopoles periodic in one direction (monopole chains) was studied a few years ago. Our aim in this note is to investigate M for doubly-periodic fields, which may be visualized as monopole walls. We identify some of the geodesics on M as fixed-point sets of discrete symmetries, and interpret these in terms of monopole scattering and bound orbits, concentrating on novel features that arise as a consequence of the periodicity.

  10. Abdominal wall hernias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Nadia A; Mortensen, Joachim H; Lorentzen, Lea

    2016-01-01

    that abdominal wall hernia formation is associated with altered collagen metabolism. The aim of this study was to evaluate biomarkers for type IV and V collagen turnover in patients with multiple hernias and control subjects without hernia. METHODS: Venous blood was collected from 88 men (mean age, 62 years......) with a history of more than 3 hernia repairs and 86, age-matched men without hernias. Biomarkers for synthesis of collagen type IV (P4NP) and type V (P5CP) as well as breakdown (C4M and C5M) were measured in serum by validated, solid-phase, competitive assays. Collagen turnover was indicated by the ratio between...... the biomarker for synthesis and breakdown. RESULTS: Type IV collagen turnover was 1.4-fold increased in patients with multiple hernias compared to control subjects (P turnover was 1.7-fold decreased (P

  11. Observations on resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerwin, R.A.; Finn, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Several results on resistive wall modes and their application to tokamaks are presented. First, it is observed that in the presence of collisional parallel dynamics there is an exact cancellation to lowest order of the dissipative and sound wave effects for an ideal Ohm's law. This is easily traced to the fact that the parallel dynamics occurs along the perturbed magnetic field lines for such electromagnetic modes. Such a cancellation does not occur in the resistive layer of a tearing-like mode. The relevance to models for resistive wall modes using an electrostatic Hammett-Perkins type operator to model Landau damping will be discussed. Second, we observe that with an ideal Ohm's law, resistive wall modes can be destabilized by rotation in that part of parameter space in which the ideal MHD modes are stable with the wall at infinity. This effect can easily be explained by interpreting the resistive wall instability in terms of mode coupling between the backward stable MHD mode and a stable mode locked into the wall. Such an effect can occur for very small rotation for tearing-resistive wall modes in which inertia dominates viscosity in the layer, but the mode is stabilized by further rotation. For modes for which viscosity dominates in the layer, rotation is purely stabilizing. For both tearing models, a somewhat higher rotation frequency gives stability essentially whenever the tearing mode is stable with a perfectly conducting wall. These tearing/resistive wall results axe also simply explained in terms of mode coupling. It has been shown that resonant external ideal modes can be stabilized in the presence of resistive wall and resistive plasma with rotation of order the nominal tearing mode growth rate. We show that these modes behave as resistive wall tearing modes in the sense above. This strengthens the suggestion that rotational stabilization of the external kink with a resistive wall is due to the presence of resistive layers, even for ideal modes

  12. Flexoelectricity in nematic domain walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Steve J

    2008-07-01

    Flexoelectric effects are studied in the domain walls of a nematic liquid crystal device showing the Freedericksz transition. Walls parallel to the alignment direction have a strong twist distortion and an electro-optic effect dominated by e1-e3 is seen. Walls perpendicular to the alignment direction have a strong splay-bend distortion and an electro-optic effect dominated by e1+e3 is seen. This allows the study of both flexoelectric coefficient combinations in a single device.

  13. Cell wall evolution and diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Ulrik Fangel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls display a considerable degree of diversity in their compositions and molecular architectures. In some cases the functional significance of a particular cell wall type appears to be easy to discern: secondary cells walls are often heavy reinforced with lignin that provides the required durability; the thin cell walls of pollen tubes have particular compositions that enable their tip growth; lupin seed cell walls are characteristically thickened with galactan used as a storage polysaccharide. However, more frequently the evolutionary mechanisms and selection pressures that underpin cell wall diversity and evolution are unclear. The rapidly increasing availability of transcriptome and genome data sets, development of high-throughput methods for cell wall analyses, and expansion of molecular probe sets, are providing new insights into the diversity and occurrence of cell wall polysaccharides and associated biosynthetic genes. Such research is important for refining our understanding of some of the fundamental processes that enabled plants to colonise land and subsequently radiate so comprehensively. The study of cell wall structural diversity is also an important aspect of the industrial utilization of global polysaccharide bio-resources.

  14. Radiometric Temperatures of Urban Canyon Walls obtained from Vehicle Traverses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, J. A.; Oke, T. R.

    Building walls form an important component of the total surface area in cities, but are not generally considered in most attempts to measure urban surface temperatures. A procedure which allows sampling of the spatial and temporal variation of wall surface temperatures in urban areas is presented. Radiometric surface temperatures are monitored using an array of infrared thermometers mounted on a moving vehicle. It is necessary to remove observations which view sky, or mixed sky and building scenes. Distribution truncation and distribution modelling are investigated as methods to remove the unwanted observations. Use of the traverse method in several urban areas reveals strong temporal variations in wall temperatures due to solar loading. Significant spatial variations in temperatures suggest caution be used in the extrapolation of data from single canyon studies to larger scales. Times of strong surface temperature contrast between different walls are linked to canyon and solar geometry. In the light industrial and residential observation areas, north-south streets show mid-morning and late afternoon peaks of approximately equal magnitude in the difference between wall surface temperatures. East-west streets show a single peak in the hour following solar noon. The downtown study area, with streets oriented northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast, shows a double wave pattern with one peak dominant. These patterns are of interest because they can lead to large biases in remotely-observed surface temperature with view direction.

  15. Warning: safety risk with some Apple AC Wall Plug Adapters

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN IT department

    2016-01-01

    Dear Mac and iOS Users, Apple has determined that some of its two prong Apple AC wall plug adapters may break and create a risk of electrical shock.   CERN users can now exchange their affected Apple wall plug adapters at the Service Desk. To find out if your adapter is affected and for any further information concerning the procedure to follow to exchange it, please check the following URL: https://cern.service-now.com/service-portal/view-outage.do?n=OTG0028639.

  16. Ultrathin antibiotic walled microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khopade, Ajay J; Arulsudar, N; Khopade, Surekha A; Hartmann, J

    2005-01-01

    Ultrathin microcapsules comprised of anionic polyelectrolytes (PE) and a polycationic aminoglycoside (AmG) antibiotic drug were prepared by depositing PE/AmG multilayers on zinc oxide (ZnO) colloid particles using the layer-by-layer self-assembly technique and subsequently dissolving the ZnO templated cores. The polyelectrolytes, dextran sulfate sodium (DxS) and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS), were selected owing to their different backbone structure. An aminoglycoside, tobramycin sulfate (TbS), was used for studying DxS/TbS or PSS/TbS multilayer films. The multilayer growth on ZnO cores was characterized by alternating zeta potential values that were different for the DxS/TbS and PSS/TbS multilayers due to the PE chemistry and its interaction with Zn(2+) ions. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy provide evidence of PE/TbS multilayer coating on ZnO core particles. The slow acid-decomposition of the ZnO cores using weak organic acids and the presence of sufficient quantity of Zn(2+) in the dispersion were required to produce antibiotic multilayer capsules. There was no difference in the morphological characteristics of the two types of capsules; although, the yield for [PSS/TbS](5) capsules was significantly higher than for [DxS/TbS](5) capsules which was related to the physicochemical properties of DxS/TbS/Zn(2+) and PSS/TbS/Zn(2+) complexes forming the capsule wall. The TbS quantity in the multilayer films was determined using a quartz crystal microbalance and high performance liquid chromatography techniques which showed less TbS loading in both, capsules and multilayers on planar gold substrate, than the theoretical DxS:TbS or PSS:TbS stoichiometric ratio. The decomposition of the [PE/TbS](6) multilayers was fastest in physiological buffer followed by mannitol and water. The decomposition rate of the [PSS/TbS](6) multilayers was slower than [DxS/TbS](6) monolayers. The incomplete decomposition of DxS/TbS under saline conditions suggests the major role of

  17. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  18. Control of Wall Mounting Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Pedersen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for designing controllers for trajectory tracking with actuator constraints. In particular, we consider a joystick-controlled wall mounting robot called WallMo. In contrast to previous works, a model-free approach is taken to the control problem, where the path...

  19. The "Brick Wall" Graphic Organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, Shirley M.

    2016-01-01

    A brick wall provides a fitting description of what happens when teachers try to teach a concept for which students are unprepared. When students are unsuccessful academically, their foundational knowledge may be missing, incomplete, or incorrect. As a result, students "hit a brick wall," and their academic progress stops because they do…

  20. Diplopia and Orbital Wall Fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  1. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  2. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marji, S.

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  3. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm resilience poses major challenges to the development of novel antimicrobial agents. Biofilm bacteria can be considered small groups of “Special Forces” capable of infiltrating the host and destroying important components of the cellular defense system with the aim of crippling the host...... defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation...

  4. Anisotropy of domain wall resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viret; Samson; Warin; Marty; Ott; Sondergard; Klein; Fermon

    2000-10-30

    The resistive effect of domain walls in FePd films with perpendicular anisotropy was studied experimentally as a function of field and temperature. The films were grown directly on MgO substrates, which induces an unusual virgin magnetic configuration composed of 60 nm wide parallel stripe domains. This allowed us to carry out the first measurements of the anisotropy of domain wall resistivity in the two configurations of current perpendicular and parallel to the walls. At 18 K, we find 8.2% and 1.3% for the domain wall magnetoresistance normalized to the wall width (8 nm) in these two respective configurations. These values are consistent with the predictions of Levy and Zhang.

  5. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  6. Channel Wall Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Adult bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...

  8. Bacterial blight of cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïda JALLOUL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial blight of cotton (Gossypium ssp., caused by Xanthomonas citri pathovar malvacearum, is a severe disease occurring in all cotton-growing areas. The interactions between host plants and the bacteria are based on the gene-for-gene concept, representing a complex resistance gene/avr gene system. In light of the recent data, this review focuses on the understanding of these interactions with emphasis on (1 the genetic basis for plant resistance and bacterial virulence, (2 physiological mechanisms involved in the hypersensitive response to the pathogen, including hormonal signaling, the oxylipin pathway, synthesis of antimicrobial molecules and alteration of host cell structures, and (3 control of the disease.

  9. Bacterial meningitis in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Lawrence C; Boggess, Kim A; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal bacterial meningitis is uncommon but devastating. Morbidity among survivors remains high. The types and distribution of pathogens are related to gestational age, postnatal age, and geographic region. Confirming the diagnosis is difficult. Clinical signs are often subtle, lumbar punctures are frequently deferred, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures can be compromised by prior antibiotic exposure. Infants with bacterial meningitis can have negative blood cultures and normal CSF parameters. Promising tests such as the polymerase chain reaction require further study. Prompt treatment with antibiotics is essential. Clinical trials investigating a vaccine for preventing neonatal Group B Streptococcus infections are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anaerobic bacterial meningitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Jun; Lien, Chia-Yi; Chien, Chun-Chih; Huang, Chi-Ren; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2018-01-22

    Anaerobic infection is a very uncommon condition in adult bacterial meningitis (ABM), and its clinical characteristics have yet to be clarified. We enrolled 540 patients with culture-proven bacterial meningitis during a study period of 30 years (1986-2015), of whom 13 (2.4%) had anaerobic infections. These 13 patients were eight men and five women, aged 22-77 years. Among them, 53.8% (7/13) had a postneurosurgical state as the preceding event, and 79.6% (10/13) had underlying medical conditions including diabetes mellitus, malignancy, liver cirrhosis, cerebral infarct and alcoholism. Nosocomial and mixed infections were found in 15.5% (2/13) and 46.1% (6/13) of the patients, respectively. A total of 14 anaerobic strains were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid specimens, including nine Gram-negative (G(-)) strains: Fusobacterium nucleatum (3), Prevotella species (3) and Bacteroides fragilis (3), and five Gram-positive (G(+)) strains: Propionibacterium acnes (3) and Peptostreptococcus micros (also known as Parvimonas micra) (2). All of the implicated G(+) anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to penicillin, and no multiple drug-resistant strains were found among the implicated G(-) anaerobic bacteria. Despite treatment, 30.8% (4/13) of the patients died. Of the nine survivors, 22.2% (2/9) had a full recovery, while the other 77.8% (7/9) had varying degrees of neurological deficits. Compared with the good outcome group (n = 6, modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores: 0-2), the poor outcome group (n = 7, mRS scores ≧3) had higher incidence of seizure. These results may offer a preliminary view of the clinical characteristics of anaerobic ABM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bacterial Cell Growth Inhibitors Targeting Undecaprenyl Diphosphate Synthase and Undecaprenyl Diphosphate Phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Desai, Janish; Zhang, Yonghui; Malwal, Satish R; Shin, Christopher J; Feng, Xinxin; Sun, Hong; Liu, Guizhi; Guo, Rey-Ting; Oldfield, Eric

    2016-10-19

    We synthesized a series of benzoic acids and phenylphosphonic acids and investigated their effects on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. One of the most active compounds, 5-fluoro-2-(3-(octyloxy)benzamido)benzoic acid (7, ED 50 ∼0.15 μg mL -1 ) acted synergistically with seven antibiotics known to target bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis (a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of ∼0.35, on average) but had indifferent effects in combinations with six non-cell-wall biosynthesis inhibitors (average FICI∼1.45). The most active compounds were found to inhibit two enzymes involved in isoprenoid/bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis: undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS) and undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP), but not farnesyl diphosphate synthase, and there were good correlations between bacterial cell growth inhibition, UPPS inhibition, and UPPP inhibition. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Microcoupon Assay Of Adhesion And Growth Of Bacterial Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Koenig, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Microbiological assay technique facilitates determination of some characteristics of sessile bacteria like those that attach to and coat interior walls of water-purification systems. Biofilms cause sickness and interfere with purification process. Technique enables direct measurement of rate of attachment of bacterial cells, their metabolism, and effects of chemicals on them. Used to quantify effects of both bactericides and growth-stimulating agents and in place of older standard plate-count and tube-dilution techniques.

  13. Structure and operation of bacterial tripartite pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Symmons, Martyn F; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, tripartite membrane machineries, or pumps, determine the efflux of small noxious molecules, such as detergents, heavy metals, and antibiotics, and the export of large proteins including toxins. They are therefore influential in bacterial survival, particularly during infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. In these tripartite pumps an inner membrane transporter, typically an ATPase or proton antiporter, binds and translocates export or efflux substrates. In cooperation with a periplasmic adaptor protein it recruits and opens a TolC family cell exit duct, which is anchored in the outer membrane and projects across the periplasmic space between inner and outer membranes. Assembled tripartite pumps thus span the entire bacterial cell envelope. We review the atomic structures of each of the three pump components and discuss how these have allowed high-resolution views of tripartite pump assembly, operation, and possible inhibition.

  14. Patterns of expression of cell wall related genes in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima D.U.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Our search for genes related to cell wall metabolism in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database (http://sucest.lbi.dcc.unicamp.br resulted in 3,283 reads (1% of the total reads which were grouped into 459 clusters (potential genes with an average of 7.1 reads per cluster. To more clearly display our correlation coefficients, we constructed surface maps which we used to investigate the relationship between cell wall genes and the sugarcane tissues libraries from which they came. The only significant correlations that we found between cell wall genes and/or their expression within particular libraries were neutral or synergetic. Genes related to cellulose biosynthesis were from the CesA family, and were found to be the most abundant cell wall related genes in the SUCEST database. We found that the highest number of CesA reads came from the root and stem libraries. The genes with the greatest number of reads were those involved in cell wall hydrolases (e.g. beta-1,3-glucanases, xyloglucan endo-beta-transglycosylase, beta-glucosidase and endo-beta-mannanase. Correlation analyses by surface mapping revealed that the expression of genes related to biosynthesis seems to be associated with the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses, pectin hydrolases being mainly associated with xyloglucan hydrolases. The patterns of cell wall related gene expression in sugarcane based on the number of reads per cluster reflected quite well the expected physiological characteristics of the tissues. This is the first work to provide a general view on plant cell wall metabolism through the expression of related genes in almost all the tissues of a plant at the same time. For example, developing flowers behaved similarly to both meristematic tissues and leaf-root transition zone tissues. Besides providing a basis for future research on the mechanisms of plant development which involve the cell wall, our findings will provide valuable tools for plant engineering in the

  15. Shielding wall for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Takaho.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns shielding walls opposing to plasmas of a thermonuclear device and it is an object thereof to conduct reactor operation with no troubles even if a portion of shielding wall tiles should be damaged. That is, the shielding wall tiles are constituted as a dual layer structure in which the lower base tiles are connected by means of bolts to first walls. Further, the upper surface tiles are bolt-connected to the layer base tiles. In this structure, the plasma thermal loads are directly received by the surface layer tiles and heat is conducted by means of conduction and radiation to the underlying base tiles and the first walls. Even upon occurrence of destruction accidents to the surface layer tiles caused by incident heat or electromagnetic force upon elimination of plasmas, since the underlying base tiles remain as they are, the first walls constituted with stainless steels, etc. are not directly exposed to the plasmas. Accordingly, the integrity of the first walls having cooling channels can be maintained and sputtering intrusion of atoms of high atom number into the plasmas can be prevented. (I.S.)

  16. Bacterial fingerprints across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasner, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE), impose major threats to human health worldwide. Both have a ‘Jekyll & Hyde’ character, since they can be present as human commensals, but can also become harmful invasive pathogens especially

  17. [Bacterial biofilms and infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, I; Del Pozo, J L; Penadés, J R; Leiva, J

    2005-01-01

    In developed countries we tend to think of heart disease and the numerous forms of cancer as the main causes of mortality, but on a global scale infectious diseases come close, or may even be ahead: 14.9 million deaths in 2002 compared to cardiovascular diseases (16.9 million deaths) and cancer (7.1 million deaths) (WHO report 2004). The infectious agents responsible for human mortality have evolved as medical techniques and hygienic measures have changed. Modern-day acute infectious diseases caused by specialized bacterial pathogens such as diphtheria, tetanus, cholera, plague, which represented the main causes of death at the beginning of XX century, have been effectively controlled with antibiotics and vaccines. In their place, more than half of the infectious diseases that affect mildly immunocompromised patients involve bacterial species that are commensal with the human body; these can produce chronic infections, are resistant to antimicrobial agents and there is no effective vaccine against them. Examples of these infections are the otitis media, native valve endocarditis, chronic urinary infections, bacterial prostatitis, osteomyelitis and all the infections related to medical devices. Direct analysis of the surface of medical devices or of tissues that have been foci of chronic infections shows the presence of large numbers of bacteria surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix, which has been named the "biofilm". Inside the biofilm, bacteria grow protected from the action of the antibodies, phagocytic cells and antimicrobial treatments. In this article, we describe the role of bacterial biofilms in human persistent infections.

  18. EDITORIAL SPONTANEOUS BACTERIAL PERITONITIS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) frequent]y occurs in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites. It is defined as an infection of previously sterile ascitic fluid without any demonstrable intrabdominal source of infection. It is now internationally agreed that a polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell count in the ascitic fluid of over 250 ...

  19. Bacterial membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetsch, Ansgar; Wolters, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    About one quarter to one third of all bacterial genes encode proteins of the inner or outer bacterial membrane. These proteins perform essential physiological functions, such as the import or export of metabolites, the homeostasis of metal ions, the extrusion of toxic substances or antibiotics, and the generation or conversion of energy. The last years have witnessed completion of a plethora of whole-genome sequences of bacteria important for biotechnology or medicine, which is the foundation for proteome and other functional genome analyses. In this review, we discuss the challenges in membrane proteome analysis, starting from sample preparation and leading to MS-data analysis and quantification. The current state of available proteomics technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages will be described with a focus on shotgun proteomics. Then, we will briefly introduce the most abundant proteins and protein families present in bacterial membranes before bacterial membrane proteomics studies of the last years will be presented. It will be shown how these works enlarged our knowledge about the physiological adaptations that take place in bacteria during fine chemical production, bioremediation, protein overexpression, and during infections. Furthermore, several examples from literature demonstrate the suitability of membrane proteomics for the identification of antigens and different pathogenic strains, as well as the elucidation of membrane protein structure and function.

  20. Seizures Complicating Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical data of 116 patients, 1 month to <5 years of age, admitted for bacterial meningitis, and grouped according to those with and without seizures during hospitalization, were compared in a study at Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and other centers in Taiwan.

  1. Diagnosis of bacterial infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rapid and easy-to-use test for bacterial infections. Clearly, this is a very ... detect antigens or specific antibodies, e.g. group A streptococcal antigen testing can be employed to reduce antibiotic use. Culture-based tests are often ... White blood cell count 12 000 cells/mm³; or the presence of >10% ...

  2. Bacterial Meningitis Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1995-01-01

    The neurologic, psychological, and educational outcomes of bacterial meningitis in 130 children evaluated at a mean age of 8 years, and 6 years after their meningitis, are reported from the Department of Paediatrics and Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, University of Melbourne, and the Royal Children’s Hospital, Victoria, Australia.

  3. The link between bacterial radiation resistance and cold adaptation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 27; Issue 2. Clipboard: The link between bacterial radiation resistance and cold adaptation. M K Chattopadhyay. Volume 27 Issue 2 March 2002 pp 71-73. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/027/02/0071-0073 ...

  4. Indoor Air Bacterial Load and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Surgical site infection is the second most common health care associated infection. One of the risk factors for such infection is bacterial contamination of operating rooms' and surgical wards' indoor air. In view of that, the microbiological quality of air can be considered as a mirror of the hygienic condition of ...

  5. Role of the chronic bacterial infection in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not bacterial infection of the urinary bladder had a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this proposition, four separate studies were conducted. The first study developed an experimental animal model where bacterial infection of the urinary bladder could be introduced and maintained for a period in excess of one year. The method of infection, inoculation of bacteria (Escherichia coli type 04) subserosally into the vesical wall, successfully caused persistent infection in the majority of animals. In the second study the temporal effects of bacterial infection on the induction of urothelial ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and 3 H-thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis were examined. Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder induced urothelial ODC with a peak in enzyme activity 6 hr after infection. 3 H-Thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis peaked 48 hr after infection and coincided with the urothelial hyperplasia that occurred in response to the infection. In the third study the specific bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to rats concurrent with the urinary bacterial infection. In the fourth study rats were administered sodium nitrate and either dibutylamine or piperazine in the drinking water. The infected group developed bladder tumors while none were detected in the non-infected rats. From these studies it may be concluded that bacterial infection may have a significant role in the process of urinary bladder carcinogenesis

  6. Corticosteroids for Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Glidden, David V.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Hong, Kevin C.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Lee, Salena M.; Zegans, Michael E.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is a benefit in clinical outcomes with the use of topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Methods Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, multicenter clinical trial comparing prednisolone sodium phosphate, 1.0%, to placebo as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Eligible patients had a culture-positive bacterial corneal ulcer and received topical moxifloxacin for at least 48 hours before randomization. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) at 3 months from enrollment. Secondary outcomes included infiltrate/scar size, reepithelialization, and corneal perforation. Results Between September 1, 2006, and February 22, 2010, 1769 patients were screened for the trial and 500 patients were enrolled. No significant difference was observed in the 3-month BSCVA (−0.009 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]; 95% CI, −0.085 to 0.068; P = .82), infiltrate/scar size (P = .40), time to reepithelialization (P = .44), or corneal perforation (P > .99). A significant effect of corticosteroids was observed in subgroups of baseline BSCVA (P = .03) and ulcer location (P = .04). At 3 months, patients with vision of counting fingers or worse at baseline had 0.17 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (95% CI, −0.31 to −0.02; P = .03) compared with placebo, and patients with ulcers that were completely central at baseline had 0.20 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (−0.37 to −0.04; P = .02). Conclusions We found no overall difference in 3-month BSCVA and no safety concerns with adjunctive corticosteroid therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. Application to Clinical Practice Adjunctive topical corticosteroid use does not improve 3-month vision in patients with bacterial corneal ulcers. PMID:21987582

  7. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Wall Insulation; BTS Technology Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

    2000-11-07

    Properly sealed, moisture-protected, and insulated walls help increase comfort, reduce noise, and save on energy costs. This fact sheet addresses these topics plus advanced framing techniques, insulation types, wall sheathings, and steps for effective wall construction and insulation.

  9. Topograph for inspection of engine cylinder walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, S; Leonhardt, K; Windecker, R; Tiziani, H J

    1999-12-20

    The microstructural inspection of engine cylinder walls is an important task for quality management in the automotive industry. Until recently, mainly tactile methods were used for this purpose. We present an optical instrument based on microscopic fringe projection that permits fast, reliable, and nondestructive measurements of microstructure. The field of view is 0.8 mm x 1.2 mm, with a spatial sampling of 1100 x 700 pixels. In contrast to conventional tactile sensors, the optical method provides fast in situ three-dimensional surface characterizations that provide more information about the surface than do line profiles. Measurements are presented, and advantages of this instrument for characterization of a surface are discussed.

  10. Restrained shrinkage of masonry walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Rots, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    State of the art computational rnechanics, in combination with experimental programmes have a lot to offer in providing insight, characterization of total behaviour and predictive ability of structural masonry. Here numerical research towards rationalizing masonry wall movement joint positioning and

  11. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes generation 2 bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation, and separation. Ultimately, it is desired to combine as man...

