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Sample records for bacterial population dynamics

  1. Population dynamics of bacterial persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Patra, Pintu

    2014-01-01

    The life of microorganisms is characterized by two main tasks, rapid growth under conditions permitting growth and survival under stressful conditions. The environments, in which microorganisms dwell, vary in space and time. The microorganisms innovate diverse strategies to readily adapt to the regularly fluctuating environments. Phenotypic heterogeneity is one such strategy, where an isogenic population splits into subpopulations that respond differently under identical environments. Bacteri...

  2. Population Dynamics of Bacterial Persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Patra, Pintu; Klumpp, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Persistence is a prime example of phenotypic heterogeneity, where a microbial population splits into two distinct subpopulations with different growth and survival properties as a result of reversible phenotype switching. Specifically, persister cells grow more slowly than normal cells under unstressed growth conditions, but survive longer under stress conditions such as the treatment with bactericidal antibiotics. We analyze the population dynamics of such a population for several typical ex...

  3. Population dynamics of bacterial persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintu Patra

    Full Text Available Persistence is a prime example of phenotypic heterogeneity, where a microbial population splits into two distinct subpopulations with different growth and survival properties as a result of reversible phenotype switching. Specifically, persister cells grow more slowly than normal cells under unstressed growth conditions, but survive longer under stress conditions such as the treatment with bactericidal antibiotics. We analyze the population dynamics of such a population for several typical experimental scenarios, namely a constant environment, shifts between growth and stress conditions, and periodically switching environments. We use an approximation scheme that allows us to map the dynamics to a logistic equation for the subpopulation ratio and derive explicit analytical expressions for observable quantities that can be used to extract underlying dynamic parameters from experimental data. Our results provide a theoretical underpinning for the study of phenotypic switching, in particular for organisms where detailed mechanistic knowledge is scarce.

  4. Dynamics of genome rearrangement in bacterial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E Darling

    represent the first characterization of genome arrangement evolution in a bacterial population evolving outside laboratory conditions. Insight into the process of genomic rearrangement may further the understanding of pathogen population dynamics and selection on the architecture of circular bacterial chromosomes.

  5. Optimal control methods for controlling bacterial populations with persister dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, N. G.

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial tolerance to antibiotics is a well-known phenomena; however, only recent studies of bacterial biofilms have shown how multifaceted tolerance really is. By joining into a structured community and offering shared protection and gene transfer, bacterial populations can protect themselves genotypically, phenotypically and physically. In this study, we collect a line of research that focuses on phenotypic (or plastic) tolerance. The dynamics of persister formation are becoming better understood, even though there are major questions that remain. The thrust of our results indicate that even without detailed description of the biological mechanisms, theoretical studies can offer strategies that can eradicate bacterial populations with existing drugs.

  6. Mechanical reaction-diffusion model for bacterial population dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ngamsaad, Waipot

    2015-01-01

    The effect of mechanical interaction between cells on the spreading of bacterial population was investigated in one-dimensional space. A nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation has been formulated as a model for this dynamics. In this model, the bacterial cells are treated as the rod-like particles that interact, when contacting each other, through the hard-core repulsion. The repulsion introduces the exclusion process that causes the fast diffusion in bacterial population at high density. The propagation of the bacterial density as the traveling wave front in long time behavior has been analyzed. The analytical result reveals that the front speed is enhanced by the exclusion process---and its value depends on the packing fraction of cell. The numerical solutions of the model have been solved to confirm this prediction.

  7. Dynamics of Sequence -Discrete Bacterial Populations Inferred Using Metagenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Sarah; Bendall, Matthew; Kang, Dongwan; Froula, Jeff; Egan, Rob; Chan, Leong-Keat; Tringe, Susannah; McMahon, Katherine; Malmstrom, Rex

    2014-03-14

    From a multi-year metagenomic time series of two dissimilar Wisconsin lakes we have assembled dozens of genomes using a novel approach that bins contigs into distinct genome based on sequence composition, e.g. kmer frequencies, and contig coverage patterns at various times points. Next, we investigated how these genomes, which represent sequence-discrete bacterial populations, evolved over time and used the time series to discover the population dynamics. For example, we explored changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies as well as patterns of gene gain and loss in multiple populations. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in some populations during the course of this study, suggesting these populations may have experienced genome-wide selective sweeps. This represents the first direct, time-resolved observations of periodic selection in natural populations, a key process predicted by the ecotype model of bacterial diversification.

  8. Dynamics of adaptive immunity against phage in bacterial populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bradde, Serena; Tesileanu, Tiberiu; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) mechanism allows bacteria to adaptively defend against phages by acquiring short genomic sequences (spacers) that target specific sequences in the viral genome. We propose a population dynamical model where immunity can be both acquired and lost. The model predicts regimes where bacterial and phage populations can co-exist, others where the populations oscillate, and still others where one population is driven to extinction. Our model considers two key parameters: (1) ease of acquisition and (2) spacer effectiveness in conferring immunity. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations show that if spacers differ mainly in ease of acquisition, or if the probability of acquiring them is sufficiently high, bacteria develop a diverse population of spacers. On the other hand, if spacers differ mainly in their effectiveness, their final distribution will be highly peaked, akin to a "winner-take-all" scenario, leading to a specialized spacer ...

  9. Population-Dynamic Modeling of Bacterial Horizontal Gene Transfer by Natural Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junwen; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Natural transformation is a major mechanism of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and plays an essential role in bacterial adaptation, evolution, and speciation. Although its molecular underpinnings have been increasingly revealed, natural transformation is not well characterized in terms of its quantitative ecological roles. Here, by using Neisseria gonorrhoeae as an example, we developed a population-dynamic model for natural transformation and analyzed its dynamic characteristics with nonlinear tools and simulations. Our study showed that bacteria capable of natural transformation can display distinct population behaviors ranging from extinction to coexistence and to bistability, depending on their HGT rate and selection coefficient. With the model, we also illustrated the roles of environmental DNA sources-active secretion and passive release-in impacting population dynamics. Additionally, by constructing and utilizing a stochastic version of the model, we examined how noise shapes the steady and dynamic behaviors of the system. Notably, we found that distinct waiting time statistics for HGT events, namely a power-law distribution, an exponential distribution, and a mix of the both, are associated with the dynamics in the regimes of extinction, coexistence, and bistability accordingly. This work offers a quantitative illustration of natural transformation by revealing its complex population dynamics and associated characteristics, therefore advancing our ecological understanding of natural transformation as well as HGT in general. PMID:26745428

  10. Population-Dynamic Modeling of Bacterial Horizontal Gene Transfer by Natural Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junwen; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Natural transformation is a major mechanism of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and plays an essential role in bacterial adaptation, evolution, and speciation. Although its molecular underpinnings have been increasingly revealed, natural transformation is not well characterized in terms of its quantitative ecological roles. Here, by using Neisseria gonorrhoeae as an example, we developed a population-dynamic model for natural transformation and analyzed its dynamic characteristics with nonlinear tools and simulations. Our study showed that bacteria capable of natural transformation can display distinct population behaviors ranging from extinction to coexistence and to bistability, depending on their HGT rate and selection coefficient. With the model, we also illustrated the roles of environmental DNA sources-active secretion and passive release-in impacting population dynamics. Additionally, by constructing and utilizing a stochastic version of the model, we examined how noise shapes the steady and dynamic behaviors of the system. Notably, we found that distinct waiting time statistics for HGT events, namely a power-law distribution, an exponential distribution, and a mix of the both, are associated with the dynamics in the regimes of extinction, coexistence, and bistability accordingly. This work offers a quantitative illustration of natural transformation by revealing its complex population dynamics and associated characteristics, therefore advancing our ecological understanding of natural transformation as well as HGT in general.

  11. Imaging the Population Dynamics of Bacterial Communities in the Zebrafish Gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael; Burns, Adam; Zac Stephens, W.; Hampton, Jennifer; Guillemin, Karen; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-03-01

    The vertebrate gut is home to a diverse microbial ecosystem whose composition has a strong influence on the development and health of the host organism. While researchers are increasingly able to identify the constituent members of the microbiome, very little is known about the spatial and temporal dynamics of commensal microbial communities, including the mechanisms by which communities nucleate, grow, and interact. We address these issues using a model organism: the larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) prepared microbe-free and inoculated with controlled compositions of fluorophore-expressing bacteria. Live imaging with light sheet fluorescence microscopy enables visualization of individual bacterial cells as well as growing colonies over the entire volume of the gut over periods up to 24 hours. We analyze the structure and dynamics of imaged bacterial communities, uncovering correlations between population size, growth rates, and the timing of inoculations that suggest the existence of active changes in the host environment induced by early bacterial exposure. Our data provide the first visualizations of gut microbiota development over an extended period of time in a vertebrate.

  12. Molecular analysis of bacterial population structure and dynamics during cold storage of untreated and treated milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasolofo, Eric Andriamahery; St-Gelais, Daniel; LaPointe, Gisele; Roy, Denis

    2010-03-31

    Spoilage bacteria in milk are controlled by treatments such as thermization, microfiltration and addition of carbon dioxide. However, little information is known about the changes in microbial communities during subsequent cold storage of treated milk. Culture-dependent methods and a direct molecular approach combining 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) were applied to obtain a better overview of the structure and the dynamics of milk microbiota. Raw milk samples were treated by the addition of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), thermization (TH) or microfiltration (MF) and stored at 4 degrees C or 8 degrees C up to 7d. Untreated milk (UT) was used as a control. Psychrotrophic and staphylococci bacteria were enumerated in the milk samples by culture methods. For the molecular approach, DNA was extracted from milk samples and 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR with universal primers prior to cloning. The Q-PCR method was used to evaluate the dynamics of dominant bacterial species revealed by clone library analysis of 16S rRNA gene. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the two most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTU), determined at 97% identity, belonged to the class Gammaproteobacteria (40.3% of the 1415 sequences) and Bacilli (40%). Dominant bacterial species in UT, CO(2) and TH milk samples at day 3 were affiliated with Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Clostridia, Aerococcus, Facklamia, Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter and Trichococcus. Dominant bacterial species detected in MF milk were Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas and Delftia, while Pseudomonas species dominated the bacterial population of UT, CO(2) and MF milk samples at day 7. Staphylococcus and Delftia were the dominant bacterial species in thermized milk. Q-PCR results showed that populations of S. aureus, A. viridans, A. calcoaceticus, C. variabile and S. uberis were stable during 7d of storage at 4 degrees C. Populations of P. fluorescens, S. uberis and total bacteria

  13. Critical dynamics of self-gravitating Langevin particles and bacterial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sire, Clément; Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2008-12-01

    We study the critical dynamics of the generalized Smoluchowski-Poisson system (for self-gravitating Langevin particles) or generalized Keller-Segel model (for the chemotaxis of bacterial populations). These models [P. H. Chavanis and C. Sire, Phys. Rev. E 69, 016116 (2004)] are based on generalized stochastic processes leading to the Tsallis statistics. The equilibrium states correspond to polytropic configurations with index n similar to polytropic stars in astrophysics. At the critical index n3=d/(d-2) (where d⩾2 is the dimension of space), there exists a critical temperature Θc (for a given mass) or a critical mass Mc (for a given temperature). For Θ>Θc or MMc the system collapses and forms, in a finite time, a Dirac peak containing a finite fraction Mc of the total mass surrounded by a halo. We study these regimes numerically and, when possible, analytically by looking for self-similar or pseudo-self-similar solutions. This study extends the critical dynamics of the ordinary Smoluchowski-Poisson system and Keller-Segel model in d=2 corresponding to isothermal configurations with n3→+∞ . We also stress the analogy between the limiting mass of white dwarf stars (Chandrasekhar’s limit) and the critical mass of bacterial populations in the generalized Keller-Segel model of chemotaxis.

  14. BACTERIAL POPULATION DYNAMICS IN WASTE OILY EMULSIONS FROM THE METAL-PROCESSING INDUSTRY

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    Paweł Kaszycki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oil-containing wastewaters are regarded as main industrial pollutants of soil and water environments. They can occur as free-floating oil, unstable or stable oil-in-water (O/W emulsions, and in the case of extreme organic load, as water-in-oil (W/O emulsions. In this study two types of oily effluents, a typical O/W emulsion marked as E1 and a W/O emulsion E2, both discharged by local metal processing plants were examined to test their toxicity to microbial communities and the ability to serve as nutrient sources for bacterial growth. The organic contaminant load of the samples was evaluated on the basis of chemical oxygen demand (COD parameter values and was equal to 48 200 mg O2·dm-3 and >300 000 mg O2·dm-3 for E1 and E2, respectively.Both emulsions proved to be non toxic to bacterial communities and were shown to contain biodiverse autochthonous microflora consisting of several bacterial strains adapted to the presence of xenobiotics (the total of 1.36 · 106 CFU·cm-3 and 1.72 · 105 CFU·cm-3 was determined for E1 and E2, respectively. These indigenous bacteria as well as exogenously inoculated specialized allochthonous microorganisms were biostimulated so as to proliferate within the wastewater environment whose organic content served as the only source of carbon. The most favorable cultivation conditions were determined as fully aerobic growth at the temperature of 25 ºC. In 9 to 18 day-tests, autochthonous as well as bioaugmented allochthonous bacterial population dynamics were monitored. For both emulsions tested there was a dramatic increase (up to three orders of magnitude in bacterial frequency, as compared to the respective initial values. The resultant high biomass densities suggest that the effluents are susceptible to bioremediation. A preliminary xenobiotic biodegradation test confirmed that mixed auto- and allochthonous bacterial consortia obtained upon inoculation of the samples with microbiocenoses preselected for efficient

  15. Population Dynamics of a Salmonella Lytic Phage and Its Host: Implications of the Host Bacterial Growth Rate in Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Sílvio Roberto Branco; Carvalho, Carla A. O. C. M.; Azeredo, Joana; Ferreira, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of bacteriophages in the ecology of bacterial communities coupled with their ability to control pathogens turn essential to understand and predict the dynamics between phage and bacteria populations. To achieve this knowledge it is essential to develop mathematical models able to explain and simulate the population dynamics of phage and bacteria. We have developed an unstructured mathematical model using delay-differential equations to predict the interactions betwee...

  16. Red Sea Acropora hemprichii Bacterial Population Dynamics under Adverse Anthropogenic Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Lizcano, Javier

    2012-08-01

    Reef-building corals are cornerstones of life in the oceans. Understanding their interactions with microorganisms and their surrounding physicochemical conditions is important to comprehend reef functioning and ultimately protect coral reef ecosystems. Corals associate with a complex and specific array of microorganisms that supposedly affect their physiology and therefore can significantly determine the condition of a coral ecosystem. As environmental conditions may shape bacterial diversity and ecology in the coral symbiosis, ecosystem changes might have unfavorable consequences for the holobiont, to date poorly understood. Here, we were studying microbial community changes in A. hemprichii as a consequence of simulated eutrophication and overfishing over a period of 16 weeks by using in situ caging and slow release fertilizer treatments in an undisturbed Red Sea reef (22.18ºN, 38.57ºW). We used 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing to evaluate the individual and combined effects of overnutrification and fishing pressure, two of the most common local threats to coral reefs. With our data we hope to better understand bacterial population dynamics under anthropogenic influences and its role in coral resilience. Projecting further, this data will be useful to better predict the consequences of human activity on reef ecosystems.

  17. Prophage-mediated dynamics of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' populations, the destructive bacterial pathogens of citrus huanglongbing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Zhou

    Full Text Available Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB, a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by screening clone libraries of infected citrus, periwinkle and psyllids. Among them, Types A and B share highly conserved sequences and localize within the two prophages, FP1 and FP2, respectively. Although Types B and C were abundant in all three libraries, Type A was much more abundant in the libraries from the Las-infected psyllids than from the Las-infected plants, and Type D was only identified in libraries from the infected host plants but not from the infected psyllids. Sequence analysis of these variants revealed that the variations may result from recombination and rearrangement events. Conventional PCR results using type-specific molecular markers indicated that A, B, C and D are the four most abundant types in Las-infected citrus and periwinkle. However, only three types, A, B and C are abundant in Las-infected psyllids. Typing results for Las-infected citrus field samples indicated that mixed populations of Las bacteria present in Floridian isolates, but only the Type D population was correlated with the blotchy mottle symptom. Extended cloning and sequencing of the Type D region revealed a third prophage/phage in the Las genome, which may derive from the recombination of FP1 and FP2. Dramatic variations in these prophage regions were also found among the global Las isolates. These results are the first to demonstrate the prophage/phage-mediated dynamics of Las populations in plant and insect hosts, and their correlation with insect transmission and

  18. Prophage-mediated dynamics of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' populations, the destructive bacterial pathogens of citrus huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lijuan; Powell, Charles A; Li, Wenbin; Irey, Mike; Duan, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las) Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB), a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by screening clone libraries of infected citrus, periwinkle and psyllids. Among them, Types A and B share highly conserved sequences and localize within the two prophages, FP1 and FP2, respectively. Although Types B and C were abundant in all three libraries, Type A was much more abundant in the libraries from the Las-infected psyllids than from the Las-infected plants, and Type D was only identified in libraries from the infected host plants but not from the infected psyllids. Sequence analysis of these variants revealed that the variations may result from recombination and rearrangement events. Conventional PCR results using type-specific molecular markers indicated that A, B, C and D are the four most abundant types in Las-infected citrus and periwinkle. However, only three types, A, B and C are abundant in Las-infected psyllids. Typing results for Las-infected citrus field samples indicated that mixed populations of Las bacteria present in Floridian isolates, but only the Type D population was correlated with the blotchy mottle symptom. Extended cloning and sequencing of the Type D region revealed a third prophage/phage in the Las genome, which may derive from the recombination of FP1 and FP2. Dramatic variations in these prophage regions were also found among the global Las isolates. These results are the first to demonstrate the prophage/phage-mediated dynamics of Las populations in plant and insect hosts, and their correlation with insect transmission and disease development.

  19. The influence of light and water mass on bacterial population dynamics in the Amundsen Sea Polynya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Richert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite being perpetually cold, seasonally ice-covered and dark, the coastal Southern Ocean is highly productive and harbors a diverse microbiota. During the austral summer, ice-free coastal patches (or polynyas form, exposing pelagic organisms to sunlight, triggering intense phytoplankton blooms. This strong seasonality is likely to influence bacterioplankton community composition (BCC. For the most part, we do not fully understand the environmental drivers controlling high-latitude BCC and the biogeochemical cycles they mediate. In this study, the Amundsen Sea Polynya was used as a model system to investigate important environmental factors that shape the coastal Southern Ocean microbiota. Population dynamics in terms of occurrence and activity of abundant taxa was studied in both environmental samples and microcosm experiments by using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. We found that the BCC in the photic epipelagic zone had low richness, with dominant bacterial populations being related to taxa known to benefit from high organic carbon and nutrient loads (copiotrophs. In contrast, the BCC in deeper mesopelagic water masses had higher richness, featuring taxa known to benefit from low organic carbon and nutrient loads (oligotrophs. Incubation experiments indicated that direct impacts of light and competition for organic nutrients are two important factors shaping BCC in the Amundsen Sea Polynya.

  20. Nonlinearity in bacterial population dynamics: Proposal for experiments for the observation of abrupt transitions in patches

    OpenAIRE

    Kenkre, V. M.; Kumar, Niraj

    2008-01-01

    An explicit proposal for experiments leading to abrupt transitions in spatially extended bacterial populations in a Petri dish is presented on the basis of an exact formula obtained through an analytic theory. The theory provides accurately the transition expressions in spite of the fact that the actual solutions, which involve strong nonlinearity, are inaccessible to it. The analytic expressions are verified through numerical solutions of the relevant nonlinear equation. The experimental set...

  1. Population dynamics of a Salmonella lytic phage and its host: implications of the host bacterial growth rate in modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sílvio B; Carvalho, Carla; Azeredo, Joana; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of bacteriophages in the ecology of bacterial communities coupled with their ability to control pathogens turn essential to understand and predict the dynamics between phage and bacteria populations. To achieve this knowledge it is essential to develop mathematical models able to explain and simulate the population dynamics of phage and bacteria. We have developed an unstructured mathematical model using delay-differential equations to predict the interactions between a broad-host-range Salmonella phage and its pathogenic host. The model takes into consideration the main biological parameters that rule phage-bacteria interactions likewise the adsorption rate, latent period, burst size, bacterial growth rate, and substrate uptake rate, among others. The experimental validation of the model was performed with data from phage-interaction studies in a 5 L bioreactor. The key and innovative aspect of the model was the introduction of variations in the latent period and adsorption rate values that are considered as constants in previous developed models. By modelling the latent period as a normal distribution of values and the adsorption rate as a function of the bacterial growth rate it was possible to accurately predict the behaviour of the phage-bacteria population. The model was shown to predict simulated data with a good agreement with the experimental observations and explains how a lytic phage and its host bacteria are able to coexist. PMID:25051248

  2. Population dynamics of a Salmonella lytic phage and its host: implications of the host bacterial growth rate in modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvio B Santos

    Full Text Available The prevalence and impact of bacteriophages in the ecology of bacterial communities coupled with their ability to control pathogens turn essential to understand and predict the dynamics between phage and bacteria populations. To achieve this knowledge it is essential to develop mathematical models able to explain and simulate the population dynamics of phage and bacteria. We have developed an unstructured mathematical model using delay-differential equations to predict the interactions between a broad-host-range Salmonella phage and its pathogenic host. The model takes into consideration the main biological parameters that rule phage-bacteria interactions likewise the adsorption rate, latent period, burst size, bacterial growth rate, and substrate uptake rate, among others. The experimental validation of the model was performed with data from phage-interaction studies in a 5 L bioreactor. The key and innovative aspect of the model was the introduction of variations in the latent period and adsorption rate values that are considered as constants in previous developed models. By modelling the latent period as a normal distribution of values and the adsorption rate as a function of the bacterial growth rate it was possible to accurately predict the behaviour of the phage-bacteria population. The model was shown to predict simulated data with a good agreement with the experimental observations and explains how a lytic phage and its host bacteria are able to coexist.

  3. Live cell imaging of SOS and prophage dynamics in isogenic bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Stefan; Pfeifer, Eugen; Krämer, Christina; Sachs, Christian Carsten; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Nöh, Katharina; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Almost all bacterial genomes contain DNA of viral origin, including functional prophages or degenerated phage elements. A frequent but often unnoted phenomenon is the spontaneous induction of prophage elements (SPI) even in the absence of an external stimulus. In this study, we have analyzed SPI of the large, degenerated prophage CGP3 (187 kbp), which is integrated into the genome of the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fluorescent reporter strains grown in microfluidic chips revealed the sporadic induction of the SOS response as a prominent trigger of CGP3 SPI but also displayed a considerable fraction (∼30%) of RecA-independent SPI. Whereas approx. 20% of SOS-induced cells recovered from this stress and resumed growth, the spontaneous induction of CGP3 always led to a stop of growth and likely cell death. A carbon source starvation experiment clearly emphasized that SPI only occurs in actively proliferating cells, whereas sporadic SOS induction was still observed in resting cells. These data highlight the impact of sporadic DNA damage on the activity of prophage elements and provide a time-resolved, quantitative description of SPI as general phenomenon of bacterial populations.

  4. Modeling physiological processes that relate toxicant exposure and bacterial population dynamics.

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    Tin Klanjscek

    Full Text Available Quantifying effects of toxicant exposure on metabolic processes is crucial to predicting microbial growth patterns in different environments. Mechanistic models, such as those based on Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB theory, can link physiological processes to microbial growth.Here we expand the DEB framework to include explicit consideration of the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Extensions considered are: (i additional terms in the equation for the "hazard rate" that quantifies mortality risk; (ii a variable representing environmental degradation; (iii a mechanistic description of toxic effects linked to increase in ROS production and aging acceleration, and to non-competitive inhibition of transport channels; (iv a new representation of the "lag time" based on energy required for acclimation. We estimate model parameters using calibrated Pseudomonas aeruginosa optical density growth data for seven levels of cadmium exposure. The model reproduces growth patterns for all treatments with a single common parameter set, and bacterial growth for treatments of up to 150 mg(Cd/L can be predicted reasonably well using parameters estimated from cadmium treatments of 20 mg(Cd/L and lower. Our approach is an important step towards connecting levels of biological organization in ecotoxicology. The presented model reveals possible connections between processes that are not obvious from purely empirical considerations, enables validation and hypothesis testing by creating testable predictions, and identifies research required to further develop the theory.

  5. Population dynamics

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    Cooch, E. G.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Increases or decreases in the size of populations over space and time are, arguably, the motivation for much of pure and applied ecological research. The fundamental model for the dynamics of any population is straightforward: the net change over time in the abundance of some population is the simple difference between the number of additions (individuals entering the population minus the number of subtractions (individuals leaving the population. Of course, the precise nature of the pattern and process of these additions and subtractions is often complex, and population biology is often replete with fairly dense mathematical representations of both processes. While there is no doubt that analysis of such abstract descriptions of populations has been of considerable value in advancing our, there has often existed a palpable discomfort when the ‘beautiful math’ is faced with the often ‘ugly realities’ of empirical data. In some cases, this attempted merger is abandoned altogether, because of the paucity of ‘good empirical data’ with which the theoretician can modify and evaluate more conceptually–based models. In some cases, the lack of ‘data’ is more accurately represented as a lack of robust estimates of one or more parameters. It is in this arena that methods developed to analyze multiple encounter data from individually marked organisms has seen perhaps the greatest advances. These methods have rapidly evolved to facilitate not only estimation of one or more vital rates, critical to population modeling and analysis, but also to allow for direct estimation of both the dynamics of populations (e.g., Pradel, 1996, and factors influencing those dynamics (e.g., Nichols et al., 2000. The interconnections between the various vital rates, their estimation, and incorporation into models, was the general subject of our plenary presentation by Hal Caswell (Caswell & Fujiwara, 2004. Caswell notes that although interest has traditionally

  6. Virial theorem and dynamical evolution of self-gravitating Brownian particles and bacterial populations in an unbounded domain

    OpenAIRE

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Sire, Clement

    2005-01-01

    We derive the Virial theorem appropriate to the generalized Smoluchowski-Poisson system describing self-gravitating Brownian particles and bacterial populations (chemotaxis). We extend previous works by considering the case of an unbounded domain and an arbitrary equation of state. We use the Virial theorem to study the diffusion (evaporation) of an isothermal Brownian gas above the critical temperature T_c in dimension d=2 and show how the effective diffusion coefficient and the Einstein rel...

