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Sample records for bacterial thiosalt oxidation

  1. Bacterial oxidation activity in heap leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳建设; 夏海波; 王兆慧; 胡岳华

    2004-01-01

    Bioleaching of sulfide minerals by bacteria, mainly Thiobacillus ferrooxidans (T. f. ) and Thiobacillus thiooxidans, plays an important role in hydrometallurgy because of its economic and environmental attractions. The surveys of production process and the bacterial oxidation activity in the heap bioleaching were investigated. The results show that pH value is high, bacteria biomass and ferric concentration are low, generation time (above 7.13 h)is long in leachate, and less bacteria are adsorbed on the ores. The bacteria in the leachate exposing on the surface and connecting with mineral, have much faster oxidation rate of Fe( Ⅱ ) and shorter generation time, compared with those which are in the reservoir for a long time. There is diversity for oxidation activity of Fe( Ⅱ ), while there is no diversity for oxidation of sulfur. So it is advisable to add sulfuric acid to degrade pH value to 2.0, add nutrients and shorten recycling time of leachate, so as to enhance bacteria concentration of leachate and the leaching efficiency.

  2. Characterization and bacterial toxicity of lanthanum oxide bulk and nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brabu Balusamy; Yamuna Gowri Kandhasamy; Anitha Senthamizhan; Gopalakrishnan Chandrasekaran; Murugan Siva Subramanian; Kumaravel Tirukalikundram S

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the bacterial toxicity of lanthanum oxide micron and nano sized particles using shake flask method against gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli,Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria.Particle size,morphology and chemical composition were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS).Resuits indicated that lanthanum oxide nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus,but not against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.It was speculated that lanthanum oxide produced this effect by interacting with the gram-positive bacterial cell wall.Furthermore,lanthanum oxide bulk particles were found to enhance the pyocyanin pigment production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  3. Inhibition of bacterial ammonia oxidation by organohydrazines in soil microcosms

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    Yucheng eWu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxylamine oxidation by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO is a key step for energy-yielding in support of the growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB. Organohydrazines have been shown to inactivate HAO from Nitrosomonas europaea, and may serve as selective inhibitors to differentiate bacterial from archaeal ammonia oxidation due to the absence of bacterial HAO gene homologue in known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA. In this study, the effects of three organohydrazines on activity, abundance and composition of AOB and AOA were evaluated in soil microcosms. The results indicate that phenylhydrazine and methylhydrazine at the concentration of 100 mol per gram dry weight soil completely suppressed the activity of soil nitrification. DGGE fingerprinting and sequencing analysis of bacterial ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene (amoA clearly demonstrated that nitrification activity change is well paralleled with the growth of Nitrosomonas europaea-like AOB in soil microcosms. No significant correlation between AOA community structure and nitrification activity was observed among all treatments during the incubation period, although incomplete inhibition of nitrification activity occurred in 2-hydroxyethylhydrazine-amended soil microcosms. These findings show that the HAO-targeted organohydrazines can effectively inhibit bacterial nitrification in soil, and the mechanism of organohydrazine affecting AOA remains unclear.

  4. Bacterial oxidation of methyl bromide in fumigated agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L.G.; Connell, T.L.; Guidetti, J.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of [14C]methyl bromide ([14C]MeBr) to 14CO2 was measured in field experiments with soils collected from two strawberry plots fumigated with mixtures of MeBr and chloropicrin (CCI3NO2). Although these fumigants are considered potent biocides, we found that the highest rates of MeBr oxidation occurred 1 to 2 days after injection when the fields were tarped, rather than before or several days after injection. No oxidation of MeBr occurred in heat-killed soils, indicating that microbes were the causative agents of the oxidation. Degradation of MeBr by chemical and/or biological processes accounted for 20 to 50% of the loss of MeBr during fumigation, with evasion to the atmosphere inferred to comprise the remainder. In laboratory incubations, complete removal of [14C]MeBr occurred within a few days, with 47 to 67% of the added MeBr oxidized to 14CO2 and the remainder of counts associated with the solid phase. Chloropicrin inhibited the oxidation of MeBr, implying that use of this substance constrains the extent of microbial degradation of MeBr during fumigation. Oxidation was by direct bacterial attack of MeBr and not of methanol, a product of the chemical hydrolysis of MeBr. Neither nitrifying nor methane-oxidizing bacteria were sufficiently active in these soils to account for the observed oxidation of MeBr, nor could the microbial degradation of MeBr be linked to cooxidation with exogenously supplied electron donors. However, repeated addition of MeBr to live soils resulted in higher rates of its removal, suggesting that soil bacteria used MeBr as an electron donor for growth. To support this interpretation, we isolated a gram-negative, aerobic bacterium from these soils which grew with MeBr as a sole source of carbon and energy.

  5. Removal of pathogenic bacterial biofilms by combinations of oxidizing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Gabriela María; Grillo-Puertas, Mariana; Cerioni, Luciana; Rapisarda, Viviana Andrea; Volentini, Sabrina Inés

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial biofilms are commonly formed on medical devices and food processing surfaces. The antimicrobials used have limited efficacy against the biofilms; therefore, new strategies to prevent and remove these structures are needed. Here, the effectiveness of brief oxidative treatments, based on the combination of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the presence of copper sulfate (CuSO4), were evaluated against bacterial laboratory strains and clinical isolates, both in planktonic and biofilm states. Simultaneous application of oxidants synergistically inactivated planktonic cells and prevented biofilm formation of laboratory Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus strains, as well as clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, Klebsiella oxytoca, and uropathogenic E. coli. In addition, preformed biofilms of E. coli C, Salmonella Typhimurium, K. pneumoniae, and Salmonella enterica exposed to treatments were removed by applying 12 mg/L NaClO, 0.1 mmol/L CuSO4, and 350 mmol/L H2O2 for 5 min. Klebsiella oxytoca and Staphylococcus aureus required a 5-fold increase in NaClO concentration, and the E. coli clinical isolate remained unremovable unless treatments were applied on biofilms formed within 24 h instead of 48 h. The application of treatments that last a few minutes using oxidizing compounds at low concentrations represents an interesting disinfection strategy against pathogens associated with medical and industrial settings.

  6. Bacterial adhesion on amorphous and crystalline metal oxide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaguer-Flores, Argelia [Facultad de Odontología, División de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra, E-mail: suriel21@yahoo.com [Unidad de Ingeniería de Tejidos, Terapia Celular y Medicina Regenerativa, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Calzada México-Xochimilco No. 289, Col. Arenal de Guadalupe, 14389 México D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Galicia, Rey; Rodil, Sandra E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the influence of surface properties (surface energy, composition and topography) of biocompatible materials on the adhesion of cells/bacteria on solid substrates; however, few have provided information about the effect of the atomic arrangement or crystallinity. Using magnetron sputtering deposition, we produced amorphous and crystalline TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} coatings with controlled micro and nanoscale morphology. The effect of the structure on the physical–chemical surface properties was carefully analyzed. Then, we studied how these parameters affect the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Our findings demonstrated that the nano-topography and the surface energy were significantly influenced by the coating structure. Bacterial adhesion at micro-rough (2.6 μm) surfaces was independent of the surface composition and structure, contrary to the observation in sub-micron (0.5 μm) rough surfaces, where the crystalline oxides (TiO{sub 2} > ZrO{sub 2}) surfaces exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria. Particularly, crystalline TiO{sub 2}, which presented a predominant acidic nature, was more attractive for the adhesion of the negatively charged bacteria. The information provided by this study, where surface modifications are introduced by means of the deposition of amorphous or crystalline oxide coatings, offers a route for the rational design of implant surfaces to control or inhibit bacterial adhesion. - Highlights: • Amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} coatings were deposited. • The atomic ordering influences the coatings surface charge and nano-topography. • The atomic ordering modifies the bacterial adhesion for the same surface chemistry. • S. aureus adhesion was lower on a-TiO{sub 2} and a-ZrO{sub 2} than on their c-oxide counterpart. • E. coli adhesion on a-TiO{sub 2} was lower than on the c-TiO{sub 2}.

  7. Bacterial adhesion to glass and metal-oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baikun; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-07-15

    Metal oxides can increase the adhesion of negatively-charged bacteria to surfaces primarily due to their positive charge. However, the hydrophobicity of a metal-oxide surface can also increase adhesion of bacteria. In order to understand the relative contribution of charge and hydrophobicity to bacterial adhesion, we measured the adhesion of 8 strains of bacteria, under conditions of low and high-ionic strength (1 and 100 mM, respectively) to 11 different surfaces and examined adhesion as a function of charge, hydrophobicity (water contact angle) and surface energy. Inorganic surfaces included three uncoated glass surfaces and eight metal-oxide thin films prepared on the upper (non-tin-exposed) side of float glass by chemical vapor deposition. The Gram-negative bacteria differed in lengths of lipopolysaccharides on their outer surface (three Escherichia coli strains), the amounts of exopolysaccharides (two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains), and their known relative adhesion to sand grains (two Burkholderia cepacia strains). One Gram positive bacterium was also used that had a lower adhesion to glass than these other bacteria (Bacillus subtilis). For all eight bacteria, there was a consistent increase in adhesion between with the type of inorganic surface in the order: float glass exposed to tin (coded here as Si-Sn), glass microscope slide (Si-m), uncoated air-side float glass surface (Si-a), followed by thin films of (Co(1-y-z)Fe(y)Cr(z))3O4, Ti/Fe/O, TiO2, SnO2, SnO2:F, SnO2:Sb, A1(2)O3, and Fe2O3 (the colon indicates metal doping, a slash indicates that the metal is a major component, while the dash is used to distinguish surfaces). Increasing the ionic strength from 1 to 100 mM increased adhesion by a factor of 2.0 +/- 0.6 (73% of the sample results were within the 95% CI) showing electrostatic charge was important in adhesion. However, adhesion was not significantly correlated with bacterial charge and contact angle. Adhesion (A) of the eight strains was

  8. Bacterial toxicity of oxide nanoparticles and their effects on bacterial surface biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei

    Toxicity of nano-scaled Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2 and ZnO to bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) was examined and compared to that of their respective bulk (micro-scaled) counterparts. All nanoparticles (NPs) but TiO2 showed higher toxicity than their bulk counterparts. Toxicity of released metal ions was differentiated from that of the oxide particles. ZnO was the most toxic among the three NPs, causing 100% mortality to the three tested bacteria. TEM images showed attachment of NPs to the bacteria, suggesting that the toxicity was affected by bacterial attachment. The effects of oxide NPs on bacteria cells and bacterial surface biomolecules were studied by FTIR spectroscopy to provide a better understanding of their cytotoxicity. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid could bind to oxide NPs through hydrogen bonding and ligand exchange, but the cytotoxicity of NPs seemed largely related to the function-involved or structural changes to proteins and phospholipids. The three NPs decreased the intensity ratio of beta-sheets/alpha-helices, indicating protein structure change, which may affect cell physiological activities. The phosphodiester bond of L-alpha-Phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (PE) was broken by ZnO NPs, forming phosphate monoesters and resulting in the highly disordered alkyl chain. Such damage to phospholipid molecular structure may lead to membrane rupture and cell leaking, which is consistent with the fact that ZnO is the most toxic of the three NPs. LPS and PE are amphiphilic biomolecules that are major constituents of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Their micelles and vesicles were studied as model cell membranes to evaluate NP effects on membrane construction. The adsorption of polysaccharides on Al2O3 and TiO 2 NPs dispersed LPS vesicles and micelles. LPS coated Al2O 3 NPs, while it caused the aggregation of TiO2 NPs according to atom force microscopy images. Desorption from the two NPs was slow due

  9. Increased electrical output when a bacterial ABTS oxidizer is used in a microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a technology that provides electrical energy from the microbial oxidation of organic compounds. Most MFCs use oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. The present study examined the formation in culture of an unidentified bacterial oxidant and investigated the ...

  10. Methionine oxidation contributes to bacterial killing by the myeloperoxidase system of neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Henry; Klebanoff, Seymour J; Wang, Yi; Brot, Nathan; Heinecke, Jay W; Fu, Xiaoyun

    2009-11-03

    Reactive oxygen intermediates generated by neutrophils kill bacteria and are implicated in inflammatory tissue injury, but precise molecular targets are undefined. We demonstrate that neutrophils use myeloperoxidase (MPO) to convert methionine residues of ingested Escherichia coli to methionine sulfoxide in high yield. Neutrophils deficient in individual components of the MPO system (MPO, H(2)O(2), chloride) exhibited impaired bactericidal activity and impaired capacity to oxidize methionine. HOCl, the principal physiologic product of the MPO system, is a highly efficient oxidant for methionine, and its microbicidal effects were found to correspond linearly with oxidation of methionine residues in bacterial cytosolic and inner membrane proteins. In contrast, outer envelope proteins were initially oxidized without associated microbicidal effect. Disruption of bacterial methionine sulfoxide repair systems rendered E. coli more susceptible to killing by HOCl, whereas over-expression of a repair enzyme, methionine sulfoxide reductase A, rendered them resistant, suggesting a direct role for methionine oxidation in bactericidal activity. Prominent among oxidized bacterial proteins were those engaged in synthesis and translocation of peptides to the cell envelope, an essential physiological function. Moreover, HOCl impaired protein translocation early in the course of bacterial killing. Together, our findings indicate that MPO-mediated methionine oxidation contributes to bacterial killing by neutrophils. The findings further suggest that protein translocation to the cell envelope is one important pathway targeted for damage.

  11. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, J.B.; Graaff, M. de; Bosch, P.L. van den; Boelee, N.C.; Keesman, K.J.; Janssen, A.J.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concl

  12. Diversity of arsenite oxidizing bacterial communities in arsenic-rich deltaic aquifers in West Bengal, India

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    Devanita eGhosh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available High arsenic (As concentration in groundwater has affected human health, particularly in South-East Asia putting millions of people at risk. Biogeochemical cycling of As carried out by different bacterial groups are suggested to control the As fluxes in aquifers. A functional diversity approach in link with As precipitation was adopted to study bacterial community structures and their variation within the As contaminated Bengal Delta Plain (BDP aquifers of India. Groundwater samples collected from two shallow aquifers in Karimpur II (West Bengal, India, during years 2010 and 2011, were investigated to trace the effects of inter-annual variability in precipitation on community structure and diversity of bacterial assemblages. The study focused on amplification, clone library generation and sequencing of the arsenite oxidase large sub-unit gene aioA and 16S rRNA marker, with respect to changes in elemental concentrations. New set of primers were designed to amplify the aioA gene as a phylogenetic marker to study taxonomically diverse arsenite oxidizing bacterial groups in these aquifers. Overall narrow distribution of bacterial communities based on aioA and 16S rRNA sequences observed was due to poor nutrient status and anoxic conditions in these As contaminated aquifers. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum detected, within which Acidovorax, Hydrogenophaga, Albidiferax, Bosea and Polymorphum were the major arsenite oxidizing bacterial genera. The structure of bacterial assemblages including those of arsenite oxidizing bacteria were affected by an increase in major elemental concentrations (e.g., As, iron, sulfur, and silica within two sampling sessions, which was supported by PCA analysis. One of the significant findings of this study is detection of novel lineages of 16S rRNA-like bacterial sequences indicating presence of indigenous bacterial communities across both wells of BDP that can play important role in biogeochemical cycling of

  13. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-01-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxi...

  14. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-04-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover.

  15. Protein oxidation implicated as the primary determinant of bacterial radioresistance.

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    Michael J Daly

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In the hierarchy of cellular targets damaged by ionizing radiation (IR, classical models of radiation toxicity place DNA at the top. Yet, many prokaryotes are killed by doses of IR that cause little DNA damage. Here we have probed the nature of Mn-facilitated IR resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, which together with other extremely IR-resistant bacteria have high intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios compared to IR-sensitive bacteria. For in vitro and in vivo irradiation, we demonstrate a mechanistic link between Mn(II ions and protection of proteins from oxidative modifications that introduce carbonyl groups. Conditions that inhibited Mn accumulation or Mn redox cycling rendered D. radiodurans radiation sensitive and highly susceptible to protein oxidation. X-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis showed that Mn is globally distributed in D. radiodurans, but Fe is sequestered in a region between dividing cells. For a group of phylogenetically diverse IR-resistant and IR-sensitive wild-type bacteria, our findings support the idea that the degree of resistance is determined by the level of oxidative protein damage caused during irradiation. We present the case that protein, rather than DNA, is the principal target of the biological action of IR in sensitive bacteria, and extreme resistance in Mn-accumulating bacteria is based on protein protection.

  16. Characterization of the DNA-Mediated Oxidation of Dps, A Bacterial Ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Anna R; Zhou, Andy; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2016-09-07

    Dps proteins are bacterial ferritins that protect DNA from oxidative stress and have been implicated in bacterial survival and virulence. In addition to direct oxidation of the Dps iron sites by diffusing oxidants, oxidation from a distance via DNA charge transport (CT), where electrons and electron holes are rapidly transported through the base-pair π-stack, could represent an efficient DNA protection mechanism utilized by Dps. Here, we spectroscopically characterize the DNA-mediated oxidation of ferrous iron-loaded Dps. X-band EPR was used to monitor the oxidation of DNA-bound Dps after DNA photooxidation using an intercalating ruthenium photooxidant and the flash-quench technique. Upon irradiation with poly(dGdC)2, a signal arises with g = 4.3, consistent with the formation of mononuclear high-spin Fe(III) sites of low symmetry, the expected oxidation product of Dps with one iron bound at each ferroxidase site. When poly(dGdC)2 is substituted with poly(dAdT)2, the yield of Dps oxidation is decreased significantly, consistent with guanine radical intermediates facilitating Dps oxidation. We have also explored possible protein electron transfer (ET) intermediates in the DNA-mediated oxidation of ferrous iron-loaded Dps. Dps proteins contain a conserved tryptophan residue in close proximity to the iron-binding ferroxidase site (W52 in E. coli Dps). In EPR studies of the oxidation of ferrous iron-loaded Dps following DNA photooxidation, a W52A Dps mutant was significantly deficient compared to WT Dps in forming the characteristic EPR signal at g = 4.3, consistent with W52 acting as an ET hopping intermediate. This effect is mirrored in vivo in E. coli survival in response to hydrogen peroxide, where mutation of W52 leads to decreased survival under oxidative stress.

  17. Green synthesis of graphene oxide sheets decorated by silver nanoprisms and their anti-bacterial properties.

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    Zhang, Danhui; Liu, Xiaoheng; Wang, Xin

    2011-09-01

    A widely soluble graphene oxide sheets decorated by silver nanoprisms were prepared through green synthesis at the room temperature using gelatin as reducing and stabilizing agent. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible spectroscopy and fluorescence spectra. The results demonstrate that these silver-nanoprisms assembled on graphene oxide sheets are flexible and can form stable suspensions in aqueous solutions. Furthermore, the formation mechanism of soluble graphene oxide sheets decorated by silver nanoprisms was successfully explained. The anti-bacterial properties of graphene oxide sheets decorated by silver nanoprisms were tested against Escherichia coli. This work provides a simple and "green" method for the synthesis of graphene oxide sheets decorated by silver nanoprisms in aqueous solution with promising antibacterial property.

  18. Roles of the host oxidative immune response and bacterial antioxidant rubrerythrin during Porphyromonas gingivalis infection.

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    Piotr Mydel

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The efficient clearance of microbes by neutrophils requires the concerted action of reactive oxygen species and microbicidal components within leukocyte secretory granules. Rubrerythrin (Rbr is a nonheme iron protein that protects many air-sensitive bacteria against oxidative stress. Using oxidative burst-knockout (NADPH oxidase-null mice and an rbr gene knockout bacterial strain, we investigated the interplay between the phagocytic oxidative burst of the host and the oxidative stress response of the anaerobic periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Rbr ensured the proliferation of P. gingivalis in mice that possessed a fully functional oxidative burst response, but not in NADPH oxidase-null mice. Furthermore, the in vivo protection afforded by Rbr was not associated with the oxidative burst responses of isolated neutrophils in vitro. Although the phagocyte-derived oxidative burst response was largely ineffective against P. gingivalis infection, the corresponding oxidative response to the Rbr-positive microbe contributed to host-induced pathology via potent mobilization and systemic activation of neutrophils. It appeared that Rbr also provided protection against reactive nitrogen species, thereby ensuring the survival of P. gingivalis in the infected host. The presence of the rbr gene in P. gingivalis also led to greater oral bone loss upon infection. Collectively, these results indicate that the host oxidative burst paradoxically enhances the survival of P. gingivalis by exacerbating local and systemic inflammation, thereby contributing to the morbidity and mortality associated with infection.

  19. Increased electrical output when a bacterial ABTS oxidizer is used in a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William J; Manter, Daniel K

    2011-02-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a technology that provides electrical energy from the microbial oxidation of organic compounds. Most MFCs use oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. This study examined the formation in culture of an unidentified bacterial oxidant and investigated the performance of this oxidant in a two-chambered MFC with a proton exchange membrane and an uncoated carbon cathode. DNA, FAME profile and characterization studies identified the microorganism that produced the oxidant as Burkholderia cenocepacia. The oxidant was produced by log phase cells, oxidized the dye 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), had a mass below 1 kD, was heat stable (121°C) and was soluble in ethanol. In a MFC with a 1000 Ω load and ABTS as a mediator, the oxidizer increased cell voltage 11 times higher than atmospheric oxygen and 2.9 times higher than that observed with ferricyanide in the cathode chamber. No increase in cell voltage was observed when no mediator was present. Organisms that produce and release oxidizers into the media may prove useful as bio-cathodes by improving the electrical output of MFCs.

  20. Influence of organic substrates on the kinetics of bacterial As(III) oxidation

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    Lescure, T.; Joulian, C.; Bauda, P.; Hénault, C.; Battaglia-Brunet, F.

    2012-04-01

    Soil microflora plays a major role on the behavior of metals and metalloids. Arsenic speciation, in particular, is related to the activity of bacteria able to oxidize, reduce or methylate this element, and determines mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of As. Arsenite (AsIII) is more toxic and more mobile than arsenate (AsV). Bacterial As(III)-oxidation tends to reduce the toxicity of arsenic in soils and the risk of transfer toward underlying aquifers, that would affect the quality of water resources. Previous results suggest that organic matter may affect kinetics or efficiency of bacterial As(III)-oxidation in presence of oxygen, thus in conventional physico-chemical conditions of a surface soil. Different hypothesis can be proposed to explain the influence of organic matter on As(III) oxidation. Arsenic is a potential energy source for bacteria. The presence of easily biodegradable organic matter may inhibit the As(III) oxidation process because bacteria would first metabolize these more energetic substrates. A second hypothesis would be that, in presence of organic matter, the Ars system involved in bacterial resistance to arsenic would be more active and would compete with the Aio system of arsenite oxidation, decreasing the global As(III) oxidation rate. In addition, organic matter influences the solubility of iron oxides which often act as the main pitfalls of arsenic in soils. The concentration and nature of organic matter could therefore have a significant influence on the bioavailability of arsenic and hence on its environmental impact. The influence of organic matter on biological As(III) oxidation has not yet been determined in natural soils. In this context, soil amendment with organic matter during operations of phytostabilization or, considering diffuse pollutions, through agricultural practices, may affect the mobility and bio-availability of the toxic metalloid. The objective of the present project is to quantify the influence of organic matter

  1. Characterization of TEMPO-oxidized bacterial cellulose scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Honglin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xiong, Guangyao [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330013 (China); Hu, Da [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin 300072 (China); Ren, Kaijing [Department of Joint Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Yao, Fanglian; Zhu, Yong [School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Gao, Chuan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wan, Yizao, E-mail: yzwantju@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2013-12-16

    Introduction of active groups on the surface of bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers is one of the promising routes of tailoring the performance of BC scaffolds for tissue engineering. This paper reported the introduction of aldehyde groups to BC nanofibers by 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpyperidine-1-oxy radical (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation and evaluation of the potential of the TEMPO-oxidized BC as tissue engineering scaffolds. Periodate oxidation was also conducted for comparison. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were carried out to determine the existence of aldehyde groups on BC nanofibers and the crystallinity. In addition, properties relevant to scaffold applications such as morphology, fiber diameter, mechanical properties, and in vitro degradation were characterized. The results indicated that periodate oxidation could introduce free aldehyde to BC nanofibers and the free aldehyde groups on the TEMPO-oxidized BC tended to transfer to acetal groups. It was also found that the advantageous 3D structure of BC scaffolds remained unchanged and that no significant changes in morphology, fiber diameter, tensile structure and in vitro degradation were found after TEMPO-mediated oxidation while significant differences were observed upon periodate oxidation. The present study revealed that TEMPO-oxidation could impart BC scaffolds with new functions while did not degrade their intrinsic advantages. - Highlights: • TEMPO-mediated oxidation on BC scaffold for tissue engineering use was conducted. • TEMPO-mediated oxidation did not degrade the intrinsic advantages of BC scaffold. • TEMPO-mediated oxidation could impart BC scaffold with new functional groups. • Feasibility of TEMPO-oxidized BC as tissue engineering scaffold was confirmed.

  2. NITRIC OXIDE ACTIVITY OF NEUTROPHIL IN BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OF THE CHILDREN WITH BACTERIAL AND VIRAL MENINGITIS

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    V. P. Molochniy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of study of nitric oxide activity of neutrophil leucocytic and freeradical processes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the children with bacterial and viral meningitison the acute period diseases. The peculiarities or activity of freeradical processes and nitric oxide of cerebrospinal fluid with bacterial meningitis in acute period diseases and activities of studies of ferments with the health children. 

  3. Bacterial toxicity comparison between nano- and micro-scaled oxide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Wei; Mashayekhi, Hamid [Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Xing Baoshan, E-mail: bx@pssci.umass.ed [Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Toxicity of nano-scaled aluminum, silicon, titanium and zinc oxides to bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) was examined and compared to that of their respective bulk (micro-scaled) counterparts. All nanoparticles but titanium oxide showed higher toxicity (at 20 mg/L) than their bulk counterparts. Toxicity of released metal ions was differentiated from that of the oxide particles. ZnO was the most toxic among the three nanoparticles, causing 100% mortality to the three tested bacteria. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles had a mortality rate of 57% to B. subtilis, 36% to E. coli, and 70% to P. fuorescens. SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles killed 40% of B. subtilis, 58% of E. coli, and 70% of P. fluorescens. TEM images showed attachment of nanoparticles to the bacteria, suggesting that the toxicity was affected by bacterial attachment. Bacterial responses to nanoparticles were different from their bulk counterparts; hence nanoparticle toxicity mechanisms need to be studied thoroughly. - Oxide nanoparticles show higher toxicity than their bulk counterparts

  4. Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron by lead nitrate in sulfate-rich systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongmei; Gong, Linfeng; Cravotta, Charles A.; Yang, Xiaofen; Tuovinen, Olli H.; Dong, Hailiang; Fu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) by Pb(NO3)2 was investigated with a mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The culture was incubated at 30 °C in ferrous-sulfate medium amended with 0–24.2 mM Pb(II) added as Pb(NO3)2. Anglesite (PbSO4) precipitated immediately upon Pb addition and was the only solid phase detected in the abiotic controls. Both anglesite and jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6) were detected in inoculated cultures. Precipitation of anglesite maintained dissolved Pb concentrations at 16.9–17.6 μM regardless of the concentrations of Pb(NO3)2 added. Fe(II) oxidation was suppressed by 24.2 mM Pb(NO3)2 addition even when anglesite was removed before inoculation. Experiments with 0–48 mM KNO3 demonstrated that bacterial Fe(II) oxidation decreased as nitrate concentration increased. Therefore, inhibition of Fe(II) oxidation at 24.2 mM Pb(NO3)2 addition resulted from nitrate toxicity instead of Pb addition. Geochemical modeling that considered the initial precipitation of anglesite to equilibrium followed by progressive oxidation of Fe(II) and the precipitation of jarosite and an amorphous iron hydroxide phase, without allowing plumbojarosite to precipitate were consistent with the experimental time-series data on Fe(II) oxidation under biotic conditions. Anglesite precipitation in mine tailings and other sulfate-rich systems maintains dissolved Pb concentrations below the toxicity threshold of A. ferrooxidans.

  5. Gaseous nitric oxide for the local treatment of bacterial keratitis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichelbohrer, Mona; Wu, Ming-Feng; Seitz, Berthold; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Meier, Carola; Bischoff, Markus; Tschernig, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The successful treatment of severe bacterial keratitis continues to be a challenge in animals and humans. In the present study the aim was to assess gaseous therapy using gaseous nitric oxide (gNO) in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis. The cornea of anesthetized mice was mechanically scratched and covered with a bacterial suspension of P. aeruginosa. One day later, the infected eyes were exposed to 200 ppm NO for 30 min. Three to seven days later the mice were sacrificed and the bulbi were obtained and processed for light microscopy. The read out parameter was the maximal corneal thickness and the severity of the hypopyon. The therapy with NO did not result in either a reduction of inflammation concerning the maximal corneal thickness or the severity of the hypopyon. The bacterial load was not investigated due to technical limitations. Thus, exposure to gNO did not reduce the local inflammation in P. aeruginosa induced murine keratitis at the investigated time-points. This does not exclude effects of NO on the bacterial load, and in experimental and human keratitis. PMID:28123711

  6. Reactive oxygen species mediated bacterial biofilm inhibition via zinc oxide nanoparticles and their statistical determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Dwivedi

    Full Text Available The formation of bacterial biofilm is a major challenge in clinical applications. The main aim of this study is to describe the synthesis, characterization and biocidal potential of zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs against bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These nanoparticles were synthesized via soft chemical solution process in a very short time and their structural properties have been investigated in detail by using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements. In this work, the potential of synthesized ZnO-NPs (∼ 10-15 nm has been assessed in-vitro inhibition of bacteria and the formation of their biofilms was observed using the tissue culture plate assays. The crystal violet staining on biofilm formation and its optical density revealed the effect on biofilm inhibition. The NPs at a concentration of 100 µg/mL significantly inhibited the growth of bacteria and biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition by ZnO-NPs was also confirmed via bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM. The Bio-TEM analysis of ZnO-NPs treated bacteria confirmed the deformation and damage of cells. The bacterial growth in presence of NPs concluded the bactericidal ability of NPs in a concentration dependent manner. It has been speculated that the antibacterial activity of NPs as a surface coating material, could be a feasible approach for controlling the pathogens. Additionally, the obtained bacterial solution data is also in agreement with the results from statistical analytical methods.

  7. Pore-forming bacterial toxins potently induce release of nitric oxide in porcine endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is believed to play an important role in sepsis- related hypotension. We examined the effects of two pore-forming bacterial exotoxins, Escherichia coli hemolysin and Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin, on NO formation in cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells. NO was quantified using a difference- spectrophotometric method based on the rapid and stoichiometric reaction of NO with oxyhemoglobin. Endothelial cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels were also monitored. Both exotoxins increased NO synthesis in endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner to an extent exceeding that observed with the ionophore A23187 or thrombin. The capacity of exotoxins to induce NO formation may be relevant in patients with severe local or systemic bacterial infections. PMID:8391061

  8. Adsorption of enterobactin to metal oxides and the role of siderophores in bacterial adhesion to metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upritchard, Hamish G; Yang, Jing; Bremer, Philip J; Lamont, Iain L; McQuillan, A James

    2011-09-01

    The potential contribution of chemical bonds formed between bacterial cells and metal surfaces during biofilm initiation has received little attention. Previous work has suggested that bacterial siderophores may play a role in bacterial adhesion to metals. It has now been shown using in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy that enterobactin, a catecholate siderophore secreted by Escherichia coli, forms covalent bonds with particle films of titanium dioxide, boehmite (AlOOH), and chromium oxide-hydroxide which model the surfaces of metals of significance in medical and industrial settings. Adsorption of enterobactin to the metal oxides occurred through the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl moieties, with the trilactone macrocycle having little involvement. Vibrational modes of the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl moiety of enterobactin, adsorbed to TiO(2), were assigned by comparing the observed IR spectra with those calculated by the density functional method. Comparison of the observed adsorbate IR spectrum with the calculated spectra of catecholate-type [H(2)NCOC(6)H(3)O(2)Ti(OH)(4)](2-) and salicylate-type [H(2)NCOC(6)H(3)O(2)HTi(OH)(4)](2-) surface complexes indicated that the catecholate type is dominant. Analysis of the spectra for enterobactin in solution and that adsorbed to TiO(2) revealed that the amide of the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoylserine group reorientates during coordination to surface Ti(IV) ions. Investigation into the pH dependence of enterobactin adsorption to TiO(2) surfaces showed that all 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl groups are involved. Infrared absorption bands attributed to adsorbed enterobactin were also strongly evident for E. coli cells attached to TiO(2) particle films. These studies give evidence of enterobactin-metal bond formation and further suggest the generality of siderophore involvement in bacterial biofilm initiation on metal surfaces.

  9. Emergence of Competitive Dominant Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Populations in a Full-Scale Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Alice C.; Dionisi, Hebe; Kuo, H.-W.; Robinson, Kevin G.; Garrett, Victoria M.; Meyers, Arthur; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial populations in an industrial wastewater treatment plant were investigated with amoA and 16S rRNA gene real-time PCR assays. Nitrosomonas nitrosa initially dominated, but over time RI-27-type ammonia oxidizers, also within the Nitrosomonas communis lineage, increased from below detection to codominance. This shift occurred even though nitrification remained constant. PMID:15691975

  10. Emergence of Competitive Dominant Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Populations in a Full-Scale Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, Alice C.; Dionisi, Hebe; Kuo, H.-W.; Robinson, Kevin G; Garrett, Victoria M.; Meyers, Arthur; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial populations in an industrial wastewater treatment plant were investigated with amoA and 16S rRNA gene real-time PCR assays. Nitrosomonas nitrosa initially dominated, but over time RI-27-type ammonia oxidizers, also within the Nitrosomonas communis lineage, increased from below detection to codominance. This shift occurred even though nitrification remained constant.

  11. Effect of iron oxide and gold nanoparticles on bacterial growth leading towards biological application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandyopadhyay Arghya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanoparticle-metal oxide and gold represents a new class of important materials that are increasingly being developed for use in research and health related activities. The biological system being extremely critical requires the fundamental understanding on the influence of inorganic nanoparticles on cellular growth and functions. Our study was aimed to find out the effect of iron oxide (Fe3O4, gold (Au nanoparticles on cellular growth of Escherichia coli (E. coli and also try to channelize the obtained result by functionalizing the Au nanoparticle for further biological applications. Result Fe3O4 and Au nanoparticles were prepared and characterized using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS. Preliminary growth analysis data suggest that the nanoparticles of iron oxide have an inhibitory effect on E. coli in a concentration dependant manner, whereas the gold nanoparticle directly showed no such activity. However the phase contrast microscopic study clearly demonstrated that the effect of both Fe3O4 and Au nanoparticle extended up to the level of cell division which was evident as the abrupt increase in bacterial cell length. The incorporation of gold nanoparticle by bacterial cell was also observed during microscopic analysis based on which glutathione functionalized gold nanoparticle was prepared and used as a vector for plasmid DNA transport within bacterial cell. Conclusion Altogether the study suggests that there is metal nanoparticle-bacteria interaction at the cellular level that can be utilized for beneficial biological application but significantly it also posses potential to produce ecotoxicity, challenging the ecofriendly nature of nanoparticles.

  12. Surface activation of graphene oxide nanosheets by ultraviolet irradiation for highly efficient anti-bacterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerapandian, Murugan; Zhang, Linghe; Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Yun, Kyusik

    2013-10-01

    A comprehensive investigation of anti-bacterial properties of graphene oxide (GO) and ultraviolet (UV) irradiated GO nanosheets was carried out. Microscopic characterization revealed that the GO nanosheet-like structures had wavy features and wrinkles or thin grooves. Fundamental surface chemical states of GO nanosheets (before and after UV irradiation) were investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results revealed that UV irradiated GO nanosheets have more pronounced anti-bacterial behavior than GO nanosheets and standard antibiotic, kanamycin. The MIC of UV irradiated GO nanosheets was 0.125 μg ml-1 for Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, 0.25 μg ml-1 for Bacillus subtilis and 0.5 μg ml-1 for Enterococcus faecalis, ensuring its potential as an anti-infective agent for controlling the growth of pathogenic bacteria. The minimum bactericidal concentration of normal GO nanosheets was determined to be two-fold higher than its corresponding MIC value, indicating promising bactericidal activity. The mechanism of anti-bacterial action was evaluated by measuring the enzymatic activity of β-d-galactosidase for the hydrolysis of o-nitrophenol-β-d-galactopyranoside.

  13. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-19

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology.

  14. [Effect of acidic treatment of the chemical composition and bacterial oxidation of arsenic-bearing gold concentrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomchenko, N V; Pivovarova, T A; Kondrat'eva, T F

    2008-01-01

    Effect of acidic pretreatment of arsenic-bearing gold concentrate, a promising gold source, on its chemical composition and efficiency of its bacterial oxidation (BO) was studied. The titer of sulfobacilli during BO of the concentrate after high-temperature acidic treatment was 9.0 x 10(7) cells/ml, the degree of arsenic sulfide oxidation being 71.1%, and in the control, 6.5 x 10(7) cells/ml with the oxidation degree as low as 48.7%. Deeper oxidation of the main gold-containing mineral, arsenic sulfide, would allow more efficient gold recovery from the concentrate.

  15. Extraction of copper from an oxidized (lateritic) ore using bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Grail, Barry M; Hilario, Felipe; du Plessis, Chris; Johnson, D Barrie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidized lateritic ore which contained 0.8 % (by weight) copper was bioleached in pH- and temperature-controlled stirred reactors under acidic reducing conditions using pure and mixed cultures of the acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Sulfur was provided as the electron donor for the bacteria, and ferric iron present in goethite (the major ferric iron mineral present in the ore) acted as electron acceptor. Significantly more copper was leached by bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution of the laterite than in aerobic cultures or in sterile anoxic reactors, with up to 78 % of the copper present in the ore being extracted. This included copper that was leached from acid-labile minerals (chiefly copper silicates) and that which was associated with ferric iron minerals in the lateritic ore. In the anaerobic bioreactors, soluble iron in the leach liquors was present as iron (II) and copper as copper (I), but both metals were rapidly oxidized (to iron (III) and copper (II)) when the reactors were aerated. The number of bacteria added to the reactors had a critical role in dictating the rate and yield of copper solubilised from the ore. This work has provided further evidence that reductive bioprocessing, a recently described approach for extracting base metals from oxidized deposits, has the potential to greatly extend the range of metal ores that can be biomined.

  16. Widespread Iron Oxidizing Bacterial Communities in a late Paleoproterozoic Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planavsky, N.; Rouxel, O.; Bekker, A.

    2007-12-01

    Discovery of exceptionally well-preserved microfossils in the Gunflint Iron Formation provided the first evidence for diverse and abundant life in the Precambrian oceans. However, whether the Gunflint microbial communities were dominated by cyanobacteria or represent an archaic, lithotrophic ecosystem is a matter of longstanding debate. Here, we present Fe isotope and rare earth element (REE) data for microfossiliferous stromatolites that are consistent with the Gunflint biota being an iron-oxidizing bacterial community. The lack of or positive Ce anomalies in REE data indicate that the benthic community grew below a redoxcline and positive iron isotope compositions reveal that the microbial community only oxidized a fraction of the dissolved iron load. This depositional setting and Fe isotope evidence for incomplete iron oxidation are inconsistent with a cyanobacterial interpretation and provide strong support that the Gunflint biota was indeed a microaerophilic lithotrophic microbial ecosystem. An apparently restricted temporal distribution of the Gunflint biota coupled with a widespread spatial distribution signals a significant ecosystem evolutionary event in the late Paleoproterozoic when the ocean was redox-stratified and Fe-rich anoxic waters impinged onto the shallow shelf.

  17. Salmonella proteomics under oxidative stress reveals coordinated regulation of antioxidant defense with iron metabolism and bacterial virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiaqi; Qi, Linlu; Hu, Mo; Liu, Yanhua; Yu, Kaiwen; Liu, Qian; Liu, Xiaoyun

    2017-02-11

    Salmonella Typhimurium is a bacterial pathogen that can cause widespread gastroenteritis. Salmonella encounters reactive oxygen species both under free-living conditions and within their mammalian host during infection. To study its response to oxidative stress, we performed the first large-scale proteomic profiling of Salmonella upon exposure to H2O2. Among 1600 detected proteins, 83 proteins showed significantly altered abundance. Interestingly, only a subset of known antioxidants was induced, likely due to distinct regulatory mechanisms. In addition, we found elevation of several Salmonella acquired phage products with potential contribution to DNA repair under oxidative stress. Furthermore, we observed robust induction of iron-uptake systems and disruption of these pathways led to bacterial survival defects under H2O2 challenge. Importantly, this work is the first to report that oxidative stress severely repressed the Salmonella type III secretion system (T3SS), reducing its virulence. Biological significance Salmonella, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, encounters reactive oxygen species (ROS) both endogenously and exogenously. To better understand its response to oxidative stress, we performed the first large-scale profiling of Salmonella protein expression upon H2O2 treatment. Among 1600 quantified proteins, the abundance of 116 proteins was altered significantly. Notably, iron acquisition systems were induced to promote bacterial survival under oxidative stress. Furthermore, we are the first to report that oxidative stress severely repressed Salmonella type III secretion system and hence reduced its virulence. We believe that these findings will not only help us better understand the molecular mechanisms that Salmonella has evolved to counteract ROS but also the global impact of oxidative stress on bacterial physiology.

  18. Complete oxidation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate by bacterial communities selected from coastal seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigoillot, J C; Nguyen, M H

    1992-01-01

    Anionic surfactants, especially alkylbenzene sulfonates, are discharged into marine areas in great quantities. Because of their poor biodegradability, linear alkylbenzene sulfonates accumulate in seawater and sediments. Bacterial communities that can degrade surfactants were selected from coastal seawater contaminated by urban sewage. All the isolated strains consisted of gram-negative, strictly aerobic rods or helical bacteria. Some of these, though isolated from coastal seawater, did not need sodium for growth and appeared to be related to the genera Alcaligenes and Pseudomonas. Complete surfactant biodegradation was achieved by three important steps: terminal oxidation of the alkyl chain, desulfonation, and aromatic-ring cleavage. Only a few strains were able to carry out the first two steps. The aromatic ring was then cleaved by other strains that possess very specific enzymatic activities. Finally, a number of strains grew on short acids that were end-of-metabolism products of the others. PMID:1599249

  19. The impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the bacterial microbiome of activated sludge systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meli, K.; Kamika, I.; Keshri, J.; Momba, M. N. B.

    2016-12-01

    The expected growth in nanomaterial applications could result in increased amounts of nanoparticles entering municipal sewer systems, eventually ending up in wastewater treatment plants and therefore negatively affecting microbial populations and biological nutrient removal. The aim of this study was to ascertain the impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) on the bacterial microbiome of an activated sludge system. A metagenomic approach combined with the latest generation Illumina MiSeq platform and RDP pipeline tools were used to identify and classify the bacterial microbiome of the sludge. Results revealed a drastic decrease in the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from 27 737 recovered in the nZnO-free sample to 23 743, 17 733, and 13 324 OTUs in wastewater samples exposed to various concentrations of nZnO (5, 10 and 100 mg/L nZnO, respectively). These represented 12 phyla, 21 classes, 30 orders, 54 families and 51 genera, completely identified at each taxonomic level in the control samples; 7-15-25-28-20 for wastewater samples exposed to 5 mg/L nZnO; 9-15-24-31-23 for those exposed to 10 mg/L and 7-11-19-26-17 for those exposed 100 mg/L nZnO. A large number of sequences could not be assigned to specific taxa, suggesting a possibility of novel species to be discovered.

  20. Assessing the influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state on organic pollutant biodegradation in algal-bacterial photobioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahr, M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Rosa, de la F.; Garcia-Encina, P.; Munoz, R.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state (CORS) of organic pollutants on their biodegradation in enclosed algal-bacterial photobioreactors was evaluated using a consortium of enriched wild-type methanotrophic bacteria and microalgae. Methane, methanol and glucose (with CORS -4, -2 and 0

  1. Evidence of novel plant-species specific ammonia oxidizing bacterial clades in acidic South African fynbos soils

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramond, JB

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available -1 Journal of Basic Microbiology Evidence of novel plant-species specific ammonia oxidizing bacterial clades in acidic South African fynbos soils Jean-Baptiste Ramond1, Joseph D. W. Lako2, William H. L. Stafford3, Marla I. Tuffin4 and Don A. Cowan1...

  2. Oxidative stress generation of silver nanoparticles in three bacterial genera and its relationship with the antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros, M A; Cano Aristizábal, V; Dalmasso, P R; Paraje, M G; Páez, P L

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress is a condition caused by the high intracellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that includes superoxide anion radicals, hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. Nanoparticles could cause rapid generation of free radicals by redox reactions. ROS can react directly with membrane lipids, proteins and DNA and are normally scavenged by antioxidants that are capable of neutralizing; however, elevated concentrations of ROS in bacterial cells can result in oxidative stress. The aim of this work was contribute to the knowledge of action mechanism of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and their relation to the generation of oxidative stress in bacteria. We demonstrated that Ag-NPs generated oxidative stress in Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated by the increment of ROS and this increase correlated with a better antimicrobial activity. On the other hand, we showed that the oxidative stress caused by the Ag-NPs biosynthesized was associated to a variation in the level of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). Oxidative stress in bacteria can result from disruption of the electronic transport chain due to the high affinity of Ag-NPs for the cell membrane. This imbalance in the oxidative stress was evidentiated by a macromolecular oxidation at level of DNA, lipids and proteins in E. coli exposed to Ag-NPs. The formation of ROS and RNI by Ag-NPs may also be considered to explain the bacterial death.

  3. Nitric oxide production in celomocytes of the earthworm Eisenia hortensis following bacterial challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR Cook

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this in vitro investigation, nitric oxide (NO production was induced within celomocytes of the earthworm Eisenia hortensis following microbial challenge. Celomocytes were pre-loaded with the fluorescent indicator 4-amino-5-methylamino-2’, 7’-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA in order to detect the presence of intracellular nitric oxide subsequent to a 16 h incubation with chemically-fixed soil bacteria including Bacillus megaterium, Arthrobacter globiformis, Pseudomonas stutzeri, and Azotobacter chroococcum at a range of multiplicities of infection (MOIs. Flow cytometric analysis measuring increases in relative fluorescence intensity (RFI, which is directly proportional to the amount of intracellular NO produced, permitted determination of statistical significance (p < 0.05 of exposed celomocytes compared to baseline controls. Significant increases in NO were detected reproducibly in celomocytes treated with all bacterial species used. The most prominent results were observed after exposure to Gram positive B. megaterium and A. globiformis where 100 % of earthworms tested exhibited statistically significant increases of RFI at MOIs of 100:1 and 500:1, respectively. Furthermore, significant decreases in NO production in bacteria-stimulated earthworm celomocytes incubated with the NOS inhibitor aminoguanidine hydrochloride were observed. These results demonstrate microbial induction of NO synthesis in earthworms and provide evidence of an antimicrobial role of NO in the innate immune system.

  4. Denitrifying bacterial communities affect current production and nitrous oxide accumulation in a microbial fuel cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Vilar-Sanz

    Full Text Available The biocathodic reduction of nitrate in Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs is an alternative to remove nitrogen in low carbon to nitrogen wastewater and relies entirely on microbial activity. In this paper the community composition of denitrifiers in the cathode of a MFC is analysed in relation to added electron acceptors (nitrate and nitrite and organic matter in the cathode. Nitrate reducers and nitrite reducers were highly affected by the operational conditions and displayed high diversity. The number of retrieved species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs for narG, napA, nirS and nirK genes was 11, 10, 31 and 22, respectively. In contrast, nitrous oxide reducers remained virtually unchanged at all conditions. About 90% of the retrieved nosZ sequences grouped in a single OTU with a high similarity with Oligotropha carboxidovorans nosZ gene. nirS-containing denitrifiers were dominant at all conditions and accounted for a significant amount of the total bacterial density. Current production decreased from 15.0 A · m(-3 NCC (Net Cathodic Compartment, when nitrate was used as an electron acceptor, to 14.1 A · m(-3 NCC in the case of nitrite. Contrarily, nitrous oxide (N2O accumulation in the MFC was higher when nitrite was used as the main electron acceptor and accounted for 70% of gaseous nitrogen. Relative abundance of nitrite to nitrous oxide reducers, calculated as (qnirS+qnirK/qnosZ, correlated positively with N2O emissions. Collectively, data indicate that bacteria catalysing the initial denitrification steps in a MFC are highly influenced by main electron acceptors and have a major influence on current production and N2O accumulation.

  5. Adsorption and oxidation of SO₂in a fixed-bed reactor using activated carbon produced from oxytetracycline bacterial residue and impregnated with copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Baohua; Yu, Lei; Song, Hanning; Li, Yaqi; Zhang, Peng; Guo, Bin; Duan, Erhong

    2015-02-01

    The SO₂removal ability (including adsorption and oxidation ability) of activated carbon produced from oxytetracycline bacterial residue and impregnated with copper was investigated. The activated carbon produced from oxytetracycline bacterial residue and modified with copper was characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The effects of the catalysts, SO₂concentration, weight hourly space velocity, and temperature on the SO₂adsorption and oxidation activity were evaluated. Activated carbon produced from oxytetracycline bacterial residue and used as catalyst supports for copper oxide catalysts provided high catalytic activity for the adsorbing and oxidizing of SO₂from flue gases.

  6. Bacterial Oxidation and Reduction of Iron in the Processes of Creation and Treatment of Acid Mining Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kupka

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainages (AMDs arise at the weathering of sulphidic minerals. The occurrence of acidic streams is commonly associated with the human mining activities. Due to the disruption and excavation of sulphide deposits, the oxidation processes have initiated. Acidic products of sulphide oxidation accelerate the degradation of accompanying minerals. AMDs typically contain high concentrations of sulfuric acid and soluble metals and cause serious ecological problems due to the water pollution and the devastation of adjacent country. Microbial life in these extremely acidic environments may be considerably diverse. AMDs are abundant in bacteria capable to oxidize and/or to reduce iron. The rate of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron released from pyrite surfaces is up to one million times faster than the chemical oxidation rate at low pH. Bacterial regeneration of ferric iron maintains the continuity of pyrite oxidation and the production of AMDs. Another group of microorganisms living in these environments are acidophilic ferric iron reducing bacteria. This group of microorganisms has been discovered only relatively recently. Acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria reduce ferric iron in either soluble or solid forms to ferrous iron. The reductive dissolution of ferric iron minerals brings about a mobilization of iron as well as associated heavy metals. The Bacterial oxidation and reduction of iron play an important role in the transformation of either crystalline or amorphous iron-containing minerals, including sulphides, oxides, hydroxysulfates, carbonates and silicates. This work discusses the role of acidophilic bacteria in the natural iron cycling and the genesis of acidic effluents. The possibilities of application of iron bacteria in the remediation of AMDs are also considered.

  7. Arsenic oxidation capabilities of a chemoautotrophic bacterial population: Use for the treatment of an arsenic contaminated wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dictor, M.-C.; Battaglia-Brunet, F.; Garrido, F.; Baranger, P.

    2003-05-01

    An autotrophic bacterial population, named CAsOl, able to oxidise arsenic has been isolated from a former gold mine (Saint-Yrieix, France). This bacterial population was composed of two microorganisms: a bacterial strain close to Ralstonia picketii and the second one related to Thiomonas genus (identification by 16S rDNA sequencing). This microbial consortium was able to oxidise arsenic with CO2 as the carbon source, arsenite as electron donor and oxygen as electron accepter. A significant oxidising activity was observed in a pH range comprised between 3 to 8 (pH optimum 5 7). A laboratory experiment for the biological treatment of a synthetic effluent containing 100 mg.L^{-1} of arsenic has been carried out. A mineral support, pouzzolana, has been colonised by the population CAsOl and the column was fed continuously with a synthetic medium in order to determine the maximal arsenic oxidation rate and the optimal residence time. In our experimental conditions, the maximum arsenic oxidation rate was 3,9 g As(Ill). L^{-1}.day^{-1} with a residence time of 1 hour after 55 days of continuous running. The performance of our bacterial population for arsenite oxidation in arsenic contaminated wastewater are especially important in the case of a treatment of arsenious wastewater as it presents advantages compared to physico-chemical treatments (consumption and cost of chemicals, potential toxic by-products generation...).

  8. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Kupffer cell phagosomal motility, bacterial clearance, and liver function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson CY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Christa Y Watson, Ramon M Molina, Andressa Louzada, Kimberly M Murdaugh, Thomas C Donaghey, Joseph D BrainCenter for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USABackground: Zinc oxide engineered nanoparticles (ZnO ENPs have potential as nanomedicines due to their inherent properties. Studies have described their pulmonary impact, but less is known about the consequences of ZnO ENP interactions with the liver. This study was designed to describe the effects of ZnO ENPs on the liver and Kupffer cells after intravenous (IV administration.Materials and methods: First, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine the tissue distribution of neutron-activated 65ZnO ENPs post-IV injection in Wistar Han rats. Then, a noninvasive in vivo method to assess Kupffer cell phagosomal motility was employed using ferromagnetic iron particles and magnetometry. We also examined whether prior IV injection of ZnO ENPs altered Kupffer cell bactericidal activity on circulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Serum and liver tissues were collected to assess liver-injury biomarkers and histological changes, respectively.Results: We found that the liver was the major site of initial uptake of 65ZnO ENPs. There was a time-dependent decrease in tissue levels of 65Zn in all organs examined, reflecting particle dissolution. In vivo magnetometry showed a time-dependent and transient reduction in Kupffer cell phagosomal motility. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa 24 hours post-ZnO ENP injection showed an initial (30 minutes delay in vascular bacterial clearance. However, by 4 hours, IV-injected bacteria were cleared from the blood, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys. Seven days post-ZnO ENP injection, creatine phosphokinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in serum were significantly increased. Histological evidence of

  9. Freestanding bacterial cellulose-graphene oxide composite membranes with high mechanical strength for selective ion permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qile; Zhou, Xufeng; Deng, Wei; Zheng, Zhi; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) based membranes have been widely applied in molecular separation based on the size exclusion effect of the nanochannels formed by stacked GO sheets. However, it’s still a challenge to prepare a freestanding GO-based membrane with high mechanical strength and structural stability which is prerequisite for separation application in aqueous solution. Here, a freestanding composite membrane based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and GO is designed and prepared. BC network provides a porous skeleton to spread GO sheets and uniformly incorporates into the GO layers, which endows the BC + GO composite membrane with well water-stability, excellent tensile strength, as well as improved toughness, guaranteeing its separation applicability in water environment. The resulting BC + GO membrane exhibits obviously discrepant permeation properties for different inorganic/organic ions with different size, and in particular, it can quickly separate ions in nano-scale from angstrom-scale. Therefore, this novel composite membrane is considered to be a promising candidate in the applications of water purification, food industry, biomedicine, and pharmaceutical and fuel separation.