  12. Super Wall Graphics for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anne; Vlastos, George

    1985-01-01

    Steps for organizing and implementing a program that involves elementary students in beautifying their school with large-scale wall graphics are outlined. Sources of design, drawing hints, painting methods, application techniques, and follow-up activities are discussed. (RM)

  13. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Fluorescence Biosensors for Pathogen Recognition in Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata K. K. Upadhyayula

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs aggregates as fluorescence sensors for pathogen recognition in drinking water treatment applications has been studied. Batch adsorption study is conducted to adsorb large concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus aureus SH 1000 and Escherichia coli pKV-11 on single-walled carbon nanotubes. Subsequently the immobilized bacteria are detected with confocal microscopy by coating the nanotubes with fluorescence emitting antibodies. The Freundlich adsorption equilibrium constant (k for S.aureus and E.coli determined from batch adsorption study was found to be 9×108 and 2×108 ml/g, respectively. The visualization of bacterial cells adsorbed on fluorescently modified carbon nanotubes is also clearly seen. The results indicate that hydrophobic single-walled carbon nanotubes have excellent bacterial adsorption capacity and fluorescent detection capability. This is an important advancement in designing fluorescence biosensors for pathogen recognition in water systems.

  14. Postinfarction heart rupture of posterior wall repaired by covering patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masashi; Okamura, Homare; Adachi, Hideo; Ino, Takashi

    2008-10-01

    A 46-year-old man underwent emergency surgery for heart rupture after acute infarction of the posterior wall. Echocardiography revealed limited myocardial thinning, so rather than sutureless repair, a covering patch was used in view of the risk of recurrent rupture. Postoperative echocardiography showed the myocardial thinning had progressed to a wide defect, and computed tomography demonstrated that the covering patch had prevented a repeat rupture.

  15. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Hartog, Dennis; Tuinebreijer, Wim; Oprel, Pim; Patka, Peter

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a computed tomography (CT) scan. Repair consisted of an open anatomical reconstruction of the abdominal wall layers with reinforcement by an intraperitoneal composite mesh. The patient recovered well and...

  16. Duct having oscillatory side wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.

    2018-04-03

    A pump system includes a particulate consolidator pump that has a pump outlet. A duct is coupled to the pump outlet. The duct has a wall that is coupled with an oscillator. The oscillator is operable to oscillate the wall at a controlled frequency. The controlled frequency is selected with respect to breaking static bridging of particulate in the duct due, at least in part, to consolidation of the particulate from a downstream check valve.

  17. Radiometric detection of bacterial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.; Wagner Junior, H.N.

    1979-01-01

    The measurement of 14 CO 2 produced by the bacterial oxidation of labelled compounds is discussed as a means of evaluating the bacterial metabolism. The following items are discussed:automated radiometric detection, types of graphs, clinical applications of the radiometric system and influential factors. Complementary studies on bacterial assimilation of substances are presented. (M.A.) [pt

  18. Roles of tRNA in cell wall biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dare, Kiley; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    responsible for cell wall modifications, aminoacyl-phosphatidylglycerol synthases (aaPGSs) and Fem, were discovered some time ago, they have recently become of intense interest for their roles in the antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic microorganisms. The addition of positively charged amino acids...... to phosphatidylglycerol (PG) by aaPGSs neutralizes the lipid bilayer making the bacteria less susceptible to positively charged antimicrobial agents. Fem transferases utilize aa-tRNA to form peptide bridges that link strands of peptidoglycan. These bridges vary among the bacterial species in which they are present...... and play a role in resistance to antibiotics that target the cell wall. Additionally, the formation of truncated peptides results in shorter peptide bridges and loss of branched linkages which makes bacteria more susceptible to antimicrobials. A greater understanding of the structure and substrate...

  19. Unusual combination of posterior femoral head dislocation with anterior and posterior wall fractures in the ipsilateral acetabulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Su, Yanling; Zhang, Yingze; Zhang, Qi; Zheng, Zhanle; Pan, Jinshe

    2010-06-09

    Although hip dislocation combined with acetabular fracture is not an uncommon injury, anterior acetabular wall fractures rarely occur in patients who have posterior fracture-dislocations of the hip. This article presents a unique case of anterior and posterior wall fractures of the ipsilateral acetabulum in a patient who sustained traumatic posterior hip dislocation that resulted from a high-speed motor vehicle accident. The initial imaging evaluation, which did not include the obturator oblique view, revealed no concomitant anterior acetabular wall fracture. Repeated manipulative reductions were unsuccessful in reducing the displaced hip joint. Pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans revealed the initially missed anterior acetabular wall fracture fragments incarcerated in the left hip joint in addition to the hip dislocation and the posterior acetabular wall fracture. The incarcerated bone fragments lay between the anterior wall and the femoral head, and between the posterior wall and the femoral head, which appeared to derive from both anterior and posterior acetabular walls, respectively. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed to manage the posterior dislocation and associated acetabular fractures. Intraoperatively, the major anterior wall fragment was used to reconstruct the defected posterior wall. This case highlights the necessity of suspicion and pre- and postoperative monitoring of the obturator oblique view and CT scans to detect the potentially existing anterior acetabular wall fracture. Early surgical intervention is important to guarantee satisfactory outcomes of such complex fracture-dislocation injuries. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Cytosolic Access of Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens: The Shigella Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellouk, Nora; Enninga, Jost

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, which causes bacillary dysentery in humans. A crucial step of Shigella infection is its invasion of epithelial cells. Using a type III secretion system, Shigella injects several bacterial effectors ultimately leading to bacterial internalization within a vacuole. Then, Shigella escapes rapidly from the vacuole, it replicates within the cytosol and spreads from cell-to-cell. The molecular mechanism of vacuolar rupture used by Shigella has been studied in some detail during the recent years and new paradigms are emerging about the underlying molecular events. For decades, bacterial effector proteins were portrayed as main actors inducing vacuolar rupture. This includes the effector/translocators IpaB and IpaC. More recently, this has been challenged and an implication of the host cell in the process of vacuolar rupture has been put forward. This includes the bacterial subversion of host trafficking regulators, such as the Rab GTPase Rab11. The involvement of the host in determining bacterial vacuolar integrity has also been found for other bacterial pathogens, particularly for Salmonella. Here, we will discuss our current view of host factor and pathogen effector implications during Shigella vacuolar rupture and the steps leading to it.

  1. Cytosolic access of intracellular bacterial pathogens: the Shigella paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora eMellouk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, which causes bacillary dysentery in humans. A crucial step of Shigella infection is its invasion of epithelial cells. Using a type III secretion system, Shigella injects several bacterial effectors ultimately leading to bacterial internalization within a vacuole. Then, Shigella escapes rapidly from the vacuole, it replicates within the cytosol and spreads from cell-to-cell. The molecular mechanism of vacuolar rupture used by Shigella has been studied in some detail during the recent years and new paradigms are emerging about the underlying molecular events. For decades, bacterial effector proteins were portrayed as main actors inducing vacuolar rupture. This includes the effector/translocators IpaB and IpaC. More recently, this has been challenged and an implication of the host cell in the process of vacuolar rupture has been put forward. This includes the bacterial subversion of host trafficking regulators, such as the Rab GTPase Rab11. The involvement of the host in determining bacterial vacuolar integrity has also been found for other bacterial pathogens, particularly for Salmonella. Here, we will discuss our current view of host factor and pathogen effector implications during Shigella vacuolar rupture and the steps leading to it.

  2. Bacterial meningitis in Nottingham.

    OpenAIRE

    Ispahani, P.

    1983-01-01

    Records of 171 cases of bacterial meningitis admitted to Nottingham hospitals from January 1974 to June 1980 were reviewed. The distribution of organisms producing meningitis and the factors influencing mortality in different age groups were assessed. Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae accounted for 69% of all proven cases. The overall mortality was 26% being lowest in patients with meningococcal meningitis (0%) and highest in those with pneumococcal m...

  3. Neglected bacterial zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikeka, I; Dumler, J S

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. Although many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which broad-spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. This review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Bacterial growth kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonkitticharoen, V.; Ehrhardt, J.C.; Kirchner, P.T.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of bacterial growth may be made using a radioassay technique. This method measures, by scintillation counting, the 14 CO 2 derived from the bacterial metabolism of a 14 C-labeled substrate. Mathematical growth models may serve as reliable tools for estimation of the generation rate constant (or slope of the growth curve) and provide a basis for evaluating assay performance. Two models, i.e., exponential and logistic, are proposed. Both models yielded an accurate fit to the data from radioactive measurement of bacterial growth. The exponential model yielded high precision values of the generation rate constant, with an average relative standard deviation of 1.2%. Under most conditions the assay demonstrated no changes in the slopes of growth curves when the number of bacteria per inoculation was changed. However, the radiometric assay by scintillation method had a growth-inhibiting effect on a few strains of bacteria. The source of this problem was thought to be hypersensitivity to trace amounts of toluene remaining on the detector

  5. Bacterial microbiome of lungs in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze MA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marc A Sze,1 James C Hogg,2 Don D Sin1 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The James Hogg Research Centre, Providence Heart-Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is currently the third leading cause of death in the world. Although smoking is the main risk factor for this disease, only a minority of smokers develop COPD. Why this happens is largely unknown. Recent discoveries by the human microbiome project have shed new light on the importance and richness of the bacterial microbiota at different body sites in human beings. The microbiota plays a particularly important role in the development and functional integrity of the immune system. Shifts or perturbations in the microbiota can lead to disease. COPD is in part mediated by dysregulated immune responses to cigarette smoke and other environmental insults. Although traditionally the lung has been viewed as a sterile organ, by using highly sensitive genomic techniques, recent reports have identified diverse bacterial communities in the human lung that may change in COPD. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the lung microbiota in COPD and its potential implications for pathogenesis of the disease. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bacterial microbiome, lungs

  6. The workplace window view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottrup, Lene Birgitte Poulsen; Stigsdotter, Ulrika K.; Meilby, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Office workers’ job satisfaction and ability to work are two important factors for the viability and competitiveness of most companies, and existing studies in contexts other than workplaces show relationships between a view of natural elements and, for example, student performance...... and neighbourhood satisfaction. This study investigates whether relationships between window view, and work ability and job satisfaction also exist in the context of the workplace by focusing on office workers’ view satisfaction. The results showed that a view of natural elements was related to high view...... satisfaction, and that high view satisfaction was related to high work ability and high job satisfaction. Furthermore, the results indicated that job satisfaction mediated the effect of view satisfaction on work ability. These findings show that a view of a green outdoor environment at the workplace can...

  7. Dynamics of strings between walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Minoru; Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke

    2009-01-01

    Configurations of vortex strings stretched between or ending on domain walls were previously found to be 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) states in N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories in 3+1 dimensions. Among zero modes of string positions, the center of mass of strings in each region between two adjacent domain walls is shown to be non-normalizable whereas the rests are normalizable. We study dynamics of vortex strings stretched between separated domain walls by using two methods, the moduli space (geodesic) approximation of full 1/4 BPS states and the charged particle approximation for string end points in the wall effective action. In the first method we explicitly obtain the effective Lagrangian in the strong coupling limit, which is written in terms of hypergeometric functions, and find the 90 deg. scattering for head-on collision. In the second method the domain wall effective action is assumed to be U(1) N gauge theory, and we find a good agreement between two methods for well-separated strings.

  8. The feasibility of removable prefab diaphragm walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaarouk, R.; De Gijt, J.G.; Braam, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    A diaphragm wall is a cast in-situ reinforced concrete retaining wall applied in, among others, quay walls. The main advantages of this type of retaining wall are that it can be made in almost every preferred length and that it can resist high structural loads. However, there are several

  9. Detection of antibody activity in human sera against meningococcal cell wall antigens using a gel-immuno-radio-assay (GIRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poolman, J.T.; Zanen, H.C.

    1980-01-01

    The authors recently described the application of the SDS-polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis-immuno-peroxidase (SGIP) technique to the analysis of meningococcal cell walls. However, it appeared that SGIP was not sensitive enough to detect low levels of human antibodies against meningococcal cell wall antigens. They therefore replaced the peroxidase labeled anti-IgG by 125 I-labeled protein A in order to detect antibody binding by bacterial antigens separated in gels, resulting in gel-immuno-radio-assay (GIRA). (Auth.)

  10. Evaluation of cell wall preparations for proteomics: a new procedure for purifying cell walls from Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canut Hervé

    2006-05-01

    new cell wall preparation described in this paper gives the lowest proportion of proteins predicted to be intracellular when compared to available protocols. The application of its principles should lead to a more realistic view of the cell wall proteome, at least for the weakly bound CWP extractable by salts. In addition, it offers a clean cell wall preparation for subsequent extraction of strongly bound CWP.

  11. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub......Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery...... of incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  12. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar, Jose E-mail: vilar_jlu@gva.es; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings.

  13. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar, Jose; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings

  14. To retouch or not to retouch – reflections on the aesthetic completion of wall paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brajer, Isabelle Eve

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making regarding the aesthetic treatment of wall paintings can be a difficult and complex process due to the multifaceted issues that influence the choices. In addition, local views and national value assignations make it difficult to apply general guidelines for retouching. This paper...... describes general theoretical concerns presented on the backdrop of specific examples, illustrating a wide range of aesthetic solutions for wall paintings....

  15. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    This PhD project was carried out as part of the Microbial Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Resources (MIRESOWA) project, funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant number 2104-08-0012). The environment is contaminated with various xenobiotic compounds e.g. pesticides......D student, to construct fungal-bacterial consortia in order to potentially stimulate pesticide degradation thereby increasing the chance of successful bioaugmentation. The results of the project are reported in three article manuscripts, included in this thesis. In manuscript I, the mineralization of 2...

  16. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the Par......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  17. Changes in bacterial meningitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, P E; Barclay, S M; Galloway, W H; Cole, G F

    1990-01-01

    In 1964, one of us (WHG) undertook a retrospective study of bacterial meningitis in childhood in the north east of Scotland during the period 1946-61. We have recently carried out a similar review of cases occurring during 1971-86, to compare the incidence, mortality, and bacteriological patterns. During the earlier period 285 cases occurred, a total incidence of 16.9/100,000 children per year. In the later period 274 children were affected, an annual incidence of 17.8/100,000. The overall mo...

  18. The role of beneficial bacteria wall elasticity in regulating innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Мokrozub, Viktoria V; Lazarenko, Liudmyla M; Sichel, Liubov M; Babenko, Lidia P; Lytvyn, Petro M; Demchenko, Olga M; Melnichenko, Yulia O; Boyko, Nadiya V; Biavati, Bruno; DiGioia, Diana; Bubnov, Rostyslav V; Spivak, Mykola Ya

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics have great potential to contribute to development of healthy dietary regimes, preventive care, and an integrated approach to immunity-related disease management. The bacterial wall is a dynamic entity, depending on many components and playing an essential role in modulating immune response. The impact of cell wall elasticity on the beneficial effects of probiotic strains has not been sufficiently studied. The aim was to investigate the effect of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and bifidobacteria strains on phagocytic system cells (macrophages) as related to bacterial wall elasticity, estimated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We conducted studies on Balb/c line mice 18-20 g in weight using lyophilized strains of LAB-Lactobacillus acidophilus IMV B-7279, Lactobacillus casei IMV B-7280, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus IMV B-7281, and bifidobacteria-Bifidobacterium animalis VKL and Bifidobacterium animalis VKB. We cultivated the macrophages obtained from the peritoneal cavity of mice individually with the strains of LAB and bifidobacteria and evaluated their effect on macrophages, oxygen-dependent bactericidal activity, nitric oxide production, and immunoregulatory cytokines. We used AFM scanning to estimate bacterial cell wall elasticity. All strains had a stimulating effect on the functional activity of macrophages and ability to produce NO/NO2 in vitro. Lactobacilli strains increased the production of IL-12 and IFN-γ in vitro. The AFM demonstrated different cell wall elasticity levels in various strains of LAB and bifidobacteria. The rigidity of the cell walls among lactobacilli was distributed as follows: Lactobacillus acidophilus IMV B-7279 > Lactobacillus casei IMV B-7280 > Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus IMV B-7281; among the strains of bifidobacteria: B. animalis VKB > B. animalis VKL. Probiotic strain survival in the macrophages depended on the bacterial cell wall elasticity and on the time of their joint cultivation. LAB

  19. Wave Forces on Crown Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jan; Burcharth, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some of the results from a large parametric laboratory study including more than 200 long-duration model tests. The study addresses both the wave forces imposed on the breakwater crown wall as well as the performance of the structure in reducing the wave overtopping. The testing...... programme includes variations of the sea state parameters and of the geometrical configuration of the breakwater and crown wall. Basic relations between forces/overtopping and the varied parameters are examined and preliminary design guidelines for structures within the tested range of variations...

  20. Solar Walls for concrete renovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Lotte; Vejen, Niels Kristian; Olsen, Lars

    1996-01-01

    This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results of the mea......This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results...

  1. QlikView scripting

    CERN Document Server

    Floyd, Matt

    2013-01-01

    This mini book offers information about QlikView scripting written in an easy-to-understand manner, and covers QlikView scripting from basic to advanced features in a compact format.If you are a basic orintermediate developer with some knowledge of QlikView applications and a basic understanding of QlikView scripting and data extraction and manipulation, this book will be great for you. If you are an advanced user, you can also use this book as a reference guide and teaching aid. If you are a QlikView project team member such as a business user, data/ETL professional, project manager, orsystem

  2. Laccases Direct Lignification in the Discrete Secondary Cell Wall Domains of Protoxylem1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Mathias; Benske, Anika; Smith, Rebecca A.; Watanabe, Yoichiro; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ralph, John; Demura, Taku; Ellis, Brian; Samuels, A. Lacey

    2014-01-01

    Plants precisely control lignin deposition in spiral or annular secondary cell wall domains during protoxylem tracheary element (TE) development. Because protoxylem TEs function to transport water within rapidly elongating tissues, it is important that lignin deposition is restricted to the secondary cell walls in order to preserve the plasticity of adjacent primary wall domains. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inducible VASCULAR NAC DOMAIN7 (VND7) protoxylem TE differentiation system permits the use of mutant backgrounds, fluorescent protein tagging, and high-resolution live-cell imaging of xylem cells during secondary cell wall development. Enzymes synthesizing monolignols, as well as putative monolignol transporters, showed a uniform distribution during protoxylem TE differentiation. By contrast, the oxidative enzymes LACCASE4 (LAC4) and LAC17 were spatially localized to secondary cell walls throughout protoxylem TE differentiation. These data support the hypothesis that precise delivery of oxidative enzymes determines the pattern of cell wall lignification. This view was supported by lac4lac17 mutant analysis demonstrating that laccases are necessary for protoxylem TE lignification. Overexpression studies showed that laccases are sufficient to catalyze ectopic lignin polymerization in primary cell walls when exogenous monolignols are supplied. Our data support a model of protoxylem TE lignification in which monolignols are highly mobile once exported to the cell wall, and in which precise targeting of laccases to secondary cell wall domains directs lignin deposition. PMID:25157028

  3. Laccases direct lignification in the discrete secondary cell wall domains of protoxylem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Mathias; Benske, Anika; Smith, Rebecca A; Watanabe, Yoichiro; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ralph, John; Demura, Taku; Ellis, Brian; Samuels, A Lacey

    2014-10-01

    Plants precisely control lignin deposition in spiral or annular secondary cell wall domains during protoxylem tracheary element (TE) development. Because protoxylem TEs function to transport water within rapidly elongating tissues, it is important that lignin deposition is restricted to the secondary cell walls in order to preserve the plasticity of adjacent primary wall domains. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inducible VASCULAR NAC DOMAIN7 (VND7) protoxylem TE differentiation system permits the use of mutant backgrounds, fluorescent protein tagging, and high-resolution live-cell imaging of xylem cells during secondary cell wall development. Enzymes synthesizing monolignols, as well as putative monolignol transporters, showed a uniform distribution during protoxylem TE differentiation. By contrast, the oxidative enzymes LACCASE4 (LAC4) and LAC17 were spatially localized to secondary cell walls throughout protoxylem TE differentiation. These data support the hypothesis that precise delivery of oxidative enzymes determines the pattern of cell wall lignification. This view was supported by lac4lac17 mutant analysis demonstrating that laccases are necessary for protoxylem TE lignification. Overexpression studies showed that laccases are sufficient to catalyze ectopic lignin polymerization in primary cell walls when exogenous monolignols are supplied. Our data support a model of protoxylem TE lignification in which monolignols are highly mobile once exported to the cell wall, and in which precise targeting of laccases to secondary cell wall domains directs lignin deposition. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Surface chemistry and acid-base activity of Shewanella putrefaciens: Cell wall charging and metal binding to bacterial cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, Jacqueline Wilhelmien

    2006-01-01

    To gain insight into the surface chemistry of live microorganisms, pH stat experiments are combined with analyses of the time-dependent changes in solution chemistry using suspensions of live cells of Shewanella putrefaciens. The results of this study illustrate the complex response of the live

  5. Surface chemistry and acid-base activity of Shewanella putrefaciens : Cell wall charging and metal binding to bacterial cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    To gain insight into the surface chemistry of live microorganisms, pH stat experiments are combined with analyses of the time-dependent changes in solution chemistry using suspensions of live cells of Shewanella putrefaciens. The results of this study illustrate the complex response of the live

  6. Synchronizing XPath Views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dennis; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2004-01-01

    . However, the XML data sources are often independent of the data consumers and may change their schemas without notification, invalidating the XML views defined by the data consumers. This requires the view definitions to be updated to reflect the new structure of the data sources, a process termed view......The increasing availability of XML-based data sources, e.g., for publishing data on the WWW, means that more and more applications (data consumers) rely on accessing and using XML data. Typically, the access is achieved by defining views over the XML data, and accessing data through these views...... synchronization. XPath is the most commonly used language for retrieving parts of XML documents, and is thus an important cornerstone for XML view definitions. This paper presents techniques for discovering schema changes in XML data sources and synchronizing XPath-based views to reflect these schema changes...

  7. Magic bullets to fight resistance : Uncovering how peptide-antibiotics break down the bacterial cell envelope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medeiros-Silva, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/288254600; Jekhmane, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412782715; Breukink, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120305100; Weingarth, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330985655

    The rapid rise of resistant bacteria urgently calls for novel antibiotics that are robust to resistance development. Ideal templates could be peptide-antibiotics that destroy the bacterial cell wall by binding to its membrane-anchored precursor lipid II at irreplaceable phosphate groups. Indeed,

  8. Airway obstruction and bacterial invasion in autopsy tissue of pediatric burn victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robert A; Jacob, Sam; Zhu, Yong; Mlcak, Ron; Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Hawkins, Hal K

    2014-01-01

    This study measured airway obstruction and bacterial invasion in systematically sampled lung tissue of burn victims at autopsy. Lung tissue from victims of combined smoke inhalation and burn injury (n = 5) and burn injury alone (n = 9) was examined histologically and the degree of bronchial and bronchiolar obstruction was measured. The walls of both bronchi and bronchioles were examined for bacterial invasion. Correlation analysis was performed for the association of airway obstruction with TBSA burn, number of ventilatory days, maximum inspiratory pressure, and days after injury. There was no significant difference in the mean degree of airway obstruction in smoke inhalation and burn victims compared with victims of burn-only injury (P > .05). Increased bronchiolar obstruction scores were detected in victims with pneumonia (55.3 ± 24.2%) compared with victims without pneumonia (9.3 ± 0.2%; P = .03). Bacterial invasion of the bronchial wall was present in one case, and invasion into the walls of bronchioles was seen in five cases. Burned children who died had extensive bronchiolar obstruction whether or not they had smoke inhalation injury. There was bacterial invasion into the airway wall in six of 14 cases (43%). Improved understanding of the mechanisms of airway obstruction is important for improved care of burned children.

  9. Doughnut-shaped structure of a bacterial muramidase revealed by X-ray crystallography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W.H.; Dijkstra, Arnoud J.; Kalk, Kor H.; Rozeboom, Henriëtte J.; Engel, Henk; Keck, Wolfgang; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1994-01-01

    THE integrity of the bacterial cell wall depends on the balanced action of several peptidoglycan (murein) synthesizing and degrading enzymes1,2. Penicillin inhibits the enzymes responsible for peptide crosslinks in the peptidoglycan polymer3. Enzymes that act solely on the glycosidic bonds are

  10. THE CATALYTIC DOMAIN OF A BACTERIAL LYTIC TRANSGLYCOSYLASE DEFINES A NOVEL CLASS OF LYSOZYMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W.H.; Isaacs, Neil W.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    The 70-kDa soluble lytic transglycosylase (SLT70) from Escherichia coli is a bacterial exo-muramidase that cleaves the cell wall peptidoglycan, producing 1,6-anhydro-muropeptides. The X-ray structure of SLT70 showed that one of its domains is structurally related to lysozyme, although there is no

  11. Literature Review of Shear Performance of Light-weight Steel Framing Wall Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuangnan; Liu, Shen; Liu, Hong

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive review of light-weight steel framing wall panels was carried out. The structure and force characteristics of light-weight steel framing wall panels were introduced. The testing and theoretical research results on the shear behaviour of light-weight steel framing wall panels were summarized in the domestic and foreign. And combined with the existing standards in China, the author's views and ideas are put forward to the problems in the research field of this kind of structural system.