  7. Prophage-Mediated Dynamics of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Populations, the Destructive Bacterial Pathogens of Citrus Huanglongbing

    OpenAIRE

    Lijuan Zhou; Powell, Charles A.; Wenbin Li; Mike Irey; Yongping Duan

    2013-01-01

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las) Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB), a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by s...

  8. Prophage-Mediated Dynamics of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Populations, the Destructive Bacterial Pathogens of Citrus Huanglongbing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lijuan; Powell, Charles A.; Li, Wenbin; Irey, Mike; Duan, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB), a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by s...

  9. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Tinta

    Full Text Available Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into

  10. Asynchronous exponential growth of a bacterial population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Boulanouar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we complete a study started earlier in [1,2] wherein a model of growing bacterial population has been the matter of a mathematical analysis. We show that the full model is governed by a strongly continuous semigroup. Beside the positivity and the irreducibility of the generated semigroup, we describe its asymptotic behavior in the uniform topology which leads to the asynchronous exponential growth of the bacterial population.

  11. Population dynamics of toxic phytoplankton and bacterial flora in the waters of the low Adriatic sea; Dinamica di popolazione di fitoplancton tossico e flora batterica nel basso Adriatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroppo, C.; Stabili, L.; Cavallo, R.A.; Pastore, M. [CNR, Ist. Sperimentale Talassografico Attlio Cerruti, Taranto (Italy); Marchiori, E. [Rome Univ., Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Organica; Bruno, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita' , Laboratorio di Igiene Ambientale, Rome (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The coastal areas of the Southern Adriatic Sea, in particular the Apulian ones, may be considered an example of intact ecosystem and represent an ideal term of comparison to other marine ecosystems having higher levels of pollution (Northern Adriatic Sea). In order to evaluate the sanitary levels of this environment, four transect were investigated during two years monitoring (April 1995-March 1997) along the Otranto Channel coasts, by joint research groups of the Environmental Hygiene Laboratory of the Istituto Superiore di Sanita' and the Istituto Sperimentale Talassografico A. Cerruti of CNR in Taranto. The study underlines the phytoplanktic and bacterial population dynamics, and the detection of the microbiological water quality along the coast tract Brindisi-Lecce-Otranto-S. Maria di Leuca. The results acquired pointed out population dynamics of some potantially toxic species of Dinophysis genus and Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima. These depended on the winter nutrient loads due to the ASW (Adriatic Superficial Waters) and to the LIW (Levantine Intermediate Waters). The bacterial community was mainly constituted by genera Aeromonas, Photobacterium, Cytophaga and Pseudomonas. Also the presence of Enterobacteriaceae family was relevant. Among the pathogenic vibrios the most frequently isolated species were Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus. [Italian] Considerando che le zone del basso Adriatico, in particolare quelle pugliesi, costituiscono un biotopo ancora relativamente inalterato, esse sono state oggetto di un'indagine sperimentale condotta in 24 mesi di attivita' (aprile 1995-marzo 1997) lungo le coste del Canale di Otranto, ad opera di un gruppo congiunto del Laboratorio di Igiene Ambientale dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanita' e dei laboratori dell'Istituto Sperimentale Talassografico A. Cerruti del CNR di Taranto, ai fini di valutare lo stato di salute di questo ambiente, che fornisce, con buona probabilita', un

  12. Market Squid Population Dynamics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains population dynamics data on paralarvae, juvenile and adult market squid collected off California and the US Pacific Northwest. These data were...

  13. Model for Mutation in Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donangelo, R.; Fort, H.

    2002-07-01

    We describe the evolution of E. coli populations through a Bak-Sneppen-type model which incorporates random mutations. We show that, for a value of the mutation level which coincides with the one estimated from experiments, this model reproduces the measures of mean fitness relative to that of a common ancestor, performed for over 10 000 bacterial generations.

  14. A model for mutation in bacterial populations

    OpenAIRE

    Donangelo, R.; Fort, H.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the evolution of $E.coli$ populations through a Bak-Sneppen type model which incorporates random mutations. We show that, for a value of the mutation level which coincides with the one estimated from experiments, this model reproduces the measures of mean fitness relative to that of a common ancestor, performed for over 10,000 bacterial generations.

  15. Insights from genomics into bacterial pathogen populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Wilson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens impose a heavy burden of disease on human populations worldwide. The gravest threats are posed by highly virulent respiratory pathogens, enteric pathogens, and HIV-associated infections. Tuberculosis alone is responsible for the deaths of 1.5 million people annually. Treatment options for bacterial pathogens are being steadily eroded by the evolution and spread of drug resistance. However, population-level whole genome sequencing offers new hope in the fight against pathogenic bacteria. By providing insights into bacterial evolution and disease etiology, these approaches pave the way for novel interventions and therapeutic targets. Sequencing populations of bacteria across the whole genome provides unprecedented resolution to investigate (i within-host evolution, (ii transmission history, and (iii population structure. Moreover, advances in rapid benchtop sequencing herald a new era of real-time genomics in which sequencing and analysis can be deployed within hours in response to rapidly changing public health emergencies. The purpose of this review is to highlight the transformative effect of population genomics on bacteriology, and to consider the prospects for answering abiding questions such as why bacteria cause disease.

  16. Population dynamics of reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Baskin

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Five types of reindeer populations are distinguished in terms of population dynamics, population density, social structure and migration distance. Differences in the biological rhythms of the populations result in calving occuring 20 days before snow melting in all populations as well as maximal utilization by the deer of young green vegetation in summer. The growth of antlers may serve as a regulatior of biological rhytms. Populations differ in the level of social motivation. Formation of groups of not less than 30-35 animals ensures cooperative protection from insects and management of the group by man. The fidelity to the calving sites, summer ranges and constant migration routes is based on the common orientation reactions of the animals and social attraction. The direction and migration routes are detemined by obligate learning. The dynamics of populations depends on the fertility of 2 and 3 year old females which is determined by feeding conditions in summer and the activity of males during the rut. Migration plays an important role in the population dynamics.

  17. Estimating Population Dynamics without Population Data

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Chambers; Vangelis Tzouvelekas

    2012-01-01

    We develop a biologically correct cost system for production systems facing invasive pests that allows the estimation of population dynamics without a priori knowledge of their true values. We apply that model to a data set for olive producers in Crete and derive from it predictions about the underlying populations dynamics. Those dynamics are compared to information on population dynamics obtained from pest sampling with extremely favorable results.

  18. Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velsko, S P

    2009-11-02

    This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population genetics by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations

  19. Midgut bacterial dynamics in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenius, Olle; Lindh, Jenny M; Eriksson-Gonzales, Karolina; Bussière, Luc; Laugen, Ane T; Bergquist, Helen; Titanji, Kehmia; Faye, Ingrid

    2012-06-01

    In vector mosquitoes, the presence of midgut bacteria may affect the ability to transmit pathogens. We have used a laboratory colony of Aedes aegypti as a model for bacterial interspecies competition and show that after a blood meal, the number of species (culturable on Luria-Bertani agar) that coexist in the midgut is low and that about 40% of the females do not harbor any cultivable bacteria. We isolated species belonging to the genera Bacillus, Elizabethkingia, Enterococcus, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Serratia, and Sphingomonas, and we also determined their growth rates, antibiotic resistance, and ex vivo inhibition of each other. To investigate the possible existence of coadaptation between midgut bacteria and their host, we fed Ae. aegypti cohorts with gut bacteria from human, a frog, and two mosquito species and followed the bacterial population growth over time. The dynamics of the different species suggests coadaptation between host and bacteria, and interestingly, we found that Pantoea stewartii isolated from Ae. aegypti survive better in Ae. aegypti as compared to P. stewartii isolated from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. PMID:22283178

  20. Dinâmica das populações bacterianas em solos de Cerrados Dynamic of bacterial populations from Cerrado soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Pereira

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Nos ambientes tropicais, os Cerrados destacam-se pelo seu potencial agrícola. Apesar das funções dos microrganismos no crescimento das plantas e na produtividade das culturas, existem poucas informações dos efeitos resultantes do manejo do solo, na ecologia microbiana. Neste estudo, foram avaliados os efeitos das condições ambientais e das práticas agrícolas sobre as populações bacterianas. As densidades das populações em solos com vegetação nativa foram variáveis e diferenciadas. Em Sete Lagoas, MG, as populações de actinomicetos variaram de 1,7 a 50 X 10(4 UFC/g de solo seco, enquanto em Planaltina as densidades das populações bacterianas em solo com primeiro e segundo ano de cultivo de soja foram semelhantes, mas superiores ao solo com vegetação nativa. A utilização agrícola deste solo não resultou em desequilíbrios acentuados das populações de actinomicetos provenientes de esporos e hifas. As relações esporos/hifas variaram de 1,1 a 5,8. Na rizosfera da soja, os coeficientes de correlação entre as populações de actinomicetos com as demais populações bacterianas foram significativos. Os resultados evidenciam que as práticas agrícolas utilizadas na introdução da cultura da soja em solos de Cerrados pode influenciar o equilíbrio das populações na comunidade bacteriana.Among tropical environments, Cerrados stand out because of its agriculture potencial. Although microorganisms play an important role on soil sustainability and crop production, few information is available on the effects of soil management systems on Cerrado's microbial ecology. In this study the effects of environmental conditions and soil management practices on bacterial populations were evaluated. Bacterial population densities in soil under native vegetation were variable and diferentiated. Actinomycetes densities varied from 1.7 to 50 X 10(4 CFU/g dry soil in Sete Lagoas region, Brazil, whereas bacterial populations in both the

  1. Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velsko, S P

    2009-11-02

    This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population genetics by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations

  2. Efeito do cultivo da soja na dinâmica da população bacteriana, em solos de cerrado Effects of soybean cultivation on the bacterial population dynamics in cerrado soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOÃO CARLOS PEREIRA

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a influência do cultivo da soja sobre a dinâmica da população bacteriana, em dois solos de Cerrado do Estado de São Paulo, originalmente cobertos com Paspalum notatum (em Barretos e Brachiaria decumbens (em S��o Carlos. Nesses solos, a densidade da população de bactérias em geral variou de 398,1 x 10³ a 467,7 x 10³ e de 123 x 10³ a 218,8 x 10³ ufc (unidades formadoras de colônias/g de solo seco, respectivamente. O cultivo da soja, em ambos os solos, resultou em incrementos variados nos números de ufc/g de solo seco da população de bactérias em geral, das resistentes aos antibióticos estreptomicina e cloranfenicol, e de actinomicetos. A população de actinomicetos ocorreu no solo principalmente como esporos, e as variações das relações esporos/hifas entre os solos não-rizosférico e rizosférico não foram significativas. Os resultados evidenciam que o cultivo da soja influenciou de forma diferenciada a população desses solos.The effect of soybean cultivation on the population dynamics of the bacterial community was evaluated in two "Cerrado" soils of São Paulo State, Brazil. The experimental areas, in the vicinities of the cities of São Carlos and Barretos, were previously cultivated, respectively, with Paspalum notatum and Brachiaria decumbens. The bacterial population densities in these soils varied from 398.1 x 10³ to 467.7 x 10³ cfu (colony forming units and from 123 x 10³ to 218.8 x 10³ cfu/g of dried soil, respectively, in São Carlos and Barretos soils. Soybean cultivation in both soils resulted in increments in the total bacterial population density, in the actinomycetes population, and in the bacterial population resistant to the antibiotics streptomycin and chloramphenicol. Actinomycetes were present in these soils mainly as spores. Soybean cultivation did not alter the actinomycetes spores/hyphae ratio when comparing rhizospheric and non-rhizospheric soils

  3. Nonlinear Stochastic Modelling of Antimicrobial resistance in Bacterial Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber

    This thesis applies mathematical modelling and statistical methods to investigate the dynamics and mechanisms of bacterial evolution. More specifically it is concerned with the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria populations, which is an increasing problem for the treatment of infections...... with antibiotics than the non-mutators. In another study a new hypothesis for the long term role of mutator bacteria is tested. This model suggests that mutators can work as "genetic work stations", where multiple mutations occur and subsequently are transmitted to the non-mutator population by conjugation....... Another study in this thesis is concerned with the spread of colonization with resistant bacteria between patients in a hospital and people in the related catchment population. The resistance considered is extended-spectrumbeta-lactamases, and it is the first time a model has been developed for the spread...

  4. Kinetics of Suicide of Bacterial Populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a number of assumptions, formulas are presented for the survival of hypothetical bacterial cultures under self-irradiation by incorporated tritium in the chromosomal material. The formulas average over different classes of cells in the balanced growing populations taking into account the increased rate of inactivation of cells with more DNA, and that nuclear division causes the number of independent chromosomes to increase. The partial multinuclearity tends to make the logarithmic survival curves concave downward, but heterogeneity in amount of DNA in the chromosomes does the opposite. Details of how the resultant effects compensate for various patterns of DNA replication and how the target numbers and final slope are given. If DNA synthesis takes only a small fraction of the total cycle, the survival curves are the well-known one or two target curves and intermediate forms depending on the point in the cell cycle that the synthesis takes place. If synthesis takes almost all of the cell cycle as is the case for enteric bacteria growing in glucose minimal medium, the apparent target numbers are lower and are, in fact, unity if nuclear division is midway in the cell cycle. This is consistent with the experimental results in studies of survival, and in cytological and other studies of the nuclear replication cycle. The effect of gaps in DNA synthesis at various parts of the cell cycle are given and their relevance to various biological systems is discussed. The apparent target number is lowest if synthesis takes place at the end of the cell cycle than if it takes place earlier. Means are provided so that the sensitivity of the resting genome can be calculated from the results of measurements of balanced growing populations. (author)

  5. Discrete modelling of bacterial conjugation dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goni-Moreno, Angel

    2012-01-01

    In bacterial populations, cells are able to cooperate in order to yield complex collective functionalities. Interest in population-level cellular behaviour is increasing, due to both our expanding knowledge of the underlying biological principles, and the growing range of possible applications for engineered microbial consortia. Researchers in the field of synthetic biology - the application of engineering principles to living systems - have, for example, recently shown how useful decision-making circuits may be distributed across a bacterial population. The ability of cells to interact through small signalling molecules (a mechanism known as it quorum sensing) is the basis for the majority of existing engineered systems. However, horizontal gene transfer (or conjugation) offers the possibility of cells exchanging messages (using DNA) that are much more information-rich. The potential of engineering this conjugation mechanism to suit specific goals will guide future developments in this area. Motivated by a l...

  6. Synchronization Phenomena in an Array of Population Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.E.; Balanov, A.G.; Mosekilde, Erik

    1998-01-01

    The paper applies continuation methods to examine synchronization phenomena that can arise in a cascaded system of population dynamic models. The individual model describes a bacterial population interacting with a population of viruses that attack the cells. Coupling between the subsystems...

  7. Perturbation Theory for Population Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez, Francisco M

    2007-01-01

    We prove that a recently proposed homotopy perturbation method for the treatment of population dynamics is just the Taylor expansion of the population variables about initial time. Our results show that this perturbation method fails to provide the global features of the ecosystem dynamics.

  8. Language dynamics in finite populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Natalia L; Nowak, Martin A

    2003-04-01

    Any mechanism of language acquisition can only learn a restricted set of grammars. The human brain contains a mechanism for language acquisition which can learn a restricted set of grammars. The theory of this restricted set is universal grammar (UG). UG has to be sufficiently specific to induce linguistic coherence in a population. This phenomenon is known as "coherence threshold". Previously, we have calculated the coherence threshold for deterministic dynamics and infinitely large populations. Here, we extend the framework to stochastic processes and finite populations. If there is selection for communicative function (selective language dynamics), then the analytic results for infinite populations are excellent approximations for finite populations; as expected, finite populations need a slightly higher accuracy of language acquisition to maintain coherence. If there is no selection for communicative function (neutral language dynamics), then linguistic coherence is only possible for finite populations.

  9. Metagenomic reconstructions of bacterial CRISPR loci constrain population histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christine L; Thomas, Brian C; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Banfield, Jillian F

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial CRISPR-Cas systems provide insight into recent population history because they rapidly incorporate, in a unidirectional manner, short fragments (spacers) from coexisting infective virus populations into host chromosomes. Immunity is achieved by sequence identity between transcripts of spacers and their targets. Here, we used metagenomics to study the stability and dynamics of the type I-E CRISPR-Cas locus of Leptospirillum group II bacteria in biofilms sampled over 5 years from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system. Despite recovery of 452,686 spacers from CRISPR amplicons and metagenomic data, rarefaction curves of spacers show no saturation. The vast repertoire of spacers is attributed to phage/plasmid population diversity and retention of old spacers, despite rapid evolution of the targeted phage/plasmid genome regions (proto-spacers). The oldest spacers (spacers found at the trailer end) are conserved for at least 5 years, and 12% of these retain perfect or near-perfect matches to proto-spacer targets. The majority of proto-spacer regions contain an AAG proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM). Spacers throughout the locus target the same phage population (AMDV1), but there are blocks of consecutive spacers without AMDV1 target sequences. Results suggest long-term coexistence of Leptospirillum with AMDV1 and periods when AMDV1 was less dominant. Metagenomics can be applied to millions of cells in a single sample to provide an extremely large spacer inventory, allow identification of phage/plasmids and enable analysis of previous phage/plasmid exposure. Thus, this approach can provide insights into prior bacterial environment and genetic interplay between hosts and their viruses. PMID:26394009

  10. The dynamics in the bacterial chemosensory arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, Ady

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial chemoreceptors form two-dimensional sensory arrays on the cell membrane. These sensory arrays, which contain thousands of molecules, detect chemical changes in the environment of the bacterial cell and accordingly control its swimming behaviour, allowing these bacteria to track chemical gradients. It was recently demonstrated that stimulus, by ligand binding, alters the physical organization of these arrays, with dynamics that follow an apparent logarithmic time dependence. Such non-exponential dynamics is often observed in glass-like systems in which the internal dynamics slow down exponentially as the system approaches its equilibrium state. In a few of these `glassy' systems it was also demonstrated that after altering the equilibrium state of the system for a certain time tw the ensuing relaxation scales with tw. Here, we examined the relaxation of the receptor arrays in the bacterium E. coli after a perturbation by ligand binding for varying periods of times. We find that changing the time tw, during which the stimulus was present, affects mostly the deviation of the receptor arrays from equilibrium, but the dynamics of the relaxation seem to be independent of tw. A possible interpretation is discussed.

  11. AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DYNAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agriculture has contributed to loss of vertebrate biodiversity in many regions, including the U.S. Corn Belt. Amphibian populations, in particular, have experienced widespread and often inexplicable declines, range reductions, and extinctions. However, few attempts have been made...

  12. Investigation of bacterial populations in a biological nutrient removal system

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanaugh, Rathi G.

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial populations proliferating in a pilot scale biological nutrient removal system (BNR) were studied. The objective of the research was to develop media and methods to identify bacterial populations in BNR systems. Samples were obtained from the last aerobic zone of a University of Cape Town (UCT)-type system. The most probable numbers (MPN) of bacteria in the samples were analyzed in liquid media containing volatile fatty acids as sole sources of carbon. Samples...

  13. Punctuated equilibrium in an evolving bacterial population

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhuri, Indranath; Bose, Indrani

    1999-01-01

    Recently, Lenski et al have carried out an experiment on bacterial evolution. Their findings support the theory of punctuated equilibrium in biological evolution. We show that the M=2 Bak-Sneppen model can explain some of the experimental results in a qualitative manner.

  14. Beta-lactam effects on mixed cultures of common respiratory isolates as an approach to treatment effects on nasopharyngeal bacterial population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sevillano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes and Haemophilus influenzae are bacteria present in the nasopharynx as part of normal flora. The ecological equilibrium in the nasopharynx can be disrupted by the presence of antibiotics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A computerized two-compartment pharmacodynamic model was used to explore beta-lactam effects on the evolution over time of a bacterial load containing common pharyngeal isolates by simulating free serum concentrations obtained with amoxicillin (AMX 875 mg tid, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC 875/125 mg tid and cefditoren (CDN 400 mg bid regimens over 24 h. Strains and MICs (microg/ml of AMX, AMC and CDN were: S. pyogenes (0.03, 0.03 and 0.015, S. pneumoniae (2, 2 and 0.25, a beta-lactamase positive H. influenzae (BL(+; >16, 2 and 0.06 and a beta-lactamase positive AMC-resistant H. influenzae (BLPACR, >16, 8 and 0.06. Mixture of identical 1:1:1:1 volumes of each bacterial suspension were prepared yielding an inocula of approximately 4 x 10(6 cfu/ml. Antibiotic concentrations were measured both in bacterial and in bacteria-free antibiotic simulations. beta-lactamase production decreased AMX concentrations and fT(>MIC against S. pneumoniae (from 43.2% to 17.7% or S. pyogenes (from 99.9% to 24.9%, and eradication was precluded. The presence of clavulanic acid countered this effect of co-pathogenicity, and S. pyogenes (but not BL(+ and S. pneumoniae was eradicated. Resistance of CDN to TEM beta-lactamase avoided this co-pathogenicity effect, and CDN eradicated S. pyogenes and H. influenzae strains (fT(>MIC >58%, and reduced in 94% S. pneumoniae counts (fT(>MIC approximately 25%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Co-pathogenicity seems to be gradual since clavulanic acid countered this effect for strains very susceptible to AMX as S. pyogenes but not for strains with AMX MIC values in the limit of susceptibility as S. pneumoniae. There is a potential therapeutic advantage for beta

  15. Measurement of Behavioral Evolution in Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Robert

    2013-03-01

    A curious aspect of bacterial behavior under stress is the induction of filamentation: the anomalous growth of certain bacteria in which cells continue to elongate but do not divide into progeny. We show that E.coli under the influence of the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin have robust filamentous growth, which provides individual bacteria a mesoscopic niche for evolution until resistant progeny can bud off and propagate. Hence, filamentation is a form of genomic amplification where even a single, isolated bacteria can have access to multiple genomes. We propose a model that predicts that the first arrival time of the normal sized progeny should follow a Gompertz distribution with the mean first arrival time proportional to the elongation rate of filament. These predictions agree with our experimental measurements. Finally, we suggest bacterial filament growth and budding has many similarities to tumor growth and metastasis and can serve as a simpler model to study those complicated processes. Sponsored by the NCI/NIH Physical Sciences Oncology Centers

  16. Community structure of actively growing bacterial populations in plant pathogen suppressive soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjort, K.; Lembke, A.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Smalla, K.; Jansson, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    The bacterial community in soil was screened by using various molecular approaches for bacterial populations that were activated upon addition of different supplements. Plasmodiophora brassicae spores, chitin, sodium acetate, and cabbage plants were added to activate specific bacterial populations a

  17. Environmental impact of mining activity in Bor area as indicated by the distribution of heavy metals and bacterial population dynamics in sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filimon M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact of inorganic pollution is pronounced in water adjacent to Bor Copper Smelter Complex (RTB Bor, Serbia, with Cu, Zn, Pb, and As being the main determinants of aquatic pollution pattern. Communities of microorganisms present in the sediments are mainly affected by heavy metal pollution. Some groups of bacteria can be considered pollution bio-indicators, due to their sensibility and ability to bioaccumulate heavy metals, thus contributing to reducing pollution. This study investigates the relationships between trace element accumulation and heterogeneity in sediment bacteria community structure found in water streams adjacent to the Bor Copper Smelter Complex (RTB Bor, Serbia. Our results showed no contamination with copper, zinc, nickel, iron, and chromium, but did show a low to moderate contamination with lead and a moderate to high contamination with arsenic in aquatic sediments within the area of interest. Spatial heterogeneity in sediment-associated bacterial communities did not relate significantly to location of sampling sites, except for iron reducing bacteria. Iron reducing bacteria and nitrifying bacteria were the best distinguishing groups of bacteria. However, only iron reducing bacteria were significantly influenced by sampling locations. The iron reducing bacteria has correlated negatively with the degree of sediment contamination with lead, and therefore, we suggest that this group of bacteria could serve as potential bio-indicators of inorganic water contamination in Bor RTB area.

  18. Daily changes in bacterial-feeding nematode populations oscillate with similar periods as bacterial populations after a nutrient impulse in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelenev, V.V.; Berkelmans, R.A.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Bongers, A.M.T.; Semenov, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we showed that bacterial populations oscillated in a regular manner in response to a nutrient impulse in soil. For this paper we investigated if the wave-like fluctuations in bacterial populations could be explained by their interactions with populations of bacterial-feeding nematodes (B

  19. Physical Limits on Bacterial Navigation in Dynamic Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Hein, Andrew M; Carrara, Francesco; Stocker, Roman; Levin, Simon A

    2015-01-01

    Many chemotactic bacteria inhabit environments in which chemicals appear as localized pulses and evolve by processes such as diffusion and mixing. We show that, in such environments, physical limits on the accuracy of temporal gradient sensing govern when and where bacteria can accurately measure the cues they use to navigate. Chemical pulses are surrounded by a predictable dynamic region, outside which bacterial cells cannot resolve gradients above noise. The outer boundary of this region initially expands in proportion to $\\sqrt{t}$, before rapidly contracting. Our analysis also reveals how chemokinesis - the increase in swimming speed many bacteria exhibit when absolute chemical concentration exceeds a threshold - may serve to enhance chemotactic accuracy and sensitivity when the chemical landscape is dynamic. More generally, our framework provides a rigorous method for partitioning bacteria into populations that are "near" and "far" from chemical hotspots in complex, rapidly evolving environments such as ...

  20. Population dynamics in variable environments

    CERN Document Server

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad

    1990-01-01

    Demography relates observable facts about individuals to the dynamics of populations. If the dynamics are linear and do not change over time, the classical theory of Lotka (1907) and Leslie (1945) is the central tool of demography. This book addresses the situation when the assumption of constancy is dropped. In many practical situations, a population will display unpredictable variation over time in its vital rates, which must then be described in statistical terms. Most of this book is concerned with the theory of populations which are subject to random temporal changes in their vital rates, although other kinds of variation (e. g. , cyclical) are also dealt with. The central questions are: how does temporal variation work its way into a population's future, and how does it affect our interpretation of a population's past. The results here are directed at demographers of humans and at popula­ tion biologists. The uneven mathematical level is dictated by the material, but the book should be accessible to re...

  1. Models of ungulate population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Eberhardt

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available A useful theory for analyzing ungulate population dynamics is available in the form of equations based on the work of A. J. Lotka. Because the Leslie matrix model yields identical results and is widely known, it is convenient to label the resulting equations as the "Lotka-Leslie" model. The approach is useful for assessing population trends and attempting to predict the outcomes of various management actions. A broad list of applications to large mammals, and two examples specific to caribou are presented with a simple spreadsheet approach to calculations.