  10. Freestanding bacterial cellulose-graphene oxide composite membranes with high mechanical strength for selective ion permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qile; Zhou, Xufeng; Deng, Wei; Zheng, Zhi; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) based membranes have been widely applied in molecular separation based on the size exclusion effect of the nanochannels formed by stacked GO sheets. However, it’s still a challenge to prepare a freestanding GO-based membrane with high mechanical strength and structural stability which is prerequisite for separation application in aqueous solution. Here, a freestanding composite membrane based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and GO is designed and prepared. BC network provides a porous skeleton to spread GO sheets and uniformly incorporates into the GO layers, which endows the BC + GO composite membrane with well water-stability, excellent tensile strength, as well as improved toughness, guaranteeing its separation applicability in water environment. The resulting BC + GO membrane exhibits obviously discrepant permeation properties for different inorganic/organic ions with different size, and in particular, it can quickly separate ions in nano-scale from angstrom-scale. Therefore, this novel composite membrane is considered to be a promising candidate in the applications of water purification, food industry, biomedicine, and pharmaceutical and fuel separation. PMID:27615451

  11. Comparison of chromium III and VI toxicities in water using sulfur-oxidizing bacterial bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qambrani, Naveed Ahmed; Hwang, Ji-Hoon; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2016-10-01

    The toxicities of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) in water were evaluated using sulfur-oxidizing bacterial (SOB) bioassays both in batch and fed-batch conditions. Two days were enough for a quick buildup of SOB consortium in the master culture reactor (MCR). At concentrations up to 100 mg L(-1), Cr (III) was found to be nontoxic in both conditions, while Cr (VI) at very low concentrations (0.1-2 mg L(-1)) was very toxic to the SOB. Literature review suggested that the nontoxic nature of Cr (III) might be due to the absence of the iron uptake pathway in Acidithiobacillus caldus (the predominant bacteria in our reactors), which is required for Cr (III) uptake. The 2-h median effective concentration (EC50) values obtained for Cr (VI) in the batch and fed-batch tests were 2.7 mg L(-1) and 1.5 mg L(-1), respectively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Pyrosequencing reveals soil enzyme activities and bacterial communities impacted by graphene and its oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yan; Wang, Yi; Guan, Yina; Ma, Jiangtao; Cai, Zhiqiang; Yang, Guanghua; Zhao, Xiyue

    2017-09-26

    Graphene (GN) and graphene oxides (GOs) are novel carbon nanomaterial, they have been attracted much attention because of their excellent properties and are widely applied in many areas including energy, electronics, biomedicine and environmental science etc. With industrial production and consumption of GN/GO, they will inevitably enter the soil and water environment. GN/GO may directly cause certain harm to microorganisms and lead to ecological and environmental risks. Graphene oxides are graphene derivative with abundant oxygen-containing functional groups in its graphitic backbone. The structure and chemistry of graphene show obvious differences compared with graphene oxide, which lead to the different environmental behaviors. In this study, four different types of soil (S1, S2, S3 and S4) were employed to investigate the effect of GN and GO on soil enzymatic activity, microbial population and bacterial community through pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The results showed that soil enzyme activity (invertase, protease, catalase and urease) and microbial population (bacteria, actinomycete and fungi) changed after GN/GO release into soils. Soil microbial community species are more richness and the diversity also increase after GO/GN application. The phylum of Proteobacteria increased at 90 days after treatment (DAT) after GN/GO application. The phylum of Chloroflexi occurred after GN applying at 90 DAT in S1 and reached 4.6%. Proteobacteria were the most phylum in S2, S3 and S4 soils, it ranged from 43.6% to 71.4% in S2, 45.6% to 73.7% in S3, 38.1% to 56.7% in S4, respectively. The most abundant genus were Bacillus (37.5% - 47.0%), Lactococcus (28.0% - 39.0%) in S1, Lysobacter and Flavobacterium in S2, Pedobacter in S3 and Massilia in S4 soil. The effect of GN and GO on soil microbial community is time dependent, and there are no significant differences between the samples at 10 and 90 DAT.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AND OXIDATIVE/ANTIOXIDATIVE STATUS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE BACTERIAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IMAD A.J. THANOON

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to compare the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, serum malondialdehyde (MDA, antioxidant parameters [represented by serum ferritin, uric acid and totalantioxidant status (TAS] in children with bacterial meningitis with a control group. Twenty-seven children with bacterial meningitis were included in this study. Thirty apparently healthy childrenwere also included as the control group. Assays of serum CRP, uric acid, ferritin and TAS were performed on samples from controls and from patients prior to antibiotic therapy. After two weeksof antibiotic therapy, assays of the same parameters were repeated in the patients. A significant rise in the serum levels of MDA and CRP, and a significant reduction in serum uric acid levels andTAS were noted in children with acute bacterial meningitis (before therapy compared to controls. Serum ferritin levels showed no significant differences. When measured parameters of children withbacterial meningitis after therapy were compared with those of the controls, highly significant differences in the mean serum levels of uric acid, CRP and TAS were noted. There were no significant differences in the mean serum ferritin levels. Serum oxidative/antioxidative balance shifted to the oxidative side in meningitis patients before therapy, and improved after therapy.Elevation of CRP in cases with bacterial meningitis may reflect its importance as an aid in the diagnosis of such cases.

  14. Disinfection of titanium dioxide nanotubes using super-oxidized water decrease bacterial viability without disrupting osteoblast behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltrán-Partida, Ernesto [Department of Biomaterials, Dental Materials and Tissue Engineering, Faculty of Dentistry Mexicali, Autonomous University of Baja California, Av. Zotoluca and Chinampas St., 21040 Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Department of Corrosion and Materials, Engineering Institute, Autonomous University of Baja California, Blvd. Benito Juarez and Normal St., 21280 Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Valdez-Salas, Benjamín, E-mail: benval@uabc.edu.mx [Department of Corrosion and Materials, Engineering Institute, Autonomous University of Baja California, Blvd. Benito Juarez and Normal St., 21280 Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Escamilla, Alan; Curiel, Mario [Department of Corrosion and Materials, Engineering Institute, Autonomous University of Baja California, Blvd. Benito Juarez and Normal St., 21280 Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Valdez-Salas, Ernesto [Ixchel Medical Centre, Av. Bravo y Obregón, 21000 Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Nedev, Nicola [Department of Corrosion and Materials, Engineering Institute, Autonomous University of Baja California, Blvd. Benito Juarez and Normal St., 21280 Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Bastidas, Jose M. [National Centre for Metallurgical Research, CSIC, Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotubes (NTs) on Ti6Al4V alloy were synthesized by anodization using a commercially available super-oxidized water (SOW). The NT surfaces were sterilized by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and disinfected using SOW. The adhesion and cellular morphology of pig periosteal osteoblast (PPO) cells and the behavior of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) cultured on the sterilized and disinfected surfaces were investigated. A non-anodized Ti6Al4V disc sterilized by UV irradiation (without SOW) was used as control. The results of this study reveal that the adhesion, morphology and filopodia development of PPO cells in NTs are dramatically improved, suggesting that SOW cleaning may not disrupt the benefits obtained by NTs. Significantly decreased bacterial viability in NTs after cleaning with SOW and comparing with non-cleaned NTs was seen. The results suggest that UV and SOW could be a recommendable method for implant sterilization and disinfection without altering osteoblast behavior while decreasing bacterial viability. - Highlights: • The effect of super-oxidized water cleaning was studied on Ti6Al4V nanotubes. • Super oxidized-water cleaning caused a decline in S. aureus viability. • Osteoblast behavior was not disrupted after super-oxidized water disinfection. • Super-oxidized water is suggested as a cleaning protocol for TiO{sub 2} nanotubes.

  15. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  16. Seasonal and annual reoccurrence in betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacterial population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouskill, Nicholas J; Eveillard, Damien; O'Mullan, Gregory; Jackson, George A; Ward, Bess B

    2011-04-01

    Microbes exhibit remarkably high genetic diversity compared with plant and animal species. Many phylogenetically diverse but apparently functionally redundant microbial taxa are detectable within a cubic centimetre of mud or a millilitre of water, and the significance of this diversity, in terms of ecosystem function, has been difficult to understand. Thus it is not known whether temporal and spatial differences in microbial community composition are linked to particular environmental factors or might modulate ecosystem response to environmental change. Fifty-three water and sediment samples from upper and lower Chesapeake Bay were analysed in triplicate arrays to determine temporal and spatial patterns and relationships between ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) communities and environmental variables. Thirty-three water samples (three depths) collected during April, August and October, 2001-2004, from the oligohaline upper region of the Bay were analysed to investigate temporal patterns in archetype distribution. Using a combination of a non-weighted discrimination analysis and principal components analysis of community composition data obtained from functional gene microarrays, it was found that co-varying AOB assemblages reoccurred seasonally in concert with specific environmental conditions, potentially revealing patterns of niche differentiation. Among the most notable patterns were correlations of AOB archetypes with temperature, DON and ammonium concentrations. Different AOB archetypes were more prevalent at certain times of the year, e.g. some were more abundant every autumn and others every spring. This data set documents the successional return to an indigenous community following massive perturbation (hurricane induced flooding) as well as the seasonal reoccurrence of specific lineages, identified by key functional genes, associated with the biogeochemically important process nitrification.

  17. A comparative ecotoxicity analysis of α- and γ-phase aluminium oxide nanoparticles towards a freshwater bacterial isolate Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakrashi, Sunandan; Kumar, Deepak; Iswarya, V; Bhuvaneshwari, M; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2014-12-01

    Crystalline structure of nanoparticles may influence their physicochemical behaviour as well as their toxicological impact on biota. The differences in orientation of the atoms result in the variations in chemical stability. Thus, toxicological impacts of different crystalline phases of aluminium oxide nanoparticles are expected to vary. The present study brings out a comparative toxicity analysis of γ-phase and α-phase aluminium oxide nanoparticles of comparable hydrodynamic size range towards a freshwater bacterial isolate Bacillus licheniformis at low exposure concentrations (5, 1, 0.5 and 0.05 µg/mL). Upon 2-h exposure, the α-aluminium oxide particles showed lower toxicity than the γ-phase aluminium oxide. The lower level of oxidative stress generation and cell membrane damage in case of the α-phase aluminium oxide nanoparticles substantiated the toxicity results. The involvement of protein, lipopolysaccharides in nanoparticle-cell surface interaction, was noted in both the cases. To conclude, the crystallinity of aluminium oxide nanoparticles played an important role in the interaction and the toxicity response.

  18. Simazine degradation in bioaugmented soil: urea impact and response of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and other soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingwei; Wan, Rui; Xie, Shuguang

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of exogenous urea nitrogen on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and other soil bacterial communities in soil bioaugmented for simazine remediation. The previously isolated simazine-degrading Arthrobacter sp. strain SD1 was used to degrade the herbicide. The effect of urea on the simazine degradation capacity of the soil bioaugmented with Arthrobacter strain SD1 was assessed using quantitative PCR targeting the s-triazine-degrading trzN and atzC genes. Structures of bacterial and AOB communities were characterized using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Urea fertilizer could affect simazine biodegradation and decreased the proportion of its trzN and atzC genes in soil augmented with Arthrobacter strain SD1. Bioaugmentation process could significantly alter the structures of both bacterial and AOB communities, which were strongly affected by urea amendment, depending on the dosage. This study could provide some new insights towards s-triazine bioremediation and microbial ecology in a bioaugmented system. However, further studies are necessary in order to elucidate the impact of different types and levels of nitrogen sources on s-triazine-degraders and bacterial and AOB communities in bioaugmented soil.

  19. Oxidative stress during bacterial growth characterized through microdialysis sampling coupled with HPLC/fluorescence detection of malondialdehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Keng-Chang; Hsu, Pi-Fu; Chen, Ya-Ching; Lin, Hsin-Chieh; Hung, Chih-Chang; Chen, Po-Chih; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2016-04-15

    Organisms that grow aerobically are routinely exposed to oxidative stress in the form of reactive oxygen species. Monitoring the dynamic variations of oxidative stress allows us to understand its role in basic cellular function and determine mechanisms of antioxidation. In this study, microdialysis (MD) sampling was employed for continuous monitoring of the formation of malondialdehyde (MDA) in a bacterium-inoculated culture broth. To test the practicality of this approach, oxidative stress was induced by cadmium and then a 60-min interval was selected to collect sufficient amounts of dialysate for high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence (HPLC-FL) detection. After optimization of this simple-to-operate, simultaneous, and continuous method for dynamic monitoring of MDA during periods of bacterial growth, a retrodialysis technique and a no-net-flux method were used to assess the probe recovery and analytical performance of the proposed system. The mean probe recovery of MDA was 78.6 ± 0.9%, with intra- and interday precisions of 2.7-6.1 and 3.5-7.6%, respectively. To evaluate the practicality of this method, the dynamic variations in the concentrations of MDA in standardized bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, ATCC(®) 29213™) were monitored continuously for 24h. The analytical results confirmed that this MD sampling technique combined with HPLC-FL detection can be used to accurately and continuously monitor the levels of MDA in microbially inoculated culture broths.

  20. Bacterial-excreted small volatile molecule 2-aminoacetophenone induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in murine skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhaya, Arunava; Constantinou, Caterina; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Ueki, Ryusuke; Yasuhara, Shingo; Martyn, J A Jeevendra; Wilhelmy, Julie; Mindrinos, Michael; Rahme, Laurence G; Tzika, A Aria

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial dysfunction and facilitates apoptosis, tissue damage or metabolic alterations following infection. We have previously discovered that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) quorum sensing (QS)-excreted small volatile molecule, 2-aminoacetophenone (2-AA), which is produced in infected human tissue, promotes bacterial phenotypes that favor chronic infection, while also dampening the pathogen‑induced innate immune response, thus compromising muscle function and promoting host tolerance to infection. In this study, murine whole-genome expression data have demonstrated that 2-AA affects the expression of genes involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis, thus producing an oxidative stress signature in skeletal muscle. The results of the present study demonstrated that the expression levels of genes involved in apoptosis signaling pathways were upregulated in the skeletal muscle of 2-AA-treated mice. To confirm the results of our transcriptome analysis, we used a novel high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS), proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method and observed increased levels of bisallylic methylene fatty acyl protons and vinyl protons, suggesting that 2-AA induces skeletal muscle cell apoptosis. This effect was corroborated by our results demonstrating the downregulation of mitochondrial membrane potential in vivo in response to 2-AA. The findings of the present study indicate that the bacterial infochemical, 2-AA, disrupts mitochondrial functions by inducing oxidative stress and apoptosis signaling and likely promotes skeletal muscle dysfunction, which may favor chronic/persistent infection.

  1. Total Antioxidant Capacity and Total Oxidant Status in Saliva of Periodontitis Patients in Relation to Bacterial Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Taowen; Andrukhov, Oleh; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Liu, Shutai; Liu, Zhonghao; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response.

  2. Total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status in saliva of periodontitis patients in relation to bacterial load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taowen eZhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC and total oxidant status (TOS in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response.

  3. Spatial distribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers in the littoral buffer zone of a nitrogen-rich lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhu, Guibing; Ye, Lei; Feng, Xiaojuan; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Yin, Chengqing

    2012-01-01

    The spatial distribution and diversity of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers (AOA and AOB) were evaluated targeting amoA genes in the gradient of a littoral buffer zone which has been identified as a hot spot for N cycling. Here we found high spatial heterogeneity in the nitrification rate and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in the five sampling sites. The bacterial amoA gene was numerically dominant in most of the surface soil but decreased dramatically in deep layers. Higher nitrification potentials were detected in two sites near the land/water interface at 4.4-6.1 microg NO(2-)-N/(g dry weight soil x hr), while only 1.0-1.7 microg NO(2-)-N/(g dry weight soil x hr) was measured at other sites. The potential nitrification rates were proportional to the amoA gene abundance for AOB, but with no significant correlation with AOA. The NH4+ concentration was the most determinative parameter for the abundance of AOB and potential nitrification rates in this study. Higher richness in the surface layer was found in the analysis of biodiversity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the bacterial amoA sequences in surface soil were affiliated with the genus of Nitrosopira while the archaeal sequences were almost equally affiliated with Candidatus 'Nitrososphaera gargensis' and Candidatus 'Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii'. The spatial distribution of AOA and AOB indicated that bacteria may play a more important role in nitrification in the littoral buffer zone of a N-rich lake.

  4. Direct Observation of an Oxepin from a Bacterial Cytochrome P450-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stok, Jeanette E; Chow, Sharon; Krenske, Elizabeth H; Farfan Soto, Clementina; Matyas, Csongor; Poirier, Raymond A; Williams, Craig M; De Voss, James J

    2016-03-18

    The cytochromes P450 are hemoproteins that catalyze a range of oxidative C-H functionalization reactions, including aliphatic and aromatic hydroxylation. These transformations are important in a range of biological contexts, including biosynthesis and xenobiotic biodegradation. Much work has been carried out on the mechanism of aliphatic hydroxylation, implicating hydrogen atom abstraction, but aromatic hydroxylation is postulated to proceed differently. One mechanism invokes as the key intermediate an arene oxide (and/or its oxepin tautomer). Conclusive isolation of this intermediate has remained elusive and, currently, direct formation of phenols from a Meisenheimer intermediate is believed to be favored. We report here the identification of a P450 [P450cam (CYP101A1) and P450cin (CYP176A1)]-generated arene oxide as a product of in vitro oxidation of tert-butylbenzene. Computations (CBS-QB3) predict that the arene oxide and oxepin have similar stabilities to other arene oxides/oxepins implicated (but not detected) in P450-mediated transformations, suggesting that arene oxides can be unstable terminal products of P450-catalyzed aromatic oxidation that can explain the origin of some observed metabolites.

  5. The influence of synthetic sheep urine on ammonia oxidizing bacterial communities in grassland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Shahid; Prosser, James I

    2006-06-01

    In grazed, grassland soils, sheep urine generates heterogeneity in ammonia concentrations, with potential impact on ammonia oxidizer community structure and soil N cycling. The influence of different levels of synthetic sheep urine on ammonia oxidizers was studied in grassland soil microcosms. 'Total' and active ammonia oxidizers were distinguished by comparing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles following PCR and RT-PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments, targeting DNA and RNA, respectively. The RNA-based approach indicated earlier, more reproducible and finer scale qualitative shifts in ammonia oxidizing communities than DNA-based analysis, but led to amplification of a small number of nonammonia oxidizer sequences. Qualitative changes in RNA-derived DGGE profiles were related to changes in nitrate accumulation. Sequence analysis of excised DGGE bands revealed that ammonia oxidizing communities in synthetic sheep urine-treated soils consisted mainly of Nitrosospira clusters 2, 3 and 4. Nitrosospira cluster 2 increased in relative abundance in microcosms treated with all levels of synthetic sheep urine. Low levels additionally led to increased relative abundance of Nitrosospira cluster 4 and medium and high levels increased relative abundance of cluster 3. Synthetic sheep urine is therefore likely to influence the spatial distribution and composition of ammonia oxidizer communities, with consequent effects on nitrate accumulation.

  6. Increased dietary zinc oxide changes the bacterial core and enterobacterial composition in the ileum of piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahjen, W; Pieper, R; Zentek, J

    2011-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of increased dietary ZnO on the bacterial core and enterobacterial composition in the small intestine of piglets that were fed diets containing a total of 124 or 3,042 mg of Zn per kilogram of diet, respectively. Zinc was supplemented to the basal diet as ZnO. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes of ileal DNA extracts were PCR-amplified with 2 bar-coded primer sets and sequenced by 454 pyrosequencing. The bacterial core species were calculated from the relative abundances of reads present in 5 of 6 samples per group and at a minimum of 5 sequences per sample. The reference database SILVA was used to assign sequence reads at an alignment minimum of 200 bases and 100% identity. Lactic acid bacteria dominated the bacterial core, but showed diverse responses to dietary ZnO. Of the dominant Lactobacillus spp., Lactobacillus reuteri was reduced due to increased dietary ZnO (44.7 vs. 17.9%; P=0.042), but L. amylovorus was not influenced. However, the changes of relative abundances of other lactic acid bacteria were more noteworthy; Weissella cibaria (10.7 vs. 23.0%; P=0.006), W. confusa (10.0 vs. 22.4%; P=0.037), Leuconostoc citreum (6.5 vs. 14.8%; P=0.009), Streptococcus equinus (0.14 vs. 1.0%; P=0.044), and S. lutetiensis (0.01 vs. 0.11%; P=0.016) increased in relative abundance. Nonlactic acid bacteria that were influenced by increased dietary ZnO included the strict anaerobic species, Sarcina ventriculi, which showed a strong numerical decrease in relative abundance (14.6 vs. 5.1%). Species of the Enterobacteriaceae increased their relative abundance, as well as species diversity, in the high dietary ZnO experimental group. Bacterial diversity indices were increased due to increased dietary ZnO (P < 0.05), which was traced back to the increase of sequences from subdominant species. Increased dietary ZnO led to an increase of less prominent species and, thus, had a major impact on the bacterial composition and diversity in

  7. Enriched iron(III-reducing bacterial communities are shaped by carbon substrate and iron oxide mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Lentini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe oxides exist in a spectrum of structures in the environment, with ferrihydrite widely considered the most bioavailable phase. Yet, ferrihydrite is unstable and rapidly transforms to more crystalline Fe(III oxides (e.g., goethite, hematite, which are poorly reduced by model dissimilatory Fe(III-reducing microorganisms. This begs the question, what processes and microbial groups are responsible for reduction of crystalline Fe(III oxides within sedimentary environments? Further, how do changes in Fe mineralogy shape oxide-hosted microbial populations? To address these questions, we conducted a large-scale cultivation effort using various Fe(III oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite and carbon substrates (glucose, lactate, acetate along a dilution gradient to enrich for microbial populations capable of reducing Fe oxides spanning a wide range of crystallinities and reduction potentials. While carbon source was the most important variable shaping community composition within Fe(III-reducing enrichments, both Fe oxide type and sediment dilution also had a substantial influence. For instance, with acetate as the carbon source, only ferrihydrite enrichments displayed a significant amount of Fe(III reduction and the well known dissimilatory metal reducer Geobacter sp. was the dominant organism enriched. In contrast, when glucose and lactate were provided, all three Fe oxides were reduced and reduction coincided with the presence of fermentative (e.g. Enterobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g. Desulfovibrio spp.. Thus, changes in Fe oxide structure and resource availability may shift Fe(III-reducing communities between dominantly metal-respiring to fermenting and/or sulfate-reducing organisms which are capable of reducing more recalcitrant Fe phases. These findings highlight the need for further targeted investigations into the composition and activity of speciation-directed metal-reducing populations within natural environments.

  8. Assessing the influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state on organic pollutant biodegradation in algal-bacterial photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Melanie; Stams, Alfons J M; De la Rosa, Francisco; García-Encina, Pedro A; Muñoz, Raul

    2011-05-01

    The influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state (CORS) of organic pollutants on their biodegradation in enclosed algal-bacterial photobioreactors was evaluated using a consortium of enriched wild-type methanotrophic bacteria and microalgae. Methane, methanol and glucose (with CORS -4, -2 and 0, respectively) were chosen as model organic pollutants. In the absence of external oxygen supply, microalgal photosynthesis was not capable of supporting a significant methane and methanol biodegradation due to their high oxygen demands per carbon unit, while glucose was fully oxidized by photosynthetic oxygenation. When bicarbonate was added, removal efficiencies of 37 ± 4% (20 days), 65 ± 4% (11 days) and 100% (2 days) were recorded for CH(4,) CH(3)OH and C(6)H(12)O(6), respectively due to the additional oxygen generated from photosynthetic bicarbonate assimilation. The use of NO(3)(-) instead of NH(4)(+) as nitrogen source (N oxidation-reduction state of +5 vs. -3) resulted in an increase in CH(4) degradation from 0 to 33 ± 3% in the absence of bicarbonate and from 37 ± 4% to 100% in the presence of bicarbonate, likely due to a decrease in the stoichiometric oxygen requirements and the higher photosynthetic oxygen production. Hypothetically, the CORS of the substrates might affect the CORS of the microalgal biomass composition (higher lipid content). However, the total lipid content of the algal-bacterial biomass was 19 ± 7% in the absence and 16 ± 2% in the presence of bicarbonate.

  9. Assessing the influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state on organic pollutant biodegradation in algal-bacterial photobioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, Melanie; Garcia-Encina, Pedro A.; Munoz, Raul [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Stams, Alfons J.M. [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands). Lab. of Microbiology; Rosa, Francisco de la [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2011-05-15

    The influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state (CORS) of organic pollutants on their biodegradation in enclosed algal-bacterial photobioreactors was evaluated using a consortium of enriched wild-type methanotrophic bacteria and microalgae. Methane, methanol and glucose (with CORS -4, -2 and 0, respectively) were chosen as model organic pollutants. In the absence of external oxygen supply, microalgal photosynthesis was not capable of supporting a significant methane and methanol biodegradation due to their high oxygen demands per carbon unit, while glucose was fully oxidized by photosynthetic oxygenation. When bicarbonate was added, removal efficiencies of 37 {+-} 4% (20 days), 65 {+-} 4% (11 days) and 100% (2 days) were recorded for CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 3}OH and C{sub 6}H{sub 12}O{sub 6}, respectively due to the additional oxygen generated from photosynthetic bicarbonate assimilation. The use of NO{sub 3}{sup -} instead of NH{sub 4}{sup +} as nitrogen source (N oxidation-reduction state of +5 vs. -3) resulted in an increase in CH4 degradation from 0 to 33 {+-} 3% in the absence of bicarbonate and from 37 {+-} 4% to 100% in the presence of bicarbonate, likely due to a decrease in the stoichiometric oxygen requirements and the higher photosynthetic oxygen production. Hypothetically, the CORS of the substrates might affect the CORS of the microalgal biomass composition (higher lipid content). However, the total lipid content of the algal-bacterial biomass was 19 {+-} 7% in the absence and 16 {+-} 2% in the presence of bicarbonate. (orig.)

  10. Cerebral blood flow, oxidative metabolism and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Thomsen, Gerda

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) in patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is unknown and controversial. The objective of this study was to measure global cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity (CO(2)R), and cerebral metabolic rates...... (CMR) of oxygen (O(2)), glucose (glu), and lactate (lac), in patients with ABM and compare the results to those obtained in healthy volunteers. METHODS: We studied 19 patients (17 of whom were sedated) with ABM and eight healthy volunteers (controls). CBF was measured during baseline ventilation...... to baseline ventilation, whereas CMR(glu) increased. CONCLUSION: In patients with acute bacterial meningitis, we found variable levels of CBF and cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity, a low a-v DO(2), low cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose, and a cerebral lactate efflux. In these patients...

  11. Sources of conductance changes during bacterial reduction of trimethylamine oxide to trimethylammonium in phosphate buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, J D; Miskin, D R; Wacher-Viveros, M C; Benge, L C

    1985-06-01

    The sources of conductance changes during reduction of trimethylamine oxide to trimethylamine by Escherichia coli with formate as electron donor and in the presence of phosphate buffer were investigated. Theoretical considerations and experimental results suggest that the major source of conductance change is the conversion of dihydrogen phosphate to hydrogen phosphate. This transformation contributes almost twice as much to the total conductance change as does the conversion of uncharged trimethylamine oxide to charged trimethylammonium.

  12. Bacterial community succession during the enrichment of chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizing bacteria at high arsenic concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nguyen Ai Le; Akiko Sato; Daisuke Inoue; Kazunari Sei; Satoshi Soda; Michihiko Ike

    2012-01-01

    To generate cost-effective technologies for the removal of arsenic from water,we developed an enrichment culture of chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizing bacteria (CAOs) that could effectively oxidize widely ranging concentrations of As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ).In addition,we attempted to elucidate the enrichment process and characterize the microbial composition of the enrichment culture.A CAOs enrichment culture capable of stably oxidizing As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ) was successfully constructed through repeated batch cultivation for more than 700 days,during which time the initial As(Ⅲ) concentrations were increased in a stepwise manner from l to 10-12 mmol/L.As(Ⅲ) oxidation activity of the enrichment culture gradually improved,and 10-12 mmol/L As(Ⅲ) was almost completely oxidized within four days.Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the dominant bacteria in the enrichment culture varied drastically during the enrichment process depending on the As(Ⅲ) concentration.Isolation and characterization of bacteria in the enrichment culture revealed that the presence of multiple CAOs with various As(Ⅲ) oxidation abilities enabled the culture to adapt to a wide range of As(Ⅲ) concentrations.The CAOs enrichment culture constructed here may he useful for pretreatment of water from which arsenic is being removed.

  13. The detection of genomic DNA from bacterial cells using iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by a hydrothermal process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Sung; Kim, Ki-Chul; Hong, Tae-Whan

    2010-04-01

    We used iron oxide nanoparticles in order to extract purified DNA from bacterial cells. Magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) are synthesized with FeSO4·7H2O via a hydrothermal process and used as a medium to detect DNA. Various characterizations were performed including X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. According to the XRD results, the XRD peaks of the synthesized magnetite and maghemite nanoparticles corresponded well with JCPDS standard data, respectively. The particle size of the iron oxide nanoparticles was about 20 nm, and the particle shape was almost spherical, which was confirmed by observation of the HRTEM image. The magnetite nanoparticles have a face-centeredcubic inverse spinel structure with a space group Fd bar 3 m, as confirmed by HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses. An agarose gel eletrophoresis analysis was performed to confirm the extraction ability of DNA using these iron oxide nanoparticles, revealing stronger reaction of the maghemite nanoparticles than the magnetite nanoparticles.

  14. Ex vivo-growth response of porcine small intestinal bacterial communities to pharmacological doses of dietary zinc oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Ingo C; Zentek, Jürgen; Vahjen, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Piglets were fed diets containing 57 (low) or 2425 (high) mg zinc from analytical grade zinc oxide (ZnO) ·kg(-1) feed. Digesta samples from the stomach and jejuna of 32, 39, 46 and 53 d old animals (n = 6 per group) were incubated in media containing 80, 40, 20 and 0 µg·mL(-1) soluble zinc from ZnO. Turbidity was recorded for 16 h and growth parameters were calculated. Additionally, DNA extracts of selected samples were analyzed via qPCR for different bacterial groups. Samples from animals fed the low dietary zinc concentration always showed highest rate of growth and lowest lag times in media without added zinc. However, media supplemented with zinc displayed highest growth rates and lowest lag time in the high dietary zinc group. Specific growth rates and lag time showed significant differences on day 32 and 39 of age, but rarely on days 46 and 53 of age. Bacterial growth in digesta samples from the high dietary zinc group was less influenced by zinc and recovered growth more rapidly than in the low dietary zinc group. Specific growth rates and bacterial cell numbers from qPCR results showed that lactobacilli were most susceptible to zinc, while bifidobacteria, enterobacteria and enterococci exhibited increased growth rates in samples of animals from the high dietary zinc treatment. No treatment related differences were observed for clostridial cluster IV and the Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas cluster. The diversity of enterobacteria after incubation was always higher in the high dietary zinc treatment or in medium supplemented with 80 µg·mL(-1) soluble ZnO. This study has shown that a pharmacological dosage of ZnO leads to a reduced ex vivo-bacterial growth rate of bacteria from the stomach and jejunum of weaned piglets. In view of the rapid bacterial adaptation to dietary zinc, the administration of ZnO in feeds for weaned piglets might only be beneficial in a short period after weaning.

  15. Ex vivo-growth response of porcine small intestinal bacterial communities to pharmacological doses of dietary zinc oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo C Starke

    Full Text Available Piglets were fed diets containing 57 (low or 2425 (high mg zinc from analytical grade zinc oxide (ZnO ·kg(-1 feed. Digesta samples from the stomach and jejuna of 32, 39, 46 and 53 d old animals (n = 6 per group were incubated in media containing 80, 40, 20 and 0 µg·mL(-1 soluble zinc from ZnO. Turbidity was recorded for 16 h and growth parameters were calculated. Additionally, DNA extracts of selected samples were analyzed via qPCR for different bacterial groups. Samples from animals fed the low dietary zinc concentration always showed highest rate of growth and lowest lag times in media without added zinc. However, media supplemented with zinc displayed highest growth rates and lowest lag time in the high dietary zinc group. Specific growth rates and lag time showed significant differences on day 32 and 39 of age, but rarely on days 46 and 53 of age. Bacterial growth in digesta samples from the high dietary zinc group was less influenced by zinc and recovered growth more rapidly than in the low dietary zinc group. Specific growth rates and bacterial cell numbers from qPCR results showed that lactobacilli were most susceptible to zinc, while bifidobacteria, enterobacteria and enterococci exhibited increased growth rates in samples of animals from the high dietary zinc treatment. No treatment related differences were observed for clostridial cluster IV and the Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas cluster. The diversity of enterobacteria after incubation was always higher in the high dietary zinc treatment or in medium supplemented with 80 µg·mL(-1 soluble ZnO. This study has shown that a pharmacological dosage of ZnO leads to a reduced ex vivo-bacterial growth rate of bacteria from the stomach and jejunum of weaned piglets. In view of the rapid bacterial adaptation to dietary zinc, the administration of ZnO in feeds for weaned piglets might only be beneficial in a short period after weaning.

  16. Bacterial and iron oxide aggregates mediate secondary iron mineral formation: green rust versus magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, A; Mustin, C; Jorand, F

    2010-06-01

    In the presence of methanoate as electron donor, Shewanella putrefaciens, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe, is able to transform lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) to secondary Fe (II-III) minerals such as carbonated green rust (GR1) and magnetite. When bacterial cells were added to a gamma-FeOOH suspension, aggregates were produced consisting of both bacteria and gamma-FeOOH particles. Recently, we showed that the production of secondary minerals (GR1 vs. magnetite) was dependent on bacterial cell density and not only on iron reduction rates. Thus, gamma-FeOOH and S. putrefaciens aggregation pattern was suggested as the main mechanism driving mineralization. In this study, lepidocrocite bioreduction experiments, in the presence of anthraquinone disulfonate, were conducted by varying the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio in order to determine whether different types of aggregate are formed, which may facilitate precipitation of GR1 as opposed to magnetite. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the relative cell surface area and lepidocrocite concentration within the aggregates and captured images were characterized by statistical methods for spatial data (i.e. variograms). These results suggest that the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio influenced both the aggregate structure and the nature of the secondary iron mineral formed. Subsequently, a [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio above 1 x 10(7) cells mmol(-1) leads to densely packed aggregates and to the formation of GR1. Below this ratio, looser aggregates are formed and magnetite was systematically produced. The data presented in this study bring us closer to a more comprehensive understanding of the parameters governing the formation of minerals in dense bacterial suspensions and suggest that screening mineral-bacteria aggregate structure is critical to understanding (bio)mineralization pathways.

  17. Regeneration of nitric oxide chelate absorption solution by two heterotrophic bacterial strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荆国华; 李伟; 施耀; 马碧瑶; 谭天恩

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous chelate absorption is deemed a promising method for NO removal from flue gas, but the key problem is the difficulty to regenerate the absorption solution, i.e. the complexes of FeⅡ(EDTA)NO and FeⅢ(EDTA) in the solution. Two bacterial strains isolated recently from the sludge of the denitrification step of a municipal wastewater treatment plant could be applied effectively to regenerate the absorbent were Pseudomonas sp. and klebsiella trevisan sp. Pseudomonas sp. exhibited high reduction ability on FeⅡ(EDTA)NO and the klebsiella trevisan sp. was more suitable for FeⅢ(EDTA) reduction.

  18. Science Letters:Regeneration of nitric oxide chelate absorption solution by two heterotrophic bacterial strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荆国华; 李伟; 施耀; 马碧瑶; 谭天恩

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous chelate absorption is deemed a promising method for NO removal from flue gas, but the key problem is the difficulty to regenerate the absorption solution, i.e. the complexes of FeⅡ(EDTA)NO and FeⅢ(EDTA) in the solution.Two bacterial strains isolated recently from the sludge of the denitrification step of a municipal wastewater treatment plant could be applied effectively to regenerate the absorbent were Pseudomonas sp. and klebsiella trevisan sp. Pseudomonas sp.exhibited high reduction ability on FeⅡ(EDTA)NO and the klebsiella trevisan sp. was more suitable for FenⅢ(EDTA) reduction.

  19. Bacterial Electrocatalysis of K4[Fe(CN)6] Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zhiyong; Xiao, Yong; Wu, Ranran

    in the electron transport (ET) processes. However, the oxidization of metal compounds was barely described. Here we report electrocatalysis of K4[Fe(CN)6] oxidation by MR-1. K4[Fe(CN)6] is a redox inorganic compound and shows a reversible redox process on bare glassy carbon (GCE). This is reflected by a pair...... of the electrocatalysis. Moreover, Selectivity of MR-1 is another interesting issue: MR-1 does not catalyze other redox compounds such as Ru[(NH3)6]Cl3 and Resorufin. In our recent work, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) showed redox properties and electron hopping through EPS. Here we notice that neither...

  20. Oxidative stability and sensory quality of meat from broiler chickens fed a bacterial meal produced on natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øverland, M; Borge, G I; Vogt, G; Schøyen, H F; Skrede, A

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial meal (BPM) produced from bacteria grown on natural gas is a feed source containing approximately 70% CP and 10% lipids with predominantly C16:0 and C16:1 fatty acids. The effect of increasing dietary levels (0, 40, 80, or 120 g/kg) of BPM on fatty acid composition, the profile of volatiles by dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and sensory quality of frozen-stored broiler chicken thigh meat was examined. Increasing levels of BPM increased (linear, P Dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was a more sensitive method in detecting early lipid oxidation compared with TBA reactive substances and sensory quality analyses in broiler thigh meat.

  1. Disinfection of titanium dioxide nanotubes using super-oxidized water decrease bacterial viability without disrupting osteoblast behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Partida, Ernesto; Valdez-Salas, Benjamín; Escamilla, Alan; Curiel, Mario; Valdez-Salas, Ernesto; Nedev, Nicola; Bastidas, Jose M

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs) on Ti6Al4V alloy were synthesized by anodization using a commercially available super-oxidized water (SOW). The NT surfaces were sterilized by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and disinfected using SOW. The adhesion and cellular morphology of pig periosteal osteoblast (PPO) cells and the behavior of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) cultured on the sterilized and disinfected surfaces were investigated. A non-anodized Ti6Al4V disc sterilized by UV irradiation (without SOW) was used as control. The results of this study reveal that the adhesion, morphology and filopodia development of PPO cells in NTs are dramatically improved, suggesting that SOW cleaning may not disrupt the benefits obtained by NTs. Significantly decreased bacterial viability in NTs after cleaning with SOW and comparing with non-cleaned NTs was seen. The results suggest that UV and SOW could be a recommendable method for implant sterilization and disinfection without altering osteoblast behavior while decreasing bacterial viability.

  2. Spatial patterns of iron- and methane-oxidizing bacterial communities in an irregularly flooded, riparian wetland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Krause, S.; Muyzer, G.; Meima-Franke, M.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Bodelier, P.L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Iron- and methane-cycling are important processes in wetlands with one connected to plant growth and the other to greenhouse gas emission, respectively. In contrast to acidic habitats, there is scarce information on the ecology of microbes oxidizing ferrous iron at circumneutral pH. The latter is

  3. Determination of the bacterial processes which are sources of nitrous oxide production in marine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Patricia; Tamburini, Christian; Michotey, Valerie

    2002-02-01

    Partial denitrification and the initial step of nitrification are the main biological processes which produce nitrous oxide. In order to determine the contribution that these processes have in nitrous oxide production, the efficiency of different inhibitors on nitrifying activity has been tested, and the effect on denitrifying activity has been investigated, using culture strains and natural marine samples. A good nitrification inhibitor should not affect denitrification. A low partial pressure of C2H2 provided the best conditions, inhibiting 75%, Nitrosococcus oceanus (culture sample) and 100% (natural sample) of the nitrifying activity and having only a small inhibitory effect (12%) on denitrifying activity. These conditions have been applied on samples from the dilution plume of the Rhĵne River, an area characterized as a source of nitrous oxide. Using these inhibitors, it has been shown that in this area, incomplete denitrification is the main process producing nitrous oxide in the surface layers at the mouth of the river and in the bottom nepheloid layer, whereas in the marine surface layer the dominant process is nitrification.

  4. Bacterial nanometric amorphous Fe-based oxide: a potential lithium-ion battery anode material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Kobayashi, Genki; Sakuma, Ryo; Fujii, Tatsuo; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kanno, Ryoji; Takano, Mikio; Takada, Jun

    2014-04-23

    Amorphous Fe(3+)-based oxide nanoparticles produced by Leptothrix ochracea, aquatic bacteria living worldwide, show a potential as an Fe(3+)/Fe(0) conversion anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The presence of minor components, Si and P, in the original nanoparticles leads to a specific electrode architecture with Fe-based electrochemical centers embedded in a Si, P-based amorphous matrix.

  5. An Oxidoreductase AioE is Responsible for Bacterial Arsenite Oxidation and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Han, Yushan; Shi, Kaixiang; Fan, Xia; Wang, Lu; Li, Mingshun; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we found that arsenite (AsIII) oxidation could improve the generation of ATP/NADH to support the growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4. In this study, we found that aioE is induced by AsIII and located in the arsenic island near the AsIII oxidase genes aioBA and co-transcripted with the arsenic resistant genes arsR1-arsC1-arsC2-acr3-1. AioE belongs to TrkA family corresponding the electron transport function with the generation of NADH and H+. An aioE in-frame deletion strain showed a null AsIII oxidation and a reduced AsIII resistance, while a cytC mutant only reduced AsIII oxidation efficiency. With AsIII, aioE was directly related to the increase of NADH, while cytC was essential for ATP generation. In addition, cyclic voltammetry analysis showed that the redox potential (ORP) of AioBA and AioE were +0.297 mV vs. NHE and +0.255 mV vs. NHE, respectively. The ORP gradient is AioBA > AioE > CytC (+0.217 ~ +0.251 mV vs. NHE), which infers that electron may transfer from AioBA to CytC via AioE. The results indicate that AioE may act as a novel AsIII oxidation electron transporter associated with NADH generation. Since AsIII oxidation contributes AsIII detoxification, the essential of AioE for AsIII resistance is also reasonable. PMID:28128323

  6. Dose-dependent effects of dietary zinc oxide on bacterial communities and metabolic profiles in the ileum of weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, R; Vahjen, W; Neumann, K; Van Kessel, A G; Zentek, J

    2012-10-01

    Pharmacological levels of zinc oxide (ZnO) can improve the health of weaning piglets and influence the intestinal microbiota. This experiment aimed at studying the dose-response effect of five dietary concentrations of ZnO on small intestinal bacteria and metabolite profiles. Fifteen piglets, weaned at 25 ± 1 days of age, were allocated into five groups according to body weight and litter. Diets were formulated to contain 50 (basal diet), 150, 250, 1000 and 2500 mg zinc/kg by adding analytical-grade (>98% purity) ZnO to the basal diet and fed ad libitum for 14 days after a 7-day adaptation period on the basal diet. Ileal bacterial community profiles were analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and selected bacterial groups quantified by real-time PCR. Concentrations of ileal volatile fatty acids (VFA), D- and L-lactate and ammonia were determined. Species richness, Shannon diversity and evenness were significantly higher at high ZnO levels. Quantitative PCR revealed lowest total bacterial counts in the 50 mg/kg group. Increasing ZnO levels led to an increase (p = 0.017) in enterobacteria from log 4.0 cfu/g digesta (50 mg/kg) to log 6.7 cfu/g digesta (2500 mg/kg). Lactic acid bacteria were not influenced (p = 0.687) and clostridial cluster XIVa declined (p = 0.035) at highest ZnO level. Concentration of total, D- and L-lactate and propionate was not affected (p = 0.736, p = 0.290 and p = 0.630), but concentrations of ileal total VFA, acetate and butyrate increased markedly from 50 to 150 mg/kg and decreased with further increasing zinc levels and reached low levels again at 2500 mg/kg (p = 0.048, p = 0.048 and p = 0.097). Ammonia decreased (p < 0.006) with increasing dietary ZnO level. In conclusion, increasing levels of dietary ZnO had strong and dose-dependent effects on ileal bacterial community composition and activity, suggesting taxonomic variation in metabolic response to ZnO.

  7. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Sensor Inositol-Requiring Enzyme 1α Augments Bacterial Killing through Sustained Oxidant Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuaita, Basel H; Burkholder, Kristin M; Boles, Blaise R; O'Riordan, Mary X

    2015-07-14

    Bacterial infection can trigger cellular stress programs, such as the unfolded protein response (UPR), which occurs when misfolded proteins accumulate within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here, we used the human pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as an infection model to probe how ER stress promotes antimicrobial function. MRSA infection activated the most highly conserved unfolded protein response sensor, inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), which was necessary for robust bacterial killing in vitro and in vivo. The macrophage IRE1-dependent bactericidal activity required reactive oxygen species (ROS). Viable MRSA cells excluded ROS from the nascent phagosome and strongly triggered IRE1 activation, leading to sustained generation of ROS that were largely Nox2 independent. In contrast, dead MRSA showed early colocalization with ROS but was a poor activator of IRE1 and did not trigger sustained ROS generation. The global ROS stimulated by IRE1 signaling was necessary, but not sufficient, for MRSA killing, which also required the ER resident SNARE Sec22B for accumulation of ROS in the phagosomal compartment. Taken together, these results suggest that IRE1-mediated persistent ROS generation might act as a fail-safe mechanism to kill bacterial pathogens that evade the initial macrophage oxidative burst. Cellular stress programs have been implicated as important components of the innate immune response to infection. The role of the IRE1 pathway of the ER stress response in immune secretory functions, such as antibody production, is well established, but its contribution to innate immunity is less well defined. Here, we show that infection of macrophages with viable MRSA induces IRE1 activation, leading to bacterial killing. IRE1-dependent bactericidal activity required generation of reactive oxygen species in a sustained manner over hours of infection. The SNARE protein Sec22B, which was previously demonstrated to control ER

  8. Enhanced specificity of bacterial spore identification by oxidation and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirev, Plamen A

    2004-01-01

    Addition of an oxidizing agent (e.g., hydrogen peroxide) to intact spores selectively and completely oxidizes Met-containing biomarker proteins by formation of Met sulfoxides. This reaction increases the masses of the biomarker proteins observed in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) of Bacillus spores by Deltam = (16 x n) Da, where n is the number of Met residues in the sequence of each individual protein. The procedure is very rapid, and can be performed in situ (i.e., on the MALDI target). It confirms the identity of individual biomarkers by comparing the number of Met amino acids from the experimentally determined mass shifts with predictions for n from the tentative amino acid sequence for each protein. In turn, accurate determination of n for several biomarkers allows rapid validation of the initial spore identification by MALDI-MS.

  9. Some bacterial parameters influencing the neutrophil oxidative burst response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Høiby, N;

    1992-01-01

    or biofilms is an important protective mechanism of the microorganisms. We examined the human PMN oxidative burst response to P. aeruginosa in biofilm and in planktonic form. The PMN chemiluminescence response to P. aeruginosa in biofilms was reduced to 30.5-47.5% (p less than 0.04) and the superoxide...... conclude that biofilm bacteria, although able to stimulate the PMN, result in a reduced, suboptimal response leading to lack of efficient eradication of the bacteria in the chronic infection....

  10. Effects of nitric oxide on resistance to bacterial infection in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, E. (INSERM, Paris, France); Bouley, G.; Blayo, M.C.

    1981-06-01

    Continuous exposure to 2 ppM nitric oxide (NO) for as long as 4 wk did not reduce the resistance of male mice to infection by aerosol inoculation with Pasteurella multocida. In contrast, mortality was slightly enhanced and survival shortened in NO-exposed compared to control female mice; however, the importance of these small differences is uncertain. These results suggest only that male and famale mice did not react similarly to the infectious challenge after exposure to NO.

  11. Sulfur-oxidizing bacterial populations within cyanobacterial dominated coral disease lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, David G; van der Zee, Marc J J; Botté, Emmanuelle S; Sato, Yui

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the diversity and quantitative shifts of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) during the onset of black band disease (BBD) in corals using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and cloning approaches targeting the soxB gene, involved in sulfur oxidation. Four Montipora sp. coral colonies identified with lesions previously termed cyanobacterial patches (CP) (comprising microbial communities different from those of BBD lesions), was monitored in situ as CP developed into BBD. The overall abundance of SOB in both CP and BBD lesions were very low and near the detection limit of the qPCR assay, although consistently indicated that SOB populations decreased as the lesions transitioned from CP to BBD. Phylogenetic assessment of retrieved soxB genes showed that SOB in both CP and BBD lesions were dominated by one sequence type, representing > 70% of all soxB gene sequences and affiliated with members of the Rhodobacteraceae within the α-Proteobacteria. This study represents the first assessment targeting SOB within BBD lesions and clearly shows that SOB are not highly diverse or abundant in this complex microbial mat. The lack of oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds by SOB likely aids the accumulation of high levels of sulfide at the base of the BBD mat, a compound contributing to the pathogenicity of BBD lesions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Long-term straw returning affects Nitrospira-like nitrite oxidizing bacterial community in a rapeseed-rice rotation soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xuesong; Han, Shun; Lai, Songsong; Huang, Qiaoyun; Chen, Wenli

    2016-11-25

    Nitrospira are the most widespread and well known nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and putatively key nitrite-oxidizers in acidic ecosystems. Nevertheless, their ecology in agriculture soils has not been well studied. To understand the impact of straw incorporation on soil Nitrospira-like bacterial community, a cloned library analysis of the nitrite oxidoreductase gene-nxrB was performed for a long-term rapeseed-rice rotation system. In this study, most members of the Nitrospira-like NOB in the paddy soils from the Wuxue field experiment station were phylogenetically related with Nitrospira lineages II. The Shannon diversity index possessed a decrease trend in the straw applied soils. The relative abundances of 16 OTUs (accounting 72% of the total OTUs, including 11 unique OTUs and 5 shared OTUs) were different between in the straw applied and control soils. These data suggested a selection effect from the long-term straw fertilization. Canonical correspondence analysis data showed that a centralized group of Nitrospira-like NOB OTUs in the community was partly explained by the soil ammonium, nitrate, available phosphorus, and the available potassium. This could suggest that straw fertilization led to the soil Nitrospira-like NOB community shift, which was correlated with the change of available nutrients in the bulk soil.

  13. Decolourisation of Acid Orange 7 recalcitrant auto-oxidation coloured by-products using an acclimatised mixed bacterial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Hui Han; Lim, Chi Kim; Kee, Thuan Chien; Ware, Ismail; Chan, Giek Far; Shahir, Shafinaz; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2014-03-01

    This study focuses on the biodegradation of recalcitrant, coloured compounds resulting from auto-oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) in a sequential facultative anaerobic-aerobic treatment system. A novel mixed bacterial culture, BAC-ZS, consisting of Brevibacillus panacihumi strain ZB1, Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain ZB2, and Enterococcus faecalis strain ZL bacteria were isolated from environmental samples. The acclimatisation of the mixed culture was carried out in an AO7 decolourised solution. The acclimatised mixed culture showed 98 % decolourisation within 2 h of facultative anaerobic treatment using yeast extract and glucose as co-substrate. Subsequent aerobic post treatment caused auto-oxidation reaction forming dark coloured compounds that reduced the percentage decolourisation to 73 %. Interestingly, further agitations of the mixed culture in the solution over a period of 48 h significantly decolourise the coloured compounds and increased the decolourisation percentage to 90 %. Analyses of the degradation compounds using UV-visible spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed complete degradation of recalcitrant AO7 by the novel BAC-ZS. Phytotoxicity tests using Cucumis sativus confirmed the dye solution after post aerobic treatment were less toxic compared to the parent dye. The quantitative real-time PCR revealed that E. faecalis strain ZL was the dominant strain in the acclimatised mix culture.

  14. Human settlement as driver of bacterial, but not of archaeal, ammonia oxidizers abundance and community structure in tropical stream sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana De Paula Reis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB are a diverse and functionally important group in the nitrogen cycle. Nevertheless, AOA and AOB communities driving this process remain uncharacterized in tropical freshwater sediment. Here, the effect of human settlement on the AOA and AOB diversity and abundance have been assessed by phylogenetic and quantitative PCR analyses, using archaeal and bacterial amoA and 16S rRNA genes. Overall, each environment contained specific clades of amoA and 16S rRNA genes sequences, suggesting that selective pressures lead to AOA and AOB inhabiting distinct ecological niches. Human settlement activities, as derived from increased metal and mineral nitrogen contents, appear to cause a response among the AOB community, with Nitrosomonas taking advantage over Nitrosospira in impacted environments. We also observed a dominance of AOB over AOA in mining-impacted sediments, suggesting that AOB might be the primary drivers of ammonia oxidation in these sediments. In addition, ammonia concentrations demonstrated to be the driver for the abundance of AOA, with an inversely proportional correlation between them. Our findings also revealed the presence of novel ecotypes of Thaumarchaeota, such as those related to the obligate acidophilic Nitrosotalea devanaterra at ammonia-rich places of circumneutral pH. These data add significant new information regarding AOA and AOB from tropical freshwater sediments, albeit future studies would be required to provide additional insights into the niche differentiation among these microorganisms.