  12. Animal Models of Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is a disease of the cornea characterized by pain, redness, inflammation, and opacity. Common causes of this disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Animal models of keratitis have been used to elucidate both the bacterial factors and the host inflammatory response involved in the disease. Reviewed herein are animal models of bacterial keratitis and some of the key findings in the last several decades. PMID:21274270

  13. Landscape settings as part of earth wall systems for defence

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk

    2013-04-01

    Remnants of earth wall systems from different periods are preserved in many European countries. They were built for different functions, such as defence, demarcating ownership or keeping wild animals or cattle in or out a terrain, and often changed function over time. Earth walls date from a past in which man had limited access to man- and horsepower. In the case of defence systems, our ancestors made use of the landscape settings to improve the strength. The poster gives an overview of landscape settings used for this purpose, from prehistoric up to medieval age, for building round and linear earth wall defence systems. Round earth walls systems are found on: • High viewpoints along a river, often in combination with marshland at its feet, • Almost completely cut-off meanders of antecedent rivers. This natural setting offered an ideal defence. It allowed an almost 360 degree view and exposed the enemy for a long time when passing the river, while the steep slopes and narrow entrance made the hill fort difficult to access, • Islands in lakes, • Bordering a lake at one side, • Confluences of rivers, • Hills near the sea and a natural harbour with possibilities for defence, • High flat hill tops of medium size with steep sides. Of each situation examples are presented. Linear earth wall defence systems For linear defence earth walls no overview of landscape settings can be given, for lack of sufficient data. The Celtic, 10 m steep Beech Bottom Dyke earth wall system from around 20 A.D. connects two steeply incised river valleys. For building the Hadrian Wall (UK) the Romans made use of earth walls paralleling the steepest cuesta of the Cheviot hills. The Viking Danewerk (Ger), was built on push moraines and used the coastal marsh lands at their feet for defence. And the defence of the earth wall around the Velder (NL, probably 13th century) made use of the many small streams crossing this marshy coversand landscape, by diverting them into a canal

  14. Retrofitting Systems for External Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    In this report, 9 different external and internal retrofitting systems are analyzed using numerical calculations. The analysis focuses on the thermal bridge effects in the different systems, and on this basis it is discussed whether internal or external retrofitting has the most advantages. The d....... The different systems are evaluated using 5 different types of existing walls....

  15. The Influence of Wall Binders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    This report is an analysis of the thermal bridge effects that occur in wall binders in masonry buildings. The effects are analyzed using a numerical calculation programme.The results are compared to the values given in the danish standard, DS418....

  16. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. den Hartog (Dennis); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); P.P. Oprel (Pim); P. Patka (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a

  17. Designing a Sound Reducing Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erk, Kendra; Lumkes, John; Shambach, Jill; Braile, Larry; Brickler, Anne; Matthys, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical engineers use their knowledge of sound to design quiet environments (e.g., classrooms and libraries) as well as to design environments that are supposed to be loud (e.g., concert halls and football stadiums). They also design sound barriers, such as the walls along busy roadways that decrease the traffic noise heard by people in…

  18. The Writing on the Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Tara Cady

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the artwork of William Christenberry, specifically on his work "Alabama Wall (Variant)," which was constructed with remnants of material culture found along Alabama rural roads. Includes a reproduction of this artwork and activities for natural science, language arts, visual arts, social studies, and history/economics. (CMK)

  19. Abdominal wall blocks in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neimann, Jens Dupont Børglum; Gögenür, Ismail; Bendtsen, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Abdominal wall blocks in adults have evolved much during the last decade; that is, particularly with the introduction of ultrasound-guided (USG) blocks. This review highlights recent advances of block techniques within this field and proposes directions for future research.  Rec...

  20. Chapter 3 Cell Wall Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; Roger Pettersen; Mandla A. Tshabalala

    2012-01-01

    Wood is best defined as a three-dimensional biopolymer composite composed of an interconnected network of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin with minor amounts of extractives, and inorganics. The major chemical component of a living tree is water, but on a dry weight basis, all wood cell walls consist mainly of sugar-based polymers (carbohydrates, 65-75%) that are...

  1. Thin Wall Austempered Ductile Iron (TWADI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the analysis of thin walled castings made of ductile iron is considered. It is shown that thin wall austempered ductile iron can be obtained by means of short-term heat treatment of thin wall castings without addition of alloying elements. Metallographic examinations of 2 mm thin walled castings along with casting with thicker wall thickness (20x28 mm after different austempring conditions are presented. It has been proved that short-term heat treatment amounted 20 minutes of austenitizing at 880 oC followed by holding at 400 oC for 5 minutes causes ausferrite matrix in 2 mm wall thickness castings, while casting with thicker wall thickness remain untransformed and martensite is still present in a matrix. Finally there are shown that thin wall ductile iron is an excellent base material for austempering heat treatments. As a result high mechanical properties received in thin wall plates made of austempered ductile iron.

  2. Toxic anterior segment syndrome caused by autoclave reservoir wall biofilms and their residual toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Andrew L; Sorenson, Robert L; Evans, David J

    2016-11-01

    To identify etiology of toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS) after uneventful phacoemulsification. EyeMD Laser and Surgery Center, Oakland, California. Retrospective case series. Patient charts with TASS were reviewed. Reservoirs of 2 autoclaves associated with these cases were cultured for bacterial contamination. Cultures were performed on 23 other autoclave reservoirs at surgery centers in the local area. The main outcome measures were the incidence of TASS and prevalence of bacterial biofilm contamination of autoclave reservoirs. From 2010 to 2013, 11 935 consecutive cataract surgeries were performed at 1 center by multiple surgeons with no reported TASS. Between January 1, 2014, and January 15, 2015, 10 cases of TASS occurred out of 3003 cataract surgeries; these patients' charts were reviewed. Cultures of 2 Statim autoclave reservoir walls grew Bacillus species, Williamsia species, Mycobacterium mucogenicum, and Candida parapsilosis. Scanning electron microscopy of reservoir wall sections showed prominent biofilm. The 2 autoclaves were replaced in January 2015. Subsequently, 2875 cataract surgeries were performed with no reported TASS (P autoclaves were also contaminated with bacterial biofilms. Toxic anterior segment syndrome was strongly associated with bacterial biofilm contamination of autoclave reservoirs. An etiological mechanism might involve transport of heat-stable bacterial cell antigens in the steam with deposition on surgical instrumentation. Data suggest widespread prevalence of bacterial biofilms on fluid-reservoir walls, despite adherence to manufacturer guidelines for cleaning and maintenance. Prevention or elimination of autoclave fluid-reservoir biofilms might reduce the risk for postoperative TASS. None of the authors has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Discovery of novel cell wall-active compounds using P ywaC, a sensitive reporter of cell wall stress, in the model gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarny, T L; Perri, A L; French, S; Brown, E D

    2014-06-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in recent years has radically reduced the clinical efficacy of many antibacterial treatments and now poses a significant threat to public health. One of the earliest studied well-validated targets for antimicrobial discovery is the bacterial cell wall. The essential nature of this pathway, its conservation among bacterial pathogens, and its absence in human biology have made cell wall synthesis an attractive pathway for new antibiotic drug discovery. Herein, we describe a highly sensitive screening methodology for identifying chemical agents that perturb cell wall synthesis, using the model of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We report on a cell-based pilot screen of 26,000 small molecules to look for cell wall-active chemicals in real time using an autonomous luminescence gene cluster driven by the promoter of ywaC, which encodes a guanosine tetra(penta)phosphate synthetase that is expressed under cell wall stress. The promoter-reporter system was generally much more sensitive than growth inhibition testing and responded almost exclusively to cell wall-active antibiotics. Follow-up testing of the compounds from the pilot screen with secondary assays to verify the mechanism of action led to the discovery of 9 novel cell wall-active compounds. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Aerotaxis in Bacterial Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Vicente; Bisson, Antoine; Bitton, Cindy; Waisbord, Nicolas; Smriga, Steven; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Concentrated suspensions of motile bacteria exhibit correlated dynamics on spatial scales much larger than an individual bacterium. The resulting flows, visually similar to turbulence, can increase mixing and decrease viscosity. However, it remains unclear to what degree the collective dynamics depend on the motile behavior of bacteria at the individual level. Using a new microfluidic device to create controlled horizontal oxygen gradients, we studied the two dimensional behavior of dense suspensions of Bacillus subtilis. This system makes it possible to assess the interplay between the coherent large-scale motions of the suspension, oxygen transport, and the directional response of cells to oxygen gradients (aerotaxis). At the same time, this device has enabled us to examine the onset of bacterial turbulence and its influence on the propagation of the diffusing oxygen front, as the bacteria begin in a dormant state and transition to swimming when exposed to oxygen.

  5. Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates: Still fabulous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Możejko-Ciesielska, Justyna; Kiewisz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are polyesters accumulated as carbon and energy storage materials under limited growth conditions in the presence of excess carbon sources. They have been developed as biomaterials with unique properties for the past many years being considered as a potential substitute for conventional non-degradable plastics. Due to the increasing concern towards global climate change, depleting petroleum resource and problems with an utilization of a growing number of synthetic plastics, PHAs have gained much more attention from industry and research. These environmentally friendly microbial polymers have great potential in biomedical, agricultural, and industrial applications. However, their production on a large scale is still limited. This paper describes the backgrounds of PHAs and discussed the current state of knowledge on the polyhydroxyalkanoates. Ability of bacteria to convert different carbon sources to PHAs, the opportunities and challenges of their introduction to global market as valuable renewable products have been also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Biosensors of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S; Tillmann, Joshua

    2017-07-01

    Biosensors are devices which utilize both an electrical component (transducer) and a biological component to study an environment. They are typically used to examine biological structures, organisms and processes. The field of biosensors has now become so large and varied that the technology can often seem impenetrable. Yet the principles which underlie the technology are uncomplicated, even if the details of the mechanisms are elusive. In this review we confine our analysis to relatively current advancements in biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells. This includes biosensors which rely on an added labeled component and biosensors which do not have a labeled component and instead detect the binding event or bound structure on the transducer. Methods to concentrate the bacteria prior to biosensor analysis are also described. The variety of biosensor types and their actual and potential uses are described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    with the proteases either encoded within the same polypeptide or on separate subunits. In contrast, substrate recognition by extracellular proteases is less selective and therefore these enzymes are generally expressed as zymogens to prevent premature proteolytic activity that would be detrimental to the cell......Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing...... signalling to short-circuit host cell processes. Common to both intra- and extracellular proteases is the tight control of their proteolytic activities. In general, substrate recognition by the intracellular proteases is highly selective which is, in part, attributed to the chaperone activity associated...

  8. Aluminum vacuum vessel/first wall concept for the CTHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbert, M.E.

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak hybrid reactor (CTHR) vacuum vessel/first wall system which satisfies the engineering requirements for a commercial environment. The hybrid reactor offers the unique condition that energy extraction from the first wall is not critical from the point of view of system economics. This allows the consideration of low temperature structural material for first wall application. Therefore, the CTHR aluminum vacuum vessel/first wall design philosophy was to utilize a low temperature design, thus minimizing the severe material and thermal stress problems associated with high temperature systems. The mechanical arrangement consists of a series of internally finned aluminum tubes fabricated into 30 sections and assembled around the torus. The coolant manifolds are at the top and bottom of the torus. The vessel sector length depends on the spacing between TF coils. Each sector is mounted on a rail system that permits translation for assembly or removal. The tubes in each sector are welded to tube sheets which are in turn welded to semi-cylindrical manifolds which distribute the coolant uniformly to the tubes

  9. Walls talk: Microbial biogeography of homes spanning urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Calderon, Jean F.; Cavallin, Humberto; Song, Se Jin; Novoselac, Atila; Pericchi, Luis R.; Hernandez, Jean N.; Rios, Rafael; Branch, Oralee H.; Pereira, Henrique; Paulino, Luciana C.; Blaser, Martin J.; Knight, Rob; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G.

    2016-01-01

    Westernization has propelled changes in urbanization and architecture, altering our exposure to the outdoor environment from that experienced during most of human evolution. These changes might affect the developmental exposure of infants to bacteria, immune development, and human microbiome diversity. Contemporary urban humans spend most of their time indoors, and little is known about the microbes associated with different designs of the built environment and their interaction with the human immune system. This study addresses the associations between architectural design and the microbial biogeography of households across a gradient of urbanization in South America. Urbanization was associated with households’ increased isolation from outdoor environments, with additional indoor space isolation by walls. Microbes from house walls and floors segregate by location, and urban indoor walls contain human bacterial markers of space use. Urbanized spaces uniquely increase the content of human-associated microbes—which could increase transmission of potential pathogens—and decrease exposure to the environmental microbes with which humans have coevolved. PMID:26933683

  10. Effects of membrane lipid composition and antibacterial drugs on the rigidity of Escherichia coli: Different contributions of various bacterial substructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Gan, Chaoye; Shao, Wenxiang; Yu, Chuan; Wang, Xingguo; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The rigidity/stiffness is an important biomechanical property of bacteria and potentially correlated with many bacterial activities. While the rigidity or fluidity of the bacterial membrane has been extensively studied, the contributions of different bacterial substructures to the bacterial rigidity are less investigated. Here, we utilized four Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains with different membrane lipid compositions and three antibacterial drugs (EDTA, lysozyme, and streptomycin) to specifically alter bacterial substructures. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we found that the average height and Young's modulus of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-deficient E. coli strains were larger than those of PE(+) strains and that EDTA, EDTA plus lysozyme instead of lysozyme alone, and streptomycin all caused significant decreases in height and Young's modulus of the four E. coli strains. Our data imply that membrane lipid composition, the integrated outer membrane, the cell wall, and the cytoplasmic content are all responsible for bacterial rigidity but to different extents. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. In situ Biodegradation of Endosulfan, Imidacloprid, and Carbendazim Using Indigenous Bacterial Cultures of Agriculture Fields of Uttarakhand, India

    OpenAIRE

    Geeta Negi; Pankaj; Anjana Srivastava; Anita Sharma

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, presence of endosulfan, imidacloprid, carbendazim, in the soil /vegetables/cereals and water samples was observed in agriculture fields of Uttarakhand. In view of biodegradation of these pesticides, 9 bacterial isolates were recovered from the soil samples of the fields which tolerated endosulfan, imidacloprid, carbendazim from 100 to 200 µg/ml. Three bacterial consortia used for in vitro bioremediation experiments were consisted of 3 bacterial isolates for carbendazim, ...

  12. Bacteriële meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M. C.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a severe disease which affects 35.000 Europeans each year and has a mortality rate of about 20%. During the past 25 years the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed significantly due to the implementation of vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria

  13. Bacterial meningitis in immunocompromised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, K.E.B.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an acute infection of the meninges, in The Netherlands most commonly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitides. Risk factors for acquiring bacterial meningitis include a decreased function of the immune system. The aim of this thesis was to study

  14. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  15. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-01-01

    after abdominal wall reconstruction, while no other significant changes were found in objective or subjective measures at one-year follow-up in both groups of patients. Lastly, study IV examined the abdominal wall- and extremity function, as well as overall and disease specific quality of life. We found...... hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire...... addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair...

  16. [Anterior chest wall examination reviewed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, A; Santilli, D; Trotta, F

    2002-01-01

    Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondyloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the "activity" of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  17. The DEMO wall load challenge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wenninger, R.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Bachmann, C.; Barbato, L.; Barrett, T.; Beckers, M.; Biel, W.; Boccaccini, L.; Carralero, D.; Coster, D.; Eich, T.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Firdaouss, M.; Graves, J.; Horáček, Jan; Kovari, M.; Lanthaler, S.; Loschiavo, V.; Lowry, C.; Lux, H.; Maddaluno, G.; Maviglia, F.; Mitteau, R.; Neu, R.; Pfefferle, D.; Schmid, K.; Siccinio, M.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Snicker, A.; Subba, F.; Varje, J.; Zohm, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 046002. ISSN 0029-5515 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : DEMO * power loads * first wall Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-4326/aa4fb4

  18. Breaching Walls in Urban Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-06

    weapons in the basement and automatic weapons on the upper stories were a deadly com- bination. Pavlov’s House was never taken.^ 3. Hundreds of...misnomer, for the street w-is the one place we could not go. Streets were completely covered by pillboxes and rapid-fire 40min guns, with each...street comer swept by at least four pillboxes . Our procedure was to go from house to house blasting holes through the walls with satchel

  19. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    OpenAIRE

    F. Trotta; D. Santilli; A. Lo Monaco

    2011-01-01

    Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as er...

  20. Cells, walls, and endless forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monniaux, Marie; Hay, Angela

    2016-12-01

    A key question in biology is how the endless diversity of forms found in nature evolved. Understanding the cellular basis of this diversity has been aided by advances in non-model experimental systems, quantitative image analysis tools, and modeling approaches. Recent work in plants highlights the importance of cell wall and cuticle modifications for the emergence of diverse forms and functions. For example, explosive seed dispersal in Cardamine hirsuta depends on the asymmetric localization of lignified cell wall thickenings in the fruit valve. Similarly, the iridescence of Hibiscus trionum petals relies on regular striations formed by cuticular folds. Moreover, NAC transcription factors regulate the differentiation of lignified xylem vessels but also the water-conducting cells of moss that lack a lignified secondary cell wall, pointing to the origin of vascular systems. Other novel forms are associated with modified cell growth patterns, including oriented cell expansion or division, found in the long petal spurs of Aquilegia flowers, and the Sarracenia purpurea pitcher leaf, respectively. Another good example is the regulation of dissected leaf shape in C. hirsuta via local growth repression, controlled by the REDUCED COMPLEXITY HD-ZIP class I transcription factor. These studies in non-model species often reveal as much about fundamental processes of development as they do about the evolution of form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermal insulation properties of walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat-protective qualities of building structures are determined by the qualities of the used materials, adequate design solutions and construction and installation work of high quality. This rule refers both to the structures made of materials similar in their structure and nature and mixed, combined by a construction system. The necessity to ecaluate thermal conductivity is important for a product and for a construction. Methods for evaluating the thermal protection of walls are based on the methods of calculation, on full-scale tests in a laboratory or on objects. At the same time there is a reason to believe that even deep and detailed calculation may cause deviation of the values from real data. Using finite difference method can improve accuracy of the results, but it doesn’t solve all problems. The article discusses new approaches to evaluating thermal insulation properties of walls. The authors propose technique of accurate measurement of thermal insulation properties in single blocks and fragments of walls and structures.

  2. Flooding Effect on Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Banimahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth building is a sustainable, environmentally friendly and economical method of construction that has been used worldwide for many centuries. For the past three decades, earth has seen a revival as a building material for a modern construction method due to its benefits in terms of low carbon content, low cost and energy involved during construction, as well as the fact that it is a sustainable technology of building. Climate change is influencing precipitation levels and patterns around the world, and as a consequence, flood risk is increasing rapidly. When flooding occurs, earth buildings are exposed to water by submersion, causing an increase in the degree of saturation of the earth structures and therefore a decrease of the suction between particles. This study investigated the effect of cycles of flooding (consecutive events of flooding followed by dry periods on earth walls. A series of characterization tests were carried out to obtain the physical and mechanical properties of the studied earth material. In a second stage, Flooding Simulation Tests (FST were performed to explore the earth walls’ response to repeated flooding events. The results obtained for the tested earth wall/samples with reinforced material (straw reveal hydraulic hysteresis when wall/samples are subject to cycles of wetting and drying.

  3. Drupal 7 Views Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Green, J Ayen

    2012-01-01

    This is a cookbook containing plenty of easy-to-follow practical recipes with screenshots that will help you in mastering the Drupal Views module. Drupal 7 Views Cookbook is for developers or technically proficient users who are fairly comfortable with the concepts behind websites and the Drupal environment.

  4. Mastering QlikView

    CERN Document Server

    Redmond, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    If you are a business application developer or a system analyst who has learned QlikView and Qlik Sense and now want to take your learning to a higher level, then this book is for you.It is assumed that you are aware of the fundamentals of QlikView and have working knowledge of development and in-memory analytics.

  5. VMware horizon view essentials

    CERN Document Server

    von Oven, Peter

    2014-01-01

    If you are a desktop administrator or an end user of a computing project team looking to speed up to the latest VMware Horizon View solution, then this book is perfect for you. It is your ideal companion to deploy a solution to centrally manage and virtualize your desktop estate using Horizon View 6.0.

  6. How do plant cell walls extend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This article briefly summarizes recent work that identifies the biophysical and biochemical processes that give rise to the extension of plant cell walls. I begin with the biophysical notion of stress relaxation of the wall and follow with recent studies of wall enzymes thought to catalyze wall extension and relaxation. Readers should refer to detailed reviews for more comprehensive discussion of earlier literature (Taiz, 1984; Carpita and Gibeaut, 1993; Cosgrove, 1993).

  7. Bacterial adherence to graft tissues in static and flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, Tiago Rafael; Claes, Jorien; Van Kerckhoven, Soetkin; Ditkowski, Bartosz; Hurtado-Aguilar, Luis G; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Mela, Petra; Jashari, Ramadan; Gewillig, Marc; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Meyns, Bart; Heying, Ruth

    2018-01-01

    Various conduits and stent-mounted valves are used as pulmonary valve graft tissues for right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction with good hemodynamic results. Valve replacement carries an increased risk of infective endocarditis (IE). Recent observations have increased awareness of the risk of IE after transcatheter implantation of a stent-mounted bovine jugular vein valve. This study focused on the susceptibility of graft tissue surfaces to bacterial adherence as a potential risk factor for subsequent IE. Adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus sanguinis to bovine pericardium (BP) patch, bovine jugular vein (BJV), and cryopreserved homograft (CH) tissues was quantified under static and shear stress conditions. Microscopic analysis and histology were performed to evaluate bacterial adhesion to matrix components. In general, similar bacteria numbers were recovered from CH and BJV tissue surfaces for all strains, especially in flow conditions. Static bacterial adhesion to the CH wall was lower for S sanguinis adhesion (P static conditions (P forces per se are not the prime determinants of bacterial adherence. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. PG-Metrics: A chemometric-based approach for classifying bacterial peptidoglycan data sets and uncovering their subjacent chemical variability

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Keshav; Espaillat, Akbar; Cava, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria cells are protected from osmotic and environmental stresses by an exoskeleton-like polymeric structure called peptidoglycan ( PG) or murein sacculus. This structure is fundamental for bacteria's viability and thus, the mechanisms underlying cell wall assembly and how it is modulated serve as targets for many of our most successful antibiotics. Therefore, it is now more important than ever to understand the genetics and structural chemistry of the bacterial cell walls in order to find...

  9. Static domain wall in braneworld gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, M.C.B.; Carlesso, P.F. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Fisica Teiorica, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco II, Barra-Funda, Caixa Postal 70532-2, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hoff da Silva, J.M. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we consider a static domain wall inside a 3-brane. Different from the standard achievement obtained in General Relativity, the analysis performed here gives a consistency condition for the existence of static domain walls in a braneworld gravitational scenario. Also the behavior of the domain wall's gravitational field in the newtonian limit is shown. (orig.)

  10. Theory of topological edges and domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, F.A.; Slingerland, J.K.; Haaker, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate domain walls between topologically ordered phases in two spatial dimensions. We present a method which allows for the determination of the superselection sectors of excitations of such walls and which leads to a unified description of the kinematics of a wall and the two phases to

  11. Steel Sheet Pile Walls in Soft Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    For almost a century, steel sheet pile walls are applied worldwide as earth retaining structures for excavations and quay walls. Within the framework of the development of European structural codes for Civil Engineering works, the Eurocodes, Eurocode 3 Part 5 for design of steel sheet pile walls was

  12. To detect anomalies in diaphragm walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, R.

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragm walls are potentially ideal retaining walls for deep excavations in densely built-up areas, as they cause no vibrations during their construction and provide structural elements with high strength and stiffness. In the recent past, however, several projects using diaphragm walls as soil

  13. An enzymatic approach to cell wall structure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    afsonderlik. Keywords: Ruminococcus a/bus, alfalfa cell walls, cellulose, hemicellulose, enzymic digestion. Introduction. The aim of the research is to provide more specific infor- mation on the chemical linkages in plant cell wall material. The procedure is (l) to determine which constituents of plant cell walls are digested by a ...

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Sonographic gallbladder wall thickness in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uniform agreement to use 3 mm as the upper limit for normal gallbladder wall thickness also applies to children.13,14 We would say that normal gallbladder wall thickness for most adults is ≤3 mm. Occasionally, even in normal subjects, the wall cannot be adequately measured, which may simply be due to the superficially ...

  15. Integrating Building Functions into Massive External Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafez, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Well into the twentieth century, brick and stone were the materials used in external walls. Bricklaying and stonemasonry were the construction technologies employed for the exterior walls of virtually all major structures. However, with the rise in quality of life, the massive walls alone became

  16. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology, etiology, clinical characteristics, treatment, outcome, and prevention of zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults. We identified 16 zoonotic bacteria causing meningitis in adults. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis is uncommon compared to bacterial meningitis caused by

  17. to view fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Collagen fibres. The Pd(0) nanoparticles stabilized by collagen fibres as a recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for the Stille reaction under aerobic condition. 813 ... Antiplasmodial and larvicidal compounds of Toddalia asiatica root bark. 1115. Covalent attachment. Synthesis of dark brown single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  18. to view fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dielectric loss. Synthesis, characterization and electrical properties of visible- light-driven Pt-ZnO/CNT. 995. Study of electrical percolation phenomenon from the dielectric and electric ... Domain walls. Nucleation and evaporation of domains due to electric field at ..... coefficients of thermal conductivity and high mechanical.