  2. BSim: an agent-based tool for modeling bacterial populations in systems and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorochowski, Thomas E; Matyjaszkiewicz, Antoni; Todd, Thomas; Oak, Neeraj; Kowalska, Kira; Reid, Stephen; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira T; Savery, Nigel J; Grierson, Claire S; di Bernardo, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale collective behaviors such as synchronization and coordination spontaneously arise in many bacterial populations. With systems biology attempting to understand these phenomena, and synthetic biology opening up the possibility of engineering them for our own benefit, there is growing interest in how bacterial populations are best modeled. Here we introduce BSim, a highly flexible agent-based computational tool for analyzing the relationships between single-cell dynamics and population level features. BSim includes reference implementations of many bacterial traits to enable the quick development of new models partially built from existing ones. Unlike existing modeling tools, BSim fully considers spatial aspects of a model allowing for the description of intricate micro-scale structures, enabling the modeling of bacterial behavior in more realistic three-dimensional, complex environments. The new opportunities that BSim opens are illustrated through several diverse examples covering: spatial multicellular computing, modeling complex environments, population dynamics of the lac operon, and the synchronization of genetic oscillators. BSim is open source software that is freely available from http://bsim-bccs.sf.net and distributed under the Open Source Initiative (OSI) recognized MIT license. Developer documentation and a wide range of example simulations are also available from the website. BSim requires Java version 1.6 or higher. PMID:22936991

  3. BSim: an agent-based tool for modeling bacterial populations in systems and synthetic biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Gorochowski

    Full Text Available Large-scale collective behaviors such as synchronization and coordination spontaneously arise in many bacterial populations. With systems biology attempting to understand these phenomena, and synthetic biology opening up the possibility of engineering them for our own benefit, there is growing interest in how bacterial populations are best modeled. Here we introduce BSim, a highly flexible agent-based computational tool for analyzing the relationships between single-cell dynamics and population level features. BSim includes reference implementations of many bacterial traits to enable the quick development of new models partially built from existing ones. Unlike existing modeling tools, BSim fully considers spatial aspects of a model allowing for the description of intricate micro-scale structures, enabling the modeling of bacterial behavior in more realistic three-dimensional, complex environments. The new opportunities that BSim opens are illustrated through several diverse examples covering: spatial multicellular computing, modeling complex environments, population dynamics of the lac operon, and the synchronization of genetic oscillators. BSim is open source software that is freely available from http://bsim-bccs.sf.net and distributed under the Open Source Initiative (OSI recognized MIT license. Developer documentation and a wide range of example simulations are also available from the website. BSim requires Java version 1.6 or higher.

  4. Patterned progression of bacterial populations in the premature infant gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Patricio S; Warner, Barbara B; Zhou, Yanjiao; Weinstock, George M; Sodergren, Erica; Hall-Moore, Carla M; Stevens, Harold J; Bennett, William E; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Linneman, Laura A; Hoffmann, Julie A; Hamvas, Aaron; Deych, Elena; Shands, Berkley A; Shannon, William D; Tarr, Phillip I

    2014-08-26

    In the weeks after birth, the gut acquires a nascent microbiome, and starts its transition to bacterial population equilibrium. This early-in-life microbial population quite likely influences later-in-life host biology. However, we know little about the governance of community development: does the gut serve as a passive incubator where the first organisms randomly encountered gain entry and predominate, or is there an orderly progression of members joining the community of bacteria? We used fine interval enumeration of microbes in stools from multiple subjects to answer this question. We demonstrate via 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of 922 specimens from 58 subjects that the gut microbiota of premature infants residing in a tightly controlled microbial environment progresses through a choreographed succession of bacterial classes from Bacilli to Gammaproteobacteria to Clostridia, interrupted by abrupt population changes. As infants approach 33-36 wk postconceptional age (corresponding to the third to the twelfth weeks of life depending on gestational age at birth), the gut is well colonized by anaerobes. Antibiotics, vaginal vs. Caesarian birth, diet, and age of the infants when sampled influence the pace, but not the sequence, of progression. Our results suggest that in infants in a microbiologically constrained ecosphere of a neonatal intensive care unit, gut bacterial communities have an overall nonrandom assembly that is punctuated by microbial population abruptions. The possibility that the pace of this assembly depends more on host biology (chiefly gestational age at birth) than identifiable exogenous factors warrants further consideration. PMID:25114261

  5. Flood trends and population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Baldassarre, G.

    2012-04-01

    Since the earliest recorded civilizations, such as those in Mesopotamia and Egypt that developed in the fertile floodplains of the Tigris and Euphrates and Nile rivers, humans tend to settle in flood prone areas as they offer favorable conditions for economic development. However, floodplains are also exposed to flood disasters that might cause severe socio-economic and environmental damages not to mention losses of human lives. A flood event turns to be a disaster when it coincides with a vulnerable environment exceeding society's capacity to manage the adverse consequences. This presentation discusses the link between hydrological risk and population change by referring to the outcomes of scientific works recently carried out in Africa and Europe. More specifically, it is shown that the severity of flood disasters, currently affecting more than 100 million people a year, might be seriously exacerbated because of population change. In fact, flood exposure and/or vulnerability might increase because of rapid population growth (and its spatial and temporal dynamics, e.g. urbanization) in the African continent and because of population ageing in many European countries. Lastly, timely and economically sustainable actions to mitigate this increasing hydrological risk are critically evaluated.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of interacting populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bazykin, Alexander D

    1998-01-01

    This book contains a systematic study of ecological communities of two or three interacting populations. Starting from the Lotka-Volterra system, various regulating factors are considered, such as rates of birth and death, predation and competition. The different factors can have a stabilizing or a destabilizing effect on the community, and their interplay leads to increasingly complicated behavior. Studying and understanding this path to greater dynamical complexity of ecological systems constitutes the backbone of this book. On the mathematical side, the tool of choice is the qualitative the

  7. Dynamics of Similar Populations: The Link Between Population Dynamics and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Meszena, G.; Gyllenberg, M.; F.J.A. Jacobs; J.A.J. Metz

    2005-01-01

    We provide the link between population dynamics and the dynamics of Darwinian evolution via studying the joint population dynamics of "similar" populations. Similarity implies that the "relative" dynamics of the populations is slow compared to, and decoupled from, their "aggregated" dynamics. The relative dynamics is simple, and captured by a Taylor expansion in the difference between the populations. The emerging evolution is directional, except at the "singular" points of the evolutionary s...

  8. Sputum Bacterial and Fungal Dynamics during Exacerbations of Severe COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Su

    Full Text Available The changes in the microbial community structure during acute exacerbations of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in hospitalized patients remain largely uncharacterized. Therefore, further studies focused on the temporal dynamics and structure of sputum microbial communities during acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD would still be necessary. In our study, the use of molecular microbiological techniques provided insight into both fungal and bacterial diversities in AECOPD patients during hospitalization. In particular, we examined the structure and varieties of lung microbial community in 6 patients with severe AECOPD by amplifying 16S rRNA V4 hyper-variable and internal transcribed spacer (ITS DNA regions using barcoded primers and the Illumina sequencing platform. Sequence analysis showed 261 bacterial genera representing 20 distinct phyla, with an average number of genera per patient of >157, indicating high diversity. Acinetobacter, Prevotella, Neisseria, Rothia, Lactobacillus, Leptotrichia, Streptococcus, Veillonella, and Actinomyces were the most commonly identified genera, and the average total sequencing number per sputum sample was >10000 18S ITS sequences. The fungal population was typically dominated by Candia, Phialosimplex, Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium and Eutypella. Our findings highlight that COPD patients have personalized structures and varieties in sputum microbial community during hospitalization periods.

  9. Effect of isolate of ruminal fibrolytic bacterial culture supplementation on fibrolytic bacterial population and survivability of inoculated bacterial strain in lactating Murrah buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brishketu Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of bacterial culture supplementation on ruminal fibrolytic bacterial population as well as on survivability of inoculated bacterial strain in lactating Murrah buffaloes kept on high fibre diet. Materials and Methods: Fibrolytic bacterial strains were isolated from rumen liquor of fistulated Murrah buffaloes and live bacterial culture were supplemented orally in treatment group of lactating Murrah buffaloes fed on high fibre diet to see it's effect on ruminal fibrolytic bacterial population as well as to see the effect of survivability of the inoculated bacterial strain at three different time interval in comparison to control group. Results: It has been shown by real time quantification study that supplementation of bacterial culture orally increases the population of major fibre degrading bacteria i.e. Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Ruminococcus albus as well as Fibrobacter succinogenes whereas there was decrease in secondary fibre degrading bacterial population i.e. Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens over the different time periods. However, the inoculated strain of Ruminococcus flavefaciens survived significantly over the period of time, which was shown in stability of increased inoculated bacterial population. Conclusion: The isolates of fibrolytic bacterial strains are found to be useful in increasing the number of major ruminal fibre degrading bacteria in lactating buffaloes and may act as probiotic in large ruminants on fibre-based diets. [Vet World 2013; 6(1.000: 14-17

  10. Design and Evaluation of PCR Primers for Analysis of Bacterial Populations in Wine by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Isabel; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda; Cocolin, Luca; Orr, Erica; Phister, Trevor; Marshall, Megan; VanderGheynst, Jean; Mills, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is routinely used to compare levels of diversity of microbial communities and to monitor population dynamics. While using PCR-DGGE to examine the bacteria in wine fermentations, we noted that several commonly used PCR primers for amplifying bacterial 16S rDNA also coamplified yeast, fungal, or plant DNA present in samples. Unfortunately, amplification of nonbacterial DNA can result in a masking of bacterial p...

  11. Evaluation of in vitro gas production and rumen bacterial populations fermenting corn milling (co)products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W L; Tedeschi, L O; Kononoff, P J; Callaway, T R; Dowd, S E; Karges, K; Gibson, M L

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the fermentation dynamics of 2 commonly fed corn (co)products in their intact and defatted forms, using the in vitro gas production (IVGP) technique, and to investigate the shifts of the predominant rumen bacterial populations using the 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) technique. The bTEFAP technique was used to determine the bacterial profile of each fermentation time at 24 and 48 h. Bacterial populations were identified at the species level. Species were grouped by substrate affinities (guilds) for cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, starch, sugars, protein, lipids, and lactate. The 2 (co)products were a dried distillers grain (DDG) plus solubles produced from a low-heat drying process (BPX) and a high-protein DDG without solubles (HP). Chemical analysis revealed that BPX contained about 11.4% ether extract, whereas HP contained only 3.88%. Previous studies have indicated that processing methods, as well as fat content, of corn (co)products directly affect fermentation rate and substrate availability, but little information is available regarding changes in rumen bacterial populations. Fermentation profiles of intact and defatted BPX and HP were compared with alfalfa hay as a standard profile. Defatting before incubation had no effect on total gas production in BPX or HP, but reduced lag time and the fractional rate of fermentation of BPX by at least half, whereas there was no effect for HP. The HP feed supported a greater percentage of fibrolytic and proteolytic bacteria than did BPX. Defatting both DDG increased the fibrolytic (26.8 to 38.7%) and proteolytic (26.1 to 37.2%) bacterial guild populations and decreased the lactate-utilizing bacterial guild (3.06 to 1.44%). Information regarding the fermentation kinetics and bacterial population shifts when feeding corn (co)products may lead to more innovative processing methods that improve feed quality (e.g., deoiling) and consequently

  12. Determination of Plasmid Segregational Stability in a Growing Bacterial Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, M Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extensively used as cloning vectors for a number of genes for academic and commercial purposes. Moreover, attenuated bacteria carrying recombinant plasmids expressing genes with anti-tumor activity have shown promising therapeutic results in animal models of cancer. Equitable plasmid distribution between daughter cells during cell division, i.e., plasmid segregational stability, depends on many factors, including the plasmid copy number, its replication mechanism, the levels of recombinant gene expression, the type of bacterial host, and the metabolic burden associated with all these factors. Plasmid vectors usually code for antibiotic-resistant functions, and, in order to enrich the culture with bacteria containing plasmids, antibiotic selective pressure is commonly used to eliminate plasmid-free segregants from the growing population. However, administration of antibiotics can be inconvenient for many industrial and therapeutic applications. Extensive ongoing research is being carried out to develop stably-inherited plasmid vectors. Here, I present an easy and precise method for determining the kinetics of plasmid loss or maintenance for every ten generations of bacterial growth in culture. PMID:26846807

  13. Plasmids foster diversification and adaptation of bacterial populations in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Holger; Smalla, Kornelia

    2012-11-01

    It is increasingly being recognized that the transfer of conjugative plasmids across species boundaries plays a vital role in the adaptability of bacterial populations in soil. There are specific driving forces and constraints of plasmid transfer within bacterial communities in soils. Plasmid-mediated genetic variation allows bacteria to respond rapidly with adaptive responses to challenges such as irregular antibiotic or metal concentrations, or opportunities such as the utilization of xenobiotic compounds. Cultivation-independent detection and capture of plasmids from soil bacteria, and complete sequencing have provided new insights into the role and ecology of plasmids. Broad host range plasmids such as those belonging to IncP-1 transfer a wealth of accessory functions which are carried by similar plasmid backbones. Plasmids with a narrower host range can be more specifically adapted to particular species and often transfer genes which complement chromosomally encoded functions. Plasmids seem to be an ancient and successful strategy to ensure survival of a soil population in spatial and temporal heterogeneous conditions with various environmental stresses or opportunities that occur irregularly or as a novel challenge in soil.

  14. Real-Time Bioluminescent Tracking of Cellular Population Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, Dan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL; Xu, Tingting [ORNL; Ripp, Steven Anthony [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Cellular population dynamics are routinely monitored across many diverse fields for a variety of purposes. In general, these dynamics are assayed either through the direct counting of cellular aliquots followed by extrapolation to the total population size, or through the monitoring of signal intensity from any number of externally stimulated reporter proteins. While both viable methods, here we describe a novel technique that allows for the automated, non-destructive tracking of cellular population dynamics in real-time. This method, which relies on the detection of a continuous bioluminescent signal produced through expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette, provides a low cost, low time-intensive means for generating additional data compared to alternative methods.

  15. Population Dynamics of Viral Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Krista; Li, Dong; Behrens, Manja; Streletzky, Kiril; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    We have investigated the population dynamics of viral inactivation in vitrousing time-resolved cryo electron microscopy combined with light and X-ray scattering techniques. Using bacteriophage λ as a model system for pressurized double-stranded DNA viruses, we found that virions incubated with their cell receptor eject their genome in a stochastic triggering process. The triggering of DNA ejection occurs in a non synchronized manner after the receptor addition, resulting in an exponential decay of the number of genome-filled viruses with time. We have explored the characteristic time constant of this triggering process at different temperatures, salt conditions, and packaged genome lengths. Furthermore, using the temperature dependence we determined an activation energy for DNA ejections. The dependences of the time constant and activation energy on internal DNA pressure, affected by salt conditions and encapsidated genome length, suggest that the triggering process is directly dependent on the conformational state of the encapsidated DNA. The results of this work provide insight into how the in vivo kinetics of the spread of viral infection are influenced by intra- and extra cellular environmental conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1252522.

  16. Mucin dynamics in intestinal bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara K Lindén

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial gastroenteritis causes morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Murine Citrobacter rodentium infection is a model for gastroenteritis caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli. Mucin glycoproteins are the main component of the first barrier that bacteria encounter in the intestinal tract. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Immunohistochemistry, we investigated intestinal expression of mucins (Alcian blue/PAS, Muc1, Muc2, Muc4, Muc5AC, Muc13 and Muc3/17 in healthy and C. rodentium infected mice. The majority of the C. rodentium infected mice developed systemic infection and colitis in the mid and distal colon by day 12. C. rodentium bound to the major secreted mucin, Muc2, in vitro, and high numbers of bacteria were found in secreted MUC2 in infected animals in vivo, indicating that mucins may limit bacterial access to the epithelial surface. In the small intestine, caecum and proximal colon, the mucin expression was similar in infected and non-infected animals. In the distal colonic epithelium, all secreted and cell surface mucins decreased with the exception of the Muc1 cell surface mucin which increased after infection (p<0.05. Similarly, during human infection Salmonella St Paul, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium difficile induced MUC1 in the colon. CONCLUSION: Major changes in both the cell-surface and secreted mucins occur in response to intestinal infection.

  17. Scale-Invariant Correlations in Dynamic Bacterial Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Dong, Xu; Be'er, Avraham; Swinney, Harry L.; Zhang, H. P.

    2012-04-01

    In Bacillus subtilis colonies, motile bacteria move collectively, spontaneously forming dynamic clusters. These bacterial clusters share similarities with other systems exhibiting polarized collective motion, such as bird flocks or fish schools. Here we study experimentally how velocity and orientation fluctuations within clusters are spatially correlated. For a range of cell density and cluster size, the correlation length is shown to be 30% of the spatial size of clusters, and the correlation functions collapse onto a master curve after rescaling the separation with correlation length. Our results demonstrate that correlations of velocity and orientation fluctuations are scale invariant in dynamic bacterial clusters.

  18. Assessment of bacterial and structural dynamics in aerobic granular biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Weissbrodt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic granular sludge is based on self-granulated flocs forming mobile biofilms with a gel-like consistence. Bacterial and structural dynamics from flocs to granules were followed in anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors fed with synthetic wastewater, namely a bubble column (BC-SBR operated under wash-out conditions for fast granulation, and two stirred-tank enrichments of Accumulibacter (PAO-SBR and Competibacter (GAO-SBR operated at steady-state. In the BC-SBR, granules formed within two weeks by swelling of Zoogloea colonies around flocs, developing subsequently smooth zoogloeal biofilms. However, Zoogloea predominance (37-79% led to deteriorated nutrient removal during the first months of reactor operation. Upon maturation, improved nitrification (80-100%, nitrogen removal (43-83%, and high but unstable dephosphatation (75-100% were obtained. Proliferation of dense clusters of nitrifiers, Accumulibacter, and Competibacter from granule cores outwards resulted in heterogeneous bioaggregates, inside which only low abundance Zoogloea (<5% were detected in biofilm interstices. The presence of different extracellular glycoconjugates detected by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis showed the complex nature of the intracellular matrix of these granules. In the PAO-SBR, granulation occurred within two months with abundant and active Accumulibacter populations (56±10% that were selected under full anaerobic uptake of volatile fatty acids and that aggregated as dense clusters within heterogeneous granules. Flocs self-granulated in the GAO-SBR after 480 days during a period of over-aeration caused by biofilm growth on the oxygen sensor. Granules were dominated by heterogeneous clusters of Competibacter (37±11%. Zoogloea were never abundant in biomass of both PAO- and GAO-SBRs. This study showed that Zoogloea, Accumulibacter, and Competibacter affiliates can form granules, and that the granulation mechanisms rely on the dominant population

  19. Population dynamics and population control of Galium aparine L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weide, van der R.Y.

    1993-01-01

    The population biology of Galium aparine L. needs to be better understood, in order to be able to rationalize decisions about the short- and long-term control of this weed species for different cropping practices.A population dynamics model was developed to simulate the basic processes of the life c

  20. Population Dynamics of Genetic Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Erez

    2005-03-01

    Unlike common objects in physics, a biological cell processes information. The cell interprets its genome and transforms the genomic information content, through the action of genetic regulatory networks, into proteins which in turn dictate its metabolism, functionality and morphology. Understanding the dynamics of a population of biological cells presents a unique challenge. It requires to link the intracellular dynamics of gene regulation, through the mechanism of cell division, to the level of the population. We present experiments studying adaptive dynamics of populations of genetically homogeneous microorganisms (yeast), grown for long durations under steady conditions. We focus on population dynamics that do not involve random genetic mutations. Our experiments follow the long-term dynamics of the population distributions and allow to quantify the correlations among generations. We focus on three interconnected issues: adaptation of genetically homogeneous populations following environmental changes, selection processes on the population and population variability and expression distributions. We show that while the population exhibits specific short-term responses to environmental inputs, it eventually adapts to a robust steady-state, largely independent of external conditions. Cycles of medium-switch show that the adapted state is imprinted in the population and that this memory is maintained for many generations. To further study population adaptation, we utilize the process of gene recruitment whereby a gene naturally regulated by a specific promoter is placed under a different regulatory system. This naturally occurring process has been recognized as a major driving force in evolution. We have recruited an essential gene to a foreign regulatory network and followed the population long-term dynamics. Rewiring of the regulatory network allows us to expose their complex dynamics and phase space structure.

  1. EFFECT OF SITE ON BACTERIAL POPULATIONS IN THE SAPWOOD OF COARSE WOODY DEBRIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Emma, G.,; Waldrop, Thomas, A.; McElreath, Susan, D.; Tainter, Frank, H.

    1998-01-01

    Porter, Emma G., T.A. Waldrop, Susan D. McElreath, and Frank H. Tainter. 1998. Effect of site on bacterial populations in the sapwood of coarse woody debris. Pp. 480-484. In: Proc. 9th Bienn. South. Silv. Res. Conf. T.A. Waldrop (ed). USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-20. Abstract: Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important structural component of southeastern forest ecosystems, yet little is known about its dynamics in these systems. This project identified bacterial populations associated with CWD and their dynamics across landscape ecosystem classification (LEC) units. Bolts of red oak and loblolly pine were placed on plots at each of three hydric, mesic, and xeric sites at the Savannah River Station. After the controls were processed, samples were taken at four intervals over a 16-week period. Samples were ground within an anaerobe chamber using nonselective media. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria were identified using the Biolog system and the anaerobes were identified using the API 20A system. Major genera isolated were: Bacillus, Buttiauxella, Cedecea, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Serratia, and Xanthomonas. The mean total isolates were determined by LEC units and sample intervals. Differences occurred between the sample intervals with total isolates of 6.67, 13.33, 10.17, and 9.50 at 3, 6, 10, and 16 weeks, respectively. No significant differences in the numbers of bacteria isolated were found between LEC units.

  2. Population dynamics of marine birds: Annual report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The characteristic dynamics of Alaskan marine bird populations are being described from studies conducted at 12 OCSEAP-funded and 6nonOCSEAP-funded U. S. Fish and...

  3. The Niches of Bacterial Populations in Productive Waters : Examples from Coastal Waters and Four Eutrophic Lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Eiler, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Recent research in microbial ecology has focused on how aquatic bacterial communities are assembled. Only a few of these studies follow a “Gleasonian” approach where the roles of single bacterial populations are in focus. In this thesis, novel molecular tools were used to describe the distribution and evolutionary relationships of microbes in productive aquatic environments. Many new phylogenetic groups of bacteria were identified, likely representing bacterial populations restricted to produ...

  4. Immigration-extinction dynamics of stochastic populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerson, Baruch; Ovaskainen, Otso

    2013-07-01

    How high should be the rate of immigration into a stochastic population in order to significantly reduce the probability of observing the population become extinct? Is there any relation between the population size distributions with and without immigration? Under what conditions can one justify the simple patch occupancy models, which ignore the population distribution and its dynamics in a patch, and treat a patch simply as either occupied or empty? We answer these questions by exactly solving a simple stochastic model obtained by adding a steady immigration to a variant of the Verhulst model: a prototypical model of an isolated stochastic population.

  5. Malthusian Population Dynamics: Theory and Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf, Quamrul; Galor, Oded

    2008-01-01

    This paper empirically tests the existence of Malthusian population dynamics in the pre-Industrial Revolution era. The theory suggests that, during the agricultural stage of development, resource surpluses beyond the maintenance of subsistence consumption were channeled primarily into population growth. In particular, societies naturally blessed by higher land productivity would have supported larger populations, given the level of socioeconomic development. Moreover, given land productivity,...

  6. How Resource Phenology Affects Consumer Population Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewick, Sharon; Cantrell, R Stephen; Cosner, Chris; Fagan, William F

    2016-02-01

    Climate change drives uneven phenology shifts across taxa, and this can result in changes to the phenological match between interacting species. Shifts in the relative phenology of partner species are well documented, but few studies have addressed the effects of such changes on population dynamics. To explore this, we develop a phenologically explicit model describing consumer-resource interactions. Focusing on scenarios for univoltine insects, we show how changes in resource phenology can be reinterpreted as transformations in the year-to-year recursion relationships defining consumer population dynamics. This perspective provides a straightforward path for interpreting the long-term population consequences of phenology change. Specifically, by relating the outcome of phenological shifts to species traits governing recursion relationships (e.g., consumer fecundity or competitive scenario), we demonstrate how changes in relative phenology can force systems into different dynamical regimes, with major implications for resource management, conservation, and other areas of applied dynamics. PMID:26807744

  7. Bacterial profile of dentine caries and the impact of pH on bacterial population diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Kianoush

    Full Text Available Dental caries is caused by the release of organic acids from fermentative bacteria, which results in the dissolution of hydroxyapatite matrices of enamel and dentine. While low environmental pH is proposed to cause a shift in the consortium of oral bacteria, favouring the development of caries, the impact of this variable has been overlooked in microbial population studies. This study aimed to detail the zonal composition of the microbiota associated with carious dentine lesions with reference to pH. We used 454 sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V3-V4 region to compare microbial communities in layers ranging in pH from 4.5-7.8 from 25 teeth with advanced dentine caries. Pyrosequencing of the amplicons yielded 449,762 sequences. Nine phyla, 97 genera and 409 species were identified from the quality-filtered, de-noised and chimera-free sequences. Among the microbiota associated with dentinal caries, the most abundant taxa included Lactobacillus sp., Prevotella sp., Atopobium sp., Olsenella sp. and Actinomyces sp. We found a disparity between microbial communities localised at acidic versus neutral pH strata. Acidic conditions were associated with low diversity microbial populations, with Lactobacillus species including L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. crispatus, being prominent. In comparison, the distinctive species of a more diverse flora associated with neutral pH regions of carious lesions included Alloprevotella tanerrae, Leptothrix sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Streptococcus anginosus. While certain bacteria were affected by the pH gradient, we also found that ∼ 60% of the taxa associated with caries were present across the investigated pH range, representing a substantial core. We demonstrated that some bacterial species implicated in caries progression show selective clustering with respect to pH gradient, providing a basis for specific therapeutic strategies.