  15. Photocurrent Generation by Photosynthetic Purple Bacterial Reaction Centers Interfaced with a Porous Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide (ATO) Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Zhang, HaoJie; Mieritz, Daniel; Volosin, Alex; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Yan, Hao; Seo, Dong-Kyun; Lin, Su; Woodbury, Neal W

    2016-09-28

    The ability to exchange energy and information between biological and electronic materials is critical in the development of hybrid electronic systems in biomedicine, environmental sensing, and energy applications. While sensor technology has been extensively developed to collect detailed molecular information, less work has been done on systems that can specifically modulate the chemistry of the environment with temporal and spatial control. The bacterial photosynthetic reaction center represents an ideal photonic component of such a system in that it is capable of modifying local chemistry via light-driven redox reactions with quantitative control over reaction rates and has inherent spectroscopic probes for monitoring function. Here a well-characterized model system is presented, consisting of a transparent, porous electrode (antimony-doped tin oxide) which is electrochemically coupled to the reaction center via a cytochrome c molecule. Upon illumination, the reaction center performs the 2-step, 2-electron reduction of a ubiquinone derivative which exchanges with oxidized quinone in solution. Electrons from the electrode then move through the cytochrome to reoxidize the reaction center electron donor. The result is a facile platform for performing redox chemistry that can be optically and electronically controlled in time and space.

  16. Influence of heme-thiolate in shaping the catalytic properties of a bacterial nitric-oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Luciana; Somasundaram, Ramasamy; Tejero, Jesús; Wilson, Adjele; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2011-11-11

    Nitric-oxide synthases (NOS) are heme-thiolate enzymes that generate nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine. Mammalian and bacterial NOSs contain a conserved tryptophan (Trp) that hydrogen bonds with the heme-thiolate ligand. We mutated Trp(66) to His and Phe (W66H, W66F) in B. subtilis NOS to investigate how heme-thiolate electronic properties control enzyme catalysis. The mutations had opposite effects on heme midpoint potential (-302, -361, and -427 mV for W66H, wild-type (WT), and W66F, respectively). These changes were associated with rank order (W66H < WT < W66F) changes in the rates of oxygen activation and product formation in Arg hydroxylation and N-hydroxyarginine (NOHA) oxidation single turnover reactions, and in the O(2) reactivity of the ferrous heme-NO product complex. However, enzyme ferrous heme-O(2) autoxidation showed an opposite rank order. Tetrahydrofolate supported NO synthesis by WT and the mutant NOS. All three proteins showed similar extents of product formation (L-Arg → NOHA or NOHA → citrulline) in single turnover studies, but the W66F mutant showed a 2.5 times lower activity when the reactions were supported by flavoproteins and NADPH. We conclude that Trp(66) controls several catalytic parameters by tuning the electron density of the heme-thiolate bond. A greater electron density (as in W66F) improves oxygen activation and reactivity toward substrate, but decreases heme-dioxy stability and lowers the driving force for heme reduction. In the WT enzyme the Trp(66) residue balances these opposing effects for optimal catalysis.

  17. Bacterial domination over Archaea in ammonia oxidation in a monsoon-driven tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vipindas, P.V.; Anas, A.; Jasmin, C.; Lallu, K.R.; Fausia, K.H.; Balachandran, K.K.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Nair, S.

    % polyacrylamide denaturing gradient gel prepared with 35 – 50 % (for AOB) and 30 – 55 % (for AOA) formamide for 17.5 h at 75 V. The bands separated were stained with SYBR green and observed in a gel documentation system (BioRAD, USA). The bands were picked.... This work was done using MMRF facility and is duly acknowledged. This is NIO contribution No: xxxx Reference 1. Mulder A, Van de Graaf AA, Robertson LA, Kuenen J (1995) Anaerobic ammonium oxidation discovered in a denitrifying fluidized bed reactor...

  18. The Staphylococcus aureus ABC-Type Manganese Transporter MntABC Is Critical for Reinitiation of Bacterial Replication Following Exposure to Phagocytic Oxidative Burst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Coady

    Full Text Available Manganese plays a central role in cellular detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Therefore, manganese acquisition is considered to be important for bacterial pathogenesis by counteracting the oxidative burst of phagocytic cells during host infection. However, detailed analysis of the interplay between bacterial manganese acquisition and phagocytic cells and its impact on bacterial pathogenesis has remained elusive for Staphylococcus aureus, a major human pathogen. Here, we show that a mntC mutant, which lacks the functional manganese transporter MntABC, was more sensitive to killing by human neutrophils but not murine macrophages, unless the mntC mutant was pre-exposed to oxidative stress. Notably, the mntC mutant formed strikingly small colonies when recovered from both type of phagocytic cells. We show that this phenotype is a direct consequence of the inability of the mntC mutant to reinitiate growth after exposure to phagocytic oxidative burst. Transcript and quantitative proteomics analyses revealed that the manganese-dependent ribonucleotide reductase complex NrdEF, which is essential for DNA synthesis and repair, was highly induced in the mntC mutant under oxidative stress conditions including after phagocytosis. Since NrdEF proteins are essential for S. aureus viability we hypothesize that cells lacking MntABC might attempt to compensate for the impaired function of NrdEF by increasing their expression. Our data suggest that besides ROS detoxification, functional manganese acquisition is likely crucial for S. aureus pathogenesis by repairing oxidative damages, thereby ensuring efficient bacterial growth after phagocytic oxidative burst, which is an attribute critical for disseminating and establishing infection in the host.

  19. The Staphylococcus aureus ABC-Type Manganese Transporter MntABC Is Critical for Reinitiation of Bacterial Replication Following Exposure to Phagocytic Oxidative Burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Alison; Xu, Min; Phung, Qui; Cheung, Tommy K; Bakalarski, Corey; Alexander, Mary Kate; Lehar, Sophie M; Kim, Janice; Park, Summer; Tan, Man-Wah; Nishiyama, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Manganese plays a central role in cellular detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, manganese acquisition is considered to be important for bacterial pathogenesis by counteracting the oxidative burst of phagocytic cells during host infection. However, detailed analysis of the interplay between bacterial manganese acquisition and phagocytic cells and its impact on bacterial pathogenesis has remained elusive for Staphylococcus aureus, a major human pathogen. Here, we show that a mntC mutant, which lacks the functional manganese transporter MntABC, was more sensitive to killing by human neutrophils but not murine macrophages, unless the mntC mutant was pre-exposed to oxidative stress. Notably, the mntC mutant formed strikingly small colonies when recovered from both type of phagocytic cells. We show that this phenotype is a direct consequence of the inability of the mntC mutant to reinitiate growth after exposure to phagocytic oxidative burst. Transcript and quantitative proteomics analyses revealed that the manganese-dependent ribonucleotide reductase complex NrdEF, which is essential for DNA synthesis and repair, was highly induced in the mntC mutant under oxidative stress conditions including after phagocytosis. Since NrdEF proteins are essential for S. aureus viability we hypothesize that cells lacking MntABC might attempt to compensate for the impaired function of NrdEF by increasing their expression. Our data suggest that besides ROS detoxification, functional manganese acquisition is likely crucial for S. aureus pathogenesis by repairing oxidative damages, thereby ensuring efficient bacterial growth after phagocytic oxidative burst, which is an attribute critical for disseminating and establishing infection in the host.

  20. Both plant and bacterial nitrate reductases contribute to nitric oxide production in Medicago truncatula nitrogen-fixing nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horchani, Faouzi; Prévot, Marianne; Boscari, Alexandre; Evangelisti, Edouard; Meilhoc, Eliane; Bruand, Claude; Raymond, Philippe; Boncompagni, Eric; Aschi-Smiti, Samira; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling and defense molecule of major importance in living organisms. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, NO production has been detected in the nitrogen fixation zone of the nodule, but the systems responsible for its synthesis are yet unknown and its role in symbiosis is far from being elucidated. In this work, using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we explored the enzymatic source of NO production in M. truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti nodules under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. When transferred from normoxia to hypoxia, nodule NO production was rapidly increased, indicating that NO production capacity is present in functioning nodules and may be promptly up-regulated in response to decreased oxygen availability. Contrary to roots and leaves, nodule NO production was stimulated by nitrate and nitrite and inhibited by tungstate, a nitrate reductase inhibitor. Nodules obtained with either plant nitrate reductase RNA interference double knockdown (MtNR1/2) or bacterial nitrate reductase-deficient (napA) and nitrite reductase-deficient (nirK) mutants, or both, exhibited reduced nitrate or nitrite reductase activities and NO production levels. Moreover, NO production in nodules was found to be inhibited by electron transfer chain inhibitors, and nodule energy state (ATP-ADP ratio) was significantly reduced when nodules were incubated in the presence of tungstate. Our data indicate that both plant and bacterial nitrate reductase and electron transfer chains are involved in NO synthesis. We propose the existence of a nitrate-NO respiration process in nodules that could play a role in the maintenance of the energy status required for nitrogen fixation under oxygen-limiting conditions.

  1. Adsorption to metal oxides of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyoverdine and implications for bacterial biofilm formation on metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upritchard, Hamish G; Yang, Jing; Bremer, Philip J; Lamont, Iain L; McQuillan, A James

    2007-06-19

    The initiation of biofilm formation is poorly understood, and in particular, the contribution of chemical bond formation between bacterial cells and metal surfaces has received little attention. We have previously used in situ infrared spectroscopy to show, during the initial stages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, the formation of coordinate covalent bonds between titanium dioxide particle films and pyoverdine, a mixed catecholate and hydroxamate siderophore. Here we show using infrared spectroscopy that pyoverdine can also form covalent bonds with particle films of Fe2O3, CrOOH, and AlOOH. Adsorption to the metal oxides through the catechol-like 2,3-diamino-6,7-dihydroxyquinoline part of pyoverdine was most evident in the infrared spectrum of the adsorbed pyoverdine molecule. Weaker infrared absorption bands that are consistent with the hydroxamic acids of pyoverdine binding covalently to TiO2, Fe2O3, and AlOOH surfaces were also observed. The adsorption of pyoverdine to TiO2 and Fe2O3 surfaces showed a pH dependence that is indicative of the dominance of the catechol-like ligand of pyoverdine. Infrared absorption bands were also evident for pyoverdine associated with the cells of P. aeruginosa on TiO2 and Fe2O3 surfaces and were notably absent for genetically modified cells unable to synthesize or bind pyoverdine at the cell surface. These studies confirm the generality of pyoverdine-metal bond formation and suggest a wider involvement of siderophores in bacterial biofilm initiation on metals.

  2. Removal and recovery of toxic silver ion using deep-sea bacterial generated biogenic manganese oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yuanjun; Chen, Xiao; Xiong, Dandan; Liao, Shuijiao; Wang, Gejiao

    2013-01-01

    Products containing silver ion (Ag(+)) are widely used, leading to a large amount of Ag(+)-containing waste. The deep-sea manganese-oxidizing bacterium Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9 efficiently oxidizes Mn(2+) to generate biogenic Mn oxide (BMO). The potential of BMO for recovering metal ions by adsorption has been investigated for some ions but not for Ag(+). The main aim of this study was to develop effective methods for adsorbing and recovering Ag using BMO produced by Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9. In addition, the adsorption mechanism was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, specific surface area analysis, adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics. The results showed that BMO had a higher adsorption capacity for Ag(+) compared to the chemical synthesized MnO2 (CMO). The isothermal absorption curves of BMO and CMO both fit the Langmuir model well and the maximum adsorption capacities at 28°C were 8.097 mmol/g and 0.787 mmol/g, for BMO and CMO, respectively. The change in enthalpy (ΔH(θ)) for BMO was 59.69 kJ/mol indicating that it acts primarily by chemical adsorption. The change in free energy (ΔG(θ)) for BMO was negative, which suggests that the adsorption occurs spontaneously. Ag(+) adsorption by BMO was driven by entropy based on the positive ΔS(θ) values. The Ag(+) adsorption kinetics by BMO fit the pseudo-second order model and the apparent activation energy of Ea is 21.72 kJ/mol. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 15.29% Ag(+) adsorbed by BMO was transferred to Ag(0) and meant that redox reaction had happened during the adsorption. Desorption using nitric acid and Na2S completely recovered the Ag. The results show that BMO produced by strain MnI7-9 has potential for bioremediation and reutilization of Ag(+)-containing waste.

  3. Effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibition on glutamine action in a bacterial translocation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rosana G C; Quirino, Iara E P; Viana, Mirelle L; Generoso, Simone V; Nicoli, Jacques R; Martins, Flaviano S; Nogueira-Machado, José A; Arantes, Rosa M E; Correia, Maria I T D; Cardoso, Valbert N

    2014-01-14

    Glutamine may be a precursor for NO synthesis, which may play a crucial role in bacterial translocation (BT). The goal of the present study was to investigate the potential effects of glutamine on BT and the immunological response in an experimental model of NO synthase inhibition by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). Mice were randomly assigned to four groups: sham; intestinal obstruction (IO); IO+500 mg/kg per d glutamine (GLN); IO+GLN plus 10 mg/kg per d l-NAME (GLN/LN). The groups were pretreated for 7 d. BT was induced by ileal ligation and was assessed 18 h later by measuring the radioactivity of 99mTc-Escherichia coli in the blood and organs. Mucosal damage was determined using a histological analysis. Intestinal permeability (IP) was assessed by measuring the levels of 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid in the blood at 4, 8 and 18 h after surgery. IgA and cytokine concentrations were determined by ELISA in the intestinal fluid and plasma, respectively. BT was increased in the GLN/LN and IO groups than in the GLN and sham groups. IP and intestinal mucosa structure of the sham, GLN and GLN/LN groups were similar. The GLN group had the highest levels of interferon-γ, while IL-10 and secretory IgA levels were higher than those of the IO group but similar to those of the GLN/LN group. The present results suggest that effects of the glutamine pathway on BT were mediated by NO. The latter also interferes with the pro-inflammatory systemic immunological response. On the other hand, IP integrity preserved by the use of glutamine is independent of NO.

  4. Bacterial exposure to metal-oxide nanoparticles: Methods, physical interactions, and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Allison Marie

    Nanotechnology is a major endeavor of this century, with proposed applications in fields ranging from agriculture to energy to medicine. Nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) is among the most widely produced nanoparticles worldwide, and already exists in consumer products including impermanent personal care products and surface coatings. Inevitably, nano-TiO2 will be transported into the environment via consumer or industrial waste, where its effects on organisms are largely unknown. Out of concern for the possible ill-effects of nanoparticles in the environment, there is now a field of study in nanotoxicology. Bacteria are ideal organisms for nanotoxicology research because they are environmentally important, respond rapidly to intoxication, and provide evidence for effects in higher organisms. My doctoral research focuses on the effects and interactions of nano-TiO2 in aqueous systems with planktonic bacteria. This dissertation describes four projects and the outcomes of the research: (1) A discovery, using a combination of environmental- and cryogenic-scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS), that initially agglomerated nano-TiO2 is dispersed upon bacterial contact, as nanoparticles preferentially sorbed to cell surfaces. (2) Establishment of a method to disperse nanoparticles in an aqueous culture medium for nanotoxicology studies. A combination of electrostatic repulsion, steric hindrance and sonication yielded a high initial level of nano-TiO2 dispersion (i.e. E. coli growth and membrane processes. Together, this research is towards: better understanding outcomes of interactions between nanoparticles and bacteria, advancing methods in the relatively new field of nanotoxicology that are transferable to other nanoparticle and media chemistries, and improving our understanding of structure-activity relationships (e.g. size and doping effects) leading to intoxication in environmental organisms.

  5. Effective bioleaching of chromium in tannery sludge with an enriched sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Kida, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a sulfur-oxidizing community was enriched from activated sludge generated in tannery wastewater treatment plants. Bioleaching of tannery sludge containing 0.9-1.2% chromium was investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the enriched community, the effect of chromium binding forms on bioleaching efficiency, and the dominant microbes contributing to chromium bioleaching. Sludge samples inoculated with the enriched community presented 79.9-96.8% of chromium leaching efficiencies, much higher than those without the enriched community. High bioleaching efficiencies of over 95% were achieved for chromium in reducible fraction, while 60.9-97.9% were observed for chromium in oxidizable and residual fractions. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, the predominant bacteria in the enriched community, played an important role in bioleaching, whereas some indigenous heterotrophic species in sludge might have had a supporting role. The results indicated that A. thiooxidans-dominant enriched microbial community had high chromium bioleaching efficiency, and chromium binding forms affected the bioleaching performance.

  6. Immobilization of bacterial S-layer proteins from Caulobacter crescentus on iron oxide-based nanocomposite: synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of zincite-coated Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Neda

    2014-05-05

    Zinc oxide was coated on Fe2O3 nanoparticles using sol-gel spin-coating. Caulobacter crescentus have a crystalline surface layer (S-layer), which consist of one protein or glycoprotein species. The immobilization of bacterial S-layers obtained from C. crescentus on zincite-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide was investigated. The SDS PAGE results of S-layers isolated from C. crescentus showed the weight of 50 KDa. Nanoparticles of the Fe2O3 and zinc oxide were synthesized by a sol-gel technique. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm were successfully prepared by the proper deposition of zinc oxide onto iron oxide nanoparticles surface annealed at 450 °C. The samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  7. Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessen, E.; Nyberg, K.; Jansson, J.K.; Hallin, S.

    2010-05-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) co-exist in soil, but their relative distribution may vary depending on the environmental conditions. Effects of changes in soil organic matter and nutrient content on the AOB and AOA are poorly understood. Our aim was to compare effects of long-term soil organic matter depletion and amendments with labile (straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and without easily plant-available nitrogen, on the activities, abundances and community structures of AOB and AOA. Soil was sampled from a long-term field site in Sweden that was established in 1956. The potential ammonia oxidation rates, the AOB and AOA amoA gene abundances and the community structures of both groups based on T-RFLP of amoA genes were determined. Straw amendment during 50 years had not altered any of the measured soil parameters, while the addition of peat resulted in a significant increase of soil organic carbon as well as a decrease in pH. Nitrogen fertilization alone resulted in a small decrease in soil pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen, but an increase in primary production. Type and amount of organic matter had an impact on the AOB and AOA community structures and the AOA abundance. Our findings confirmed that AOA are abundant in soil, but showed that under certain conditions the AOB dominate, suggesting niche differentiation between the two groups at the field site. The large differences in potential rates between treatments correlated to the AOA community size, indicating that they were functionally more important in the nitrification process than the AOB. The AOA abundance was positively related to addition of labile organic carbon, which supports the idea that AOA could have alternative growth strategies using organic carbon. The AOB community size varied little in contrast to that of the AOA. This indicates that the bacterial ammonia oxidizers as a group have a greater ecophysiological diversity and

  8. Distribution and diversity of carbon monoxide-oxidizing bacteria and bulk bacterial communities across a succession gradient on a Hawaiian volcanic deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C F; King, G M

    2010-07-01

    Relatively little is known about the distribution and diversity of CO-oxidizing bacteria during succession on volcanic deposits even though they are among the primary colonists. We surveyed CO-oxidizing communities across a vegetation gradient on a 1959 cinder deposit using coxL (large subunit gene of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) sequences. Sequences most closely related to a coxL sequence from Ktedonobacter racemifer, dominated unvegetated cinders, while Proteobacteria-like sequences dominated vegetated sites. The number of coxL operational taxonomic units (OTUs) increased threefold with increased vegetation, and correlated most strongly with the increased beta-Proteobacteria richness (r = 0.987). These compositional shifts were also reflected in overall bacterial community compositions as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Notably, coxL OTU:16S rRNA OTU ratios increased with increased vegetation, indicating that CO oxidizers became a larger fraction of total bacterial richness during succession. Results from most probable number estimates and maximum potential CO uptake activity assays indicate that increased richness is paralleled by increased CO oxidizer abundance, which likely results from increased vegetation and organic carbon content. Collectively, results suggest that in contrast to patterns observed for plant succession, a versatile bacterial functional group that is important during early colonization and succession can remain important in later stages of succession, irrespective of dramatic environmental changes.

  9. Single-molecule in vivo imaging of bacterial respiratory complexes indicates delocalized oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente-Garcia, Isabel; Lenn, Tchern; Erhardt, Heiko; Harriman, Oliver L; Liu, Lu-Ning; Robson, Alex; Chiu, Sheng-Wen; Matthews, Sarah; Willis, Nicky J; Bray, Christopher D; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Shin, Jae Yen; Bustamante, Carlos; Liphardt, Jan; Friedrich, Thorsten; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Leake, Mark C

    2014-06-01

    Chemiosmotic energy coupling through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is crucial to life, requiring coordinated enzymes whose membrane organization and dynamics are poorly understood. We quantitatively explore localization, stoichiometry, and dynamics of key OXPHOS complexes, functionally fluorescent protein-tagged, in Escherichia coli using low-angle fluorescence and superresolution microscopy, applying single-molecule analysis and novel nanoscale co-localization measurements. Mobile 100-200nm membrane domains containing tens to hundreds of complexes are indicated. Central to our results is that domains of different functional OXPHOS complexes do not co-localize, but ubiquinone diffusion in the membrane is rapid and long-range, consistent with a mobile carrier shuttling electrons between islands of different complexes. Our results categorically demonstrate that electron transport and proton circuitry in this model bacterium are spatially delocalized over the cell membrane, in stark contrast to mitochondrial bioenergetic supercomplexes. Different organisms use radically different strategies for OXPHOS membrane organization, likely depending on the stability of their environment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Enterococcus faecalis zinc-responsive proteins mediate bacterial defence against zinc overload, lysozyme and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, Marta C; Kok, Jan; Silva Lopes, Maria de Fátima

    2014-12-01

    Two Enterococcus faecalis genes encoding the P-type ATPase EF1400 and the putative SapB protein EF0759 were previously shown to be strongly upregulated in the presence of high concentrations of zinc. In the present work, we showed that a Zn(2+)-responsive DNA-binding motif (zim) is present in the promoter regions of these genes. Both proteins were further studied with respect to their involvement in zinc homeostasis and invasion of the host. EF0759 contributed to intramacrophage survival by an as-yet unknown mechanism(s). EF1400, here renamed ZntAEf, is an ATPase with specificity for zinc and plays a role in dealing with several host defences, i.e. zinc overload, oxidative stress and lysozyme; it provides E. faecalis cells with the ability to survive inside macrophages. As these three host defence mechanisms are important at several sites in the host, i.e. inside macrophages and in saliva, this work suggested that ZntAEf constitutes a crucial E. faecalis defence mechanism that is likely to contribute to the ability of this bacterium to endure life inside its host.

  11. Occurrence and elimination of antibiotics at four sewage treatment plants in Japan and their effects on bacterial ammonia oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Gopal Chandra; Okuda, Takashi; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence and elimination of seventeen antibiotics (three macrolides: azithromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin; five quinolones: ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, nalidixic acid and norfloxacin; five sulfonamides: sulfadimethoxine, sulfadimizine, sulfamerazine, sulfamethoxazole and sulfamonomethoxine; and others: tetracycline, lincomycin, salinomycin and trimethoprim) were investigated at four full-scale sewage treatment plants in Japan. The highest concentration was recorded for clarithromycin (1,129 to 4,820 ng/L) in influent, followed by azithromycin (160 to 1,347 ng/L), levofloxacin (255 to 587 ng/L) and norfloxacin (155 to 486 ng/L). A vary inconsistence picture was obtained with negative to over 90% removal. Nalidixic acid (53 to 100%) exhibited higher removal efficiency followed by norfloxacin (75 to 95%), levofloxacin (40 to 90%), ciprofloxacin (60 to 83%) and enrofloxacin (38 to 74%). Among macrolides, clarithromycin (50 to 88%) and azithromycin (34 to 86%) showed relatively higher removal efficiency than roxithromycin (-32 to 59%). For most of the antibiotics removal efficiency was higher in A2O and AO based secondary treatment process than CAS process. The effect of the antibiotics on bacterial ammonia oxidation determined by oxygen uptake rate presented that there was no significant effect below 0.05 mg/L of each antibiotics. Even at the same concentration, antibiotics in mixed condition had higher inhibition effects than individuals.

  12. Bacterial communities and syntrophic associations involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane process of the Sonora Margin cold seeps, Guaymas Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Adrien; Cruaud, Perrine; Pignet, Patricia; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Gayet, Nicolas; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Godfroy, Anne; Toffin, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    The Sonora Margin cold seeps present on the seafloor a patchiness pattern of white microbial mats surrounded by polychaete and gastropod beds. These surface assemblages are fuelled by abundant organic inputs sedimenting from the water column and upward-flowing seep fluids. Elevated microbial density was observed in the underlying sediments. A previous study on the same samples identified anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) as the potential dominant archaeal process in these Sonora Margin sediments, probably catalysed by three clades of archaeal anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME-1, ANME-2 and ANME-3) associated with bacterial syntrophs. In this study, molecular surveys and microscopic observations investigating the diversity of Bacteria involved in AOM process, as well as the environmental parameters affecting the composition and the morphologies of AOM consortia in the Sonora Margin sediments were carried out. Two groups of Bacteria were identified within the AOM consortia, the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus SEEP SRB-1a group and a Desulfobulbus-related group. These bacteria showed different niche distributions, association specificities and consortia architectures, depending on sediment surface communities, geochemical parameters and ANME-associated phylogeny. Therefore, the syntrophic AOM process appears to depend on sulphate-reducing bacteria with different ecological niches and/or metabolisms, in a biofilm-like organic matrix. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effects of 30 Years of Crop Rotation and Tillage on Bacterial and Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Jake W; McCormick, Ian; Deen, William; Dunfield, Kari E

    2016-05-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) both mediate soil nitrification and may have specialized niches in the soil. Little is understood of how these microorganisms are affected by long-term crop rotation and tillage practices. In this study, we assessed abundance and gene expression of AOB and AOA under two contrasting crop rotations and tillage regimes at a 30-yr-old long-term experiment on a Canadian silt loam soil. Continuous corn ( L.) (CC) was compared with a corn-corn-soybean [ (L.) Merr.]-winter wheat ( L.) rotation under-seeded with red clover ( L.) (RC), with conventional tillage (CT) and no-till (NT) as subplot treatments. Soil sampling was performed during the first corn year at four time points throughout the 2010 season and at three discrete depths (0-5, 5-15, and 15-30 cm). Overall, AOA abundance was found to be more than 10 times that of AOB, although AOA transcriptional activity was below detectable levels across all treatments. Crop rotation had a marginally significant effect on AOB abundance, with 1.3 times as many gene copies under the simpler CC rotation than under the more diverse RC rotation. More pronounced effects of depth on AOB abundance and gene expression were observed under NT versus CT management, and NT supported higher abundances of total archaea and AOA than CT across the growing season. We suggest that AOB may be more functionally important than AOA in this high-input agricultural soil but that NT management can promote enhanced soil archaeal populations. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  14. Wildfire and charcoal enhance nitrification and ammonium-oxidizing bacterial abundance in dry montane forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, P N; MacKenzie, M D; DeLuca, T H; Holben, W E

    2010-01-01

    All forest fire events generate some quantity of charcoal, which may persist in soils for hundreds to thousands of years. However, few studies have effectively evaluated the potential for charcoal to influence specific microbial communities or processes. To our knowledge, no studies have specifically addressed the effect of charcoal on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in forest soils. Controlled experiments have shown that charcoal amendment of fire-excluded temperate and boreal coniferous forest soil increases net nitrification, suggesting that charcoal plays a major role in maintaining nitrification for extended periods postfire. In this study, we examined the influence of fire history on gross nitrification, nitrification potential, and the nature and abundance of AOB. Soil cores were collected from sites in the Selway-Bitterroot wilderness area in northern Idaho that had been exposed twice (in 1910, 1934) or three times (1910, 1934, and 1992) in the last 94 yr, allowing us to contrast soils recently exposed to fire to those that experienced no recent fire (control). Charcoal content was determined in the O horizon by hand-separation and in the mineral soil by a chemical digestion procedure. Gross and net nitrification, and potential rates of nitrification were measured in mineral soil. Analysis of the AOB community was conducted using primer sets specific for the ammonia mono-oxygenase gene (amoA) or the 16S rRNA gene of AOB. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the AOB community structure, while AOB abundance was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Recent (12-yr-old) wildfire resulted in greater charcoal contents and nitrification rates compared with sites without fire for 75 yr, and the more recent fire appeared to have directly influenced AOB abundance and community structure. We predicted and observed greater abundance of AOB in soils recently exposed to fire compared with control soils. Interestingly, sequence data

  15. Freshwater Recirculating Aquaculture System Operations Drive Biofilter Bacterial Community Shifts around a Stable Nitrifying Consortium of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Comammox Nitrospira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelme, Ryan P.; McLellan, Sandra L.; Newton, Ryan J.

    2017-01-01

    Recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) are unique engineered ecosystems that minimize environmental perturbation by reducing nutrient pollution discharge. RAS typically employ a biofilter to control ammonia levels produced as a byproduct of fish protein catabolism. Nitrosomonas (ammonia-oxidizing), Nitrospira, and Nitrobacter (nitrite-oxidizing) species are thought to be the primary nitrifiers present in RAS biofilters. We explored this assertion by characterizing the biofilter bacterial and archaeal community of a commercial scale freshwater RAS that has been in operation for >15 years. We found the biofilter community harbored a diverse array of bacterial taxa (>1000 genus-level taxon assignments) dominated by Chitinophagaceae (~12%) and Acidobacteria (~9%). The bacterial community exhibited significant composition shifts with changes in biofilter depth and in conjunction with operational changes across a fish rearing cycle. Archaea also were abundant, and were comprised solely of a low diversity assemblage of Thaumarchaeota (>95%), thought to be ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) from the presence of AOA ammonia monooxygenase genes. Nitrosomonas were present at all depths and time points. However, their abundance was >3 orders of magnitude less than AOA and exhibited significant depth-time variability not observed for AOA. Phylogenetic analysis of the nitrite oxidoreductase beta subunit (nxrB) gene indicated two distinct Nitrospira populations were present, while Nitrobacter were not detected. Subsequent identification of Nitrospira ammonia monooxygenase alpha subunit genes in conjunction with the phylogenetic placement and quantification of the nxrB genotypes suggests complete ammonia-oxidizing (comammox) and nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira populations co-exist with relatively equivalent and stable abundances in this system. It appears RAS biofilters harbor complex microbial communities whose composition can be affected directly by typical system operations while

  16. Freshwater Recirculating Aquaculture System Operations Drive Biofilter Bacterial Community Shifts around a Stable Nitrifying Consortium of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Comammox Nitrospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelme, Ryan P; McLellan, Sandra L; Newton, Ryan J

    2017-01-01

    Recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) are unique engineered ecosystems that minimize environmental perturbation by reducing nutrient pollution discharge. RAS typically employ a biofilter to control ammonia levels produced as a byproduct of fish protein catabolism. Nitrosomonas (ammonia-oxidizing), Nitrospira, and Nitrobacter (nitrite-oxidizing) species are thought to be the primary nitrifiers present in RAS biofilters. We explored this assertion by characterizing the biofilter bacterial and archaeal community of a commercial scale freshwater RAS that has been in operation for >15 years. We found the biofilter community harbored a diverse array of bacterial taxa (>1000 genus-level taxon assignments) dominated by Chitinophagaceae (~12%) and Acidobacteria (~9%). The bacterial community exhibited significant composition shifts with changes in biofilter depth and in conjunction with operational changes across a fish rearing cycle. Archaea also were abundant, and were comprised solely of a low diversity assemblage of Thaumarchaeota (>95%), thought to be ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) from the presence of AOA ammonia monooxygenase genes. Nitrosomonas were present at all depths and time points. However, their abundance was >3 orders of magnitude less than AOA and exhibited significant depth-time variability not observed for AOA. Phylogenetic analysis of the nitrite oxidoreductase beta subunit (nxrB) gene indicated two distinct Nitrospira populations were present, while Nitrobacter were not detected. Subsequent identification of Nitrospira ammonia monooxygenase alpha subunit genes in conjunction with the phylogenetic placement and quantification of the nxrB genotypes suggests complete ammonia-oxidizing (comammox) and nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira populations co-exist with relatively equivalent and stable abundances in this system. It appears RAS biofilters harbor complex microbial communities whose composition can be affected directly by typical system operations while

  17. Inhibition of pathogenic bacterial growth on excision wound by green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles leads to accelerated wound healing activity in Wistar Albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Renu; Baskaran, Athmanathan; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2015-07-01

    An impaired wound healing is one of the major health related problem in diabetic and non-diabetic patients around the globe. The pathogenic bacteria play a predominant role in delayed wound healing, owing to interaction in the wound area. In our previous work we developed green chemistry mediated copper oxide nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa leaf extract. In the present study we make an attempt to evaluate the anti-bacterial, and wound healing activity of green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles in male Wistar Albino rats. The agar well diffusion assay revealed copper oxide nanoparticles have substantial inhibition activity against human pathogenic strains such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella dysenteriae, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, which were responsible for delayed wound healing process. Furthermore, the analyses results of wound closure, histopathology and protein profiling confirmed that the F. religiosa leaf extract tailored copper oxide nanoparticles have enhanced wound healing activity in Wistar Albino rats.

  18. The roles of bacterial biofilm and oxidizing enzymes in the biodegradation of plastic by the bacterium Rhodococcus ruber (C208)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, A.; Gilan, I.; Santo, M.

    2011-12-01

    Synthetic polymers such as polyethylene are amongst the most durable plastic materials and, therefore are resistant to natural biodegradation resulting in their accumulation in the environment posing a global hazard. We have carried out a two-step enrichment procedure aimed at the isolation of polyethylene-degrading bacteria from soil. The initial enrichment was carried out in soil and the second, in a liquid mineral medium supplemented with linear low-density polyethylene (LDPE; MW 191,000) as the sole carbon source. UV-photooxidation may enhance biodegradation by the formation of carbonyl residues that can be utilized by microorganisms. This screening gave rise to several bacterial strains that were capable of degrading polyethylene. One of these strains (C208), identified as the actinomycete Rhodococcus ruber, colonized the polyethylene producing a biofilm which eventually lead to the degradation of the polyethylene. Adherence and colonization of planktonic C208 cells to the polyethylene surface occurred within minutes from exposure to the polyolefin. This resulted in formation of an initial biofilm that differentiated into cell-aggregation-forming microcolonies. Further organization yielded three-dimensional sessile structures as the mature biofilm. The ratio between the population densities, of the biofilm and planktonic, was about 60:1, indicating a high preference for the biofilm mode of growth. Analysis of the extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the biofilm of C208 revealed that the polysaccharides level was up to 2.5 folds higher than that of the protein. Surprisingly, the EPS also contained DNA that is actively excreted from live bacterial cells. This is supported by the reduction in biofilm content (but not in viability) following addition, of DNase 1 and RNAse A. The biofilm showed a high viability even after 60 days of incubation in a carbon free medium. This durability of the biofilm, can be attributed to biodegradation of polyethylene. A

  19. An oxidative burst and its attenuation by bacterial peroxidase activity is required for optimal establishment of the Arachis hypogaea-Bradyrhizobium sp. symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, V; Ibáñez, F; Figueredo, M S; Fabra, A

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine whether the Arachis hypogaea L. root oxidative burst, produced at early stages of its symbiotic interaction with Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA 6144, and the bacterial antioxidant system are required for the successful development of this interaction. Pharmacological approaches were used to reduce both plant oxidative burst and bacterial peroxidase enzyme activity. In plants whose H2 O2 levels were decreased, a low nodule number, a reduction in the proportion of red nodules (%) and an increase in the bacteroid density were found. The symbiotic phenotype of plants inoculated with a Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA 6144 culture showing decreased peroxidase activity was also affected, since the biomass production, nodule number and percentage of red nodules in these plants were lower than in plants inoculated with Bradyrhizobium sp. control cultures. We demonstrated for the first time that the oxidative burst triggered at the early events of the symbiotic interaction in peanut, is a prerequisite for the efficient development of root nodules, and that the antioxidant system of bradyrhizobial peanut symbionts, particularly the activity of peroxidases, is counteracting this oxidative burst for the successful establishment of the symbiosis. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the development of the symbiotic interaction established in A. hypogaea L. a legume infected in an intercellular way. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Influence of poly(ethylene oxide)-based copolymer on protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion on stainless steel: modulation by surface hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Rouxhet, Paul G; Chudziak, Dorota; Telegdi, Judit; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the adhesion of Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021, a typical aerobic marine microorganism, on stainless steel (SS) substrate. More particularly, the potential effect on adhesion of adsorbed poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymer is investigated. Bacterial attachment experiments were carried out using a modified parallel plate flow chamber, allowing different surface treatments to be compared in a single experiment. The amount of adhering bacteria was determined via DAPI staining and fluorescence microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the surface chemical composition of SS and hydrophobized SS before and after PEO-PPO-PEO adsorption. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein, was investigated to test the resistance of PEO-PPO-PEO layers to protein adsorption. The results show that BSA adsorption and Pseudomonas 2021 adhesion are significantly reduced on hydrophobized SS conditioned with PEO-PPO-PEO. Although PEO-PPO-PEO is also found to adsorb on SS, it does not prevent BSA adsorption nor bacterial adhesion, which is attributed to different PEO-PPO-PEO adlayer structures on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The obtained results open the way to a new strategy to reduce biofouling on metal oxide surfaces using PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer.

  1. The effects of indoor and outdoor dust exposure on the growth, sensitivity to oxidative-stress, and biofilm production of three opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraju, Mohammed O; Lalinde-Barnes, Sloan; Sanamvenkata, Sachindra; Esmaeili, Mahsa; Shishodia, Shishir; Rosenzweig, Jason A

    2015-12-15

    Within the last decade, many studies have highlighted the radical changes in the components of indoor and outdoor dust. For example, agents like automobile emitted platinum group elements and different kinds of organic phthalates and esters have been reported to be accumulating in the biosphere. Humans consistently face dermal, respiratory, and dietary exposures to these particles while indoors and outdoors. In fact, dust particulate matter has been associated with close to 500,000 deaths per year in Europe and about 200,000 deaths per year in the United States. To date, there has been limited examination of the physiological impact of indoor and outdoor dust exposure on normal flora microbes. In this study, the effect of indoor- and outdoor-dust exposure on three opportunistic bacterial species (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was assessed. Specifically, bacterial growth, oxidative stress resistance, and biofilm production were measured following indoor- and outdoor-dust exposures. Studies were conducted in nutritionally-rich and -poor environments typically encountered by bacteria. Surprisingly, indoor-dust (200μg/mL), enhanced the growth of all three bacterial species in nutrient-poor conditions, but slowed growth in nutrient-rich conditions. In nutrient-rich medium, 100μg/mL exposure of either indoor- or outdoor-dust resulted in significantly reduced oxidative stress resistance in E. coli. Most interestingly, dust (indoor and outdoor), either in nutrient-rich or -poor conditions, significantly increased biofilm production in all three bacterial species. These data suggest that indoor and outdoor dust, can modify opportunistic bacteria through altering growth, sensitivity to oxidative stress, and their virulence potential through enhanced biofilm formation.

  2. Mercury mobilization and speciation linked to bacterial iron oxide and sulfate reduction: A column study to mimic reactive transfer in an anoxic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellal, Jennifer; Guédron, Stéphane; Huguet, Lucie; Schäfer, Jörg; Laperche, Valérie; Joulian, Catherine; Lanceleur, Laurent; Burnol, André; Ghestem, Jean-Philippe; Garrido, Francis; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) mobility and speciation in subsurface aquifers is directly linked to its surrounding geochemical and microbial environment. The role of bacteria on Hg speciation (i.e., methylation, demethylation and reduction) is well documented, however little data is available on their impact on Hg mobility. The aim of this study was to test if (i) Hg mobility is due to either direct iron oxide reduction by iron reducing bacteria (IRB) or indirect iron reduction by sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), and (ii) to investigate its subsequent fate and speciation. Experiments were carried out in an original column setup combining geochemical and microbiological approaches that mimic an aquifer including an interface of iron-rich and iron depleted zones. Two identical glass columns containing iron oxides spiked with Hg(II) were submitted to (i) direct iron reduction by IRB and (ii) to indirect iron reduction by sulfides produced by SRB. Results show that in both columns Hg was leached and methylated during the height of bacterial activity. In the column where IRB are dominant, Hg methylation and leaching from the column was directly correlated to bacterial iron reduction (i.e., FeII release). In opposition, when SRB are dominant, produced sulfide induced indirect iron oxide reduction and rapid adsorption of leached Hg (or produced methylmercury) on neoformed iron sulfides (e.g., Mackinawite) or its precipitation as HgS. At the end of the SRB column experiment, when iron-oxide reduction was complete, filtered Hg and Fe concentrations increased at the outlet suggesting a leaching of Hg bound to FeS colloids that may be a dominant mechanism of Hg transport in aquifer environments. These experimental results highlight different biogeochemical mechanisms that can occur in stratified sub-surface aquifers where bacterial activities play a major role on Hg mobility and changes in speciation.

  3. Copper Complex in Poly(vinyl chloride) as a Nitric Oxide-Generating Catalyst for the Control of Nitrifying Bacterial Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonoputri, Vita; Gunawan, Cindy; Liu, Sanly; Barraud, Nicolas; Yee, Lachlan H; Lim, May; Amal, Rose

    2015-10-14

    In this study, catalytic generation of nitric oxide by a copper(II) complex embedded within a poly(vinyl chloride) matrix in the presence of nitrite (source of nitric oxide) and ascorbic acid (reducing agent) was shown to effectively control the formation and dispersion of nitrifying bacteria biofilms. Amperometric measurements indicated increased and prolonged generation of nitric oxide with the addition of the copper complex when compared to that with nitrite and ascorbic acid alone. The effectiveness of the copper complex-nitrite-ascorbic acid system for biofilm control was quantified using protein analysis, which showed enhanced biofilm suppression when the copper complex was used in comparison to that with nitrite and ascorbic acid treatment alone. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and LIVE/DEAD staining revealed a reduction in cell surface coverage without a loss of viability with the copper complex and up to 5 mM of nitrite and ascorbic acid, suggesting that the nitric oxide generated from the system inhibits proliferation of the cells on surfaces. Induction of nitric oxide production by the copper complex system also triggered the dispersal of pre-established biofilms. However, the addition of a high concentration of nitrite and ascorbic acid to a pre-established biofilm induced bacterial membrane damage and strongly decreased the metabolic activity of planktonic and biofilm cells, as revealed by CLSM with LIVE/DEAD staining and intracellular adenosine triphosphate measurements, respectively. This study highlights the utility of the catalytic generation of nitric oxide for the long-term suppression and removal of nitrifying bacterial biofilms.

  4. The Campylobacter jejuni MarR-like transcriptional regulators RrpA and RrpB both influence bacterial responses to oxidative and aerobic stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozan eGundogdu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the human intestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni to respond to oxidative stress is central to bacterial survival both in vivo during infection and in the environment. Re-annotation of the C. jejuni NCTC11168 genome revealed the presence of two MarR-type transcriptional regulators Cj1546 and Cj1556, originally annotated as hypothetical proteins, which we have designated RrpA and RrpB (regulator of response to peroxide respectively. Previously we demonstrated a role for RrpB in both oxidative and aerobic (O2 stress and that RrpB was a DNA binding protein with auto-regulatory activity, typical of MarR-type transcriptional regulators. In this study, we show that RrpA is also a DNA binding protein and that a rrpA mutant in strain 11168H exhibits increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide oxidative stress. Mutation of either rrpA or rrpB reduces catalase (KatA expression. However a rrpAB double mutant exhibits higher levels of resistance to hydrogen peroxide oxidative stress, with levels of KatA expression similar to the wild-type strain. Neither the rrpA nor rrpB mutant exhibits any significant difference in sensitivity to either cumene hydroperoxide or menadione oxidative stresses, but both mutants exhibit a reduced ability to survive aerobic (O2 stress, enhanced biofilm formation and reduced virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model. The rrpAB double mutant exhibits wild-type levels of biofilm formation and wild-type levels of virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model. Together these data indicate a role for both RrpA and RrpB in the C. jejuni peroxide oxidative and aerobic (O2 stress responses, enhancing bacterial survival in vivo and in the environment.

  5. Evaluation of anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant potential of andrographolide and echiodinin isolated from callus culture of Andrographis paniculata Nees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammed Arifullah; Nima Dandu Namsa; Manabendra Mandal; Kishore Kumar Chiruvella; Paritala Vikrama; Ghanta Rama Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant activity of andrographolide (AND) and echiodinin (ECH) of Andrographis paniculata. Methods:In this study, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the anti-microbial and anti-oxidant activity of isolated AND and ECH by broth micro-dilution method and 2,2-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) assay, respectively. Structure elucidation was determined by electro-spray ionization-MSD, NMR (1H and 13C) and IR spectra. Results: AND was effective against most of the strains tested including Mycobacteriumsmegmatis, showing broad spectrum of growth inhibition activity with Minimum inhibitory concentration values against Staphylococcus aureus (100 µg/mL), Streptococcus thermophilus (350 µg/mL) Bacillus subtilis (100 µg/mL), Escherichia coli (50 µg/mL), Mycobacterium smegmatis (200 µg/mL), Klebsiella pneumonia (100 µg/mL), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (200 µg/mL). ECH showed specific anti-bacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a concentration higher than 225 µg/mL. Both AND and ECH were not effective against the two yeast strains, Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae tested in this study. Conclusion:This preliminary study showed promising anti-bacterial activity and moderate free radical scavenging activity of AND and ECH, and it may provide the scientific rationale for its popular folklore medicines.

  6. The influence of nicotine on granulocytic differentiation – Inhibition of the oxidative burst and bacterial killing and increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Diane E

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils leave the bone marrow as terminally differentiated cells, yet little is known of the influence of nicotine or other tobacco smoke components on neutrophil differentiation. Therefore, promyelocytic HL-60 cells were differentiated into neutrophils using dimethylsulfoxide in the presence and absence of nicotine (3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl pyridine. Differentiation was evaluated over 5 days by monitoring terminal differentiation markers (CD11b expression and formazan deposition; cell viability, growth phase, kinetics, and apoptosis; assessing cellular morphology and ultrastructure; and conformational changes to major cellular components. Key neutrophil effector functions (oxidative burst, bacterial killing, matrix metalloproteinase release were also examined. Results Nicotine increased the percentage of cells in late differentiation phases (metamyelocytes, banded neutrophils and segmented neutrophils compared to DMSO alone (p p p p in vivo (p Conclusion These findings may partially explain the known increase in susceptibility to bacterial infection and neutrophil-associated destructive inflammatory diseases in individuals chronically exposed to nicotine.

  7. Textile dye degradation by bacterial consortium and subsequent toxicological analysis of dye and dye metabolites using cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phugare, Swapnil S; Kalyani, Dayanand C; Patil, Asmita V; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2011-02-15

    The present study aims to evaluate Red HE3B degrading potential of developed microbial consortium SDS using two bacterial cultures viz. Providencia sp. SDS (PS) and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa strain BCH (PA) originally isolated from dye contaminated soil. Consortium was found to be much faster for decolorization and degradation of Red HE3B compared to the individual bacterial strain. The intensive metabolic activity of these strains led to 100% decolorization of Red HE3B (50 mg l(-1)) with in 1h. Significant induction of various dye decolorizing enzymes viz. veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, azoreductase and DCIP reductase compared to control, point out towards their involvement in overall decolorization and degradation process. Analytical studies like HPLC, FTIR and GC-MS were used to scrutinize the biodegradation process. Toxicological studies before and after microbial treatment was studied with respect to cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, oxidative stress, antioxidant enzyme status, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation analysis using root cells of Allium cepa. Toxicity analysis with A. cepa signifies that dye Red HE3B exerts oxidative stress and subsequently toxic effect on the root cells where as biodegradation metabolites of the dye are relatively less toxic in nature. Phytotoxicity studies also indicated that microbial treatment favors detoxification of Red HE3B.

  8. Effect of humic acids and sunlight on the cytotoxicity of engineered zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles to a river bacterial assemblage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thabitha P.Dasari; Huey-Min Hwang

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a terrestrial humic acid (HA) and Suwannee River HA on the cytotoxicity of engineered zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs)and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) to natural aquatic bacterial assemblages was measured with spread plate counting.The effect of HA (10 and 40 ppm) on the cytotoxicity of ZnONPs and TiO2NPs was tested factorially in the presence and absence of natural sunlight (light irradiation (LI)).The experiment was of full factorial,completely randomized design and the results were analyzed using the General Linear Model in SAS analytical software.The method of least squares means was used to separate the means or combinations of means.We determined the mechanism of toxicity via measurements of oxidative stress and metal ions.The toxicity of ZnONPs and TiO2NPs to natural aquatic bacterial assemblages appears to be concentration dependent.Moreover,the cytotoxicity of ZnONPs and TiO2NPs appeared to be affected by HA concentration,the presence of sunlight irradiation,and the dynamic multiple interactions among these factors.With respect to light versus darkness in the control group,the data indicate that bacterial viability was inhibited more in the light exposure than in the darkness exposure.The same was true in the HA treatment groups.With respect to terrestrial versus Suwanee River HA for a given nanoparticle,in light versus darkness,bacterial viability was more inhibited in the light treatment groups containing the terrestrial HA than in those containing Suwanee River HA.Differences in the extent of reactive oxygen species formation,adsorption/binding of ZnONPs/TiO2NPs by HA,and the levels of free metal ions were speculated to account for the observed cytotoxicity.TEM images indicate the attachment and binding of the tested nanoparticles to natural bacterial assemblages.Besides the individual parameter,significant effects on bacterial viability count were also observed in the following combined treatments

  9. View of the bacterial strains of Escherichia coli M-17 and its interaction with the nanoparticles of zinc oxide by means of atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagitova, A.; Yaminsky, I.; Meshkov, G.

    2016-08-01

    Visualization of the structure of biological objects plays a key role in medicine, biotechnology, nanotechnology and IT-technology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a promising method of studying of objects’ morphology and structure. In this work, AFM was used to determine the size and shape of the bacterial strains of Escherichia coli M-17 and visualization its interaction with the nanoparticles of zinc oxide. The suspension of E.coli bacteria was applied to natural mica and studied by contact mode using the FemtoScan multifunctional scanning probe microscope.

  10. Evaluation of anti–bacterial and anti–oxidant potential of andrographolide and echiodinin isolated from callus culture of Andrographis paniculata Nees

    OpenAIRE

    Mohmmed Arifullah; Nima Dandu Namsa; Manabendra Mandal; Kishore Kumar Chiruvella; Paritala Vikrama; Ghanta Rama Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the anti–bacterial and anti–oxidant activity of andrographolide (AND) and echiodinin (ECH) of Andrographis paniculata. Methods: In this study, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the anti–microbial and antioxidant activity of isolated AND and ECH by broth micro–dilution method and 2,2–diphenyl–2–picryl–hydrazyl (DPPH) assay, respectively. Structure elucidation was determined by electro–spray ionization–MSD, NMR (1H and 13C) and IR spectra. Results: AND was eff...

  11. Temporal changes in abundance and composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal communities in a drained peat soil in relation to N{sub 2}O emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andert, Janet [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Microbiology; Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Wessen, Ella; Hallin, Sara [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Microbiology; Boerjesson, Gunnar [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Soil and Environment

    2011-12-15

    Boreal peat soils comprise about 3% of the terrestrial environments, and when drained, they become sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). Ammonia oxidation can result in N{sub 2}O emissions, either directly or by fuelling denitrification, but we know little about the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) in peat soils. Our aim was to determine temporal alterations in abundance and composition of these communities in a drained and forested peat soil in relation to N{sub 2}O emissions and ammonia oxidation activity. Materials and methods The peat was sampled at three different depths in the upper 0.5 m over a period of 9 months covering two summer and two winter samplings. Community composition and abundance were determined by T-RFLP and quantitative real-time PCR of the bacterial and archaeal amoA genes. Potential ammonia oxidation rates were measured using the chlorate inhibition technique, and in situ N{sub 2}O emission was determined using chambers. Results and discussion The soil parameters displayed little spatial and temporal heterogeneity, which probably explained why there were no depth-related effects on the abundance, composition, or activity of the ammonia oxidizers. In contrast to most terrestrial environments, the AOB dominated numerically over the AOA. Both groups changed in community composition between sampling occasions, although the AOB showed more significant seasonal signatures than the AOA. Temporal changes in abundance were only observed for the AOB, with a decrease in numbers from May to March. Such differences were not reflected by the activity or N{sub 2}O emissions. Conclusions The high ammonium concentrations in the peat soil likely favored the AOB over the AOA, and we hypothesize that they were more active than the AOA and therefore responded to climatic and environmental changes. However, other processes rather than ammonia oxidation were likely responsible for N{sub 2}O emissions at the site.

  12. Effect of Elevated CO2 Concentration, Elevated Temperature and No Nitrogen Fertilization on Methanogenic Archaeal and Methane-Oxidizing Bacterial Community Structures in Paddy Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongyan; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Usui, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Susumu

    2016-09-29

    Elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) enhance the production and emission of methane in paddy fields. In the present study, the effects of elevated [CO2], elevated temperature (ET), and no nitrogen fertilization (LN) on methanogenic archaeal and methane-oxidizing bacterial community structures in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experimental paddy field were investigated by PCR-DGGE and real-time quantitative PCR. Soil samples were collected from the upper and lower soil layers at the rice panicle initiation (PI) and mid-ripening (MR) stages. The composition of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was not markedly affected by the elevated [CO2], ET, or LN condition. The abundance of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was also not affected by elevated [CO2] or ET, but was significantly increased at the rice PI stage and significantly decreased by LN in the lower soil layer. In contrast, the composition of the methane-oxidizing bacterial community was affected by rice-growing stages in the upper soil layer. The abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was significantly decreased by elevated [CO2] and LN in both soil layers at the rice MR stage and by ET in the upper soil layer. The ratio of mcrA/pmoA genes correlated with methane emission from ambient and FACE paddy plots at the PI stage. These results indicate that the decrease observed in the abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was related to increased methane emission from the paddy field under the elevated [CO2], ET, and LN conditions.