  19. to view fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    50 The No-Slip Boundary Condition in Fluid. Mechanics. 1. The Riddle of Fluid Sticking to the Wall in Flow. Sandeep Prabhakara and M D Deshpande. 61 Nobel Prize in Chemistry - 2003. The Gateway for Perfect Health. S M Srideshikan and S K Srivatsa. 71 The Meaning of Integration-I. A K Nandakumaran.

  20. to view fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Tobacco plants infected with a tobacco-specific virus showed an enhancement of NOS activity (Durner et al 1998), and similar results were observed in soybean cells and Arabidopsis thaliana in response to a bacterial pathogen or a proper elicitor (Delledonne et al 1998), suggesting that. NO significantly contributes to the ...

  1. Evolution of Bacterial Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    While active, controlled cellular suicide (autolysis) in bacteria is commonly observed, it has been hard to argue that autolysis can be beneficial to an individual who commits it. We propose a theoretical model that predicts that bacterial autolysis is evolutionarily advantageous to an individualand would fixate in physically structured environments for stationary phase colonies. We perform spatially resolved agent-based simulations of the model, which predict that lower mixing in the environment results in fixation of a higher autolysis rate from a single mutated cell, regardless of the colony's genetic diversity. We argue that quorum sensing will fixate as well, even if initially rare, if it is coupled to controlling the autolysis rate. The model does not predict a strong additional competitive advantage for cells where autolysis is controlled by quorum sensing systems that distinguish self from nonself. These predictions are broadly supported by recent experimental results in B. subtilisand S. pneumoniae. Research partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No. 220020321 and by HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  2. Substrate Preferences Establish the Order of Cell Wall Assembly in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Kaitlin; Owens, Tristan W; Kahne, Daniel; Walker, Suzanne

    2018-02-21

    The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall is a large supramolecular structure and its assembly requires coordination of complex biosynthetic pathways. In the step that merges the two major biosynthetic pathways in Staphylococcus aureus cell wall assembly, conserved protein ligases attach wall teichoic acids to peptidoglycan, but the order of biosynthetic events is a longstanding question. Here, we use a chemical approach to define which of the possible peptidoglycan intermediates are substrates for wall-teichoic acid ligases, thereby establishing the order of cell wall assembly. We have developed a strategy to make defined glycan chain-length polymers of either un-cross-linked or cross-linked peptidoglycan, and we find that wall teichoic acid ligases cannot transfer wall teichoic acid precursors to the cross-linked substrates. A 1.9 Å crystal structure of a LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) family ligase in complex with a wall teichoic acid precursor defines the location of the peptidoglycan binding site as a long, narrow groove, and suggests that the basis for selectivity is steric exclusion of cross-linked peptidoglycan. Consistent with this hypothesis, we have found that chitin oligomers are good substrates for transfer, showing that LCPs do not discriminate cross-linked from un-cross-linked peptidoglycan substrates by recognizing features of the un-cross-linked stem peptide. We conclude that wall teichoic acids are coupled to un-cross-linked peptidoglycan chains at an early stage of peptidoglycan synthesis and may create marks that define the proper spacing of subsequent cross-links.

  3. The Neglected Intrinsic Resistome of Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Alicia; Martínez-Martín, Nadia; Mercadillo, María; Galán, Juan C.; Ghysels, Bart; Matthijs, Sandra; Cornelis, Pierre; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; Baquero, Fernando; Martínez, José L.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria with intrinsic resistance to antibiotics are a worrisome health problem. It is widely believed that intrinsic antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens is mainly the consequence of cellular impermeability and activity of efflux pumps. However, the analysis of transposon-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants presented in this article shows that this phenotype emerges from the action of numerous proteins from all functional categories. Mutations in some genes make P. aeruginosa more susceptible to antibiotics and thereby represent new targets. Mutations in other genes make P. aeruginosa more resistant and therefore define novel mechanisms for mutation-driven acquisition of antibiotic resistance, opening a new research field based in the prediction of resistance before it emerges in clinical environments. Antibiotics are not just weapons against bacterial competitors, but also natural signalling molecules. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes are not merely protective shields and offer a more comprehensive view of the role of antibiotic resistance genes in the clinic and in nature. PMID:18286176

  4. Towards an integrated model of bacterial conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón, Elena; Ripoll-Rozada, Jorge; Peña, Alejandro; de la Cruz, Fernando; Arechaga, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation is one of the main mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer. It constitutes a key element in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes to human pathogenic bacteria. DNA transfer is mediated by a membrane-associated macromolecular machinery called Type IV secretion system (T4SS). T4SSs are involved not only in bacterial conjugation but also in the transport of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria. Thus, the search for specific inhibitors of different T4SS components opens a novel approach to restrict plasmid dissemination. This review highlights recent biochemical and structural findings that shed new light on the molecular mechanisms of DNA and protein transport by T4SS. Based on these data, a model for pilus biogenesis and substrate transfer in conjugative systems is proposed. This model provides a renewed view of the mechanism that might help to envisage new strategies to curb the threating expansion of antibiotic resistance. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  5. The neglected intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Fajardo

    Full Text Available Bacteria with intrinsic resistance to antibiotics are a worrisome health problem. It is widely believed that intrinsic antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens is mainly the consequence of cellular impermeability and activity of efflux pumps. However, the analysis of transposon-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants presented in this article shows that this phenotype emerges from the action of numerous proteins from all functional categories. Mutations in some genes make P. aeruginosa more susceptible to antibiotics and thereby represent new targets. Mutations in other genes make P. aeruginosa more resistant and therefore define novel mechanisms for mutation-driven acquisition of antibiotic resistance, opening a new research field based in the prediction of resistance before it emerges in clinical environments. Antibiotics are not just weapons against bacterial competitors, but also natural signalling molecules. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes are not merely protective shields and offer a more comprehensive view of the role of antibiotic resistance genes in the clinic and in nature.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of sea Cucumber (Stichopus variegatus) body wall extract in Chabahar Bay, Oman Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Shakouri, Arash; Shoushizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Nematpour, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Seas and oceans have been recognized as a rich source of metabolites and bioactive compounds with biodiversity and drug activity. These compounds have accumulated in various organisms. Bioactive compounds can be extracted from various animal groups, such as coral, crabs, moss animals, Echinodermata, case-bearers, fishes, and sponges. Objectives: Antimicrobial extracts of the sea cucumber body wall (Stichopus variegatus), collected from Chabahar Bay, were tested for four bacterial,...

  7. Bacterial Communities Associated with the Lichen Symbiosis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Scott T.; Cropsey, Garrett W. G.; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah

    2011-01-01

    Lichens are commonly described as a mutualistic symbiosis between fungi and “algae” (Chlorophyta or Cyanobacteria); however, they also have internal bacterial communities. Recent research suggests that lichen-associated microbes are an integral component of lichen thalli and that the classical view of this symbiotic relationship should be expanded to include bacteria. However, we still have a limited understanding of the phylogenetic structure of these communities and their variability across lichen species. To address these knowledge gaps, we used bar-coded pyrosequencing to survey the bacterial communities associated with lichens. Bacterial sequences obtained from four lichen species at multiple locations on rock outcrops suggested that each lichen species harbored a distinct community and that all communities were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria. Across all samples, we recovered numerous bacterial phylotypes that were closely related to sequences isolated from lichens in prior investigations, including those from a lichen-associated Rhizobiales lineage (LAR1; putative N2 fixers). LAR1-related phylotypes were relatively abundant and were found in all four lichen species, and many sequences closely related to other known N2 fixers (e.g., Azospirillum, Bradyrhizobium, and Frankia) were recovered. Our findings confirm the presence of highly structured bacterial communities within lichens and provide additional evidence that these bacteria may serve distinct functional roles within lichen symbioses. PMID:21169444

  8. Emerging Roles of Toxin-Antitoxin Modules in Bacterial Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kędzierska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA cassettes are encoded widely by bacteria. The modules typically comprise a protein toxin and protein or RNA antitoxin that sequesters the toxin factor. Toxin activation in response to environmental cues or other stresses promotes a dampening of metabolism, most notably protein translation, which permits survival until conditions improve. Emerging evidence also implicates TAs in bacterial pathogenicity. Bacterial persistence involves entry into a transient semi-dormant state in which cells survive unfavorable conditions including killing by antibiotics, which is a significant clinical problem. TA complexes play a fundamental role in inducing persistence by downregulating cellular metabolism. Bacterial biofilms are important in numerous chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases and cause serious therapeutic problems due to their multidrug tolerance and resistance to host immune system actions. Multiple TAs influence biofilm formation through a network of interactions with other factors that mediate biofilm production and maintenance. Moreover, in view of their emerging contributions to bacterial virulence, TAs are potential targets for novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches that are required urgently in an era of expanding antibiotic resistance. This review summarizes the emerging evidence that implicates TAs in the virulence profiles of a diverse range of key bacterial pathogens that trigger serious human disease.

  9. Bacterial growth on macrophyte leachate and fate of bacterial production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, S.; Carlough, L.; Crocker, M.T.; Gill, H.K.; Meyer, J.L.; Smith, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The role bacteria play in transferring organic carbon to other trophic levels in aquatic ecosystems depends on the efficiency with which they convert dissolved organic [ 14 C]-labelled carbon into bacterial biomass and on the ability of consumers to graze bacteria. The authors have measured the conversion efficiency for bacteria growing on macrophyte-derived dissolved organic carbon and estimated the amount of bacterial production removed by grazing. Bacteria converted this DOC into new tissue with an efficiency of 53%, substantially higher than the apparent conversion efficiency of macrophyte-derived particulate organic carbon or other types of DOC. Two estimates of grazing indicate that the decline in bacterial numbers after the bloom was probably due to grazing by flagellates. These results show the significance of the bacterial link between DOC and other trophic levels

  10. Quantitative Evaluation of Bacteria Adherent and in Biofilm on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube-Coated Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Pantanella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm is a common bacterial lifestyle, and it plays a crucial role in human health, causing biofilm-mediated infections. Recently, to counteract biofilm development, new nano-structured biomaterials have been proposed. However, data about the antibacterial properties of nano-structured surfaces are fragmentary and controversial, and, in particular, the susceptibility of nano-structured materials to colonization and biofilm formation by bacterial pathogens has not been yet thoroughly considered. Here, the ability of the pathogenic Streptococcus mutans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adhere and form biofilm on surfaces coated with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs was analyzed. Our results showed that the surfaces of SWCNTs-coated glass beads (SWCNTs-GBs were colonized at the same extent of uncoated GBs both by S. mutans and P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that single wall SWCNTs-coated surfaces are not suitable to counteract bacterial adhesion and biofilm development.

  11. Adjunctive Therapies for Bacterial Keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakhil, Turki Abdulaziz Bin; Stone, Donald U; Gritz, David C

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is the most common type among all types of infectious keratitis. Currently, antibiotics are the main-stay of treatment. The objective of this systematic review is to review published clinical studies which discuss the adjunctive treatment of bacterial keratitis to guide clinical decision-making. We reviewed the role of a variety of medications and surgeries which can help in managing bacterial keratitis complications, which include as thinning, perforation, and impaired wound healing. We have included appropriate animal and laboratory studies, case reports and case series, and randomized clinical trials regarding each therapy.

  12. Molecular detection of human bacterial pathogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Dongyou

    2011-01-01

    .... Molecular Detection of Human Bacterial Pathogens addresses this issue, with international scientists in respective bacterial pathogen research and diagnosis providing expert summaries on current...

  13. Skyrmions from Instantons inside Domain Walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Tong, David

    2005-01-01

    Some years ago, Atiyah and Manton described a method to construct approximate Skyrmion solutions from Yang-Mills instantons. Here we present a dynamical realization of this construction using domain walls in a five-dimensional gauge theory. The non-Abelian gauge symmetry is broken in each vacuum but restored in the core of the domain wall, allowing instantons to nestle inside the wall. We show that the world volume dynamics of the wall is given by the Skyrme model, including the four-derivative term, and the instantons appear as domain wall Skyrmions

  14. Temperate bacterial viruses as double-edged swords in bacterial warfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, João Alves; Reis, Ana Maria; Domingues, Iolanda; Mendes-Soares, Helena; Matos, Ana Margarida; Dionisio, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    It has been argued that bacterial cells may use their temperate viruses as biological weapons. For instance, a few bacterial cells among a population of lysogenic cells could release the virus and kill susceptible non-lysogenic competitors, while their clone mates would be immune. Because viruses replicate inside their victims upon infection, this process would amplify their number in the arena. Sometimes, however, temperate viruses spare recipient cells from death by establishing themselves in a dormant state inside cells. This phenomenon is called lysogenization and, for some viruses such as the λ virus, the probability of lysogenization increases with the multiplicity of infection. Therefore, the amplification of viruses leads to conflicting predictions about the efficacy of temperate viruses as biological weapons: amplification can increase the relative advantage of clone mates of lysogens but also the likelihood of saving susceptible cells from death, because the probability of lysogenization is higher. To test the usefulness of viruses as biological weapons, we performed competition experiments between lysogenic Escherichia coli cells carrying the λ virus and susceptible λ-free E. coli cells, either in a structured or unstructured habitat. In structured and sometimes in unstructured habitats, the λ virus qualitatively behaved as a "replicating toxin". However, such toxic effect of λ viruses ceased after a few days of competition. This was due to the fact that many of initially susceptible cells became lysogenic. Massive lysogenization of susceptible cells occurred precisely under the conditions where the amplification of the virus was substantial. From then on, these cells and their descendants became immune to the λ virus. In conclusion, if at short term bacterial cells may use temperate viruses as biological weapons, after a few days only the classical view of temperate bacterial viruses as parasitic agents prevails.

  15. Temperate bacterial viruses as double-edged swords in bacterial warfare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Alves Gama

    Full Text Available It has been argued that bacterial cells may use their temperate viruses as biological weapons. For instance, a few bacterial cells among a population of lysogenic cells could release the virus and kill susceptible non-lysogenic competitors, while their clone mates would be immune. Because viruses replicate inside their victims upon infection, this process would amplify their number in the arena. Sometimes, however, temperate viruses spare recipient cells from death by establishing themselves in a dormant state inside cells. This phenomenon is called lysogenization and, for some viruses such as the λ virus, the probability of lysogenization increases with the multiplicity of infection. Therefore, the amplification of viruses leads to conflicting predictions about the efficacy of temperate viruses as biological weapons: amplification can increase the relative advantage of clone mates of lysogens but also the likelihood of saving susceptible cells from death, because the probability of lysogenization is higher. To test the usefulness of viruses as biological weapons, we performed competition experiments between lysogenic Escherichia coli cells carrying the λ virus and susceptible λ-free E. coli cells, either in a structured or unstructured habitat. In structured and sometimes in unstructured habitats, the λ virus qualitatively behaved as a "replicating toxin". However, such toxic effect of λ viruses ceased after a few days of competition. This was due to the fact that many of initially susceptible cells became lysogenic. Massive lysogenization of susceptible cells occurred precisely under the conditions where the amplification of the virus was substantial. From then on, these cells and their descendants became immune to the λ virus. In conclusion, if at short term bacterial cells may use temperate viruses as biological weapons, after a few days only the classical view of temperate bacterial viruses as parasitic agents prevails.

  16. Understanding bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides: From the surface to deep inside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria-Neto, Simone; de Almeida, Keyla Caroline; Macedo, Maria Ligia Rodrigues; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2015-11-01

    Resistant bacterial infections are a major health problem in many parts of the world. The major commercial antibiotic classes often fail to combat common bacteria. Although antimicrobial peptides are able to control bacterial infections by interfering with microbial metabolism and physiological processes in several ways, a large number of cases of resistance to antibiotic peptide classes have also been reported. To gain a better understanding of the resistance process various technologies have been applied. Here we discuss multiple strategies by which bacteria could develop enhanced antimicrobial peptide resistance, focusing on sub-cellular regions from the surface to deep inside, evaluating bacterial membranes, cell walls and cytoplasmic metabolism. Moreover, some high-throughput methods for antimicrobial resistance detection and discrimination are also examined. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy for correlative studies of bacterial capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukalov, Oleg; Korenevsky, Anton; Beveridge, Terry J; Dutcher, John R

    2008-09-01

    Bacteria can possess an outermost assembly of polysaccharide molecules, a capsule, which is attached to their cell wall. We have used two complementary, high-resolution microscopy techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to study bacterial capsules of four different gram-negative bacterial strains: Escherichia coli K30, Pseudomonas aeruginosa FRD1, Shewanella oneidensis MR-4, and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. TEM analysis of bacterial cells using different preparative techniques (whole-cell mounts, conventional embeddings, and freeze-substitution) revealed capsules for some but not all of the strains. In contrast, the use of AFM allowed the unambiguous identification of the presence of capsules on all strains used in the present study, including those that were shown by TEM to be not encapsulated. In addition, the use of AFM phase imaging allowed the visualization of the bacterial cell within the capsule, with a depth sensitivity that decreased with increasing tapping frequency.

  18. Present and future etiological treatment of bacterial pneumonia 3. The antibacterial drugs under development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Abaturov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The rapid spread of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains necessitates the development of new antibacterial agents and a review of the guidelines for etiological treatment of bacterial infections, including pneumonia. Currently, new antibacterial agents are being developed that disrupt the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, teichoic and lipoteichoic acids, and also block the attachment of virulent factors to the bacterial wall. New molecules of old classes of antibiotics and representatives of new classes of antibiotics with their targets (lipid II and III, teichoic and lipoteichoic acids, alanine racemase, and sortase A will become practical tools in clinical practice in the very near future. The goals and mechanisms of action of new antibacterial compounds predetermine their clinical prospects in future strategies for the treatment of infectious bacterial diseases.

  19. A view on EOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchitta, Baerbel K.

    1989-11-01

    I am replying to the recent solicitation to provide views on NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) to an AGU panel (Eos, October 3, p. 886). My view concerns Landsat. A flashy EOS poster, recently distributed, features six images from space; three of these are from the Landsat satellite. Yet no Landsat-type imaging system is contemplated for EOS. Imaging systems such as HIRIS and HRIS (high-resolution imaging spectrometers) do not give the synoptic view of Landsat and are much too elaborate for simple but invaluable observations of many global- scale processes.

  20. The exoskeleton of bacterial cells (the sacculus): still a highly attractive target for antibacterial agents that will last for a long time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A L

    2000-01-01

    Most bacteria are entirely surrounded by a strong cell wall held together by covalent bonds of strength similar to those holding the atoms in a diamond together. This exoskeleton is a coat of armor or corset and is usually called a sacculus. It protects the bacterium from the stresses resulting from the higher osmotic pressure of the cytoplasm when compared with its environment. This strategy of constructing an external mechanical support has the weakness that the wall barrier has to be cleaved and new wall material inserted outside of the cell proper in order for the bacterium to grow and divide. Because of the unique chemistry and the necessity of selectively cleaving old stress-bearing wall for growth, the wall of the bacterial cell has been a key target for chemotherapeutic treatment of bacterial diseases. Currently, many infectious organisms are becoming resistant to overused antibiotics. Still the wall is a good target, and there could possibly be several entirely new classes of antibiotics targeted toward other parts of wall metabolism and function. The essential autolysins may be a particularly relevant target. To find chemotherapeutic agents we must use and extend our present understanding of the structural mechanics of bacterial wall and their biophysics, biochemistry, and physiology. Moreover, if we use our knowledge of biophysics/genetics and of the evolution of antibiotic resistance mutations that occurred millions of years ago, as well as our knowledge of ones that have arisen recently, quite novel antibiotics may be designed.

  1. Seismic displacement of gravity retaining walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismic displacement of gravity walls had been studied using conventional static methods for controlled displacement design. In this study plain strain numerical analysis is performed using Plaxis dynamic program where prescribed displacement is applied at the bottom boundary of the soil to simulate the applied seismic load. Constrained absorbent side boundaries are introduced to prevent any wave reflection. The studied soil is chosen dense granular sand and modeled as elasto-plastic material according to Mohr–Column criteria while the gravity wall is assumed elastic. By comparing the resulted seismic wall displacements calculated by numerical analysis for six historical ground motions with that calculated by the pseudo-static method, it is found that numerical seismic displacements are either equal to or greater than corresponding pseudo-static values. Permissible seismic wall displacement calculated by AASHTO can be used for empirical estimation of seismic displacement. It is also found that seismic wall displacement is directly proportional with the positive angle of inclination of the back surface of the wall, soil flexibility and with the earthquake maximum ground acceleration. Seismic wall sliding is dominant and rotation is negligible for rigid walls when the ratio between the wall height and the foundation width is less than 1.4, while for greater ratios the wall becomes more flexible and rotation (rocking increases till the ratio reaches 1.8 where overturning is susceptible to take place. Cumulative seismic wall rotation increases with dynamic time and tends to be constant at the end of earthquake.

  2. Bacterial sepsis and chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Makiko; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Takeuchi, Dan; Utsunomiya, Tokuichiro; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Fujio

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis causes a high mortality rate when it occurs in patients with compromised host defenses. Severely burned patients, typical immunocompromised hosts, are extremely susceptible to infections from various pathogens, and a local wound infection frequently escalates into sepsis. In these patients, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are familiar pathogens that cause opportunistic infections. Also, polymicrobial sepsis frequently occurs in these patients. In this review, therefore, the roles of chemokines in thermally injured patients infected with these 3 pathogens and polymicrobial sepsis will be discussed. These infections in thermally injured patients may be controlled immunologically, because immunocompetent hosts are resistant to infections with these pathogens. Classically activated macrophages (M1Mphi) are major effector cells for host innate immune responses against these infections. However, M1Mphi are not generated in thermally injured patients whose alternatively activated macrophages (M2Mphi) predominate. M2Mphi appear in patients early after severe burn injuries. M2Mphi inhibit M1Mphi generation through the secretion of CCL17 and IL-10. As a modulator of Mphi, two different subsets of neutrophils (PMN-I, PMN-II) are described. PMN-I direct the polarization of resident Mphi into M1Mphi through the production of CCL3. M2Mphi are induced from resident Mphi by CCL2 released from PMN-II. Therefore, as an inhibitor of CCL2, glycyrrhizin protects individuals infected with S. aureus. Sepsis stemming from P. aeruginosa wound infection is also influenced by CCL2 released from immature myeloid cells. A large number of immature myeloid cells appear in association with burn injuries. Host resistance to S. aureus, E. faecalis, P. aeruginosa or polymicrobial infections may be improved in thermally injured patients through the induction of M1Mphi, elimination of CCL2 and/or depletion of M2Mphi induced by CCL2.

  3. Control of bacterial adhesion and growth on honeycomb-like patterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Ding, Yonghui; Ge, Xiang; Leng, Yang

    2015-11-01

    It is a great challenge to construct a persistent bacteria-resistant surface even though it has been demonstrated that several surface features might be used to control bacterial behavior, including surface topography. In this study, we develop micro-scale honeycomb-like patterns of different sizes (0.5-10 μm) as well as a flat area as the control on a single platform to evaluate the bacterial adhesion and growth. Bacteria strains, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with two distinct shapes (rod and sphere) are cultured on the platforms, with the patterned surface-up and surface-down in the culture medium. The results demonstrate that the 1 μm patterns remarkably reduce bacterial adhesion and growth while suppressing bacterial colonization when compared to the flat surface. The selective adhesion of the bacterial cells on the patterns reveals that the bacterial adhesion is cooperatively mediated by maximizing the cell-substrate contact area and minimizing the cell deformation, from a thermodynamic point of view. Moreover, study of bacterial behaviors on the surface-up vs. surface-down samples shows that gravity does not apparently affect the spatial distribution of the adherent cells although it indeed facilitates bacterial adhesion. Furthermore, the experimental results suggest that two major factors, i.e. the availability of energetically favorable adhesion sites and the physical confinements, contribute to the anti-bacterial nature of the honeycomb-like patterns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed M. Stubbendieck

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities.

  5. Bacterial flora of sturgeon fingerling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arani, A.S.; Mosahab, R.

    2008-01-01

    The study on microbial populations is a suitable tool to understand and apply control methods to improve the sanitary level of production in fish breeding and rearing centers, ensure health of sturgeon fingerlings at the time of their release into the rivers and also in the conversation and restoration of these valuable stocks in the Caspian Sea, Iran. A laboratory research based on Austin methods (Austin, B., Austin, D.A. 1993) was conducted for bacterial study on 3 sturgeon species naming A. persicus, A. stellatus and A. nudiventris during different growth stages. Bacterial flora of Acinetobacter, Moraxella, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Edwardsiella, Staphylococcus, Proteus, Yersinia, Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas were determined. The factors which may induce changes in bacterial populations during different stages of fife are the followings: quality of water in rearing ponds, different conditions for growth stages, suitable time for colonization of bacterial flora in rearing pond, water temperature increase in fingerlings size and feeding condition. (author)

  6. Subdural Empyema in Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, evaluated the occurrence, treatment, and outcome of subdural empyema as a complication of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in 28 (2.7% adults.