  8. Curating Transient Population in Urban Dynamics System

    CERN Document Server

    Thakur, Gautam S; Stewart, Robert N; Urban, Marie L; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2016-01-01

    For past several decades, research efforts in population modelling has proven its efficacy in understanding the basic information about residential and commercial areas, as well as for the purposes of planning, development and improvement of the community as an eco-system. More or less, such efforts assume static nature of population distribution, in turn limited by the current ability to capture the dynamics of population change at a finer resolution of space and time. Fast forward today, more and more people are becoming mobile, traveling across borders impacting the nuts and bolts of our urban fabric. Unfortunately, our current efforts are being surpassed by the need to capture such transient population. It is becoming imperative to identify and define them, as well as measure their dynamics and interconnectedness. In this work, we intend to research urban population mobility patterns, gauge their transient nature, and extend our knowledge of their visited locations. We plan to achieve this by designing an...

  9. Population Dynamics and Air Pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Sørensen, Jan; Bønløkke, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To explore how three different assumptions on demographics affect the health impact of Danish emitted air pollution in Denmark from 2005 to 2030, with health impact modeled from 2005 to 2050. Methods. Modeled air pollution from Danish sources was used as exposure in a newly developed......) a static year 2005 population, (2) morbidity and mortality fixed at the year 2005 level, or (3) an expected development. Results. The health impact of air pollution was estimated at 672,000, 290,000, and 280,000 lost life years depending on demographic assumptions and the corresponding social costs at 430.......4 M€, 317.5 M€, and 261.6 M€ through the modeled years 2005–2050. Conclusion. The modeled health impact of air pollution differed widely with the demographic assumptions, and thus demographics and assumptions on demographics played a key role in making health impact assessments on air pollution....

  10. Compositional stability of a salivary bacterial population against supragingival microbiota shift following periodontal therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Supragingival plaque is permanently in contact with saliva. However, the extent to which the microbiota contributes to the salivary bacterial population remains unclear. We compared the compositional shift in the salivary bacterial population with that in supragingival plaque following periodontal therapy. Samples were collected from 19 patients with periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy (mean sample collection interval, 25.8 ± 2.6 months, and their bacterial composition was investigated using barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Phylogenetic community analysis using the UniFrac distance metric revealed that the overall bacterial community composition of saliva is distinct from that of supragingival plaque, both pre- and post-therapy. Temporal variation following therapy in the salivary bacterial population was significantly smaller than in the plaque microbiota, and the post-therapy saliva sample was significantly more similar to that pre-therapy from the same individual than to those from other subjects. Following periodontal therapy, microbial richness and biodiversity were significantly decreased in the plaque microbiota, but not in the salivary bacterial population. The operational taxonomic units whose relative abundances changed significantly after therapy were not common to the two microbiotae. These results reveal the compositional stability of salivary bacterial populations against shifts in the supragingival microbiota, suggesting that the effect of the supragingival plaque microbiota on salivary bacterial population composition is limited.

  11. Detection, Diversity, and Population Dynamics of Waterborne Phytophthora ramorum Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, C A; Garbelotto, M

    2015-01-01

    Sudden oak death, the tree disease caused by Phytophthora ramorum, has significant environmental and economic impacts on natural forests on the U.S. west coast, plantations in the United Kingdom, and in the worldwide nursery trade. Stream baiting is vital for monitoring and early detection of the pathogen in high-risk areas and is performed routinely; however, little is known about the nature of water-borne P. ramorum populations. Two drainages in an infested California forest were monitored intensively using stream-baiting for 2 years between 2009 and 2011. Pathogen presence was determined both by isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from symptomatic bait leaves. Isolates were analyzed using simple sequence repeats to study population dynamics and genetic structure through time. Isolation was successful primarily only during spring conditions, while PCR extended the period of pathogen detection to most of the year. Water populations were extremely diverse, and changed between seasons and years. A few abundant genotypes dominated the water during conditions considered optimal for aerial populations, and matched those dominant in aerial populations. Temporal patterns of genotypic diversification and evenness were identical among aerial, soil, and water populations, indicating that all three substrates are part of the same epidemiological cycle, strongly influenced by rainfall and sporulation on leaves. However, there was structuring between substrates, likely arising due to reduced selection pressure in the water. Additionally, water populations showed wholesale mixing of genotypes without the evident spatial autocorrelation present in leaf and soil populations.

  12. Multispecies population dynamics of prebiotic compositional assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovitch, Omer; Lancet, Doron

    2014-09-21

    Present life portrays a two-tier phenomenology: molecules compose supramolecular structures, such as cells or organisms, which in turn portray population behaviors, including selection, evolution and ecological dynamics. Prebiotic models have often focused on evolution in populations of self-replicating molecules, without explicitly invoking the intermediate molecular-to-supramolecular transition. Here, we explore a prebiotic model that allows one to relate parameters of chemical interaction networks within molecular assemblies to emergent population dynamics. We use the graded autocatalysis replication domain (GARD) model, which simulates the network dynamics within amphiphile-containing molecular assemblies, and exhibits quasi-stationary compositional states termed compotype species. These grow by catalyzed accretion, divide and propagate their compositional information to progeny in a replication-like manner. The model allows us to ask how molecular network parameters influence assembly evolution and population dynamics parameters. In 1000 computer simulations, each embodying different parameter set of the global chemical interaction network parameters, we observed a wide range of behaviors. These were analyzed by a multi species logistic model often used for analyzing population ecology (r-K or Lotka-Volterra competition model). We found that compotypes with a larger intrinsic molecular repertoire show a higher intrinsic growth (r) and lower carrying capacity (K), as well as lower replication fidelity. This supports a prebiotic scenario initiated by fast-replicating assemblies with a high molecular diversity, evolving into more faithful replicators with narrower molecular repertoires. PMID:24831416

  13. Habit Formation, Dynastic Altruism, and Population Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Schäfer, Andreas; Valente, Simone

    2007-01-01

    We study the general equilibrium properties of two growth models with overlapping generations, habit formation and endogenous fertility. In the neoclassical model, habits modify the economy's growth rate and generate transitional dynamics in fertility; station- ary income per capita is associated with either increasing or decreasing population and output, depending on the strength of habits. In the AK specification, growing population and increasing consumption per capita require that the hab...

  14. Population dynamics of microbial communities in the zebrafish gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael; Burns, Adam; Hampton, Jennifer; Rolig, Annah; Wiles, Travis; Guillemin, Karen; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2015-03-01

    The vertebrate intestine is home to a diverse microbial community, which plays a crucial role in the development and health of its host. Little is known about the population dynamics and spatial structure of this ecosystem, including mechanisms of growth and interactions between species. We have constructed an experimental model system with which to explore these issues, using initially germ-free larval zebrafish inoculated with defined communities of fluorescently tagged bacteria. Using light sheet fluorescence microscopy combined with computational image analysis we observe and quantify the entire bacterial community of the intestine during the first 24 hours of colonization, during which time the bacterial population grows from tens to tens of thousands of bacteria. We identify both individual bacteria and clusters of bacteria, and quantify the growth rate and spatial distribution of these distinct subpopulations. We find that clusters of bacteria grow considerably faster than individuals and are located in specific regions of the intestine. Imaging colonization by two species reveals spatial segregation and competition. These data and their analysis highlight the importance of spatial organization in the establishment of gut microbial communities, and can provide inputs to physical models of real-world ecological dynamics.

  15. Extinction rate fragility in population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasin, M; Dykman, M I

    2009-08-01

    Population extinction is of central interest for population dynamics. It may occur from a large rare fluctuation. We find that, in contrast to related large-fluctuation effects like noise-induced interstate switching, quite generally extinction rates in multipopulation systems display fragility, where the height of the effective barrier to be overcome in the fluctuation depends on the system parameters nonanalytically. We show that one of the best-known models of epidemiology, the susceptible-infectious-susceptible model, is fragile to total population fluctuations.

  16. Dispersive models describing mosquitoes’ population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, W. M. S.; Takahashi, L. T.; Chapiro, G.

    2016-08-01

    The global incidences of dengue and, more recently, zica virus have increased the interest in studying and understanding the mosquito population dynamics. Understanding this dynamics is important for public health in countries where climatic and environmental conditions are favorable for the propagation of these diseases. This work is based on the study of nonlinear mathematical models dealing with the life cycle of the dengue mosquito using partial differential equations. We investigate the existence of traveling wave solutions using semi-analytical method combining dynamical systems techniques and numerical integration. Obtained solutions are validated through numerical simulations using finite difference schemes.

  17. Bacterial incorporation of tritiated thymidine and populations of bacteriophagous fauna in the rhizosphere of wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik; Griffiths, Bryan; Christensen, Søren

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial and microfaunal populations, and bacterial productivity measured by tritiated thymidine (3HTdr) incorporation, in the rhizosphere of wheat seedlings were measured. Soil from planted pots was fractionated into rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere (bulk) soil, while unplanted soil was taken fr...

  18. The population genetics of drug resistance evolution in natural populations of viral, bacterial and eukaryotic pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin A; Garud, Nandita R; Feder, Alison F; Assaf, Zoe J; Pennings, Pleuni S

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is a costly consequence of pathogen evolution and a major concern in public health. In this review, we show how population genetics can be used to study the evolution of drug resistance and also how drug resistance evolution is informative as an evolutionary model system. We highlight five examples from diverse organisms with particular focus on: (i) identifying drug resistance loci in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum using the genomic signatures of selective sweeps, (ii) determining the role of epistasis in drug resistance evolution in influenza, (iii) quantifying the role of standing genetic variation in the evolution of drug resistance in HIV, (iv) using drug resistance mutations to study clonal interference dynamics in tuberculosis and (v) analysing the population structure of the core and accessory genome of Staphylococcus aureus to understand the spread of methicillin resistance. Throughout this review, we discuss the uses of sequence data and population genetic theory in studying the evolution of drug resistance.

  19. Daily variations in pathogenic bacterial populations in a monsoon influenced tropical environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Naik, S.D.; Gaonkar, C.C.

    Changing climatic conditions have influenced the monsoon pattern in recent years. Variations in bacterial population in one such tropical environment were observed everyday over two years and point out intra and inter annual changes driven...

  20. Dynamical inference of hidden biological populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchinsky, D. G.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Millonas, M.; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2008-10-01

    Population fluctuations in a predator-prey system are analyzed for the case where the number of prey could be determined, subject to measurement noise, but the number of predators was unknown. The problem of how to infer the unmeasured predator dynamics, as well as the model parameters, is addressed. Two solutions are suggested. In the first of these, measurement noise and the dynamical noise in the equation for predator population are neglected; the problem is reduced to a one-dimensional case, and a Bayesian dynamical inference algorithm is employed to reconstruct the model parameters. In the second solution a full-scale Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation is used to infer both the unknown predator trajectory, and also the model parameters, using the one-dimensional solution as an initial guess.

  1. Bacterial molecular networks: bridging the gap between functional genomics and dynamical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helden, Jacques; Toussaint, Ariane; Thieffry, Denis

    2012-01-01

    This introductory review synthesizes the contents of the volume Bacterial Molecular Networks of the series Methods in Molecular Biology. This volume gathers 9 reviews and 16 method chapters describing computational protocols for the analysis of metabolic pathways, protein interaction networks, and regulatory networks. Each protocol is documented by concrete case studies dedicated to model bacteria or interacting populations. Altogether, the chapters provide a representative overview of state-of-the-art methods for data integration and retrieval, network visualization, graph analysis, and dynamical modelling.

  2. Bacterial population structure of the jute-retting environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Tulika K; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2008-08-01

    Jute is one of the most versatile bast fibers obtained through the process of retting, which is a result of decomposition of stalks by the indigenous microflora. However, bacterial communities associated with the retting of jute are not well characterized. To investigate the presence of microorganisms during the process of jute retting, full-cycle rRNA approach was followed, and two 16S rRNA gene libraries, from jute-retting locations of Krishnanagar and Barrackpore, were constructed. Phylotypes affiliating to seven bacterial divisions were identified in both libraries. The bulk of clones came from Proteobacteria ( approximately 37, 41%) and a comparatively smaller proportion of clones from the divisions-Firmicutes ( approximately 11, 12%), Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroidetes group (CFB; approximately 9, 7%), Verrucomicrobia ( approximately 6, 5%), Acidobacteria ( approximately 4, 5%), Chlorobiales ( approximately 5, 5%), and Actinobacteria ( approximately 4, 2%) were identified. Percent coverage value and diversity estimations of phylotype richness, Shannon-Weiner index, and evenness confirmed the diverse nature of both the libraries. Evaluation of the retting waters by whole cell rRNA-targeted flourescent in situ hybridization, as detected by domain- and group-specific probes, we observed a considerable dominance of the beta-Proteobacteria (25.9%) along with the CFB group (24.4%). In addition, 32 bacterial species were isolated on culture media from the two retting environments and identified by 16S rDNA analysis, confirming the presence of phyla, Proteobacteria ( approximately 47%), Firmicutes ( approximately 22%), CFB group ( approximately 19%), and Actinobacteria ( approximately 13%) in the retting niche. Thus, our study presents the first quantification of the dominant and diverse bacterial phylotypes in the retting ponds, which will further help in improving the retting efficiency, and hence the fiber quality. PMID:18097714

  3. Instability in bacterial populations and the curvature tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo, Augusto; Langoni, Laura; Ruscitti, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    In the geometry associated with equilibrium thermodynamics the scalar curvature Rs is a measure of the volume of correlation, and therefore the singularities of Rs indicates the system instabilities. We explore the use of a similar approach to study instabilities in non-equilibrium systems and we choose as a test example, a colony of bacteria. In this regard we follow the proposal made by Obata et al. of using the curvature tensor for studying system instabilities. Bacterial colonies are often found in nature in concentrated biofilms, or other colony types, which can grow into spectacular patterns visible under the microscope. For instance, it is known that a decrease of bacterial motility with density can promote separation into bulk phases of two coexisting densities; this is opposed to the logistic law for birth and death that allows only a single uniform density to be stable. Although this homogeneous configuration is stable in the absence of bacterial interactions, without logistic growth, a density-dependent swim speed v(ρ) leads to phase separation via a spinodal instability. Thus we relate the singularities in the curvature tensor R to the spinodal instability, that is the appearance of regions of different densities of bacteria.

  4. Environmental colour affects aspects of single-species population dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Petchey, O L

    2000-01-01

    Single-species populations of ciliates (Colpidium and Paramecium) experienced constant temperature or white or reddened temperature fluctuations in aquatic microcosms in order to test three hypotheses about how environmental colour influences population dynamics. (i) Models predict that the colour of population dynamics is tinged by the colour of the environmental variability. However, environmental colour had no effect on the colour of population dynamics. All population dynamics in this exp...

  5. Galactic civilizations - Population dynamics and interstellar diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W. I.; Sagan, C.

    1981-01-01

    A model is developed of the interstellar diffusion of galactic civilizations which takes into account the population dynamics of such civilizations. The problem is formulated in terms of potential theory, with a family of nonlinear partial differential and difference equations specifying population growth and diffusion for an organism with advantageous genes that undergoes random dispersal while increasing in population locally, and a population at zero population growth. In the case of nonlinear diffusion with growth and saturation, it is found that the colonization wavefront from the nearest independently arisen galactic civilization can have reached the earth only if its lifetime exceeds 2.6 million years, or 20 million years if discretization can be neglected. For zero population growth, the corresponding lifetime is 13 billion years. It is concluded that the earth is uncolonized not because interstellar spacefaring civilizations are rare, but because there are too many worlds to be colonized in the plausible colonization lifetime of nearby civilizations, and that there exist no very old galactic civilizations with a consistent policy of the conquest of inhabited worlds.

  6. Dynamics of bacterial community in the gut of Cornu aspersum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKA KOLEVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the bacterial community in the intestinal tract of Cornu aspersum was investigated during different states of its life cycle. Two approaches were applied – culture and non-culture. The non-culture approach was performed by ARDRA of 16S rDNA using two of the six tested endonucleases. Data were analyzed by hierarchical cluster analysis. The restriction of 16S rDNA samples from the snail of different physiological states with endonucleases HinfI and Csp6I resulted in generation of different profiles depending on the snail states. By the culture approach we found that the total number of cultivable bacteria, representatives of Enterobacteriaceae, lactic acid bacteria, amylolitic and cellulolytic bacteria were the most abundant in active state of the snails. Cellulolytic bacteria were not detected in juveniles of C. aspersum. Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens as well as bacteria from the genus Salmonella, Shigella and Pseudomonas were not detected. Bacteria of the genus Aeromonas were found in juveniles of C. aspersum, after that their number decrease and were not found in hibernating snails. On the base of the two applied approaches this study shows that the bacterial flora in the intestinal tract of C. aspersum is affected by the seasonal and environmental variations and undergoes quantitative and qualitative changes during the different states of the life cycle. The snails harbor in their gut intestinal bacteria, which possess biochemical potentiality to degrade the plant components.

  7. Populations of Stored Product Mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae Differ in Their Bacterial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erban, Tomas; Klimov, Pavel B.; Smrz, Jaroslav; Phillips, Thomas W.; Nesvorna, Marta; Kopecky, Jan; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tyrophagus putrescentiae colonizes different human-related habitats and feeds on various post-harvest foods. The microbiota acquired by these mites can influence the nutritional plasticity in different populations. We compared the bacterial communities of five populations of T. putrescentiae and one mixed population of T. putrescentiae and T. fanetzhangorum collected from different habitats. Material: The bacterial communities of the six mite populations from different habitats and diets were compared by Sanger sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA obtained from amplification with universal eubacterial primers and using bacterial taxon-specific primers on the samples of adults/juveniles or eggs. Microscopic techniques were used to localize bacteria in food boli and mite bodies. The morphological determination of the mite populations was confirmed by analyses of CO1 and ITS fragment genes. Results: The following symbiotic bacteria were found in compared mite populations: Wolbachia (two populations), Cardinium (five populations), Bartonella-like (five populations), Blattabacterium-like symbiont (three populations), and Solitalea-like (six populations). From 35 identified OTUs97, only Solitalea was identified in all populations. The next most frequent and abundant sequences were Bacillus, Moraxella, Staphylococcus, Kocuria, and Microbacterium. We suggest that some bacterial species may occasionally be ingested with food. The bacteriocytes were observed in some individuals in all mite populations. Bacteria were not visualized in food boli by staining, but bacteria were found by histological means in ovaria of Wolbachia-infested populations. Conclusion: The presence of Blattabacterium-like, Cardinium, Wolbachia, and Solitalea-like in the eggs of T. putrescentiae indicates mother to offspring (vertical) transmission. Results of this study indicate that diet and habitats influence not only the ingested bacteria but also the symbiotic bacteria of T. putrescentiae. PMID

  8. Bacterial Community in Different Populations of Rice Brown Planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Stål)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hong-xing; ZHENG Xu-song; YANG Ya-jun; WANG Xin; YE Gong-yin; LU Zhong-xian

    2014-01-01

    The structures of bacterial communities in the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) from different geographic and resistant virulent populations were analyzed by using denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Results showed that the bacterial communities in BPH nymph from the first to the fifth instars varied with nymphal growth and development. The bacterial communities in the first-instar BPH nymph were similar to those in adults. Nine geographic BPH populations were divided into three groups based on the cluster analysis of DGGE fingerprint. The first group was from the Philippines;the second group was from Thailand and Hainan, Yunnan and Zhejiang provinces of China; and the third group was from Vietnam and Guangxi, Hunan and Jiangxi provinces of China. BPH populations adapted to different resistant rice varieties. The BPH populations from Mudgo (with resistant gene Bph1) and ASD7 (with resistant gene bph2) differed with those of the susceptible rice variety TN1.

  9. Detailed analyses of the bacterial populations in processed cocoa beans of different geographic origin, subject to varied fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolini, Cristian; Patrone, Vania; Puglisi, Edoardo; Morelli, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    The quality of chocolate is influenced by several parameters, one of which is bacterial diversity during fermentation and drying; a crucial factor for the generation of the optimal cocoa flavor precursors. Our understanding of the bacterial populations involved in chocolate fermentation can be improved by the use of high-throughput sequencing technologies (HTS), combined with PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA subunit. Here, we have conducted a high-throughput assessment of bacterial diversity in four processed samples of cocoa beans from different geographic origins. As part of this study, we also assessed whether different DNA extraction methods could affect the quality of our data. The dynamics of microbial populations were analyzed postharvest (fermentation and sun drying) and shipment, before entry to the industrial process. A total of 691,867 high quality sequences were obtained by Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the two bacterial 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, V3 and V4, following paired-read assembly of the raw reads. Manual curation of the 16S database allowed us to assign the correct taxonomic classifications, at species level, for 83.8% of those reads. This approach revealed a limited biodiversity and population dynamics for both the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB), both of which are key players during the acetification and lactic acid fermentation phases. Among the LAB, the most abundant species were Lactobacillus fermentum, Enterococcus casseliflavus, Weissella paramesenteroides, and Lactobacillus plantarum/paraplantarum. Among the AAB, Acetobacter syzygii, was most abundant, then Acetobacter senegalensis and Acetobacter pasteriuanus. Our results indicate that HTS approach has the ability to provide a comprehensive view of the cocoa bean microbiota at the species level. PMID:27458718

  10. Characterization by culture-dependent and culture-1 independent methods of the 2 bacterial population of suckling-lamb packaged in different atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oses, S.M.; Diez, A.M.; Melero, B.; Luning, P.A.; Jaime, I.; Rovira, J.

    2013-01-01

    This study offers insight into the dynamics of bacterial populations in fresh cuts of suckling lamb under four different atmospheric conditions: air (A), and three Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP) environments, 15%O2/30%CO2/55%N2 (C, commercial), 70%O2/30%CO2 (O), and 15%O2/85%CO2 (H) for 18 days

  11. Evaluation of a routine antiseptic and two disinfectants for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof

    OpenAIRE

    Moosa Javdani,; Seifollah Dehghani,; Ali Ghashghaii; Zahra Nikousefat

    2011-01-01

    A routine antiseptic and two disinfectant agents were used separately for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof: 1) 7.5% povidone–iodine scrub mixed with 10% povidone–iodine solution, 2) 10% copper sulfate, and 3) 8% formaldehyde. Swabbing for microbial colony counts were used to evaluate pre and post–scrub of hooves of eight cows. The results revealed no significant differences in reduction of bacterial colony count between post–scrubs of povidone–iodine and formaldehyde. B...

  12. Photometric Application of the Gram Stain Method To Characterize Natural Bacterial Populations in Aquatic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Saida, H; Ytow, N.; Seki, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Gram stain method was applied to the photometric characterization of aquatic bacterial populations with a charge-coupled device camera and an image analyzer. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were used as standards of typical gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, respectively. A mounting agent to obtain clear images of Gram-stained bacteria on Nuclepore membrane filters was developed. The bacterial stainability by the Gram stain was indicated by the Gram stain index (GSI), which ...

  13. Population Code Dynamics in Categorical Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Chihiro I; Tajima, Satohiro; Koida, Kowa; Komatsu, Hidehiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2016-03-03

    Categorical perception is a ubiquitous function in sensory information processing, and is reported to have important influences on the recognition of presented and/or memorized stimuli. However, such complex interactions among categorical perception and other aspects of sensory processing have not been explained well in a unified manner. Here, we propose a recurrent neural network model to process categorical information of stimuli, which approximately realizes a hierarchical Bayesian estimation on stimuli. The model accounts for a wide variety of neurophysiological and cognitive phenomena in a consistent framework. In particular, the reported complexity of categorical effects, including (i) task-dependent modulation of neural response, (ii) clustering of neural population representation, (iii) temporal evolution of perceptual color memory, and (iv) a non-uniform discrimination threshold, are explained as different aspects of a single model. Moreover, we directly examine key model behaviors in the monkey visual cortex by analyzing neural population dynamics during categorization and discrimination of color stimuli. We find that the categorical task causes temporally-evolving biases in the neuronal population representations toward the focal colors, which supports the proposed model. These results suggest that categorical perception can be achieved by recurrent neural dynamics that approximates optimal probabilistic inference in the changing environment.

  14. Diagnosis and Management of Bacterial Meningitis in the Paediatric Population: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L. Tacon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency which, despite advances in medical management, still has a significant morbidity and mortality. Over recent decades new vaccines have led to a change in epidemiology of the disease; however, it remains a condition that requires a high index of suspicion, prompt diagnosis, and early management in the emergency department. New laboratory techniques and clinical tools are aiding the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, yet some controversies still exist in its management. This paper outlines the changing epidemiology of the disease, current diagnostic techniques as well as controversies and advances in the management of bacterial meningitis in the paediatric population.

  15. Bacterial dynamics in steady-state biofilters: beyond functional stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Léa; Malhautier, Luc; Poly, Franck; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The spatial and temporal dynamics of microbial community structure and function were surveyed in duplicated woodchip-biofilters operated under constant conditions for 231 days. The contaminated gaseous stream for treatment was representative of composting emissions, included ammonia, dimethyl disulfide and a mixture of five oxygenated volatile organic compounds. The community structure and diversity were investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis on 16S rRNA gene fragments. During the first 42 days, microbial acclimatization revealed the influence of operating conditions and contaminant loading on the biofiltration community structure and diversity, as well as the limited impact of inoculum compared to the greater persistence of the endogenous woodchip community. During long-term operation, a high and stable removal efficiency was maintained despite a highly dynamic microbial community, suggesting the probable functional redundancy of the community. Most of the contaminant removal occurred in the first compartment, near the gas inlet, where the microbial diversity was the highest. The stratification of the microbial structures along the filter bed was statistically correlated to the longitudinal distribution of environmental conditions (selective pressure imposed by contaminant concentrations) and function (contaminant elimination capacity), highlighting the central role of the bacterial community. The reproducibility of microbial succession in replicates suggests that the community changes were presumably driven by a deterministic process.

  16. Genomics reveals historic and contemporary transmission dynamics of a bacterial disease among wildlife and livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pauline L.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Drees, Kevin P.; Luikart, Gordon; Quance, Christine; Anderson, Neil J.; Clarke, P. Ryan; Cole, Eric K.; Drew, Mark L.; Edwards, William H.; Rhyan, Jack C.; Treanor, John J.; Wallen, Rick L.; White, Patrick J.; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Cross, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing has provided fundamental insights into infectious disease epidemiology, but has rarely been used for examining transmission dynamics of a bacterial pathogen in wildlife. In the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), outbreaks of brucellosis have increased in cattle along with rising seroprevalence in elk. Here we use a genomic approach to examine Brucella abortus evolution, cross-species transmission and spatial spread in the GYE. We find that brucellosis was introduced into wildlife in this region at least five times. The diffusion rate varies among Brucella lineages (B3 to 8 km per year) and over time. We also estimate 12 host transitions from bison to elk, and 5 from elk to bison. Our results support the notion that free-ranging elk are currently a self-sustaining brucellosis reservoir and the source of livestock infections, and that control measures in bison are unlikely to affect the dynamics of unrelated strains circulating in nearby elk populations.