  13. The influence of surface texture and wettability on initial bacterial adhesion on titanium and zirconium oxide dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassmann, Torsten; Kreis, Stefan; Behr, Michael; Buergers, Ralf

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to investigate bacterial adhesion on different titanium and ceramic implant surfaces, to correlate these findings with surface roughness and surface hydrophobicity, and to define the predominant factor for bacterial adhesion for each material. Zirconia and titanium specimens with different surface textures and wettability (5.0 mm in diameter, 1.0 mm in height) were prepared. Surface roughness was measured by perthometer (R a ) and atomic force microscopy, and hydrophobicity according to contact angles by computerized image analysis. Bacterial suspensions of Streptococcus sanguinis and Staphylococcus epidermidis were incubated for 2 h at 37 °C with ten test specimens for each material group and quantified with fluorescence dye CytoX-Violet and an automated multi-detection reader. Variations in surface roughness (R a ) did not lead to any differences in adhering S. epidermidis, but higher R a resulted in increased S. sanguinis adhesion. In contrast, higher bacterial adhesion was observed on hydrophobic surfaces than on hydrophilic surfaces for S. epidermidis but not for S. sanguinis. The potential to adhere S. sanguinis was significantly higher on ceramic surfaces than on titanium surfaces; no such preference could be found for S. epidermidis. Both surface roughness and wettability may influence the adhesion properties of bacteria on biomaterials; in this context, the predominant factor is dependent on the bacterial species. Wettability was the predominant factor for S. epidermidis and surface texture for S. sanguinis. Zirconia did not show any lower bacterial colonization potential than titanium. Arithmetical mean roughness values R a (measured by stylus profilometer) are inadequate for describing surface roughness with regard to its potential influence on microbial adhesion.

  14. Micropollutant degradation, bacterial inactivation and regrowth risk in wastewater effluents: Influence of the secondary (pre)treatment on the efficiency of Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Stefanos; Voumard, Margaux; Grandjean, Dominique; Magnet, Anoys; De Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Pulgarin, César

    2016-10-01

    In this work, disinfection by 5 Advanced Oxidation Processes was preceded by 3 different secondary treatment systems present in the wastewater treatment plant of Vidy, Lausanne (Switzerland). 5 AOPs after two biological treatment methods (conventional activated sludge and moving bed bioreactor) and a physiochemical process (coagulation-flocculation) were tested in laboratory scale. The dependence among AOPs efficiency and secondary (pre)treatment was estimated by following the bacterial concentration i) before secondary treatment, ii) after the different secondary treatment methods and iii) after the various AOPs. Disinfection and post-treatment bacterial regrowth were the evaluation indicators. The order of efficiency was Moving Bed Bioreactor > Activated Sludge > Coagulation-Flocculation > Primary Treatment. As far as the different AOPs are concerned, the disinfection kinetics were: UVC/H2O2 > UVC and solar photo-Fenton > Fenton or solar light. The contextualization and parallel study of microorganisms with the micropollutants of the effluents revealed that higher exposure times were necessary for complete degradation compared to microorganisms for the UV-based processes and inversed for the Fenton-related ones. Nevertheless, in the Fenton-related systems, the nominal 80% removal of micropollutants deriving from the Swiss legislation, often took place before the elimination of bacterial regrowth risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Flexible bacterial strains that oxidize arsenite in anoxic or aerobic conditions and utilize hydrogen or acetate as alternative electron donors

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Freire, Lucía; Sun, Wenjie; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a carcinogenic compound widely distributed in the groundwater around the world. The fate of arsenic in groundwater depends on the activity of microorganisms either by oxidizing arsenite (AsIII), or by reducing arsenate (AsV). Because of the higher toxicity and mobility of AsIII compared to AsV, microbial-catalyzed oxidation of AsIII to AsV can lower the environmental impact of arsenic. Although aerobic AsIII-oxidizing bacteria are well known, anoxic oxidation of AsIII with nitrate ...

  16. Device-independent, real-time identification of bacterial pathogens with a metal oxide-based olfactory sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Bruins (Marcel); A.N.R. Bos (Albert); P.L. Petit (Pieter); K. Eadie (Kimberley); A. Rog; R. Bos (Rens); G.H. van Ramshorst (Gabrielle); A.F. van Belkum (Alex)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractA novel olfactory method for bacterial species identification using an electronic nose device called the MonoNose was developed. Differential speciation of micro-organisms present in primary cultures of clinical samples could be performed by real-time identification of volatile organic

  17. Mn(II,III) oxidation and MnO2 mineralization by an expressed bacterial multicopper oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Cristina N.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Spiro, Thomas G.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-07-01

    Reactive Mn(IV) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and control the bioavailability and distribution of many toxic and essential elements and organic compounds. Their formation is thought to be dependent on microbial enzymes, because spontaneous Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxidation is slow. Several species of marine Bacillus spores oxidize Mn(II) on their exosporium, the outermost layer of the spore, encrusting them with Mn(IV) oxides. Molecular studies have identified the mnx (Mn oxidation) genes, including mnxG, encoding a putative multicopper oxidase (MCO), as responsible for this two-electron oxidation, a surprising finding because MCOs only catalyze single-electron transfer reactions. Characterization of the enzymatic mechanism has been hindered by the lack of purified protein. By purifying active protein from the mnxDEFG expression construct, we found that the resulting enzyme is a blue (absorption maximum 590 nm) complex containing MnxE, MnxF, and MnxG proteins. Further, by analyzing the Mn(II)- and (III)-oxidizing activity in the presence of a Mn(III) chelator, pyrophosphate, we found that the complex facilitates both electron transfers from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV). X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the Mn mineral product confirmed its similarity to Mn(IV) oxides generated by whole spores. Our results demonstrate that Mn oxidation from soluble Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxides is a two-step reaction catalyzed by an MCO-containing complex. With the purification of active Mn oxidase, we will be able to uncover its mechanism, broadening our understanding of Mn mineral formation and the bioinorganic capabilities of MCOs.

  18. Total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status in saliva of periodontitis patients in relation to bacterial load

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls ...

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa SoxR does not conform to the archetypal paradigm for SoxR-dependent regulation of the bacterial oxidative stress adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Marco; Zurita, Juan; Ferreras, Julian A; Worgall, Stefan; Larone, Davise H; Shi, Lei; Campagne, Fabien; Quadri, Luis E N

    2005-05-01

    SoxR is a transcriptional regulator that controls an oxidative stress response in Escherichia coli. The regulator is primarily activated by superoxide anion-dependent oxidation. Activated SoxR turns on transcription of a single gene, soxS, which encodes a transcriptional regulator that activates a regulon that includes dozens of oxidative stress response genes. SoxR homologues have been identified in many bacterial species, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the expected SoxR partner, SoxS, has not been found in P. aeruginosa. Thus, the primary gene target(s) of P. aeruginosa SoxR is unknown and the involvement of this regulator in the oxidative stress response of the bacterium remains unclear. We utilized transcriptome profiling to identify the P. aeruginosa SoxR regulon and constructed and characterized an unmarked P. aeruginosa DeltasoxR mutant. We provide evidence indicating that P. aeruginosa SoxR activates a six-gene regulon in response to O(2)(.-)-induced stress. The regulon includes three transcriptional units: (i) the recently identified mexGHI-ompD four-gene operon, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump system involved in quorum-sensing signal homeostasis; (ii) gene PA3718, encoding a probable efflux pump; and (iii) gene PA2274, encoding a probable monooxygenase. We also demonstrate that P. aeruginosa SoxR is not a key regulatory player in the oxidative stress response. Finally, we show that P. aeruginosa SoxR is required for virulence in a mouse model of intrapulmonary infection. These results demonstrate that the E. coli-based SoxRS paradigm does not hold in P. aeruginosa and foster new hypotheses for the possible physiological role of P. aeruginosa SoxR.

  20. Simazine application inhibits nitrification and changes the ammonia-oxidizing bacterial communities in a fertilized agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Marcela; Jia, Zhongjun; Conrad, Ralf; Seeger, Michael

    2011-12-01

    s-Triazine herbicides are widely used for weed control, and are persistent in soils. Nitrification is an essential process in the global nitrogen cycle in soil, and involves ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA). In this study, we evaluated the effect of the s-triazine herbicide simazine on the nitrification and on the structure of ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities in a fertilized agricultural soil. The effect of simazine on AOB and AOA were studied by PCR-amplification of amoA genes of nitrifying Bacteria and Archaea in soil microcosms and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses. Simazine [50 μg g(-1) dry weight soil (d.w.s)] completely inhibited the nitrification processes in the fertilized agricultural soil. The inhibition by simazine of ammonia oxidation observed was similar to the reduction of ammonia oxidation by the nitrification inhibitor acetylene. The application of simazine-affected AOB community DGGE patterns in the agricultural soil amended with ammonium, whereas no significant changes in the AOA community were observed. The DGGE analyses strongly suggest that simazine inhibited Nitrosobacteria and specifically Nitrosospira species. In conclusion, our results suggest that the s-triazine herbicide not only inhibits the target susceptible plants but also inhibits the ammonia oxidation and the AOB in fertilized soils.

  1. MUNC13-4 protein regulates the oxidative response and is essential for phagosomal maturation and bacterial killing in neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfregola, Jlenia; Johnson, Jennifer Linda; Meijler, Michael M; Napolitano, Gennaro; Catz, Sergio Daniel

    2012-12-28

    Neutrophils use diverse mechanisms to kill pathogens including phagocytosis, exocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and neutrophil extracellular traps. These mechanisms rely on their ability to mobilize intracellular organelles and to deliver granular cargoes to specific cellular compartments or into the extracellular milieu, but the molecular mechanisms regulating vesicular trafficking in neutrophils are not well understood. MUNC13-4 is a RAB27A effector that coordinates exocytosis in hematopoietic cells, and its deficiency is associated with the human immunodeficiency familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 3. In this work, we have established an essential role for MUNC13-4 in selective vesicular trafficking, phagosomal maturation, and intracellular bacterial killing in neutrophils. Using neutrophils from munc13-4 knock-out (KO) mice, we show that MUNC13-4 is necessary for the regulation of p22(phox)-expressing granule trafficking to the plasma membrane and regulates extracellular ROS production. MUNC13-4 was also essential for the regulation of intracellular ROS production induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa despite normal trafficking of p22(phox)-expressing vesicles toward the phagosome. Importantly, in the absence of MUNC13-4, phagosomal maturation was impaired as observed by the defective delivery of azurophilic granules and multivesicular bodies to the phagosome. Significantly, this mechanism was intact in RAB27A KO neutrophils. Intracellular bacterial killing was markedly impaired in MUNC13-4 KO neutrophils. MUNC13-4-deficient cells showed a significant increase in neutrophil extracellular trap formation but were unable to compensate for the impaired bacterial killing. Altogether, these findings characterize novel functions of MUNC13-4 in the innate immune response of the neutrophil and have direct implications for the understanding of immunodeficiencies in patients with MUNC13-4 deficiency.

  2. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin. However, the exact mechanism of flavin involvement is unclear; while some indicate that flavins mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008), others point to flavin serving as co-factors to outer membrane proteins (Okamoto et al., 2013). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MVrad +)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of microbially produced flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 μM) by MELs ([MVrad +] ∼ 40 μM and MtrABC ⩽ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MVrad + and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where (i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and (ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 s. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (⩽1 μM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. For LEP, with the highest reduction

  3. Study of anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacterial community in the aged refuse bioreactor with 16S rRNA gene library technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Xie, Bing; Han, Lu; Xu, Xiaofan

    2013-10-01

    In order to investigate the anaerobic ammonium-oxidation (Anammox) nitrogen removal pathway of the aged refuse bioreactor treating landfill leachate, a lab-scale bioreactor was established and run for 35 weeks, the performance of the bioreactor and its bacterial community structure of Planctomycetes were analyzed. The results showed that the average TN removal rate of landfill leachate could be reached to 89%. 16S rRNA gene library of Planctomycetes revealed that Anammox sequences accounted for 28.3% of the total Planctomycetes sequences in the bioreactor, and previously recognized Anammox bacterium Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis was the only detected Anammox species in the reactor. It was also found that Anammox bacteria distributed at different sites of the bioreactor while mostly concentrated in the middle and low-middle part. Results above confirmed that Anammox process could happen in aged refuse bioreactor treating landfill leachate and provided an alternative nitrogen removal pathway in practical landfills.

  4. Effect of Different Fertilizer Treatments on Quantity of Soil Microbes and Structure of Ammonium Oxidizing Bacterial Community in a Calcareous Purple Paddy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The quantity of soil microbes and the structure of ammonium oxidizing bacterial (AOB) community were analyzed using the dilution plate counting and most probable number method (MPN), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), respectively. Fertilizer application tended to increase the number of soil microbes and alter the AOB community compared to the control with no fertilizer application (CK). Among the eight fertilizer treatments, soil samples from the treatments of mineral fertilizers (e.g., N, P, K) in combination with farmyard manure (M) had greater numbers of soil microbes and more complex structure of AOB community than those receiving mineral fertilizers alone. The principal component analyses (PCA) for ammonium oxidizing bacterial community structure showed that the eight fertilizer treatments could be divided into two PCA groups (PCA1 and PCA2). For the soil sampled after rice harvest, PCA1 included NP, NM, NPM and NPKM fertilizer treatments, while PCA2 was consisted of CK, N, M and NPK fertilizer treatments. For soil samples collected after wheat harvest, PCA1 was consisted of M, NM, NPM and NPKM fertilizer treatments, while PCA2 was composed of CK, N, NP and NPK fertilizer treatments. For a given rotation, the richness of AOB community in PCA1 was greater than that in PCA2. In addition, AOB community structure was more complex in the soil after rice harvest than that after wheat harvest. The results indicated that different fertilizer treatments resulted in substantial changes of soil microbe number and AOB community. Furthermore, mineral fertilizers (N, NP, NPK) combined with farmyard manure were effective for increasing the quantity of soil microbes, enriching AOB community, and improving the soil biofertility.

  5. The bovine paranasal sinuses: Bacterial flora, epithelial expression of nitric oxide and potential role in the in-herd persistence of respiratory disease pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Neill, Rónan G.; Lee, Alison M.; McElroy, Máire C.; More, Simon J.; Monagle, Aisling; Earley, Bernadette; Cassidy, Joseph P.

    2017-01-01

    The bovine paranasal sinuses are a group of complex cavernous air-filled spaces, lined by respiratory epithelium, the exact function of which is unclear. While lesions affecting these sinuses are occasionally reported in cattle, their microbial flora has not been defined. Furthermore, given that the various bacterial and viral pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease (BRD) persist within herds, we speculated that the paranasal sinuses may serve as a refuge for such infectious agents. The paranasal sinuses of clinically normal cattle (n = 99) and of cattle submitted for post-mortem examination (PME: n = 34) were examined by microbial culture, PCR and serology to include bacterial and viral pathogens typically associated with BRD: Mycoplasma bovis, Histophilus somni, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and bovine parainfluenza-3 virus (BPIV-3). Overall, the paranasal sinuses were either predominantly sterile or did not contain detectable microbes (83.5%: 94.9% of clinically normal and 50.0% of cattle submitted for PME). Bacteria, including BRD causing pathogens, were identified in relatively small numbers of cattle (<10%). While serology indicated widespread exposure of both clinically normal and cattle submitted for PME to BPIV-3 and BRSV (seroprevalences of 91.6% and 84.7%, respectively), PCR identified BPIV-3 in only one animal. To further explore these findings we investigated the potential role of the antimicrobial molecule nitric oxide (NO) within paranasal sinus epithelium using immunohistochemistry. Expression of the enzyme responsible for NO synthesis, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), was detected to varying degrees in 76.5% of a sub-sample of animals suggesting production of this compound plays a similar protective role in the bovine sinus as it does in humans. PMID:28282443

  6. Dose-dependent effects of dietary zinc oxide on bacterial communities and metabolic profiles in the ileum of weaned pigs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, R.; Vahjen, W.; Neumann, K.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Zentek, J.

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological levels of zinc oxide (ZnO) can improve the health of weaning piglets and influence the intestinal microbiota. This experiment aimed at studying the dose-response effect of five dietary concentrations of ZnO on small intestinal bacteria and metabolite profiles. Fifteen piglets, weaned

  7. Graphene Oxide/Silver Nanohybrid as Multi-functional Material for Highly Efficient Bacterial Disinfection and Detection of Organic Dye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tam, L.T.; Dinh, N. X.; Cuong, N. V.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a multi-functional hybrid system consisting of graphene oxide and silver nanoparticles (GO-Ag NPs) was successfully synthesized by using a two-step chemical process. We firstly demonstrated noticeable bactericidal ability of the GO-Ag hybrid system. We provide more chemo...

  8. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-25

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, some evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin that are proposed to mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MV•+)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of secreted flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 µM) by MELs ([MV•+] ~ 42 µM and MtrABC ≤ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MV•+ and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 seconds. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (≤ 1 µM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. However, at higher FMN concentrations (> 1 µM), the reaction rates for both steps decreased and varied inversely with FMN concentration, indicating that FMN inhibited the MEL to Fe(III)-oxide electron transfer

  9. Isolation and characterization of Acidithiobacillus caldus from a sulfur-oxidizing bacterial biosensor and its role in detection of toxic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Kim, Sung-Min; Yoon, Sung-Hwan; Joo, Jin-Ho; Shin, Beom-Soo; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Bae, Wookeun; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2010-08-01

    A novel toxicity detection methodology based on sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been developed for the rapid and reliable detection of toxic chemicals in water. The methodology exploits the ability of SOB to oxidize sulfur particles in the presence of oxygen to produce sulfuric acid. The reaction results in an increase in electrical conductivity (EC) and a decrease in pH. The assay is based on the inhibition of SOB in the presence of toxic chemicals by measuring changes in EC and pH. We found that SOB biosensor can detect toxic chemicals, such as heavy metals and CN-, in the 5-2000ppb range. One bacterium was isolated from an SOB biosensor and the 16S rRNA gene of the bacterial strain has 99% and 96% sequence similarity to Acidithiobacillus sp. ORCS6 and Acidithiobacillus caldus DSM 8584, respectively. The isolate was identified as A. caldus SMK. The SOB biosensor is ideally suited for monitoring toxic chemicals in water having the advantages of high sensitivity and quick detection.

  10. Neutrophils from p40phox-/- mice exhibit severe defects in NADPH oxidase regulation and oxidant-dependent bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellson, Chris D; Davidson, Keith; Ferguson, G John; O'Connor, Rod; Stephens, Len R; Hawkins, Phillip T

    2006-08-07

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex plays a critical role in the antimicrobial functions of the phagocytic cells of the immune system. The catalytic core of this oxidase consists of a complex between gp91(phox), p22(phox), p47(phox), p67(phox), p40(phox), and rac-2. Mutations in each of the phox components, except p40(phox), have been described in cases of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), defining their essential role in oxidase function. We sought to establish the role of p40(phox) by investigating the NADPH oxidase responses of neutrophils isolated from p40(phox-/-) mice. In the absence of p40(phox), the expression of p67(phox) is reduced by approximately 55% and oxidase responses to tumor necrosis factor alpha/fibrinogen, immunoglobulin G latex beads, Staphylococcus aureus, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, and zymosan were reduced by approximately 97, 85, 84, 75, and 30%, respectively. The defect in ROS production by p40(phox-/-) neutrophils in response to S. aureus translated into a severe, CGD-like defect in the killing of this organism both in vitro and in vivo, defining p40(phox) as an essential component in bacterial killing.

  11. The Diversity of Sulfide Oxidation and Sulfate Reduction Genes Expressed by the Bacterial Communities of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Mora, Maria J; Edgcomb, Virginia P; Taylor, Craig; Scranton, Mary I; Taylor, Gordon T; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative expression of dissimilative sulfite reductase (dsrA), a key gene in sulfate reduction, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (sqr), a key gene in sulfide oxidation was investigated. Neither of the two could be amplified from mRNA retrieved with Niskin bottles but were amplified from mRNA retrieved by the Deep SID. The sqr and sqr-like genes retrieved from the Cariaco Basin were related to the sqr genes from a Bradyrhizobium sp., Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum, Sulfurovum sp. NBC37-1, Sulfurimonas autotrophica, Thiorhodospira sibirica and Chlorobium tepidum. The dsrA gene sequences obtained from the redoxcline of the Cariaco Basin belonged to chemoorganotrophic and chemoautotrophic sulfate and sulfur reducers belonging to the class Deltaproteobacteria (phylum Proteobacteria) and the order Clostridiales (phylum Firmicutes).

  12. Immobilization of bacterial S-layer proteins from Caulobacter crescentus on iron oxide-based nanocomposite: Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of zincite-coated Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Neda

    Zinc oxide was coated on Fe2O3 nanoparticles using sol-gel spin-coating. Caulobacter crescentus have a crystalline surface layer (S-layer), which consist of one protein or glycoprotein species. The immobilization of bacterial S-layers obtained from C. crescentus on zincite-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide was investigated. The SDS PAGE results of S-layers isolated from C. crescentus showed the weight of 50 KDa. Nanoparticles of the Fe2O3 and zinc oxide were synthesized by a sol-gel technique. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm were successfully prepared by the proper deposition of zinc oxide onto iron oxide nanoparticles surface annealed at 450 °C. The samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  13. Graphene Oxide/Silver Nanohybrid as Multi-functional Material for Highly Efficient Bacterial Disinfection and Detection of Organic Dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Le Thi; Dinh, Ngo Xuan; Van Cuong, Nguyen; Van Quy, Nguyen; Huy, Tran Quang; Ngo, Duc-The; Mølhave, Kristian; Le, Anh-Tuan

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a multi-functional hybrid system consisting of graphene oxide and silver nanoparticles (GO-Ag NPs) was successfully synthesized by using a two-step chemical process. We firstly demonstrated noticeable bactericidal ability of the GO-Ag hybrid system. We provide more chemo-physical evidence explaining the antibacterial behavior of GO-Ag nanohybrid against Gram-negative Escherichia Coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus in light of ultrastructural damage analyses and Ag1+ ions release rate onto the cells/medium. A further understanding of the mode of antimicrobial action is very important for designing and developing advanced antimicrobial systems. Secondly, we have also demonstrated that the GO-Ag nanohybrid material could be used as a potential surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to detect and quantify organic dyes, e.g., methylene blue (MB), in aqueous media. Our findings revealed that the GO-Ag hybrid system showed better SERS performance of MB detection than that of pure Ag-NPs. MB could be detected at a concentration as low as 1 ppm. The GO-Ag-based SERS platform can be effectively used to detect trace concentrations of various types of organic dyes in aqueous media. With the aforementioned properties, the GO-Ag hybrid system is found to be very promising as a multi-functional material for advanced biomedicine and environmental monitoring applications.

  14. Bacterial stimuli activate nitric oxide colonic mucosal production in diverticular disease. Protective effects of L. casei DG® (Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-1572).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Fabio; Andreozzi, Paolo; Palumbo, Ilaria; Zito, Francesco Paolo; Cargiolli, Martina; Fiore, Walter; Gennarelli, Nicola; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni; Cuomo, Rosario

    2017-08-01

    Micro-inflammation and changes in gut microbiota may play a role in the pathogenesis of diverticular disease (DD). The objective of this article is to evaluate the expression of nitric oxide (NO)-related mediators and S100B in colonic mucosa of patients with DD in an ex vivo model of bacterial infection. Intestinal biopsies obtained from patients with diverticulosis, symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease (SUDD) and SUDD with previous acute diverticulitis (SUDD+AD) were stimulated with the probiotic L. casei DG® (LCDG) and/or the pathogen enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC). S100B, NO release and iNOS expression were then evaluated. Basal iNOS expression was significantly increased in SUDD and SUDD+AD patients. Basal NO expression was significantly increased in SUDD+AD. No differences in S100B release were found. In all groups, iNOS expression was significantly increased by EIEC and reduced by LCDG. In all groups, except for SUDD+AD, EIEC significantly increased NO release, whereas no increase was observed when LCDG was added to biopsies. EIEC did not induce significant changes in S100B release. Colonic mucosa of patients with DD is characterized by a different reactivity toward pathogenic stimuli. LCDG plays a role in counteracting the pro-inflammatory effects exerted by EIEC, suggesting a beneficial role of this probiotic in DD.

  15. Impacts of organic and inorganic fertilizers on nitrification in a cold climate soil are linked to the bacterial ammonia oxidizer community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fenliang; Yang, Qianbao; Li, Zhaojun; Wei, Dan; Cui, Xi'an; Liang, Yongchao

    2011-11-01

    The microbiology underpinning soil nitrogen cycling in northeast China remains poorly understood. These agricultural systems are typified by widely contrasting temperature, ranging from -40 to 38°C. In a long-term site in this region, the impacts of mineral and organic fertilizer amendments on potential nitrification rate (PNR) were determined. PNR was found to be suppressed by long-term mineral fertilizer treatment but enhanced by manure treatment. The abundance and structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) and archaeal (AOA) communities were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis techniques. The abundance of AOA was reduced by all fertilizer treatments, while the opposite response was measured for AOB, leading to a six- to 60-fold reduction in AOA/AOB ratio. The community structure of AOA exhibited little variation across fertilization treatments, whereas the structure of the AOB community was highly responsive. PNR was correlated with community structure of AOB rather than that of AOA. Variation in the community structure of AOB was linked to soil pH, total carbon, and nitrogen contents induced by different long-term fertilization regimes. The results suggest that manure amendment establishes conditions which select for an AOB community type which recovers mineral fertilizer-suppressed soil nitrification.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Atmospheric-Methane-Oxidizing Bacterial Community Structure and Activity in an Alpine Glacier Forefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiri, E.; Nauer, P. A.; Rainer, E. M.; Zeyer, J. A.; Schroth, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    High-affinity methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) play a crucial role in regulating the sink strength for atmospheric methane (CH4) in upland soils. Community structure and activity of MOB have been extensively studied in developed soils. However, little is known about their ecosystem service in young, developing soils. Examples of developing soils are found in Alpine glacier forefields, which progressively expand due to glacial retreat. Glacier forefields exhibit diverse geomorphological landforms, which may differ in biogeochemical properties. Also, glacier forefields are subject to seasonal variability in environmental parameters such as soil temperature and water content, which may affect MOB community structure and activity. We recently showed that glacier-forefield soils are a sink for atmospheric CH4, but a comprehensive understanding of crucial factors affecting MOB community structure and activity is still missing. In this study we assessed soil-atmosphere CH4 flux and MOB community structure in three different glacier-forefield landforms (sandhills, floodplains, terraces) throughout a snow-free sampling season. Specifically, we quantified CH4 flux using the soil-gas-profile method and static flux chambers. The MOB community structure was assessed using next-generation sequencing technology (Illumina-MiSeqTM) targeting the functional gene pmoA. We observed substantial differences in CH4 flux between soils of different landforms, with largest fluxes observed in well-drained sandhills (up to -2.2 mg CH4 m-2 d-1) and considerably smaller fluxes in other landforms. Methane flux showed a prominent seasonal variability, which was attenuated in older forefield soils. High-diversity MOB communities and a remarkable number of landform-specific operational taxonomic units were found in sandhills, whereas a lower diversity was observed in other landforms. Our phylogenetic analysis suggests the presence of a potentially new group of MOB inhabiting glacier-forefield soils.

  17. Variation of Potential Nitrification and Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Community with Plant-Growing Period in Apple Orchard Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ling-zhi; QIN Si-jun; L De-guo; WANG Bing-ying; YANG Ze-yuan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential nitriifcation and community structure of soil-based ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in apple orchard soil during different growth periods and explored the effects of environmental factors on nitriifcation activity and AOB community composition in the soil of a Hanfu apple orchard, using a culture-dependent technique and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We observed that nitrification activity and AOB abundance were the highest in November, lower in May, and the lowest in July. The results of statistical analysis indicated that total nitrogen (N) content, NH4+-N content, NO3--N content, and pH showed signiifcant correlations with AOB abundance and nitriifcation activity in soil. The Shannon-Winner diversity, as well as species richness and evenness indices (determined by PCR-DGGE banding patterns) in soil samples were the highest in September, but the lowest in July, when compared to additional sampled dates. The DGGE ifngerprints of soil-based 16S rRNA genes in November were apparently distinct from those observed in May, July, and September, possessing the lowest species richness indices and the highest dominance indices among all four growth periods. Fourteen DGGE bands were excised for sequencing. The resulting analysis indicated that all AOB communities belonged to the β-Proteobacteriaphylum, with the dominant AOB showing high similarity to theNitrosospira genus. Therefore, soil-based environmental factors, such as pH variation and content of NH4+-N and NO3--N, can substantially inlfuence the abundance of AOB communities in soil, and play a critical role in soil-based nitriifcation kinetics.

  18. Observing the confinement potential of bacterial pore-forming toxin receptors inside rafts with nonblinking Eu(3+)-doped oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkcan, Silvan; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Casanova, Didier; Mialon, Geneviève; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre; Popoff, Michel R; Alexandrou, Antigoni

    2012-05-16

    We track single toxin receptors on the apical cell membrane of MDCK cells with Eu-doped oxide nanoparticles coupled to two toxins of the pore-forming toxin family: α-toxin of Clostridium septicum and ε-toxin of Clostridium perfringens. These nonblinking and photostable labels do not perturb the motion of the toxin receptors and yield long uninterrupted trajectories with mean localization precision of 30 nm for acquisition times of 51.3 ms. We were thus able to study the toxin-cell interaction at the single-molecule level. Toxins bind to receptors that are confined within zones of mean area 0.40 ± 0.05 μm(2). Assuming that the receptors move according to the Langevin equation of motion and using Bayesian inference, we determined mean diffusion coefficients of 0.16 ± 0.01 μm(2)/s for both toxin receptors. Moreover, application of this approach revealed a force field within the domain generated by a springlike confining potential. Both toxin receptors were found to experience forces characterized by a mean spring constant of 0.30 ± 0.03 pN/μm at 37°C. Furthermore, both toxin receptors showed similar distributions of diffusion coefficient, domain area, and spring constant. Control experiments before and after incubation with cholesterol oxidase and sphingomyelinase show that these two enzymes disrupt the confinement domains and lead to quasi-free motion of the toxin receptors. Our control data showing cholesterol and sphingomyelin dependence as well as independence of actin depolymerization and microtubule disruption lead us to attribute the confinement of both receptors to lipid rafts. These toxins require oligomerization to develop their toxic activity. The confined nature of the toxin receptors leads to a local enhancement of the toxin monomer concentration and may thus explain the virulence of this toxin family.

  19. The effects of manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve chitosan microspheres on sludge bacterial community structures during sewage biological treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fei; Liu, Wen; Yu, Yang; Yin, Xianze; Wang, Qingrong; Zheng, Ziyan; Wu, Min; Zhao, Dongye; Zhang, Qiu; Lei, Xiaoman; Xia, Dongsheng

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the effects of manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve chitosan microspheres (Fe3O4@OMS-2@CTS) on anaerobic and aerobic microbial communities during sewage biological treatment. The addition of Fe3O4@OMS-2@CTS (0.25 g/L) resulted in enhanced levels of operational performance for decolourization dye X-3B. However, degradation dye X-3B inhibition in the presence of Fe3O4@OMS-2@CTS was recorded as greater than or equal to 1.00 g/L. Illumina MiSeq high throughput sequencing of the 16 S rRNA gene showed that 108 genera were observed during the anaerobic process, while only 71 genera were observed during the aerobic process. The largest genera (Aequorivita) decreased from 21.14% to 12.65% and the Pseudomonas genera increased from 10.57% to 12.96% according to the abundance in the presence of 0.25 g/L Fe3O4@OMS-2@CTS during the anaerobic process. The largest Gemmatimonas genera decreased from 21.46% to 11.68% and the Isosphaerae genera increased from 5.8% to 11.98% according to the abundance in the presence of 0.25 g/L Fe3O4@OMS-2@CTS during the aerobic process. Moreover, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that the valence states of Mn and Fe in Fe3O4@OMS-2@CTS changed during sewage biological treatment.

  20. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Bacterial Vaginosis – CDC Fact Sheet Language: English (US) Españ ...

  1. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues > Conditions > Sexually Transmitted > Bacterial Vaginosis Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Bacterial Vaginosis Page Content Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in sexually active teenaged girls . It appears to be caused by ...

  2. Bacterial Sialidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  3. Mimicking the oxygen minimum zones: stimulating interaction of aerobic archaeal and anaerobic bacterial ammonia oxidizers in a laboratory-scale model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, J.; Haaijer, S.C.M.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; van Niftrik, L.; Stahl, D.A.; Könneke, M.; Rush, D.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hu, Y.Y.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) rather than marine ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) may provide nitrite to anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria. Here we demonstrate the cooperation between marine anammox bacteria and nitrifiers in a laboratory-scale

  4. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common types of bacterial gastroenteritis in a couple of days. The goal is to make you feel better and avoid dehydration. Drinking enough fluids and learning what to eat will help ease symptoms. You ...

  5. Bacterial vaginosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Islam, Aliya; Safdar, Anjum; Malik, Ayesha

    2009-01-01

    To estimate the frequency of bacterial vaginosis in women with preterm labour. Descriptive cross sectional study carried out in department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Military Hospital and Army Medical College Laboratory, Rawalpindi...

  6. Active-Site Models of Bacterial Nitric Oxide Reductase Featuring Tris-Histidyl and Glutamic Acid Mimics: Influence of Carboxylate Ligand on FeB Binding and Heme Fe/FeB Redox Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collman, James P.; Yan, Yi-Long; Lei, Jianping; Dinolfo, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Active-site models of bacterial nitric oxide reductase (NOR) featuring a heme iron and a trisimidazole and a glutaric acid-bound non-heme iron (FeB) have been synthesized. These models closely replicate the proposed active site of native NORs. Examination of these models shows that the glutamic acid mimic is required for both FeB retention in the distal binding site and proper modulation of the redox potentials of both the heme and non-heme irons. PMID:16961346

  7. Manganese Oxidation by Bacteria: Biogeochemical Aspects

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Manganese is an essential trace metal that is not as readily oxidizable like iron. Several bacterial groups posses the ability to oxidize Mn effectively competing with chemical oxidation. The oxides of Mn are the strongest of the oxidants, next...

  8. Effects of Pinus sylvestris root growth and mycorrhizosphere development on bacterial carbon source utilization and hydrocarbon oxidation in forest and petroleum-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonsalo, J; Haahtela, K.; Sen, R. [Helsinki Univ., Dept. of Biosciences, Helsinki (Finland); Jorgensen, K. S. [Finnish Environmental Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    2000-05-01

    A forest ecosystem-based phytoremediation simulation project was carried out to demonstrate that pine root and mycorrhizosphere development beneficially influence bacterial community-linked carbon utilization. The process is also believed to drive a concomitant reduction of mineral oil levels in petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC)-contaminated soil. Results showed that total cell and culturable bacterial densities significantly increased in both rhizospheres and mycorrhizospheres that actively developed in the humus and PHC-contaminated soil. It was also observed that mycorrhizospheres supported the largest number of bacteria. The multivariate analysis of bacterial community carbon source utilization profiles from different rhizosphere, mycorrhizospheres, unplanted bulk soil and rhizosphere in contaminated soils highlighted three main niche-related groupings, and correspondence analysis identified amino acid preferences in rhizosphere and mycorrhizosphere compartments. Decreased levels of mineral oil were detected in PHC-contaminated soil colonized by pine root and mycorrhizal fungi, providing further confirmation of the importance of root-fungal bacterial associations in active transformations in higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in natural and contaminated soils. 61 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs.

  9. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  10. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  11. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  12. Enhanced killing of penicillin-treated gram-positive cocci by human granulocytes: role of bacterial autolysins, catalase, and granulocyte oxidative pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isturiz, R; Metcalf, J A; Root, R K

    1985-01-01

    Staphylococci pretreated with subminimal inhibitory concentrations (subMIC) of cell-wall active antibiotics exhibit increased susceptibility to killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), even when phagosome information is impaired by the mold metabolite, cytochalasin B. To investigate the role of specific bacterial factors in the process, studies were carried out with organisms lacking catalase (streptococci) or cell-wall autolytic enzymes and compared to findings with Staphylococcus aureus 502A. Neutrophil factors were studied using inhibitors, oxygen radical scavengers, myeloperoxidase (MPO)-deficient PMNs, or PMNs from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Documentation of the enhanced susceptibility of the streptococcal strains to killing by PMNs following subMIC penicillin pretreatment required the use of cytochalasin B. Enhancement of killing occurred independent of the presence or absence of bacterial autolysins or catalase. SubMIC penicillin pretreatment of S. pneumoniae R36A specifically promoted the susceptibility of these organisms to killing by myeloperoxidase (MPO)-mediated mechanisms (enhancement lost using MPO-deficient or azide-treated cells). Factors other than MPO or toxic oxygen products generated by the PMN respiratory burst are responsible for enhanced killing of penicillin-pretreated S. aureus 502A (enhancement preserved using MPO-deficient, azide-treated, or chronic granulomatous disease patient cells). These studies define methods to study the interaction of antimicrobial agents and PMNs in the killing of microorganisms. They also demonstrate that penicillin treatment can change the susceptibility of gram-positive cocci to the action of specific PMN microbicidal mechanisms. The mechanism of the enhancement appears to be bacterial strain-dependent and not predictable by bacterial autolysin or catalase activity.

  13. Oxidation of calprotectin by hypochlorous acid prevents chelation of essential metal ions and allows bacterial growth: Relevance to infections in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magon, Nicholas J; Turner, Rufus; Gearry, Richard B; Hampton, Mark B; Sly, Peter D; Kettle, Anthony J

    2015-09-01

    Calprotectin provides nutritional immunity by sequestering manganese and zinc ions. It is abundant in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis but fails to prevent their recurrent infections. Calprotectin is a major protein of neutrophils and composed of two monomers, S100A8 and S100A9. We show that the ability of calprotectin to limit growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is exquisitely sensitive to oxidation by hypochlorous acid. The N-terminal cysteine residue on S100A9 was highly susceptible to oxidation which resulted in cross-linking of the protein monomers. The N-terminal methionine of S100A8 was also readily oxidized by hypochlorous acid, forming both the methionine sulfoxide and the unique product dehydromethionine. Isolated human neutrophils formed these modifications on calprotectin when their myeloperoxidase generated hypochlorous acid. Up to 90% of the N-terminal amine on S100A8 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from young children with cystic fibrosis was oxidized. Oxidized calprotectin was higher in children with cystic fibrosis compared to disease controls, and further elevated in those patients with infections. Our data suggest that oxidative stress associated with inflammation in cystic fibrosis will stop metal sequestration by calprotectin. Consequently, strategies aimed at blocking extracellular myeloperoxidase activity should enable calprotectin to provide nutritional immunity within the airways.

  14. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists.

  15. 3-D analysis of bacterial cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using complementary microscopy tomography approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, G; Zeitvogel, F; Hao, L; Ingino, P; Floetenmeyer, M; Stierhof, Y-D; Schroeppel, B; Burkhardt, C J; Kappler, A; Obst, M

    2014-07-01

    The formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates as a consequence of bacterial iron oxidation is an environmentally widespread process with a number of implications for processes such as sorption and coprecipitation of contaminants and nutrients. Whereas the overall appearance of such aggregates is easily accessible using 2-D microscopy techniques, the 3-D and internal structure remain obscure. In this study, we examined the 3-D structure of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using a combination of advanced 3-D microscopy techniques. We obtained 3-D structural and chemical information on different cellular encrustation patterns at high spatial resolution (4-200 nm, depending on the method): more specifically, (1) cells free of iron minerals, (2) periplasm filled with iron minerals, (3) spike- or platelet-shaped iron mineral structures, (4) bulky structures on the cell surface, (5) extracellular iron mineral shell structures, (6) cells with iron mineral filled cytoplasm, and (7) agglomerations of extracellular globular structures. In addition to structural information, chemical nanotomography suggests a dominant role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in controlling the formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates. Furthermore, samples in their hydrated state showed cell-(iron)mineral aggregates in pristine conditions free of preparation (i.e., drying/dehydration) artifacts. All these results were obtained using 3-D microscopy techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tomography, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tomography, scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) tomography, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). It turned out that, due to the various different contrast mechanisms of the individual approaches, and due to the required sample preparation steps, only the combination of these techniques was able to provide a

  16. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... in the formation of highly complex sessile communities, referred to as biofilms. Such microbial communities are often highly dynamic and heterogeneous in nature. Microbial biofilms are of great importance in a wide range of natural processes and industrial settings, from the commensal flora of the gastrointestinal...

  17. Extraction of Au from high arsenic refractory gold concentrate by bacterial oxidation-cyanidation%高砷难处理金精矿细菌氧化-氰化提金

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玮; 覃文庆; 刘瑞强; 任允超

    2011-01-01

    Through blending low arsenic carbonate gold concentrate with different ratios into high arsenic-containing gold concentrate and changing the content of major ores, such as sulfur, arsenic and iron, the effect of iron-arsenic molar ratio on the bacteria oxidating-cyaniding extraction from high arsenic-containing refractory gold concentrate was investigated. The result shows that the iron-arsenic mole ratio of arsenic-containing gold concentrate has direct effect on the bacteria oxidation, bacteria activity and iron-arsenic molar ratio in solution. High iron-arsenic mole ratio in feeding results in high iron-arsenic ratio in solution. With iron-arsenic molar ratio increasing, the iron-arsenic ratio increases, and the frequency of change accelerates. The iron-arsenic ratio ranging from 4.6 to 5.2 is helpful to bacteria oxidizing-cyaniding extraction, the oxidation ratios of iron and arsenic increase to 89.90% and 93.60% from 6.14% and 7.38%, respectively. The extraction rate of gold and silver increase to 97.78% and 88.83% from 64.18% and 35.93%,respectively. Choosing appropriate iron-arsenic molar ratio can effectively improve the bacterial oxidation, stabilizes and optimize the process of bacterial pre-oxidation.%通过在高砷金精矿中配入不同比例的低砷碳酸盐型金精矿,使其所含硫、砷及铁等主要矿物成分含量发生变化,研究给矿中铁砷摩尔比对难处理高砷金精矿细菌氧化一氰化浸出效果的影响.结果表明:含砷金精矿中铁砷摩尔比直接影响细菌预氧化的效果,同时也影响细菌的活性和溶液中铁砷摩尔比的变化,给矿中铁砷摩尔比越高,溶液中的铁砷摩尔比也越高,且随着给矿中铁砷摩尔比的增加,溶液中铁砷摩尔比的变化幅度加大,给矿中铁砷摩尔比介于4.6~2之间,有利于细菌预氧化和氰化浸出,铁、砷氧化率分别由6.14%和7.38%提高到89.90%和93.60%,金、银浸出率分别由64.18%和35.93%提高到97

  18. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  19. Distribution and abundance of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers in the sediments of the Dongjiang River, a drinking water supply for Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Xia, Chunyu; Xu, Meiying; Guo, Jun; Wang, Aijie; Sun, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) play important roles in nitrification. However, limited information about the characteristics of AOA and AOB in the river ecosystem is available. The distribution and abundance of AOA and AOB in the sediments of the Dongjiang River, a drinking water source for Hong Kong, were investigated by clone library analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Group 1.1b- and Group 1.1b-associated sequences of AOA predominated in sediments with comparatively high carbon and nitrogen contents (e.g. total carbon (TC) >13 g kg(-1) sediment, NH4(+)-N >144 mg kg(-1) sediment), while Group 1.1a- and Group 1.1a-associated sequences were dominant in sediments with opposite conditions (e.g. TC distribution of AOA and the sediment pH and TC, which suggested that AOA responded more sensitively than AOB to variations of environmental factors. These results extend our knowledge about the environmental responses of ammonia oxidizers in the river ecosystem.

  20. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Bacterial vaginosis (also called BV or vaginitis) is an infection ...

  1. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... page It's been added to your dashboard . Bacterial vaginosis (also called BV or vaginitis) is an infection ...

  2. Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000687.htm Bacterial vaginosis - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... back after you use the bathroom. Preventing Bacterial Vaginosis You can help prevent bacterial vaginosis by: Not ...

  3. Bacterial pericarditis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial pericarditis is an inflammation of the pericardium, the sac-like covering of the heart, caused by a bacterial infection. The bacterial infection causes inflammation and swelling of the pericardium. Pain ...

  4. Efficiency of Vanilla, Patchouli and Ylang Ylang Essential Oils Stabilized by Iron Oxide@C14 Nanostructures against Bacterial Adherence and Biofilms Formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Bilcu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14 in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties.

  5. Mechanistic investigations on six bacterial terpene cyclases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Rabe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The products obtained by incubation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP with six purified bacterial terpene cyclases were characterised by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, allowing for a full structure elucidation. The absolute configurations of four terpenes were determined based on their optical rotary powers. Incubation experiments with 13C-labelled isotopomers of FPP in buffers containing water or deuterium oxide allowed for detailed insights into the cyclisation mechanisms of the bacterial terpene cyclases.

  6. Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies enhances the effects of disulfide bonds reducer on Escherichia coli growth and affects the bacterial surface oxidation-reduction state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgomyan, Heghine; Trchounian, Armen

    2011-10-14

    Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies (flux capacity - 0.06 mW cm(-2)) had bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli. This EMI (1h) exposure suppressed the growth of E. coli K-12(λ). The pH value (6.0-8.0) did not significantly affect the growth. The lag-phase duration was prolonged, and the growth specific rate was inhibited, and these effects were more noticeable after 73 GHz irradiation. These effects were enhanced by the addition of DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), a strong reducer of disulfide bonds in surface membrane proteins, which in its turn also has bactericidal effect. Further, the number of accessible SH-groups in membrane vesicles was markedly decreased by EMI that was augmented by N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide and DTT. These results indicate a change in the oxidation-reduction state of bacterial cell membrane proteins that could be the primary membranous mechanism in the bactericidal effects of low-intensity EMI of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies.

  7. OxyR and SoxR modulate the inducible oxidative stress response and are implicated during different stages of infection for the bacterial phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey; Roper, M Caroline

    2014-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) from a variety of sources are often encountered by invading plant pathogens during the infection process. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the etiological agent of Stewart's wilt, is a serious bacterial pathogen of sweet corn that colonizes both the apoplast and xylem tissues in which ROS are produced. The P. stewartii genome predicts the presence of two redox-sensing transcriptional regulators, OxyR and SoxR, which both activate gene expression in response to oxidative stress. ROS exposure in the form of hydrogen peroxide and the superoxide-generating compound paraquat initiates an induced stress response through OxyR and SoxR that includes activation of the ROS-detoxifying enzymes alkyl hydroperoxide reductase and superoxide dismutase. P. stewartii ΔsoxR was more sensitive to paraquat and was compromised in the ability to form water-soaked lesions, while ΔoxyR was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide treatment and was deficient in exopolysaccharide production and the elicitation of wilting symptoms. This demonstrates that both SoxR and OxyR play an important role in virulence in the different niches that P. stewartii colonize during the infection process.

  8. Bacterial community distribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation biofilter at low temperature%低温厌氧氨氧化生物滤池细菌群落沿层分布规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾涛涛; 李冬; 刘涛; 邱文新; 蔡言安; 许达; 张杰

    2013-01-01

    通过扫描电镜(SEM)、变性梯度凝胶电泳技术(DGGE)和克隆测序等方法,对低温(14.9~16.2℃)稳定运行的上流式厌氧氨氧化(ANAMMOX)生物滤池内上(140~190 cm)、中(60~140 m)、下(10~60 cm)3部分细菌群落分布进行研究.研究结果表明:大部分氨氮、亚氮在反应器中部呈比例地去除,总氮去除负荷达2.4 kg/(m3.d);类似ANAMMOX菌的球形细菌主要分布在反应器中部;生物滤柱上部细菌多样性最高,中部其次,下层细菌多样性最低,细菌群落结构沿层变化是适应生物滤柱沿层氮素变化的结果;生物滤柱不同滤层分布着同一种厌氧氨氧化菌(ANAMMOX)与好氧氨氧化菌(AOB),克隆测序鉴定ANAMMOX菌为Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis,AOB为Nitrosomonas sp.ENI-11:AOB的存在能够消耗进水中的微量溶解氧,为反应器创造厌氧环境,有利于生物滤柱中部富集较多的ANAMMOX菌.%Techniques of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), cloning and sequencing were utilized together to study bacterial community distribution of upper (140-190 cm), middle (60-140 cm) and lower (10-60 cm) parts of an up-flow anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) biofilter, which was run stably at low temperature (14.9-16.2 ℃). The results show that a large proportion of ammonia and nitrite proportional disappears in the middle part of biofilter and a high total nitrogen removal rate of 2.4 kg/(m3·d) is obtained. The spherical bacteria, which is similar to ANAMMOX bacteria, predominates in the middle part of biofilter. There is the highest bacterial diversity in the upper part of biofilter, followed by middle part and minimum bacterial diversity in lower part. Bacterial community structures varied in different parts of biofilter due to nitrogen distinction along biofilter layer. There is only one type of ANAMMOX bacterium and AOB presented in different parts of biofilter, which are identified as

  9. Bacterial gasotransmitters: an innate defense against antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhachack, Lyly; Nudler, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    In recent decades, there has been growing interest in the field of gasotransmitters, endogenous gaseous signaling molecules (NO, H2S, and CO), as regulators of a multitude of biochemical pathways and physiological processes. Most of the concerted effort has been on eukaryotic gasotransmitters until the subsequent discovery of bacterial counterparts. While the fundamental aspects of bacterial gasotransmitters remain undefined and necessitate further research, we will discuss a known specific role they play in defense against antibiotics. Considering the current dilemma of multidrug-resistant bacteria we consider it particularly prudent to exploring novel targets and approaches, of which the bacterial gasotransmitters, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide represent.

  10. The Isolation and Identification of an Efficient Fe/Mn-oxidizing Bacterial Strain P1,and the Optimization of Its Oxidizing Conditions%一株高效铁锰氧化细菌P1的分离鉴定及氧化条件优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊星; 王淑婷; 李春艳

    2016-01-01

    By enrichment culture,a Fe/Mn-oxidizing bacterial strain P1 was isolated from the sludge samples of groundwater well that was rich in Fe/Mn. According to morphologic and physiological-biochemical characteristics as well as 16S rDNA sequence analysis,strain P1 was identified as Bacillus cereus. Concurrently,single factor test was used to study the growth of strain P1 and its oxidation characteristics;and the response surface methodology(RSM)was employed to explore the effects of inoculation size,temperature and pH on the oxidation characteristics of strain P1 and further optimize the oxidation conditions. The results showed that the optimal oxidation conditions were temperature 28.54℃,pH 7.23,and inoculation size 4.35%. At the optimal conditions,the removal ratios of Mn and Fe were 93%and 100%respectively in the selective medium containing 200 mg/L Fe and 800 mg/L Mn after strain P1 was cultured for 3 d.%利用富集培养技术从富含铁锰的地下水井淤泥中分离得到1株能够氧化铁锰的细菌,命名为P1。经形态特征、生理生化特征和16S rDNA序列分析,将菌株P1鉴定为蜡状芽孢杆菌(Bacillus cereus)。利用单因素实验探讨菌株P1的生长及氧化特性;采用响应面分析方法考察接种量、温度、pH值3个因素对菌株P1氧化特性的影响,进一步优化菌株的氧化条件。结果表明,菌株P1的最佳氧化条件:温度28.54℃,pH7.23,接种量4.35%。在此条件下,菌株P1在锰含量为200 mg/L、铁含量为800 mg/L的选择性培养液中培养3 d后,锰氧化率达93%以上,铁氧化率达100%。

  11. Nanoengineered Superhydrophobic Surfaces of Aluminum with Extremely Low Bacterial Adhesivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hizal, Ferdi; Rungraeng, Natthakan; Lee, Junghoon; Jun, Soojin; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on surfaces are troublesome in many industrial processes. Here, nanoporous and nanopillared aluminum surfaces were engineered by anodizing and postetching processes and made hydrophilic (using the inherent oxide layer) or hydrophobic (applying a Teflon

  12. Bacterial oxygen production in the dark

    OpenAIRE

    Ettwig, K.F.; Speth, D. R.; Reimann, J.; Wu, M.L.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Keltjens, J T

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are among Nature’s most powerful electron acceptors. In recent years it became clear that microorganisms can take advantage of the oxidizing power of these compounds to degrade recalcitrant aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. For two unrelated bacterial species, the ‘NC10’ phylum bacterium ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera’ and the γ-proteobacterial strain HdN1 it has been suggested that under anoxic conditions with nitrate and/or nitrite, monooxy...

  13. The bacterial lux reporter system: applications in bacterial localisation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahan, Cormac G M

    2012-02-01

    Bacterial production of visible light is a natural phenomenon occurring in marine (Vibrio and Photobacterium) and terrestrial (Photorhabdus) species. The mechanism underpinning light production in these organisms is similar and involves the oxidation of an aldehyde substrate in a reaction catalysed by the bacterial luciferase enzyme. The genes encoding the luciferase and a fatty acid reductase complex which synthesizes the substrate are contained in a single operon (the lux operon). This provides a useful reporter system as cloning the operon into a recipient host bacterium will generate visible light without the requirement to add exogenous substrate. The light can be detected in vivo in the living animal using a sensitive detection system and is therefore ideally suited to bioluminescence imaging protocols. The system has therefore been widely used to track bacteria during infection or colonisation of the host. As bacteria are currently being examined as bactofection vectors for gene delivery, particularly to tumour tissue, the use of bioluminescence imaging offers a powerful means to investigate vector amplification in situ. The implications of this technology for bacterial localization, tumour targeting and gene transfer (bactofection) studies are discussed.

  14. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  15. Peritonitis - spontaneous bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP); Ascites - peritonitis; Cirrhosis - peritonitis ... who are on peritoneal dialysis for kidney failure. Peritonitis may have other causes . These include infection from ...

  16. 高海拔地区难处理金精矿的细菌氧化预处理及氰化浸金%Bacterial Pre-oxidation of Refractory Gold Concentrate from the High Altitude Areas and Cyanidation Leaching of Gold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张祉倩; 刘升明; 李超; 李宏煦; 吴超

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pre-oxidation of refractory gold ore from the high altitude areas was studied. The removal rates of Fe, S, As and cyanidation teaching rate of Au were examined under the different conditions. And the gold concentrate, oxidizing slag, and leaching residue were analyzed by XRD and SEM. The results indicated that the removal rates of Fe, S and As were up to 85% and the leaching rate of gold was 88.09%. Feasibility of bio-oxidation pretreatment in the high altitude areas was proved. Based on the experimental results, the bacterial oxidation mechanism of gold concentrates and acid solution neutralization were analyzed briefly. The bacterial oxidation of gold concentrate occurred under cooperative direct and indirect mechanism. Removal of the arsenic and heavy metal ions of liquid phase in the form of ferric arsenate and hydroxide precipitation was the main purpose of acid solution neutralization.%针对高海拔地区某难处理金精矿含砷高的特点,采用细菌氧化预处理工艺,考察在一定工艺条件下,Fe,S,As脱除率及金的氰化浸出率,并对金精矿及氧化渣、氰化渣进行了分析.结果表明,Fe,S,As脱除率均达85%以上,金氰化浸出率为88.09%,说明对该类矿物采用细菌氧化预处理工艺具有可行性.机理分析表明,细菌氧化金精矿是通过直接与间接协同作用机理;氧化酸液中和主要是将液相中砷以化学性质稳定的砷酸铁沉淀除去,将重金属离子等以氢氧化物沉淀去除.