  7. Reflections on a flat wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, G.R.; Huhtinen, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation into whether estimates of attenuation in the flat sidewalls of the tunnel for the MC main ring can be based on a simple point-source/line-of-sight model. Having seen the limitations of such a model, an alternative is proposed where the main radiation source is not the initial object struck by the beam but the plane source provided by the first interactions of secondaries from the target in the shield-wall. This is shown to have a closer relation to reality than the point-source/line-of-sight model. (author)

  8. "Private Views" Ungaris

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    9. juulist Dunaujvarosi Kaasaegse Kunsti Instituudis eesti ja briti kunstnike ühisnäitus "Private Views. Ruum taasavastatud eesti ja briti kaasaegses kunstis". Kuraatorid Pam Skelton, Mare Tralla. Osalejad.

  9. "Private Views" Ungaris

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    9. juulist Dunaujvarosi Kaasaegse Kunsti Instituudis eesti ja briti kunstnike ühisnäitus "Private Views. Ruum taasavastatud eesti ja briti kaasaegses kunstis" Kuraatorid Pam Skelton, Mare Tralla. Osalejad

  10. Japanese views on ASSET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, M.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation briefly reviews the following aspects directed to ensuring NPP safety: Japanese participation in ASSET activities; views to ASSET activities; recent operating experience in Japan; future ASSET activities

  11. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticle and its application in cell wall disruption to release carbohydrate and lipid from C. vulgaris for biofuel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirajunnisa Abdul Razack

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are the fledging feedstocks yielding raw materials for the production of third generation biofuel. Assorted and conventional cell wall disruption techniques were helpful in extracting lipids and carbohydrates, nevertheless the disadvantages have led the biotechnologists to explore new process to lyse cell wall in a faster and an economical manner. Silver nanoparticles have the ability to break the cell wall of microalgae and release biomolecules effectively. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles was performed using a novel bacterial isolate of Bacillus subtilis. Characterisation of nanosilver and its effect on cell wall lysis of microalgae were extensively analysed. Cell wall damage was confirmed by lactate dehydrogenase assay and visually by SEM analysis. This first piece of research work on direct use of nanoparticles for cell wall lysis would potentially be advantageous over its conventional approaches and a greener, cost effective and non laborious method for the production of biodiesel.

  12. Single-Side Two-Location Spotlight Imaging for Building Based on MIMO Through-Wall-Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Through-wall-radar imaging is of interest for mapping the wall layout of buildings and for the detection of stationary targets within buildings. In this paper, we present an easy single-side two-location spotlight imaging method for both wall layout mapping and stationary target detection by utilizing multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO through-wall-radar. Rather than imaging for building walls directly, the images of all building corners are generated to speculate wall layout indirectly by successively deploying the MIMO through-wall-radar at two appropriate locations on only one side of the building and then carrying out spotlight imaging with two different squint-views. In addition to the ease of implementation, the single-side two-location squint-view detection also has two other advantages for stationary target imaging. The first one is the fewer multi-path ghosts, and the second one is the smaller region of side-lobe interferences from the corner images in comparison to the wall images. Based on Computer Simulation Technology (CST electromagnetic simulation software, we provide multiple sets of validation results where multiple binary panorama images with clear images of all corners and stationary targets are obtained by combining two single-location images with the use of incoherent additive fusion and two-dimensional cell-averaging constant-false-alarm-rate (2D CA-CFAR detection.

  13. Design of experimental setup for investigation of cavitation bubble collapse close to a solid wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živný Martin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article describes experimental setup for investigation of the impact load from collapsing cavitation bubble on a solid wall. A vapour bubble is generated inside a cubic chamber by local heating of water inside a thin channel in a button. The bubble collapse is initiated by a piezoelectric actuator attached to the flexible wall of the chamber. A laser diode with a linear CCD sensor are used to detect the bubble position during its buoyancy-driven rise to the upper wall of the chamber. The bubble collapse impact load is measured using a PVDF piezoelectric transducer glued to the upper wall of the chamber and recorded by high-speed CCD camera illuminated by a high-power LED diode. The pressure inside the chamber is measured by the dynamic pressure transducer. All the system components are controlled and synchronized by an oscilloscope and pulse generator using the LabView software.

  14. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Newville, Matthew G.; Rimondi, Valentina; Pratesi, Giovanni; Costagliola, Pilario

    2018-02-01

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Xray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the c axis (by 0.03Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.

  15. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Newville, Matthew; Rimondi, Valentina; Pratesi, Giovanni; Costagliola, Pilario

    2018-02-01

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the c axis (by 0.03 Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.

  16. Current knowledge of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis, earlier termed nonspecific vaginitis (anaerobic vaginosis because of the absence of recognized pathogens, is most common vaginal syndrome of women of childbearing age affecting 15-30%. This syndrome, whose aetiology and pathogenesis remains unknown, is characterized by significant changes in the vaginal ecosystem. These changes consist of a decrease in the number of lactobacilli and a large increase in the number of anaerobic organisms. The bacteria adhere to desquamated epithelial cells with a distinctive appearance of clue cells The main complaints of women with symptomatic bacterial vaginosis include vaginal discharge and odour. However, a significant number of all women who have bacterial vaginosis deny symptoms. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with a number of gynaecologic and obstetric complications including cervicitis, cervical neoplasia, pelvic inflammatory disease, postoperative infections, and preterm labour. The diagnosis is most frequently made based on vaginal smear stained according to Gram (Nugent scoring method. Metronidazole and clindamycin are the drugs of choice for treatment of women with bacterial vaginosis. Which women should undergo treatment? According to the prevailing attitude, it should include women with symptoms. Symptomatic women with frequent relapses of bacterial vaginosisas, as a rule, have poor response to the applied therapy. To achieve better efficiency in the treatment of such women, it is necessary to have more extensive understanding of all factors in the pathogenesis of the syndrome.

  17. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yoshitaro; Agata, Kiyokazu; Inoue, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called “wall preference”. This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian “wall-preference” behavior only appears to be a “preference” behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and then

  18. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaro Akiyama

    Full Text Available The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called "wall preference". This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian "wall-preference" behavior only appears to be a "preference" behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and

  19. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  20. Reactor wall in thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibui, Masanao.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To always monitor the life of armours in reactor walls and automatically shutdown the reactor if it should be operated in excess of the limit of use. Constitution: Monitoring material of lower melting point than armours (for example beryllium pellets) as one of the reactor wall constituents of a thermonuclear device are embedded in a region leaving the thickness corresponding to the allowable abrasion of the armour. In this structure, if the armours are abrased due to particle loads of a plasma and the abrasion exceeds a predetermined allowable level, the monitoring material is exposed to the plasma and melted and evaporated. Since this can be detected by impurity monitors disposed in the reactor, it is possible to recognize the limit for the working life of the armours. If the thermonuclear reactor should be operated accidentally exceeding the life of the armours, since a great amount of the monitoring materials have been evaporated, they flow into the plasma to increase the plasma radiation loss thereby automatically eliminate the plasma. (K.M.)

  1. Steady at the wheel: conservative sex and the benefits of bacterial transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambur, Ole Herman; Engelstädter, Jan; Johnsen, Pål J; Miller, Eric L; Rozen, Daniel E

    2016-10-19

    Many bacteria are highly sexual, but the reasons for their promiscuity remain obscure. Did bacterial sex evolve to maximize diversity and facilitate adaptation in a changing world, or does it instead help to retain the bacterial functions that work right now? In other words, is bacterial sex innovative or conservative? Our aim in this review is to integrate experimental, bioinformatic and theoretical studies to critically evaluate these alternatives, with a main focus on natural genetic transformation, the bacterial equivalent of eukaryotic sexual reproduction. First, we provide a general overview of several hypotheses that have been put forward to explain the evolution of transformation. Next, we synthesize a large body of evidence highlighting the numerous passive and active barriers to transformation that have evolved to protect bacteria from foreign DNA, thereby increasing the likelihood that transformation takes place among clonemates. Our critical review of the existing literature provides support for the view that bacterial transformation is maintained as a means of genomic conservation that provides direct benefits to both individual bacterial cells and to transformable bacterial populations. We examine the generality of this view across bacteria and contrast this explanation with the different evolutionary roles proposed to maintain sex in eukaryotes. This article is part of the themed issue 'Weird sex: the underappreciated diversity of sexual reproduction'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Altered Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cell Wall Metabolism and Physiology Associated With RpoB Mutation H526D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. Campodónico

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb rpoB mutations are associated with global metabolic remodeling. However, the net effects of rpoB mutations on Mtb physiology, metabolism and function are not completely understood. Based on previous work, we hypothesized that changes in the expression of cell wall molecules in Mtb mutant RpoB 526D lead to changes in cell wall permeability and to altered resistance to environmental stresses and drugs.Methods: The phenotypes of a fully drug-susceptible clinical strain of Mtb and its paired rifampin-monoresistant, RpoB H526D mutant progeny strain were compared.Results: The rpoB mutant showed altered colony morphology, bacillary length and cell wall thickness, which were associated with increased cell wall permeability and susceptibility to the cell wall detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS after exposure to nutrient starvation. Relative to the isogenic rifampin-susceptible strain, the RpoB H526D mutant showed altered bacterial cellular metabolic activity and an eightfold increase in susceptibility to the cell-wall acting drug vancomycin.Conclusion: Our data suggest that RpoB mutation H526D is associated with altered cell wall physiology and resistance to cell wall-related stress. These findings are expected to contribute to an improved understanding of the pathogenesis of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis infections.

  3. Reinforcing masonry walls with composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jai, John Chia-Han

    1999-10-01

    In this investigation, a procedure is developed for determining the effectiveness of composite materials in retrofitting masonry buildings to reduce seismic damage. The reinforcement considered is a thin layer of fiber-reinforced composite applied to the wall in a wallpaper-like fashion. Models were developed which predicts the behavior of masonry walls reinforced in such a fashion and subjected to static, in-plane normal and shear loads. Solid walls, as well as walls with openings (such as windows and doors), were considered. The models estimate the load-deflection characteristic of the wall, the load set at which the wall fails, and the deflection of the wall at the instant of failure. The models were verified by tests performed with walls constructed of clay bricks and mortar, and with walls made of wood bricks. In these tests, the load versus deflection, the failure load, and the failure deflection were measured. Reasonable agreements were found between the values calculated by the models and the data. Parametric studies were also performed. The results of these studies indicate that composite reinforcement applied in a wallpaper-like fashion may increase substantially the load carrying capacities of masonry walls.

  4. Defensive remodeling: How bacterial surface properties and biofilm formation promote resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuri, Reut; Shprung, Tal; Shai, Yechiel

    2015-11-01

    Multidrug resistance bacteria are a major concern worldwide. These pathogens cannot be treated with conventional antibiotics and thus alternative therapeutic agents are needed. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are considered to be good candidates for this purpose. Most AMPs are short and positively charged amphipathic peptides, which are found in all known forms of life. AMPs are known to kill bacteria by binding to the negatively charged bacterial surface, and in most cases cause membrane disruption. Resistance toward AMPs can be developed, by modification of bacterial surface molecules, secretion of protective material and up-regulation or elimination of specific proteins. Because of the general mechanisms of attachment and action of AMPs, bacterial resistance to AMPs often involves biophysical and biochemical changes such as surface rigidity, cell wall thickness, surface charge, as well as membrane and cell wall modification. Here we focus on the biophysical, surface and surrounding changes that bacteria undergo in acquiring resistance to AMPs. In addition we discuss the question of whether bacterial resistance to administered AMPs might compromise our innate immunity to endogenous AMPs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Targeting Bacterial Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Janish; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ke; Malwal, Satish R; Oldfield, Eric

    2016-10-06

    We synthesized potential inhibitors of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), or undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP), and tested them in bacterial cell growth and enzyme inhibition assays. The most active compounds were found to be bisphosphonates with electron-withdrawing aryl-alkyl side chains which inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) at ∼1-4 μg mL -1 levels. They were found to be potent inhibitors of FPPS; cell growth was partially "rescued" by the addition of farnesol or overexpression of FPPS, and there was synergistic activity with known isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway inhibitors. Lipophilic hydroxyalkyl phosphonic acids inhibited UPPS and UPPP at micromolar levels; they were active (∼2-6 μg mL -1 ) against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative organisms, and again exhibited synergistic activity with cell wall biosynthesis inhibitors, but only indifferent effects with other inhibitors. The results are of interest because they describe novel inhibitors of FPPS, UPPS, and UPPP with cell growth inhibitory activities as low as ∼1-2 μg mL -1 . © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Bacterial Prostatitis: Bacterial Virulence, Clinical Outcomes, and New Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, John N; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2016-02-01

    Four prostatitis syndromes are recognized clinically: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and asymptomatic prostatitis. Because Escherichia coli represents the most common cause of bacterial prostatitis, we investigated the importance of bacterial virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in E. coli strains causing prostatitis and the potential association of these characteristics with clinical outcomes. A structured literature review revealed that we have limited understanding of the virulence-associated characteristics of E. coli causing acute prostatitis. Therefore, we completed a comprehensive microbiological and molecular investigation of a unique strain collection isolated from healthy young men. We also considered new data from an animal model system suggesting certain E. coli might prove important in the etiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Our human data suggest that E. coli needs multiple pathogenicity-associated traits to overcome anatomic and immune responses in healthy young men without urological risk factors. The phylogenetic background and accumulation of an exceptional repertoire of extraintestinal pathogenic virulence-associated genes indicate that these E. coli strains belong to a highly virulent subset of uropathogenic variants. In contrast, antibiotic resistance confers little added advantage to E. coli strains in these healthy outpatients. Our animal model data also suggest that certain pathogenic E. coli may be important in the etiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome through mechanisms that are dependent on the host genetic background and the virulence of the bacterial strain.

  7. Improvement of wall condensation modeling with suction wall functions for containment application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmkuhl, Jan, E-mail: j.lehmkuhl@fz-juelich.de [RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Kelm, Stephan, E-mail: s.kelm@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Bucci, Matteo [Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives, Paris (France); Allelein, Hans-Josef [RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of wall functions for single phase condensation models for large scale application. • Identification of modeling errors related to standard log-law due to buoyancy and wall normal mass transfer (suction). • Modeling of wall normal mass transfer by literature formulation (Sucec, 1999) and in-house approach (FIBULA). • Validation against isothermal Favre experimental data. • Comparison against reference fine grid solution for condensing conditions. - Abstract: To simulate wall condensation on containment scale with CFD methods at reasonable computational cost, a single phase approach has to be applied and wall functions have to be used. However, standard wall functions were derived for flows without heat and mass transfer and their fundamental simplifications are not appropriate to deal with condensation. This paper discusses the limitations of standard wall functions and proposes two wall functions for the momentum equation dealing with mass transfer normal to the sheared wall (suction). The first proposed suction wall function is an algebraic modification based on the standard wall function concept. The second proposed wall function is an in-house developed suction wall function with the potential to cover also heat and mass transfer effects by storing the complex solutions of the RANS-Equations in a lookup table. The wall function approaches are compared to experimental results for boundary layer flows with suction and to the reference results obtained using a refined grid in order to resolve the condensing boundary layer.

  8. Inverse measurement of wall pressure field in flexible-wall wind tunnels using global wall deformation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kenneth; Brown, Julian; Patil, Mayuresh; Devenport, William

    2018-02-01

    The Kevlar-wall anechoic wind tunnel offers great value to the aeroacoustics research community, affording the capability to make simultaneous aeroacoustic and aerodynamic measurements. While the aeroacoustic potential of the Kevlar-wall test section is already being leveraged, the aerodynamic capability of these test sections is still to be fully realized. The flexibility of the Kevlar walls suggests the possibility that the internal test section flow may be characterized by precisely measuring small deflections of the flexible walls. Treating the Kevlar fabric walls as tensioned membranes with known pre-tension and material properties, an inverse stress problem arises where the pressure distribution over the wall is sought as a function of the measured wall deflection. Experimental wall deformations produced by the wind loading of an airfoil model are measured using digital image correlation and subsequently projected onto polynomial basis functions which have been formulated to mitigate the impact of measurement noise based on a finite-element study. Inserting analytic derivatives of the basis functions into the equilibrium relations for a membrane, full-field pressure distributions across the Kevlar walls are computed. These inversely calculated pressures, after being validated against an independent measurement technique, can then be integrated along the length of the test section to give the sectional lift of the airfoil. Notably, these first-time results are achieved with a non-contact technique and in an anechoic environment.

  9. Intracellular Bacterial Communities: A Potential Etiology for Chronic Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Victoria C S; Haake, David A; Churchill, Bernard M; Justice, Sheryl S; Kim, Ja-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Patients with persistent lower urinary tract symptoms and negative urine cultures are often difficult to treat. Infection may go undetected in these patients because the concentrations of bacteria in their urine are beneath the threshold of standard urine culture techniques. Empiric treatment may result in temporary relief, followed by recurrent symptoms. Occult and recurrent urinary tract infection may be due to both invasion of the bladder wall by uropathogenic Escherichia coli and the formation of biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities. This review examines emerging evidence for a role of intracellular bacterial communities in human infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bistable Bacterial Growth Rate in Response to Antibiotics with Low Membrane Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, Johan; Nilsson, Karin; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrate that growth rate bistability for bacterial cells growing exponentially at a fixed external antibiotic concentration can emerge when the cell wall permeability for the drug is low and the growth rate sensitivity to the intracellular drug concentration is high. Under such conditions, an initially high growth rate can remain high, due to dilution of the intracellular drug concentration by rapid cell volume increase, while an initially low growth rate can remain low, due to slow cell volume increase and insignificant drug dilution. Our findings have implications for the testing of novel antibiotics on growing bacterial strains.

  11. Immersive viewing engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonlau, William J.

    2006-05-01

    An immersive viewing engine providing basic telepresence functionality for a variety of application types is presented. Augmented reality, teleoperation and virtual reality applications all benefit from the use of head mounted display devices that present imagery appropriate to the user's head orientation at full frame rates. Our primary application is the viewing of remote environments, as with a camera equipped teleoperated vehicle. The conventional approach where imagery from a narrow field camera onboard the vehicle is presented to the user on a small rectangular screen is contrasted with an immersive viewing system where a cylindrical or spherical format image is received from a panoramic camera on the vehicle, resampled in response to sensed user head orientation and presented via wide field eyewear display, approaching 180 degrees of horizontal field. Of primary interest is the user's enhanced ability to perceive and understand image content, even when image resolution parameters are poor, due to the innate visual integration and 3-D model generation capabilities of the human visual system. A mathematical model for tracking user head position and resampling the panoramic image to attain distortion free viewing of the region appropriate to the user's current head pose is presented and consideration is given to providing the user with stereo viewing generated from depth map information derived using stereo from motion algorithms.

  12. Diversity and abundance of the bacterial community of the red Macroalga Porphyra umbilicalis: did bacterial farmers produce macroalgae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilibeth N Miranda

    Full Text Available Macroalgae harbor microbial communities whose bacterial biodiversity remains largely uncharacterized. The goals of this study were 1 to examine the composition of the bacterial community associated with Porphyra umbilicalis Kützing from Schoodic Point, ME, 2 determine whether there are seasonal trends in species diversity but a core group of bacteria that are always present, and 3 to determine how the microbial community associated with a laboratory strain (P.um.1 established in the presence of antibiotics has changed. P. umbilicalis blades (n = 5, fall 2010; n = 5, winter 2011; n = 2, clonal P.um.1 were analyzed by pyrosequencing over two variable regions of the 16 S rDNA (V5-V6 and V8; 147,880 total reads. The bacterial taxa present were classified at an 80% confidence threshold into eight phyla (Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, and the candidate division TM7. The Bacteroidetes comprised the majority of bacterial sequences on both field and lab blades, but the Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria were also abundant. Sphingobacteria (Bacteroidetes and Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes had inverse abundances on natural versus P.um.1 blades. Bacterial communities were richer and more diverse on blades sampled in fall compared to winter. Significant differences were observed between microbial communities among all three groups of blades examined. Only two OTUs were found on all 12 blades, and only one of these, belonging to the Saprospiraceae (Bacteroidetes, was abundant. Lewinella (as 66 OTUs was found on all field blades and was the most abundant genus. Bacteria from the Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes that are known to digest the galactan sulfates of red algal cell walls were well-represented. Some of these taxa likely provide essential morphogenetic and beneficial nutritive factors to P. umbilicalis and may have had

  13. Diversity and abundance of the bacterial community of the red Macroalga Porphyra umbilicalis: did bacterial farmers produce macroalgae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Lilibeth N; Hutchison, Keith; Grossman, Arthur R; Brawley, Susan H

    2013-01-01

    Macroalgae harbor microbial communities whose bacterial biodiversity remains largely uncharacterized. The goals of this study were 1) to examine the composition of the bacterial community associated with Porphyra umbilicalis Kützing from Schoodic Point, ME, 2) determine whether there are seasonal trends in species diversity but a core group of bacteria that are always present, and 3) to determine how the microbial community associated with a laboratory strain (P.um.1) established in the presence of antibiotics has changed. P. umbilicalis blades (n = 5, fall 2010; n = 5, winter 2011; n = 2, clonal P.um.1) were analyzed by pyrosequencing over two variable regions of the 16 S rDNA (V5-V6 and V8; 147,880 total reads). The bacterial taxa present were classified at an 80% confidence threshold into eight phyla (Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, and the candidate division TM7). The Bacteroidetes comprised the majority of bacterial sequences on both field and lab blades, but the Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria) were also abundant. Sphingobacteria (Bacteroidetes) and Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes) had inverse abundances on natural versus P.um.1 blades. Bacterial communities were richer and more diverse on blades sampled in fall compared to winter. Significant differences were observed between microbial communities among all three groups of blades examined. Only two OTUs were found on all 12 blades, and only one of these, belonging to the Saprospiraceae (Bacteroidetes), was abundant. Lewinella (as 66 OTUs) was found on all field blades and was the most abundant genus. Bacteria from the Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes that are known to digest the galactan sulfates of red algal cell walls were well-represented. Some of these taxa likely provide essential morphogenetic and beneficial nutritive factors to P. umbilicalis and may have had unexpected

  14. The Human Vaginal Bacterial Biota and Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Srinivasan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial biota of the human vagina can have a profound impact on the health of women and their neonates. Changes in the vaginal microbiota have been associated with several adverse health outcomes including premature birth, pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of HIV infection. Cultivation-independent molecular methods have provided new insights regarding bacterial diversity in this important niche, particularly in women with the common condition bacterial vaginosis (BV. PCR methods have shown that women with BV have complex communities of vaginal bacteria that include many fastidious species, particularly from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Healthy women are mostly colonized with lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, and Lactobacillus iners, though a variety of other bacteria may be present. The microbiology of BV is heterogeneous. The presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae coating the vaginal epithelium in some subjects with BV suggests that biofilms may contribute to this condition.

  15. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Leitao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  16. First wall/blanket fabrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohri, Kensuke; Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yamada, Takeshi; Akiba, Masato; Seki, Masahiro.

    1991-01-01

    In a fusion nuclear reactor, armor is required to protect the in-vessel components from the plasma energy. In many first wall armor concepts, a radiative cooled armor tile first wall is proposed as one of the candidate structure for the first wall components, characterized by a central mechanical attachment, a thermally insulated mount, remote-handling capability and simplicity. In this paper, R and D results on the fabrication of first wall panel with two Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) bonding techniques, i.e. grooved plate type technique and rectangular tube one, and on the fabrication of first wall panel with radiative cooled graphite armor tile are described. A thermal-analysis and stress-analysis for this first wall panel with radiative cooled graphite armor tile are also studied. (author)

  17. [Application of a bacterial endotoxin test for parenteral drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Y

    1994-01-01

    The Limulus test, which has been adopted as the Test for Bacterial Endotoxins in the JP XII, can detect or quantitate endotoxins of Gram-negative bacterial origin using blood corpuscle extracts (Limulus amebocyte lysate, LAL) of horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus, Tachypleus tridentatus, etc.). It may be conducted by the gel-clot or spectrophotometric (turbidimetric and colorimetric) techniques, the former being based on gel formation due to the activation of LAL by endotoxins. The turbidimetric technique is based on the LAL turbidity change during the gel formation and the colorimetric technique on activation of peptide hydrolytic enzymes in LAL. The Limulus test has been unofficially utilized as a simple and highly sensitive method for the determination of endotoxins in parenteral drugs in lieu of the in vivo Pyrogen Test using rabbits. For the Bacterial Endotoxins Test of the JP XII, the gel-clot technique alone was adopted, the technique being only allowed for Injection. Although most parenteral drugs show inhibition or enhancement in practice, this test can be most easily conducted by eliminating interfering effects through dilution of specimens by a factor not exceeding the maximum valid dilution (MVD) with water. Since MVD is dependent on the sensitivity of applied methodology, the turbidimetric and colorimetric techniques, which are more sensitive than the gel-clot technique, have a distinct advantage. The JP, as the leading Pharmacopoeia for the international harmonization of Bacterial Endotoxins Testing, has presented a "Draft towards International Harmonization of Bacterial Endotoxins Test", whose main purpose is the introduction of supplementary turbidimetric and colorimetric techniques. Under these circumstances the following subjects are discussed: (1) the proposal that, with a view towards international harmonization of the technical requirements of Pharmacopoeias, both the turbidimetric and colorimetic techniques should be included together with

  18. Nano-QSAR: Genotoxicity of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toropova, A. P.; Toropov, A. A.; Rallo, R.; Leszczynska, D.; Leszczynski, J.