  17. Bacterial population in traditional sourdough evaluated by molecular methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randazzo, C.L.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Restuccia, C.; Giudici, P.; Caggia, C.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To study the microbial communities in artisanal sourdoughs, manufactured by traditional procedure in different areas of Sicily, and to evaluate the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) population by classical and culture-independent approaches. Methods and Results: Forty-five LAB isolates were identifie

  18. Noise-induced effects in population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Bernardo; Cirone, Markus; La Barbera, Antonino; de Pasquale, Ferdinando

    2002-03-01

    We investigate the role of noise in the nonlinear relaxation of two ecosystems described by generalized Lotka-Volterra equations in the presence of multiplicative noise. Specifically we study two cases: (i) an ecosystem with two interacting species in the presence of periodic driving; (ii) an ecosystem with a great number of interacting species with random interaction matrix. We analyse the interplay between noise and periodic modulation for case (i) and the role of the noise in the transient dynamics of the ecosystem in the presence of an absorbing barrier in case (ii). We find that the presence of noise is responsible for the generation of temporal oscillations and for the appearance of spatial patterns in the first case. In the other case we obtain the asymptotic behaviour of the time average of the ith population and discuss the effect of the noise on the probability distributions of the population and of the local field.

  19. NONLOCAL CROWD DYNAMICS MODELS FOR SEVERAL POPULATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rinaldo M. Colombo; Magali Lécureux-Mercier

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops the basic analytical theory related to some recently introduced crowd dynamics models.Where well posedness was known only locally in time,it is here extended to all of R+.The results on the stability with respect to the equations are improved.Moreover,here the case of several populations is considered,obtaining the well posedness of systems of multi-D non-local conservation laws.The basic analytical tools are provided by the classical Kru(z)kov theory of scalar conservation laws in several space dimensions.

  20. Nonlocal Crowd Dynamics Models for several Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Rinaldo M

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops the basic analytical theory related to some recently introduced crowd dynamics models. Where well posedness was known only locally in time, it is here extended to all of $\\reali^+$. The results on the stability with respect to the equations are improved. Moreover, here the case of several populations is considered, obtaining the well posedness of systems of multi-D non-local conservation laws. The basic analytical tools are provided by the classical Kruzkov theory of scalar conservation laws in several space dimensions.

  1. [Population dynamics and development in the Caribbean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, B

    1995-12-01

    The impact is examined of socioeconomic factors on Caribbean population dynamics. This work begins by describing the socioeconomic context of the late 1980s and early 1990s, under the influence of the economic changes and crises of the 1980s. The small size, openness, dependency, and lack of diversification of the Caribbean economies have made them vulnerable to external pressures. The Bahamas and Belize had economic growth rates exceeding 5% annually during 1981-90, but most of the countries had low or negative growth. Unemployment, poverty, the structural adjustment measures adopted in the mid-1980s, and declines in social spending exacerbated general economic conditions. In broad terms, the population situation of the Caribbean is marked by diversity of sizes and growth rates. A few countries oriented toward services and tourism had demographic growth rates exceeding 3%, while at least 7 had almost no growth or negative growth. Population growth rates reflected different combinations of natural increase and migration. Crude death rates ranged from around 5/1000 to 11/1000, except in Haiti, and all countries of the region except Haiti had life expectancies of 70 years or higher. Despite fertility decline, the average crude birth rate was still relatively high at 26/1000, and the rate of natural increase was 1.8% annually for the region. Nearly half of the regional population was under 15 or over 65 years old. The body of this work provides greater detail on mortality patterns, variations by sex, infant mortality, causes of death, and implications for policy. The discussion of fertility includes general patterns and trends, age specific fertility rates, contraceptive prevalence, levels of adolescent fertility and age factors in adolescent sexual behavior, characteristics of adolescent unions, contraceptive usage, health and social consequences of adolescent childbearing, and the search for solutions. The final section describes the magnitude and causes of

  2. The diversity of a distributed genome in bacterial populations

    CERN Document Server

    Baumdicker, F; Pfaffelhuber, P

    2009-01-01

    The distributed genome hypothesis states that the set of genes in a population of bacteria is distributed over all individuals that belong to the specific taxon. It implies that certain genes can be gained and lost from generation to generation. We use the random genealogy given by a Kingman coalescent in order to superimpose events of gene gain and loss along ancestral lines. Gene gains occur at constant rate along ancestral lines. We assume that gained genes have never been present in the population before. Gene losses occur at a rate proportional to the number of genes present along the ancestral line. In this "infinitely many genes model" we derive moments for several statistics within a sample: the average number of genes per individual, the average number of genes differing between individuals, the number of incongruent pairs of genes, the total number of different genes in the sample and the gene frequency spectrum. We demonstrate that the model gives a reasonable fit with gene frequency data from mari...

  3. Model Studies of the Dynamics of Bacterial Flagellar Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, F; Lo, C; Berry, R; Xing, J

    2009-03-19

    The Bacterial Flagellar Motor is a rotary molecular machine that rotates the helical filaments which propel swimming bacteria. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies exist on the structure, assembly, energy input, power generation and switching mechanism of the motor. In our previous paper, we explained the general physics underneath the observed torque-speed curves with a simple two-state Fokker-Planck model. Here we further analyze this model. In this paper we show (1) the model predicts that the two components of the ion motive force can affect the motor dynamics differently, in agreement with the latest experiment by Lo et al.; (2) with explicit consideration of the stator spring, the model also explains the lack of dependence of the zero-load speed on stator number in the proton motor, recently observed by Yuan and Berg; (3) the model reproduces the stepping behavior of the motor even with the existence of the stator springs and predicts the dwelling time distribution. Predicted stepping behavior of motors with two stators is discussed, and we suggest future experimental verification.

  4. Influence of copper on Euplotes sp. and associated bacterial population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Oliveira Andrade da Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of copper on the ciliate Euplotes sp. and associated bacteria isolated from sediment samples of Guanabara Bay were investigated in bioassays. This region is highly affected by heavy metals such as copper, from solid waste constantly dumped in the bay and other sources such as industrial effluents, antifouling paints, atmospheric deposition and urban drainage, and even today there are few data on the metal toxicity to the ecosystem of the Bay of Guanabara. Bioassays were conducted to estimate the LC50-24 h of copper, in order to determine the concentration of metal bearing 50% of the population mortality. The results indicated that the concentrations of 0.05 and 0.009 mg L-1 presented no toxicity to Euplotes sp. The associated bacteria are tolerant to copper concentrations used in bioassays, and suggest that they could be used as a potential agent in the bioremediation of areas affected by copper.

  5. Bacterial dynamics in intestines of the black tiger shrimp and the Pacific white shrimp during Vibrio harveyi exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungrassamee, Wanilada; Klanchui, Amornpan; Maibunkaew, Sawarot; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota play important roles in health of their host, contributing to maintaining the balance and resilience against pathogen. To investigate effects of pathogen to intestinal microbiota, the bacterial dynamics upon a shrimp pathogen, Vibrio harveyi, exposures were determined in two economically important shrimp species; the black tiger shrimp (BT) and the Pacific white shrimp (PW). Both shrimp species were reared under the same diet and environmental conditions. Shrimp survival rates after the V. harveyi exposure revealed that the PW shrimp had a higher resistance to the pathogen than the BT shrimp. The intestinal bacterial profiles were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and barcoded pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA sequences under no pathogen challenge control and under pathogenic V. harveyi challenge. The DGGE profiles showed that the presence of V. harveyi altered the intestinal bacterial patterns in comparison to the control in BT and PW intestines. This implies that bacterial balance in shrimp intestines was disrupted in the presence of V. harveyi. The barcoded pyrosequencing analysis showed the similar bacterial community structures in intestines of BT and PW shrimp under a normal condition. However, during the time course exposure to V. harveyi, the relative abundance of bacteria belong to Vibrio genus was higher in the BT intestines at 12h after the exposure, whereas relative abundance of vibrios was more stable in PW intestines. The principle coordinates analysis based on weighted-UniFrac analysis showed that intestinal bacterial population in the BT shrimp lost their ability to restore their bacterial balance during the 72-h period of exposure to the pathogen, while the PW shrimp were able to reestablish their bacterial population to resemble those seen in the unexposed control group. This observation of bacterial disruption might correlate to different mortality rates observed between the two shrimp species

  6. 冰核细菌在山东茶树上的分布规律及消长动态研究%Distribution and Dynamic Changes of Ice Nucleation Active Bacterial Population Inhabiting on Tea Plant in Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓琴; 束怀瑞; 张丽霞; 单秋娟; 陈宗懋

    2009-01-01

    对山东茶树上冰核细菌的种类和分布规律及消长动态进行了研究,结果表明:在山东茶树上可分离得到泛菌属两个种的冰核细菌,分别为菠萝泛菌(Pantoea ananatis)、成团泛菌(Pantoea agglomerans).分离到的22株冰核细菌中,冰核活性最强的是8号和11号.茶树上不同部位存在的冰核细菌的密度和频率不同,初展叶(芽)上分离得到的冰核细菌的密度最高,也较易分离得到,其次为嫩叶和老叶;茶树品种和不同的茶树栽培区域同样也会影响冰核细菌的分布,如在青岛地区分离的冰核细菌的密度大于泰安地区,不同品种上存在冰核细菌的密度也不同.此外,在雨水较多、湿度较大的季节茶树上冰核细菌的密度较高,而在干燥寒冷的时候则较难分离得到冰核细菌.%The species,distribution and the dynamic changes of Ice Nucleation-Active (INA) bacteria in tea garden of Shandong province were investigated by the authors.Results showed that there are two species of INA bacteria (Pantoea ananatis and Pantoea agglomerans) existed on tea plant of Shandong province.Among the isolated 22 strains of INA bacteria,No.8 and No.11 have the strongest ice nucleation activity.Different frequency and density of INA bacteria were showed in the different parts of tea plant.The density of the INA bacteria was highest on the tea bud,then the tender leaf and the old leaf successively.The different cultivars and different distributive location of tea plant will also influence the distribution of INA bacteria.Investigation showed that the density of INA bacteria isolated from the Qingdao region is higher than that in Tai-an region.Besides,it is easier to isolate the INA bacteria in the spring and autumn season with more rain and higher humidity than that in cold and dry winter season.

  7. Humpback whale populations share a core skin bacterial community: towards a health index for marine mammals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Apprill

    Full Text Available Microbes are now well regarded for their important role in mammalian health. The microbiology of skin--a unique interface between the host and environment--is a major research focus in human health and skin disorders, but is less explored in other mammals. Here, we report on a cross-population study of the skin-associated bacterial community of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae, and examine the potential for a core bacterial community and its variability with host (endogenous or geographic/environmental (exogenous specific factors. Skin biopsies or freshly sloughed skin from 56 individuals were sampled from populations in the North Atlantic, North Pacific and South Pacific oceans and bacteria were characterized using 454 pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA genes. Phylogenetic and statistical analyses revealed the ubiquity and abundance of bacteria belonging to the Flavobacteria genus Tenacibaculum and the Gammaproteobacteria genus Psychrobacter across the whale populations. Scanning electron microscopy of skin indicated that microbial cells colonize the skin surface. Despite the ubiquity of Tenacibaculum and Psychrobater spp., the relative composition of the skin-bacterial community differed significantly by geographic area as well as metabolic state of the animals (feeding versus starving during migration and breeding, suggesting that both exogenous and endogenous factors may play a role in influencing the skin-bacteria. Further, characteristics of the skin bacterial community from these free-swimming individuals were assembled and compared to two entangled and three dead individuals, revealing a decrease in the central or core bacterial community members (Tenacibaculum and Psychrobater spp., as well as the emergence of potential pathogens in the latter cases. This is the first discovery of a cross-population, shared skin bacterial community. This research suggests that the skin bacteria may be connected to humpback health and immunity and could

  8. Bacterial populations and processes involved in acetate and propionate consumption in anoxic brackish sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, H.T.S.; De Graaf, W.; Köster, M.; Meyer-Reil, L.A.; Cappenberg, T.E.

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial populations and pathways involved in acetate and propionate consumption were studied in anoxic brackish sediment from the Grosser Jasmunder Bodden, German Baltic Sea. Uptake of acetate and propionate from the porewater was studied using stable carbon isotope-labeled compounds. Labeled acet

  9. Effect of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zylenicum) supplementation on the intestinal selected bacterial population in Japanese quail

    OpenAIRE

    A. Baraa Mohamed,; F. A. Huseen; O. T. Jawad

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of adding graded levels (0, 1.0 and 1.5%) of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zylenicum) in the basal diet on the intestinal bacterial population of the Japanese quail. Sixty Japanese quail were randomly distributed into 3 groups. Each treatment contained four replicates (5 birds/replicate). The results showed significant (P

  10. Population Density Modulates Drug Inhibition and Gives Rise to Potential Bistability of Treatment Outcomes for Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltas, Jeff; Brumm, Peter; Wood, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    The inoculum effect (IE) is an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antibiotic as a function of the initial size of a microbial population. The IE has been observed in a wide range of bacteria, implying that antibiotic efficacy may depend on population density. Such density dependence could have dramatic effects on bacterial population dynamics and potential treatment strategies, but explicit measures of per capita growth as a function of density are generally not available. Instead, the IE measures MIC as a function of initial population size, and population density changes by many orders of magnitude on the timescale of the experiment. Therefore, the functional relationship between population density and antibiotic inhibition is generally not known, leaving many questions about the impact of the IE on different treatment strategies unanswered. To address these questions, here we directly measured real-time per capita growth of Enterococcus faecalis populations exposed to antibiotic at fixed population densities using multiplexed computer-automated culture devices. We show that density-dependent growth inhibition is pervasive for commonly used antibiotics, with some drugs showing increased inhibition and others decreased inhibition at high densities. For several drugs, the density dependence is mediated by changes in extracellular pH, a community-level phenomenon not previously linked with the IE. Using a simple mathematical model, we demonstrate how this density dependence can modulate population dynamics in constant drug environments. Then, we illustrate how time-dependent dosing strategies can mitigate the negative effects of density-dependence. Finally, we show that these density effects lead to bistable treatment outcomes for a wide range of antibiotic concentrations in a pharmacological model of antibiotic treatment. As a result, infections exceeding a critical density often survive otherwise effective treatments. PMID:27764095

  11. Dynamic properties of bacterial pili measured by optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallman, Erik G.; Andersson, Magnus J.; Schedin, Staffan S.; Jass, Jana; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2004-10-01

    The ability of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to cause urinary tract infections is dependent on their ability to colonize the uroepithelium. Infecting bacteria ascend the urethra to the bladder and then kidneys by attaching to the uroepithelial cells via the differential expression of adhesins. P pili are associated with pyelonephritis, the more severe infection of the kidneys. In order to find means to treat pyelonephritis, it is therefore of interest to investigate the properties P pili. The mechanical behavior of individual P pili of uropathogenic Escherichia coli has recently been investigated using optical tweezers. P pili, whose main part constitutes the PapA rod, composed of ~1000 PapA subunits in a helical arrangement, are distributed over the bacterial surface and mediate adhesion to host cells. We have earlier studied P pili regarding its stretching/elongation properties where we have found and characterized three different elongation regions, of which one constitute an unfolding of the quaternary (helical) structure of the PapA rod. It was shown that this unfolding takes place at an elongation independent force of 27 +/- 2 pN. We have also recently performed studies on its folding properties and shown that the unfolding/folding of the PapA rod is completely reversible. Here we present a study of the dynamical properties of the PapA rod. We show, among other things, that the unfolding force increases and that the folding force decreases with the speed of unfolding and folding respectively. Moreover, the PapA rod can be folded-unfolded a significant number of times without loosing its characteristics, a phenomenon that is believed to be important for the bacterium to keep close contact to the host tissue and consequently helps the bacterium to colonize the host tissue.

  12. Novel, deep-branching heterotrophic bacterial populations recovered from thermal spring metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Colman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal spring ecosystems are a valuable resource for the discovery of novel hyperthermophilic Bacteria and Archaea, and harbor deeply-branching lineages that provide insight regarding the nature of early microbial life. We characterized bacterial populations in two circumneutral (pH ~ 8 Yellowstone National Park thermal (T ~ 80 oC spring filamentous ‘streamer’ communities using random metagenomic DNA sequence to investigate the metabolic potential of these novel populations. Four de novo assemblies representing three abundant, deeply-branching bacterial phylotypes were recovered. Analysis of conserved phylogenetic marker genes indicated that two of the phylotypes represent separate groups of an uncharacterized phylum (for which we propose the candidate phylum name ‘Pyropristinus’. The third new phylotype falls within the proposed Calescamantes phylum. Metabolic reconstructions of the 'Pyropristinus' and Calescamantes populations showed that these organisms appear to be chemoorganoheterotrophs, and have the genomic potential for aerobic respiration and oxidative phosphorylation via archaeal-like V-type, and bacterial F-type ATPases, respectively. A survey of similar phylotypes (> 97% nt identity within 16S rRNA gene datasets suggest that the newly described organisms are restricted to terrestrial thermal springs ranging from 70 - 90 oC and pH values of ~ 7 - 9. The characterization of these lineages is important for understanding the diversity of deeply-branching bacterial phyla, and their functional role in high-temperature circumneutral ‘streamer’ communities.

  13. Positive epistasis between co-infecting plasmids promotes plasmid survival in bacterial populations

    OpenAIRE

    San Millan, Alvaro; Heilbron, Karl; MacLean, R. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Plasmids have a key role in the horizontal transfer of genes among bacteria. Although plasmids are catalysts for bacterial evolution, it is challenging to understand how they can persist in bacterial populations over the long term because of the burden they impose on their hosts (the ‘plasmid paradox'). This paradox is especially perplexing in the case of ‘small' plasmids, which are unable to self-transfer by conjugation. Here, for the first time, we investigate how interactions between co-in...

  14. Source-sink plasmid transfer dynamics maintain gene mobility in soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James P J; Wood, A Jamie; Harrison, Ellie; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2016-07-19

    Horizontal gene transfer is a fundamental process in bacterial evolution that can accelerate adaptation via the sharing of genes between lineages. Conjugative plasmids are the principal genetic elements mediating the horizontal transfer of genes, both within and between bacterial species. In some species, plasmids are unstable and likely to be lost through purifying selection, but when alternative hosts are available, interspecific plasmid transfer could counteract this and maintain access to plasmid-borne genes. To investigate the evolutionary importance of alternative hosts to plasmid population dynamics in an ecologically relevant environment, we established simple soil microcosm communities comprising two species of common soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and a mercury resistance (Hg(R)) plasmid, pQBR57, both with and without positive selection [i.e., addition of Hg(II)]. In single-species populations, plasmid stability varied between species: although pQBR57 survived both with and without positive selection in P. fluorescens, it was lost or replaced by nontransferable Hg(R) captured to the chromosome in P. putida A simple mathematical model suggests these differences were likely due to pQBR57's lower intraspecific conjugation rate in P. putida By contrast, in two-species communities, both models and experiments show that interspecific conjugation from P. fluorescens allowed pQBR57 to persist in P. putida via source-sink transfer dynamics. Moreover, the replacement of pQBR57 by nontransferable chromosomal Hg(R) in P. putida was slowed in coculture. Interspecific transfer allows plasmid survival in host species unable to sustain the plasmid in monoculture, promoting community-wide access to the plasmid-borne accessory gene pool and thus potentiating future evolvability. PMID:27385827

  15. Source–sink plasmid transfer dynamics maintain gene mobility in soil bacterial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A. Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is a fundamental process in bacterial evolution that can accelerate adaptation via the sharing of genes between lineages. Conjugative plasmids are the principal genetic elements mediating the horizontal transfer of genes, both within and between bacterial species. In some species, plasmids are unstable and likely to be lost through purifying selection, but when alternative hosts are available, interspecific plasmid transfer could counteract this and maintain access to plasmid-borne genes. To investigate the evolutionary importance of alternative hosts to plasmid population dynamics in an ecologically relevant environment, we established simple soil microcosm communities comprising two species of common soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and a mercury resistance (HgR) plasmid, pQBR57, both with and without positive selection [i.e., addition of Hg(II)]. In single-species populations, plasmid stability varied between species: although pQBR57 survived both with and without positive selection in P. fluorescens, it was lost or replaced by nontransferable HgR captured to the chromosome in P. putida. A simple mathematical model suggests these differences were likely due to pQBR57’s lower intraspecific conjugation rate in P. putida. By contrast, in two-species communities, both models and experiments show that interspecific conjugation from P. fluorescens allowed pQBR57 to persist in P. putida via source–sink transfer dynamics. Moreover, the replacement of pQBR57 by nontransferable chromosomal HgR in P. putida was slowed in coculture. Interspecific transfer allows plasmid survival in host species unable to sustain the plasmid in monoculture, promoting community-wide access to the plasmid-borne accessory gene pool and thus potentiating future evolvability. PMID:27385827

  16. Proton dynamics in bacterial spores, a neutron scattering investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noue Alexandre Colas de la

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results from first neutron scattering experiments on bacterial spores are reported. The elastic intensities and mean square displacements have a non-linear behaviour as function of temperature, which is in agreement with a model presenting more pronounced variations at around 330 K (57 ∘C and 400 K (127 ∘C. Based on the available literature on thermal properties of bacterial spores, mainly referring to differential scanning calorimetry, they are suggested to be associated to main endothermic transitions induced by coat and/or core bacterial response to heat treatment.

  17. Particle-associated bacterial dynamics in a tropical tidal plain (Zuari estuary, India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    The dynamics of particle-associated bacteria (PAB) in a tropical estuary, Zuari, in Goa on the west coast of India, was studied for a year from September 1997 to October 1998. Bacterial abundance, productivity and enzymatic activities were measured...

  18. Dynamics of seawater bacterial communities in a shellfish hatchery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, S M; Chapman, C C; Bermudes, M; Tamplin, M L

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial disease is a significant issue for larviculture of several species of shellfish, including oysters. One source of bacteria is the seawater used throughout the hatchery. In this study carried out at a commercial oyster hatchery in Tasmania, Australia, the diversity of the bacterial community and its relationship with larval production outcomes were studied over a 2-year period using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and tag-encoded pyrosequencing. The bacterial communities were very diverse, dominated by the Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria and Cyanobacteria. The communities were highly variable on scales of days, weeks and seasons. The difference between the intake seawater and treated clean seawater used in the hatchery was smaller than the observed temporal differences in the seawater throughout the year. No clear correlation was observed between production outcomes and the overall bacterial community structure. However, one group of Cyanobacterial sequences was more abundant when mass mortality events occurred than when healthy spat were produced although they were always present.

  19. Population dynamic theory of size-dependent cannibalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Claessen; A.M. de Roos; L. Persson

    2004-01-01

    Cannibalism is characterized by four aspects: killing victims, gaining energy from victims, size-dependent interactions and intraspecific competition. In this review of mathematical models of cannibalistic populations, we relate the predicted population dynamic consequences of cannibalism to its fou

  20. Evaluation of a routine antiseptic and two disinfectants for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Javdani,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A routine antiseptic and two disinfectant agents were used separately for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof: 1 7.5% povidone–iodine scrub mixed with 10% povidone–iodine solution, 2 10% copper sulfate, and 3 8% formaldehyde. Swabbing for microbial colony counts were used to evaluate pre and post–scrub of hooves of eight cows. The results revealed no significant differences in reduction of bacterial colony count between post–scrubs of povidone–iodine and formaldehyde. Bacterial colony counts after the povidone–iodine scrub solution and formaldehyde scrub were significantly different from those obtained after the copper sulfate scrub. Significant reduction in number of microbial colony in post–scrub by povidone–iodine, formaldehyde, and copper sulfate were observed which were different from the control (warm tap water.

  1. Genome-wide selective sweeps and gene-specific sweeps in natural bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendall, Matthew L; Stevens, Sarah Lr; Chan, Leong-Keat; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Froula, Jeff; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary A; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J; McMahon, Katherine D; Malmstrom, Rex R

    2016-07-01

    Multiple models describe the formation and evolution of distinct microbial phylogenetic groups. These evolutionary models make different predictions regarding how adaptive alleles spread through populations and how genetic diversity is maintained. Processes predicted by competing evolutionary models, for example, genome-wide selective sweeps vs gene-specific sweeps, could be captured in natural populations using time-series metagenomics if the approach were applied over a sufficiently long time frame. Direct observations of either process would help resolve how distinct microbial groups evolve. Here, from a 9-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake (2005-2013), we explore changes in single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in 30 bacterial populations. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied by >1000-fold among populations. SNP allele frequencies also changed dramatically over time within some populations. Interestingly, nearly all SNP variants were slowly purged over several years from one population of green sulfur bacteria, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were lost from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep in progress, a process predicted by the 'ecotype model' of speciation but not previously observed in nature. In contrast, other populations contained large, SNP-free genomic regions that appear to have swept independently through the populations prior to the study without purging diversity elsewhere in the genome. Evidence for both genome-wide and gene-specific sweeps suggests that different models of bacterial speciation may apply to different populations coexisting in the same environment. PMID:26744812

  2. Population dynamics in biological treatment process. ; Population dynamics of bacteria for biological phosphorus removal. Population dynamics to kankyo joka. ; Datsurin kin gun no population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, M. (Hiroshima Univ., Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1992-09-10

    The microbial industry can easily cultivate only the specific microorganism by introducing the closed reaction system and the sterile operation. When the superior bacteria is selected or it is created by the gene manipulation, therefore, it is not so much difficult that it is utilized for production. Since the water treatment is an open reaction system many microorganisms can join, however, it becomes to be important that how the necessary microorganisms, for example, the dephosphorylation bacteria etc. out of them are let fixed in the reaction system, and win in a competition with the other microorganisms, and in addition, are let display their functions stably for a long period. In this regard, in this paper, concerning to the issues that whether the dephosphorylation bacteria exists or not, how the behavior of dephosphorylation bacteria in the activated sludge should be clarified, what kind of behavior the dephosphorylation bacteria shows in the dephosphorylation activated sludge and so forth, grasping the population dynamics of microorganism, and furthermore, including the methodology to control it, is outlined. 31 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Bacterial populations and adaptations in the mucus layers on living corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducklow, H.W.; Mitchell, R.