  17. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...... valuable weapons for preventing pathogen contamination and fighting infectious diseases in the future....

  18. Bacterial diseases affecting apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial diseases of plants are usually difficult to control and often require a combination of control measures to successfully manage the disease. There are often stark differences between the means available to control bacterial diseases in annual crops versus a woody tree crop, such as apple. ...

  19. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...... about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria...

  20. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria....

  1. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  2. Bacterial surface adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  3. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  4. Bacterial toxins as immunomodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, David S; Williams, Neil A

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial toxins are the causative agent at pathology in a variety of diseases. Although not always the primary target of these toxins, many have been shown to have potent immunomodulatory effects, for example, inducing immune responses to co-administered antigens and suppressing activation of immune cells. These abilities of bacterial toxins can be harnessed and used in a therapeutic manner, such as in vaccination or the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, the ability of toxins to gain entry to cells can be used in novel bacterial toxin based immuno-therapies in order to deliver antigens into MHC Class I processing pathways. Whether the immunomodulatory properties of these toxins arose in order to enhance bacterial survival within hosts, to aid spread within the population or is pure serendipity, it is interesting to think that these same toxins potentially hold the key to preventing or treating human disease.

  5. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  6. Dequalinium for bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is an infection characterised by overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria in the vagina with an accompanying loss of lactobacilli, and is thought to be the most common cause of abnormal vaginal discharge in women of child-bearing age.(1) Standard treatment for symptomatic bacterial vaginosis consists of a short course of an oral or topical antibiotic.(2) Dequalinium, a topical antiseptic agent, has been available for many years as a treatment for oral infections.(3) A new formulation, dequalinium 10mg vaginal tablets (Fluomizin-Kora Healthcare), was licensed in the UK in June 2015 for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis.(4) Here, we review evidence for the effectiveness and safety of dequalinium vaginal tablets in the management of bacterial vaginosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing....... These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  8. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  9. The bacterial lipocalins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, R E

    2000-10-18

    The lipocalins were once regarded as a eukaryotic protein family, but new members have been recently discovered in bacteria. The first bacterial lipocalin (Blc) was identified in Escherichia coli as an outer membrane lipoprotein expressed under conditions of environmental stress. Blc is distinguished from most lipocalins by the absence of intramolecular disulfide bonds, but the presence of a membrane anchor is shared with two of its closest homologues, apolipoprotein D and lazarillo. Several common features of the membrane-anchored lipocalins suggest that each may play an important role in membrane biogenesis and repair. Additionally, Blc proteins are implicated in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and in the activation of immunity. Recent genome sequencing efforts reveal the existence of at least 20 bacterial lipocalins. The lipocalins appear to have originated in Gram-negative bacteria and were probably transferred horizontally to eukaryotes from the endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of the mitochondrion. The genome sequences also reveal that some bacterial lipocalins exhibit disulfide bonds and alternative modes of subcellular localization, which include targeting to the periplasmic space, the cytoplasmic membrane, and the cytosol. The relationships between bacterial lipocalin structure and function further illuminate the common biochemistry of bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  10. Lipoproteins of Bacterial Pathogens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs-Simon, A.; Titball, R. W.; Michell, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality, these proteins have a considerable significance in many phenomena, from cellular physiology through cell division and virulence. Here we give a general overview of lipoprotein biogenesis and highlight examples of the roles of lipoproteins in bacterial disease caused by a selection of medically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Neisseria meningitidis. Lipoproteins have been shown to play key roles in adhesion to host cells, modulation of inflammatory processes, and translocation of virulence factors into host cells. As such, a number of lipoproteins have been shown to be potential vaccines. This review provides a summary of some of the reported roles of lipoproteins and of how this knowledge has been exploited in some cases for the generation of novel countermeasures to bacterial diseases. PMID:20974828

  11. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  12. Bacterial blight of cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïda JALLOUL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial blight of cotton (Gossypium ssp., caused by Xanthomonas citri pathovar malvacearum, is a severe disease occurring in all cotton-growing areas. The interactions between host plants and the bacteria are based on the gene-for-gene concept, representing a complex resistance gene/avr gene system. In light of the recent data, this review focuses on the understanding of these interactions with emphasis on (1 the genetic basis for plant resistance and bacterial virulence, (2 physiological mechanisms involved in the hypersensitive response to the pathogen, including hormonal signaling, the oxylipin pathway, synthesis of antimicrobial molecules and alteration of host cell structures, and (3 control of the disease.

  13. Bacterial glycosyltransferase toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Mono-glycosylation of host proteins is a common mechanism by which bacterial protein toxins manipulate cellular functions of eukaryotic target host cells. Prototypic for this group of glycosyltransferase toxins are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which modify guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the Rho family. However, toxin-induced glycosylation is not restricted to the Clostridia. Various types of bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Yersinia, Photorhabdus and Legionella species produce glycosyltransferase toxins. Recent studies discovered novel unexpected variations in host protein targets and amino acid acceptors of toxin-catalysed glycosylation. These findings open new perspectives in toxin as well as in carbohydrate research.

  14. [Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velkey, Bálint; Vitális, Eszter; Vitális, Zsuzsanna

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis occurs most commonly in cirrhotic patients with ascites. Pathogens get into the circulation by intestinal translocation and colonize in peritoneal fluid. Diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is based on elevated polymorphonuclear leukocyte count in the ascites (>0,25 G/L). Ascites culture is often negative but aids to get information about antibiotic sensitivity in positive cases. Treatment in stable patient can be intravenous then orally administrated ciprofloxacin or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, while in severe cases intravenous III. generation cephalosporin. Nosocomial spontaneous bacterial peritonitis often caused by Gram-positive bacteria and multi-resistant pathogens can also be expected thus carbapenem should be the choice of the empiric treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be considered. Norfloxacin is used most commonly, but changes are expected due to increase in quinolone resistance. As a primary prophylaxis, a short-term antibiotic treatment is recommended after gastrointestinal bleeding for 5 days, while long-term prophylaxis is for patients with low ascites protein, and advanced disease (400 mg/day). Secondary prophylaxis is recommended for all patients recovered from spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Due to increasing antibiotic use of antibiotics prophylaxis is debated to some degree. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(2), 50-57.

  15. Seizures Complicating Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical data of 116 patients, 1 month to <5 years of age, admitted for bacterial meningitis, and grouped according to those with and without seizures during hospitalization, were compared in a study at Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and other centers in Taiwan.

  16. Bacterial fingerprints across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasner, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE), impose major threats to human health worldwide. Both have a ‘Jekyll & Hyde’ character, since they can be present as human commensals, but can also become harmful invasive pathogens especially

  17. Bacterial cell factoriest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, van Richard

    2017-01-01

    The research of Bacterial Cell Factories aims to apply bacteria for production of biobased chemicals from renewable resources. The focus lies on thermophilic Gram-positives. This group of relatively unexplored thermophiles has many relevant characteristics that make them attractive as production

  18. Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Díaz-Pérez, César; Vargas, Eréndira; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Campos-García, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2008-06-01

    Chromium is a non-essential and well-known toxic metal for microorganisms and plants. The widespread industrial use of this heavy metal has caused it to be considered as a serious environmental pollutant. Chromium exists in nature as two main species, the trivalent form, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous, and the hexavalent form, Cr(VI), considered a more toxic species. At the intracellular level, however, Cr(III) seems to be responsible for most toxic effects of chromium. Cr(VI) is usually present as the oxyanion chromate. Inhibition of sulfate membrane transport and oxidative damage to biomolecules are associated with the toxic effects of chromate in bacteria. Several bacterial mechanisms of resistance to chromate have been reported. The best characterized mechanisms comprise efflux of chromate ions from the cell cytoplasm and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Chromate efflux by the ChrA transporter has been established in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Cupriavidus metallidurans (formerly Alcaligenes eutrophus) and consists of an energy-dependent process driven by the membrane potential. The CHR protein family, which includes putative ChrA orthologs, currently contains about 135 sequences from all three domains of life. Chromate reduction is carried out by chromate reductases from diverse bacterial species generating Cr(III) that may be detoxified by other mechanisms. Most characterized enzymes belong to the widespread NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein family of reductases. Several examples of bacterial systems protecting from the oxidative stress caused by chromate have been described. Other mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromate involve the expression of components of the machinery for repair of DNA damage, and systems related to the homeostasis of iron and sulfur.

  19. Comparison of Cultivable Acetic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in Organic and Conventional Apple Cider Vinegar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aleksandra Stornik; Barbara Skok; Janja Trcek

    2016-01-01

      The authors compared the cultivable acetic acid bacterial microbiota in the production of organic and conventional apple cider vinegars from a smoothly running oxidation cycle of a submerged industrial process...

  20. Comparison of the efficiency of titanium(IV) and iron(III) oxide nanoparticles as mediators in suppression of bacterial growth by radiation of a blue (405 nm) light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, P. O.; Tuchina, E. S.; Kulikova, M. V.; Kochubei, V. I.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    The effect of blue (405 nm) radiation of a light-emitting diode in combination with titanium(IV) and iron(III) oxide nanoparticles on S. aureus 209 P, S. simulans, and D. hominis bacteria is studied. It is shown that, upon irradiation of bacteria by blue (405 nm) light, Fe2O3 nanoparticles have a stronger (by 5-30%) antibacterial effect than TiO2 nanoparticles.

  1. Evaluación de oxidación bacteriana de sulfuros con Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans mediante pruebas de FTIR y difracción de rayos X Evaluating Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans bacterial oxidation of sulphur compounds using FTIR and X-ray diffraction assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz Orlando

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Una cepa bacteriana nativa con capacidad de oxidar hierro ferroso y compuestos del azufre fue aislada a partir de efluentes y material de la mina de oro La Maruja, en el municipio de Marmato (Caldas, la cual fue identificada bioquímicamente como Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Esta cepa fue evaluada en su capacidad de oxidar concentra­dos de sulfuros metálicos a dos diferentes concentraciones de pulpa y dos tamaños de partícula. Después de 15 días de biooxidación de los sulfuros se observó que, efectivamente, la bacteria mostró acción catalizadora sobre el proce­so de disolución del mineral. Palabras clave: biooxidación; biolixiviación; A. ferrooxidans; sulfuros metálicosA native bacterial strain capable of oxidising ferrous iron and sulphur compounds was isolated from effluent and material from the La Maruja gold mine in the municipality of Marmato (Caldas; this was biochemically identified as being Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. This strain's ability to oxidise metallic sulphide concentrates having two differ-ent pulp proportions and two particle sizes was evaluated. Sulphide bio-oxidation was observed after 15 days showing this strain's catalytic action on the mineral break-down process. Key words: bio-oxidation; bio-leaching; A. ferrooxidans; sulphides

  2. Formation of bacterial nanocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, Mikhail; Kudryashova, Ekaterina; Suzina, Natalia; Ariskina, Elena; Voronkov, Vadim

    1998-07-01

    Existence of nanobacteria received increasing attention both in environmental microbiology/geomicro-biology and in medical microbiology. In order to study a production of nanoforms by typical bacterial cells. Effects of different physical factors were investigated. Treatment of bacterial cultures with microwave radiation, or culturing in field of electric current resulted in formation a few types of nanocells. The number and type of nanoforms were determined with type and dose of the treatment. The produced nanoforms were: i) globules, ii) clusters of the globules--probably produced by liaison, iii) nanocells coated with membrane. The viability of the globules is an object opened for doubts. The nanocells discovered multiplication and growth on solidified nutrient media. The authors suggest that formation of nanocells is a common response of bacteria to stress-actions produced by different agents.

  3. Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a novel optimization algorithm based on the social foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. This paper presents a variation on the original BFO algorithm, namely, the Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization (CBFO, which significantly improve the original BFO in solving complex optimization problems. This significant improvement is achieved by applying two cooperative approaches to the original BFO, namely, the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the implicit space decomposition level and the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the hybrid space decomposition level. The experiments compare the performance of two CBFO variants with the original BFO, the standard PSO and a real-coded GA on four widely used benchmark functions. The new method shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  4. Bacterial Colony Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Niu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the behaviors at different developmental stages in Escherichia coli (E. coli lifecycle and developing a new biologically inspired optimization algorithm named bacterial colony optimization (BCO. BCO is based on a lifecycle model that simulates some typical behaviors of E. coli bacteria during their whole lifecycle, including chemotaxis, communication, elimination, reproduction, and migration. A newly created chemotaxis strategy combined with communication mechanism is developed to simplify the bacterial optimization, which is spread over the whole optimization process. However, the other behaviors such as elimination, reproduction, and migration are implemented only when the given conditions are satisfied. Two types of interactive communication schemas: individuals exchange schema and group exchange schema are designed to improve the optimization efficiency. In the simulation studies, a set of 12 benchmark functions belonging to three classes (unimodal, multimodal, and rotated problems are performed, and the performances of the proposed algorithms are compared with five recent evolutionary algorithms to demonstrate the superiority of BCO.

  5. Targeting bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, Mattias E; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Castagner, Bastien

    2012-04-23

    Protein toxins constitute the main virulence factors of several species of bacteria and have proven to be attractive targets for drug development. Lead candidates that target bacterial toxins range from small molecules to polymeric binders, and act at each of the multiple steps in the process of toxin-mediated pathogenicity. Despite recent and significant advances in the field, a rationally designed drug that targets toxins has yet to reach the market. This Review presents the state of the art in bacterial toxin targeted drug development with a critical consideration of achieved breakthroughs and withstanding challenges. The discussion focuses on A-B-type protein toxins secreted by four species of bacteria, namely Clostridium difficile (toxins A and B), Vibrio cholerae (cholera toxin), enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (Shiga toxin), and Bacillus anthracis (anthrax toxin), which are the causative agents of diseases for which treatments need to be improved. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Bacterial assays for recombinagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, G R

    1992-12-01

    Two principal strategies have been used for studying recombinagenic effects of chemicals and radiation in bacteria: (1) measurement of homologous recombination involving defined alleles in a partially diploid strain, and (2) measurement of the formation and loss of genetic duplications in the bacterial chromosome. In the former category, most methods involve one allele in the bacterial chromosome and another in a plasmid, but it is also possible to detect recombination between two chromosomal alleles or between two extrachromosomal alleles. This review summarizes methods that use each of these approaches for detecting recombination and tabulates data on agents that have been found to be recombinagenic in bacteria. The assays are discussed with respect to their effectiveness in testing for recombinagens and their potential for elucidating mechanisms underlying recombinagenic effects.

  7. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishko, V. V.; Nogovitsina, Y. M.; Ivshina, I. B.

    2014-04-01

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references.

  8. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Al Amri Saleh

    1995-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is an infection of the ascitic fluid without obvious intra-abdominal source of sepsis; usually complicates advanced liver disease. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial: low ascitic protein-content, which reflects defi-cient ascitic fluid complement and hence, reduced opsonic activity is thought to be the most important pathogenic factor. Frequent and prolonged bacteremia has been considered as another pertinent cause of SBP. This disease is...

  9. Modelling bacterial speciation

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    A central problem in understanding bacterial speciation is how clusters of closely related strains emerge and persist in the face of recombination. We use a neutral Fisher–Wright model in which genotypes, defined by the alleles at 140 house-keeping loci, change in each generation by mutation or recombination, and examine conditions in which an initially uniform population gives rise to resolved clusters. Where recombination occurs at equal frequency between all members of the population, we o...

  10. Neglected bacterial zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikeka, I; Dumler, J S

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. Although many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which broad-spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. This review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control.

  11. Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a recently developed nature-inspired optimization algorithm, which is based on the foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. Up to now, BFO has been applied successfully to some engineering problems due to its simplicity and ease of implementation. However, BFO possesses a poor convergence behavior over complex optimization problems as compared to other nature-inspired optimization techniques. This paper first analyzes how the run-length unit parameter of BFO controls the exploration of the whole search space and the exploitation of the promising areas. Then it presents a variation on the original BFO, called the adaptive bacterial foraging optimization (ABFO, employing the adaptive foraging strategies to improve the performance of the original BFO. This improvement is achieved by enabling the bacterial foraging algorithm to adjust the run-length unit parameter dynamically during algorithm execution in order to balance the exploration/exploitation tradeoff. The experiments compare the performance of two versions of ABFO with the original BFO, the standard particle swarm optimization (PSO and a real-coded genetic algorithm (GA on four widely-used benchmark functions. The proposed ABFO shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  12. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar, Jose E-mail: vilar_jlu@gva.es; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings.

  13. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte;

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the Par......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  14. Bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possoz, Christophe; Junier, Ivan; Espeli, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Dividing cells have mechanisms to ensure that their genomes are faithfully segregated into daughter cells. In bacteria, the description of these mechanisms has been considerably improved in the recent years. This review focuses on the different aspects of bacterial chromosome segregation that can be understood thanks to the studies performed with model organisms: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Caulobacter crescentus and Vibrio cholerae. We describe the global positionning of the nucleoid in the cell and the specific localization and dynamics of different chromosomal loci, kinetic and biophysic aspects of chromosome segregation are presented. Finally, a presentation of the key proteins involved in the chromosome segregation is made.

  15. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Amri Saleh

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP is an infection of the ascitic fluid without obvious intra-abdominal source of sepsis; usually complicates advanced liver disease. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial: low ascitic protein-content, which reflects defi-cient ascitic fluid complement and hence, reduced opsonic activity is thought to be the most important pathogenic factor. Frequent and prolonged bacteremia has been considered as another pertinent cause of SBP. This disease is associated with high mortality and recurrence. Therefore, orompt recognition and institution of therapy and plan of prophylaxis is vital.

  16. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anastasios Koulaouzidis; Shivaram Bhat; Athar A Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Since its initial description in 1964, research has transformed spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) from a feared disease (with reported mortality of 90%) to a treatable complication of decompensated cirrhosis,albeit with steady prevalence and a high recurrence rate. Bacterial translocation, the key mechanism in the pathogenesis of SBP, is only possible because of the concurrent failure of defensive mechanisms in cirrhosis.Variants of SBP should be treated. Leucocyte esterase reagent strips have managed to shorten the 'tap-toshot' time, while future studies should look into their combined use with ascitic fluid pH. Third generation cephalosporins are the antibiotic of choice because they have a number of advantages. Renal dysfunction has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in patients with SBP. Albumin is felt to reduce the risk of renal impairment by improving effective intravascular volume, and by helping to bind proinflammatory molecules. Following a single episode of SBP, patients should have long-term antibiotic prophylaxis and be considered for liver transplantation.

  17. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future.

  18. Inhibition of pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin) decreases the ability of human neutrophils to generate reactive oxidants but does not impair bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kate J; Cross, Andrew; Vasieva, Olga; Moots, Robert J; Edwards, Steven W

    2013-09-01

    NAMPT, also known as PBEF and visfatin, can act extracellularly as a cytokine-like molecule or intracellularly as a NAMPT, regulating NAD biosynthesis in the NAD salvage pathway. Inhibitors of NAMPT have anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity and are finding use as therapeutic agents. In view of the importance of NAD metabolism in neutrophil function, we determined the effects of NAMPT inhibition on a variety of neutrophil functions associated with their role in host protection against infections. Incubation of human neutrophils with the NAMPT inhibitor APO866 decreased neutrophil NAD(P)/H levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner but without a concomitant change in cell viability. NAMPT inhibition did not affect the expression of a number of cell-surface receptors involved in adhesion and opsono-phagocytosis, but the respiratory burst was decreased significantly. Whereas opsono-phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus was unaffected by NAMPT inhibition, intraphagosomal oxidant production was decreased. However, the killing efficiency of neutrophils was unaffected. These data indicate that therapeutic NAMPT inhibition is unlikely to have deleterious effects on host protection against infections, in spite of this ability to down-regulate neutrophil respiratory burst activity significantly.

  19. Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community composition in the nitrifying biofilter of Recirculating Aquaculture System%循环海水养殖系统硝化滤器中氨氧化微生物分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长发; 姚敬元; 袁瑗; 刘卫东

    2012-01-01

    研究循环水养殖硝化滤器裁体上附着生物膜的微生物群落结构可以为提高其处理速率和数率,并为特异性工程菌构建提供依据.采用改良的AFLP方法分析了循环水养殖硝化滤器载体上附着的氨氧化细菌16S rRNA基因和氨单加氧酶amoA基因片段及其系统发育情况.结果表明:分析16S rRNA基因得到的序列片段比分析amoA基因片段得到了更多信息,准确度较高,可作为分析循环水养殖硝化滤器氨氧化茵群组成的有效方法.克隆测序所得序列与网上公布数据比对,可见存在于循环水养殖硝化滤器载体上的氨氧化细菌与Nitrosomonas cryotolerans、Nitrosomonas oligotropha、Nitrosospira tenuis、Nitrosomonasmarina相似度达100%,与Nitrosomornas aestuarii相似度为87%.大部分属于亚硝化单胞茵属(Nitrosomonns),仅少数序列属于亚硝化螺茵属(Nitrosospira).采用16S rRNA基因和amoA片段分析方法得到的附着于封闭循环海水养殖硝化滤器载体上的氨氧化细菌主要为变形茵(Proteobacteria)的β-亚类的亚硝化单胞茵属(Nitrosomonas)和少量的亚硝化螺茵属(Nitrosospira)氨氧化细菌,以及一定数量的y-亚类氨氧化细菌.%Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play an important role in transformation from ammonia nitrogen to nitrite nitrogen in the nitrifying biofilter.Studying community structure of nitrifying organisms adhered on the media of nitrification biofilter in the recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) could provide a basis of improving removal rate and performance of biofilter,and construction of nitrifying engineering bacteria for removal of ammonia from RAS.The PCR-based gene cloning and mapping of 16S rRNA gene and betaproteobacteria ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria isolated from nitrification biofilter were surveyed by using the method of improved amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis.The results showed that

  20. Fe-oxide grain coatings support bacterial Fe-reducing metabolisms in 1.7-2.0 km-deep subsurface quartz arenite sandstone reservoirs of the Illinois Basin (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran eDong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone, deeply buried within the Illinois Basin of the midcontinent of North America, contains quartz sand grains ubiquitously encrusted with iron-oxide cements and dissolved ferrous iron in pore-water. Although microbial iron reduction has previously been documented in the deep terrestrial subsurface, the potential for diagenetic mineral cementation to drive microbial activity has not been well studied. In this study, two subsurface formation water samples were collected at 1.72 and 2.02 km, respectively, from the Mt. Simon Sandstone in Decatur, Illinois. Low-diversity microbial communities were detected from both horizons and were dominated by Halanaerobiales of Phylum Firmicutes. Iron-reducing enrichment cultures fed with ferric citrate were successfully established using the formation water. Phylogenetic classification identified the enriched species to be related to Vulcanibacillus from the 1.72 km depth sample, while Orenia dominated the communities at 2.02 km of burial depth. Species-specific quantitative analyses of the enriched organisms in the microbial communities suggest that they are indigenous to the Mt. Simon Sandstone. Optimal iron reduction by the 1.72 km enrichment culture occurred at a temperature of 40oC (range 20 to 60oC and a salinity of 25 parts per thousand (range 25-75 ppt. This culture also mediated fermentation and nitrate reduction. In contrast, the 2.02 km enrichment culture exclusively utilized hydrogen and pyruvate as the electron donors for iron reduction, tolerated a wider range of salinities (25-200 ppt, and exhibited only minimal nitrate- and sulfate-reduction. In addition, the 2.02 km depth community actively reduces the more crystalline ferric iron minerals goethite and hematite. The results suggest evolutionary adaptation of the autochthonous microbial communities to the Mt. Simon Sandstone and carries potentially important implications for future utilization of this reservoir

  1. Exploration and mining of the bacterial terpenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, David E; Ikeda, Haruo

    2012-03-20

    identification of the resultant terpene hydrocarbon or alcohol and (ii) in vivo expression in engineered bacterial hosts that can support the production of terpene metabolites. One of the most attractive features of the coordinated application of genome mining and biochemical characterization is that the discovery of natural products is directly coupled to the simultaneous discovery and exploitation of the responsible biosynthetic genes and enzymes. Bacterial genome mining has proved highly rewarding scientifically, already uncovering more than a dozen newly identified cyclic terpenes (many of them unique to bacteria), as well as several novel cyclization mechanisms. Moreover, bioinformatic analysis has identified more than 120 presumptive genes for bacterial terpene synthases that are now ripe for exploration. In this Account, we review a particularly rich vein we have mined in the genomes of two model Actinomycetes, Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces avermitilis, from which the entire set of terpenoid biosynthetic genes and pathways have now been elucidated. In addition, studies of terpenoid biosynthetic gene clusters have revealed a wealth of previously unknown oxidative enzymes, including cytochromes P450, non-heme iron-dependent dioxygenases, and flavin monooxygenases. We have shown that these enzymes catalyze a variety of unusual biochemical reactions, including two-step ketonization of methylene groups, desaturation-epoxidation of secondary methyl groups, and pathway-specific Baeyer-Villiger oxidations of cyclic ketones.

  2. Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates: Still fabulous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Możejko-Ciesielska, Justyna; Kiewisz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are polyesters accumulated as carbon and energy storage materials under limited growth conditions in the presence of excess carbon sources. They have been developed as biomaterials with unique properties for the past many years being considered as a potential substitute for conventional non-degradable plastics. Due to the increasing concern towards global climate change, depleting petroleum resource and problems with an utilization of a growing number of synthetic plastics, PHAs have gained much more attention from industry and research. These environmentally friendly microbial polymers have great potential in biomedical, agricultural, and industrial applications. However, their production on a large scale is still limited. This paper describes the backgrounds of PHAs and discussed the current state of knowledge on the polyhydroxyalkanoates. Ability of bacteria to convert different carbon sources to PHAs, the opportunities and challenges of their introduction to global market as valuable renewable products have been also discussed.

  3. Epigenetics and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases.

  4. Bacterial sepsis in the neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubarth, Lori Baas; Christensen, Carla M; Riley, Cheryl

    2017-09-21

    Neonatal bacterial infections leading to sepsis occur frequently in the first few days or weeks of life. NPs must be able to recognize the early signs of sepsis and understand the need for rapid evaluation and treatment. This article discusses antibiotic treatments for various types and locations of bacterial infections and sepsis in the neonate.

  5. Evolution of Bacterial Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    While active, controlled cellular suicide (autolysis) in bacteria is commonly observed, it has been hard to argue that autolysis can be beneficial to an individual who commits it. We propose a theoretical model that predicts that bacterial autolysis is evolutionarily advantageous to an individualand would fixate in physically structured environments for stationary phase colonies. We perform spatially resolved agent-based simulations of the model, which predict that lower mixing in the environment results in fixation of a higher autolysis rate from a single mutated cell, regardless of the colony's genetic diversity. We argue that quorum sensing will fixate as well, even if initially rare, if it is coupled to controlling the autolysis rate. The model does not predict a strong additional competitive advantage for cells where autolysis is controlled by quorum sensing systems that distinguish self from nonself. These predictions are broadly supported by recent experimental results in B. subtilisand S. pneumoniae. Research partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No. 220020321 and by HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  6. Bacterial degradation of aminopyrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecher, H; Blecher, R; Wegst, W; Eberspaecher, J; Lingens, F

    1981-11-01

    1. Four strains of bacteria growing with aminopyrine as sole source of carbon were isolated from soil and were identified as strains of Phenylobacterium immobilis. 2. Strain M13 and strain E, the type species of Phenylobacterium immobilis (DSM 1986), which had been isolated by enrichment with chloridazon (5-amino-4-chloro-2-phenyl-2H-pyridazin-3-one) were used to investigate the bacterial degradation of aminopyrine. 3. Three metabolites were isolated and identified as: 4-(dimethylamino)-1,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-2-(2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxy-4,6-cyc lohexadien-1-yl)-3H-pyrazol-3-one, 4-(dimethylamino)-1,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-2-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)-3H-pyrazol-3 -one and 4-(dimethylamino)-1,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-3H-pyrazol-3-one. 4. An enzyme extract from cells of strain m13 was shown to further metabolize the catechol derivative of aminopyrine, with the formation of 2-pyrone-6-carboxylic acid. 5. Results indicate that the benzene ring of aminopyrine is the principal site of microbial metabolism.

  7. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  8. Bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Carrión, Andrés

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial endocarditis (BE) is a disease resulting from the association of morphological alterations of the heart and bacteraemia originating from different sources that at times can be indiscernible (infectious endocarditis). It is classified on the basis of the morphological alteration involved, depending on the clinical manifestations and course of illness, which varies according to the causative microorganism and host conditions (for example, it is characteristic in I.V. drug users). The most common microorganisms involved are: Streptococcus viridans (55%), Staphylococcus aureus (30%), Enterococcus (6%) and HACEK bacteria (corresponding to the initials: Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella and Kingella), although on occasions it can also be caused by fungi. The oral microbiological flora plays a very important role in the aetiopathogenesis of BE, given that the condition may be of oral or dental origin. This paper will deal with the prevention of said bacteraemia. Prophylaxis will be undertaken using amoxicillin or clindamycin according to action protocols, with special emphasis placed on oral hygiene in patients with structural defects of the heart.

  9. Pyrosequencing analysis of the bacterial community in drinking water wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Suárez-Arriaga, Mayra C; Rojas-Valdes, Aketzally; Montoya-Ciriaco, Nina M; Gómez-Acata, Selene; Fernández-Luqueño, Fabián; Dendooven, Luc

    2013-07-01

    Wells used for drinking water often have a large biomass and a high bacterial diversity. Current technologies are not always able to reduce the bacterial population, and the threat of pathogen proliferation in drinking water sources is omnipresent. The environmental conditions that shape the microbial communities in drinking water sources have to be elucidated, so that pathogen proliferation can be foreseen. In this work, the bacterial community in nine water wells of a groundwater aquifer in Northern Mexico were characterized and correlated to environmental characteristics that might control them. Although a large variation was observed between the water samples, temperature and iron concentration were the characteristics that affected the bacterial community structure and composition in groundwater wells. Small increases in the concentration of iron in water modified the bacterial communities and promoted the growth of the iron-oxidizing bacteria Acidovorax. The abundance of the genera Flavobacterium and Duganella was correlated positively with temperature and the Acidobacteria Gp4 and Gp1, and the genus Acidovorax with iron concentrations in the well water. Large percentages of Flavobacterium and Pseudomonas bacteria were found, and this is of special concern as bacteria belonging to both genera are often biofilm developers, where pathogens survival increases.

  10. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  11. Meningitis bacteriana Bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa Alvarado Guevara

    2006-03-01

    causales son virales lo cual conlleva a las diferentes sub-clasificaciones. También en ciertos casos puede ser ocasionada por hongos, bacterias atípicas, micobacterias y parásitos.In Costa Rica the bacterial meningitis had turn into a high-priority subject in which to monitoring epidemiologist. It had been talked about in the last months, to dice an increase in the attention is published of this subject, due to this phenomenon it becomes necessary to make a revision of topic. Meningitis is an inflammation of leptomeninges and colonization of the subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (LCR due to different agents, which produces meningeal symptoms (ex. migraine, neck rigidity, and photophobia and pleocytosis in LCR. De pending on the variables to take into account is possible to group it in different classifications, taking into account the time of evolution are possible to be divided in acute or chronic, to first with few hours or days of beginning of the symptoms, whereas the chronicle also presents a silence course but of the disease of approximately 4 weeks of instauration. There is a difference according to its etiologic agent; they can be infectious and non-infectious. Examples of common non-infectious causes include medications (ex, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and antibiotics and carcinomatosis. A classification exists as well according to the causal agent. The acute bacterial meningitis remarks a bacterial origin of the syndrome, which characterizes by the by an acute onset of meningeal symptoms and neutrophilic pleocytosis. Each one of the bacteriological agents, parasitic or fungus finishes by characterizing the different presentations of the clinical features (ex, meningocóccica meningitis, Cryptococcus meningitis. Finally, there is also the aseptic meningitis, denominated in this form because it’s nonpyogenic cellular response caused by many types of agents. The patients show an acute beginning of symptoms, fever and lymphocytic pleocytosis. After

  12. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed M. Stubbendieck

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities.

  13. Surface micropattern limits bacterial contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Ethan E.; Manna, Dipankar; Mettetal, Michael R; May, Rhea M.; Dannemiller, Elisa M; Chung, Kenneth K.; Brennan, Anthony B; Reddy, Shravanthi T

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial surface contamination contributes to transmission of nosocomial infections. Chemical cleansers used to control surface contamination are often toxic and incorrectly implemented. Additional non-toxic strategies should be combined with regular cleanings to mitigate risks of human error and further decrease rates of nosocomial infections. The Sharklet micropattern (MP), inspired by shark skin, is an effective tool for reducing bacterial load on surfaces without toxic additiv...

  14. Bacterial cellulose/boehmite composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvi, Denise T.B. de; Barud, Hernane S.; Messaddeq, Younes; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho. UNESP. Instituto de Quimica de Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Caiut, Jose Mauricio A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo. Departamento de Quimica - FFCLRP/USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Composites based on bacterial cellulose membranes and boehmite were obtained. SEM results indicate that the bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes are totally covered by boehmite and obtained XRD patterns suggest structural changes due to this boehmite addition. Thermal stability is accessed through TG curves and is dependent on boehmite content. Transparency is high comparing to pure BC as can be seen through UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  15. Bacterial toxins: friends or foes?

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, C K; Meysick, K. C.; O'Brien, A D

    1999-01-01

    Many emerging and reemerging bacterial pathogens synthesize toxins that serve as primary virulence factors. We highlight seven bacterial toxins produced by well-established or newly emergent pathogenic microbes. These toxins, which affect eukaryotic cells by a variety of means, include Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin, Shiga toxin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1, Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin, botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins, and S. aureus toxic-shock syndrome toxin. For each, we...

  16. Bacterial Chromosome Organization and Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Toro, Esteban; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are generally ∼1000 times longer than the cells in which they reside, and concurrent replication, segregation, and transcription/translation of this crowded mass of DNA poses a challenging organizational problem. Recent advances in cell-imaging technology with subdiffraction resolution have revealed that the bacterial nucleoid is reliably oriented and highly organized within the cell. Such organization is transmitted from one generation to the next by progressive segrega...

  17. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials.

  18. [Current knowledge of bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Opavski, Nataša; Mijač, Vera; Ranin, Lazar

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis, earlier termed nonspecific vaginitis (anaerobic vaginosis) because of the absence of recognized pathogens, is most common vaginal syndrome of women of childbearing age affecting 15-30%. This syndrome, whose aetiology and pathogenesis remains unknown, is characterized by significant changes in the vaginal ecosystem. These changes consist of a decrease in the number of lactobacilli and a large increase in the number of anaerobic organisms. The bacteria adhere to desquamated epithelial cells with a distinctive appearance of clue cells The main complaints of women with symptomatic bacterial vaginosis include vaginal discharge and odour. However, a significant number of all women who have bacterial vaginosis deny symptoms. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with a number of gynaecologic and obstetric complications including cervicitis, cervical neoplasia, pelvic inflammatory disease, postoperative infections, and preterm labour.The diagnosis is most frequently made based on vaginal smear stained according to Gram (Nugent scoring method). Metronidazole and clindamycin are the drugs of choice for treatment of women with bacterial vaginosis. Which women should undergo treatment? According to the prevailing attitude, it should include women with symptoms. Symptomatic women with frequent relapses of bacterial vaginosisas, as a rule, have poor response to the applied therapy. To achieve better efficiency in the treatment of such women, it is necessary to have more extensive understanding of all factors in the pathogenesis of the syndrome.

  19. Current knowledge of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis, earlier termed nonspecific vaginitis (anaerobic vaginosis because of the absence of recognized pathogens, is most common vaginal syndrome of women of childbearing age affecting 15-30%. This syndrome, whose aetiology and pathogenesis remains unknown, is characterized by significant changes in the vaginal ecosystem. These changes consist of a decrease in the number of lactobacilli and a large increase in the number of anaerobic organisms. The bacteria adhere to desquamated epithelial cells with a distinctive appearance of clue cells The main complaints of women with symptomatic bacterial vaginosis include vaginal discharge and odour. However, a significant number of all women who have bacterial vaginosis deny symptoms. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with a number of gynaecologic and obstetric complications including cervicitis, cervical neoplasia, pelvic inflammatory disease, postoperative infections, and preterm labour. The diagnosis is most frequently made based on vaginal smear stained according to Gram (Nugent scoring method. Metronidazole and clindamycin are the drugs of choice for treatment of women with bacterial vaginosis. Which women should undergo treatment? According to the prevailing attitude, it should include women with symptoms. Symptomatic women with frequent relapses of bacterial vaginosisas, as a rule, have poor response to the applied therapy. To achieve better efficiency in the treatment of such women, it is necessary to have more extensive understanding of all factors in the pathogenesis of the syndrome.

  20. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    in diabetes resulting from the diabetic state, a dysfunction that includes increased production of hydrogen peroxide. We suggest that the intracellular RNA oxidation is compartmentalized from the traditional biomarkers in the extracellular compartment, and therefore provides independent prognostic value...... diabetes. In agreement with our previous finding, DNA oxidation did not show any prognostic value. RNA oxidation represents oxidative stress intracellularly, presumably predominantly in the cytosol. The mechanism of RNA oxidation is not clear, but hypothesized to result from mitochondrial dysfunction...

  1. Bacterial communities involved in soil formation and plant establishment triggered by pyrite bioweathering on arctic moraines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapelli, Francesca; Marasco, Ramona; Rizzi, Agostino; Baldi, Franco; Ventura, Stefano; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara

    2011-02-01

    In arctic glacier moraines, bioweathering primed by microbial iron oxidizers creates fertility gradients that accelerate soil development and plant establishment. With the aim of investigating the change of bacterial diversity in a pyrite-weathered gradient, we analyzed the composition of the bacterial communities involved in the process by sequencing 16S rRNA gene libraries from different biological soil crusts (BSC). Bacterial communities in three BSC of different morphology, located within 1 m distance downstream a pyritic conglomerate rock, were significantly diverse. The glacier moraine surrounding the weathered site showed wide phylogenetic diversity and high evenness with 15 represented bacterial classes, dominated by Alphaproteobacteria and pioneer Cyanobacteria colonizers. The bioweathered area showed the lowest diversity indexes and only nine bacterial families, largely dominated by Acidobacteriaceae and Acetobacteraceae typical of acidic environments, in accordance with the low pH of the BSC. In the weathered BSC, iron-oxidizing bacteria were cultivated, with counts decreasing along with the increase of distance from the rock, and nutrient release from the rock was revealed by environmental scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analyses. The vegetated area showed the presence of Actinomycetales, Verrucomicrobiales, Gemmatimonadales, Burkholderiales, and Rhizobiales, denoting a bacterial community typical of developed soils and indicating that the lithoid substrate of the bare moraine was here subjected to an accelerated colonization, driven by iron-oxidizing activity.

  2. Mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picardal, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    Nine bacteria were tested for the ability to dehalogenate tetrachloromethane (CT), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) under anaerobic conditions. Three bacteria were able to reductively dehalogenate CT. Dehalogenation ability was not readily linked to a common metabolism or changes in culture redox potential. None of the bacteria tested were able to dehalogenate PCE or TCA. One of the bacteria capable of dehalogenating CT, Shewanella putrefaciens, was chosen as a model organism to study mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation. The effect of a variety of alternate electron acceptors on CT dehalogenation ability by S. putrefaciens was determined. oxygen and nitrogen oxides were inhibitory but Fe (III), trimethylamine oxide, and fumarate were not. A model of the electron transport chain of S. putrefaciens was developed to explain inhibition patterns. A period of microaerobic growth prior to CT exposure increased the ability of S. putrefaciens to dehalogenate CT. A microaerobic growth period also increased cytochrome concentrations. A relationship between cytochrome content and dehalogenation ability was developed from studies in which cytochrome concentrations in S. putrefaciens were manipulated by changing growth conditions. Stoichiometry studies using {sup 14}C-CT suggested that CT was first reduced to form a trichloromethyl radical. Reduction of the radical to produce chloroform and reaction of the radical with cellular biochemicals explained observed product distributions. Carbon dioxide or other fully dehalogenated products were not found.

  3. Bacterial oxidation of low-chlorinated compounds under anoxic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons belong to the most frequently encountered contaminants in soil and groundwater. Many of them were found to be toxic and recalcitrant, which causes a potential threat to the environment. Therefore, it is of great importance that sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbon

  4. Bacterial oxidation of low-chlorinated compounds under anoxic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons belong to the most frequently encountered contaminants in soil and groundwater. Many of them were found to be toxic and recalcitrant, which causes a potential threat to the environment. Therefore, it is of great importance that sites contaminated with chlorinated

  5. Manganese oxidation by bacterial isolates from the Indian Ridge System

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Krishnan, K.P.; Khedekar, V.D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Ridge waters during the cruise SK194 onboard ORV Sagar Kanya (July, 2003). A total of 25 samples along the ridge axis and flanks were collected in 100 ml sterile polypropylene bottles and analyzed immediately onboard. An inoculum of 100 ll was used... twice with sterile saline and resuspended by vortexing. The inoculum size was calculated by direct cell counts in a cell counting chamber. Triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC; 0.025%) was added to every tube prior to incubation. For heterotrophic or amen...

  6. Protein Oxidation Implicated as the Primary Determinant of Bacterial Radioresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    the facultative anaerobic, radio- resistant bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum [1,22] accumulates 20–25 mM Mn(II) [23]. For an irradiated cell...in dH2O at 0 8C and pre-conditioned to be anaerobic, H2O2 was released by D. radiodurans (;23 105 M) and L. plantarum (;6 3 105 M), in which the...non-irradiated D. radiodurans or L. plantarum control samples, nor by irradiated S. oneidensis (Figure 5A), which accumulates substantially more Fe

  7. Bacterial oxidation of low-chlorinated compounds under anoxic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons belong to the most frequently encountered contaminants in soil and groundwater. Many of them were found to be toxic and recalcitrant, which causes a potential threat to the environment. Therefore, it is of great importance that sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbon

  8. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide o...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  9. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide o...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  10. The Human Vaginal Bacterial Biota and Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Srinivasan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial biota of the human vagina can have a profound impact on the health of women and their neonates. Changes in the vaginal microbiota have been associated with several adverse health outcomes including premature birth, pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of HIV infection. Cultivation-independent molecular methods have provided new insights regarding bacterial diversity in this important niche, particularly in women with the common condition bacterial vaginosis (BV. PCR methods have shown that women with BV have complex communities of vaginal bacteria that include many fastidious species, particularly from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Healthy women are mostly colonized with lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, and Lactobacillus iners, though a variety of other bacteria may be present. The microbiology of BV is heterogeneous. The presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae coating the vaginal epithelium in some subjects with BV suggests that biofilms may contribute to this condition.

  11. Oxidation of pyrite: Consequences and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Mile D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the most important studies on the oxidation of pyrite particularly in aqueous solutions. The consequences of pyrite oxidation was examined, as well as its importance, from both the technical-technological and environmental points of view. The oxidation of pyrite was considered in two parts. The spontaneous oxidation of pyrite in nature was described in the first part, with this part comprising pyrite oxidation in deposits depots and mines. It is explained how way natural electrochemical processes lead to the decomposition of pyrite and other minerals associated with pyrite. The oxidation of pyrite occurring during technological processes such as grinding, flotation and leaching, was shown in the second part. Particular emphasis was placed on the oxidation of pyrite during leaching. This part includes the leaching of sulphide and oxide ores, the leaching of pyrite coal and the leaching of refractory gold-bearing ores (pressure oxidation, bacterial oxidation, oxidation by means of strong oxidants and the electrolysis of pyrite suspensions. Various mechanisms of pyrite oxidation and of the galvanic interaction of pyrite with other sulphide minerals are shown.

  12. New Treatments for Bacterial Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L. M. Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review the newer treatments for bacterial keratitis. Data Sources. PubMed literature search up to April 2012. Study Selection. Key words used for literature search: “infectious keratitis”, “microbial keratitis”, “infective keratitis”, “new treatments for infectious keratitis”, “fourth generation fluoroquinolones”, “moxifloxacin”, “gatifloxacin”, “collagen cross-linking”, and “photodynamic therapy”. Data Extraction. Over 2400 articles were retrieved. Large scale studies or publications at more recent dates were selected. Data Synthesis. Broad spectrum antibiotics have been the main stay of treatment for bacterial keratitis but with the emergence of bacterial resistance; there is a need for newer antimicrobial agents and treatment methods. Fourth-generation fluoroquinolones and corneal collagen cross-linking are amongst the new treatments. In vitro studies and prospective clinical trials have shown that fourth-generation fluoroquinolones are better than the older generation fluoroquinolones and are as potent as combined fortified antibiotics against common pathogens that cause bacterial keratitis. Collagen cross-linking was shown to improve healing of infectious corneal ulcer in treatment-resistant cases or as an adjunct to antibiotics treatment. Conclusion. Fourth-generation fluoroquinolones are good alternatives to standard treatment of bacterial keratitis using combined fortified topical antibiotics. Collagen cross-linking may be considered in treatment-resistant infectious keratitis or as an adjunct to antibiotics therapy.

  13. Bacterial carbonatogenesis; La carbonatogenese bacterienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castanier, S. [Angers Univ., 49 (France). Faculte des Sciences; Le Metayer-Levrel, G.; Perthuisot, J.P. [Nantes Univ., 44 (France). Laboratoire de Biogeologie, Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques

    1998-12-31

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The `passive` carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The `active` carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author) 43 refs.

  14. Bacterial community diversity in municipal waste landfill sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liyan; Wang, Yangqing; Tang, Wei; Lei, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the bacterial diversity of landfills and how environmental factors impact the diversity. In this study, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing was used to investigate the bacterial communities of ten landfill leachate samples from five landfill sites in China. A total of 137 K useable sequences from the V3-V6 regions of the 16S rRNA gene were retrieved from 205 K reads. These sequences revealed the presence of a large number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the landfills (709-1599 OTUs per sample). The most predominant bacterial representatives in the landfills investigated, regardless of geographic area, included Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. The phyla Fusobacteria and Tenericutes were also found for the first time to be predominant in the landfills. The phylum Fusobacteria predominated (51.5 and 48.8%) in two semi-arid landfills, and the phylum Tenericutes dominated (30.6%) at one humid, subtropical landfill. Further, a large number of Pseudomonas was detected in most samples, comprising the dominant group and accounting for 40.9 to 92.4% of the total abundance. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis based on OTU abundance showed that the abundant taxa separated the bacterial community. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) suggested that precipitation and landfilling age significantly impact on the bacterial community structure. The bacterial community function (e.g., cellulolytic bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), sulfate-oxidizing bacteria, and xenobiotic organic compound (XOC)-degrading bacteria) was also diverse, but the pattern is unclear.

  15. Magnesium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some ... to relieve heartburn, sour stomach, or acid indigestion. Magnesium oxide also may be used as a laxative ...

  16. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  17. Acute bacterial and viral meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartt, Russell

    2012-12-01

    Most cases of acute meningitis are infectious and result from a potentially wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. The organized approach to the patient with suspected meningitis enables the prompt administration of antibiotics, possibly corticosteroids, and diagnostic testing with neuroimaging and spinal fluid analysis. Acute meningitis is infectious in most cases and caused by a potentially wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. Shifts in the epidemiology of bacterial pathogens have been influenced by changes in vaccines and their implementation. Seasonal and environmental changes influence the likely viral and rickettsial pathogens. The organized approach to the patient with suspected meningitis enables the prompt administration of antibiotics, possibly corticosteroids, and diagnostic testing with neuroimaging and spinal fluid analysis. Pertinent testing and treatment can vary with the clinical presentation, season, and possible exposures. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of acute meningitis.

  18. Bacterial vaginosis and preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns-James, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Although it has been clear for more than 2 decades that bacterial vaginosis increases the risk for preterm birth in some women, it is not yet fully understood why this association exists or how best to modify the risk. Incomplete understanding of this polymicrobial condition and difficulties in classification contribute to the challenge. The relationship between altered vaginal microflora and preterm birth is likely mediated by host immune responses. Because treatment of bacterial vaginosis during pregnancy does not improve preterm birth rates, and may in fact increase them, screening and treatment of asymptomatic pregnant women is discouraged. Symptomatic women should be treated for symptom relief. This article reviews the pathophysiology of bacterial vaginosis and controversy surrounding management during pregnancy. Agents currently recommended for treatment of this condition are reviewed. © 2011 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  19. Molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial persisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Gerdes, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    All bacteria form persisters, cells that are multidrug tolerant and therefore able to survive antibiotic treatment. Due to the low frequencies of persisters in growing bacterial cultures and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms, the phenomenon has been challenging to study. However, recent...... technological advances in microfluidics and reporter genes have improved this scenario. Here, we summarize recent progress in the field, revealing the ubiquitous bacterial stress alarmone ppGpp as an emerging central regulator of multidrug tolerance and persistence, both in stochastically and environmentally...... induced persistence. In several different organisms, toxin-antitoxin modules function as effectors of ppGpp-induced persistence....

  20. Food-Borne Bacterial Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, F. S.

    1966-01-01

    Food poisoning caused by the ingestion of preformed bacterial toxins is considered in relation to comparative symptoms, procedures for extraction and purification of the causal toxins, their chemistry, serology, assay procedures and pharmacology, in so far as these are known. The bacteria discussed in this context are Clostridium botulinum, C. perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and Vibrio parahemolyticus. The possible roles of the enterococci, Proteus, E. coli and of unknown species, in relation to production of non-antigenic toxic substances, are discussed briefly. Requirements for prevention of the various forms of bacterial food poisoning are outlined. PMID:5905949

  1. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine...

  2. Bacterial canker resistance in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sen, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) is the pathogen causing bacterial  canker in tomato. The disease was described for the first time in 1910 in Michigan, USA. Cmmis considered the most harmful bacteria threatening tomato. Disease transmission occurs via seed and symptoms becom

  3. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bac...

  4. Food irradiation and bacterial toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranter, H.S.; Modi, N.K.; Hambleton, P.; Melling, J.; Rose, S.; Stringer, M.F.

    1987-07-04

    The authors' findings indicate that irradiation confers no advantage over heat processing in respect of bacterial toxins (clostridium botulinum, neurotoxin A and staphylococcal enterotoxin A). It follows that irradiation at doses less than the ACINF recommended upper limit of 10 kGy could not be used to improve the ambient temperature shelf life on non-acid foods.

  5. Genomic analysis of bacterial mycophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mela, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    The study of bacterial-fungal interactions is essential to obtain a better understanding of terrestrial microbial ecology and may lie at the basis of novel applications in agriculture, food industry and human health. Nevertheless, the incentives, the genetic determinants and the mechanisms that

  6. Polyhydroxyalkanoates production by bacterial enrichments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) is a natural bacterial storage compound, which can be used as carbon and electron source. Their remarkable similarities in physical properties to conventional plastics, such as polypropylene, attract great commercial interest. This thesis focuses on PHAs production by b

  7. Bacterial toxins and Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Frederick

    2007-11-15

    The primary pathogenetic mechanism responsible for the distinctive demyelinating lesions in the Central Nervous System (CNS) in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), first described in remarkable detail by Charcot more than 170 years ago, remains one of the most baffling conundrums in medicine. A possible role for bacterial cell molecules and transportable proteins in the pathogenesis of MS is reviewed. The ability of bacterial toxins to distort immunity and to cause distinctive toxic damage in the nervous system is discussed in the light of largely forgotten data linking bacterial nasopharyngeal infections with optic neuritis, optochiasmatic arachnoiditis and MS. While the blood-brain barrier substantially protects the CNS from hematogenous toxins, there is a route by which the barrier may be by-passed. Data is reviewed which shows that the CSF and extra-cellular fluid circulation is bi-directionally linked to the lymphatic drainage channels of the nasopharyngeal mucosa. While this provides a facility by which the CNS may mount immunological responses to antigenic challenges from within, it is also a route by which products of nasopharyngeal infection may drain into the CNS and be processed by the immune cells of the meninges and Virchow-Robin perivascular spaces. If potentially toxic bacterial products are identified in early MS tissues at these sites, this would provide an entirely new insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms of this frustratingly enigmatic disease.

  8. Bacterial infec tions in travellers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review will concentrate on common infections, namely bacterial ... as pyrexia of unknown origin. ... cause of fever without lung involvement (Pontiac fever). Gram- negative ... Frequent use of DEET-based insect repel- lants .... No firm evidence for chemoprophylaxis, but some studies show benefit in short-term travellers.

  9. Bacterial Cytotoxins Target Rho GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gudula; Aktories, Klaus

    1998-06-01

    Low molecular mass GTPases of the Rho family, which are involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and in various signal transduction processes, are the eukaryotic targets of bacterial protein toxins. The toxins covalently modify Rho proteins by ADP ribosylation, glucosylation, and deamidation, thereby inactivating and activating the GTPases.

  10. Biotechnological applications of bacterial cellulases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Menendez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cellulases have numerous applications in several industries, including biofuel production, food and feed industry, brewing, pulp and paper, textile, laundry, and agriculture.Cellulose-degrading bacteria are widely spread in nature, being isolated from quite different environments. Cellulose degradation is the result of a synergic process between an endoglucanase, an exoglucanase and a,β-glucosidase. Bacterial endoglucanases degrade ß-1,4-glucan linkages of cellulose amorphous zones, meanwhile exoglucanases cleave the remaining oligosaccharide chains, originating cellobiose, which is hydrolyzed by ß-glucanases. Bacterial cellulases (EC 3.2.1.4 are comprised in fourteen Glycosil Hydrolase families. Several advantages, such as higher growth rates and genetic versatility, emphasize the suitability and advantages of bacterial cellulases over other sources for this group of enzymes. This review summarizes the main known cellulolytic bacteria and the best strategies to optimize their cellulase production, focusing on endoglucanases, as well as it reviews the main biotechnological applications of bacterial cellulases in several industries, medicine and agriculture.