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to develop an efficient approach for prediction the genotoxicity of carbon nano tubes. The experimental data on the bacterial reverse mutation test (TA100) on multi-walled carbon nano tubes was collected from the literature and examined as an endpoint. By means of the optimal descriptors calculated with the Monte Carlo method a mathematical model of the endpoint was built up. The model is represented by a function of: (i) dose (μg/plate); (ii) metabolic activation (i.e. with S9 mix or without S9 mix); and (iii) two types of multi-walled carbon nano tubes. The above listed conditions were represented by so-called quasi-SMILES. Simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES) is a tool for representation of molecular structure. The quasi-SMILES is a tool to represent physicochemical and / or biochemical conditions for building up a predictive model. Thus, instead of well-known paradigm of predictive modeling “endpoint is a mathematical function of molecular structure” a fresh paradigm “endpoint is a mathematical function of available eclectic data (conditions) is suggested.

  19. First wall of thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Nobuharu.

    1992-01-01

    In a first wall of a thermonuclear device, armour tiles are metallurgically bonded to a support substrate only for the narrow area of the central portion thereof, while bonded by metallurgical bonding with cooling tubes of low mechanical toughness, separated from each other in other regions. Since the bonding area with the support substrate of great mechanical rigidity is limited to the narrow region at the central portion of the armour tiles, cracking are scarcely caused at the end portion of the bonding surface. In other regions, since cooling tubes of low mechanical rigidity are bonded metallurgically, they can be sufficiently withstand to high thermal load. That is, even if the armour tiles are deformed while undergoing thermal load from plasmas, since the cooling tubes absorb it, there is no worry of damaging the metallurgically bonded face. Since the cooling tubes are bonded directly to the armour tiles, they absorb the heat of the armour tiles efficiently. (N.H.)

  20. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations...... are based on static models to ease computational burden leading to inaccurate estimations. The aim of this work was to estimate the effect of vessel wall deformations (expansion and bending) on WSS levels....

  1. Retaining force augmentation of retaining walls

    OpenAIRE

    Manohar, Krishpersad; Tota-Maharaj, Kiran; Panchoo, Roshan

    2017-01-01

    Concrete blocks retaining walls are commonly used for landscaping projects in which the retaining force strength of the structure is of paramount importance in preserving the integrity of the project and safety of humans and property. The effect of augmenting the retaining force strength of concrete block retaining walls was investigated using interlocking and interlocking with a horizontal steel re-bar and compared with regular concrete block walls. The average maximum retaining force for re...

  2. Steel Sheet Pile Walls in Soft Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Kort, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    For almost a century, steel sheet pile walls are applied worldwide as earth retaining structures for excavations and quay walls. Within the framework of the development of European structural codes for Civil Engineering works, the Eurocodes, Eurocode 3 Part 5 for design of steel sheet pile walls was issued in 1997. This code offers possibilities for cheaper and safer steel sheet piling, in comparison with the existing design criteria used in most countries. Two of these design criteria with w...

  3. Rectangular Blocks vs Polygonal Walls in Archaeoseismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus-G. Hinzen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Collapsed or deformed walls in ancient structures constitute important evidence in archaeoseismology, where damage is interpreted in terms of earthquake ground motion. A large variety of wall types have been developed during the millennia in different cultural backgrounds. Often walls with polygonal-shaped building blocks are regarded as more earthquake-resistant than a wall consisting of rectangular elements and, as is sometimes speculated, that the irregular wall types were intentionally developed for that purpose. We use simply structured discrete element models of four walls with different block geometries, perfect rectangular, an Inka-type structure and two polygonal designs, to test their dynamic behavior. In addition to an analytic calculation of ground motion, we use measured strong motion signals as boundary conditions for the 3D wall models with varying height to width ratios. At peak ground accelerations between 1.0 and 9.0 m/s2 and major frequencies of 0.5 to 3 Hz, numeric experiments with the horizontally applied analytic ground motions result in clear differences in the resistance of the four wall types with the rectangular block wall being most vulnerable. For more complex measured 3D motions the Inka-type wall proves more stable than the rectangular block wall; however, height to width ratio still has equally strong influence on the stability. Internal deformation of non-collapsed walls shows some correlation with the parameters of the driving motion. For simple impulsive ground motions, a peak ground displacement threshold exists between toppling and remaining upright for all four models but peak acceleration cannot be reliably back calculated.

  4. Dissecting the functional significance of non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules in the deconstruction of plant cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Michael G. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Complex Carbohydrate Research Center

    2017-03-16

    The project seeks to investigate the mechanism by which CBMs potentiate the activity of glycoside hydrolases against complete plant cell walls. The project is based on the hypothesis that the wide range of CBMs present in bacterial enzymes maximize the potential target substrates by directing the cognate enzymes not only to different regions of a specific plant cell wall, but also increases the range of plant cell walls that can be degraded. In addition to maximizing substrate access, it was also proposed that CBMs can target specific subsets of hydrolases with complementary activities to the same region of the plant cell wall, thereby maximizing the synergistic interactions between these enzymes. This synergy is based on the premise that the hydrolysis of a specific polysaccharide will increase the access of closely associated polymers to enzyme attack. In addition, it is unclear whether the catalytic module and appended CBM of modular enzymes have evolved unique complementary activities.

  5. Effect of inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate and immune parameters in Pacific White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutchanee Chotikachinda

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of dietary inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate, and immune parameters in pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei was investigated. Three dosages of inactive yeast cell wall (0, 1, and 2 g kg-1 were tested in three replicate groups of juvenile shrimps with an average initial weight of 7.15±0.05 g for four weeks. There was no significant difference in final weight, survival rate, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio, feed intake, protein efficiency ratio, and apparent net protein utilization of each treatments. However, different levels of inactive yeast cell wall showed an effect on certain immune parameters (p<0.05. Total hemocyte counts, granular hemocyte count, and bacterial clearance were better in shrimp fed diets supplemented with 1 and 2 g kg-1 inactive yeast cell wall as compared with thecontrol group.

  6. Bacterial contamination of blood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavecino, Elizabeth; Jacobs, Michael; Yomtovian, Roslyn

    2004-11-01

    The occurrence of a septic reaction resulting from bacterial contamination of blood products, particularly with room-temperature stored platelets, is the most common transfusion-associated infectious risk in the United States. Bacterial contamination of blood products was first identified more than 60 years ago; yet, strategies to resolve this problem have proved daunting despite ongoing awareness and increasing concern especially in the last few years. With the recent US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of culture methods for quality control testing of platelet units and the promulgation of accreditation standards by the College of American Pathologists and American Association of Blood Banks to detect bacterially contaminated platelet units and to prevent transfusion of these units, blood banks and transfusion services have finally started to address this problem, in a more standardized manner. Furthermore, as new methods of interdicting, inactivating and detecting bacterially contaminated blood products emerge, it is hoped that the problem of bacterial contamination of blood products will be overcome.

  7. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costerus, Joost M; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Bijlsma, Merijn W; van de Beek, Diederik

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and is associated with a high disease burden. We reviewed recent progress in the management of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis. The worldwide burden of disease of bacterial meningitis remains high, despite the decreasing incidence following introduction of routine vaccination campaigns. Delay in diagnosis and treatment remain major concerns in the management of acute bacterial meningitis. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases guidelines strive for a door-to-antibiotic-time less than 1 h. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has emerged as an important diagnostic tool to identify the causative organism. Point-of-care tests using fast multiplex PCR have been developed, but additional value has not been proven. Although anecdotal observations advocate pressure-based management, a randomized controlled trial will need to be performed first to determine efficacy and safety of such an aggressive treatment approach. Adjunctive dexamethasone remains the only adjunctive therapy with proven efficacy. The incidence of bacterial meningitis has been decreasing after the implementation of effective vaccines. Treatment should be administered as soon as possible and time to treatment should not exceed 1 h.

  8. The ColM Family, Polymorphic Toxins Breaching the Bacterial Cell Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten G. K. Ghequire

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria host an arsenal of antagonism-mediating molecules to combat for ecologic space. Bacteriocins represent a pivotal group of secreted antibacterial peptides and proteins assisting in this fight, mainly eliminating relatives. Colicin M, a model for peptidoglycan-interfering bacteriocins in Gram-negative bacteria, appears to be part of a set of polymorphic toxins equipped with such a catalytic domain (ColM targeting lipid II. Diversifying recombination has enabled parasitism of different receptors and has also given rise to hybrid bacteriocins in which ColM is associated with another toxin module. Remarkably, ColM toxins have recruited a diverse array of immunity partners, comprising cytoplasmic membrane-associated proteins with different topologies. Together, these findings suggest that different immunity mechanisms have evolved for ColM, in contrast to bacteriocins with nuclease activities.

  9. Superfast domain walls in KTP single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Esin, A. A.; Alam, M. A.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.

    2017-10-01

    Potassium titanyl phosphate KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystals with periodical ferroelectric domain structures are one of the most promising materials for nonlinear optics, in which the main types of nonlinear optical interactions have been demonstrated. Despite the crucial importance of the in situ visualization of domain structure kinetics for creation of high quality periodical domain gratings, there are only a few works concerning KTP. We present the results of in situ visualization of domain kinetics in KTP with the time resolution down to 12.5 μs and simultaneous recording of the switching current data. The wide range of wall velocities with two orders of magnitude difference was observed for switching in a uniform electric field. The kinetic maps allowed analyzing the spatial distribution of wall motion velocities and classifying the walls by velocity ranges. The distinguished slow, fast, and superfast types of domain walls differed by their orientation. It was shown that the fast and slow domain walls provided the smooth input to the switching current, whereas the short-lived superfast walls resulted in short current peaks. The mobility and the threshold fields for all types of domain walls were estimated. The revealed increase in the wall velocity with deviation from low-index crystallographic planes for slow and fast walls was considered in terms of determined step generation and anisotropic kink motion. The obtained results are important for further development of domain engineering in KTP required for creation of high power, reliable, and effective coherent light sources.

  10. Planar domain walls in black hole spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, Filip; Mach, Patryk

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the behavior of low-mass, planar domain walls in the so-called ϕ4 model of the scalar field on the Schwarzschild and Kerr backgrounds. We focus on a transit of a domain wall through a black hole and solve numerically the equations of motion for a range of parameters of the domain wall and the black hole. We observe a behavior resembling an occurrence of ringing modes. Perturbations of domain walls vanish during latter evolution, suggesting their stability against a passage through the black hole. The results obtained for Kerr and Reissner-Nordström black holes are also compared.

  11. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  12. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-01-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  13. Glycoprotein component of plant cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.B.; Chen, J.A.; Varner, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The primary wall surrounding most dicotyledonous plant cells contains a hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) component named extensin. A small group of glycopeptides solubilized from isolated cell walls by proteolysis contained a repeated pentapeptide glycosylated by tri- and tetraarabinosides linked to hydroxyproline and, by galactose, linked to serine. Recently, two complementary approaches to this problem have provided results which greatly increase the understanding of wall extensin. In this paper the authors describe what is known about the structure of soluble extensin secreted into the walls of the carrot root cells

  14. Low-rise shear wall failure modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Reed, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the data that are available concerning the structural response of low-rise shear walls is presented. This data will be used to address two failure modes associated with the shear wall structures. First, data concerning the seismic capacity of the shear walls with emphasis on excessive deformations that can cause equipment failure are examined. Second, data concerning the dynamic properties of shear walls (stiffness and damping) that are necessary to compute the seismic inputs to attached equipment are summarized. This case addresses the failure of equipment when the structure remains functional. 23 refs

  15. Hyphal walls of isolated lichen fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galun, M.; Braun, A.; Frensdorff, A.; Galun, E.

    1976-01-01

    The hyphal walls of three mycobionts, isolated from the lichens Xanthoria parietina, Tornabenia intricata and Sarcogyne sp. were investigated by two techniques: microaudiography of fungal colonies exposed to radioactive carbohydrate precursors; and binding, in vivo, of fluorescein conjugated lectins to hyphal walls of such colonies. N-( 3 H) acetylglucosamine was readily incorporated into tips, young hyphal walls and septa of the three mycobionts and the free-living fungus Trichoderma viride, but not into Phytophthora citrophthora, indicating that chitin is a major component of the mycobionts' hyphal walls. All three mycobionts, but neither of the free-living fungi, incorporated ( 3 H) mannose and ( 3 H) mannitol into their hyphal walls. Fluorescein-conjugated wheat germ agglutinin was bound to the hyphal walls of the three mycobionts and T. viride, but not to the walls of P. citrophthora; the binding pattern was similar to the grain pattern obtained in audiographs after short N-( 3 H) acetylglucosamine labelling. As wheat germ agglutinin binds specifically to chitin oligomers, the lectin binding tests further confirmed that chitin is a mycobiont hyphal wall component. Binding characteristics of several fluorescein-conjugated lectins to the three mycobionts indicated that this technique can yield useful information concerning the chemical composition of hyphal wall surfaces. (orig./AJ) [de

  16. Remote viewing of objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motin, J.D.; Reformatsky, I.A.; Sinitsyn, P.R.; Ivanov, N.M.; Ivanov, B.I.; Malakhov, I.K.

    1979-01-01

    An object in a nuclear power plant is viewed through a radiation-proof shield by means of an entrance lens, optic fibre bundle and exit lens. The optic fibre bundle being heated to ensure thermostabilization of its light conducting properties in the presence of ionising radiation. Heating is by an electric heating coil. Alternatively, heating may be by argon itself heated by an electric heating element, a coating of resistive heating material, or absorption of neutrons in the material of the fibres or a coating therefor. Viewing may be on a CRT screen. (author)

  17. Kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral fractures with posterior wall injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgawaad, Ahmed Shawky; Ezzati, Ali; Govindasamy, Ramachandran; Krajnovic, Branko; Elnady, Belal; Said, Galal Zaki

    2017-11-14

    Cement augmentation techniques are standard treatments for osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Compared with vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty is associated with lower rates of cement leak and better deformity correction; however, posterior wall fractures are relative, but not absolute; contraindications for both techniques and hence treatment practices vary among spine centers. The primary aim of this study was to assess our center's incidence of posterior cement leakage in osteoporotic vertebral fractures with posterior wall injury treated by balloon kyphoplasty (BKP). Secondarily, physiological results, pain relief, complication rates, and non-posterior cement leakage were also evaluated. This is a prospective cohort study done in a high-volume spine center in Germany. Eighty-two patients with 98 osteoporotic vertebral fractures with posterior wall cortical injury were studied from 2012 to 2016. The following were the outcome measures: (1) physiological measures: standing plain x-rays (anteroposterior and lateral views), with the following parameters evaluated: cement leak behind the posterior vertebral body border, Cobb angle for local sagittal deformity, vertebral wedge angle, and anterior vertebral height; (2) cement volume injected in each vertebra; and (3) self-report measures: visual analog scale (VAS). All patients underwent BKP using a bipedicular approach. Preoperative clinical and neurologic evaluations were done. Radiological evaluations included plain x-rays, computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance imaging. The average follow-up period was 18 months. No cement leakage into the spinal canal occurred in any of the patients. Asymptomatic leakage into other sites was seen in 22 vertebrae (22.45%). There was significant improvement in the Cobb angle, the vertebral wedge angle, and the anterior vertebral height in all cases. The mean preoperative VAS was 8.1, and this improved to 2.3 on the third postoperative day. Balloon kyphoplasty is a viable option

  18. The hysterographic (empty bladder) view of the uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, R.; Gombergh, R.

    1986-01-01

    Technical improvements in transducer design permit a direct coronal view of the uterus (''hysterographic view'') to be obtained with the bladder empty as a valuable complement to the usual US study of the pelvis with the bladder distended. Good visualization of the uterine cavity and wall is possible in 95% of cases. More than 50 cases of endometrial and myometrial pathology (polyps, cancers, submucous fibroids) with abnormalities inapparent on standard US scans have hysterographic and/or pathologic proof confirming the empty-bladder US-based diagnosis. If tubal visualization is not necessary, empty-bladder US may often avoid hysterography. It is also the best way to demonstrate IUD position

  19. Electromagnetic approaches to wall characterization, wall mitigation, and antenna design for through-the-wall radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thajudeen, Christopher

    Through-the-wall imaging (TWI) is a topic of current interest due to its wide range of public safety, law enforcement, and defense applications. Among the various available technologies such as, acoustic, thermal, and optical imaging, which can be employed to sense and image targets of interest, electromagnetic (EM) imaging, in the microwave frequency bands, is the most widely utilized technology and has been at the forefront of research in recent years. The primary objectives for any Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging (TWRI) system are to obtain a layout of the building and/or inner rooms, detect if there are targets of interest including humans or weapons, determine if there are countermeasures being employed to further obscure the contents of a building or room of interest, and finally to classify the detected targets. Unlike conventional radar scenarios, the presence of walls, made of common construction materials such as brick, drywall, plywood, cinder block, and solid concrete, adversely affects the ability of any conventional imaging technique to properly image targets enclosed within building structures as the propagation through the wall can induce shadowing effects on targets of interest which may result in image degradation, errors in target localization, and even complete target masking. For many applications of TWR systems, the wall ringing signals are strong enough to mask the returns from targets not located a sufficient distance behind the wall, beyond the distance of the wall ringing, and thus without proper wall mitigation, target detection becomes extremely difficult. The results presented in this thesis focus on the development of wall parameter estimation, and intra-wall and wall-type characterization techniques for use in both the time and frequency domains as well as analysis of these techniques under various real world scenarios such as reduced system bandwidth scenarios, various wall backing scenarios, the case of inhomogeneous walls, presence

  20. Mechanical analysis of the dry stone walls built by the Incas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the retaining walls in the agricultural terraces built by the Incas are analyzed from a mechanical point of view. In order to do so, ten different walls from the Lower Agricultural Sector of Machu Picchu, Perú, were selected using images from Google Street View and Google Earth Pro. Then, these walls were digitalized and their mechanical stability was evaluated. Firstly, it was found that these retaining walls are characterized by two distinctive features: disorder and a block size distribution with a large size span, i.e., the particle size varies from blocks that can be carried by one person to large blocks weighing several tons. Secondly, it was found that, thanks to the large span of the block size distribution, the factor of safety of the Inca retaining walls is remarkably close to those that are recommended in modern geotechnical design standards. This suggests that these structures were not only functional but also highly optimized, probably as a result of a careful trial and error procedure.

  1. Mechanical analysis of the dry stone walls built by the Incas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Jaime; Vallejo, Luis E.; Estrada, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the retaining walls in the agricultural terraces built by the Incas are analyzed from a mechanical point of view. In order to do so, ten different walls from the Lower Agricultural Sector of Machu Picchu, Perú, were selected using images from Google Street View and Google Earth Pro. Then, these walls were digitalized and their mechanical stability was evaluated. Firstly, it was found that these retaining walls are characterized by two distinctive features: disorder and a block size distribution with a large size span, i.e., the particle size varies from blocks that can be carried by one person to large blocks weighing several tons. Secondly, it was found that, thanks to the large span of the block size distribution, the factor of safety of the Inca retaining walls is remarkably close to those that are recommended in modern geotechnical design standards. This suggests that these structures were not only functional but also highly optimized, probably as a result of a careful trial and error procedure.

  2. Bacterial phagocytosis by macrophage of autogenous splenic implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques R. G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Autogenous splenic implant seems to be the only alternative for preservation of splenic tissue after total splenectomy. This work was carried out to analyze the morphologic regeneration of autotransplanted splenic tissue in Wistar rats and to determine the bacterial phagocytic function of their macrophages. We utilized an experimental model with thirty-two rats, of both sexes, submitted to total splenectomy combined with autotransplantation in greater omentum of slices of the whole spleen mass. The animals were divided into two groups: I - young rats weighing 100 to 150 g; and II - adult rats weighing 250 to 300 g. Sixteen weeks later animals were intravenously inoculated with a suspension of Escherichia coli AB1157. Twenty minutes after inoculation, the animals were sacrificed and the splenic autotransplants were removed for morphological study. There was regeneration of autotransplanted splenic tissue in all animals. A similar morphological aspect among all animals was observed, with splenic tissue showing red and white pulps, lymphoid follicles, and marginal zone, with a moderate architectural disarrangement. Macrophages containing gram-negative bacterial aggregates as well as macrophages with hemosiderin pigments within the cytoplasm were observed. Blood vessels showed preserved walls, with no signs of vasculitis or thrombosis. The present results suggest that autogenous splenic implants in the greater omentum of the rat acquire the macro- and microscopic architecture of a normal spleen, with reduced dimensions, and preserve bacterial phagocyte function.

  3. Chest wall – a structure underestimated in ultrasonography. Part III: Neoplastic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall neoplasms mainly include malignancies, metastatic in particular. Differential diagnosis should include clinical data; tumor location, extent, delineation; the degree of homogeneity; the presence of calcifications; the nature of bone destruction and the degree of vascularization. The aim of the paper is to present both the benefits and limitations of ultrasound for the diagnosis of chest wall neoplasms. The neoplastic process may be limited to the chest wall; it may spread from the chest wall into the intrathoracic structures or spread from the inside of the chest towards the chest wall. Benign tumors basically originate from vessels, nerves, bones, cartilage and soft tissues. In this paper, we briefly discuss malformations of blood and lymphatic vessels, glomus tumor as well as neurogenic tumors originating in the thoracic branches of the spinal nerves and the autonomic visceral system. Metastases, particularly lung, breast, kidney cancer, melanoma and prostate cancer, are predominant tumors of the osteocartilaginous structures of the chest wall. Plasma cell myeloma is also relatively common. The vast majority of these lesions are osteolytic, which is reflected in ultrasound as irregular cortical defects. Osteoblastic foci result only in irregular outline of the bone surface. Lipomas are the most common neoplasms of the chest wall soft tissue. Elastofibroma is another tumor with characteristic echostructure. Desmoid fibromatosis, which is considered to be a benign lesion with local aggressivity and recurrences after surgical resection, represents an interesting tumor form the clinical point of view. Ultrasonography represents an optimal tool for the monitoring of different biopsies of pathological lesions located in the chest wall. Based on our experiences and literature data, this method should be considered as a preliminary diagnosis of patients with chest wall tumors.

  4. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa

  5. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  6. Clashing world views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagassa, G.

    1992-01-01

    This article examines how politics, economics, and an increasing awareness of environmental and societal impacts are affecting the market for new hydroelectric projects. The topics of the article include border conflicts, new opposition, resettlement issues, the problems and benefits of hydroelectric projects, taking action, and a clash of world views

  7. Summary: Two Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, W. Harry; Hurst, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Two student services administrators present differing views on the role of consultation in the university community. These authors, speaking from one of the most inclusive levels of the university system, raise a number of issues concerning the pros and cons of intersystem consultation within the university. (Author)

  8. to view fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-08

    Jan 8, 2012 ... Herein, we review recent findings supporting the view that autophagy, one of the major protein degradation systems, is critically involved in Aβ homeostasis and AD pathogenesis, and discuss possible therapeutic strategies targeting autophagic activity in alleviating the Aβ-associated pathogenesis of AD.

  9. VMware view security essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Langenhan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A practical and fast-paced guide that gives you all the information you need to secure your virtual environment.This book is a ""how-to"" for the novice, a ""reference guide"" for the advanced user, and a ""go to"" for the experienced user in all the aspects of VMware View desktop virtualization security.

  10. to view fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In the rapidly developing field of study of the transient sky, fast radio transients are perhaps the most exciting objects of scrutiny at present. The SKA, with its wide field-of-view and significant improve- ment in sensitivity over existing facilities, is expected to detect a plethora of fast transients which, in addition to help ...

  11. Post-human Viewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between theories of photography and mobile phone footage. In doing so, it asks if theories of photography still apply in a technologically saturated world of imagery. Technology is an increasingly important part of viewing imagery today and enables imagery...

  12. to view fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nevertheless, P1 peptidase in many ways is still a mysterious viral protein. In this review, we would like to offer a comprehensive overview, discussing the proteomic, biochemical and phylogenetic views of the P1 protein. 1. Introduction. The Potyviridae family [named after its type member,. Potato virus Y (PVY)] is the largest ...

  13. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  14. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1” to 1 ½”), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  15. Bacterial computing with engineered populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Martyn; Axmann, Ilka Maria; Blüthgen, Nils; de la Cruz, Fernando; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Paton, Alfonso; Simmel, Friedrich

    2015-07-28

    We describe strategies for the construction of bacterial computing platforms by describing a number of results from the recently completed bacterial computing with engineered populations project. In general, the implementation of such systems requires a framework containing various components such as intracellular circuits, single cell input/output and cell-cell interfacing, as well as extensive analysis. In this overview paper, we describe our approach to each of these, and suggest possible areas for future research. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Changes in the repertoire of natural antibodies caused by immunization with bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shilova, N V; Navakouski, M J; Huflejt, M

    2011-01-01

    The repertoire of natural anti-glycan antibodies in naïve chickens and in chickens immunized with bacteria Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Francisella tularensis as well as with peptides from an outer membrane protein of B. pseudomallei was studied. A relatively restricted...... pattern of natural antibodies (first of all IgY against bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan fragments, L-Rha, and core N-acetyllactosamine) shrank and, moreover, the level of detectable antibodies decreased as a result of immunization....