    1979-07-01

    The external mucus layers of the stony coral Porites astreoides and the soft corals Palythoa sp. and Heteroxenia fuscesens are inhabited by communities of marine heterotrophic bacteria. Population levels of bacteria in coral mucus may be regulated by the self-cleaning behavior of the host. Bacterial populations in coral mucus respond to stresses applied to the host coral by growing to higher population levels in the mucus, indicating that these are populations of viable organisms closely attuned to host metabolism. Members of these microbial populations utilize the mucus compounds and may play a role in processing coral mucus for reef detritus feeders. One such species, Vibrio alginolyticus, grows rapidly on Heteroxenia mucus, is attracted to dissolved mucus, and possesses a mechanism to maintain itself on the coral surface.

  4. Phase resetting reveals network dynamics underlying a bacterial cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihan Lin

    Full Text Available Genomic and proteomic methods yield networks of biological regulatory interactions but do not provide direct insight into how those interactions are organized into functional modules, or how information flows from one module to another. In this work we introduce an approach that provides this complementary information and apply it to the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, a paradigm for cell-cycle control. Operationally, we use an inducible promoter to express the essential transcriptional regulatory gene ctrA in a periodic, pulsed fashion. This chemical perturbation causes the population of cells to divide synchronously, and we use the resulting advance or delay of the division times of single cells to construct a phase resetting curve. We find that delay is strongly favored over advance. This finding is surprising since it does not follow from the temporal expression profile of CtrA and, in turn, simulations of existing network models. We propose a phenomenological model that suggests that the cell-cycle network comprises two distinct functional modules that oscillate autonomously and couple in a highly asymmetric fashion. These features collectively provide a new mechanism for tight temporal control of the cell cycle in C. crescentus. We discuss how the procedure can serve as the basis for a general approach for probing network dynamics, which we term chemical perturbation spectroscopy (CPS.

  5. The population structure of antibiotic-producing bacterial symbionts of Apterostigma dentigerum ants: impacts of coevolution and multipartite symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldera, Eric J; Currie, Cameron R

    2012-11-01

    Fungus-growing ants (Attini) are part of a complex symbiosis with Basidiomycetous fungi, which the ants cultivate for food, Ascomycetous fungal pathogens (Escovopsis), which parasitize cultivars, and Actinobacteria, which produce antibiotic compounds that suppress pathogen growth. Earlier studies that have characterized the association between attine ants and their bacterial symbionts have employed broad phylogenetic approaches, with conclusions ranging from a diffuse coevolved mutualism to no specificity being reported. However, the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution proposes that coevolved interactions likely occur at a level above local populations but within species. Moreover, the scale of population subdivision is likely to impact coevolutionary dynamics. Here, we describe the population structure of bacteria associated with the attine Apterostigma dentigerum across Central America using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of six housekeeping genes. The majority (90%) of bacteria that were isolated grouped into a single clade within the genus Pseudonocardia. In contrast to studies that have suggested that Pseudonocardia dispersal is high and therefore unconstrained by ant associations, we found highly structured ([Formula: see text]) and dispersal-limited (i.e., significant isolation by distance; [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]) populations over even a relatively small scale (e.g., within the Panama Canal Zone). Estimates of recombination versus mutation were uncharacteristically low compared with estimates for free-living Actinobacteria (e.g., [Formula: see text] in La Selva, Costa Rica), which suggests that recombination is constrained by association with ant hosts. Furthermore, Pseudonocardia population structure was correlated with that of Escovopsis species ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]), supporting the bacteria's role in disease suppression. Overall, the population dynamics of symbiotic Pseudonocardia are more consistent with a

  6. Supplemental dietary inulin of variable chain lengths alters intestinal bacterial populations in young pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Jannine K; Yasuda, Koji; Welch, Ross M; Miller, Dennis D; Lei, Xin Gen

    2010-12-01

    Previously, we showed that supplementation of diets with short-chain inulin (P95), long-chain inulin (HP), and a 50:50 mixture of both (Synergy 1) improved body iron status and altered expression of the genes involved in iron homeostasis and inflammation in young pigs. However, the effects of these 3 types of inulin on intestinal bacteria remain unknown. Applying terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, we determined the abundances of luminal and adherent bacterial populations from 6 segments of the small and large intestines of pigs (n = 4 for each group) fed an iron-deficient basal diet (BD) or the BD supplemented with 4% of P95, Synergy 1, or HP for 5 wk. Compared with BD, all 3 types of inulin enhanced (P inulin on bacterial populations in the lumen contents were found. Meanwhile, all 3 types of inulin suppressed the less desirable bacteria Clostridium spp. and members of the Enterobacteriaceae in the lumen and mucosa of various gut segments. Our findings suggest that the ability of dietary inulin to alter intestinal bacterial populations may partially account for its iron bioavailability-promoting effect and possibly other health benefits.

  7. A novel approach for estimating growth phases and parameters of bacterial population in batch culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Using mathematical analysis, a new method has been developed for studying the growth kinetics of bacterial populations in batch culture. First, sampling data were smoothed with the spline interpolation method. Second, the instantaneous rates were derived by numerical differential techniques and finally, the derived data were fitted with the Gaussian function to obtain growth parameters. We named this the Spline-Numerical-Gaussian or SNG method. This method yielded more accurate estimates of the growth rates of bacterial populations and new parameters. It was possible to divide the growth curve into four different but continuous phases based on changes in the instantaneous rates. The four phases are the accelerating growth phase, the constant growth phase, the decelerating growth phase and the declining phase. Total DNA content was measured by flow cytometry and varied depending on the growth phase. The SNG system provides a very powerful tool for describing the kinetics of bacterial population growth. The SNG method avoids the unrealistic assumptions generally used in the traditional growth equations.

  8. A shift from exploitation to interference competition with increasing density affects population and community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdridge, Erica M; Cuellar-Gempeler, Catalina; terHorst, Casey P

    2016-08-01

    Intraspecific competition influences population and community dynamics and occurs via two mechanisms. Exploitative competition is an indirect effect that occurs through use of a shared resource and depends on resource availability. Interference competition occurs by obstructing access to a resource and may not depend on resource availability. Our study tested whether the strength of interference competition changes with protozoa population density. We grew experimental microcosms of protozoa and bacteria under different combinations of protozoan density and basal resource availability. We then solved a dynamic predator-prey model for parameters of the functional response using population growth rates measured in our experiment. As population density increased, competition shifted from exploitation to interference, and competition was less dependent on resource levels. Surprisingly, the effect of resources was weakest when competition was the most intense. We found that at low population densities, competition was largely exploitative and resource availability had a large effect on population growth rates, but the effect of resources was much weaker at high densities. This shift in competitive mechanism could have implications for interspecific competition, trophic interactions, community diversity, and natural selection. We also tested whether this shift in the mechanism of competition with protozoa density affected the structure of the bacterial prey community. We found that both resources and protozoa density affected the structure of the bacterial prey community, suggesting that competitive mechanism may also affect trophic interactions.

  9. A shift from exploitation to interference competition with increasing density affects population and community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdridge, Erica M; Cuellar-Gempeler, Catalina; terHorst, Casey P

    2016-08-01

    Intraspecific competition influences population and community dynamics and occurs via two mechanisms. Exploitative competition is an indirect effect that occurs through use of a shared resource and depends on resource availability. Interference competition occurs by obstructing access to a resource and may not depend on resource availability. Our study tested whether the strength of interference competition changes with protozoa population density. We grew experimental microcosms of protozoa and bacteria under different combinations of protozoan density and basal resource availability. We then solved a dynamic predator-prey model for parameters of the functional response using population growth rates measured in our experiment. As population density increased, competition shifted from exploitation to interference, and competition was less dependent on resource levels. Surprisingly, the effect of resources was weakest when competition was the most intense. We found that at low population densities, competition was largely exploitative and resource availability had a large effect on population growth rates, but the effect of resources was much weaker at high densities. This shift in competitive mechanism could have implications for interspecific competition, trophic interactions, community diversity, and natural selection. We also tested whether this shift in the mechanism of competition with protozoa density affected the structure of the bacterial prey community. We found that both resources and protozoa density affected the structure of the bacterial prey community, suggesting that competitive mechanism may also affect trophic interactions. PMID:27551386

  10. Local extinction synchronizes population dynamics in spatial networks

    OpenAIRE

    Matter, Stephen F.; Roland, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Spatial population theory predicts that synchrony in the dynamics of local populations should decrease as dispersal among populations decreases. Thus, it would be expected that the extinction of local populations and the attendant loss of immigrants to surrounding populations would reduce synchrony. We tested this hypothesis through a large-scale experiment, simulation of the experimental system and general models. Experimental removal of two adjacent subpopulations of the Rocky Mountain Apol...

  11. Gene Expression Variability Underlies Adaptive Resistance in Phenotypically Heterogeneous Bacterial Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Keesha E; Otoupal, Peter B; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-11-13

    The root cause of the antibiotic resistance crisis is the ability of bacteria to evolve resistance to a multitude of antibiotics and other environmental toxins. The regulation of adaptation is difficult to pinpoint due to extensive phenotypic heterogeneity arising during evolution. Here, we investigate the mechanisms underlying general bacterial adaptation by evolving wild-type Escherichia coli populations to dissimilar chemical toxins. We demonstrate the presence of extensive inter- and intrapopulation phenotypic heterogeneity across adapted populations in multiple traits, including minimum inhibitory concentration, growth rate, and lag time. To search for a common response across the heterogeneous adapted populations, we measured gene expression in three stress-response networks: the mar regulon, the general stress response, and the SOS response. While few genes were differentially expressed, clustering revealed that interpopulation gene expression variability in adapted populations was distinct from that of unadapted populations. Notably, we observed both increases and decreases in gene expression variability upon adaptation. Sequencing select genes revealed that the observed gene expression trends are not necessarily attributable to genetic changes. To further explore the connection between gene expression variability and adaptation, we propagated single-gene knockout and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) interference strains and quantified impact on adaptation to antibiotics. We identified significant correlations that suggest genes with low expression variability have greater impact on adaptation. This study provides evidence that gene expression variability can be used as an indicator of bacterial adaptive resistance, even in the face of the pervasive phenotypic heterogeneity underlying adaptation. PMID:27623410

  12. Evolutionary dynamics with fluctuating population sizes and strong mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2015-08-01

    Game theory ideas provide a useful framework for studying evolutionary dynamics in a well-mixed environment. This approach, however, typically enforces a strictly fixed overall population size, deemphasizing natural growth processes. We study a competitive Lotka-Volterra model, with number fluctuations, that accounts for natural population growth and encompasses interaction scenarios typical of evolutionary games. We show that, in an appropriate limit, the model describes standard evolutionary games with both genetic drift and overall population size fluctuations. However, there are also regimes where a varying population size can strongly influence the evolutionary dynamics. We focus on the strong mutualism scenario and demonstrate that standard evolutionary game theory fails to describe our simulation results. We then analytically and numerically determine fixation probabilities as well as mean fixation times using matched asymptotic expansions, taking into account the population size degree of freedom. These results elucidate the interplay between population dynamics and evolutionary dynamics in well-mixed systems.

  13. Evolutionary dynamics with fluctuating population sizes and strong mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R

    2015-08-01

    Game theory ideas provide a useful framework for studying evolutionary dynamics in a well-mixed environment. This approach, however, typically enforces a strictly fixed overall population size, deemphasizing natural growth processes. We study a competitive Lotka-Volterra model, with number fluctuations, that accounts for natural population growth and encompasses interaction scenarios typical of evolutionary games. We show that, in an appropriate limit, the model describes standard evolutionary games with both genetic drift and overall population size fluctuations. However, there are also regimes where a varying population size can strongly influence the evolutionary dynamics. We focus on the strong mutualism scenario and demonstrate that standard evolutionary game theory fails to describe our simulation results. We then analytically and numerically determine fixation probabilities as well as mean fixation times using matched asymptotic expansions, taking into account the population size degree of freedom. These results elucidate the interplay between population dynamics and evolutionary dynamics in well-mixed systems. PMID:26382443

  14. Cryptic population dynamics: rapid evolution masks trophic interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehito Yoshida

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Trophic relationships, such as those between predator and prey or between pathogen and host, are key interactions linking species in ecological food webs. The structure of these links and their strengths have major consequences for the dynamics and stability of food webs. The existence and strength of particular trophic links has often been assessed using observational data on changes in species abundance through time. Here we show that very strong links can be completely missed by these kinds of analyses when changes in population abundance are accompanied by contemporaneous rapid evolution in the prey or host species. Experimental observations, in rotifer-alga and phage-bacteria chemostats, show that the predator or pathogen can exhibit large-amplitude cycles while the abundance of the prey or host remains essentially constant. We know that the species are tightly linked in these experimental microcosms, but without this knowledge, we would infer from observed patterns in abundance that the species are weakly or not at all linked. Mathematical modeling shows that this kind of cryptic dynamics occurs when there is rapid prey or host evolution for traits conferring defense against attack, and the cost of defense (in terms of tradeoffs with other fitness components is low. Several predictions of the theory that we developed to explain the rotifer-alga experiments are confirmed in the phage-bacteria experiments, where bacterial evolution could be tracked. Modeling suggests that rapid evolution may also confound experimental approaches to measuring interaction strength, but it identifies certain experimental designs as being more robust against potential confounding by rapid evolution.

  15. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMahon, Katherine D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.

    2014-06-18

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  16. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMcahon, Katherine D.; Mamlstrom, Rex R.

    2014-05-12

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ecotype model? of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  17. [The effect of the new technological revolution on population dynamics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K

    1985-01-29

    The impact of modernization on population dynamics in China is examined. The author notes that the industrialization process involves the concentration of the population in urban areas and the mechanization of agriculture. The need to redistribute the urban population from major urban areas to smaller towns is noted.

  18. Effect of Algal Inoculation on COD and Nitrogen Removal, and Indigenous Bacterial Dynamics in Municipal Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jangho; Lee, Jaejin; Shukla, Sudheer Kumar; Park, Joonhong; Lee, Tae Kwon

    2016-05-28

    The effects of algal inoculation on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total nitrogen (TN) removal, and indigenous bacterial dynamics were investigated in municipal wastewater. Experiments were conducted with municipal wastewater inoculated with either Chlorella vulgaris AG10032, Selenastrum gracile UTEX 325, or Scenedesmus quadricauda AG 10308. C. vulgaris and S. gracile as fast growing algae in municipal wastewater, performed high COD and TN removal in contrast to Sc. quadricauda. The indigenous bacterial dynamics revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplification showed different bacterial shifts in response to different algal inoculations. The dominant bacterial genera of either algal case were characterized as heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria. Our results suggest that selection of indigenous bacteria that symbiotically interact with algal species is important for better performance of wastewater treatment. PMID:26930350

  19. Statistical Dynamics of Regional Populations and Economies

    CERN Document Server

    Huo, Jie; Hao, Rui; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    A practical statistical analysis on the regional populations and GDPs of China is conducted. The result shows that the distribution of the populations and that of the GDPs obeys the shifted power law, respectively. To understand these characteristics, a generalized Langevin equation describing variation of population is proposed based on the correlation between population and GDP as well as the random fluctuations of the related factors. The equation is transformed into the Fokker-Plank equation, and the solution demonstrates a transform of population distribution from the normal Gaussian distribution to a shifted power law. It also suggests a critical point of time at which the transform occurs. The shifted power law distribution in the supercritical situation is qualitatively in accordance with the practical result. The distribution of the GDPs is derived based on the Cobb-Douglas production function, and presents a change from a shifted power law to the Gaussian distribution. This result indicates that the...

  20. Bacterial dynamics within the mucus, tissue and skeleton of the coral Porites lutea during different seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chen, Qi; Long, Li-Juan; Dong, Jun-De; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Si

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of the response of coral microbial communities to seasonal ecological environment at the microscale will advance our understanding of the relationship between coral-associated bacteria community and coral health. In this study, we examined bacteria community composition from mucus, tissue and skeleton of Porites lutea and surrounding seawater every three months for 1 year on Luhuitou fringing reef. The bacterial communities were analyzed using pyrosequencing of the V1-V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene, which demonstrated diverse bacterial consortium profiles in corals. The bacterial communities in all three coral compartments studied were significantly different from the surrounding seawater. Moreover, they had a much more dynamic seasonal response compared to the seawater communities. The bacterial communities in all three coral compartments collected in each seasonal sample tended to cluster together. Analysis of the relationship between bacterial assemblages and the environmental parameters showed that the bacterial community correlated to dissolved oxygen and rainfall significantly at our study site. This study highlights a dynamic relationship between the high complexity of coral associated bacterial community and seasonally varying ecosystem parameters.

  1. Effect of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zylenicum supplementation on the intestinal selected bacterial population in Japanese quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baraa Mohamed,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of adding graded levels (0, 1.0 and 1.5% of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zylenicum in the basal diet on the intestinal bacterial population of the Japanese quail. Sixty Japanese quail were randomly distributed into 3 groups. Each treatment contained four replicates (5 birds/replicate. The results showed significant (P<0.05 improvement in lactobacillus of birds fed 1.5% cinnamon. Total bacterial count, coli form and fungi count was significantly (P<0.05 lower compared to the control. In conclusion, 1.5% level of cinnamon may be used for antimicrobial balance in gut for Japanese quail.

  2. Local extinction synchronizes population dynamics in spatial networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Stephen F; Roland, Jens

    2010-03-01

    Spatial population theory predicts that synchrony in the dynamics of local populations should decrease as dispersal among populations decreases. Thus, it would be expected that the extinction of local populations and the attendant loss of immigrants to surrounding populations would reduce synchrony. We tested this hypothesis through a large-scale experiment, simulation of the experimental system and general models. Experimental removal of two adjacent subpopulations of the Rocky Mountain Apollo butterfly, Parnassius smintheus within a network consisting of 15 other local populations resulted in a decrease in immigration to surrounding populations that was proportional to their connectivity to the removal populations. These populations also showed a significant increase in synchrony during population removal. The spatial extent of the synchrony showed good agreement with the predicted loss of immigrants owing to the removals. Simulation of the Parnassius system showed a similar short-term result and also indicated that permanent loss of populations produces structural changes increasing synchrony. General models indicate that an increase in synchrony following extinction occurs when populations undergoing extinction have different carrying capacities than surrounding populations. The result is not owing to biased migration per se, but rather is because of the number of immigrants relative to the carrying capacity. Synchrony following extinction should be most common for patchy populations, but can occur in any situation where carrying capacities differ. Overall, our results indicate that local extinction can create a positive feedback for extinction risk, increasing the probability of extinction for population networks by synchronizing their dynamics. PMID:19889700

  3. Bacterial population in intestines of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon under different growth stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanilada Rungrassamee

    Full Text Available Intestinal bacterial communities in aquaculture have been drawn to attention due to potential benefit to their hosts. To identify core intestinal bacteria in the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon, bacterial populations of disease-free shrimp were characterized from intestines of four developmental stages (15-day-old post larvae (PL15, 1- (J1, 2- (J2, and 3-month-old (J3 juveniles using pyrosequencing, real-time PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE approaches. A total of 25,121 pyrosequencing reads (reading length = 442±24 bases were obtained, which were categorized by barcode for PL15 (7,045 sequences, J1 (3,055 sequences, J2 (13,130 sequences and J3 (1,890 sequences. Bacteria in the phyla Bacteroides, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were found in intestines at all four growth stages. There were 88, 14, 27, and 20 bacterial genera associated with the intestinal tract of PL15, J1, J2 and J3, respectively. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Proteobacteria (class Gammaproteobacteria was a dominant bacteria group with a relative abundance of 89% for PL15 and 99% for J1, J2 and J3. Real-time PCR assay also confirmed that Gammaproteobacteria had the highest relative abundance in intestines from all growth stages. Intestinal bacterial communities from the three juvenile stages were more similar to each other than that of the PL shrimp based on PCA analyses of pyrosequencing results and their DGGE profiles. This study provides descriptive bacterial communities associated to the black tiger shrimp intestines during these growth development stages in rearing facilities.

  4. Growth strategy of heterotrophic bacterial population along successional sequence on spoil of brown coal colliery substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristufek, V.; Elhottova, D.; Chronakova, A.; Dostalkova, I.; Picek, T.; Kalcik, J. [Academy of Science in Czech Republic, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic). Inst. of Soil Biology

    2005-07-01

    The bacterial population of brown coal colliery spoil (Sokolov coal mining district, Czech Republic) was characterized by measuring viable bacterial biomass, the culturable to total cell ratio (C:T), colony-forming curve (CFC) analysis and species and/or biotype diversity. Bacterial representatives that differed in colony-forming growth (fast and/or slow growers) were used for growth-strategy investigation of heterotrophic bacteria. Spoil substrates from the surface (0-50 mm) and the mineral (100-150 mm) layers were sampled on 4 sites undergoing spontaneous succession corresponding to 1, 11, 21 and 43 years after deposition (initial, early, mid and late stages). The bacterial biomass of the surface layer increased during the initial and early stages with a maximum at mid stage and stabilized in the late stage while mineral layer biomass increased throughout the succession. The maxima of C:T ratios were at the early stage, minima at the late stage. Depending on the succession stage the C:T ratio was 1.5-2 times higher in the mineral than the surface layer of soil. An increase in the fraction of nonculturable bacteria was associated with the late succession stage. CFC analysis of the surface layer during a 3-d incubation revealed that the early-succession substrate contained more (75%) rapidly colonizing bacteria than successively older substrates. The culturable bacterial community of the mineral layer maintained a high genera and species richness of fast growers along the succession line in contrast to the surface layer community, where there was a maximum in the abundance of fast growers in the early stage. A markedly lower abundance of slow growers was observed in the mineral in contrast to the surface layer.

  5. Stochastic population dynamics under resource constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavane, Ajinkya S.; Nigam, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the population growth of a certain species in which every generation reproduces thrice over a period of predefined time, under certain constraints of resources needed for survival of population. We study the survival period of a species by randomizing the reproduction probabilities within a window at same predefined ages and the resources are being produced by the working force of the population at a variable rate. This randomness in the reproduction rate makes the population growth stochastic in nature and one cannot predict the exact form of evolution. Hence we study the growth by running simulations for such a population and taking an ensemble averaged over 500 to 5000 such simulations as per the need. While the population reproduces in a stochastic manner, we have implemented a constraint on the amount of resources available for the population. This is important to make the simulations more realistic. The rate of resource production then is tuned to find the rate which suits the survival of the species. We also compute the mean life time of the species corresponding to different resource production rate. Study for these outcomes in the parameter space defined by the reproduction probabilities and rate of resource production is carried out.

  6. Evaluating seasonal dynamics of bacterial communities in marine fish aquaculture: a preliminary study before applying phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla; Salvador, Sara; Arrojado, Cátia; Silva, Yolanda; Santos, Ana L; Cunha, Angela; Gomes, Newton C M; Gomes, Newton; Almeida, Adelaide

    2011-04-01

    The increasing problem of antibiotic resistance in common pathogenic bacteria and the concern about the spreading of antibiotics in the environment bring the need to find new methods to control fish pathogens. Phage therapy represents a potential alternative to antibiotics, but its use in aquaculture requires a detailed understanding of bacterial communities, namely of fish pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, in this study the seasonal dynamics of the overall bacterial communities, microbiological water quality and disease-causing bacteria were followed in a marine aquaculture system of Ria de Aveiro (Portugal). Analysis of the bacterial diversity of the water samples by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA gene fragments indicates that the bacterial community structure varied seasonally, showing a higher complexity during the warm season. The diversity of the main fish pathogenic bacteria, assessed by DGGE targeting the Vibrio genus, showed lower seasonal variation, with new dominating populations appearing mainly in the spring. Bacterial indicators, faecal coliforms and enterococci, enumerated by the filter-membrane method, also varied seasonally. The fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) results showed that the specific groups of bacteria varied during the study period and that the non-indigenous Enterobactereaceae family was the most abundant group followed by Vibrio and Aeromonas. The seasonal variation detected in terms of density and structure of total and pathogenic bacterial communities demonstrates the need for a careful monitoring of water through the year in order to select the suitable phages to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria. The spring season seems to be the critical time period when phage therapy should be applied. PMID:21344093

  7. The habits of highly effective phages: population dynamics as a framework for identifying therapeutic phages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Bull

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of bacteriophages as antibacterial agents is being actively researched on a global scale. Typically, the phages used are isolated from the wild by plating on the bacteria of interest, and a far larger set of candidate phages is often available than can be used in any application. When an excess of phages is available, how should the best phages be identified? Here we consider phage-bacterial population dynamics as a basis for evaluating and predicting phage success. A central question is whether the innate dynamical properties of phages are the determinants of success, or instead, whether extrinsic, indirect effects can be responsible. We address the dynamical perspective, motivated in part by the absence of dynamics in previously suggested principles of phage therapy. Current mathematical models of bacterial-phage dynamics do not capture the realities of in vivo dynamics, nor is this likely to change, but they do give insight to qualitative properties that may be generalizable. In particular, phage adsorption rate may be critical to treatment success, so understanding the effects of the in vivo environment on host availability may allow prediction of useful phages prior to in vivo experimentation. Principles for predicting efficacy may be derived by developing a greater understanding of the in vivo system, or such principles could be determined empirically by comparing phages with known differences in their dynamic properties. The comparative approach promises to be a powerful method of discovering the key to phage success. We offer five recommendations for future study: (i compare phages differing in treatment efficacy to identify the phage properties associated with success, (ii assay dynamics in vivo, (iii understand mechanisms of bacterial escape from phages, (iv test phages in model infections that are relevant to the intended clinical applications, and (v develop new classes of models for phage growth in spatially heterogeneous

  8. Galactic civilizations: Population dynamics and interstellar diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W. I.; Sagan, C.

    1978-01-01

    The interstellar diffusion of galactic civilizations is reexamined by potential theory; both numerical and analytical solutions are derived for the nonlinear partial differential equations which specify a range of relevant models, drawn from blast wave physics, soil science, and, especially, population biology. An essential feature of these models is that, for all civilizations, population growth must be limited by the carrying capacity of the environment. Dispersal is fundamentally a diffusion process; a density-dependent diffusivity describes interstellar emigration. Two models are considered: the first describing zero population growth (ZPG), and the second which also includes local growth and saturation of a planetary population, and for which an asymptotic traveling wave solution is found.

  9. Population Dynamics and Non-Hermitian Localization

    OpenAIRE

    Dahmen, Karin A.; Nelson, David R; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    1999-01-01

    We review localization with non-Hermitian time evolution as applied to simple models of population biology with spatially varying growth profiles and convection. Convection leads to a constant imaginary vector potential in the Schroedinger-like operator which appears in linearized growth models. We illustrate the basic ideas by reviewing how convection affects the evolution of a population influenced by a simple square well growth profile. Results from discrete lattice growth models in both o...