  11. Extracardiac manifestations of bacterial endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, J E

    1979-08-01

    Bacterial endocarditis is an elusive disease that challenges clinicians' diagnostic capabilities. Because it can present with various combinations of extravalvular signs and symptoms, the underlying primary disease can go unnoticed.A review of the various extracardiac manifestations of bacterial endocarditis suggests three main patterns by which the valvular infection can be obscured. (1) A major clinical event may be so dramatic that subtle evidence of endocarditis is overlooked. The rupture of a mycotic aneurysm may simulate a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a congenital aneurysm. (2) The symptoms of bacterial endocarditis may be constitutional complaints easily attributable to a routine, trivial illness. Symptoms of low-grade fever, myalgias, back pain and anorexia may mimic a viral syndrome. (3) Endocarditis poses a difficult diagnostic dilemma when it generates constellations of findings that are classic for other disorders. Complaints of arthritis and arthralgias accompanied by hematuria and antinuclear antibody may suggest systemic lupus erythematosus; a renal biopsy study showing diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis may support this diagnosis. The combination of fever, petechiae, altered mental status, thrombocytopenia, azotemia and anemia may promote the diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. When the protean guises of bacterial endocarditis create these clinical difficulties, errors in diagnosis occur and appropriate therapy is delayed. Keen awareness of the varied disease presentations will improve success in managing endocarditis by fostering rapid diagnosis and prompt therapy.

  12. Bacterial iron-sulfur cluster sensors in mammalian pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Halie K.; Auerbuch, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters act as important cofactors for a number of transcriptional regulators in bacteria, including many mammalian pathogens. The sensitivity of iron-sulfur clusters to iron availability, oxygen tension, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species enables bacteria to use such regulators to adapt their gene expression profiles rapidly in response to changing environmental conditions. In this review, we discuss how the [4Fe-4S] or [2Fe-2S] cluster-containing regulators FNR, Wbl, aconitase, IscR, NsrR, SoxR, and AirSR contribute to bacterial pathogenesis through control of both metabolism and classical virulence factors. In addition, we briefly review mammalian iron homeostasis as well as oxidative/nitrosative stress to provide context for understanding the function of bacterial iron-sulfur cluster sensors in different niches within the host. PMID:25738802

  13. Identification of bacterial taxa in archaeological waterlogged wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Palla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The microscopic and molecular techniques described in this study are aimed at understanding the degradation processes of the anatomical structure of submerged archaeological wood, correlating it to the degradation induced by bacteria. The SEM micrographs showed alterations of the wooden structure due to bacterial colonization, as well as the presence of pyrite framboids. The difficulty of extracting bacterial DNA from wooden fragments belonging to submerged finds is well-known, due to the presence of many inhibitors; this study describes some extraction and in vitro amplification protocols for wooden submerged finds. The results of the molecular investigations, based on the analysis of specific sequences of microbial genomic DNA enabled us to detect the presence of cellulolytic and ligninolytic bacteria, in addition to iron-oxidizing or sulfatereducing bacteria, otherwise undetectable by traditional in vitro culture methods.

  14. Bacterial chemoautotrophy in coastal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasquez-Cardenas, D.

    2016-01-01

    Chemoautotrophy is the process by which micro-organisms fix CO2 by obtainingenergy from the oxidation of reduced compounds such sulfide and ammonium (e.g.sulfur oxidation and nitrification). This metabolism is widespread in nature and isvastly studied in extreme environments such as hydrothermal ven

  15. Prostatitis-bacterial - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000395.htm Prostatitis- bacterial - self-care To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. You have been diagnosed with bacterial prostatitis . This is an infection of the prostate gland. ...

  16. common bacterial isolates from infected eyes abstract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIVINGSTON

    The common bacterial isolates and their antibiotics susceptibility were studied in 298 bacterial ... Bacteria were isolated most on the eye infections of the conjunctiva ... practitioners to avoid development of resistance from indiscriminate use.

  17. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, M.; Beek, D. van de; Weisfelt, M.; Gans, J. de; Schmand, B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy c

  18. Involvement of a 1-Cys peroxiredoxin in bacterial virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Hideo Kaihami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The killing of bacterial pathogens by macrophages occurs via the oxidative burst and bacteria have evolved to overcome this challenge and survive, using several virulence and defense strategies, including antioxidant mechanisms. We show here that the 1-Cys peroxiredoxin LsfA from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is endowed with thiol-dependent peroxidase activity that protects the bacteria from H(2O(2 and that this protein is implicated in pathogenicity. LsfA belongs to the poorly studied Prx6 subfamily of peroxiredoxins. The function of these peroxiredoxins has not been characterized in bacteria, and their contribution to host-pathogen interactions remains unknown. Infection of macrophages with the lsfA mutant strains resulted in higher levels of the cytokine TNF-α production due to the activation of the NF-kB and MAPK pathways, that are partially inhibited by the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain. A redox fluorescent probe was more oxidized in the lsfA mutant-infected macrophages than it was in the macrophages infected with the wild-type strain, suggesting that the oxidative burst was overstimulated in the absence of LsfA. Although no differences in the phagocytosis rates were observed when macrophages were infected with wild-type and mutant bacteria in a gentamicin exclusion assay, a higher number of wild-type bacterial cells was found in the supernatant. This difference was not observed when macrophages were pre-treated with a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, confirming the role of LsfA in the bacterial resistance to ROS generated via NADPH oxidase. In an acute pneumonia model, mice infected with the mutant strains presented higher cytokine release in the lungs and increased activated neutrophil recruitment, with reduced bacterial burden and improved survival rates compared to mice infected with the wild-type bacteria. LsfA is the first bacterial 1-Cys Prx shown to modulate host immune responses and its characterization will allow a

  19. Bacterial diversity in Fe-rich hydrothermal sediments at two South Tonga Arc submarine volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, N L; Murdock, S A; Juniper, S K

    2010-12-01

    Seafloor iron oxide deposits are a common feature of submarine hydrothermal systems. Morphological study of these deposits has led investigators to suggest a microbiological role in their formation, through the oxidation of reduced Fe in hydrothermal fluids. Fe-oxidizing bacteria, including the recently described Zetaproteobacteria, have been isolated from a few of these deposits but generally little is known about the microbial diversity associated with this habitat. In this study, we characterized bacterial diversity in two Fe oxide samples collected on the seafloor of Volcanoes 1 and 19 on the South Tonga Arc. We were particularly interested in confirming the presence of Zetaproteobacteria at these two sites and in documenting the diversity of groups other than Fe oxidizers. Our results (small subunit rRNA gene sequence data) showed a surprisingly high bacterial diversity, with 150 operational taxonomic units belonging to 19 distinct taxonomic groups. Both samples were dominated by Zetaproteobacteria Fe oxidizers. This group was most abundant at Volcano 1, where sediments were richer in Fe and contained more crystalline forms of Fe oxides. Other groups of bacteria found at these two sites include known S- and a few N-metabolizing bacteria, all ubiquitous in marine environments. The low similarity of our clones with the GenBank database suggests that new species and perhaps new families were recovered. The results of this study suggest that Fe-rich hydrothermal sediments, while dominated by Fe oxidizers, can be exploited by a variety of autotrophic and heterotrophic micro-organisms.

  20. Induction of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Lipopolysaccharide and the Influences of Cell Volume Changes, Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress on Nitric Oxide Efflux from the Perfused Liver of Air-Breathing Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis: e0150469

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahua G Choudhury; Nirmalendu Saha

    2016-01-01

    ...) (a bacterial endotoxin), and (b) to determine the effects of hepatic cell volume changes due to anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites, stress hormones and by induction of oxidative stress on production of NO from...

  1. Distribution of Triplet Separators in Bacterial Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Rui; ZHENG Wei-Mou

    2001-01-01

    Distributions of triplet separator lengths for two bacterial complete genomes are analyzed. The theoretical distributions for the independent random sequence and the first-order Markov chain are derived and compared with the distributions of the bacterial genomes. A prominent double band structure, which does not exist in the theoretical distributions, is observed in the bacterial distributions for most triplets.``

  2. [Nitric oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Spatially resolved characterization of biogenic manganese oxideproduction within a bacterial biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

    2004-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1, a biofilm forming bacteria, was used as a model for the study of bacterial Mn oxidation in freshwater and soil environments. The oxidation of Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} by P. putida was characterized by spatially and temporally resolving the oxidation state of Mn in the presence of a bacterial biofilm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combined with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Mn-L{sub 2,3} absorption edges. Subsamples were collected from growth flasks containing 0.1 mM and 1 mM total Mn at 16, 24, 36 and 48 hours after inoculation. Immediately after collection, the unprocessed hydrated subsamples were imaged at 40 nm resolution. Manganese NEXAFS spectra were extracted from x-ray energy sequences of STXM images (stacks) and fit with linear combinations of well characterized reference spectra to obtain quantitative relative abundances of Mn(II), Mn(III) and Mn(IV). Careful consideration was given to uncertainty in the normalization of the reference spectra, choice of reference compounds, and chemical changes due to radiation damage. The STXM results confirm that Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} was removed from solution by P. putida and was concentrated as Mn(III) and Mn(IV) immediately adjacent to the bacterial cells. The Mn precipitates were completely enveloped by bacterial biofilm material. The distribution of Mn oxidation states was spatially heterogeneous within and between the clusters of bacterial cells. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is a promising tool to advance the study of hydrated interfaces between minerals and bacteria, particularly in cases where the structure of bacterial biofilms needs to be maintained.

  4. Bacterial survival in Martian conditions

    CERN Document Server

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppe Galletta; Giulio Bertoloni; Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    We shortly discuss the observable consequences of the two hypotheses about the origin of life on Earth and Mars: the Lithopanspermia (Mars to Earth or viceversa) and the origin from a unique progenitor, that for Earth is called LUCA (the LUCA hypothesis). To test the possibility that some lifeforms similar to the terrestrial ones may survive on Mars, we designed and built two simulators of Martian environments where to perform experiments with different bacterial strains: LISA and mini-LISA. Our LISA environmental chambers can reproduce the conditions of many Martian locations near the surface trough changes of temperature, pressure, UV fluence and atmospheric composition. Both simulators are open to collaboration with other laboratories interested in performing experiments on many kind of samples (biological, minerals, electronic) in situations similar to that of the red planet. Inside LISA we have studied the survival of several bacterial strains and endospores. We verified that the UV light is the major re...

  5. Electromagnetic Signals from Bacterial DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N; Sivasubramanian, S

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions can be induced at a distance due to the propagation of electromagnetic signals during intermediate chemical stages. Although is is well known at optical frequencies, e.g. photosynthetic reactions, electromagnetic signals hold true for muck lower frequencies. In E. coli bacteria such electromagnetic signals can be generated by electric transitions between energy levels describing electrons moving around DNA loops. The electromagnetic signals between different bacteria within a community is a "wireless" version of intercellular communication found in bacterial communities connected by "nanowires". The wireless broadcasts can in principle be of both the AM and FM variety due to the magnetic flux periodicity in electron energy spectra in bacterial DNA orbital motions.

  6. Intracellular trafficking of bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey M; Tsai, Billy

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial toxins often translocate across a cellular membrane to gain access into the host cytosol, modifying cellular components in order to exert their toxic effects. To accomplish this feat, these toxins traffic to a membrane penetration site where they undergo conformational changes essential to eject the toxin's catalytic subunit into the cytosol. In this brief review, we highlight recent findings that elucidate both the trafficking pathways and membrane translocation mechanisms of toxins that cross the plasma, endosomal, or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. These findings not only illuminate the specific nature of the host-toxin interactions during entry, but should also provide additional therapeutic strategies to prevent or alleviate the bacterial toxin-induced diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation.

  8. Dynamics of bacterial gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Atul

    2009-03-01

    The phenomenon of diauxic growth is a classical problem of bacterial gene regulation. The most well studied example of this phenomenon is the glucose-lactose diauxie, which occurs because the expression of the lac operon is strongly repressed in the presence of glucose. This repression is often explained by appealing to molecular mechanisms such as cAMP activation and inducer exclusion. I will begin by analyzing data showing that these molecular mechanisms cannot explain the strong lac repression because they exert a relatively weak effect. I will then present a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution, which yields strong repression despite the absence of catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. The model also explains the growth patterns observed in batch and continuous cultures of various bacterial strains and substrate mixtures. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the experimental evidence regarding positive feedback, the key component of the minimal model.

  9. Antibiotic drugs targeting bacterial RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiling Hong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available RNAs have diverse structures that include bulges and internal loops able to form tertiary contacts or serve as ligand binding sites. The recent increase in structural and functional information related to RNAs has put them in the limelight as a drug target for small molecule therapy. In addition, the recognition of the marked difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA has led to the development of antibiotics that specifically target bacterial rRNA, reduce protein translation and thereby inhibit bacterial growth. To facilitate the development of new antibiotics targeting RNA, we here review the literature concerning such antibiotics, mRNA, riboswitch and tRNA and the key methodologies used for their screening.

  10. Bacterial streamers in curved microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    Biofilms, generally identified as microbial communities embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, are involved in a wide variety of health-related problems ranging from implant-associated infections to disease transmissions and dental plaque. The usual picture of these bacterial films is that they grow and develop on surfaces. However, suspended biofilm structures, or streamers, have been found in natural environments (e.g., rivers, acid mines, hydrothermal hot springs) and are always suggested to stem from a turbulent flow. We report the formation of bacterial streamers in curved microfluidic channels. By using confocal laser microscopy we are able to directly image and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of these filamentous structures. Such streamers, which always connect the inner corners of opposite sides of the channel, are always located in the middle plane. Numerical simulations of the flow provide evidences for an underlying hydrodynamic mechanism behind the formation of the streamers.

  11. Collective Functionality through Bacterial Individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Martin

    According to the conventional view, the properties of an organism are a product of nature and nurture - of its genes and the environment it lives in. Recent experiments with unicellular organisms have challenged this view: several molecular mechanisms generate phenotypic variation independently of environmental signals, leading to variation in clonal groups. My presentation will focus on the causes and consequences of this microbial individuality. Using examples from bacterial genetic model systems, I will first discuss different molecular and cellular mechanisms that give rise to bacterial individuality. Then, I will discuss the consequences of individuality, and focus on how phenotypic variation in clonal populations of bacteria can promote interactions between individuals, lead to the division of labor, and allow clonal groups of bacteria to cope with environmental uncertainty. Variation between individuals thus provides clonal groups with collective functionality.

  12. Antibody inhibition of polymorphonuclear phagocytosis. Dissociation of bacterial attachment and bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J P; Valeri, C R

    1980-06-01

    The inhibition of killing of Staphylococcus aureus 502A by PMNs treated with the IgG fraction of serum from a group of patients with demonstrable leukocyte antibodies was investigated. The uptake of opsonized thymidine-labeled S. aureus 502A by PMNs treated with allogeneic antibody was essentially unimpaired, despite significantly decreased killing. The findings were similar to bacteria opsonized by serum complement or bacteria opsonized with specific lapine antibody. An increased proportion of PMN-bound bacteria susceptible to lysis by lysostaphin indicated a reduced rate of translocation of bacteria from the surface of allogeneic antibody-treated PMNs. Antibody did not stimulate the basal oxidative metabolism, but the oxidative metabolism of antibody-treated PMNs during phagocytosis was increased. Although the precise mechanism of inhibition of PMN killing by antibody is uncertain, the data suggest that the impairment of bacterial killing by PMNs treated with allogeneic leukocyte antibody is associated with inefficient translocation of bacteria into phagolysosomes rather than by interference with the binding of bacteria to specific PMN opsonic receptors.

  13. The bacterial SoxAX cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2013-03-01

    SoxAX cytochromes are heme-thiolate proteins that play a key role in bacterial thiosulfate oxidation, where they initiate the reaction cycle of a multi-enzyme complex by catalyzing the attachment of sulfur substrates such as thiosulfate to a conserved cysteine present in a carrier protein. SoxAX proteins have a wide phylogenetic distribution and form a family with at least three distinct types of SoxAX protein. The types of SoxAX cytochromes differ in terms of the number of heme groups present in the proteins (there are diheme and triheme versions) as well as in their subunit structure. While two of the SoxAX protein types are heterodimers, the third group contains an additional subunit, SoxK, that stabilizes the complex of the SoxA and SoxX proteins. Crystal structures are available for representatives of the two heterodimeric SoxAX protein types and both of these have shown that the cysteine ligand to the SoxA active site heme carries a modification to a cysteine persulfide that implicates this ligand in catalysis. EPR studies of SoxAX proteins have also revealed a high complexity of heme dependent signals associated with this active site heme; however, the exact mechanism of catalysis is still unclear at present, as is the exact number and types of redox centres involved in the reaction.

  14. Bacterial canker resistance in tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) is the pathogen causing bacterial  canker in tomato. The disease was described for the first time in 1910 in Michigan, USA. Cmmis considered the most harmful bacteria threatening tomato. Disease transmission occurs via seed and symptoms become visible at least 20 days after infection. Due to its complex strategy and transmission, Cmm is under quarantine regulation in EU and other countries. There is no method to stop disease progress i...

  15. Bacterial Associations: Antagonism to Symbiosis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.

    with the faeces and then are present in relatively large numbers (Schulz, 1987). Negative Relationship ? Antagonism Microbial populations have a resilient dynamic stability produced by biological buffering from competition. Microorganisms compete for nutrients... Assisted Molecular Breeding (PAMB), wherein, under selective environmental pressure, plasmid transfer and natural recombinants could be derived among bacterial species to enhance their competence and degradation efficiency. It has been able to demonstrate...

  16. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  17. Bacterial motility on abiotic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gibiansky, Maxsim

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are structured microbial communities which are widespread both in nature and in clinical settings. When organized into a biofilm, bacteria are extremely resistant to many forms of stress, including a greatly heightened antibiotic resistance. In the early stages of biofilm formation on an abiotic surface, many bacteria make use of their motility to explore the surface, finding areas of high nutrition or other bacteria to form microcolonies. They use motility appendages, incl...

  18. Intracellular Trafficking of Bacterial Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Jeffrey M.; Tsai, Billy

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxins often translocate across a cellular membrane to gain access into the host cytosol, modifying cellular components in order to exert their toxic effects. To accomplish this feat, these toxins traffic to a membrane penetration site where they undergo conformational changes essential to eject the toxin’s catalytic subunit into the cytosol. In this brief review, we highlight recent findings that elucidate both the trafficking pathways and membrane translocation mechanisms of toxin...

  19. Biotechnological applications of bacterial cellulases

    OpenAIRE

    Esther Menendez; Paula Garcia-Fraile; Raul Rivas

    2015-01-01

    Cellulases have numerous applications in several industries, including biofuel production, food and feed industry, brewing, pulp and paper, textile, laundry, and agriculture.Cellulose-degrading bacteria are widely spread in nature, being isolated from quite different environments. Cellulose degradation is the result of a synergic process between an endoglucanase, an exoglucanase and a,β-glucosidase. Bacterial endoglucanases degrade ß-1,4-glucan linkages of cellulose amorphous zones, mean...

  20. Bacterial Interstitial Nephritis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Bobadilla Chang, Fernando; Departamento de Ciencias Dinámicas Facultad de Medicina Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos Lima, Perú; Villanueva, Dolores; Departamento de Ciencias Dinámicas Facultad de Medicina Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnosis approach to urinary tract infections in children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical records from 103 children with diagnosis of interstitial bacterial nephritis were retrospectively reviewed. Diagnosis was supported by the dramatic involvement of renal parenquima, which is not addressed as "urinary tract infection". RESULTS: From all 103 patients, 49 were 2-years-old or younger, 33 were between 2 and 5-years-old, and 21 were between 6 to 10. Clinical picture inc...

  1. Bioluminescent Bacterial Imaging In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Baban, Chwanrow K; Cronin, Michelle; Akin, Ali R.; O'Brien, Anne; Gao, Xuefeng; Tabirca, Sabin; Francis, Kevin P.; Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This video describes the use of whole body bioluminesce imaging (BLI) for the study of bacterial trafficking in live mice, with an emphasis on the use of bacteria in gene and cell therapy for cancer. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumors following systemic administration. Bacteria engineered to express the lux gene cassette permit BLI detection of the bacteria and concurrently tumor sites. The locat...

  2. Detergent-compatible bacterial amylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyonzima, Francois N; More, Sunil S

    2014-10-01

    Proteases, lipases, amylases, and cellulases are enzymes used in detergent formulation to improve the detergency. The amylases are specifically supplemented to the detergent to digest starchy stains. Most of the solid and liquid detergents that are currently manufactured contain alkaline enzymes. The advantages of using alkaline enzymes in the detergent formulation are that they aid in removing tough stains and the process is environmentally friendly since they reduce the use of toxic detergent ingredients. Amylases active at low temperature are preferred as the energy consumption gets reduced, and the whole process becomes cost-effective. Most microbial alkaline amylases are used as detergent ingredients. Various reviews report on the production, purification, characterization, and application of amylases in different industry sectors, but there is no specific review on bacterial or fungal alkaline amylases or detergent-compatible amylases. In this mini-review, an overview on the production and property studies of the detergent bacterial amylases is given, and the stability and compatibility of the alkaline bacterial amylases in the presence of the detergents and the detergent components are highlighted.

  3. DIAGNOSTIC DIFFICULTIES IN BACTERIAL SPONDYLODISCITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Orso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To analyze aspects related to the diagnostic difficulty in patients with bacterial spondylodiscitis. Methods : Cross-sectional observational study with retrospective data collected in the period from March 2004 to January 2014.Twenty-one patients diagnosed with bacterial spondylodiscitis were analyzed. Results : Women were the most affected, as well as older individuals. Pain in the affected region was the initial symptom in 52% of patients, and 45.5% of the patients had low back pain, and those with dorsal discitis had back pain as the main complaint; the patients with thoracolumbar discitis had pain in that region, and only one patient had sacroiliac discitis. The average time between onset of symptoms and treatment was five months. The lumbar segment was the most affected with 11 cases (52%, followed by thoracolumbar in 24%, dorsal in 19% of cases and a case in the sacroiliac segment. Only seven patients had fever. Pain in the affected level was coincidentally the most common symptom. Conclusions : Early diagnosis of bacterial spondylodiscitis remains a challenge due to the nonspecific signs and symptoms reported by the patient and the wide variability of laboratory results and imaging. The basis for early diagnosis remains the clinical suspicion at the time of initial treatment.

  4. Bacterial Carriers for Glioblastoma Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Mehta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of aggressive glioblastoma brain tumors is challenging, largely due to diffusion barriers preventing efficient drug dosing to tumors. To overcome these barriers, bacterial carriers that are actively motile and programmed to migrate and localize to tumor zones were designed. These carriers can induce apoptosis via hypoxia-controlled expression of a tumor suppressor protein p53 and a pro-apoptotic drug, Azurin. In a xenograft model of human glioblastoma in rats, bacterial carrier therapy conferred a significant survival benefit with 19% overall long-term survival of >100 days in treated animals relative to a median survival of 26 days in control untreated animals. Histological and proteomic analyses were performed to elucidate the safety and efficacy of these carriers, showing an absence of systemic toxicity and a restored neural environment in treated responders. In the treated non-responders, proteomic analysis revealed competing mechanisms of pro-apoptotic and drug-resistant activity. This bacterial carrier opens a versatile avenue to overcome diffusion barriers in glioblastoma by virtue of its active motility in extracellular space and can lead to tailored therapies via tumor-specific expression of tumoricidal proteins.

  5. Cytochemical Differences in Bacterial Glycocalyx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautgartner, Wolf Dietrich; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Hannig, Matthias; Pelz, Klaus; Stoiber, Walter

    2005-02-01

    To examine new cytochemical aspects of the bacterial adhesion, a strain 41452/01 of the oral commensal Streptococcus sanguis and a wild strain of Staphylococcus aureus were grown with and without sucrose supplementation for 6 days. Osmiumtetraoxyde (OsO4), uranyl acetate (UA), ruthenium red (RR), cupromeronic blue (CB) staining with critical electrolytic concentrations (CECs), and the tannic acid-metal salt technique (TAMST) were applied for electron microscopy. Cytochemically, only RR-positive fimbriae in S. sanguis were visualized. By contrast, some types of fimbriae staining were observed in S. aureus glycocalyx: RR-positive, OsO4-positive, tannophilic and CB-positive with ceasing point at 0.3 M MgCl2. The CB staining with CEC, used for the first time for visualization of glycoproteins of bacterial glycocalyx, also reveals intacellular CB-positive substances-probably the monomeric molecules, that is, subunits forming the fimbriae via extracellular assembly. Thus, glycosylated components of the biofilm matrix can be reliably related to single cells. The visualization of intracellular components by CB with CEC enables clear distinction between S. aureus and other bacteria, which do not produce CB-positive substances. The small quantities of tannophilic substances found in S. aureus makes the use of TAMST for the same purpose difficult. The present work protocol enables, for the first time, a partial cytochemical differentiation of the bacterial glycocalyx.

  6. Bacterial adhesion and biofilms on surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Trevor Roger Garrett; Manmohan Bhakoo; Zhibing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion has become a significant problem in industry and in the domicile,and much research has been done for deeper understanding of the processes involved.A generic biological model of bacterial adhesion and population growth called the bacterial biofilm growth cycle,has been described and modified many times.The biofilm growth cycle encompasses bacterial adhesion at all levels,starting with the initial physical attraction of bacteria to a substrate,and ending with the eventual liberation of cell dusters from the biofilm matrix.When describing bacterial adhesion one is simply describing one or more stages of biofilm development,neglecting the fact that the population may not reach maturity.This article provides an overview of bacterial adhesion.cites examples of how bac-terial adhesion affects industry and summarises methods and instrumentation used to improve our understanding of the adhesive prop-erties of bacteria.

  7. Contribution of bacterial outer membrane vesicles to innate bacterial defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manning Andrew J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs are constitutively produced by Gram-negative bacteria throughout growth and have proposed roles in virulence, inflammation, and the response to envelope stress. Here we investigate outer membrane vesiculation as a bacterial mechanism for immediate short-term protection against outer membrane acting stressors. Antimicrobial peptides as well as bacteriophage were used to examine the effectiveness of OMV protection. Results We found that a hyper-vesiculating mutant of Escherichia coli survived treatment by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs polymyxin B and colistin better than the wild-type. Supplementation of E. coli cultures with purified outer membrane vesicles provided substantial protection against AMPs, and AMPs significantly induced vesiculation. Vesicle-mediated protection and induction of vesiculation were also observed for a human pathogen, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC, challenged with polymyxin B. When ETEC with was incubated with low concentrations of vesicles concomitant with polymyxin B treatment, bacterial survival increased immediately, and the culture gained resistance to polymyxin B. By contrast, high levels of vesicles also provided immediate protection but prevented acquisition of resistance. Co-incubation of T4 bacteriophage and OMVs showed fast, irreversible binding. The efficiency of T4 infection was significantly reduced by the formation of complexes with the OMVs. Conclusions These data reveal a role for OMVs in contributing to innate bacterial defense by adsorption of antimicrobial peptides and bacteriophage. Given the increase in vesiculation in response to the antimicrobial peptides, and loss in efficiency of infection with the T4-OMV complex, we conclude that OMV production may be an important factor in neutralizing environmental agents that target the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.

  8. Bacterial meningitis and diseases caused by bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rings, D M

    1987-03-01

    Bacterial meningitis most commonly occurs in young calves secondary to septicemia. Clinical signs of hyperirritability are usually seen. Meningitis can be confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid analysis and culture or by necropsy. Intoxications by the exotoxins of Clostridium perfringens types C and D, C. botulinum, and C. tetani are difficult to confirm. The clinical signs of these intoxications vary from flaccid paralysis (botulism) to muscular rigidity (tetanus). Treatment of affected cattle has been unrewarding in botulism and enterotoxemia, whereas early aggressive treatment of tetanus cases can often be successfully resolved. Botulism and enterotoxemia can be proved using mouse inoculation tests, whereas tetanus is diagnosed largely by ruling out other diseases.

  9. Microbial manganese oxide formation and interaction with toxic metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Naoyuki; Tani, Yukinori; Sakata, Masahiro; Iwahori, Keisuke

    2007-07-01

    Diverse bacteria and fungi oxidize Mn(II) enzymatically and produce insoluble Mn(III, IV) oxides, and these organisms are considered to be the primal agents for the occurrence of natural Mn oxide phases in most environments. Biogenic Mn oxides have a high sorption capacity for metal cations and an ability to oxidize numerous inorganic and organic compounds, owing to their structural and redox features. Thus, the microbial process is of significance in both biogeochemical and biotechnological contexts. In this article we summarize the enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation and interactions of biogenic Mn oxides with toxic metal and metalloid ions. Although Mn oxide formation by fungi has not been fully characterized yet, recent researches with ascomycetes emphasize the similarity between the bacterial and fungal Mn(II) oxidation with respect to the involved catalyst (i.e., multicopper oxidase-type enzymes) and the reaction product [i.e., layer-type Mn(IV) oxides]. Laboratory cultures of bacterial and fungal Mn oxidizers are expected to provide fundamental knowledge in their potential use for remediation of environments and effluents contaminated with toxic metal(loid) ions.

  10. Dynamics of Bacterial Community Abundance and Structure in Horizontal Subsurface Flow Wetland Mesocosms Treating Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristjan Oopkaup

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of bacterial community abundance and structure of a newly established horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF pilot-scale wetland were studied using high-throughput sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods. Bacterial community abundance increased rapidly within one month and stabilised thereafter in three replicate HSSF constructed wetland (CW mesocosms. The most dominant phylum was Proteobacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes in wetland media biofilms and Firmicutes in influent wastewater. CW bacterial community diversity increased over time and was positively related to the wastewater treatment efficiency. Increase in the abundance of total bacteria in the community was accompanied with the abundance of denitrifying bacteria that promoted nitrate and nitrite removal from the wastewater. During the 150-day study period, similar patterns of bacterial community successions were observed in replicate HSSF CW mesocosms. The data indicate that successions in the bacterial community in HSSF CW are shaped by biotic interactions, with a significant contribution made by external abiotic factors such as influent chemical parameters. Network analysis of the bacterial community revealed that organic matter and nitrogen removal in HSSF CW could be, in large part, allocated to a small subset of tightly interconnected bacterial species. The diversity of bacterial community and abundance of denitrifiers were good predictors of the removal efficiency of ammonia, nitrate and total organic C in HSSF CW mesocosms, while the removal of the seven-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD7 was best predicted by the abundance of a small set of bacterial phylotypes. The results suggest that nitrogen removal in HSSF CW consist of two main pathways. The first is heterotrophic nitrification, which is coupled with aerobic denitrification and mediated by mixotrophic nitrite-oxidizers. The second pathway is anaerobic denitrification, which leads to gaseous

  11. Anodic oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sidney D; Rudd, Eric J; Blomquist, Alfred T; Wasserman, Harry H

    2013-01-01

    Anodic Oxidation covers the application of the concept, principles, and methods of electrochemistry to organic reactions. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 12 chapters that consider the mechanism of anodic oxidation. Part I surveys the theory and methods of electrochemistry as applied to organic reactions. These parts also present the mathematical equations to describe the kinetics of electrode reactions using both polarographic and steady-state conditions. Part II examines the anodic oxidation of organic substrates by the functional group initially attacked. This part particular

  12. COMPOSITION AND ACTIVITY OF BACTERIAL COMMUNITY OF COAL TAILING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blayda I. A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the composition of aboriginal bacterial community of coal tailing and to evaluate lixiviation activity of different groups of microorganisms belonging to this community. Using standard microbiological techniques we obtained and quantified the saving cultures of microorganisms from different physiological groups — filamentous fungi, heterotrophic microorganisms, mesophilic and thermophilic moderately acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing chemolithotrophic bacteria. Their oxidative activity was also established. The optimal results were achieved for collective leaching of rare and heavy metals into the solution under thermophilic conditions, which are favorable for the growth and activity of Sulfobacillus and under mesophilic conditions with the usage of ferrous iron as an energy substrate. This confirms the leading role of A. ferrooxidans in the processes of bacterial leaching of metals. Comparing our results with the available literature data we made a conclusion that the qualitative composition of acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacteria living in technogenic waste did not differ from the microbiocenose structure of natural sulfide ores.

  13. Influence of ethylene oxide gas treatment on the in vitro degradation behaviour of dermal sheep collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde damink, L.H.H.; Olde Damink, L.H.H.; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; van Luyn, M.J.A.; van Wachem, P.B.; Nieuwenhuis, P.; Feijen, Jan

    1995-01-01

    The influence of ethylene oxide gas treatment on the in vitro degradation behavior of noncrosslinked, glutaraldehyde crosslinked or hexamethylene diisocyanate crosslinked dermal sheep collagen (DSC) using bacterial collagenase is described. The results obtained were compared with the degradation

  14. Nitrification expanded: discovery, physiology and genomics of a nitrite-oxidizing bacterium from the phylum Chloroflexi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Lücker, Sebastian; Vejmelkova, Dana; Kostrikina, Nadezhda A; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Le Paslier, Denis; Muyzer, Gerard; Wagner, Michael; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Daims, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) catalyze the second step of nitrification, a major process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, but the recognized diversity of this guild is surprisingly low and only two bacterial phyla contain known NOB...

  15. Influence of ethylene oxide gas treatment on the in vitro degradation behavior of dermal sheep collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Damink, L.H.H.; Dijkstra, P.J.; Luyn, van M.J.A.; Wachem, van P.B.; Nieuwenhuis, P.; Feijen, J.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of ethylene oxide gas treatment on the in vitro degradation behavior of noncrosslinked, glutaraldehyde crosslinked or hexamethylene diisocyanate crosslinked dermal sheep collagen (DSC) using bacterial collagenase is described. The results obtained were compared with the degradation beh

  16. Effects of opsonization of Rhodococcus equi on bacterial viability and phagocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Dominic R; Nydam, Daryl V; Price, Christopher T; Graham, James E; Cynamon, Michael H; Divers, Thomas J; Felippe, Maria Julia B

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the effect of opsonization of Rhodococcus equi with R. equi-specific antibodies in plasma on bacterial viability and phagocyte activation in a cell culture model of infection. Neutrophils and monocyte-derived macrophages from 6 healthy 1-week-old foals and 1 adult horse. Foal and adult horse phagocytes were incubated with either opsonized or nonopsonized bacteria. Opsonization was achieved by use of plasma containing high or low concentrations of R. equi-specific antibodies. Phagocyte oxidative burst activity was measured by use of flow cytometry, and macrophage tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production was measured via an ELISA. Extracellular and intracellular bacterial viability was measured with a novel R. equi-luciferase construct that used a luminometer. Opsonized bacteria increased oxidative burst activity in adult horse phagocytes, and neutrophil activity was dependent on the concentration of specific antibody. Secretion of TNF-α was higher in macrophages infected with opsonized bacteria. Opsonization had no significant effect on bacterial viability in macrophages; however, extracellular bacterial viability was decreased in broth containing plasma with R. equi-specific antibodies, compared with viability in broth alone. The use of plasma enriched with specific antibodies for the opsonization of R. equi increased the activation of phagocytes and decreased bacterial viability in the extracellular space. Although opsonized R. equi increased TNF-α secretion and oxidative burst in macrophages, additional factors may be necessary for effective intracellular bacterial killing. These data have suggested a possible role of plasma antibody in protection of foals from R. equi pneumonia.

  17. Oxidative refolding from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher A; Lee, Chung A; Fremont, Daved H

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes the growth and purification of bacterial inclusion body proteins with an option to selenomethionine label the targeted protein through feedback inhibition of methionine biosynthesis in common (non-auxotrophic) strains of E. coli. The method includes solubilization of inclusion body proteins by chemical denaturation and disulfide reduction, renaturation of the solubilized material through rapid dilution by pulsed injection into refolding buffer containing arginine and a mixture of oxidized and reduced glutathione, recovery of the recombinant protein using a stirred cell concentrator, and removal of the aggregated or misfolded fraction by passage over size-exclusion chromatography. The quality of the resulting protein can be assessed by SDS-PAGE.

  18. Bacterial communities in tetrachloroethene-polluted groundwaters: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotik, Michael; Davidová, Anna; Voříšková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr

    2013-06-01

    The compositions of bacterial groundwater communities of three sites contaminated with chlorinated ethenes were analyzed by pyrosequencing their 16S rRNA genes. For each location, the entire and the active bacterial populations were characterized by independent molecular analysis of the community DNA and RNA. The sites were selected to cover a broad range of different environmental conditions and contamination levels, with tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) being the primary contaminants. Before sampling the biomass, a long-term monitoring of the polluted locations revealed high concentrations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC), which are toxic by-products of the incomplete bacterial degradation of PCE and TCE. The applied pyrosequencing technique enabled known dechlorinators to be identified at a very low detection level (study revealed that only a few species dominated the bacterial communities, with Albidiferax ferrireducens being the only highly prominent member found at all three sites. Only a limited number of OTUs with abundances of up to 1% and high sequence identities to known dechlorinating microorganisms were retrieved from the RNA pools of the two highly contaminated sites. The dechlorinating consortium was likely to be comprised of cDCE-assimilating bacteria (Polaromonas spp.), anaerobic organohalide respirers (mainly Geobacter spp.), and Burkholderia spp. involved in cometabolic dechlorination processes, together with methylotrophs (Methylobacter spp.). The deep sequencing results suggest that the indigenous dechlorinating consortia present at the investigated sites can be used as a starting point for future bioremediation activities by stimulating their anaerobic and aerobic chloroethene degradation capacities (i.e. reductive dechlorination, and metabolic and cometabolic oxidation).

  19. Archaea Dominate the Ammonia-Oxidizing Community in the Rhizosphere of the Freshwater Macrophyte Littorella uniflora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Saunders, Aaron M.; Schramm, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Archaeal and bacterial ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA) had similar low relative abundances in freshwater sediment. In the rhizosphere of the submersed macrophyte Littorella uniflora, archaeal amoA was 500- to >8,000-fold enriched compared to bacterial amoA, suggesting that the enhanced nitrifi...... nitrification activity observed in the rhizosphere was due to ammonia-oxidizing Archaea....

  20. Iron Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Amonette, James E.

    2016-09-19

    Abstract: Fe oxides are common clay-sized oxide, oxyhydroxide and hydroxide soil minerals. They are compounds of Fe, O, and H that have structures based on close-packed arrays of O. The octahedral and tetrahedral cavities within these arrays are filled with either Fe3+ or Fe2+ to form Fe(O/OH)6, FeO6, or FeO4 structural units. All of the naturally occurring Fe oxide minerals usually undergo some degree of isomorphous substitution of other metal ions for Fe in their structures. Relatively simple techniques may be used to identify Fe oxides in the field based on their typical colors and magnetic properties. In the laboratory, a variety of instrumental techniques can be used to confirm phase identity and to quantify amount. Of these, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy are the most commonly used techniques. As oxides, the functional groups on their surfaces may have positive, negative, or no charge depending on pH and on the concentration and nature of other ions in the contact solution. A net positive surface charge usually is observed in soils because Fe oxides have a point-of-zero-charge in the neutral or slightly basic pHs. The functional groups on the surface form complexes with cations and anions from the aqueous phase. Their sorption and electron-buffering properties significantly affect the geochemical cycles of almost all elements having agronomic or environmental significance.

  1. Bacterial pericarditis in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole LeBlanc

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 4-year-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat was presented to the Oregon State University cardiology service for suspected pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade was documented and pericardiocentesis yielded purulent fluid with cytologic results supportive of bacterial pericarditis. The microbial population consisted of Pasteurella multocida, Actinomyces canis, Fusobacterium and Bacteroides species. Conservative management was elected consisting of intravenous antibiotic therapy with ampicillin sodium/sulbactam sodium and metronidazole for 48 h followed by 4 weeks of oral antibiotics. Re-examination 3 months after the initial incident indicated no recurrence of effusion and the cat remained free of clinical signs 2 years after presentation. Relevance and novel information Bacterial pericarditis is a rare cause of pericardial effusion in cats. Growth of P multocida, A canis, Fusobacterium and Bacteroides species has not previously been documented in feline septic pericarditis. Conservative management with broad-spectrum antibiotics may be considered when further diagnostic imaging or exploratory surgery to search for a primary nidus of infection is not feasible or elected.

  2. Bacterial Culture of Neonatal Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Movahedian

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal bacterial sepsis is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. This retrospective study was performed to determine the incidence of bacterial sepsis with focus on Gram negative organisms in neonates admitted at Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, during a 3-yr period, from September 2002 to September 2005. Blood culture was performed on all neonates with risk factors or signs of suggestive sepsis. Blood samples were cultured using brain heart infusion (BHI broth according to standard method. From the 1680 neonates 36% had positive blood culture for Pseudomans aeruginosa, 20.7% for Coagulase negative Staphylococci, and 17% for Klebsiella spp. Gram-negative organisms accounted for 72.1% of all positive cultures. The overall mortality rate was 19.8% (22 /111 of whom 63.6% (14 /22 were preterm. Pseudomona aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. showed a high degree of resistance to commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin, gentamicin as well as third generation cephalosporins. Continued local surveillance studies are urged to monitor emerging antimicrobial resistance and to guide interventions to minimize its occurrence.

  3. Periodontal diseases as bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bascones Martínez

    Full Text Available The periodontal disease is conformed by a group of illnesses affecting the gums and dental support structures. They are caused by certain bacteria found in the bacterial plaque. These bacteria are essential to the onset of illness; however, there are predisposing factors in both the host and the microorganisms that will have an effect on the pathogenesis of the illness. Periodontopathogenic bacterial microbiota is needed, but by itself, it is not enough to cause the illness, requiring the presence of a susceptible host. These diseases have been classified as gingivitis, when limited to the gums, and periodontitis, when they spread to deeper tissues. Classification of periodontal disease has varied over the years.The one used in this work was approved at the International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, held in 1999. This study is an overview of the different periodontal disease syndromes. Later, the systematic use of antibiotic treatment consisting of amoxicillin, amoxicillinclavulanic acid, and metronidazole as first line coadjuvant treatment of these illnesses will be reviewed.

  4. Bacterial oligopeptide-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, V

    2003-10-01

    This review focuses on bacterial oligopeptide-binding proteins, which form part of the oligopeptide transport system belonging to the ATP-binding cassette family of transporters. Depending on the bacterial species, these binding proteins (OppA) capture peptides ranging in size from 2 to 18 amino acids from the environment and pass them on to the other components of the oligopeptide transport system for internalisation. Bacteria have developed several strategies to produce these binding proteins, which are periplasmic in Gram- bacteria and membrane-anchored in Gram+, with a higher stoichiometry (probably necessary for efficient transport) than the other components in the transport system. The expression of OppA-encoding genes is clearly modulated by external factors, especially nitrogen compounds, but the mechanisms of regulation are not always clear. The best-understood roles played by OppAs are internalisation of peptides for nutrition and recycling of muropeptides. It has, however, recently become clear that OppAs are also involved in sensing the external medium via specific or non-specific peptides.

  5. LYSOSOMAL DISRUPTION BY BACTERIAL TOXINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernheimer, Alan W.; Schwartz, Lois L.

    1964-01-01

    Bernheimer, Alan W. (New York University School of Medicine, New York), and Lois L. Schwartz. Lysosomal disruption by bacterial toxins. J. Bacteriol. 87:1100–1104. 1964.—Seventeen bacterial toxins were examined for capacity (i) to disrupt rabbit leukocyte lysosomes as indicated by decrease in turbidity of lysosomal suspensions, and (ii) to alter rabbit liver lysosomes as measured by release of β-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase. Staphylococcal α-toxin, Clostridium perfringens α-toxin, and streptolysins O and S affected lysosomes in both systems. Staphylococcal β-toxin, leucocidin and enterotoxin, Shiga neurotoxin, Serratia endotoxin, diphtheria toxin, tetanus neurotoxin, C. botulinum type A toxin, and C. perfringens ε-toxin were not active in either system. Staphylococcal δ-toxin, C. histolyticum collagenase, crude C. perfringens β-toxin, and crude anthrax toxin caused lysosomal damage in only one of the test systems. There is a substantial correlation between the hemolytic property of a toxin and its capacity to disrupt lysosomes, lending support to the concept that erythrocytes and lysosomes are bounded by similar membranes. PMID:5874534

  6. Bioinformatic Comparison of Bacterial Secretomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Catharine Song; Aseem Kumar; Mazen Saleh

    2009-01-01

    The rapid increasing number of completed bacterial genomes provides a good op-portunity to compare their proteomes. This study was undertaken to specifically compare and contrast their secretomes-the fraction of the proteome with pre-dicted N-terminal signal sequences, both type Ⅰ and type Ⅱ. A total of 176 theoreti-cal bacterial proteomes were examined using the ExProt program. Compared with the Gram-positives, the Gram-negative bacteria were found, on average, to con-tain a larger number of potential Sec-dependent sequences. In the Gram-negative bacteria but not in the others, there was a positive correlation between proteome size and secretome size, while there was no correlation between secretome size and pathogenicity. Within the Gram-negative bacteria, intracellular pathogens were found to have the smallest secretomes. However, the secretomes of certain bacte-ria did not fit into the observed pattern. Specifically, the secretome of Borrelia burgdoferi has an unusually large number of putative lipoproteins, and the signal peptides of mycoplasmas show closer sequence similarity to those of the Gram-negative bacteria. Our analysis also suggests that even for a theoretical minimal genome of 300 open reading frames, a fraction of this gene pool (up to a maximum of 20%) may code for proteins with Sec-dependent signal sequences.

  7. BACTERIAL DESEASES IN SEA FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivančica Strunjak-Perović

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available With development of the fish culturing in the sea, the interest in their health also increased. The reason for this are diseases or rather mortality that occur in such controlled cultures and cause great economic losses. By growing large quantities of fish in rather small species, natural conditions are changed, so fish is more sensitive and prone to infection agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites. Besides, a large fish density in the cultural process accelerates spreading if the diseases, but also enables a better perception of them. In wild populations sick specimen very quickly become predator’s prey, witch makes it difficult to note any pathological changes in such fish. There are lots of articles on viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases nowdays, but this work deals exclusively with bacterial deseases that occur in the controlled sea cultures (vibriosis, furunculosis, pastherelosis, nocardiosis, mycobaceriosis, edwardsielosis, yersiniosis, deseases caused by bacteria of genera Flexibacter, Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Streptococus and bacteria nephryithis. Yet, the knowledge of these deseases vary, depending on wether a fish species is being cultured for a longer period of time or is only being introduced in the controlled culture.

  8. Interaction between resource identity and bacterial community composition regulates bacterial respiration in aquatic ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. F. Pires

    Full Text Available Abstract Resource identity and composition structure bacterial community, which in turn determines the magnitude of bacterial processes and ecological services. However, the complex interaction between resource identity and bacterial community composition (BCC has been poorly understood so far. Using aquatic microcosms, we tested whether and how resource identity interacts with BCC in regulating bacterial respiration and bacterial functional diversity. Different aquatic macrophyte leachates were used as different carbon resources while BCC was manipulated through successional changes of bacterial populations in batch cultures. We observed that the same BCC treatment respired differently on each carbon resource; these resources also supported different amounts of bacterial functional diversity. There was no clear linear pattern of bacterial respiration in relation to time succession of bacterial communities in all leachates, i.e. differences on bacterial respiration between different BCC were rather idiosyncratic. Resource identity regulated the magnitude of respiration of each BCC, e.g. Ultricularia foliosa leachate sustained the greatest bacterial functional diversity and lowest rates of bacterial respiration in all BCC. We conclude that both resource identity and the BCC interact affecting the pattern and the magnitude of bacterial respiration in aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Bacterial production of methyl ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, Harry R.; Goh, Ee-Been

    2017-01-31

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for increasing production of methyl ketones in a genetically modified host cell that overproduces .beta.-ketoacyl-CoAs through a re-engineered .beta.-oxidation pathway and overexpresses FadM.

  10. Growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in soil microcosms is inhibited by acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offre, Pierre; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2009-10-01

    Autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were considered to be responsible for the majority of ammonia oxidation in soil until the recent discovery of the autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea. To assess the relative contributions of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil ammonia oxidation, their growth was analysed during active nitrification in soil microcosms incubated for 30 days at 30 degrees C, and the effect of an inhibitor of ammonia oxidation (acetylene) on their growth and soil nitrification kinetics was determined. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of bacterial ammonia oxidizer 16S rRNA genes did not detect any change in their community composition during incubation, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of bacterial amoA genes indicated a small decrease in abundance in control and acetylene-containing microcosms. DGGE fingerprints of archaeal amoA and 16S rRNA genes demonstrated changes in the relative abundance of specific crenarchaeal phylotypes during active nitrification. Growth was also indicated by increases in crenarchaeal amoA gene copy number, determined by qPCR. In microcosms containing acetylene, nitrification and growth of the crenarchaeal phylotypes were suppressed, suggesting that these crenarchaea are ammonia oxidizers. Growth of only archaeal but not bacterial ammonia oxidizers occurred in microcosms with active nitrification, indicating that ammonia oxidation was mostly due to archaea in the conditions of the present study.

  11. Drag Reduction of Bacterial Cellulose Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ogata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag reduction due to bacterial cellulose suspensions with small environmental loading was investigated. Experiments were carried out by measuring the pressure drop in pipe flow. It was found that bacterial cellulose suspensions give rise to drag reduction in the turbulent flow range. We observed a maximum drag reduction ratio of 11% and found that it increased with the concentration of the bacterial cellulose suspension. However, the drag reduction effect decreased in the presence of mechanical shear.

  12. Forensic identification using skin bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    FIERER Noah; Lauber, Christian L.; Zhou, Nick; McDonald, Daniel; Costello, Elizabeth K.; Knight, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the diversity of skin-associated bacterial communities is far higher than previously recognized, with a high degree of interindividual variability in the composition of bacterial communities. Given that skin bacterial communities are personalized, we hypothesized that we could use the residual skin bacteria left on objects for forensic identification, matching the bacteria on the object to the skin-associated bacteria of the individual who touched the object....

  13. In vivo bacterial morphogenetic protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    van der Ploeg, R.; den Blaauwen, T.; Meghea, A.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter will discuss none-invasive techniques that are widely used to study protein-protein interactions. As an example, their application in exploring interactions between proteins involved in bacterial cell division will be evaluated. First, bacterial morphology and cell division of the rod-shaped bacterium Escherichia coli will be introduced. Next, three bacterial two-hybrid methods and three Förster resonance energy transfer detection methods that are frequently applied to detect int...

  14. Bar-Coded Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons Reveals Changes in Ileal Porcine Bacterial Communities Due to High Dietary Zinc Intake ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahjen, W.; Pieper, R.; Zentek, J.

    2010-01-01

    Feeding high levels of zinc oxide to piglets significantly increased the relative abundance of ileal Weissella spp., Leuconostoc spp., and Streptococcus spp., reduced the occurrence of Sarcina spp. and Neisseria spp., and led to numerical increases of all Gram-negative facultative anaerobic genera. High dietary zinc oxide intake has a major impact on the porcine ileal bacterial composition. PMID:20709843

  15. Bar-Coded Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons Reveals Changes in Ileal Porcine Bacterial Communities Due to High Dietary Zinc Intake ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Feeding high levels of zinc oxide to piglets significantly increased the relative abundance of ileal Weissella spp., Leuconostoc spp., and Streptococcus spp., reduced the occurrence of Sarcina spp. and Neisseria spp., and led to numerical increases of all Gram-negative facultative anaerobic genera. High dietary zinc oxide intake has a major impact on the porcine ileal bacterial composition.

  16. Bioleaching of Arsenic-Rich Gold Concentrates by Bacterial Flora before and after Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehui Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the bioleaching efficiency of arsenic-rich gold concentrates, a mixed bacterial flora had been developed, and the mutation breeding method was adopted to conduct the research. The original mixed bacterial flora had been enrichedin acid mine drainage of Dexing copper mine, Jiangxi Province, China. It was induced by UV (ultraviolet, ultrasonic, and microwave, and their combination mutation. The most efficient bacterial flora after mutation was collected for further bioleaching of arsenic-rich gold concentrates. Results indicated that the bacterial flora after mutation by UV 60 s combined with ultrasonic 10 min had the best oxidation rate of ferrous, the biggest density of cells, and the most activity of total protein. During bioleaching of arsenic-rich gold concentrates, the density of the mutant bacterial cells reached to 1.13×108 cells/mL at 15 days, more than 10 times compared with that of the original culture. The extraction of iron reached to 95.7% after 15 days, increased by 9.9% compared with that of the original culture. The extraction of arsenic reached to 92.6% after 12 days, which was increased by 46.1%. These results suggested that optimum combined mutation could improve leaching ability of the bacterial flora more significantly.

  17. Bioleaching of arsenic-rich gold concentrates by bacterial flora before and after mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xuehui; Yuan, Xuewu; Liu, Na; Chen, Xiaoguang; Abdelgadir, Awad; Liu, Jianshe

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the bioleaching efficiency of arsenic-rich gold concentrates, a mixed bacterial flora had been developed, and the mutation breeding method was adopted to conduct the research. The original mixed bacterial flora had been enrichedin acid mine drainage of Dexing copper mine, Jiangxi Province, China. It was induced by UV (ultraviolet), ultrasonic, and microwave, and their combination mutation. The most efficient bacterial flora after mutation was collected for further bioleaching of arsenic-rich gold concentrates. Results indicated that the bacterial flora after mutation by UV 60 s combined with ultrasonic 10 min had the best oxidation rate of ferrous, the biggest density of cells, and the most activity of total protein. During bioleaching of arsenic-rich gold concentrates, the density of the mutant bacterial cells reached to 1.13 × 10⁸ cells/mL at 15 days, more than 10 times compared with that of the original culture. The extraction of iron reached to 95.7% after 15 days, increased by 9.9% compared with that of the original culture. The extraction of arsenic reached to 92.6% after 12 days, which was increased by 46.1%. These results suggested that optimum combined mutation could improve leaching ability of the bacterial flora more significantly.