  17. Resistance of Membrane Retrofit Concrete Masonry Walls to Lateral Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    of wall with no openings α Wall support degree of fixity β Ratio of wall curvature Bw Factor for opening in wall c Radius of curvature Δ wall...recognizing all of the relevant design variables (Yokel and Dikkers 1971). Design variables such as loading geometry, end fixity , wall stiffness, and...bottom interfaces. The last assumption is made to help develop the necessary equations for wall failure with varying degrees of end fixity . Although

  18. Vacuum system and wall conditioning in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usselmann, E.; Dietz, K.J.; Hemmerich, H.; Schueller, F.C.; Tanga, A.

    1984-01-01

    The JET vacuum system, operation experience and the modifications required for future Tritium operation are described. The techniques and results of the wall conditioning employed will be summarised with respect to plasma performance. Consequences for the choice of limiter and wall material will be discussed. (author)

  19. ADULT ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA IN IBADAN.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Abdominal wall hernia repair accounts, in the average surgical unit, for 15-18% of all surgical procedures1,2. Indeed hernias are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in various parts of Africa1,3,4,5,6. Approximately 7 in 10 cases of all abdominal wall hernias occur in the groin, thus making inguinal ...

  20. Building Walls Instead of Building Friendships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Else Marie Wiberg

    2008-01-01

    An editorial about the perspectives and proportions in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and the Israeli claim that a wall prevents "evil".......An editorial about the perspectives and proportions in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and the Israeli claim that a wall prevents "evil"....

  1. Transcriptional regulatory network controlling secondary cell wall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secondary wall is an abundant component of plant biomass and has a potential to be a renewable resource of bioenergy and biomaterials. It is important to unravel the molecular mechanism underlying secondary wall formation and how it contributes to plant biomass production. In this review, we summarized the potential ...

  2. Cartan frames for heart wall fiber motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samari, Babak; Aumentado-Armstrong, Tristan; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Froeling, Martijn; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2017-01-01

    Current understanding of heart wall fiber geometry is based on ex vivo static data obtained through diffusion imaging or histology. Thus, little is known about the manner in which fibers rotate as the heart beats. Yet, the geometric organization of moving fibers in the heart wall is key to its

  3. [The cell wall of Coelastrum (Chlorophycees)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, O

    1975-01-01

    The cell wall of Coelastrum is usually composed of three layers. The outermost layer was studied most extensively. It consists of erect tubules which often bear long bristles whose function may be to stabilize the algae in its enviroment. The cell wall can modify its morphology according to the enviroment.

  4. Safety Aspects for Vertical Wall Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Burcharth, H. F.; Christiani, E.

    1996-01-01

    In this appendix some safety aspects in relation to vertical wall breakwaters are discussed. Breakwater structures such as vertical wall breakwaters are used under quite different conditions. The expected lifetime can be from 5 years (interim structure) to 100 years (permanent structure) and the ...

  5. Full size testing of sheet pile walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuilen, J.W.G. van de; Linden, M.L.R. van der; Katsma, H.; Stolle, P.

    1996-01-01

    Azobé (Lophira alata) is widely used in timber sheet pile walls in the Netherlands. The boards in these walls are coupled and therefore load-sharing can be expected. A simulation model based on the finite element method DIANA (DIANA, 1992) was developed and load-sharing could be calculated. To check

  6. Detection of Anomalies in Diaphragm Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, R.; Van Tol, F.; Broere, W.

    2015-01-01

    If a calamity with a retaining wall occurs, the impact on surrounding buildings and infrastructure is at least an order of magnitude more severe than without the calamity. In 2005 and 2006 major leaks in the retaining walls of underground stations in Amsterdam and Rotterdam occurred. After these

  7. Risk Assessment of Energy-Efficient Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallin, Simon B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hun, Diana E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jackson, Roderick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kehrer, Manfred [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This multi-year project aims to provide the residential construction industry with energy-efficient wall designs that are moisture durable. The present work focused on the initial step of this project, which is to develop a moisture durability protocol that identifies energy efficient wall designs that have a low probability of experiencing moisture problems.

  8. Post caesarean section anterior abdominal wall endometriosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdominal wall endometriosis is a likely sequelae of caesarean section as viable endometrial tissue are deposited in the peritoneal cavity or anterior abdominal wall. One such case to sensitize clinicians of this rare presentation of the disease is presented. The patient was a 48 year old woman who presented with a lesion ...

  9. Limb body wall complex: A rare anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panduranga Chikkannaiah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present autopsy findings of a case of limb body wall complex (LBWC. The fetus had encephalocele, genitourinary agenesis, skeletal anomalies and body wall defects. The rare finding in our case is the occurrence of both cranial and urogenital anomalies. The presence of complex anomalies in this fetus, supports embryonal dysplasia theory of pathogenesis for LBWC.

  10. Synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matushita, J.P.K.; Matushita, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    A case report of synovial sarcoma arising in the abdominal wall is presented. A brief review of the clinical and radiological features of synovial sarcoma is made. Pre-operative diagnosis of an abdominal wall synovial sarcoma is virtually impossible, but should be considered when a soft tissue swelling is found to show amorphous stippled calcification X-ray. (author) [pt

  11. Connective tissue alteration in abdominal wall hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Yadete, D H; Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2011-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of abdominal wall hernia formation is complex. Optimal treatment of hernias depends on a full understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in their formation. The aim of this study was to review the literature on specific collagen alterations...... in abdominal wall hernia formation....

  12. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  13. Statistical analysis of silo wall pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Berntsen, Kasper Nikolaj

    1998-01-01

    Previously published silo wall pressure measurements during plug flow of barley in alarge concrete silo are re-analysed under the hypothesis that the wall pressures are gamma-distributed.The fits of the gamma distribution type to the local pressure data from each measuring cell are satisfactory...

  14. THz reflectometric imaging of medieval wall paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz time-domain reflectometry has been applied to the investigation of a medieval Danish wall painting. The technique has been able to detect the presence of carbonblack layer on the surface of the wall painting and a buried insertion characterized by high reflectivity values has been found...

  15. Mechanics of the Toxoplasma gondii oocyst wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of microorganisms to survive under extreme conditions is closely related to the physicochemical properties of their wall. In the ubiquitous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the oocyst stage possesses a bilayered wall that protects the dormant but potentially infective parasites from...

  16. Green Walls Utilizing Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrejs BONDAREVS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A wireless sensor network was used to automatically control the life-support equipment of a green wall and to measure its influence on the air quality. Temperature, relative humidity, particulate matter, volatile organic compound and carbon dioxide were monitored during different tests. Green wall performance on improving the air quality and the influence of the air flow through the green wall on its performance were studied. The experimental results show that the green wall is effective to absorb particulate matter and volatile organic compound. The air flow through the green wall significantly increases the performance. The built-in fan increases the absorption rate of particulate matter by 8 times and that of formaldehyde by 3 times.

  17. Wind Load Test of Earthbag Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Scott

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Earthbag construction is a sustainable, low-cost, housing option for developing countries. Earthbag structures are built of individual soil-filled fabric bags (i.e., sand bags stacked in a running bond pattern. Once stacked, earthbags are compacted and the soil inside the bags is dried in-place to form earthen bricks. Barbed wires are placed between each course to affect shear transfer within the wall. Results of an out-of-plane load test on a full-scale earthbag wall are presented in this paper. The wall was subjected to out-of-plane pressure up to 3.16 kPa, which resulted in plastic deformations up to 50 mm. The wall did not collapse during loading. Wall behavior and force transfer mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Anther Wall Formation in Solanaceae Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARRIZO GARCÍA, CAROLINA

    2002-01-01

    Anther wall formation was studied in 32 species belonging to 27 genera of Solanaceae. Dicotyledonous and basic types of wall formation were observed, as well as several deviations due to subsequent periclinal divisions in the layers formed (middle layers and sometimes the endothecium). One type of wall formation was observed in each species. Some genera are uniform in their type of wall formation, while others are heterogeneous; a similar situation was observed at the tribal level. Summarizing all reported information on anther wall formation in the Solanaceae, 64 % of species show the basic type, while the remaining 36 % show the dicotyledonous type. Thus, neither type predominates, and no single type characterizes genera, tribes or the entire family. PMID:12451025

  19. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  20. Diaphragm walling for Sizewell B sets records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The first phase of construction of the Sizewell-B nuclear reactor has been completed. This was the building of a diaphragm wall around the site. It is one of the largest and deepest diaphragm walls to be installed in Europe. The site can be pumped dry of groundwater and the foundations constructed in the dry. The specifications of the wall and its construction, using two Hydrofraise excavation rigs, are described. The excavated material is brought up as a slurry and the (bentonite) slurry is cleaned and desanded. Most of the wall has been formed using a plastic concrete but reinforced concrete has been used for some stretches. The diaphragm wall, which is 1258m long and 55m deep on average, was built in 19 weeks. (U.K.)

  1. Chest wall invasion by bronchogenic carcinoma. Evaluation with Cine-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawano, Shigeru; Murakami, Kohji; Ohnuma, Hiroshi; Iwata, Ryoko; Hayashi, Takayuki; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Nishiwaki, Yutaka; Nagai, Kanji

    1996-01-01

    With the view of examining possible chest wall invasion of bronchogenic carcinoma, Cine-MRI was performed on 22 such cases. These cases were suspected of having above chest wall invasion by CT and their histopathological findings were obtained in surgery. The judgment of the chest wall invasion by Cine-CT was made such that non-moving up and down of the tumor with respiration involves its invasion, moving of the tumor without any up-and-down movement suspects its invasion and moving up and down of the tumor with respiration involves no invasion. The chest wall invasion was observed in 5 of 7 cases of invasion judged by Cine-MRI. For 2 false-positive cases, the histopathological findings presumed that tumor cells disappeared from the chest wall invaded region as the result of preoperative chemotherapy. The above invasion was observed in 1 of 4 cases suspected of possible invasion. Correct diagnosis was formed of 11 cases judged invasion-free by Cine-MRI. The above results suggested Cine-MRI to be useful for diagnosis of chest wall invasion of bronchogenic carcinoma. (author)

  2. Domain wall solitons and Hopf algebraic translational symmetries in noncommutative field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasai, Yuya; Sasakura, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    Domain wall solitons are the simplest topological objects in field theories. The conventional translational symmetry in a field theory is the generator of a one-parameter family of domain wall solutions, and induces a massless moduli field which propagates along a domain wall. We study similar issues in braided noncommutative field theories possessing Hopf algebraic translational symmetries. As a concrete example, we discuss a domain wall soliton in the scalar φ 4 braided noncommutative field theory in Lie-algebraic noncommutative space-time, [x i ,x j ]=2iκε ijk x k (i,j,k=1,2,3), which has a Hopf algebraic translational symmetry. We first discuss the existence of a domain wall soliton in view of Derrick's theorem, and construct explicitly a one-parameter family of solutions in perturbation of the noncommutativity parameter κ. We then find the massless moduli field which propagates on the domain wall soliton. We further extend our analysis to the general Hopf algebraic translational symmetry

  3. Biotechnological applications of bacterial cellulases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menéndez, E.; García-Fraile, Paula; Rivas, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2015), s. 163-182 ISSN 2306-5354 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Biotechnological applications * Bacterial cellulases * Cellulose degradation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  4. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bac...

  5. Metagenomic Diagnosis of Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shota; Maeda, Norihiro; Miron, Ionut Mihai; Yoh, Myonsun; Izutsu, Kaori; Kataoka, Chidoh; Honda, Takeshi; Yasunaga, Teruo; Nakaya, Takaaki; Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Horii, Toshihiro

    2008-01-01

    To test the ability of high-throughput DNA sequencing to detect bacterial pathogens, we used it on DNA from a patient’s feces during and after diarrheal illness. Sequences showing best matches for Campylobacter jejuni were detected only in the illness sample. Various bacteria may be detectable with this metagenomic approach. PMID:18976571

  6. bacterial flora and antibiotic sensitivity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purulent pelvic collections are common pathologies observed in contemporary gynaecological practice. They may originate from chronic pelvic inflammatory disease, from abortions or following normal deliveries. This study was designed to compare the bacterial flora in purulent pelvic collections obtained from HIV infected ...

  7. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  8. Molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial persisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Gerdes, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    All bacteria form persisters, cells that are multidrug tolerant and therefore able to survive antibiotic treatment. Due to the low frequencies of persisters in growing bacterial cultures and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms, the phenomenon has been challenging to study. However, recent...

  9. Biotechnological applications of bacterial cellulases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Menendez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cellulases have numerous applications in several industries, including biofuel production, food and feed industry, brewing, pulp and paper, textile, laundry, and agriculture.Cellulose-degrading bacteria are widely spread in nature, being isolated from quite different environments. Cellulose degradation is the result of a synergic process between an endoglucanase, an exoglucanase and a,β-glucosidase. Bacterial endoglucanases degrade ß-1,4-glucan linkages of cellulose amorphous zones, meanwhile exoglucanases cleave the remaining oligosaccharide chains, originating cellobiose, which is hydrolyzed by ß-glucanases. Bacterial cellulases (EC 3.2.1.4 are comprised in fourteen Glycosil Hydrolase families. Several advantages, such as higher growth rates and genetic versatility, emphasize the suitability and advantages of bacterial cellulases over other sources for this group of enzymes. This review summarizes the main known cellulolytic bacteria and the best strategies to optimize their cellulase production, focusing on endoglucanases, as well as it reviews the main biotechnological applications of bacterial cellulases in several industries, medicine and agriculture.

  10. Repair of Lateral Wall Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezeafshar, Reza; Moubayed, Sami P; Most, Sam P

    2018-03-01

    Lateral wall insufficiency (LWI) is classified by the zone in which it occurs. Multiple techniques for treating LWI are described in the literature and are used, but no treatment approach has been widely adopted. To establish an algorithm for treatment of LWI by evaluating subjective and objective outcomes of patients who underwent LWI repair and comparing these results with those of a control group who received no specific LWI repair. This case-control study was conducted in a tertiary referral center. In group 1, there were 44 patients who underwent septorhinoplasty to repair LWI between February 1, 2014, and May 31, 2016. In group 2, there were 44 age- and sex-matched patients who underwent cosmetic septorhinoplasty without LWI repair. Data analysis was conducted from February 1, 2014, to May 31, 2016. Open septorhinoplasty. Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scores and LWI grades. Forty-four patients (8 men and 36 women, with a mean [SD] age of 46 [16] years) who underwent open septorhinoplasty to repair LWI and 44 age- and sex-matched patients (composed of 8 men and 36 women, with a mean [SD] age of 41 [12] years) were included in the study. The mean (SD) preoperative NOSE scores were 69.4 (22) in group 1 and 20.5 (20.8) in group 2 (P system enables surgeons to localize LWI, tailor the surgical treatment to the patient, and monitor improvements in the postoperative period. 3.

  11. Mirror, mirror on the wall

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    RICH 2, one of the two Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment, is being prepared to join the other detector elements ready for the first proton-proton collisions at LHC. The mirrors of the RICH2 detector are meticulously assembled in a clean room.In a large dark room, men in white move around an immense structure some 7 metres high, 10 metres wide and nearly 2.5 metres deep. Apparently effortlessly, they are installing the two large high-precision spherical mirrors. These mirrors will focus Cherenkov light, created by the charged particles that will traverse this detector, onto the photon detectors. Each spherical mirror wall is made up of facets like a fly's eye. Twenty-eight individual thin glass mirrors will all point to the same point in space to within a few micro-radians. The development of these mirrors has been technically demanding : Ideally they should be massless, sturdy, precise and have high reflectivity. In practice, though not massless, they are made from a mere 6 mm thin gl...

  12. [Abdominal wall closure in laparotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellón-Caneiro, Juan M

    2005-03-01

    The midline laparotomy is among the most common ways of accessing the peritoneal cavity. This approach is not only used for surgery of the digestive tract but is also extensively applied in vascular, gynecology and urological surgery. When this surgical procedure is conducted in an emergency setting, and depending on the type of surgery (clean and /or contaminated), the incidence of complications may be particularly high, especially when acute dehiscence of the wall occurs (evisceration). Furthermore, the rate of herniation related to midline laparotomy is still high at approximately 16% of cases. Despite efforts to evaluate different suture techniques, suture threads (reabsorbable or non-reabsorbable) and general factors that may interfere with the repair process, the incidence of complications associated with this approach has not been reduced. After multiple studies including meta-analyses, the outcome of laparotomy closure has not essentially improved. We should therefore consider the use of new ways of closing the abdomen in selected patients that might somehow reinforce the surgical wound and notably reduce the incidence of short- and medium-term complications. One such method could perhaps be the use of a biomaterial to support and strengthen conventional sutures.

  13. Multi-view point splatting

    OpenAIRE

    Hübner, T; Zhang, Y; Pajarola, R

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental drawback of current stereo and multi-view visualization is the necessity to perform multi pass rendering (one pass for each view) and subsequent image composition + masking for generating multiple stereo views. Thus the rendering time increases in general linearly with the number of views. In this paper we introduce a new method for multi-view splatting based on deferred blending. Our method exploits the programmability of modern graphic processing units (...

  14. Integrating Building Functions into Massive External Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hisham Hafez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Well into the twentieth century, brick and stone were the materials used. Bricklaying and stonemasonry were the construction technologies employed for the exterior walls of virtually all major structures. However, with the rise in quality of life, the massive walls alone became incapable of fulfilling all the developed needs. Adjacent systems and layers had then to be attached to the massive layer. Nowadays, the external wall is usually composed of a layered construction. Each external wall function is usually represented by a separate layer or system. The massive layer of the wall is usually responsible for the load-bearing function. Traditional massive external walls vary in terms of their external appearance, their composition and attached layers. However, their design and construction process is usually a repeated process. It is a linear process where each discipline is concerned with a separate layer or system. These disciplines usually take their tasks away and bring them back to be re-integrated in a layered manner. New massive technologies with additional function have recently become available. Such technologies can provide the external wall with other functions in addition to its load-bearing function. The purpose of this research is to map the changes required to the traditional design and construction process when massive technologies with additional function are applied in external walls. Moreover, the research aims at assessing the performance of massive solutions with additional function when compared to traditional solutions in two different contexts, the Netherlands and Egypt. Through the analysis of different additional function technologies in external walls, a guidance scheme for different stakeholders is generated. It shows the expected process changes as related to the product level and customization level. Moreover, the research concludes that the performance of additional insulating technologies, and specifically

  15. Nonsingular walls in plane cholesteric layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, V A; Osipov, M A; Stewart, I W

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a straight interface (wall) between regions with differing values of the pitch in planar cholesteric layers with finite strength of the surface anchoring is investigated theoretically. It is found that the shape and strength of the anchoring potential influences essentially the structure of the wall and a motionless wall between thermodynamically stable regions without a singularity in the director distribution in the layer can exist for sufficiently weak anchoring only. More specifically, for the existence of such a wall the dimensionless parameter S d = K 22 /Wd (where W is the depth of the anchoring potential, K 22 is the elastic twist modulus and d is the layer thickness) should exceed its critical value, which is dependent on the shape of the anchoring potential. General equations describing the director distribution in the wall are presented. Detailed analysis of these equations is carried out for the case of infinitely strong anchoring at one surface and finite anchoring strength at the second layer surface. It is shown that the wall width L is directly dependent upon the shape and strength of the anchoring potential and that its estimate ranges from d to (dL p ) 1/2 (where L p = K 22 /W is the penetration length), corresponding to different anchoring strengths and shape potentials. The dependence of the director distribution in the wall upon all three Frank elastic moduli is analytically found for some specific limiting cases of the model anchoring potentials. Motion of the wall is briefly investigated and the corresponding calculations performed under the assumption that the shape of a moving wall is the same as a motionless one. It is noted that experimental investigation of the walls in planar cholesteric layers can be used for the determination of the actual shape of surface anchoring potentials

  16. Sunspot Light Walls Suppressed by Nearby Brightenings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Hou, Yijun; Li, Xiaohong [CAS Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Erdélyi, Robertus [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Yan, Limei, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Earth and Planetary Physics, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Light walls, as ensembles of oscillating bright structures rooted in sunspot light bridges, have not been well studied, although they are important for understanding sunspot properties. Using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and Solar Dynamics Observatory observations, here we study the evolution of two oscillating light walls each within its own active region (AR). The emission of each light wall decays greatly after the appearance of adjacent brightenings. For the first light wall, rooted within AR 12565, the average height, amplitude, and oscillation period significantly decrease from 3.5 Mm, 1.7 Mm, and 8.5 minutes to 1.6 Mm, 0.4 Mm, and 3.0 minutes, respectively. For the second light wall, rooted within AR 12597, the mean height, amplitude, and oscillation period of the light wall decrease from 2.1 Mm, 0.5 Mm, and 3.0 minutes to 1.5 Mm, 0.2 Mm, and 2.1 minutes, respectively. Particularly, a part of the second light wall even becomes invisible after the influence of a nearby brightening. These results reveal that the light walls are suppressed by nearby brightenings. Considering the complex magnetic topology in light bridges, we conjecture that the fading of light walls may be caused by a drop in the magnetic pressure, where the flux is canceled by magnetic reconnection at the site of the nearby brightening. Another hypothesis is that the wall fading is due to the suppression of driver source ( p -mode oscillation), resulting from the nearby avalanche of downward particles along reconnected brightening loops.

  17. Thoracic wall reconstruction after tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran eHarati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment of malignant thoracic wall tumors represents a formidable challenge. In particular, locally advanced tumors that have already infiltrated critical anatomic structures are associated with a high surgical morbidity and can result in full thickness defects of the thoracic wall. Plastic surgery can reduce this surgical morbidity by reconstructing the thoracic wall through various tissue transfer techniques. Sufficient soft tissue reconstruction of the thoracic wall improves life quality and mitigates functional impairment after extensive resection. The aim of this article is to illustrate the various plastic surgery treatment options in the multimodal therapy of patients with malignant thoracic wall tumors.Material und methods: This article is based on a review of the current literature and the evaluation of a patient database.Results: Several plastic surgical treatment options can be implemented in the curative and palliative therapy of patients with malignant solid tumors of the chest wall. Large soft tissue defects after tumor resection can be covered by local, pedicled or free flaps. In cases of large full-thickness defects, flaps can be combined with polypropylene mesh to improve chest wall stability and to maintain pulmonary function. The success of modern medicine has resulted in an increasing number of patients with prolonged survival suffering from locally advanced tumors that can be painful, malodorous or prone to bleeding. Resection of these tumors followed by thoracic wall reconstruction with viable tissue can substantially enhance the life quality of these patients. Discussion: In curative treatment regimens, chest wall reconstruction enables complete resection of locally advanced tumors and subsequent adjuvant radiotherapy. In palliative disease treatment, stadium plastic surgical techniques of thoracic wall reconstruction provide palliation of tumor-associated morbidity and can therefore improve

  18. Teaching with Technology: Using Websites and Videos to Increase Understanding of Bacterial Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Stephanie; Ross, Donna L.

    2010-01-01

    Technology can be a powerful tool to increase motivation, engagement, and achievement (Park, Khan, and Petrina 2009). In this article, the authors describe their collaborative approach to integrating technology with a lab on bacterial transformation. Students view websites and create videos to increase their conceptual understanding. Although the…

  19. Fungal innate immunity induced by bacterial microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ip Cho, Simon; Sundelin, Thomas; Erbs, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    generation, transport, amino acid production, secondary metabolism, and especially iron uptake were detected for all three. Half of the genes related to iron uptake were predicted MirA type transporters that potentially take up bacterial siderophores. These quick responses can be viewed as a preparation...

  20. bacterial flora in the urinary bladder of apparently healthy cattle in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uwaifoh

    2012-03-30

    Mar 30, 2012 ... 2007; Divers and Peek, 2008) with Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium renale being the most commonly incriminated organisms. Bacterial flora of the urinary bladder of cattle in other parts of Nigeria has been reported (Fatihu, 1997; Ogunshe et al., 2008). In view of this, the present study was designed to ...

  1. Spontaneous and controlled-diameter synthesis of single-walled and few-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shuhei; Lojindarat, Supanat; Kawamoto, Takahiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we explored the spontaneous and controlled-diameter growth of carbon nanotubes. We evaluated the effects of catalyst density, reduction time, and a number of catalyst coating on the substrate (for multi-walled carbon nanotubes) on the diameter of single-walled carbon nanotubes and the number of layers in few-walled carbon nanotubes. Increasing the catalyst density and reduction time increased the diameters of the carbon nanotubes, with the average diameter increasing from 1.05 nm to 1.86 nm for single-walled carbon nanotubes. Finally, we succeeded in synthesizing a significant double-walled carbon nanotube population of 24%.