  10. Genomic islands are dynamic, ancient integrative elements in bacterial evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, E Fidelma; Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Parent, Michelle A

    2009-02-01

    Acquisition of genomic islands plays a central part in bacterial evolution as a mechanism of diversification and adaptation. Genomic islands are non-self-mobilizing integrative and excisive elements that encode diverse functional characteristics but all contain a recombination module comprised of an integrase, associated attachment sites and, in some cases, a recombination directionality factor. Here, we discuss how a group of related genomic islands are evolutionarily ancient elements unrelated to plasmids, phages, integrons and integrative conjugative elements. In addition, we explore the diversity of genomic islands and their insertion sites among Gram-negative bacteria and discuss why they integrate at a limited number of tRNA genes. PMID:19162481

  11. Dynamics of bacterial community structure on intertidal sandflat inhabited by the ghost shrimp Nihonotrypaea harmandi (Decapoda: Axiidea: Callianassidae) in Tomioka Bay, Amakusa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Minoru; Urakawa, Tatsuyuki; Tamaki, Akio

    2016-02-01

    Callianassid (ghost) shrimp has been claimed as an ecosystem engineer, as it is one of the most powerful bioturbating macrobenthos in intertidal sandflats. However, our knowledge about the relationship between areal distribution of bottom-dwelling ghost shrimps and dynamics of sediment microbial community structure remains obscured. We used automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) to reveal the bacterial community dynamics in the sediment of intertidal sandflat of Tomioka Bay, Kyushu, Japan, which is predominantly inhabited by a burrow-dwelling callianassid shrimp Nihonotrypaea harmandi. We found that the bacterial community structures of high and middle shrimp population areas were significantly differentiated from those of low population area (ANOSIM, R=0.10-0.18, p0.1). These results illustrated the potential importance of shrimp population density as a key factor in shaping the bacterial community structure and interpreting their dynamics in the sandflat. Furthermore, greater similarity between burrow and non-burrow communities was found in samples taken in autumn through winter than in those in summer (one-way ANOVA, pshrimp in permeable sandflat would strongly homogenize sediment particles, enhance solute transport surrounding the burrow and ambient subsurface substrate, and therefore reduce spatial differentiation of the bacterial community structure between the two sites. A comparison between present and previous studies of axiidean (former taxonomic group name, thalassinidean) ghost shrimps provides us with a comprehensive understanding of the shrimps' impacts on bacterial community dynamics, highlighting the importance of sediment permeability, a characteristic determined by the type of sediment, as a key controlling factor to shape spatial heterogeneity of bacterial community structure around burrow.

  12. Dynamic of bacterial communities attached to lightened phytodetritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Morgan; Bonin, Patricia; Amiraux, Rémi; Michotey, Valérie; Guasco, Sophie; Armitano, Joshua; Jourlin-Castelli, Cécile; Vaultier, Frédéric; Méjean, Vincent; Rontani, Jean-François

    2015-09-01

    The effects of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) transfer to bacteria attached on phytodetritus were investigated under laboratory-controlled conditions. For this purpose, a nonaxenic culture of Emiliania huxleyi in late stationary phase was studied for bacterial viability. Our results indicated that only 9 ± 3% of attached bacteria were alive compared to 46 ± 23% for free bacteria in the E. huxleyi culture. Apparently, under conditions of low irradiance (36 W m(-2)), during the culture, the cumulative dose received (22,000 kJ m(-2)) was sufficiently important to induce an efficient (1)O2 transfer to attached bacteria during the senescence of E. huxleyi cells. At this stage, attached bacteria appeared to be dominated by pigmented bacteria (Maribacter, Roseobacter, Roseovarius), which should resist to (1)O2 stress probably due to their high contents of carotenoids. After subsequent irradiation of the culture until fully photodegradation of chlorophyll, DGGE analyses showed that the diversity of bacteria attached to E. huxleyi cells is modified by light. Photooxidative alterations of bacteria were confirmed by the increasing amounts of cis-vaccenic photoproducts (bacterial marker) per bacteria observed during irradiation time. Interestingly, preliminary chemotaxis experiments showed that Shewanella oneidensis considered here as a model of motile bacteria was attracted by phytodetritus producing or not (1)O2. This lack of repulsive effects could explain the high mortality rate of bacteria measured on E. huxleyi cells. PMID:25687611

  13. Dynamic population mapping using mobile phone data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Pierre; Linard, Catherine; Martin, Samuel; Gilbert, Marius; Stevens, Forrest R; Gaughan, Andrea E; Blondel, Vincent D; Tatem, Andrew J

    2014-11-11

    During the past few decades, technologies such as remote sensing, geographical information systems, and global positioning systems have transformed the way the distribution of human population is studied and modeled in space and time. However, the mapping of populations remains constrained by the logistics of censuses and surveys. Consequently, spatially detailed changes across scales of days, weeks, or months, or even year to year, are difficult to assess and limit the application of human population maps in situations in which timely information is required, such as disasters, conflicts, or epidemics. Mobile phones (MPs) now have an extremely high penetration rate across the globe, and analyzing the spatiotemporal distribution of MP calls geolocated to the tower level may overcome many limitations of census-based approaches, provided that the use of MP data is properly assessed and calibrated. Using datasets of more than 1 billion MP call records from Portugal and France, we show how spatially and temporarily explicit estimations of population densities can be produced at national scales, and how these estimates compare with outputs produced using alternative human population mapping methods. We also demonstrate how maps of human population changes can be produced over multiple timescales while preserving the anonymity of MP users. With similar data being collected every day by MP network providers across the world, the prospect of being able to map contemporary and changing human population distributions over relatively short intervals exists, paving the way for new applications and a near real-time understanding of patterns and processes in human geography. PMID:25349388

  14. Impact of climate change on fish population dynamics in the baltic sea: a dynamical downscaling investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackenzie, Brian R; Meier, H E Markus; Lindegren, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how climate change, exploitation and eutrophication will affect populations and ecosystems of the Baltic Sea can be facilitated with models which realistically combine these forcings into common frameworks. Here, we evaluate sensitivity of fish recruitment and population dynamics to...

  15. A linear model of population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kagan, A. I.

    2016-08-01

    The Malthus process of population growth is reformulated in terms of the probability w(n,t) to find exactly n individuals at time t assuming that both the birth and the death rates are linear functions of the population size. The master equation for w(n,t) is solved exactly. It is shown that w(n,t) strongly deviates from the Poisson distribution and is expressed in terms either of Laguerre’s polynomials or a modified Bessel function. The latter expression allows for considerable simplifications of the asymptotic analysis of w(n,t).

  16. A NEW DYNAMICAL POPULATION OF ASTEROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gallardo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have found approximately 1500 asteroids evolving in the exterior 1:2 resonance with Mars. Looking at the histogram of semimajor axes of the asteroids in the main belt the population can be distinguished as a peak at a ' 2:419 AU. Approximately 400 asteroids are librating around the asymmetric libration centers and about 700 are describing horseshoe trajectories. A strong secular perturbation due to Jupiter and due to Mars' eccentricity time evolution produces switching between libration centers and between librations and horseshoe trajectories. In spite of this strong secular e ect the population remains linked to the resonance over time scales of 108 - 109 years.

  17. Multistability in simplest models of the population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanova, Oksana L.; Frisman, Efim Ya.

    2016-06-01

    The investigation of dynamics behavior of population number and genetic structure has been conducted for a homogeneous limited population influenced by density-dependent selection in single di-allelic genetic locus. The detailed investigation of the mechanisms of the loss of stability in the considered model is carried out. It is shown that coexistence of several different asymptotic dynamic regimes (with own attraction basins) is possible in numerous enough parametric regions which are meaningful biologically.

  18. Artificial nighttime light changes aphid-parasitoid population dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk Sanders; Rachel Kehoe; Katie Tiley; Jonathan Bennie; Dave Cruse; Davies, Thomas W; F J Frank van Veen; Gaston, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Artificial light at night (ALAN) is recognized as a widespread and increasingly important anthropogenic environmental pressure on wild species and their interactions. Understanding of how these impacts translate into changes in population dynamics of communities with multiple trophic levels is, however, severely lacking. In an outdoor mesocosm experiment we tested the effect of ALAN on the population dynamics of a plant-aphid-parasitoid community with one plant species, three aphid species an...

  19. Evolution of Sex-Ratio in Structured Population Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ripoll i Missé, Jordi

    2005-01-01

    In this Thesis we address the study of some non-linear evolution equations (e.g. pde's) modelling the dynamics of sexually-reproducing structured populations, with special emphasis on biological evolution driven by natural selection. The latter is incorporated into the models through the adaptive dynamics, which is a way of describing how the hereditary characteristics of the population evolve. The sex-ratio, defined as the proportion between females and males, is analyzed from the evolutiona...

  20. Dynamic properties of bacterial pili measured by optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Fallman, Erik; Schedin, Staffan; Jass, Jana; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2014-01-01

    The ability of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to cause urinary tract infections is dependent on their ability to colonize the uroepithelium. Infecting bacteria ascend the urethra to the bladder and then kidneys by attaching to the uroepithelial cells via the differential expression of adhesins. P pili are associated with pyelonephritis, the more severe infection of the kidneys. In order to find means to treat pyelonephritis, it is therefore of interest to investigate the properties P pili. The mechanical behavior of individual P pili of uropathogenic Escherichia coli has recently been investigated using optical tweezers. P pili, whose main part constitutes the PapA rod, composed of ~1000 PapA subunits in a helical arrangement, are distributed over the bacterial surface and mediate adhesion to host cells. We have earlier studied P pili regarding its stretching/elongation properties where we have found and characterized three different elongation regions, of which one constitute an unfolding of the quate...

  1. The projection dynamic, the replicator dynamic and the geometry of population games

    OpenAIRE

    Dokumaci, E.; Lahkar, R.; Sandholm, W. H.

    2007-01-01

    Every population game defines a vector field on the set of strategy distributions X. The projection dynamic maps each population game to a new vector field: namely, the one closest to the payoff vector field among those that never point outward from X. We investigate the geometric underpinnings of the projection dynamic, describe its basic game-theoretic properties, and establish a number of close connections between the projection dynamic and the replicator dynamic.

  2. Dynamic bacterial communities on reverse-osmosis membranes in a full-scale desalination plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, C-L de O; West, N; Rapenne, S; Lebaron, P

    2011-01-01

    To better understand biofouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, bacterial diversity was characterized in the intake water, in subsequently pretreated water and on SWRO membranes from a full-scale desalination plant (FSDP) during a 9 month period. 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting and sequencing revealed that bacterial communities in the water samples and on the SWRO membranes were very different. For the different sampling dates, the bacterial diversity of the active and the total bacterial fractions of the water samples remained relatively stable over the sampling period whereas the bacterial community structure on the four SWRO membrane samples was significantly different. The richness and evenness of the SWRO membrane bacterial communities increased with usage time with an increase in the Shannon diversity index of 2.2 to 3.7. In the oldest SWRO membrane (330 days), no single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) dominated and the majority of the OTUs fell into the Alphaproteobacteria or the Planctomycetes. In striking contrast, a Betaproteobacteria OTU affiliated to the genus Ideonella was dominant and exclusively found in the membrane used for the shortest time (10 days). This suggests that bacteria belonging to this genus could be one of the primary colonizers of the SWRO membrane. Knowledge of the dominant bacterial species on SWRO membranes and their dynamics should help guide culture studies for physiological characterization of biofilm forming species. PMID:21108068

  3. Dynamic bacterial communities on reverse-osmosis membranes in a full-scale desalination plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, C-L de O; West, N; Rapenne, S; Lebaron, P

    2011-01-01

    To better understand biofouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, bacterial diversity was characterized in the intake water, in subsequently pretreated water and on SWRO membranes from a full-scale desalination plant (FSDP) during a 9 month period. 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting and sequencing revealed that bacterial communities in the water samples and on the SWRO membranes were very different. For the different sampling dates, the bacterial diversity of the active and the total bacterial fractions of the water samples remained relatively stable over the sampling period whereas the bacterial community structure on the four SWRO membrane samples was significantly different. The richness and evenness of the SWRO membrane bacterial communities increased with usage time with an increase in the Shannon diversity index of 2.2 to 3.7. In the oldest SWRO membrane (330 days), no single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) dominated and the majority of the OTUs fell into the Alphaproteobacteria or the Planctomycetes. In striking contrast, a Betaproteobacteria OTU affiliated to the genus Ideonella was dominant and exclusively found in the membrane used for the shortest time (10 days). This suggests that bacteria belonging to this genus could be one of the primary colonizers of the SWRO membrane. Knowledge of the dominant bacterial species on SWRO membranes and their dynamics should help guide culture studies for physiological characterization of biofilm forming species.

  4. What is Growth? Concurrent determination of a bacterial population's many shades of growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Kussell, Edo

    2013-03-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the study of the physics of microbial life is the ability to precisely monitor stochastic variations of gene expression in individual cells. A fundamental question is whether these variations improve the long-term ability of a population to adapt to new environments. While variations in gene expression in bacteria are easily measured through the use of reporter systems such as green fluorescent proteins and its variants, precise determination of a cell's growth rate, and how it is influenced by its immediate environment, remains challenging. Here, we show that many conflicting and ambiguous definitions of bacterial growth can actually be used interchangeably in E. coli. Indeed, by monitoring small populations of E. coli bacteria inside a microfluidic device, we show that seemingly independent measurements of growth (elongation rate and the average division time, for instance) agree very precisely with one another. We combine these definitions with the population's length and age distribution to very precisely quantify the influence of temperature variations on a population's growth rate. We conclude by using coalescence theory to describe the evolution of a population's genetic structure over time.

  5. Dynamics of a bacterial flagellum under reverse rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Adhyapak, Tapan Chandra

    2016-01-01

    To initiate tumbling of an E. coli, one of the helical flagella reverses its sense of rotation. It then transforms from its normal form first to the transient semicoiled state and subsequently to the curly-I state. The dynamics of polymorphism is effectively modeled by describing flagellar elasticity through an extended Kirchhoff free energy. However, the complete landscape of the free energy remains undetermined because the ground state energies of the polymorphic forms are not known. We investigate how variations in these ground state energies affect the dynamics of a reversely rotated flagellum of a swimming bacterium. We find that the flagellum exhibits a number of distinct dynamical states and comprehensively summarize them in a state diagram. As a result, we conclude that tuning the landscape of the extended Kirchhoff free energy alone cannot generate the intermediate full-length semicoiled state. However, our model suggests an ad hoc method to realize the sequence of polymorphic states as observed for ...

  6. An individual-based approach to explain plasmid invasion in bacterial populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seoane, Jose Miguel; Yankelevich, Tatiana; Dechesne, Arnaud;

    2011-01-01

    We present an individual-based experimental framework to identify and estimate the main parameters governing bacterial conjugation at the individual cell scale. From this analysis, we have established that transient periods of unregulated plasmid transfer within newly formed transconjugant cells......, together with contact mechanics arising from cellular growth and division, are the two main processes determining the emergent inability of the pWW0 TOL plasmid to fully invade spatially structured Pseudomonas putida populations. We have also shown that pWW0 conjugation occurs mainly at advanced stages...... observe, however, that transient periods of elevated plasmid transfer in newly formed transconjugant cells are offset by unfavorable cell-to-cell contact mechanics, which ultimately precludes the pWWO TOL plasmid from fully invading tightly packed multicellular P. putida populations such as microcolonies...

  7. EFFECT OF REFINED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS CONTAMINATION ON BACTERIAL POPULATION AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CULTIVATED AGRICULTURAL SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale Sogo Olalemi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the effect of refined petroleum products contamination on bacterial population and physicochemical characteristics of cultivated agricultural soil was carried out. The soil samples obtained from the Teaching and Research Farm, Obakekere, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Ondo State were contaminated with varying volumes of petrol, diesel and kerosene. The results revealed higher bacterial populations in uncontaminated soils than contaminated soils. The counts of bacteria ranged from 3.0 × 105 to 5.0 × 105 cfu/g in uncontaminated soils and 1.0 × 105 to 3.0 × 105 cfu/g in contaminated soils. The isolated bacteria were identified as Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, Corynebacterium variabilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens. The contamination had no significant effect on pH, potassium, sodium, organic carbon and nitrogen content of the soils, while the moisture, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium content of the contaminated soils were significantly different (P < 0.05 compared with the uncontaminated soils. The ability of Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, and Pseudomonas fluorescens to utilize the refined petroleum products suggest that these bacteria had potential to bioremediate petroleum contaminated soils.

  8. Impact of bioremediation treatments on the biodegradation of buried oil and predominant bacterial populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of using mineral fertilizers as a bioremediation treatment for oil buried in fine sediments was tested in field trials at a site in the south-west of England. The plots were divided into three blocks of four treatments including untreated, fertilized, oiled unfertilized and oiled fertilized plots. The changes in residual hydrocarbons were monitored to study the biodegradation of Arabian Light Crude Oil which is known to have a high portion of biodegradable components. Samples were extracted at random points at intervals of 0, 42 and 101 days. The analysis process identified a range of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as a range of geochemical biomarkers. The final results suggested that the oil in the fertilized plots was more degraded than in the oiled, unfertilized control plots. Three way, factorial analysis of variance was used to analyse the data from the oiled fertilized and oiled unfertilized plots. No significant effect of treatment on the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons was observed. The results also showed that oil treatment and treatment with oil and fertilizer increased the abundance of hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial population. One significant observation was that different bacterial populations were stimulated in response to oil alone and a bioremediation treatment. It was concluded that the addition of inorganic fertilizers to the oiled oxic fine sediment substantially enhanced the level of biodegradation compared to untreated oiled sediment. Bioremediation is a feasible treatment for oil spills where the oil is buried in fine sediment. 14 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  9. Bacterial community dynamics in a rotating biological contactor treating 2-fluorophenol-containing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Anouk F; Bessa, Vânia S; Castro, Paula M L

    2014-01-01

    One of the main factors affecting the performance of rotating biological contactors (RBC) is the biofilm characteristics. Therefore, a deep understanding of the microbial population dynamics and structure of the biofilm is mandatory if optimization of organic matter and nutrients removal is targeted. This study focused on the effects of organic shock loads of 2-fluorophenol (2-FP) on the microbial diversity present in an RBC biofilm. The RBC was seeded with activated sludge from a conventional wastewater treatment plant and was operated during 496 days. During the first 126 days, the RBC was subjected to intermittent 2-FP shocks of 25 mg l(-1) and no degradation occurred. Therefore, the reactor was subsequently augmented with a 2-FP-degrading strain (FP1). Afterwards, the RBC had a stable performance when subjected to 2-FP shocks up to 50 mg l(-1) and to a starvation period, as indicated by removal of the compound. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed large shifts in microbial communities present in the first and fifth stages, although no clear relation between the sample collection time and spatial factor was found. Phylogenetic affiliation of some predominant members was assessed by direct sequencing of correspondent DGGE bands. Affiliations to α-, β- and δ-Proteobacteria were found. Several bacterial strains isolated from the reactor showed capacity for 2-FP degradation. Strain FP1 was successfully recovered from the biofilm by plating and by DGGE, reinforcing that bioaugmentation was successfully achieved.

  10. Effect of Soil Tillage Practices on Dynamic of Bacterial Communities in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Mrkonjić Fuka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated that intensive tillage has notable effect on properties of the soil microbiota that may influence numerous important soils functions, e.g. mobilization of nutrients or change of the overall emission rates of greenhouse gases. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate dynamic of microbial communities in soil planted with soybean under different tillage systems. Moreover, abundance of populations harboring the nitrous- oxide reductase gene (nosZ as an indicator for potential shift s in N2O emission rates was studied. The study was established at chernozem soil of Northern Baranja region in Republic of Croatia as completely randomized block design of four replicate plots for each tillage system in three years experiment. The soil was managed as followed: CT - conventional tillage (moldboard ploughing at 25-30 cm depth, DH - multiple discs harrowing (10-15 cm depth, and NT – no-tillage system. Soil samples were collected in summer and autumn in year 2003. Our results suggested that the reduction of tillage had no effects on the bacterial community structure. This might be a result of the very dry climatic conditions at the investigated site and /or a result of plant species effect (soybean. Slight effects of the tillage management became visible at least when samples were taken in autumn for microbes harboring the N2O reductase gene, indicating that there might be shift s in denitrification pattern in response to changes in tillage practice.

  11. Stage-Structured Population Dynamics of AEDES AEGYPTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Nuraini; Budin, Harun; Ismail, Salemah

    Aedes aegypti is the main vector in the transmission of dengue fever, a vector-borne disease affecting world population living in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Better understanding of the dynamics of its population growth will help in the efforts of controlling the spread of this disease. In looking at the population dynamics of Aedes aegypti, this paper explored the stage-structured modeling of the population growth of the mosquito using the matrix population model. The life cycle of the mosquito was divided into five stages: eggs, larvae, pupae, adult1 and adult2. Developmental rates were obtained for the average Malaysian temperature and these were used in constructing the transition matrix for the matrix model. The model, which was based only on temperature, projected that the population of Aedes aegypti will blow up with time, which is not realistic. For further work, other factors need to be taken into account to obtain a more realistic result.

  12. Dynamics of genetic rescue in inbred Drosophila melanogaster populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, R.; Westerhof, M. D. D.; Roekx, L. P.; Pen, I.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic rescue has been proposed as a management strategy to improve the fitness of genetically eroded populations by alleviating inbreeding depression. We studied the dynamics of genetic rescue in inbred populations of Drosophila. Using balancer chromosomes, we show that the force of heterosis that

  13. The frankincense tree of Ethiopia : ecology, productivity and population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eshete Wassie, A.

    2011-01-01

    Keywords: Boswellian papyrifera, Frankincense tree, matrix model, population dynamics,
    population bottleneck, tapping. Combretum – Terminalia woodlands and Acacia – Commiphora woodlands are the two
    dominant vegetation types that cover large parts of the dry land areas in Eth

  14. Contributions of Alan C. Lazer to mathematical population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Cosner

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a survey of the contributions that Professor Alan C. Lazer has made to the mathematical theory of population dynamics. Specific areas where Professor Lazer has made important contributions include time periodic population models with diffusion and nonautonomous models for many competing species.

  15. Population dynamical responses to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Mads; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Høye, Toke Thomas;

    2008-01-01

    , the effects of climate change may potentially extend through any of these interactions. In this chapter, we focus on the extent to which evolutionarily distinct species at different trophic levels respond to similar changes in climate. By using a broad spectrum of statistically and ecologically founded...... and three out of five wader species, displayed significant direct density dependence. Only two species (sanderling and long-tailed skua) displayed dynamics characterised by delayed density dependence. The direct effects of previous winter's snow were related to over-wintering strategies of resident...... of arctic fox were not significantly related to changes in lemming abundance, both the stoat and the breeding of long-tailed skua were mainly related to lemming dynamics. The predator-prey system at Zackenberg differentiates from previously described systems in high-arctic Greenland, which, we suggest...

  16. Growth-rate-dependent dynamics of a bacterial genetic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osella, Matteo; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2013-01-01

    Gene networks exhibiting oscillatory dynamics are widespread in biology. The minimal regulatory designs giving rise to oscillations have been implemented synthetically and studied by mathematical modeling. However, most of the available analyses generally neglect the coupling of regulatory circuits with the cellular “chassis” in which the circuits are embedded. For example, the intracellular macromolecular composition of fast-growing bacteria changes with growth rate. As a consequence, important parameters of gene expression, such as ribosome concentration or cell volume, are growth-rate dependent, ultimately coupling the dynamics of genetic circuits with cell physiology. This work addresses the effects of growth rate on the dynamics of a paradigmatic example of genetic oscillator, the repressilator. Making use of empirical growth-rate dependencies of parameters in bacteria, we show that the repressilator dynamics can switch between oscillations and convergence to a fixed point depending on the cellular state of growth, and thus on the nutrients it is fed. The physical support of the circuit (type of plasmid or gene positions on the chromosome) also plays an important role in determining the oscillation stability and the growth-rate dependence of period and amplitude. This analysis has potential application in the field of synthetic biology, and suggests that the coupling between endogenous genetic oscillators and cell physiology can have substantial consequences for their functionality.

  17. Noise Induced Phenomena in Population Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Valenti, D.; Giuffrida, A; Denaro, G.; Pizzolato, N; Curcio, L; Spagnolo, B.; Mazzola, S.; Basilone, G.; Bonanno, A.

    2015-01-01

    Noise through its interaction with the nonlinearity of the living systems can give rise to counter-intuitive phenomena. In this paper we shortly review the noise induced effects in different ecosystems. The transient dynamics of these ecosystems are analyzed through generalized Lotka-Volterra equations in the presence of multiplicative noise, which models the interaction between the species and the environment. We find noise induced phenomena such as quasi-deterministic oscillations, stochast...

  18. Geography, European colonization, and past population dynamics in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Vaz Silva, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Past population dynamics in Africa have remained largely elusive due to the lack of demographic data. Researchers are understandably deterred from trying to explain what is not known and African historical population estimates suffer from this lack of interest. In this paper I explain present day African population densities using mostly ecological factors as explanatory variables. I find evidence supporting the view that ecological factors deeply affected precolonial patterns of human settle...

  19. AN INVARIANCE PRINCIPLE IN LARGE POPULATION STOCHASTIC DYNAMIC GAMES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minyi HUANG; Peter E. CAINES; Roland P. MALHAM(E)

    2007-01-01

    We study large population stochastic dynamic games where the so-called Nash certainty equivalence based control laws are implemented by the individual players. We first show a martingale property for the limiting control problem of a single agent and then perform averaging across the population; this procedure leads to a constant value for the martingale which shows an invariance property of the population behavior induced by the Nash strategies.

  20. Population Dynamics and Livelihood Change on Ukara Island, Lake Victoria

    OpenAIRE

    Lounio, Tomi

    2014-01-01

    This study is about the relation between population dynamics and livelihood change in the Kara farming system on Ukara Island, Tanzania. The population densities on Ukara have been exceptionally high since the 18th century, which has been made possible by a complex set of soil conserving measures utilised by the local Kara farmers. According to the data derived from national censuses, the population densities on Ukara have been rising rapidly since the late 1970s. This research is based on 49...