  18. Measurement of Bacterial Bioluminescence Intensity and Spectrum: Current Physical Techniques and Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Ionescu, Rodica Elena

    2016-01-01

    : Bioluminescence is light production by living organisms, which can be observed in numerous marine creatures and some terrestrial invertebrates. More specifically, bacterial bioluminescence is the "cold light" produced and emitted by bacterial cells, including both wild-type luminescent and genetically engineered bacteria. Because of the lively interplay of synthetic biology, microbiology, toxicology, and biophysics, different configurations of whole-cell biosensors based on bacterial bioluminescence have been designed and are widely used in different fields, such as ecotoxicology, food toxicity, and environmental pollution. This chapter first discusses the background of the bioluminescence phenomenon in terms of optical spectrum. Platforms for bacterial bioluminescence detection using various techniques are then introduced, such as a photomultiplier tube, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) based integrated circuit. Furthermore, some typical biochemical methods to optimize the analytical performances of bacterial bioluminescent biosensors/assays are reviewed, followed by a presentation of author's recent work concerning the improved sensitivity of a bioluminescent assay for pesticides. Finally, bacterial bioluminescence as implemented in eukaryotic cells, bioluminescent imaging, and cancer cell therapies is discussed.

  19. Assessment of bacterial community structure in nitrifying biofilm under inorganic carbon-sufficient and -limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyokwan; Chung, Yun-Chul; Yang, Heejeong; Lee, Changsoo; Aryapratama, Rio; Yoo, Young J; Lee, Seockheon

    2015-01-01

    In this work, nitrification and changes in the composition of the total bacterial community under inorganic carbon (IC)-limited conditions, in a nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor, was investigated. A culture-independent analysis of cloning and sequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene was applied to quantify the bacterial diversity and to determine bacterial taxonomic assignment. IC concentrations had significant effects on the stability of ammonia-oxidation as indicated by the reduction of the nitrogen conversion rate with high NH4(+)-N loadings. The predominance of Nitrosomonas europaea was maintained in spite of changes in the IC concentration. In contrast, heterotrophic bacterial species contributed to a high bacterial diversity, and to a dynamic shift in the bacterial community structure, under IC-limited conditions. In this study, individual functions of heterotrophic bacteria were estimated based on taxonomic information. Possible key roles of coexisting heterotrophic bacteria are the assimilation of organic compounds of extracellular polymeric substances produced by nitrifiers, and biofilm formation by providing a filamentous structure and aggregation properties.

  20. Comparison of Bacterial Cellulose Production among Different Strains and Fermented Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Jalili Tabaii

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different carbon sources on bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus (PTCC 1734 and two newly isolated strains (from vinegar under static culture conditions was studied. The production of bacterial cellulose was examined in modified Hestrin-Shramm medium by replacing D-glucose with other carbon sources. The results showed that the yield and characteristics of bacterial cellulose were influenced by the type of carbon source. Glycerol gave the highest yield in all of the studied strains (6%, 9.7% and 3.8% for S, A2 strain and Gluconacetobacter xylinus (PTCC 1734, respectively. The maximum dry bacterial cellulose weight in the glycerol containing medium is due to A2 strain (1.9 g l-1 in comparison to Gluconacetobacter xylinus as reference strain (0.76 g l-1. Although all of the studied strains were in Gluconacetobacter family, each used different sugars for maximum production after glycerol (mannitol and fructose for two newly isolated strains and glucose for Gluconacetobacter xylinus. The maximum moisture content was observed when sucrose and food-grade sucrose were used as carbon source. Contrary to expectations, while the maximum thickness of bacterial cellulose membrane was attained when glycerol was used, bacterial cellulose from glycerol had less moisture content than the others. The oxidized cellulose showed antibacterial activities, which makes it as a good candidate for food-preservatives.

  1. Bacterial contamination of hospital physicians' stethoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, L; Kereveur, A; Durand, D; Gonot, J; Goldstein, F; Mainardi, J L; Acar, J; Carlet, J

    1999-09-01

    Because stethoscopes might be potential vectors of nosocomial infections, this study, conducted in a 450-bed general hospital, was devised to evaluate the bacterial contamination of stethoscopes; bacterial survival on stethoscope membranes; the kinetics of the bacterial load on stethoscope membranes during clinical use; and the efficacy of 70% alcohol or liquid soap for membrane disinfection. Among the 355 stethoscopes tested, 234 carried > or =2 different bacterial species; 31 carried potentially pathogenic bacteria. Although some bacteria deposited onto membranes could survive 6 to 18 hours, none survived after disinfection.

  2. Bacterial Nanocellulose as a Microbiological Derived Nanomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisławska A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC is a nanofibrilar polymer produced by strains such as Gluconacetobacter xylinus, one of the best bacterial species which given the highest efficiency in cellulose production. Bacterial cellulose is a biomaterial having unique properties such as: chemical purity, good mechanical strength, high flexibility, high absorbency, possibility of forming any shape and size and many others. Such a large number of advantages contributes to the widespread use of the BNC in food technology, paper, electronic industry, but also the architecture in use. However, the greatest hopes are using the BNC in medicine. This text contains information about bacterial nanocellulose, its specific mechanical and biological properties and current applications.

  3. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osredkar Joško

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The human organism is exposed to the influence of various forms of stress, either physical, psychological or chemical, which all have in common that they may adversely affect our body. A certain amount of stress is always present and somehow directs, promotes or inhibits the functioning of the human body. Unfortunately, we are now too many and too often exposed to excessive stress, which certainly has adverse consequences. This is especially true for a particular type of stress, called oxidative stress. All aerobic organisms are exposed to this type of stress because they produce energy by using oxygen. For this type of stress you could say that it is rather imperceptibly involved in our lives, as it becomes apparent only at the outbreak of certain diseases. Today we are well aware of the adverse impact of radicals, whose surplus is the main cause of oxidative stress. However, the key problem remains the detection of oxidative stress, which would allow us to undertake timely action and prevent outbreak of many diseases of our time. There are many factors that promote oxidative stress, among them are certainly a fast lifestyle and environmental pollution. The increase in oxidative stress can also trigger intense physical activity that is directly associated with an increased oxygen consumption and the resulting formation of free radicals. Considering generally positive attitude to physical activity, this fact may seem at first glance contradictory, but the finding has been confimed by several studies in active athletes. Training of a top athlete daily demands great physical effort, which is also reflected in the oxidative state of the organism. However, it should be noted that the top athletes in comparison with normal individuals have a different defense system, which can counteract the negative effects of oxidative stress. Quite the opposite is true for irregular or excessive physical activity to which the body is not adapted.

  4. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confalonieri, F; Sommer, S, E-mail: fabrice.confalonieri@u-psud.fr, E-mail: suzanne.sommer@u-psud.fr [University Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR8621, Institut de Genetique et Microbiologie, Batiments 400-409, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  5. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  6. STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION OF BACTERIAL UREASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak YuV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This brief review concerns the basic principles of structural organization of multi-subunit bacterial ureases and formation of their quaternary structure. Urease is a nickel-containing enzyme (urea amidohydrolase, ЕС 3.5.1.5 that catalyses the hydrolysis of urea to get ammonia and carbamate which then decomposes with water to get ammonia and carbon dioxide. Urease is produced by bacteria, fungi, yeast and plants. On the basis of similarities in amino acid sequences, ureases assumed to have a similar structure and conservative catalytic mechanism. Within past two decades bacterial ureases have gained much attention in research field as a virulence factor in human and animal infections. The first crystal structure of urease has been determined for that from Klebsiella aerogenes. The native enzyme consists of three subunits, UreA (α-chain, UreB (β-chain and UreC (γ-chain, and contains four structural domains: two in α-chain (α-domain 1 and α-domain-2, one in β- and one in γ-chain. These three chains form a T-shaped heterotrimer αβγ. Three αβγ heterotrimers form quaternary complex (αβγ3. In case of Helicobacter pilori, the analogous trimers of corresponding dimeric subunits (αβ3 form tetrameric structure ((αβ34 in which four trimers are situated at the vertexes of the regular triangle pyramid. Active center is located in α-domain 1 and contains two atoms of nickel coordinated by residues His134, His136, carboxylated Lys217, His 246, His272 and Asp360, as well as residues involved in binding (His219 and catalysis (His320. Active site is capped by a flap that controls substrate ingress to and product egress from the dinickel center. Urease requires accessory proteins (UreD, UreF, UreG and UreE for the correct assembly of their Ni-containing metallocenters. The accessory proteins UreD, UreF, and UreG sequentially bind to the apoprotein (UreABC3 to finally form (UreABC-UreDFG3 activation complex. UreE metallochaperone delivers

  7. Extended recombinant bacterial ghost system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, W; Witte, A; Eko, F O; Kamal, M; Jechlinger, W; Brand, E; Marchart, J; Haidinger, W; Huter, V; Felnerova, D; Stralis-Alves, N; Lechleitner, S; Melzer, H; Szostak, M P; Resch, S; Mader, H; Kuen, B; Mayr, B; Mayrhofer, P; Geretschläger, R; Haslberger, A; Hensel, A

    1999-08-20

    Controlled expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts from a variety of bacteria are used as non-living candidate vaccines. In the recombinant ghost system, foreign proteins are attached on the inside of the inner membrane as fusions with specific anchor sequences. Ghosts have a sealed periplasmic space and the export of proteins into this space vastly extends the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts to function as carriers of foreign antigens. In addition, S-layer proteins forming shell-like self assembly structures can be expressed in candidate vaccine strains prior to E-mediated lysis. Such recombinant S-layer proteins carrying foreign epitopes further extend the possibilities of ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes. As ghosts have inherent adjuvant properties, they can be used as adjuvants in combination with subunit vaccines. Subunits or other ligands can also be coupled to matrixes like dextran which are used to fill the internal lumen of ghosts. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral immunization of experimental animals with recombinant ghosts induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in this production. This fact explains the superior quality of ghosts when compared to other inactivated vaccines. The endotoxic component of the outer membrane does not limit the use of ghosts as vaccine candidates but triggers the release of several potent immunoregulatory cytokines. As carriers, there is no limitation in the size of foreign antigens that can be inserted in the membrane and the capacity of all spaces including the membranes, peri

  8. Bacterial mycophagy: definition and diagnosis of a unique bacterial-fungal interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leveau, J.H.J.; Preston, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    This review analyses the phenomenon of bacterial mycophagy, which we define as a set of phenotypic behaviours that enable bacteria to obtain nutrients from living fungi and thus allow the conversion of fungal into bacterial biomass. We recognize three types of bacterial strategies to derive

  9. Cervicovaginal bacterial count and failure of metronidazole therapy for bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchiari, Heloise R; Ferreira, Carolina S T; Golim, Márjorie A; Silva, Márcia G; Marconi, Camila

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate whether total bacterial count in cervicovaginal fluid is associated with failure of metronidazole therapy for bacterial vaginosis. In a cross-sectional study, women attending a primary health center in Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil, for routine cervical screening between September 2012 and October 2013 were enrolled. Women who tested positive for bacterial vaginosis (Nugent classification) were offered oral metronidazole. Women who completed metronidazole treatment and an equal number of control women with normal vaginal flora at initial screening were included in analyses of total bacterial count, assessed by flow cytometry of cervicovaginal fluid samples. Of 287 women who enrolled, 49 were excluded because they tested positive for trichomoniasis, chlamydial endocervicitis, gonorrhea, or candidiasis. Among the remaining 238, 85 (35.7%) had bacterial vaginosis. Among 36 women evaluated at follow-up, 23 (63.9%) had successfully restored lactobacilli-dominant flora, 12 (33.3%) had persistent bacterial vaginosis, and 1 (2.8%) had vaginal candidiasis (excluded from flow cytometry). Total bacterial count did not differ between 35 women with bacterial vaginosis and 35 with normal vaginal flora (P=0.62). Total bacterial count did not differ at enrollment between women who went on to have persistent bacterial vaginosis and those who had successful treatment (P=0.78). Failure of oral metronidazole therapy for bacterial vaginosis was not associated with total bacterial count in cervicovaginal fluid. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Autoproteolytic Activation of Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6, which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins.

  11. Bacterial interactions in dental biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruijie; Li, Mingyun; Gregory, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are masses of microorganisms that bind to and multiply on a solid surface, typically with a fluid bathing the microbes. The microorganisms that are not attached but are free floating in an aqueous environment are termed planktonic cells. Traditionally, microbiology research has addressed results from planktonic bacterial cells. However, many recent studies have indicated that biofilms are the preferred form of growth of most microbes and particularly those of a pathogenic nature. Biofilms on animal hosts have significantly increased resistance to various antimicrobials compared to planktonic cells. These microbial communities form microcolonies that interact with each other using very sophisticated communication methods (i.e., quorum-sensing). The development of unique microbiological tools to detect and assess the various biofilms around us is a tremendously important focus of research in many laboratories. In the present review, we discuss the major biofilm mechanisms and the interactions among oral bacteria.

  12. Antigenic Variation in Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Guy H; Bankhead, Troy; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-02-01

    Antigenic variation is a strategy used by a broad diversity of microbial pathogens to persist within the mammalian host. Whereas viruses make use of a minimal proofreading capacity combined with large amounts of progeny to use random mutation for variant generation, antigenically variant bacteria have evolved mechanisms which use a stable genome, which aids in protecting the fitness of the progeny. Here, three well-characterized and highly antigenically variant bacterial pathogens are discussed: Anaplasma, Borrelia, and Neisseria. These three pathogens display a variety of mechanisms used to create the structural and antigenic variation needed for immune escape and long-term persistence. Intrahost antigenic variation is the focus; however, the role of these immune escape mechanisms at the population level is also presented.

  13. Cooperative Model of Bacterial Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Y; Shi, Yu; Duke, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is controlled by the signalling of a cluster of receptors. A cooperative model is presented, in which coupling between neighbouring receptor dimers enhances the sensitivity with which stimuli can be detected, without diminishing the range of chemoeffector concentration over which chemotaxis can operate. Individual receptor dimers have two stable conformational states: one active, one inactive. Noise gives rise to a distribution between these states, with the probability influenced by ligand binding, and also by the conformational states of adjacent receptor dimers. The two-state model is solved, based on an equivalence with the Ising model in a randomly distributed magnetic field. The model has only two effective parameters, and unifies a number of experimental findings. According to the value of the parameter comparing coupling and noise, the signal can be arbitrarily sensitive to changes in the fraction of receptor dimers to which ligand is bound. The counteracting effect of a change of...

  14. Autoproteolytic Activation of Bacterial Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Aimee

    2010-01-01

    Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD) in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX) and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6), which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins. PMID:22069620

  15. Autoproteolytic activation of bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Aimee

    2010-05-01

    Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD) in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX) and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)), which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins.

  16. New pathways for bacterial polythioesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Polythioesters (PTE) contain sulfur in the backbone and represent persistent biopolymers, which are produced by certain chemical procedures as well as biotechnological in vitro and in vivo techniques. Different building blocks can be incorporated, resulting in PTE with variable features that could become interesting for special purposes. Particularly, the option to produce PTE in large-scale and in accordance with the methods of white biotechnology or green chemistry is valuable due to economical potentials and public environmental consciousness. This review is focused on the synthesis of PTE by the three established bacterial production strains Ralstonia eutropha, Escherichia coli and Advenella mimigardefordensis. In addition, an overview of the in vitro production and degradation of PTE is depicted.

  17. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet S. H. Lorv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions.

  18. Metabolic Signatures of Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Martin T.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Djukovic, Danijel; Hoffman, Noah G.; Raftery, Daniel; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by shifts in the vaginal microbiota from Lactobacillus dominant to a microbiota with diverse anaerobic bacteria. Few studies have linked specific metabolites with bacteria found in the human vagina. Here, we report dramatic differences in metabolite compositions and concentrations associated with BV using a global metabolomics approach. We further validated important metabolites using samples from a second cohort of women and a different platform to measure metabolites. In the primary study, we compared metabolite profiles in cervicovaginal lavage fluid from 40 women with BV and 20 women without BV. Vaginal bacterial representation was determined using broad-range PCR with pyrosequencing and concentrations of bacteria by quantitative PCR. We detected 279 named biochemicals; levels of 62% of metabolites were significantly different in women with BV. Unsupervised clustering of metabolites separated women with and without BV. Women with BV have metabolite profiles marked by lower concentrations of amino acids and dipeptides, concomitant with higher levels of amino acid catabolites and polyamines. Higher levels of the signaling eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), a biomarker for inflammation, were noted in BV. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii exhibited similar metabolite correlation patterns, which were distinct from correlation patterns exhibited by BV-associated bacteria. Several metabolites were significantly associated with clinical signs and symptoms (Amsel criteria) used to diagnose BV, and no metabolite was associated with all four clinical criteria. BV has strong metabolic signatures across multiple metabolic pathways, and these signatures are associated with the presence and concentrations of particular bacteria. PMID:25873373

  19. Bacterial trajectories tracked with time-lapse video-microscopy reveal the impact of manganese biomineralization on bacterial sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboas, Camille; Pena, Jasquelin; De Anna, Pietro

    2017-04-01

    In aquatic and subsurface environments, sedimentation may influence bacterial transport. Microorganisms that carry out biomineralization reactions may exhibit distinct transport properties from non-biomineralizing organisms due an apparent increase in density caused by biomineral production. For several decades, the biomineralization of manganese (Mn) has been recognized to be a major environmental process, whereby Mn oxide (MnO2(s)) minerals participate in a plethora of biogeochemical processes including contaminant adsorption, organic matter oxidation. Typically, manganese biomineralization proceeds through the enzymatic oxidation of aqueous Mn2+ to Mn4+ and precipitation of MnO2(s) in a biofilm matrix outside the bacterial cell. Here, we present a study of the impact of biomineralization on the sedimentation properties of bacteria at small scales (over mm distances) under hydrostatic conditions. We hypothesize that bacteria will sediment faster when biomineralization is active due to encrustation of the organisms by mineral particles. To test this hypothesis, we tracked the vertical notion of individual bacteria (Pseudomonas putida GB-1) using time-lapse video-microscopy. We compared the sedimentation velocity of bacteria in the case where significant biomineralization had occurred, as inferred from bulk measurements of solid phase Mn, with the sinking velocity of bacteria grown without Mn. We calibrated the proposed method by comparing velocity measurements of sinking polystyrene micro-sphere of known density and size with Stokes law, obtaining results that were accurate within 1% of the theoretical value (29.4 nm/s). We also measured a diffusion coefficient of 7x10-13 m2/s for the particles. Following this approach, we measured the sedimentation velocity of P. putida with and without MnO2(s). Our results show that biomineralization leads to faster sedimentation of the bacteria. In natural environments, biomineralization reactions may increase the sinking

  20. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  1. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  2. Cerebral infarction in childhood bacterial meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, R.D.; Stovring, J; Cushing, A H; Davis, L. E.; Hardy, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Forty-nine children with complicated bacterial meningitis were studied. Thirteen had abnormalities on computed tomography compatible with the diagnosis of brain infarction; one had a brain biopsy with the histological appearance of infarction. Factors exist in childhood bacterial meningitis which are associated with the development of brain infraction.

  3. BIBI, a Bioinformatics Bacterial Identification Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Devulder, G.; Perrière, G; Baty, F.; Flandrois, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    BIBI was designed to automate DNA sequence analysis for bacterial identification in the clinical field. BIBI relies on the use of BLAST and CLUSTAL W programs applied to different subsets of sequences extracted from GenBank. These sequences are filtered and stored in a new database, which is adapted to bacterial identification.

  4. Use of Bacteriophages to control bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytic bacteriophages can provide a natural method and an effective alternative to antibiotics to reduce bacterial pathogens in animals, foods, and other environments. Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses which infect bacterial cells and eventually kill them through lysis, and represent the most abun...

  5. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Blaauwen, T.; Andreu, J.M.; Monasterio, O.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of

  6. Warfare between Host Immunity and Bacterial Weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Manda; Lai, Erh-Min

    2017-01-11

    Bacterial pathogens deploy protein secretion systems to facilitate infection and colonization of their hosts. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Chen et al. (2017) report a new role for a type VI secretion effector in promoting bacterial colonization by preventing inflammasome activation induced by a type III secretion system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Revealing the Achilles heel of bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Jens-Michael

    2014-11-20

    In addition to having antimicrobial properties, defensins inactivate various structurally unrelated bacterial toxins by a yet unknown manner. In this issue of Immunity, Kudryashova et al. (2014b) provide insights into mechanisms by which human ?-defensins destabilize and inactivate bacterial toxins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Multiple bacterial species reside in chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjødsbøl, Kristine; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Karlsmark, Tonny;

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the bacterial profile of chronic venous leg ulcers and the importance of the profile to ulcer development. Patients with persisting venous leg ulcers were included and followed for 8 weeks. Every second week, ulcer samples were collected and the bacterial s...

  9. Bacterial biofilms: prokaryotic adventures in multicellularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kjelleberg, S.

    2003-01-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms includes both the initial social behavior of undifferentiated cells, as well as cell death and differentiation in the mature biofilm, and displays several striking similarities with higher organisms. Recent advances in the field provide new insight...... into differentiation and cell death events in bacterial biofilm development and propose that biofilms have an unexpected level of multicellularity....

  10. Transport equation for growing bacterial populations (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Boulanouar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the growing bacterial population. Each bacterium is distinguished by its degree of maturity and its maturation velocity. To complete the study in [3], we describe the bacterial profile of this population by proving that the generated semigroup possesses an asynchronous exponential growth property.

  11. Bacterial Flora of the Female Genital Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsakdi Chaisilwattana

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the ability of septicemic and nonsepticemic isolates of group B streptococci (GBS to inhibit in vitro the principal bacterial groups found in the normal bacterial flora of the female genital tract.

  12. In vivo bacterial morphogenetic protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, R.; den Blaauwen, T.; Meghea, A.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter will discuss none-invasive techniques that are widely used to study protein-protein interactions. As an example, their application in exploring interactions between proteins involved in bacterial cell division will be evaluated. First, bacterial morphology and cell division of the rod-s

  13. [Competitive Microbial Oxidation and Reduction of Arsenic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting-ting; Bai, Yao-hui; Liang, Jin-song; Huo, Yang; Wang, Ming-xing; Yuan, Lin-ijang

    2016-02-15

    Filters are widely applied in drinking water treatment plants. Our previous study, which explored the asenic redox in a filter of drinking water plant treating underground water, found that As3+ could be oxidized to As5+ by biogenic manganese oxides, while As5+ could be reduced to As3+ by some microbial arsenic reductases in the biofilter system. This microbial competition could influence the system stability and treatment efficiency. To explore its mechanism, this study selected a manganese-oxidizing bacterial strain (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) and a arsenic-reducing strain (Brevibacterium sp. LSJ-9) to investigate their competitive relationship in nutrient acquisition and arsenic redox in the presence of Mn2+, As3+ or As5+ The results revealed that the concentration and valence of Mn and As varied with different reaction time; biological manganese oxides dominated the arsenic redox by rapidly oxidizing the As3+ in the existing system and the As3+ generated by arsenic reductase into As. PCR and RT-PCR results indicated that the arsenic reductase (arsC) was inhibited by the manganese oxidase (cumA). The expression of 16S rRNA in QJX-1 was two orders of magnitude higher than that in LSJ-9, which implied QJX-1 was dominant in the bacterial growth. Our data revealed that hydraulic retention time was critical to the valence of arsenic in the effluent of filter in drinking water treatment plant.

  14. Structural biology of bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2015-05-11

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477-42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  15. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko S. Murakami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485, an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP. In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank, describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  16. Chemical behaviors of different arsenic-bearing sulphides bio-oxidated by thermophilic bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-ying; GONG En-pu; YANG Li-li; WANG Da-wen

    2005-01-01

    The study on arsenopyrite and realgar of bacterial oxidation shows that the chemical behaviors of different arsenic-bearing sulphides oxidated by thermophilic bacteria are quite distinct. Arsenopyrite is active and quickly eroded in bacteria-bearing solution. With a high leaching rate over 95%, the arsenopyrite phase cannot be detected by X-ray diffraction(XRD). Arsenopyrite is highly toxic to bacteria that at the initial stage of bio-oxidation, bacterial growth is inhibited and the number of bacterium cell drops from 2.26 × 108/mL to the lowest 2.01 × 105/mL. At the later stages of bio-oxidation, bacteria grow fast and reach 2.23 × 108/mL. Comparably, realgar is inertial and resistive to bacterial corrosion and oxidation. Arsenic in realgar crystal is hard to be leached and the residue is still realgar phase, as indicated by XRD. The cell number of bacteria varies a little, decreasing from 2.26 × 108/mL to 2.01 × 107/mL, during the bacterial oxidation. The results show that the crystal structure and arsenic valency of arsenic-bearing sulphides play a vital role during the leaching process of bacterial oxidation.

  17. Occurrences at mineral-bacteria interface during oxidation of arsenopyrite by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, M.G.M. [Univ. Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico). Inst. de Metalurgia; Mustin, C.; Berthelin, J. [Univ. Henri Poincare, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France). Centre de Pedologie Biologique; Donato, P. de; Barres, O.; Marion, P. [I.N.P.L.-E.N.S.G., Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1995-04-05

    The combination of an improved bacterial desorption method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), diffuse reflectance and transmission infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, and a desorption-leaching device like high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to analyze bacterial populations and surface-oxidized phases during the arsenopyrite biooxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The bacterial distribution, the physicochemical composition of the leachate, the evolution of corrosion patterns, and the nature and amount of the surface-oxidized chemical species characterized different behavior for each step of arsenopyrite bioleaching.

  18. Impact of Short-Term Acidification on Nitrification and Nitrifying Bacterial Community Dynamics in Soilless Cultivation Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkovitch, Irit; Negreanu, Yael; Dowd, Scot; Frenk, Sammy; Silber, Avner

    2012-01-01

    Soilless medium-based horticulture systems are highly prevalent due to their capacity to optimize growth of high-cash crops. However, these systems are highly dynamic and more sensitive to physiochemical and pH perturbations than traditional soil-based systems, especially during nitrification associated with ammonia-based fertilization. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of nitrification-generated acidification on ammonia oxidation rates and nitrifying bacterial community dynamics in soilless growth media. To achieve this goal, perlite soilless growth medium from a commercial bell pepper greenhouse was incubated with ammonium in bench-scale microcosm experiments. Initial quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizers were significantly more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and therefore, research focused on this group. Ammonia oxidation rates were highest between 0 and 9 days, when pH values dropped from 7.4 to 4.9. Pyrosequencing of betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing amoA gene fragments indicated that r-strategist-like Nitrosomonas was the dominant ammonia-oxidizing bacterial genus during this period, seemingly due to the high ammonium concentration and optimal growth conditions in the soilless media. Reduction of pH to levels below 4.8 resulted in a significant decrease in both ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, with increased relative abundance of the r-strategist-like Nitrosospira. Nitrite oxidizers (Nitrospira and Nitrobacter) were on the whole more abundant and less sensitive to acidification than ammonia oxidizers. This study demonstrates that nitrification and nitrifying bacterial community dynamics in high-N-load intensive soilless growth media may be significantly different from those in in-terra agricultural systems. PMID:22773643

  19. Structure and properties of polypyrrole/bacterial cellulose nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Daliana; Rambo, Carlos R; Porto, Luismar M; Schreiner, Wido H; Barra, Guilherme M O

    2013-04-15

    An electrically conducting composite based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and polypyrrole (PPy) was prepared through in situ oxidative polymerization of pyrrole (Py) in the presence of BC membrane using ammonium persulfate (APS), as an oxidant. The electrical conductivity, morphology, mechanical properties and thermal stability of the composites obtained using APS (BC/PPy·APS) were evaluated and compared with BC/PPy composites prepared using as oxidant agent Iron III chloride hexahydrate (FeCl3·6H2O). The morphology of the BC/PPy·APS composites is characterized by spherical conducting nanoparticles uniformly distributed on the BC nanofiber surface, while the composites produced with FeCl3·6H2O (BC/PPy·FeCl3) is composed of a continuous conducting polymer layer coating the BC-nanofibers. The electrical conductivity of BC/PPy·FeCl3 was 100-fold higher than that found for BC/PPy·APS composites. In order to understand the site-specific interaction between PPy and BC functional groups, both composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (attenuated total reflectance mode) spectroscopy attenuation reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). The affinity between functional groups of PPy·FeCl3 and BC is higher than that found for BC/PPy·APS composite. In addition, the tensile properties were also influenced by the chemical affinity of both components in the polymer composites.

  20. Detoxification of azo dyes by bacterial oxidoreductase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Shahid; Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq; Crowley, David E

    2016-08-01

    Azo dyes and their intermediate degradation products are common contaminants of soil and groundwater in developing countries where textile and leather dye products are produced. The toxicity of azo dyes is primarily associated with their molecular structure, substitution groups and reactivity. To avoid contamination of natural resources and to minimize risk to human health, this wastewater requires treatment in an environmentally safe manner. This manuscript critically reviews biological treatment systems and the role of bacterial reductive and oxidative enzymes/processes in the bioremediation of dye-polluted wastewaters. Many studies have shown that a variety of culturable bacteria have efficient enzymatic systems that can carry out complete mineralization of dye chemicals and their metabolites (aromatic compounds) over a wide range of environmental conditions. Complete mineralization of azo dyes generally involves a two-step process requiring initial anaerobic treatment for decolorization, followed by an oxidative process that results in degradation of the toxic intermediates that are formed during the first step. Molecular studies have revealed that the first reductive process can be carried out by two classes of enzymes involving flavin-dependent and flavin-free azoreductases under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions. The second step that is carried out by oxidative enzymes that primarily involves broad specificity peroxidases, laccases and tyrosinases. This review focuses, in particular, on the characterization of these enzymes with respect to their enzyme kinetics and the environmental conditions that are necessary for bioreactor systems to treat azo dyes contained in wastewater.

  1. Protein chlorination in neutrophil phagosomes and correlation with bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jessie N; Kettle, Anthony J; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2014-12-01

    Neutrophils ingest and kill bacteria within phagocytic vacuoles. We investigated where they produce hypochlorous acid (HOCl) following phagocytosis by measuring conversion of protein tyrosine residues to 3-chlorotyrosine. We also examined how varying chloride availability affects the relationship between HOCl formation in the phagosome and bacterial killing. Phagosomal proteins, isolated following ingestion of opsonized magnetic beads, contained 11.4 Cl-Tyr per thousand tyrosine residues. This was 12 times higher than the level in proteins from the rest of the neutrophil and ~6 times higher than previously recorded for protein from ingested bacteria. These results indicate that HOCl production is largely localized to the phagosomes and a substantial proportion reacts with phagosomal protein before reaching the microbe. This will in part detoxify the oxidant but should also form chloramines which could contribute to the killing mechanism. Neutrophils were either suspended in chloride-free gluconate buffer or pretreated with formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, a procedure that has been reported to deplete intracellular chloride. These treatments, alone or in combination, decreased both chlorination in phagosomes and killing of Staphylococcus aureus by up to 50%. There was a strong positive correlation between the two effects. Killing was predominantly oxidant and myeloperoxidase dependent (88% inhibition by diphenylene iodonium and 78% by azide). These results imply that lowering the chloride concentration limits HOCl production and oxidative killing. They support a role for HOCl generation, rather than an alternative myeloperoxidase activity, in the killing process.

  2. Oral bacterial DNA findings in pericardial fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Mari Louhelainen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We recently reported that large amounts of oral bacterial DNA can be found in thrombus aspirates of myocardial infarction patients. Some case reports describe bacterial findings in pericardial fluid, mostly done with conventional culturing and a few with PCR; in purulent pericarditis, nevertheless, bacterial PCR has not been used as a diagnostic method before. Objective: To find out whether bacterial DNA can be measured in the pericardial fluid and if it correlates with pathologic–anatomic findings linked to cardiovascular diseases. Methods: Twenty-two pericardial aspirates were collected aseptically prior to forensic autopsy at Tampere University Hospital during 2009–2010. Of the autopsies, 10 (45.5% were free of coronary artery disease (CAD, 7 (31.8% had mild and 5 (22.7% had severe CAD. Bacterial DNA amounts were determined using real-time quantitative PCR with specific primers and probes for all bacterial strains associated with endodontic disease (Streptococcus mitis group, Streptococcus anginosus group, Staphylococcus aureus/Staphylococcus epidermidis, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra and periodontal disease (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatus, and Dialister pneumosintes. Results: Of 22 cases, 14 (63.6% were positive for endodontic and 8 (36.4% for periodontal-disease-associated bacteria. Only one case was positive for bacterial culturing. There was a statistically significant association between the relative amount of bacterial DNA in the pericardial fluid and the severity of CAD (p=0.035. Conclusions: Oral bacterial DNA was detectable in pericardial fluid and an association between the severity of CAD and the total amount of bacterial DNA in pericardial fluid was found, suggesting that this kind of measurement might be useful for clinical purposes.

  3. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  4. Prospects for using combined engineered bacterial enzymes and plant systems to rhizoremediate polychlorinated biphenyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvestre, Michel

    2013-03-01

    The fate of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil is driven by a combination of interacting biological processes. Several investigations have brought evidence that the rhizosphere provides a remarkable ecological niche to enhance the PCB degradation process by rhizobacteria. The bacterial oxidative enzymes involved in PCB degradation have been investigated extensively and novel engineered enzymes exhibiting enhanced catalytic activities toward more persistent PCBs have been described. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that approaches involving processes based on plant-microbe associations are very promising to remediate PCB-contaminated sites. In this review emphasis will be placed on the current state of knowledge regarding the strategies that are proposed to engineer the enzymes of the PCB-degrading bacterial oxidative pathway and to design PCB-degrading plant-microbe systems to remediate PCB-contaminated soil.

  5. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.;

    2003-01-01

    and the low capacity to oxidize and trap sulfide. The inner shelf break marks the seaward border of sulfidic bottom waters, and separates two different regimes of bacterial sulfate reduction. In the sulfidic bottom waters on the shelf, up to 55% of sulfide oxidation is mediated by the large nitrate...... to the sediment-water interface and reduce the hydrogen sulfide flux to the water column. Modeling of pore water sulfide concentration profiles indicates that sulfide produced by bacterial sulfate reduction in the uppermost 16 cm of sediment is sufficient to account for the total flux of hydrogen sulfide...... to the water column. However, the total pool of hydrogen sulfide in the water column is too large to be explained by steady state diffusion across the sediment-water interface. Episodic advection of hydrogen sulfide, possibly triggered by methane eruptions, may contribute to hydrogen sulfide in the water...

  6. New Conjugated Benzothiazole-N-oxides: Synthesis and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlína Foltínová

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Eleven new 2-styrylbenzothiazole-N-oxides have been prepared by aldol – type condensation reactions between 2-methylbenzothiazole–N-oxide and para-substituted benzaldehydes. Compounds with cyclic amino substituents showed typical push-pull molecule properties. Four compounds were tested against various bacterial strains as well as the protozoan Euglena gracilis as model microorganisms. Unlike previously prepared analogous benzothiazolium salts, only weak activity was recorded.

  7. Diversity, Physiology, and Niche Differentiation of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Hatzenpichler, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, has been suggested to have been a central part of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle since the oxygenation of Earth. The cultivation of several ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) as well as the discovery that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amo)-like gene sequences are nearly ubiquitously distributed in the environment and outnumber their bacterial counterparts in many habitats fundamentally revised our understanding o...

  8. Bacterial Histidine Kinases as Novel Antibacterial Drug Targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bem, A.E.; Velikova, N.R.; Pellicer, M.T.; Baarlen, van P.; Marina, A.; Wells, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial histidine kinases (HKs) are promising targets for novel antibacterials. Bacterial HKs are part of bacterial two-component systems (TCSs), the main signal transduction pathways in bacteria, regulating various processes including virulence, secretion systems and antibiotic resistance. In thi

  9. Bacterial Histidine Kinases as Novel Antibacterial Drug Targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bem, A.E.; Velikova, N.R.; Pellicer, M.T.; Baarlen, van P.; Marina, A.; Wells, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial histidine kinases (HKs) are promising targets for novel antibacterials. Bacterial HKs are part of bacterial two-component systems (TCSs), the main signal transduction pathways in bacteria, regulating various processes including virulence, secretion systems and antibiotic resistance. In

  10. Solubility and bacterial sealing ability of MTA and root-end filling materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Galletti ESPIR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate solubility and sealing ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA and root-end filling materials. Material and Methods The materials evaluated were: MTA, Calcium Silicate Cement with zirconium oxide (CSC/ZrO2, and zinc oxide/eugenol (ZOE. Solubility test was performed according to ANSI/ADA. The difference between initial and final mass of the materials was analyzed after immersion in distilled water for 7 and 30 days. Retrograde cavities in human teeth with single straight root canal were performed by using ultrasonic tip CVD 9.5107-8. The cavities were filled with the evaluated materials to evaluate sealing ability using the bacterial leakage test with Enterococcus faecalis. Bacterial leakage was evaluated every 24 hours for six weeks observing the turbidity of Brain Heart infusion (BHI medium in contact with root apex. Data were submitted to ANOVA followed by Tukey tests (solubility, and Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (sealing ability at a 5% significance level. Results For the 7-day period, ZOE presented highest solubility when compared with the other groups (p<0.05. For the 30-day period, no difference was observed among the materials. Lower bacterial leakage was observed for MTA and CSC/ZrO2, and both presented better results than ZOE (p<0.05. Conclusion MTA and CSC/ZrO2 presented better bacterial sealing capacity, which may be related to lower initial solubility observed for these materials in relation to ZOE.

  11. Bacteria attenuation by iron electrocoagulation governed by interactions between bacterial phosphate groups and Fe(III) precipitates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delaire, Caroline; van Genuchten, Case M.; Amrose, Susan E.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2016-01-01

    Iron electrocoagulation (Fe-EC) is a low-cost process in which Fe(II) generated from an Fe(0) anode reacts with dissolved O2 to form (1) Fe(III) precipitates with an affinity for bacterial cell walls and (2) bactericidal reactive oxidants. Previous work suggests that Fe-EC is a promising treatment o

  12. 454-Pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial communities from autotrophic nitrogen removal bioreactors utilizing universal primers: effect of annealing temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, A.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A.; Rodelas, B.; Abbas, B.A.; Martinez-Toledo, M.V.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Osorio, F.; Gonzalez-Lopez, J.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria by molecular tools aimed at the evaluation of bacterial diversity in autotrophic nitrogen removal systems is limited by the difficulty to design universal primers for the Bacteria domain able to amplify the anammox 16S rRNAgenes.Ameta

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Enhanced Bacterial Growth on Hexadecane with Red Clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Jang, In-Ae; Ahn, Sungeun; Shin, Bora; Kim, Jisun; Park, Chulwoo; Jee, Seung Cheol; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2015-11-01

    Red clay was previously used to enhance bioremediation of diesel-contaminated soil. It was speculated that the enhanced degradation of diesel was due to increased bacterial growth. In this study, we selected Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1, a soil-borne degrader of diesel and alkanes, as a model bacterium and performed transcriptional analysis using RNA sequencing to investigate the cellular response during hexadecane utilization and the mechanism by which red clay promotes hexadecane degradation. We confirmed that red clay promotes the growth of A. oleivorans DR1 on hexadecane, a major component of diesel, as a sole carbon source. Addition of red clay to hexadecane-utilizing DR1 cells highly upregulated β-oxidation, while genes related to alkane oxidation were highly expressed with and without red clay. Red clay also upregulated genes related to oxidative stress defense, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutaredoxin genes, suggesting that red clay supports the response of DR1 cells to oxidative stress generated during hexadecane utilization. Increased membrane fluidity in the presence of red clay was confirmed by fatty acid methyl ester analysis at different growth phases, suggesting that enhanced growth on hexadecane could be due to increased uptake of hexadecane coupled with upregulation of downstream metabolism and oxidative stress defense. The monitoring of the bacterial community in soil with red clay for a year revealed that red clay stabilized the community structure.

  14. THE ETIOLOGY OF BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turovskiy, Yevgeniy; Noll, Katia Sutyak; Chikindas, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection among women of childbearing age. This condition is notorious for causing severe complications related to the reproductive health of women. Five decades of intense research established many risk factors for acquisition of BV, however due to the complexity of BV and due to lack of a reliable animal model for this condition, its exact etiology remains elusive. In this manuscript we use a historical perspective to critically review the development of major theories on the etiology of BV, ultimately implicating BV-related pathogens, healthy vaginal microbiota, bacteriophages and the immune response of the host. None of these theories on their own can reliably explain the epidemiological data. Instead, BV is caused by a complex interaction of multiple factors, which include the numerous components of the vaginal microbial ecosystem and their human host. Many of these factors are yet to be characterized because a clear understanding of their relative contribution to the etiology of BV is pivotal to formulation of an effective treatment for and prophylaxis of this condition. PMID:21332897

  15. Initiation of bacterial spore germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, J C; Halvorson, H O

    1968-04-01

    To investigate the problem of initiation in bacterial spore germination, we isolated, from extracts of dormant spores of Bacillus cereus strain T and B. licheniformis, a protein that initiated spore germination when added to a suspension of heat-activated spores. The optimal conditions for initiatory activity of this protein (the initiator) were 30 C in 0.01 to 0.04 m NaCl and 0.01 m tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (pH 8.5). The initiator was inhibited by phosphate but required two co-factors, l-alanine (1/7 of K(m) for l-alanine-inhibited germination) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (1.25 x 10(-4)m). In the crude extract, the initiator activity was increased 3.5-fold by heating the extract at 65 C for 10 min, but the partially purified initiator preparation was completely heat-sensitive (65 C for 5 min). Heat stability could be conferred on the purified initiator by adding 10(-3)m dipicolinic acid. A fractionation of this protein that excluded l-alanine dehydrogenase and adenosine deaminase from the initiator activity was developed. The molecular weight of the initiator was estimated as 7 x 10(4). The kinetics of germination in the presence of initiator were examined at various concentrations of l-alanine and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

  16. BACTERIAL FLORA IN DIABETIC ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Lavanya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Diabetic foot infections are one of the most feared complications of diabetes. This study was undertaken to determine the common etiological agents of diabetic foot infections and their in vitro antibiotic susceptibility. METHODS : A prospective study was p erformed over a period of two years in a tertiary care hospital. The aerobic and anaerobic bacterial agents were isolated and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern was determined . RESULTS : One hundred patients with Diabetic ulcer were studied, of which 6 5 were males and 35 were females. Majority of patients were in the age group of 51 to 60 years (37% and polymicrobial etiology was 64 % and monomicrobial etiology was 36%. A total of 187 organisms were isolated of which 165 were aerobic and 22 were anaero bic. Most frequently isolated aerobic organisms were Pseudomonas Sp., Klebsiella Sp., E coli Sp., and Staphylococcus aureus. The common anaerobic organisms isolated were Peptostreptococcus Sp. And Bacterioids Sp. CONCLUSION : High prevalence of multi - drug r esistant pathogens was observed. Amikacin, Imipenem were active against gram - negative bacilli, while vancomycin was found to be active against gram - positive bacteria.

  17. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria and Bacterial Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2015-10-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is very common. In healthy women, asymptomatic bacteriuria increases with age, from bacteriuria, irrespective of age or gender. The prevalence is very high in residents of long-term-care facilities, from 25% to 50% of women and 15% to 40% of men. Escherichia coli is the most frequent organism isolated, but a wide variety of other organisms may occur. Bacteriuria may be transient or persist for a prolonged period. Pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria identified in early pregnancy and who are untreated have a risk of pyelonephritis later in pregnancy of 20% to 30%. Bacteremia is frequent in bacteriuric subjects following mucosal trauma with bleeding, with 5% to 10% of patients developing severe sepsis or septic shock. These two groups with clear evidence of negative outcomes should be screened for bacteriuria and appropriately treated. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in other populations is benign and screening and treatment are not indicated. Antimicrobial treatment has no benefits but is associated with negative outcomes including reinfection with antimicrobial resistant organisms and a short-term increased frequency of symptomatic infection post-treatment. The observation of increased symptomatic infection post-treatment, however, has led to active investigation of bacterial interference as a strategy to prevent symptomatic episodes in selected high risk patients.

  18. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  19. Acute bacterial sinusitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMuri, Gregory; Wald, Ellen R

    2013-10-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, the pathogenesis of sinusitis involves 3 key factors: sinusostia obstruction, ciliary dysfunction, and thickening of sinus secretions. On the basis of studies of the microbiology of otitis media, H influenzae is playing an increasingly important role in the etiology of sinusitis, exceeding that of S pneumoniae in some areas, and b-lactamase production by H influenzae is increasing in respiratory isolates in the United States. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the presentation of acute bacterial sinusitis conforms to 1 of 3 predicable patterns; persistent, severe, and worsening symptoms. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the diagnosis of sinusitis should be made by applying strict clinical criteria. This approach will select children with upper respiratory infection symptoms who are most likely to benefit from an antibiotic. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,imaging is not indicated routinely in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging provides useful information when complications of sinusitis are suspected. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,amoxicillin-clavulanate should be considered asa first-line agent for the treatment of sinusitis.

  20. Bacterial antimicrobial metal ion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobman, Jon L; Crossman, Lisa C

    2015-05-01

    Metals such as mercury, arsenic, copper and silver have been used in various forms as antimicrobials for thousands of years with until recently, little understanding of their mode of action. The discovery of antibiotics and new organic antimicrobial compounds during the twentieth century saw a general decline in the clinical use of antimicrobial metal compounds, with the exception of the rediscovery of the use of silver for burns treatments and niche uses for other metal compounds. Antibiotics and new antimicrobials were regarded as being safer for the patient and more effective than the metal-based compounds they supplanted. Bacterial metal ion resistances were first discovered in the second half of the twentieth century. The detailed mechanisms of resistance have now been characterized in a wide range of bacteria. As the use of antimicrobial metals is limited, it is legitimate to ask: are antimicrobial metal resistances in pathogenic and commensal bacteria important now? This review details the new, rediscovered and 'never went away' uses of antimicrobial metals; examines the prevalence and linkage of antimicrobial metal resistance genes to other antimicrobial resistance genes; and examines the evidence for horizontal transfer of these genes between bacteria. Finally, we discuss the possible implications of the widespread dissemination of these resistances on re-emergent uses of antimicrobial metals and how this could impact upon the antibiotic resistance problem. © 2014 The Authors.

  1. BIOSYNTHESIS OF BACTERIAL CELLULOSE BY МEDUSOMYCES GISEVII

    OpenAIRE

    E. K. Gladysheva; E. A. Skiba

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Bacterial cellulose is an organic material that is synthesized by microorganisms extracellularly. Bacterial cellulose can be used in various industries. Especially, bacterial cellulose has found its application basically in medicine. The production of bacterial cellulose is a complicated and long process. The principal criterion for the process to be successful is bacterial cellulose to be obtained in a higher yield. Russia is lacking an operating facility to produce bacterial cellul...

  2. Marine mesocosm bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Verena; Cimarelli, Corrado; Ayris, Paul; Kueppers, Ulrich; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald; Woerheide, Gert

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, wind-delivered volcanic ash may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation remain unknown. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. The effect of substrate properties on bacterial colonisation was tested by exposing five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash (Sakurajima, Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size, in controlled marine coral reef aquaria under low light conditions for six months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis of Similarity supported significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community with the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community composition during colonisation of volcanic ash in a coral reef-like environment is controlled by the

  3. Control of bacterial exoelectrogenesis by c-AMP-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Phillips, Grace E; Stav, Shira; Lünse, Christina E; McCown, Phillip J; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-28

    Major changes in bacterial physiology including biofilm and spore formation involve signaling by the cyclic dinucleotides c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP. Recently, another second messenger dinucleotide, c-AMP-GMP, was found to control chemotaxis and colonization by Vibrio cholerae. We have identified a superregulon of genes controlled by c-AMP-GMP in numerous Deltaproteobacteria, including Geobacter species that use extracellular insoluble metal oxides as terminal electron acceptors. This exoelectrogenic process has been studied for its possible utility in energy production and bioremediation. Many genes involved in adhesion, pilin formation, and others that are important for exoelectrogenesis are controlled by members of a variant riboswitch class that selectively bind c-AMP-GMP. These RNAs constitute, to our knowledge, the first known specific receptors for c-AMP-GMP and reveal that this molecule is used by many bacteria to control specialized physiological processes.

  4. Enzymatic Reductive Dehalogenation Controls the Biosynthesis of Marine Bacterial Pyrroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gamal, Abrahim; Agarwal, Vinayak; Rahman, Imran; Moore, Bradley S

    2016-10-12

    Enzymes capable of performing dehalogenating reactions have attracted tremendous contemporary attention due to their potential application in the bioremediation of anthropogenic polyhalogenated persistent organic pollutants. Nature, in particular the marine environment, is also a prolific source of polyhalogenated organic natural products. The study of the biosynthesis of these natural products has furnished a diverse array of halogenation biocatalysts, but thus far no examples of dehalogenating enzymes have been reported from a secondary metabolic pathway. Here we show that the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of the highly brominated marine bacterial product pentabromopseudilin is catalyzed by an unusual debrominase Bmp8 that utilizes a redox thiol mechanism to remove the C-2 bromine atom of 2,3,4,5-tetrabromopyrrole to facilitate oxidative coupling to 2,4-dibromophenol. To the best of our knowledge, Bmp8 is first example of a dehalogenating enzyme from the established genetic and biochemical context of a natural product biosynthetic pathway.

  5. An electrochemical impedance model for integrated bacterial biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar, E-mail: benyoav@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Freeman, Amihay [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Sternheim, Marek [The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Shacham-Diamand, Yosi [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University (Israel)

    2011-09-30

    Bacterial cells attachment onto solid surfaces and the following growth into mature microbial biofilms may result in highly antibiotic resistant biofilms. Such biofilms may be incidentally formed on tissues or implanted devices, or intentionally formed by directed deposition of microbial sensors on whole-cell bio-chip surface. A new method for electrical characterization of the later on-chip microbial biofilm buildup is presented in this paper. Measurement of impedance vs. frequency in the range of 100 mHz to 400 kHz of Escherichia coli cells attachment to indium-tin-oxide-coated electrodes was carried out while using optical microscopy estimating the electrode area coverage. We show that impedance spectroscopy measurements can be interpreted by a simple electrical equivalent model characterizing both attachment and growth of the biofilm. The correlation of extracted equivalent electrical lumped components with the visual biofilm parameters and their dependence on the attachment and growth phases is confirmed.

  6. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  7. Biochemistry of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanath Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens that are multi-drug resistant compromise the effectiveness of treatment when they are the causative agents of infectious disease. These multi-drug resistance mechanisms allow bacteria to survive in the presence of clinically useful antimicrobial agents, thus reducing the efficacy of chemotherapy towards infectious disease. Importantly, active multi-drug efflux is a major mechanism for bacterial pathogen drug resistance. Therefore, because of their overwhelming presence in bacterial pathogens, these active multi-drug efflux mechanisms remain a major area of intense study, so that ultimately measures may be discovered to inhibit these active multi-drug efflux pumps.

  8. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis in Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalip Gupta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypothyroidism is an uncommon cause of ascites. Here we describe a case of a 75 year-old female patient with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and subclinical hypothyroidism that resolved with thyroid replacement and antibiotic therapy respectively. Ascitic fluid analysis revealed a gram-positive bacterium on gram staining. A review of the literature revealed just one other reported case of myxoedema ascites with concomitant spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and no case has till been reported of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in subclinical hypothyroidism.

  9. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demuth Donald R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacterial function of leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, T cells and B cells, providing a mechanistic explanation for increased infection risk. Further epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic research into this important area is warranted.

  10. Bacterial community composition and abundance in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Bo Yue; Qi Wang; Zechun Huang; Qifei Huang; Zengqiang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The abundance and phylogenetic composition of bacterial community in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfill were compared through real-time polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.In semi-aerobic landfill scenario,the bacterial 16S rRNA copy numbers in leachate had no significant reduction from initial stage to stable period.In the scenario of anaerobic landfill,the largest bacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number was found in leachate at initial stage,but it reduced significantly at stable period.Moreover,methane-oxidizing bacteria population in stable period was lower than that in initial period in both two landfill processes.However,semi-aerobic landfill leachate had more methanotrophic bacteria populations than that in the anaerobic one.Furthermore,according to the sequences and phylogenetic analysis,obvious difference could be detected in bacterial community composition in different scenarios.Proteobacteria and bacteroidetes took up a dominantly higher proportion in semi-aerobic landfill leachate.To summarize up,different landfill methods and its landfill ages had crucial impacts on bacterial abundance and composition in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills.

  11. Monooxygenation of small hydrocarbons catalyzed by bacterial cytochrome p450s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Osami; Watanabe, Yoshihito

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (P450s) catalyze the NAD(P)H/O2-dependent monooxygenation of less reactive organic molecules under mild conditions. The catalytic activity of bacterial P450s is very high compared with P450s isolated from animals and plants, and the substrate specificity of bacterial P450s is also very high. Accordingly, their catalytic activities toward nonnative substrates are generally low especially toward small hydrocarbons. However, mutagenesis approaches have been very successful for engineering bacterial P450s for the hydroxylation of small hydrocarbons. On the other hand, "decoy" molecules, whose structures are very similar to natural substrates, can be used to trick the substrate recognition of bacterial P450s, allowing the P450s to catalyze oxidation reactions of nonnative substrates without any substitution of amino acid residues in the presence of decoy molecules. Thus, the hydroxylation of small hydrocarbons such as ethane, propane, butane and benzene can be catalyzed by P450BM3, a long-alkyl-chain hydroxylase, using substrate misrecognition of P450s induced by decoy molecules. Furthermore, a number of H2O2-dependent bacterial P450s can catalyze the peroxygenation of a variety of nonnative substrates through a simple substrate-misrecognition trick, in which catalytic activities and enantioselectivity are dependent on the structure of decoy molecules.

  12. [Effect of Three Typical Disinfection Byproducts on Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Lu; Zhang, Meng-lu; Wang, Chun-ming; Lin, Hui-rong; Yu, Xin

    2015-07-01

    The effect of typical disinfection byproducts (DBPs) on bacterial antibiotic resistance was investigated in this study. chlorodibromomethane (CDBM), iodoacetic acid (IAA) and chloral hydrate (CH) were selected, which belong to trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and aldehydes, respectively. After exposure to the selected DBPs, the resistance change of the tested strains to antibiotics was determined. As a result, all of the three DBPs induced Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to gain increased resistance to the five antibiotics tested, and the DBPs ranked as IAA > CH > CDBM according to their enhancement effects. Multidrug resistance could also be enhanced by treatment with IAA. The same result was observed in Escherichia coli K12, suggesting that the effect of DBPs on antibiotic resistance was a common phenomenon. The mechanism was probably that DBPs stimulated oxidative stress, which induced mutagenesis. And the antibiotic resistance mutation frequency could be increased along with mutagenesis. This study revealed that the acquisition of bacterial antibiotic resistance might be related to DBPs in drinking water systems. Besides the genotoxicological risks, the epidemiological risks of DBPs should not be overlooked.