  2. Oscillatory domain wall velocity of current-induced domain wall motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.J.; Seo, S.M.; Lee, T.D.; Lee, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the effect of Oersted field (H Oe ) on current-induced domain wall motion (CIDWM) in magnetic nanowires. We found that H Oe generates spin waves. Because of interaction between domain wall (DW) and spin wave, time-dependent wall velocity is oscillatory at the early stage of wall motion. The period of the oscillatory DW motion is in antiphase with the period of out-of-plane (OOP) magnetization oscillation inside the DW. The oscillatory wall velocity is suppressed as the thickness of nanowire decreases because of strong demagnetization field

  3. Hot section viewing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morey, W.W.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers the development and testing of a prototype combustor viewing system. The system allows one to see and record images from the inside of an operating gas turbine combustor. The program proceeded through planned phases of conceptual design, preliminary testing to resolve problem areas, prototype design and fabrication, and rig testing. Successful tests were completed with the viewing system in the laboratory, in a high pressure combustor rig, and on a Pratt and Whitney PW20307 jet engine. Both film and video recordings were made during the tests. Digital image analysis techniques were used to enhance images and bring out special effects. The use of pulsed laser illumination was also demonstrated as a means for observing liner surfaces in the presence of luminous flame.

  4. The impact of metabolic state on Cd adsorption onto bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K.J.; Ams, D.A.; Wedel, A.N.; Szymanowski, J.E.S.; Weber, D.L.; Schneegurt, M.A.; Fein, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the effect of bacterial metabolism on the adsorption of Cd onto Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells. Metabolically active Gram-positive cells adsorbed significantly less Cd than non-metabolizing cells. Gram-negative cells, however, showed no systematic difference in Cd adsorption between metabolizing and non-metabolizing cells. The effect of metabolism on Cd adsorption to Gram-positive cells was likely due to an influx of protons in and around the cell wall from the metabolic proton motive force, promoting competition between Cd and protons for adsorption sites on the cell wall. The relative lack of a metabolic effect on Cd adsorption onto Gram-negative compared to Gram-positive cells suggests that Cd binding in Gram-negative cells is focused in a region of the cell wall that is not reached, or is unaffected by this proton flux. Thermodynamic modeling was used to estimate that proton pumping causes the pH in the cell wall of metabolizing Gram-positive bacteria to decrease from the bulk solution value of 7.0 to approximately 5.7. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  5. [Bacterial efflux pumps - their role in antibiotic resistance and potential inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hricová, Kristýna; Kolář, Milan

    2014-12-01

    Efflux pumps capable of actively draining antibiotic agents from bacterial cells may be considered one of potential mechanisms of the development of antimicrobial resistance. The most important group of efflux pumps capable of removing several types of antibiotics include RND (resistance - nodulation - division) pumps. These are three proteins that cross the bacterial cell wall, allowing direct expulsion of the agent out from the bacterial cell. The most investigated efflux pumps are the AcrAB-TolC system in Escherichia coli and the MexAB-OprM system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, efflux pumps are able to export other than antibacterial agents such as disinfectants, thus decreasing their effectiveness. One potential approach to inactivation of an efflux pump is to use the so-called efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Potential inhibitors tested in vitro involve, for example, phenylalanyl-arginyl-b-naphthylamide (PAbN), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or agents of the phenothiazine class.

  6. Enhanced biogas production from penicillin bacterial residue by thermal-alkaline pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Weizhang; Li, Guixia; Gao, Yan; Li, Zaixing; Geng, Xiaoling; Li, Yubing; Yang, Jingliang; Zhou, Chonghui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the orthogonal experimental design was used to determine the optimum conditions for the effect of thermal alkaline; pretreatment on the anaerobic digestion of penicillin bacterial residue. The biodegradability of the penicillin; bacterial residue was evaluated by biochemical methane potential tests in laboratory. The optimum values of temperature,; alkali concentration, pretreatment time and moisture content for the thermal-alkaline pretreatment were determined as; 70 °C, 6% (w/v), 30 min, and 85%, respectively. Thermal-alkaline pretreatment could significantly enhance the soluble; chemical oxygen demand solubilization, the suspended solid solubilization and the biodegradability. Biogas production; was enhanced by the thermal-alkaline pretreatment, probably as a result of the breakdown of cell walls and membranes of; micro-organisms, which may facilitate the contact between organic molecules and anaerobic microorganisms.; Keywords: penicillin bacterial residue; anaerobic digestion; biochemical methane potential tests; pretreatment

  7. Bacterial cells with improved tolerance to polyamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Provided are bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as polyamines, and methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyamines and other compounds....

  8. Bacterial cells with improved tolerance to polyols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as diols and other polyols, and to methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyols and other compounds....

  9. Adjunctive Corticosteroids in Adults with Bacterial Meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; de Gans, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a complex disorder in which neurologic injury is caused, in part, by the causative organism and, in part, by the host's own inflammatory response. In studies of experimental bacterial meningitis, adjuvant treatment with corticosteroids, specifically dexamethasone, has

  10. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, Marjolein J.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with

  11. Dexamethasone in adults with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gans, Jan; van de Beek, Diederik

    2002-01-01

    Background: Mortality and morbidity rates are high among adults with acute bacterial meningitis, especially those with pneumococcal meningitis. In studies of bacterial meningitis in animals, adjuvant treatment with corticosteroids has beneficial effects. Methods: We conducted a prospective,

  12. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, Martine; van de Beek, Diederik; Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; Schmand, Ben

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy

  13. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, M.; Beek, D. van de; Weisfelt, M.; Gans, J. de; Schmand, B.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility in community-acquired bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, two bacterial pathogens commonly associated with communityacquired pneumonia. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Bacterial isolates were obtained from adults suspected to have ...

  15. (PCR) in the diagnosis of bacterial infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... bacterial infections that can be diagnosed using the technique which include among others; Tuberculosis (TB), whooping cough, brain abscesses and spinal infection, otitis media with effusion, Mycoplasmal pneumonia, endophthalmitis and bacterial meningitis. Keywords: Polymerase chain reaction, Diagnosis, Bacteria, ...

  16. Bacterial resistance to Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (QAC) disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Robert; Jansen, Arina; Coetzee, Marisa; van der Westhuizen, Wouter; Boucher, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    of the bacterial cell wall and leaking of the cytoplasm out of the cells. Our main focus is on the control of bacterial and viral diseases in the poultry industry in a post-antibiotic era, but the principles remain similar for disease control in any veterinary field as well as in human medicine.

  17. Phenotypic resistance and the dynamics of bacterial escape from phage control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, James J.; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Schmerer, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The canonical view of phage - bacterial interactions in dense, liquid cultures is that the phage will eliminate most of the sensitive cells; genetic resistance will then ascend to restore high bacterial densities. Yet there are various mechanisms by which bacteria may remain sensitive to phages...... be specific to the receptors used by phages, awareness of its mechanisms may identify ways of improving the choice of phages for therapy. Phenotypic resistance can also explain several enigmas in the ecology of phage-bacterial dynamics. Phenotypic resistance does not preclude the evolution of genetic...... but still attain high densities in their presence - because bacteria enter a transient state of reduced adsorption. Importantly, these mechanisms may be cryptic and inapparent prior to the addition of phage yet result in a rapid rebound of bacterial density after phage are introduced. We describe...

  18. Carbon nanomaterials alter plant physiology and soil bacterial community composition in a rice-soil-bacterial ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yi; Ma, Chuanxin; Zhang, Zetian; Song, Youhong; Cao, Weidong; Guo, Jing; Zhou, Guopeng; Rui, Yukui; Liu, Liming; Xing, Baoshan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the toxicity effects of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), namely fullerene (C 60 ), reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), on a mini-ecosystem of rice grown in a loamy potted soil. We measured plant physiological and biochemical parameters and examined bacterial community composition in the CNMs-treated plant-soil system. After 30 days of exposure, all the three CNMs negatively affected the shoot height and root length of rice, significantly decreased root cortical cells diameter and resulted in shrinkage and deformation of cells, regardless of exposure doses (50 or 500 mg/kg). Additionally, at the high exposure dose of CNM, the concentrations of four phytohormones, including auxin, indoleacetic acid, brassinosteroid and gibberellin acid 4 in rice roots significantly increased as compared to the control. At the high exposure dose of MWCNTs and C 60 , activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) in roots increased significantly. High-throughput sequencing showed that three typical CNMs had little effect on shifting the predominant soil bacterial species, but the presence of CNMs significantly altered the composition of the bacterial community. Our results indicate that different CNMs indeed resulted in environmental toxicity to rice and soil bacterial community in the rhizosphere and suggest that CNMs themselves and their incorporated products should be reasonably used to control their release/discharge into the environment to prevent their toxic effects on living organisms and the potential risks to food safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Polyphosphorylated fungal cell wall glycopeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonetti, S.J.; Black, B.; Gander, J.E.

    1987-05-01

    Penicillium charlesii secretes a 65 kDa peptidophosphogalactomannan (pPGM) containing 10 phosphodiester residues and 10 galactofuranosyl-containing galactin chains attached to a linear mannan; the polysaccharides is attached to a 3 kDa seryl- and threonyl-rich peptide. The authors have now isolated and partially characterized a form of pPGM released from mycelia of P. charlesii treated at 50/sup 0/C for 15, 30, 60 or 120 min. Two- to 3-fold more pPGM was released by heat treatment than is secreted. Crude pPGM, released by heat, was fractionated on DE-52 and was fractionated into two major fractions on the basis of its difference in negative charge. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of these two fractions provided spectra very similar to that of secreted pPGM previously reported from this laboratory. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 31/P NMR showed major signals at 1.47, and 0.22 ppm and minor signals at 1.32, 1.15, 1.00, 0.91 and 0.76 ppm. These signals are upfield from phosphomonoesters and are in the region observed for (6-O-phosphorylcholine)- and (6-O-phosphorylethanolamine)-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl residues which are 0.22 and 0.90 ppm, respectively. These polymers contain 30 phosphodiester residues per molecule of 70 kDa mass compared with 10 phosphodiesters in secreted pPGM. Acid phosphatase and alkaline protease were the only lytic enzymes released by heat treatment. The evidence suggests that much of the pPGM is derived from cell walls; and that the polysaccharide is highly phosphorylated.

  20. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Iuliana V; Walker, Louise A; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P

    2015-07-28

    The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Cek1) signaling pathways. These mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways modulate cell wall gene expression, leading to the construction of a new, modified cell wall. We show that the cell wall is not rigid but elastic, displaying rapid structural realignments that impact survival following osmotic shock. Lactate-grown Candida albicans cells are more resistant to hyperosmotic shock than glucose-grown cells. We show that this elevated resistance is not dependent on Hog1 or Mkc1 signaling and that most cell death occurs within 10 min of osmotic shock. Sudden decreases in cell volume drive rapid increases in cell wall thickness. The elevated stress resistance of lactate-grown cells correlates with reduced cell wall elasticity, reflected in slower changes in cell volume following hyperosmotic shock. The cell wall elasticity of lactate-grown cells is increased by a triple mutation that inactivates the Crh family of cell wall cross-linking enzymes, leading to increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic shock. Overexpressing Crh family members in glucose-grown cells reduces cell wall elasticity, providing partial protection against hyperosmotic shock. These changes correlate with structural realignment of the cell wall and with the ability of cells to withstand osmotic shock. The C. albicans cell wall is the first line of defense against external insults, the site of immune recognition by the host, and an attractive target for antifungal therapy. Its tensile strength is conferred by

  1. The Bacterial Sequential Markov Coalescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Nicola; Wilson, Daniel J

    2017-05-01

    Bacteria can exchange and acquire new genetic material from other organisms directly and via the environment. This process, known as bacterial recombination, has a strong impact on the evolution of bacteria, for example, leading to the spread of antibiotic resistance across clades and species, and to the avoidance of clonal interference. Recombination hinders phylogenetic and transmission inference because it creates patterns of substitutions (homoplasies) inconsistent with the hypothesis of a single evolutionary tree. Bacterial recombination is typically modeled as statistically akin to gene conversion in eukaryotes, i.e. , using the coalescent with gene conversion (CGC). However, this model can be very computationally demanding as it needs to account for the correlations of evolutionary histories of even distant loci. So, with the increasing popularity of whole genome sequencing, the need has emerged for a faster approach to model and simulate bacterial genome evolution. We present a new model that approximates the coalescent with gene conversion: the bacterial sequential Markov coalescent (BSMC). Our approach is based on a similar idea to the sequential Markov coalescent (SMC)-an approximation of the coalescent with crossover recombination. However, bacterial recombination poses hurdles to a sequential Markov approximation, as it leads to strong correlations and linkage disequilibrium across very distant sites in the genome. Our BSMC overcomes these difficulties, and shows a considerable reduction in computational demand compared to the exact CGC, and very similar patterns in simulated data. We implemented our BSMC model within new simulation software FastSimBac. In addition to the decreased computational demand compared to previous bacterial genome evolution simulators, FastSimBac provides more general options for evolutionary scenarios, allowing population structure with migration, speciation, population size changes, and recombination hotspots. FastSimBac is

  2. Immunization with bacterial ghost-based vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, Cornelis; Ramasamy, Ranjan; Steen, Anton; KOK, JAAM; Buist, Girbe; Kuipers, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Methods for improving binding of a proteinaceous substance to cell-wall material of a Gram-positive bacterium are disclosed. The proteinaceous substance includes an AcmA cell-wall binding domain, homolog or functional derivative thereof. The method includes treating the cell-wall material with a

  3. Bacterial reproductive pathogens of cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Elizabeth M; Taylor, David J

    2012-05-01

    With the notable exception of Brucella canis, exogenous bacterial pathogens are uncommon causes of reproductive disease in cats and dogs. Most bacterial reproductive infections are endogenous, and predisposing factors for infection are important. This article reviews the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and public health significance of bacterial reproductive pathogens in cats and dogs.

  4. Retaining Walls Made of Precast Cylindrical Valuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ungureanu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Retaining walls are large category of engineering structures of multiple uses, having an essential safety ensuring role. The structural systems are varied because the situations and requirements derived from both site conditions and other criteria are varied. The paper enlarges upon retaining walls systems that use an outstanding amount of precast units and multiple cylindrical vault type structural systems supported by abutments [1], [2]. The paper proposes extending the structural system to retaining walls and develops certain specific issues. Some considerations regarding structural design are made.

  5. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  6. Development of wall ranging radiation inspection robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. J.; Yoon, J. S.; Park, Y. S.; Hong, D. H.; Oh, S. C.; Jung, J. H.; Chae, K. S.

    1999-03-01

    With the aging of nation's nuclear facilities, the target of this project is to develop an under water wall ranging robotic vehicle which inspects the contamination level of the research reactor (TRIGA MARK III) as a preliminary process to dismantling. The developed vehicle is driven by five thrusters and consists of small sized control boards, and absolute position detector, and a radiation detector. Also, the algorithm for autonomous navigation is developed and its performance is tested through under water experiments. Also, the test result at the research reactor shows that the vehicle firmly attached the wall while measuring the contamination level of the wall

  7. Seismic proof test of shielding block walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohte, Yukio; Watanabe, Takahide; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Kazuhide

    1989-01-01

    Most of the shielding block walls used for building nuclear facilities are built by dry process. When a nuclear facility is designed, seismic waves specific at each site are set as input seismic motions and they are adopted in the design. Therefore, it is necessary to assure safety of the shielding block walls for earthquake by performing anti-seismic experiments under the conditions at each site. In order to establish the normal form that can be applied to various seismic conditions in various areas, Shimizu Corp. made an actual-size test samples for the shielding block wall and confirmed the safety for earthquake and validity of normalization. (author)

  8. Myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma of the chest wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Fan Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the case of an 87-year-old male who developed a huge tumor at the chest wall that limited the range of motion of the upper limb. We performed a wide excision of the tumor with chest wall reconstruction. The tumor exhibited lobulated pattern with myxoid fluid and fibrous tissue, which was accumulated by a thin capsule. The final diagnosis was myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma (MIFS, a kind of uncommon low-grade malignant tumor that extremely develops rarely in the chest wall. At this moment, we review the epidemiology, histopathologic characteristics, similar cases, and the current treatment for MIFS.

  9. Chest wall sarcomas and induction therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharczuk, John C

    2012-02-01

    Chest wall sarcomas are uncommon tumors. The best patient outcomes likely result from a formalized multidisciplinary treatment plan in a specialized center. No clear guidelines exist to determine whether patients with chest wall sarcomas benefit from preoperative adjuvant therapy. Most decisions are made on a case-by-case basis with little available evidence. It is unclear whether established guidelines for the more commonly occurring extremity sarcomas can be appropriately extrapolated to the care of patients with chest wall disease. The single most important factor in local control and long-term survival is a wide, complete, R0 resection. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Enhanced Worldvolume Supersymmetry and Intersecting Domain Walls in N=1 SQCD

    CERN Document Server

    Shifman, M; Vainshtein, A I

    2004-01-01

    We study the worldvolume dynamics of BPS domain walls in N=1 SQCD with N_f=N flavors, and exhibit an enhancement of supersymmetry for the reduced moduli space associated with broken flavor symmetries. We provide an explicit construction of the worldvolume superalgebra which corresponds to an N=2 Kahler sigma model in 2+1D deformed by a potential, given by the norm squared of a U(1) Killing vector, resulting from the flavor symmetries broken by unequal quark masses. This framework leads to a worldvolume description of novel two-wall junction configurations, which are 1/4-BPS objects, but nonetheless preserve two supercharges when viewed as kinks on the wall worldvolume.

  11. Viewing Age: Lifespan Identity and Television Viewing Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Jake

    1997-01-01

    Introduces a theoretical perspective on media viewing choices, grounded in social identity theory. Content analysis demonstrates that child, younger adult, and older adult television viewers show a preference for viewing characters of their own age. The experiment demonstrates that young adults' preference for viewing young adult characters exists…

  12. Dynamics of bacterial gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Atul

    2009-03-01

    The phenomenon of diauxic growth is a classical problem of bacterial gene regulation. The most well studied example of this phenomenon is the glucose-lactose diauxie, which occurs because the expression of the lac operon is strongly repressed in the presence of glucose. This repression is often explained by appealing to molecular mechanisms such as cAMP activation and inducer exclusion. I will begin by analyzing data showing that these molecular mechanisms cannot explain the strong lac repression because they exert a relatively weak effect. I will then present a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution, which yields strong repression despite the absence of catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. The model also explains the growth patterns observed in batch and continuous cultures of various bacterial strains and substrate mixtures. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the experimental evidence regarding positive feedback, the key component of the minimal model.

  13. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  14. Bacterial streamers in curved microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    Biofilms, generally identified as microbial communities embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, are involved in a wide variety of health-related problems ranging from implant-associated infections to disease transmissions and dental plaque. The usual picture of these bacterial films is that they grow and develop on surfaces. However, suspended biofilm structures, or streamers, have been found in natural environments (e.g., rivers, acid mines, hydrothermal hot springs) and are always suggested to stem from a turbulent flow. We report the formation of bacterial streamers in curved microfluidic channels. By using confocal laser microscopy we are able to directly image and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of these filamentous structures. Such streamers, which always connect the inner corners of opposite sides of the channel, are always located in the middle plane. Numerical simulations of the flow provide evidences for an underlying hydrodynamic mechanism behind the formation of the streamers.

  15. Metatranscriptomics reveals overall active bacterial composition in caries lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea Simón-Soro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying the microbial species in caries lesions is instrumental to determine the etiology of dental caries. However, a significant proportion of bacteria in carious lesions have not been cultured, and the use of molecular methods has been limited to DNA-based approaches, which detect both active and inactive or dead microorganisms. Objective: To identify the RNA-based, metabolically active bacterial composition of caries lesions at different stages of disease progression in order to provide a list of potential etiological agents of tooth decay. Design: Non-cavitated enamel caries lesions (n=15 and dentin caries lesions samples (n=12 were collected from 13 individuals. RNA was extracted and cDNA was constructed, which was used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene. The resulting 780 bp polymerase chain reaction products were pyrosequenced using Titanium-plus chemistry, and the sequences obtained were used to determine the bacterial composition. Results: A mean of 4,900 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene with an average read length of 661 bp was obtained per sample, giving a comprehensive view of the active bacterial communities in caries lesions. Estimates of bacterial diversity indicate that the microbiota of cavities is highly complex, each sample containing between 70 and 400 metabolically active species. The composition of these bacterial consortia varied among individuals and between caries lesions of the same individuals. In addition, enamel and dentin lesions had a different bacterial makeup. Lactobacilli were found almost exclusively in dentin cavities. Streptococci accounted for 40% of the total active community in enamel caries, and 20% in dentin caries. However, Streptococcus mutans represented only 0.02–0.73% of the total bacterial community. Conclusions: The data indicate that the etiology of dental caries is tissue dependent and that the disease has a clear polymicrobial origin. The low proportion of mutans streptococci

  16. Optimization of factor analysis of the left ventricle in echocardiography for detecting wall motion abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, Benoît; Delouche, Annie; Abergel, Eric; Raffoul, Hanna; Diebold, Hervé; Frouin, Frédérique

    2005-12-01

    This study has tested solutions to optimize the ability of factor analysis of the left ventricle in echocardiography (FALVE) to detect segmental wall motion abnormalities automatically. On four- and two-chamber views of 38 patients, two factors (one flat curve and one curve describing the contraction-relaxation sequence) were extracted and associated factor images were combined to synthesize a parametric image (constant image in green, positive/negative values of the contraction-relaxation image in red/blue). The segments were graded on the visual and the parametric views. The impact of selecting a whole cardiac cycle, masking the left ventricle and realigning the image sequence on the results, was demonstrated. Systematic realignment had a positive impact, especially for patients with left bundle branch block or pacemaker. After alignment, for the entire population, the absolute concordance was 68.6% and the relative concordance (within one grade) was 99%. Thus, FALVE is promising for detecting segmental wall motion abnormalities.

  17. Bacterial antagonist mediated protein molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Urbizu, Lucia Paola; Sparo, Mónica Delfina; Sanchez Bruni, Sergio Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial antagonism mediated by ribosomally synthesised peptides has gained considerable attention in recent years because of its potential applications in the control of undesirable microbiota. These peptides, generally referred to as bacteriocins, are defined as a heterogeneous group of ribosomally synthesised, proteinaceous substances (with or without further modifications) extracellularly secreted by many Gram-positive and some Gram-negative bacteria. Their mode of activity is primarily ...

  18. Spectrum Analyzer Application for the Proton Synchrotron Wall Current Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Limpens, Rik

    The Proton Synchrotron (PS) is a key component in CERN's accelerator complex, where it usually accelerates either protons or heavy ions. The new acquisition system for the PS ring wall current monitors has been installed to be able to perform higher frequency measurements of a beam bunch. This is an important improvement, since the oscillating signals are related to losses of a beam bunch. The main goal of this project is to develop a LabVIEW application running on a Real-Time target to perform continuous and triggered spectral acquisition of a PS beam bunch and to provide a data visualization and analysis tool for the operators and users of the machine.

  19. ‘Occupy Wall Street’ and IPE: Insights and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Cobbett

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The academic discipline of International Political Economy (IPE is a hard-nosed and empirically-oriented field of study. The usual subjects of IPE often include the organization of international trade, global finance, transnational production, national welfare and competitiveness, productivity levels and of course state actions and expenditures. The actions of a handful of protestors such as the ‘Occupy Wall Street’(OWS movement rarely attract academic attention. In this case, however, we should take note. In our view, the actions of OWS provide further clues that we are entering an era of significant transformation in the organization and structure of world order. The insights generated by reflecting on this movement suggest that the inter-subjective mentality at the heart of global capitalism is no longer coherent, with the implication thatwe are at long last about to leave behind a half century of American hegemony.

  20. Bacterial Biofilms in Jones Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eric S; Hauck, Matthew J; Kirk Harris, Jonathan; Robertson, Charles E; Dailey, Roger A

    To investigate the presence and microbiology of bacterial biofilms on Jones tubes (JTs) by direct visualization with scanning electron microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of representative JTs, and to correlate these findings with inflammation and/or infection related to the JT. In this study, prospective case series were performed. JTs were recovered from consecutive patients presenting to clinic for routine cleaning or recurrent irritation/infection. Four tubes were processed for scanning electron microscopy alone to visualize evidence of biofilms. Two tubes underwent PCR alone for bacterial quantification. One tube was divided in half and sent for scanning electron microscopy and PCR. Symptoms related to the JTs were recorded at the time of recovery. Seven tubes were obtained. Five underwent SEM, and 3 out of 5 showed evidence of biofilms (60%). Two of the 3 biofilms demonstrated cocci and the third revealed rods. Three tubes underwent PCR. The predominant bacteria identified were Pseudomonadales (39%), Pseudomonas (16%), and Staphylococcus (14%). Three of the 7 patients (43%) reported irritation and discharge at presentation. Two symptomatic patients, whose tubes were imaged only, revealed biofilms. The third symptomatic patient's tube underwent PCR only, showing predominantly Staphylococcus (56%) and Haemophilus (36%) species. Two of the 4 asymptomatic patients also showed biofilms. All symptomatic patients improved rapidly after tube exchange and steroid antibiotic drops. Bacterial biofilms were variably present on JTs, and did not always correlate with patients' symptoms. Nevertheless, routine JT cleaning is recommended to treat and possibly prevent inflammation caused by biofilms.