  13. Pneumococcal lipoproteins involved in bacterial fitness, virulence, and immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Sylvia; Voß, Franziska; Gómez Mejia, Alejandro; Brown, Jeremy S; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) has evolved sophisticated strategies to survive in several niches within the human body either as a harmless commensal or as a serious pathogen causing a variety of diseases. The dynamic interaction between pneumococci and resident host cells during colonization of the upper respiratory tract and at the site of infection is critical for bacterial survival and the development of disease. Pneumococcal lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins and have pivotal roles in bacterial fitness including envelope stability, cell division, nutrient acquisition, signal transduction, transport (as substrate-binding proteins of ABC transporter systems), resistance to oxidative stress and antibiotics, and protein folding. In addition, lipoproteins are directly involved in virulence-associated processes such as adhesion, colonization, and persistence through immune evasion. Conversely, lipoproteins are also targets for the host response both as ligands for toll-like receptors and as targets for acquired antibodies. This review summarizes the multifaceted roles of selected pneumococcal lipoproteins and how this knowledge can be exploited to combat pneumococcal infections. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. The Magnetosome Model: Insights into the Mechanisms of Bacterial Biomineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilah eRahn-Lee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Though the most ready example of biomineralization is the calcium phosphate of vertebrate bones and teeth, many bacteria are capable of creating biominerals inside their cells. Because of the diversity of these organisms and the minerals they produce, their study may reveal aspects of the fundamental mechanisms of biomineralization in more complex organisms. The best-studied case of intracellular biomineralization in bacteria is the magnetosome, an organelle produced by a diverse group of aquatic bacteria that contains single-domain crystals of the iron oxide magnetite (Fe3O4 or the iron sulfide greigite (Fe3S4. Here, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of bacterial magnetite biomineralization are discussed and used as a framework for understanding less-well studied examples, including the bacterial intracellular biomineralization of cadmium, selenium, silver, nickel, uranium, and calcium carbonate. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological formation of these minerals will have important implications for technologies such as the fabrication of nanomaterials and the bioremediation of toxic compounds.

  15. Transcriptional response of Musca domestica larvae to bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Tang

    Full Text Available The house fly Musca domestica, a cosmopolitan dipteran insect, is a significant vector for human and animal bacterial pathogens, but little is known about its immune response to these pathogens. To address this issue, we inoculated the larvae with a mixture of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and profiled the transcriptome 6, 24, and 48 h thereafter. Many genes known to controlling innate immunity in insects were induced following infection, including genes encoding pattern recognition proteins (PGRPs, various components of the Toll and IMD signaling pathways and of the proPO-activating and redox systems, and multiple antimicrobial peptides. Interestingly, we also uncovered a large set of novel immune response genes including two broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides (muscin and domesticin, which might have evolved to adapt to house-fly's unique ecological environments. Finally, genes mediating oxidative phosphorylation were repressed at 48 h post-infection, suggesting disruption of energy homeostasis and mitochondrial function at the late stages of infection. Collectively, our data reveal dynamic changes in gene expression following bacterial infection in the house fly, paving the way for future in-depth analysis of M. domestica's immune system.

  16. Use of a Burkholderia cenocepacia ABTS Oxidizer in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) often use biological processes to generate electrons from organic material contained in the anode chamber and abiotic processes employing atmospheric oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. This study investigated the accumulation of an oxidant in bacterial cultures...

  17. INFLUENCE OF ETHYLENE-OXIDE GAS TREATMENT ON THE IN-VITRO DEGRADATION BEHAVIOR OF DERMAL SHEEP COLLAGEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAMINK, LHHO; DIJKSTRA, PJ; VANLUYN, MJA; VANWACHEM, PB; NIEUWENHUIS, P; FEIJEN, J

    The influence of ethylene oxide gas treatment on the in vitro degradation behavior of noncrosslinked, glutaraldehyde crosslinked or hexamethylene diisocyanate crosslinked dermal sheep collagen (DSC) using bacterial collagenase is described. The results obtained were compared with the degradation

  18. INFLUENCE OF ETHYLENE-OXIDE GAS TREATMENT ON THE IN-VITRO DEGRADATION BEHAVIOR OF DERMAL SHEEP COLLAGEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAMINK, LHHO; DIJKSTRA, PJ; VANLUYN, MJA; VANWACHEM, PB; NIEUWENHUIS, P; FEIJEN, J

    1995-01-01

    The influence of ethylene oxide gas treatment on the in vitro degradation behavior of noncrosslinked, glutaraldehyde crosslinked or hexamethylene diisocyanate crosslinked dermal sheep collagen (DSC) using bacterial collagenase is described. The results obtained were compared with the degradation beh

  19. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Löscher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O.

    Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved

  20. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Loescher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O which occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been described to produce N2O. Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and Eastern Tropical South Pacific Oceans (ETSP. Particularly in the ETNA, maxima in abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes correlated with the N2O maximum and the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved oxygen

  1. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high-level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC-XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone-related compounds, ε-caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC-XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/P(BAD), RhaR-RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications.

  2. Studies on phytoplankton-bacterial interactions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeCosta, P.M.

    Given the sheer range of phytoplankton-bacterial interactions, some intriguing aspects have been addressed in this study. Firstly, the role of bacteria in influencing phytoplankton communities at the system level was examined. The seasonal changes...

  3. The bacterial microbiota in inflammatory lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffnagle, Gary B; Dickson, Robert P

    2015-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920s, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined.

  4. Respiratory bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Hansen, Christine R; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial respiratory infections are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains the main pathogen in adults, but other Gram-negative bacteria such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia as well...

  5. Plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoyo, Gustavo; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Orozco-Mosqueda, Ma del Carmen; Glick, Bernard R

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial endophytes ubiquitously colonize the internal tissues of plants, being found in nearly every plant worldwide. Some endophytes are able to promote the growth of plants. For those strains the mechanisms of plant growth-promotion known to be employed by bacterial endophytes are similar to the mechanisms used by rhizospheric bacteria, e.g., the acquisition of resources needed for plant growth and modulation of plant growth and development. Similar to rhizospheric plant growth-promoting bacteria, endophytic plant growth-promoting bacteria can act to facilitate plant growth in agriculture, horticulture and silviculture as well as in strategies for environmental cleanup (i.e., phytoremediation). Genome comparisons between bacterial endophytes and the genomes of rhizospheric plant growth-promoting bacteria are starting to unveil potential genetic factors involved in an endophytic lifestyle, which should facilitate a better understanding of the functioning of bacterial endophytes.

  6. AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Sciences, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, P.M.B. 1111, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. ... Methods:A total of 207 wound specimens collected from patients attending the University of Benin ..... of bacterial pathogens in burn wound.

  7. Endolymphatic sac involvement in bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Andersen, Christian Østergaard;

    2015-01-01

    The commonest sequelae of bacterial meningitis are related to the inner ear. Little is known about the inner ear immune defense. Evidence suggests that the endolymphatic sac provides some protection against infection. A potential involvement of the endolymphatic sac in bacterial meningitis......-inoculated. The rats were killed when reaching terminal illness or on day 7, followed by light microscopy preparation and PAS-Alcian blue staining. The endolymphatic sac was examined for bacterial invasion and leukocyte infiltration. Neither bacteria nor leukocytes infiltrated the endolymphatic sac during the first...... days. Bacteria invaded the inner ear through the cochlear aquaduct. On days 5-6, the bacteria invaded the endolymphatic sac through the endolymphatic duct subsequent to invasion of the vestibular endolymphatic compartment. No evidence of direct bacterial invasion of the sac through the meninges...

  8. The Bacterial Microbiota in Inflammatory Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffnagle, Gary B.; Dickson, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920's, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined. PMID:26122174

  9. The diversity of bacterial pathogenicity mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Eugene

    2005-01-01

    A report on the international conference 'Molecular basis of bacterial pathogenesis', sponsored by the Federation of European Microbiological Societies (FEMS) and the Israel Center for the Study of Emerging Diseases, Ein Gedi, Israel, 23-27 January 2005.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Novel Biocontrol Bacterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Cheol Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Because bacterial isolates from only a few genera have been developed commercially as biopesticides, discovery and characterization of novel bacterial strains will be a key to market expansion. Our previous screen using plant bioassays identified 24 novel biocontrol isolates representing 12 different genera. In this study, we characterized the 3 isolates showing the best biocontrol activities. The isolates were Pantoea dispersa WCU35, Proteus myxofaciens WCU244, and Exiguobacterium acetylicum WCU292 based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The isolates showed differential production of extracellular enzymes, antimicrobial activity against various fungal or bacterial plant pathogens, and induced systemic resistance activity against tomato gray mold disease caused by Botrytis cinerea. E. acetylicum WCU292 lacked strong in vitro antimicrobial activity against plant pathogens, but induced systemic resistance against tomato gray mold disease. These results confirm that the trait of biological control is found in a wide variety of bacterial genera

  11. Heterotrophic bacterial populations in tropical sandy beaches

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Distribution pattern of heterotrophic bacterial flora of three sandy beaches of the west coast of India was studied. The population in these beaches was microbiologically different. Population peaks of halotolerant and limnotolerant forms were...

  12. Failure of bacterial streamers in creeping flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ishita; Ghosh, Ranajay; Sadrzadeh, Mohtada; Kumar, Aloke

    2016-11-01

    In the recent years, the dynamical response of filamentous bacterial aggregates called bacterial streamer in creeping flows has attracted attention. We report the observation of 'necking-type' instability leading to failure in bacterial (Pseudomonas fluorescens) streamers formed in creeping flows. Quantification of the failure process was made possible through the use of 200 nm red fluorescent polystyrene tracer particles embedded in the bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The nonlinear failure behavior shows distinct phases of deformation with mutually different characteristic times, which end with a distinct localized failure of the streamer. We also develop a simplified analytical model to describe the experimental observations of the failure phenomena. The theoretical power law relationship between critical stretch ratio and the fluid velocity scale matches closely experimental observations.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26

    The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength

  14. Bacterial endophytes enhance competition by invasive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Marnie E; Chrzanowski, Thomas H; Westlie, Tara K; DeLuca, Thomas H; Callaway, Ragan M; Holben, William E

    2013-09-01

    Invasive plants can alter soil microbial communities and profoundly alter ecosystem processes. In the invasive grass Sorghum halepense, these disruptions are consequences of rhizome-associated bacterial endophytes. We describe the effects of N2-fixing bacterial strains from S. halepense (Rout and Chrzanowski, 2009) on plant growth and show that bacteria interact with the plant to alter soil nutrient cycles, enabling persistence of the invasive. • We assessed fluxes in soil nutrients for ∼4 yr across a site invaded by S. halepense. We assayed the N2-fixing bacteria in vitro for phosphate solubilization, iron chelation, and production of the plant-growth hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). We assessed the plant's ability to recruit bacterial partners from substrates and vertically transmit endophytes to seeds and used an antibiotic approach to inhibit bacterial activity in planta and assess microbial contributions to plant growth. • We found persistent alterations to eight biogeochemical cycles (including nitrogen, phosphorus, and iron) in soils invaded by S. halepense. In this context, three bacterial isolates solubilized phosphate, and all produced iron siderophores and IAA in vitro. In growth chamber experiments, bacteria were transmitted vertically, and molecular analysis of bacterial community fingerprints from rhizomes indicated that endophytes are also horizontally recruited. Inhibiting bacterial activity with antibiotics resulted in significant declines in plant growth rate and biomass, with pronounced rhizome reductions. • This work suggests a major role of endophytes on growth and resource allocation of an invasive plant. Indeed, bacterial isolate physiology is correlated with invader effects on biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, phosphate, and iron.

  15. Pattern Formation in a Bacterial Colony Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinze Lian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a bacterial colony model. Based on the stability analysis, we derive the conditions for Hopf and Turing bifurcations. Furthermore, we present novel numerical evidence of time evolution of patterns controlled by parameters in the model and find that the model dynamics exhibit a diffusion controlled formation growth to spots, holes and stripes pattern replication, which show that the bacterial colony model is useful in revealing the spatial predation dynamics in the real world.

  16. Rho-modifying bacterial protein toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Rho proteins are targets of numerous bacterial protein toxins, which manipulate the GTP-binding proteins by covalent modifications, including ADP ribosylation, glycosylation, adenylylation, proteolytic cleavage and deamidation. Bacterial toxins are important virulence factors but are also potent and efficient pharmacological tools to study the physiological functions of their eukaryotic targets. Recent studies indicate that amazing variations exist in the molecular mechanisms by which toxins attack Rho proteins, which are discussed here.

  17. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities.

  18. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf eTyc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities.

  19. Asynchronous exponential growth of a bacterial population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Boulanouar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we complete a study started earlier in [1,2] wherein a model of growing bacterial population has been the matter of a mathematical analysis. We show that the full model is governed by a strongly continuous semigroup. Beside the positivity and the irreducibility of the generated semigroup, we describe its asymptotic behavior in the uniform topology which leads to the asynchronous exponential growth of the bacterial population.

  20. [Combination therapy of chronic bacterial prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khryanin, A A; Reshetnikov, O V

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the possible etiological factors in the development of chronic bacterial prostatitis. The authors presented a comparative long-term analysis of morbidity from non-viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Russia. Against the background of general decline in STIs incidence, a significant percentage of them is made up by urogenital trichomoniasis. The findings substantiated the advantages of combination therapy (ornidazole and ofloxacin) for bacterial urinary tract infections.

  1. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinta, Tinkara; Kogovšek, Tjaša; Malej, Alenka; Turk, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into possible changes in

  2. [Bacterial vaginosis. Treatment of the relapse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, M

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal infection in women of reproductive age. Bacterial vaginosis is an ecological disorder that ensues when normal lactobacilli are replaced by large numbers of Gardnerella vaginalis, Prevotella sp., Bacteroides sp., Mobiluncus sp. and M. hominis. Numerous studies have consistently shown that BV at 12-24 weeks are associated with increased risks of preterm birth (PTB), preterm rupture of the membranes, chorioamnionitis, fetal infection and cerebral palsy. Deficiencies in local immunity may predispose women to BV.

  3. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Tinta

    Full Text Available Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into

  4. Recombination and the nature of bacterial speciation

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Genetic surveys are uncovering the diversity of bacteria, and are causing the species concepts used to categorize these to be questioned. One difficulty in defining bacterial species arises from the high rates of recombination that results in the transfer of DNA between relatively distantly related bacteria. Barriers to this process, which could be used to define species naturally, are not apparent. Here, we have reviewed conceptual models of bacterial speciation and simulate speciation in si...

  5. Determination of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrate Oxidizing Bacteria in Wastewater and Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Somilez Asya

    2014-01-01

    The process of water purification has many different physical, chemical, and biological processes. One part of the biological process is the task of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Both play critical roles in the treatment of wastewater by oxidizing toxic compounds. The broad term is nitrification, a naturally occurring process that is carried out by AOB and NOB by using oxidation to convert ammonia to nitrite and nitrite to nitrate. To monitor this biological activity, bacterial staining was performed on wastewater contained in inoculum tanks and biofilm samples from bioreactors. Using microscopy and qPCR, the purpose of this experiment was to determine if the population of AOB and NOB in wastewater and membrane bioreactors changed depending on temperature and hibernation conditions to determine the optimal parameters for AOB/NOB culture to effectively clean wastewater.

  6. Soil carbon quality and nitrogen fertilization structure bacterial communities with predictable responses of major bacterial phyla

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural practices affect the soil ecosystem in multiple ways and the soil microbial communities represent an integrated and dynamic measure of soil status. Our aim was to test whether the soil bacterial community and the relative abundance of major bacterial phyla responded predictably to long-term organic amendments representing different carbon qualities (peat and straw) in combination with nitrogen fertilization levels and if certain bacterial groups were indicative of specific treatm...

  7. The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Sadie A; Koci, Remzie A; Qehaja-Buçaj, Emine; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Mehmeti, Murat

    2014-07-14

    The purpose of this study was to present the epidemiologic features of bacterial meningitis in the developing country of Kosovo. Data were collected from active surveillance of bacterial meningitis cases treated at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo in the years 2000 (first post-war year) and 2010. Meningitis cases in 2000 compared with 2010 showed a 35.5% decline in incidence (from 4.8 to 3.1 cases per 100,000 population) and a decrease in the case fatality rate from 10% to 5%. In children, there was a lower mortality rate (5% versus 2%) and a lower incidence of neurological complications (13% versus 16%) as compared to adults (32% versus 10% and 16% versus 35%, respectively). Neisseria meningitidis was the most common pathogen of bacterial meningitis in both study periods. Bacterial meningitis was most prevalent in the pediatric population, and showed an increase in the median age, from three years in 2000 to seven years in 2010. A steady number of bacterial meningitis cases in adults throughout last decade (around 20 cases per year) was recorded. During the last decade, gradual changes have been observed in the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis that are unrelated to the introduction of new vaccines, but are partly due to the improvement of living conditions.

  8. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed. PMID:26244150

  9. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-05-21

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis in the Netherlands from 2006 to 2012. Endocarditis was identified in 24 of 1025 episodes (2%) of bacterial meningitis. Cultures yielded Streptococcus pneumoniae in 13 patients, Staphylococcus aureus in 8 patients, and Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus salivarius in 1 patient each. Clues leading to the diagnosis of endocarditis were cardiac murmurs, persistent or recurrent fever, a history of heart valve disease, and S aureus as the causative pathogen of bacterial meningitis. Treatment consisted of prolonged antibiotic therapy in all patients and surgical valve replacement in 10 patients (42%). Two patients were treated with oral anticoagulants, and both developed life-threatening intracerebral hemorrhage. Systemic (70%) and neurological (54%) complications occurred frequently, leading to a high proportion of patients with unfavorable outcome (63%). Seven of 24 patients (29%) with meningitis and endocarditis died. Endocarditis is an uncommon coexisting condition in bacterial meningitis but is associated with a high rate of unfavorable outcome.

  10. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bacterial reverse transcriptases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Toro

    Full Text Available Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs, Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L, and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology.

  11. Graphene oxide decorated electrospun gelatin nanofibers: Fabrication, properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalaja, K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 547 (India); Sreehari, V.S. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal, Bhauri, Madhya Pradesh 462066 (India); Kumar, P.R. Anil [Tissue culture laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 012 (India); Nirmala, R. James, E-mail: nirmala@iist.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 547 (India)

    2016-07-01

    Gelatin nanofiber fabricated by electrospinning process is found to mimic the complex structural and functional properties of natural extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. In order to improve the physico-chemical and biological properties of the nanofibers, graphene oxide is incorporated in the gelatin to form graphene oxide decorated gelatin nanofibers. The current research effort is focussed on the fabrication and evaluation of physico-chemical and biological properties of graphene oxide-gelatin composite nanofibers. The presence of graphene oxide in the nanofibers was established by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We report the effect of incorporation of graphene oxide on the mechanical, thermal and biological performance of the gelatin nanofibers. The tensile strength of gelatin nanofibers was increased from 8.29 ± 0.53 MPa to 21 ± 2.03 MPa after the incorporation of GO. In order to improve the water resistance of nanofibers, natural based cross-linking agent, namely, dextran aldehyde was employed. The cross-linked composite nanofibers showed further increase in the tensile strength up to 56.4 ± 2.03 MPa. Graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers are evaluated for bacterial activity against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and cyto compatibility using mouse fibroblast cells (L-929 cells). The results indicate that the graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers do not prevent bacterial growth, nevertheless support the L-929 cell adhesion and proliferation. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide nano reinforced gelatin nanofibers are fabricated by electrospinning. • Graphene oxide (0.5%) loading resulted in increased tensile strength. • GO/gelatin nanofibers are cross-linked with dextran aldehyde. • Composite nanofibers favoured adhesion of L-929 cells. • GO/gelatin mats do not prevent bacterial growth.

  12. Antioxidant Functions of Nitric Oxide Synthase in a Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Vaish

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide and its derivative peroxynitrites are generated by host defense system to control bacterial infection. However certain Gram positive bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus possess a gene encoding nitric oxide synthase (SaNOS in their chromosome. In this study it was determined that under normal growth conditions, expression of SaNOS was highest during early exponential phase of the bacterial growth. In oxidative stress studies, deletion of SaNOS led to increased susceptibility of the mutant cells compared to wild-type S. aureus. While inhibition of SaNOS activity by the addition of L-NAME increased sensitivity of the wild-type S. aureus to oxidative stress, the addition of a nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside, restored oxidative stress tolerance of the SaNOS mutant. The SaNOS mutant also showed reduced survival after phagocytosis by PMN cells with respect to wild-type S. aureus.

  13. Neutrophilic iron oxidizers adapted to highly oxic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    indicate that neutrophilic iron oxidizers in highly oxic environments like drinking water treatment systems can be abundant (5 E+04 to 7 E+05 cells per gram of wet sand material). It was furthermore observed that the diversity of the cultivated dominant iron oxidizers differs substantially from those...... carbon) while oxygen (O2) is the electron acceptor provided during the aeration process. Numerous previous studies have described neutrophilic iron oxidizers as a bacterial guild with a special niche preference, especially the transition zone between aerobic and anoxic regions, where abiotic chemical...

  14. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurunathan S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Jae Woong Han, Ahmed Abdal Dayem, Vasuki Eppakayala, Jin-Hoi KimDepartment of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul, South KoreaBackground: Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO and reduced graphene oxide (rGO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we used a novel reducing agent, betamercaptoethanol (BME, for synthesis of graphene to avoid the use of toxic materials. To uncover the impacts of GO and rGO on human health, the antibacterial activity of two types of graphene-based material toward a bacterial model P. aeruginosa was studied and compared.Methods: The synthesized GO and rGO was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle-size analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Further, to explain the antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, we employed various assays, such as cell growth, cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation, and DNA fragmentation.Results: Ultraviolet-visible spectra of the samples confirmed the transition of GO into graphene. Dynamic light-scattering analyses showed the average size among the two types of graphene materials. X-ray diffraction data validated the structure of graphene sheets, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene. Raman spectroscopy data indicated the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and the formation of graphene. The exposure of cells to GO and rGO induced the production of superoxide radical anion and loss of cell viability. Results suggest that the antibacterial activities are contributed to by loss of

  15. Bacterial Cellulose (BC) as a Functional Nanocomposite Biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandgaonkar, Avinav Ghanashyam

    compressive tests. In our second study, we developed a one-pot in-situ biosynthetic method to fabricate structurally controllable bacterial cellulose (BC)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composites. The graphene oxide (GO) was highly reduced during a standard autoclave process using a traditional mannitol culture medium as the reducing agent. The electrical conductivity of the RGO was found to be 23.75 S m-1. The final BC/RGO composites were developed in three distinct forms: 1) sealed structures in the water, 2) aerogels characterized by a porous cross section and aligned longitudinal structure, and 3) films embedded within the RGO sheets. Because of the simplicity and non-toxic nature of this work, it can be used in biomedical and bioelectronics applications. The last study was on dye degradation using BC as the substrate. The surface of the BC was chemically oxidized to produce aldehyde groups to successfully covalently crosslink laccase. TiO2 and laccase (Lac) were co-immobilized on the surface of OBC and the dye degradation process was carried out under specific conditions. Compared with free laccase, the optimum pH of the immobilized laccase system shifted to lower pH, while the optimum temperature decreased from 55 °C to 50 °C. The dye degradation experiments showed that the optimum pH for dye degradation was pH 5.0-6.0, while the optimum temperature was ca. 40 ºC. Under UV illumination, the dye degradation efficiency significantly improved characteristic of a synergy in the system. This dissertation contributes to the basic research of bacterial cellulose which will result in novel ideas that can possibly result in future industrial applications. The research provides a fundamental underpinning of specialized structure-property relationships between BC and the materials used to fabricate the BC nanocomposites that have value-added applications that are environmentally safe and eco-friendly.

  16. Quantitative characterization of the influence of the nanoscale morphology of nanostructured surfaces on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Vikram Singh

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection of implants and prosthetic devices is one of the most common causes of implant failure. The nanostructured surface of biocompatible materials strongly influences the adhesion and proliferation of mammalian cells on solid substrates. The observation of this phenomenon has led to an increased effort to develop new strategies to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, primarily through nanoengineering the topology of the materials used in implantable devices. While several studies have demonstrated the influence of nanoscale surface morphology on prokaryotic cell attachment, none have provided a quantitative understanding of this phenomenon. Using supersonic cluster beam deposition, we produced nanostructured titania thin films with controlled and reproducible nanoscale morphology respectively. We characterized the surface morphology; composition and wettability by means of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. We studied how protein adsorption is influenced by the physico-chemical surface parameters. Lastly, we characterized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus adhesion on nanostructured titania surfaces. Our results show that the increase in surface pore aspect ratio and volume, related to the increase of surface roughness, improves protein adsorption, which in turn downplays bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. As roughness increases up to about 20 nm, bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are enhanced; the further increase of roughness causes a significant decrease of bacterial adhesion and inhibits biofilm formation. We interpret the observed trend in bacterial adhesion as the combined effect of passivation and flattening effects induced by morphology-dependent protein adsorption. Our findings demonstrate that bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces are significantly influenced by nanoscale morphological

  17. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  18. The role and regulation of catalase in respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Mia M; Fan, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract bacterial pathogens are the etiologic agents of a variety of illnesses. The ability of these bacteria to cause disease is imparted through survival within the host and avoidance of pathogen clearance by the immune system. Respiratory tract pathogens are continually bombarded by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be produced by competing bacteria, normal metabolic function, or host immunological responses. In order to survive and proliferate, bacteria have adapted defense mechanisms to circumvent the effects of ROS. Bacteria employ the use of anti-oxidant enzymes, catalases and catalase-peroxidases, to relieve the effects of the oxidative stressors to which they are continually exposed. The decomposition of ROS has been shown to provide favorable conditions in which respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Legionella pneumophila, and Neisseria meningitidis are able to withstand exposure to highly reactive molecules and yet survive. Bacteria possessing mutations in the catalase gene have a decreased survival rate, yet may be able to compensate for the lack of catalatic activity if peroxidatic activity is present. An incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms by which catalase and catalase-peroxidases are regulated still persists, however, in some bacterial species, a regulatory factor known as OxyR has been shown to either up-regulate or down-regulate catalase gene expression. Yet, more research is still needed to increase the knowledge base in relation to this enzyme class. As with this review, we focus on major respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens in order to elucidate the function and regulation of catalases. The importance of the research could lead to the development of novel treatments against respiratory bacterial infections.

  19. Diverse bacterial groups are associated with corrosive lesions at a Granite Mountain Record Vault (GMRV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, J; Chellamuthu, P; Obraztsova, A; Moore, J E; Nealson, K H

    2011-08-01

    This study applied culture-dependent and molecular approaches to examine the bacterial communities at corrosion sites at Granite Mountain Record Vault (GMRV) in Utah, USA, with the goal of understanding the role of microbes in these unexpected corrosion events. Samples from corroded steel chunks, rock particles and waters around the corrosion pits were collected for bacterial isolation and molecular analyses. Bacteria cultivated from these sites were identified as members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. In addition, molecular genetic characterization of the communities via nested-polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) indicated the presence of a broad spectrum of bacterial groups, including Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. However, neither cultivation nor molecular approaches identified sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), the bacteria commonly implicated as causative organisms were found associated with corrosive lesions in a process referred to as microbially influenced corrosion (MIC). The high diversity of bacterial groups at the corrosion sites in comparison with that seen in the source waters suggested to us a role for the microbes in corrosion, perhaps being an expression of a redox-active group of microbes transferring electrons, harvesting energy and producing biomass. The corrosion sites contained highly diverse microbial communities, consistent with the involvement of microbial activities along the redox gradient at corrosion interface. We hypothesize an electron transport model for MIC, involving diverse bacterial groups such as acid-producing bacteria (APB), SRB, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB), metal-reducing bacteria (MRB) and metal-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). The characterization of micro-organisms that influence metal-concrete corrosion at GMRV has significant implications for corrosion control in high

  20. Temporal and Spatial Variations of Bacterial and Faunal Communities Associated with Deep-Sea Wood Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop Ristova, Petra; Bienhold, Christina; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Rossel, Pamela E; Boetius, Antje

    2017-01-01

    Sinking of large organic food falls i.e. kelp, wood and whale carcasses to the oligotrophic deep-sea floor promotes the establishment of locally highly productive and diverse ecosystems, often with specifically adapted benthic communities. However, the fragmented spatial distribution and small area poses challenges for the dispersal of their microbial and faunal communities. Our study focused on the temporal dynamics and spatial distributions of sunken wood bacterial communities, which were deployed in the vicinity of different cold seeps in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Norwegian deep-seas. By combining fingerprinting of bacterial communities by ARISA and 454 sequencing with in situ and ex situ biogeochemical measurements, we show that sunken wood logs have a locally confined long-term impact (> 3y) on the sediment geochemistry and community structure. We confirm previous hypotheses of different successional stages in wood degradation including a sulphophilic one, attracting chemosynthetic fauna from nearby seep systems. Wood experiments deployed at similar water depths (1100-1700 m), but in hydrographically different oceanic regions harbored different wood-boring bivalves, opportunistic faunal communities, and chemosynthetic species. Similarly, bacterial communities on sunken wood logs were more similar within one geographic region than between different seas. Diverse sulphate-reducing bacteria of the Deltaproteobacteria, the sulphide-oxidizing bacteria Sulfurovum as well as members of the Acidimicrobiia and Bacteroidia dominated the wood falls in the Eastern Mediterranean, while Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia colonized the Norwegian Sea wood logs. Fauna and bacterial wood-associated communities changed between 1 to 3 years of immersion, with sulphate-reducers and sulphide-oxidizers increasing in proportion, and putative cellulose degraders decreasing with time. Only 6% of all bacterial genera, comprising the core community, were found at any time on

  1. Effect of Copper Treatment on the Composition and Function of the Bacterial Community in the Sponge Haliclona cymaeformis

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, R.-M.

    2014-11-04

    Marine sponges are the most primitive metazoan and host symbiotic microorganisms. They are crucial components of the marine ecological system and play an essential role in pelagic processes. Copper pollution is currently a widespread problem and poses a threat to marine organisms. Here, we examined the effects of copper treatment on the composition of the sponge-associated bacterial community and the genetic features that facilitate the survival of enriched bacteria under copper stress. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing results showed that the sponge Haliclona cymaeformis harbored symbiotic sulfur-oxidizing Ectothiorhodospiraceae and photosynthetic Cyanobacteria as dominant species. However, these autotrophic bacteria decreased substantially after treatment with a high copper concentration, which enriched for a heterotrophic-bacterium-dominated community. Metagenomic comparison revealed a varied profile of functional genes and enriched functions, including bacterial motility and chemotaxis, extracellular polysaccharide and capsule synthesis, virulence-associated genes, and genes involved in cell signaling and regulation, suggesting short-period mechanisms of the enriched bacterial community for surviving copper stress in the microenvironment of the sponge. Microscopic observation and comparison revealed dynamic bacterial aggregation within the matrix and lysis of sponge cells. The bacteriophage community was also enriched, and the complete genome of a dominant phage was determined, implying that a lytic phage cycle was stimulated by the high copper concentration. This study demonstrated a copper-induced shift in the composition of functional genes of the sponge-associated bacterial community, revealing the selective effect of copper treatment on the functions of the bacterial community in the microenvironment of the sponge. IMPORTANCE This study determined the bacterial community structure of the common sponge Haliclona cymaeformis and examined the effect of copper

  2. Exploring bacterial infections: theoretical and experimental studies of the bacterial population dynamics and antibiotic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xinxian

    Bacterial infections are very common in human society. Thus extensive research has been conducted to reveal the molecular mechanisms of the pathogenesis and to evaluate the antibiotics' efficacy against bacteria. Little is known, however, about the population dynamics of bacterial populations and their interactions with the host's immune system. In this dissertation, a stochatic model is developed featuring stochastic phenotypic switching of bacterial individuals to explain the single-variant bottleneck discovered in multi strain bacterial infections. I explored early events in a bacterial infection establishment using classical experiments of Moxon and Murphy on neonatal rats. I showed that the minimal model and its simple variants do not work. I proposed modifications to the model that could explain the data quantitatively. The bacterial infections are also commonly established in physical structures, as biofilms or 3-d colonies. In contrast, most research on antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections has been conducted in well-mixed liquid cultures. I explored the efficacy of antibiotics to treat such bacterial colonies, a broadly applicable method is designed and evaluated where discrete bacterial colonies on 2-d surfaces were exposed to antibiotics. I discuss possible explanations and hypotheses for the experimental results. To verify these hypotheses, we investigated the dynamics of bacterial population as 3-d colonies. We showed that a minimal mathematical model of bacterial colony growth in 3-d was able to account for the experimentally observed presence of a diffusion-limited regime. The model further revealed highly loose packing of the cells in 3-d colonies and smaller cell sizes in colonies than plancktonic cells in corresponding liquid culture. Further experimental tests of the model predictions have revealed that the ratio of the cell size in liquid culture to that in colony cultures was consistent with the model prediction, that the dead cells

  3. Responses of bacterial community and functional marker genes of nitrogen cycling to biochar, compost and combined amendments in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haipeng; Zeng, Guangming; Liang, Jie; Chen, Jin; Xu, Jijun; Dai, Juan; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, Ming; Xu, Piao; Zhou, Yaoyu; Li, Fei; Hu, Liang; Wan, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Biochar and compost are seen as two attractive waste management options and are used for soil amendment and pollution remediation. The interaction between biochar and composting may improve the potential benefits of biochar and compost. We investigated soil physicochemical properties, bacterial community, bacterial 16S rRNA, and functional marker genes of nitrogen cycling of the soil remedied with nothing (S), compost (SC), biochar (SB), a mixture of compost and biochar (SBC), composted biochar (SBced), and a composted mixture of biochar and biomass (SBCing). The results were that all amendments (1) increased the bacterial community richness (except SB) and SBCing showed the greatest efficiency; (2) increased the bacterial community diversity (SBCing > SBC > SC > SBced > SB > S); and (3) changed the gene copy numbers of 16S rRNA, nirK, nirS, and nosZ genes of bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). All amendments (except SB) could increase the gene copy number of 16S rRNA, and SBCing had the greatest efficiency. The changes of soil bacterial community richness and diversity and the gene copy numbers of 16S rRNA, nirK, nirS, nosZ, AOA, and AOB would affect carbon and nitrogen cycling of the ecosystem and also implied that BCing had the greatest efficiency on soil amendment.

  4. Bacterial Responses to Glyoxal and Methylglyoxal: Reactive Electrophilic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhan; Park, Chankyu

    2017-01-01

    Glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MG), belonging to α-oxoaldehydes, are produced by organisms from bacteria to humans by glucose oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA oxidation. Since glyoxals contain two adjacent reactive carbonyl groups, they are referred to as reactive electrophilic species (RES), and are damaging to proteins and nucleotides. Therefore, glyoxals cause various diseases in humans, such as diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, from which all living organisms need to be protected. Although the glyoxalase system has been known for some time, details on how glyoxals are sensed and detoxified in the cell have not been fully elucidated, and are only beginning to be uncovered. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on bacterial responses to glyoxal, and specifically focus on the glyoxal-associated regulators YqhC and NemR, as well as their detoxification mediated by glutathione (GSH)-dependent/independent glyoxalases and NAD(P)H-dependent reductases. Furthermore, we will address questions and future directions. PMID:28106725

  5. Bacterial communities involved in sulfur transformations in wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Daniel Derrossi; de Andrade, Pedro Avelino Maia; Durrer, Ademir; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Corção, Gertrudes; Brandelli, Adriano

    2016-12-01

    The main sulfate-reducing (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in six wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located at southern Brazil were described based on high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rDNA. Specific taxa of SRB and SOB were correlated with some abiotic factors, such as the source of the wastewater, oxygen content, sample type, and physical chemical attributes of these WWTPs. When the 22 families of SRB and SOB were clustered together, the samples presented a striking distribution, demonstrating grouping patterns according to the sample type. For SOB, the most abundant families were Spirochaetaceae, Chromatiaceae, Helicobacteriaceae, Rhodospirillaceae, and Neisseriaceae, whereas, for SRB, were Syntrophaceae, Desulfobacteraceae, Nitrospiraceae, and Desulfovibriaceae. The structure and composition of the major families related to the sulfur cycle were also influenced by six chemical attributes (sulfur, potassium, zinc, manganese, phosphorus, and nitrogen). Sulfur was the chemical attribute that most influenced the variation of bacterial communities in the WWTPs (λ = 0.14, p = 0.008). The OTUs affiliated to Syntrophus showed the highest response to the increase of total sulfur. All these findings can contribute to improve the understanding in relation to the sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing communities in WWTPs aiming to reduce H2S emissions.

  6. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCorno

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The release of antibiotics (AB into the environment poses several threats for human health due to potential development of ABresistant natural bacteria. Even though the use of low-dose antibiotics has been promoted in health care and farming, significant amounts of AB are observed in aquatic environments. Knowledge on the impact of AB on natural bacterial communities is missing both in terms of spread and evolution of resistance mechanisms, and of modifications of community composition and productivity. New approaches are required to study the response of microbial communities rather than individual resistance genes. In this study a chemostat-based experiment with 4 coexisting bacterial strains has been performed to mimicking the response of a freshwater bacterial community to the presence of antibiotics in low and high doses. Bacterial abundance rapidly decreased by 75% in the presence of AB, independently of their concentration, and remained constant until the end of the experiment. The bacterial community was mainly dominated by Aeromonas hydrophila and Brevundimonas intermedia while the other two strains, Micrococcus luteus and Rhodococcus sp. never exceed 10%. Interestingly, the bacterial strains, which were isolated at the end of the experiment, were not AB-resistant, while reassembled communities composed of the 4 strains, isolated from treatments under AB stress, significantly raised their performance (growth rate, abundance in the presence of AB compared to the communities reassembled with strains isolated from the treatment without AB. By investigating the phenotypic adaptations of the communities subjected to the different treatments, we found that the presence of AB significantly increased co-aggregation by 5-6 fold.These results represent the first observation of co-aggregation as a successful strategy of AB resistance based on phenotype in aquatic bacterial communities, and can represent a fundamental step in the understanding of

  7. Nest Material Shapes Eggs Bacterial Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ruiz-Castellano

    Full Text Available Selective pressures imposed by pathogenic microorganisms to embryos have selected in hosts for a battery of antimicrobial lines of defenses that includes physical and chemical barriers. Due to the antimicrobial properties of volatile compounds of green plants and of chemicals of feather degrading bacteria, the use of aromatic plants and feathers for nest building has been suggested as one of these barriers. However, experimental evidence suggesting such effects is scarce in the literature. During two consecutive years, we explored experimentally the effects of these nest materials on loads of different groups of bacteria (mesophilic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus of eggshells in nests of spotless starlings (Sturnus unicolor at the beginning and at the end of the incubation period. This was also explored in artificial nests without incubation activity. We also experimentally increased bacterial density of eggs in natural and artificial nests and explored the effects of nest lining treatments on eggshell bacterial load. Support for the hypothetical antimicrobial function of nest materials was mainly detected for the year and location with larger average values of eggshell bacterial density. The beneficial effects of feathers and plants were more easily detected in artificial nests with no incubation activity, suggesting an active role of incubation against bacterial colonization of eggshells. Pigmented and unpigmented feathers reduced eggshell bacterial load in starling nests and artificial nest boxes. Results from artificial nests allowed us to discuss and discard alternative scenarios explaining the detected association, particularly those related to the possible sexual role of feathers and aromatic plants in starling nests. All these results considered together confirm the antimicrobial functionality mainly of feathers but also of plants used as nest materials, and highlight the importance of temporally and

  8. Photoinactivation of major bacterial pathogens in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyong Jin Roh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Significant increases in the bacterial resistance to various antibiotics have been found in fish farms. Non-antibiotic therapies for infectious diseases in aquaculture are needed. In recent years, light-emitting diode technology has been applied to the inactivation of pathogens, especially those affecting humans. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of blue light (wavelengths 405 and 465 nm on seven major bacterial pathogens that affect fish and shellfish important in aquaculture. Results We successfully demonstrate inactivation activity of a 405/465-nm LED on selected bacterial pathogens. Although some bacteria were not fully inactivated by the 465-nm light, the 405-nm light had a bactericidal effect against all seven pathogens, indicating that blue light can be effective without the addition of a photosensitizer. Photobacterium damselae, Vibrio anguillarum, and Edwardsiella tarda were the most susceptible to the 405-nm light (36.1, 41.2, and 68.4 J cm−2, respectively, produced one log reduction in the bacterial populations, whereas Streptococcus parauberis was the least susceptible (153.8 J cm−2 per one log reduction. In general, optical density (OD values indicated that higher bacterial densities were associated with lower inactivating efficacy, with the exception of P. damselae and Vibrio harveyi. In conclusion, growth of the bacterial fish and shellfish pathogens evaluated in this study was inactivated by exposure to either the 405- or 465-nm light. In addition, inactivation was dependent on exposure time. Conclusions This study presents that blue LED has potentially alternative therapy for treating fish and shellfish bacterial pathogens. It has great advantages in aspect of eco-friendly treating methods differed from antimicrobial methods.

  9. Graphene oxide decorated electrospun gelatin nanofibers: Fabrication, properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaja, K; Sreehari, V S; Kumar, P R Anil; Nirmala, R James

    2016-07-01

    Gelatin nanofiber fabricated by electrospinning process is found to mimic the complex structural and functional properties of natural extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. In order to improve the physico-chemical and biological properties of the nanofibers, graphene oxide is incorporated in the gelatin to form graphene oxide decorated gelatin nanofibers. The current research effort is focussed on the fabrication and evaluation of physico-chemical and biological properties of graphene oxide-gelatin composite nanofibers. The presence of graphene oxide in the nanofibers was established by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We report the effect of incorporation of graphene oxide on the mechanical, thermal and biological performance of the gelatin nanofibers. The tensile strength of gelatin nanofibers was increased from 8.29±0.53MPa to 21±2.03MPa after the incorporation of GO. In order to improve the water resistance of nanofibers, natural based cross-linking agent, namely, dextran aldehyde was employed. The cross-linked composite nanofibers showed further increase in the tensile strength up to 56.4±2.03MPa. Graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers are evaluated for bacterial activity against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and cyto compatibility using mouse fibroblast cells (L-929 cells). The results indicate that the graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers do not prevent bacterial growth, nevertheless support the L-929 cell adhesion and proliferation.

  10. Condom use and its association with bacterial vaginosis and bacterial vaginosis-associated vaginal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Katherine B; Kip, Kevin E; Ness, Roberta B

    2007-11-01

    Previous studies have been inconsistent with regard to whether condom use is associated with bacterial vaginosis. We evaluated this association using case-crossover analyses. A total of 871 women at high risk for sexually transmitted diseases were followed for a median of 3 years. At baseline and at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months thereafter, vaginal swabs were obtained for gram stain diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis, culture of microflora, and DNA amplification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Case-crossover analyses using incident and recurrent incident case periods were used to assess the associations among condom use, bacterial vaginosis, and vaginal microflora. Consistent condom use (10 out of 10 sexual encounters) was associated with a decreased frequency of bacterial vaginosis (adjusted odds ratio = 0.55 [95% confidence interval 0.35-0.88]). When we excluded women with intermediate flora, consistent condom use was even more strongly protective against bacterial vaginosis (0.37 [0.20-0.70]). Consistent condom use was similarly protective against carriage of anaerobic gram-negative pigmented rods (0.58 [0.36-0.94]). Results were similar when analyses were repeated to capture only first occurrences of outcomes among women without bacterial vaginosis at baseline, suggesting a protective effect against the acquisition of bacterial vaginosis. Consistent condom use was associated with a decrease in the risk for bacterial vaginosis and associated vaginal microflora.

  11. Bacterial coinfections in children with viral wheezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, P; Jartti, T; Virkki, R; Vuorinen, T; Leinonen, M; Peltola, V; Ruohola, A; Ruuskanen, O

    2006-07-01

    Bacterial coinfections occur in respiratory viral infections, but the attack rates and the clinical profile are not clear. The aim of this study was to determine bacterial coinfections in children hospitalized for acute expiratory wheezing with defined viral etiology. A total of 220 children aged 3 months to 16 years were investigated. The viral etiology of wheezing was confirmed by viral culture, antigen detection, serologic investigation, and/or PCR. Specific antibodies to common respiratory bacteria were measured from acute and convalescent serum samples. All children were examined clinically for acute otitis media, and subgroups of children were examined radiologically for sinusitis and pneumonia. Rhinovirus (32%), respiratory syncytial virus (31%), and enteroviruses (31%) were the most common causative viruses. Serologic evidence of bacterial coinfection was found in 18% of the children. Streptococcus pneumoniae (8%) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (5%) were the most common causative bacteria. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 44% of the children. Chest radiographs showed alveolar infiltrates in 10%, and paranasal radiographs and clinical signs showed sinusitis in 17% of the older children studied. Leukocyte counts and serum C-reactive protein levels were low in a great majority of patients. Viral lower respiratory tract infection in children is often associated with bacterial-type upper respiratory tract infections. However, coexisting bacterial lower respiratory tract infections that induce systemic inflammatory response are seldom detected.

  12. Bacterial communities associated with the lichen symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Scott T; Cropsey, Garrett W G; Caporaso, J Gregory; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah

    2011-02-01

    Lichens are commonly described as a mutualistic symbiosis between fungi and "algae" (Chlorophyta or Cyanobacteria); however, they also have internal bacterial communities. Recent research suggests that lichen-associated microbes are an integral component of lichen thalli and that the classical view of this symbiotic relationship should be expanded to include bacteria. However, we still have a limited understanding of the phylogenetic structure of these communities and their variability across lichen species. To address these knowledge gaps, we used bar-coded pyrosequencing to survey the bacterial communities associated with lichens. Bacterial sequences obtained from four lichen species at multiple locations on rock outcrops suggested that each lichen species harbored a distinct community and that all communities were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria. Across all samples, we recovered numerous bacterial phylotypes that were closely related to sequences isolated from lichens in prior investigations, including those from a lichen-associated Rhizobiales lineage (LAR1; putative N(2) fixers). LAR1-related phylotypes were relatively abundant and were found in all four lichen species, and many sequences closely related to other known N(2) fixers (e.g., Azospirillum, Bradyrhizobium, and Frankia) were recovered. Our findings confirm the presence of highly structured bacterial communities within lichens and provide additional evidence that these bacteria may serve distinct functional roles within lichen symbioses.

  13. Bacterial infections in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Zaccherini

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections represent a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis carrying a significantly greater risk of morbidity and mortality as compared to that observed in non-cirrhotic patients. Such unfavourable prognosis is related to the systemic complications (liver and renal failure, shock, coagulopathy, multiple organ failure induced by a series of pro-inflammatory and immunological systems which are activated by bacteria and their pathogenetic products.The epidemiology of bacterial infections in cirrhosis has changed in the last years with a marked increase of Gram+ infections and the emergence of multi-resistant bacteria.The severity of liver disease represents the major clinical factor predisposing to bacterial infections, which are asymptomatic or paucisymptomatic at presentation in almost half of the cases. Aim of this review is to summarise the clinical and therapeutic aspects of bacterial infections in cirrhotic patients. The most common sites of infection are the urinary tract, ascites, blood, lungs and soft tissues.Beside antibiotics, it has been proposed the administration of human albumin to prevent the development of renal failure in patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and, more recently, the use of hydrocortisone to treat cirrhotic patients with septic shock.

  14. Microbial Degradation of Aniline by Bacterial Consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-LONG WANG; ZE-YU MAO; WEI-ZHONG WU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of microbial degradation of aniline by a stable bacterial consortium. Methods The bacterial consortium was isolated from activated sludge treating chemical wastewater using aniline as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen by enrichment and isolation technique. The biomass was measured as optical density (OD) at 510 nm using a spectrophotometer. Aniline concentrations were determined by spectrophotometer. The intermediates of aniline degradation were identified by GC/MS method. Results The bacterial consortium could grow at a range of aniline concentrations between 50 and 500 mg/L. The optimal pH and temperature for aniline degradation were determined to be 7.0 and 30, respectively. The presence of NH4NO3 as an additional nitrogen source (100-500 mg/L) had no adverse effect on bacterial growth and aniline degradation. The presence of heavy metal ions, such as Co2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Mn2+ and Cu2+ had an inhibitory effect on aniline degradation. Conclusions The isolated bacterial consortium candegrade aniline up to 500 mg/L effectively and tolerate some heavy metal ions that commonly exist in chemical wastewater. It has a potential to be applied in the practical treatment of aniline-containingwastewater.

  15. Emerging bacterial pathogens: the past and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouga, M; Greub, G

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1950s, medical communities have been facing with emerging and reemerging infectious diseases, and emerging pathogens are now considered to be a major microbiologic public health threat. In this review, we focus on bacterial emerging diseases and explore factors involved in their emergence as well as future challenges. We identified 26 major emerging and reemerging infectious diseases of bacterial origin; most of them originated either from an animal and are considered to be zoonoses or from water sources. Major contributing factors in the emergence of these bacterial infections are: (1) development of new diagnostic tools, such as improvements in culture methods, development of molecular techniques and implementation of mass spectrometry in microbiology; (2) increase in human exposure to bacterial pathogens as a result of sociodemographic and environmental changes; and (3) emergence of more virulent bacterial strains and opportunistic infections, especially affecting immunocompromised populations. A precise definition of their implications in human disease is challenging and requires the comprehensive integration of microbiological, clinical and epidemiologic aspects as well as the use of experimental models. It is now urgent to allocate financial resources to gather international data to provide a better understanding of the clinical relevance of these waterborne and zoonotic emerging diseases.

  16. Synthetic analogs of bacterial quorum sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Rashi (Los Alamos, NM); Ganguly, Kumkum (Los Alamos, NM); Silks, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-12-06

    Bacterial quorum-sensing molecule analogs having the following structures: ##STR00001## and methods of reducing bacterial pathogenicity, comprising providing a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria which produce natural quorum-sensing molecule; providing a synthetic bacterial quorum-sensing molecule having the above structures and introducing the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule into the biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria. Further is provided a method of targeted delivery of an antibiotic, comprising providing a synthetic quorum-sensing molecule; chemically linking the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule to an antibiotic to produce a quorum-sensing molecule-antibiotic conjugate; and introducing the conjugate into a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the antibiotic.

  17. Mesoscopic modeling of bacterial flagellar microhydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremichael, Yeshitila; Ayton, Gary S; Voth, Gregory A

    2006-11-15

    A particle-based hybrid method of elastic network model and smooth-particle hydrodynamics has been employed to describe the propulsion of bacterial flagella in a viscous hydrodynamic environment. The method explicitly models the two aspects of bacterial propulsion that involve flagellar flexibility and long-range hydrodynamic interaction of low-Reynolds-number flow. The model further incorporates the molecular organization of the flagellar filament at a coarse-grained level in terms of the 11 protofilaments. Each of these protofilaments is represented by a collection of material points that represent the flagellin proteins. A computational model of a single flexible helical segment representing the filament of a bacterial flagellum is presented. The propulsive dynamics and the flow fields generated by the motion of the model filament are examined. The nature of flagellar deformation and the influence of hydrodynamics in determining the shape of deformations are examined based on the helical filament.

  18. Citrobacter rodentium mouse model of bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepin, Valerie F; Collins, James W; Habibzay, Maryam; Frankel, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium is a robust model to study bacterial pathogenesis, mucosal immunology, the health benefits of probiotics and the role of the microbiota during infection. C. rodentium was first isolated by Barthold from an outbreak of mouse diarrhea in Yale University in 1972 and was 'rediscovered' by Falkow and Schauer in 1993. Since then the use of the model has proliferated, and it is now the gold standard for studying virulence of the closely related human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively). Here we provide a detailed protocol for various applications of the model, including bacterial growth, site-directed mutagenesis, mouse inoculation (from cultured cells and after cohabitation), monitoring of bacterial colonization, tissue extraction and analysis, immune responses, probiotic treatment and microbiota analysis. The main protocol, from mouse infection to clearance and analysis of tissues and host responses, takes ∼5 weeks to complete.

  19. Liver Cirrhosis and Intestinal Bacterial Translocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction, facilitating translocation of bacteria and bacterial products, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Intestinal defense system including microbial barrier, immunologic barrier, mechanical barrier, chemical barrier, plays an important role in the maintenance of intestinal function. Under normal circumstances, the intestinal barrier can prevent intestinal bacteria through the intestinal wall from spreading to the body. Severe infection, trauma, shock, cirrhosis, malnutrition, immune suppression conditions, intestinal bacteria and endotoxin translocation, can lead to multiple organ dysfunction. The intestinal microlfora is not only involved in the digestion of nutrients, but also in local immunity, forming a barrier against pathogenic microorganisms. The derangement of the gut microlfora may lead to microbial translocation, deifned as the passage of viable microorganisms or bacterial products from the intestinal lumen to the mesenteric lymph nodes and other extraintestinal sites. In patients with cirrhosis, primary and intestinal lfora imbalance, intestinal bacterial overgrowth, intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction, endotoxemia is associated with weakened immunity.

  20. Emerging drugs for acute bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Alonso, Jean-Michel; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2009-09-01

    The management of acute bacterial meningitis is based on early antibiotic treatment to prevent unfavorable outcome (death and permanent sequelae). beta-Lactam antibiotics, particularly third-generation cephalosporins, are effective against most agents of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis. Resistance to beta-lactams evolves, particularly in Streptococcus pneumoniae, that may lead to treatment failure. Evaluation of other antibiotics such as fourth-generation cephalosporin, new penems and quinolones is warranted. Adjunctive therapy aims to reduce tissue injuries provoked by the inflammatory response. The use of dexamethasone is still a matter of debate, but seems to be helpful under conditions of rapid etiological diagnosis and prompt management. Other drugs that neutralize bacterial factors or host mechanisms involved in induction of inflammatory response are under development.