  1. A Particle Population Control Method for Dynamic Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweezy, Jeremy; Nolen, Steve; Adams, Terry; Zukaitis, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    A general particle population control method has been derived from splitting and Russian Roulette for dynamic Monte Carlo particle transport. A well-known particle population control method, known as the particle population comb, has been shown to be a special case of this general method. This general method has been incorporated in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Monte Carlo Application Toolkit (MCATK) and examples of it's use are shown for both super-critical and sub-critical systems.

  2. Dynamics of Litter Decomposition, Microbiota Populations, and Nutrient Movement Following Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions to a Deciduous Forest Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.M.

    2002-10-29

    The objective of this study was quantification of the dynamics of litter decomposition, microbiota populations, and nutrient movement in response to nitrogen and phosphorus additions to a deciduous forest stand. Nitrogen (urea) was applied at rates of 0, 550, and 1100 kg/ha in combination with phosphorus (concentrated superphosphate) at rates of 0, 275, and 550 kg/ha. Total loss of organic material from white oak, red maple, and black gum litter bags over a 16-month period was 34, 35, and 45%, respectively. Phosphorus treatment retarded weight loss from litter bags of all species. Weight loss for the 0-, 275-, and 55-kg/ha levels of phosphorus averaged 23, 20, and 19% for white oak; 26, 25, and 25% for red maple; 29, 27 and 26% for black gum. Weight losses were increased by a small amount (1 to 2%) or not at all by nitrogen treatment. The NP interfaction weight loss means were intermediate to the main treatment means. The increase in decomposition associated with nitrogen was offset by the decrease associated with phosphorus. Litter and soil bacterial populations were significantly increased by nitrogen additions, while litter and soil fungi did not respond to nitrogen. Soil fungal populations were increased by phosphorus addition, while litter bacterial populations were reduced. Litter fungi and soil bacteria did not respond to phosphorus. Combined additions of nitrogen and phosphorus increased bacterial populations, though not as much as nitrogen alone. There was a good correlation (r = 0.70) between bacterial population and litter weight loss.

  3. Archaeal and bacterial community dynamics and bioprocess performance of a bench-scale two-stage anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria Jesus; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Osorio, Francisco; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    Two-stage technologies have been developed for anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge. In this study, the archaeal and bacterial community structure dynamics and bioprocess performance of a bench-scale two-stage anaerobic digester treating urban sewage sludge have been studied by the means of high-throughput sequencing techniques and physicochemical parameters such as pH, dried sludge, volatile dried sludge, acid concentration, alkalinity, and biogas generation. The coupled analyses of archaeal and bacterial communities and physicochemical parameters showed a direct relationship between archaeal and bacterial populations and bioprocess performance during start-up and working operation of a two-stage anaerobic digester. Moreover, results demonstrated that archaeal and bacterial community structure was affected by changes in the acid/alkalinity ratio in the bioprocess. Thus, a predominance of the acetoclastic methanogen Methanosaeta was observed in the methanogenic bioreactor at high-value acid/alkaline ratio, while a predominance of Methanomassilicoccaeceae archaea and Methanoculleus genus was observed in the methanogenic bioreactor at low-value acid/alkaline ratio. Biodiversity tag-iTag sequencing studies showed that methanogenic archaea can be also detected in the acidogenic bioreactor, although its biological activity was decreased after 4 months of operation as supported by physicochemical analyses. Also, studies of the VFA producers and VFA consumers microbial populations showed as these microbiota were directly affected by the physicochemical parameters generated in the bioreactors. We suggest that the results obtained in our study could be useful for future implementations of two-stage anaerobic digestion processes at both bench- and full-scale. PMID:26940050

  4. Dynamic Metabolic Modeling of Denitrifying Bacterial Growth: The Cybernetic Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Liu, Chongxuan

    2015-06-29

    Denitrification is a multistage reduction process converting nitrate ultimately to nitrogen gas, carried out mostly by facultative bacteria. Modeling of the denitrification process is challenging due to the complex metabolic regulation that modulates sequential formation and consumption of a series of nitrogen oxide intermediates, which serve as the final electron acceptors for denitrifying bacteria. In this work, we examined the effectiveness and accuracy of the cybernetic modeling framework in simulating the growth dynamics of denitrifying bacteria in comparison with kinetic models. In four different case studies using the literature data, we successfully simulated diauxic and triauxic growth patterns observed in anoxic and aerobic conditions, only by tuning two or three parameters. In order to understand the regulatory structure of the cybernetic model, we systematically analyzed the effect of cybernetic control variables on simulation accuracy. The results showed that the consideration of both enzyme synthesis and activity control through u- and v-variables is necessary and relevant and that uvariables are of greater importance in comparison to v-variables. In contrast, simple kinetic models were unable to accurately capture dynamic metabolic shifts across alternative electron acceptors, unless an inhibition term was additionally incorporated. Therefore, the denitrification process represents a reasonable example highlighting the criticality of considering dynamic regulation for successful metabolic modeling.

  5. feedback between population and evolutionary dynamics determines the fate of social microbial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Sanchez

    Full Text Available The evolutionary spread of cheater strategies can destabilize populations engaging in social cooperative behaviors, thus demonstrating that evolutionary changes can have profound implications for population dynamics. At the same time, the relative fitness of cooperative traits often depends upon population density, thus leading to the potential for bi-directional coupling between population density and the evolution of a cooperative trait. Despite the potential importance of these eco-evolutionary feedback loops in social species, they have not yet been demonstrated experimentally and their ecological implications are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the presence of a strong feedback loop between population dynamics and the evolutionary dynamics of a social microbial gene, SUC2, in laboratory yeast populations whose cooperative growth is mediated by the SUC2 gene. We directly visualize eco-evolutionary trajectories of hundreds of populations over 50-100 generations, allowing us to characterize the phase space describing the interplay of evolution and ecology in this system. Small populations collapse despite continual evolution towards increased cooperative allele frequencies; large populations with a sufficient number of cooperators "spiral" to a stable state of coexistence between cooperator and cheater strategies. The presence of cheaters does not significantly affect the equilibrium population density, but it does reduce the resilience of the population as well as its ability to adapt to a rapidly deteriorating environment. Our results demonstrate the potential ecological importance of coupling between evolutionary dynamics and the population dynamics of cooperatively growing organisms, particularly in microbes. Our study suggests that this interaction may need to be considered in order to explain intraspecific variability in cooperative behaviors, and also that this feedback between evolution and ecology can critically affect the

  6. Co-infection alters population dynamics of infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Hanna; Barrès, Benoit; Vale, Pedro F; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Co-infections by multiple pathogen strains are common in the wild. Theory predicts co-infections to have major consequences for both within- and between-host disease dynamics, but data are currently scarce. Here, using common garden populations of Plantago lanceolata infected by two strains of the pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis, either singly or under co-infection, we find the highest disease prevalence in co-infected treatments both at the host genotype and population levels. A spore-trapping experiment demonstrates that co-infected hosts shed more transmission propagules than singly infected hosts, thereby explaining the observed change in epidemiological dynamics. Our experimental findings are confirmed in natural pathogen populations-more devastating epidemics were measured in populations with higher levels of co-infection. Jointly, our results confirm the predictions made by theoretical and experimental studies for the potential of co-infection to alter disease dynamics across a large host-pathogen metapopulation. PMID:25569306

  7. Co-infection alters population dynamics of infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Hanna; Barrès, Benoit; Vale, Pedro F; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2015-01-08

    Co-infections by multiple pathogen strains are common in the wild. Theory predicts co-infections to have major consequences for both within- and between-host disease dynamics, but data are currently scarce. Here, using common garden populations of Plantago lanceolata infected by two strains of the pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis, either singly or under co-infection, we find the highest disease prevalence in co-infected treatments both at the host genotype and population levels. A spore-trapping experiment demonstrates that co-infected hosts shed more transmission propagules than singly infected hosts, thereby explaining the observed change in epidemiological dynamics. Our experimental findings are confirmed in natural pathogen populations-more devastating epidemics were measured in populations with higher levels of co-infection. Jointly, our results confirm the predictions made by theoretical and experimental studies for the potential of co-infection to alter disease dynamics across a large host-pathogen metapopulation.

  8. Modelling the Dynamics of an Aedes albopictus Population

    CERN Document Server

    Basuki, Thomas Anung; Barbuti, Roberto; Maggiolo-Schettini, Andrea; Milazzo, Paolo; Rossi, Elisabetta; 10.4204/EPTCS.33.2

    2010-01-01

    We present a methodology for modelling population dynamics with formal means of computer science. This allows unambiguous description of systems and application of analysis tools such as simulators and model checkers. In particular, the dynamics of a population of Aedes albopictus (a species of mosquito) and its modelling with the Stochastic Calculus of Looping Sequences (Stochastic CLS) are considered. The use of Stochastic CLS to model population dynamics requires an extension which allows environmental events (such as changes in the temperature and rainfalls) to be taken into account. A simulator for the constructed model is developed via translation into the specification language Maude, and used to compare the dynamics obtained from the model with real data.

  9. Growth dynamics and the evolution of cooperation in microbial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Jonas; Melbinger, Anna; Frey, Erwin

    2012-02-01

    Microbes providing public goods are widespread in nature despite running the risk of being exploited by free-riders. However, the precise ecological factors supporting cooperation are still puzzling. Following recent experiments, we consider the role of population growth and the repetitive fragmentation of populations into new colonies mimicking simple microbial life-cycles. Individual-based modeling reveals that demographic fluctuations, which lead to a large variance in the composition of colonies, promote cooperation. Biased by population dynamics these fluctuations result in two qualitatively distinct regimes of robust cooperation under repetitive fragmentation into groups. First, if the level of cooperation exceeds a threshold, cooperators will take over the whole population. Second, cooperators can also emerge from a single mutant leading to a robust coexistence between cooperators and free-riders. We find frequency and size of population bottlenecks, and growth dynamics to be the major ecological factors determining the regimes and thereby the evolutionary pathway towards cooperation.

  10. A quantitative model of honey bee colony population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Khoury

    Full Text Available Since 2006 the rate of honey bee colony failure has increased significantly. As an aid to testing hypotheses for the causes of colony failure we have developed a compartment model of honey bee colony population dynamics to explore the impact of different death rates of forager bees on colony growth and development. The model predicts a critical threshold forager death rate beneath which colonies regulate a stable population size. If death rates are sustained higher than this threshold rapid population decline is predicted and colony failure is inevitable. The model also predicts that high forager death rates draw hive bees into the foraging population at much younger ages than normal, which acts to accelerate colony failure. The model suggests that colony failure can be understood in terms of observed principles of honey bee population dynamics, and provides a theoretical framework for experimental investigation of the problem.

  11. Bacterial populations in samples of bioleached copper ore as revealed by analysis of DNA obtained before and after cultivation.

    OpenAIRE

    Pizarro, J.; Jedlicki, E; Orellana, O; J. Romero; Espejo, R T

    1996-01-01

    The composition of bacterial populations in copper bioleaching systems was investigated by analysis of DNA obtained either directly from ores or leaching solutions or after laboratory cultures. This analysis consisted of the characterization of the spacer regions between the 16 and 23S genes in the bacterial rRNA genetic loci after PCR amplification. The sizes of the spacer regions, amplified from DNAs obtained from samples, were compared with the sizes of those obtained from cultures of the ...

  12. Fluid dynamics and noise in bacterial cell-cell and cell-surface scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Drescher, Knut; Cisneros, Luis H; Ganguly, Sujoy; Goldstein, Raymond E; 10.1073/pnas.1019079108

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial processes ranging from gene expression to motility and biofilm formation are constantly challenged by internal and external noise. While the importance of stochastic fluctuations has been appreciated for chemotaxis, it is currently believed that deterministic long-range fluid dynamical effects govern cell-cell and cell-surface scattering - the elementary events that lead to swarming and collective swimming in active suspensions and to the formation of biofilms. Here, we report the first direct measurements of the bacterial flow field generated by individual swimming Escherichia coli both far from and near to a solid surface. These experiments allowed us to examine the relative importance of fluid dynamics and rotational diffusion for bacteria. For cell-cell interactions it is shown that thermal and intrinsic stochasticity drown the effects of long-range fluid dynamics, implying that physical interactions between bacteria are determined by steric collisions and near-field lubrication forces. This dom...

  13. Differences in activity profile of bacterial cultures studied by dynamic speckle patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Miquet, E. E.; Otero, I.; Rodríguez, D.; Darias, J. G.; Combarro, A. M.; Contreras, O. R.

    2013-02-01

    We outline the main differences in the activity profile of bacterial cultures studied by dynamic laser speckle (or biospeckle) patterns. The activity is detected in two sorts of culture mediums. The optical setup and the experimental procedure are presented. The experimentally obtained images are processed by the temporal difference method and a qualitative assessment is made with the time history of speckle patterns of the sample. The main differences are studied after changing the culture medium composition. We conclude that the EC medium is suitable to detect the E. coli bacterial presence in early hours and that Mueller Hinton agar delays some additional hours to make possible the assessment of bacteria in time.

  14. Neutron Star Population Dynamics; 1, Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Cordes, J M; Chernoff, David F.

    1997-01-01

    We study the field millisecond pulsar (MSP) population to infer its intrinsic distribution in spin period and luminosity and to determine its spatial distribution within the Galaxy. Our likelihood analysis on data from extant surveys (22 pulsars with periods 0.65 ms (99% confidence), a period distribution proportional to P^{-2.0 +- 0.33} and a pseudo-luminosity distribution proportional to L_p^{-2.0 +- 0.2} (where L_p = flux density times distance^2, for L_p >= 1.1 mJy kpc^2). We find a vertical scale height 0.65{+0.16,-0.12} kpc. We use our results to estimate the total number and birthrate of MSPs in the disk of the Galaxy. We limit the density contribution of a diffuse halo-like component to <1% of the midplane value. The MSP velocity dispersion is smaller that that of young, long-period pulsars by about a factor of 5. Our best estimate of the 1D velocity kick that is unique to MSP evolution is approximately 40 km s^-1. We discuss the evolutionary relationship of MSPs and low-mass X-ray binaries and pr...

  15. Dynamics of highly polydisperse colloidal suspensions as a model system for bacterial cytoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jiye; Kim, Jeongmin; Sung, Bong June

    2016-08-01

    There are various kinds of macromolecules in bacterial cell cytoplasm. The size polydispersity of the macromolecules is so significant that the crystallization and the phase separation could be suppressed, thus stabilizing the liquid state of bacterial cytoplasm. On the other hand, recent experiments suggested that the macromolecules in bacterial cytoplasm should exhibit glassy dynamics, which should be also affected significantly by the size polydispersity of the macromolecules. In this work, we investigate the anomalous and slow dynamics of highly polydisperse colloidal suspensions, of which size distribution is chosen to mimic Escherichia coli cytoplasm. We find from our Langevin dynamics simulations that the diffusion coefficient (Dtot) and the displacement distribution functions (P (r ,t ) ) averaged over all colloids of different sizes do not show anomalous and glassy dynamic behaviors until the system volume fraction ϕ is increased up to 0.82. This indicates that the intrinsic polydispersity of bacterial cytoplasm should suppress the glass transition and help maintain the liquid state of the cytoplasm. On the other hand, colloids of each kind show totally different dynamic behaviors depending on their size. The dynamics of colloids of different size becomes non-Gaussian at a different range of ϕ , which suggests that a multistep glass transition should occur. The largest colloids undergo the glass transition at ϕ =0.65 , while the glass transition does not occur for smaller colloids in our simulations even at the highest value of ϕ . We also investigate the distribution (P (θ ,t ) ) of the relative angles of displacement for macromolecules and find that macromolecules undergo directionally correlated motions in a sufficiently dense system.

  16. Biogeochemical controls on the bacterial populations in the eastern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, S. B.; Koch, B. P.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Pohl, C.; Kattner, G.; Yamasaki, S.; Lara, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about bacterial dynamics in the oligotrophic ocean, particularly about cultivable bacteria. We examined the abundance of total and cultivable bacteria in relation to changes in biogeochemical conditions in the eastern Atlantic Ocean with special regard to Vibrio spp., a group of bacteria that can cause diseases in human and aquatic organisms. Surface, deep water and plankton (55 μm) samples were collected between 50° N and 24° S. Chlorophyll-a was very low (prokaryotes represented by 4´-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) counts, ranged mostly between 107 and 108 cells l-1, while cultivable bacterial counts (CBC) and Vibrio spp. were found at concentrations of 104-107 and 102-105 colony forming units (CFU) l-1, respectively. Most bacteria (>99 %) were found in the nanoplankton fraction (prokaryotes, cultivable Vibrio showed a stronger and highly significant correlation with DOC and DON (p < 0.0005 and p < 0.005, respectively). In cold waters of the mesopelagic and abyssal zones, CBC was 50 to 100-times lower than in the surface layer; however, cultivable Vibrio spp. could be isolated from the bathypelagic zone and even near the seafloor (average ~10 CFU l-1). The depth-wise decrease in CBC and Vibrio coincided with the decrease in both DOC and POC. Our study indicates that Vibrio and other bacteria may largely depend on dissolved organic matter to survive in nutrient-poor oceanic habitats.

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aming; Broom, Mark; Du, Jinming; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of populations is influenced by many factors, and the simple classical models have been developed in a number of important ways. Both population structure and multiplayer interactions have been shown to significantly affect the evolution of important properties, such as the level of cooperation or of aggressive behavior. Here we combine these two key factors and develop the evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations represented by regular graphs. The traditional linear and threshold public goods games are adopted as models to address the dynamics. We show that for linear group interactions, population structure can favor the evolution of cooperation compared to the well-mixed case, and we see that the more neighbors there are, the harder it is for cooperators to persist in structured populations. We further show that threshold group interactions could lead to the emergence of cooperation even in well-mixed populations. Here population structure sometimes inhibits cooperation for the threshold public goods game, where depending on the benefit to cost ratio, the outcomes are bistability or a monomorphic population of defectors or cooperators. Our results suggest, counterintuitively, that structured populations are not always beneficial for the evolution of cooperation for nonlinear group interactions.

  18. Inferences about ungulate population dynamics derived from age ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, N.C.; Kauffman, M.J.; Mills, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Age ratios (e.g., calf:cow for elk and fawn:doe for deer) are used regularly to monitor ungulate populations. However, it remains unclear what inferences are appropriate from this index because multiple vital rate changes can influence the observed ratio. We used modeling based on elk (Cervus elaphus) life-history to evaluate both how age ratios are influenced by stage-specific fecundity and survival and how well age ratios track population dynamics. Although all vital rates have the potential to influence calf:adult female ratios (i.e., calf:xow ratios), calf survival explained the vast majority of variation in calf:adult female ratios due to its temporal variation compared to other vital rates. Calf:adult female ratios were positively correlated with population growth rate (??) and often successfully indicated population trajectories. However, calf:adult female ratios performed poorly at detecting imposed declines in calf survival, suggesting that only the most severe declines would be rapidly detected. Our analyses clarify that managers can use accurate, unbiased age ratios to monitor arguably the most important components contributing to sustainable ungulate populations, survival rate of young and ??. However, age ratios are not useful for detecting gradual declines in survival of young or making inferences about fecundity or adult survival in ungulate populations. Therefore, age ratios coupled with independent estimates of population growth or population size are necessary to monitor ungulate population demography and dynamics closely through time.

  19. Predicting when climate-driven phenotypic change affects population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Nina; Lawson, Callum R; Leech, Dave I; van de Pol, Martijn

    2016-06-01

    Species' responses to climate change are variable and diverse, yet our understanding of how different responses (e.g. physiological, behavioural, demographic) relate and how they affect the parameters most relevant for conservation (e.g. population persistence) is lacking. Despite this, studies that observe changes in one type of response typically assume that effects on population dynamics will occur, perhaps fallaciously. We use a hierarchical framework to explain and test when impacts of climate on traits (e.g. phenology) affect demographic rates (e.g. reproduction) and in turn population dynamics. Using this conceptual framework, we distinguish four mechanisms that can prevent lower-level responses from impacting population dynamics. Testable hypotheses were identified from the literature that suggest life-history and ecological characteristics which could predict when these mechanisms are likely to be important. A quantitative example on birds illustrates how, even with limited data and without fully-parameterized population models, new insights can be gained; differences among species in the impacts of climate-driven phenological changes on population growth were not explained by the number of broods or density dependence. Our approach helps to predict the types of species in which climate sensitivities of phenotypic traits have strong demographic and population consequences, which is crucial for conservation prioritization of data-deficient species. PMID:27062059

  20. Selective labelling and eradication of antibiotic-tolerant bacterial populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Hao, Piliang;

    2016-01-01

    acids (pulsed-SILAC), to quantify newly expressed proteins in colistin-tolerant subpopulations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (colistin is a 'last-resort' antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens). Migration is essential for the formation of colistin-tolerant biofilm...... subpopulations, with colistin-tolerant cells using type IV pili to migrate onto the top of the colistin-killed biofilm. The colistin-tolerant cells employ quorum sensing (QS) to initiate the formation of new colistin-tolerant subpopulations, highlighting multicellular behaviour in antibiotic tolerance...... development. The macrolide erythromycin, which has been previously shown to inhibit the motility and QS of P. aeruginosa, boosts biofilm eradication by colistin. Our work provides insights on the mechanisms underlying the formation of antibiotic-tolerant populations in bacterial biofilms and indicates...

  1. Interacting trophic forcing and the population dynamics of herring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Martin; Ostman, Orjan; Gardmark, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Small pelagic fish occupy a central position in marine ecosystems worldwide, largely by determining the energy transfer from lower trophic levels to predators at the top of the food web, including humans. Population dynamics of small pelagic fish may therefore be regulated neither strictly bottom......-up nor top-down, but rather through multiple external and internal drivers. While in many studies single drivers have been identified, potential synergies of multiple factors, as well as their relative importance in regulating population dynamics of small pelagic fish, is a largely unresolved issue....... Using a statistical, age-structured modeling approach, we demonstrate the relative importance and influence of bottom-up (e.g., climate, zooplankton availability) and top-down (i.e., fishing and predation) factors on the population dynamics of Bothnian Sea herring (Clupea harengus) throughout its life...

  2. Differences in bacterial diversity of host-associated populations of Phylloxera notabilis Pergande (Hemiptera: Phylloxeridae) in pecan and water hickory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, R F; Nachappa, P; Tamborindeguy, C

    2011-04-01

    Host-associated differentiation (HAD) is the presence of genetically divergent, host-associated populations. It has been suggested that microbial symbionts of insect herbivores may play a role in HAD by allowing their insect hosts to use different plant species. The objective of this study was to document if host-associated populations of Phylloxera notabilis Pergande (Hemiptera: Phylloxeridae) in pecan and water hickory corresponded with differences in the composition of their associated bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we characterized the symbionts present in P. notabilis associated with these two tree species through metagenomic analyses using 454 sequencing. Differences in bacterial diversity were found between P. notabilis populations associated with pecan and water hickory. The bacteria, Pantoea agglomerans and Serratia marcescens, were absent in the P. notabilis water hickory population, whereas both species accounted for more than 69.72% of bacterial abundance in the pecan population. PMID:21261774

  3. Stochastic population dynamics of a montane ground-dwelling squirrel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Hostetler

    Full Text Available Understanding the causes and consequences of population fluctuations is a central goal of ecology. We used demographic data from a long-term (1990-2008 study and matrix population models to investigate factors and processes influencing the dynamics and persistence of a golden-mantled ground squirrel (Callospermophilus lateralis population, inhabiting a dynamic subalpine habitat in Colorado, USA. The overall deterministic population growth rate λ was 0.94±SE 0.05 but it varied widely over time, ranging from 0.45±0.09 in 2006 to 1.50±0.12 in 2003, and was below replacement (λ<1 for 9 out of 18 years. The stochastic population growth rate λ(s was 0.92, suggesting a declining population; however, the 95% CI on λ(s included 1.0 (0.52-1.60. Stochastic elasticity analysis showed that survival of adult females, followed by survival of juvenile females and litter size, were potentially the most influential vital rates; analysis of life table response experiments revealed that the same three life history variables made the largest contributions to year-to year changes in λ. Population viability analysis revealed that, when the influences of density dependence and immigration were not considered, the population had a high (close to 1.0 in 50 years probability of extinction. However, probability of extinction declined to as low as zero when density dependence and immigration were considered. Destabilizing effects of stochastic forces were counteracted by regulating effects of density dependence and rescue effects of immigration, which allowed our study population to bounce back from low densities and prevented extinction. These results suggest that dynamics and persistence of our study population are determined synergistically by density-dependence, stochastic forces, and immigration.

  4. Coarse Dynamics for Coarse Modeling: An Example From Population Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Bush

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Networks have become a popular way to concisely represent complex nonlinear systems where the interactions and parameters are imprecisely known. One challenge is how best to describe the associated dynamics, which can exhibit complicated behavior sensitive to small changes in parameters. A recently developed computational approach that we refer to as a database for dynamics provides a robust and mathematically rigorous description of global dynamics over large ranges of parameter space. To demonstrate the potential of this approach we consider two classical age-structured population models that share the same network diagram and have a similar nonlinear overcompensatory term, but nevertheless yield different patterns of qualitative behavior as a function of parameters. Using a generalization of these models we relate the different structure of the dynamics that are observed in the context of biologically relevant questions such as stable oscillations in populations, bistability, and permanence.

  5. Cumulant dynamics in a finite population linkage equilibrium theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rattray, M; Rattray, Magnus; Shapiro, Jonathan L.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of a finite population at linkage equilibrium is described in terms of the dynamics of phenotype distribution cumulants. This provides a powerful method for describing evolutionary transients and we elucidate the relationship between the cumulant dynamics and the diffusion approximation. A separation of time-scales between the first and higher cumulants for low mutation rates is demonstrated in the diffusion limit and provides a significant simplification of the dynamical system. However, the diffusion limit may not be appropriate for strong selection as the standard Fisher-Wright model of genetic drift can break down in this case. Two novel examples of this effect are considered: we shown that the dynamics may depend on the number of loci under strong directional selection and that environmental variance results in a reduced effective population size. We also consider a simple model of a changing environment which cannot be described by a diffusion equation and we derive the optimal mutation ra...

  6. Beyond survival estimation: mark-recapture, matrix population models, and population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caswell, H.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Survival probability is of interest primarily as a component of population dynamics. Only when survival estimates are included in a demographic model are their population implications apparent. Survival describes the transition between living and dead. Biologically important as this transition is, it is only one of many transitions in the life cycle. Others include transitions between immature and mature, unmated and mated, breeding and non¿breeding, larva and adult, small and large, and location x and location y. The demographic consequences of these transitions can be captured by matrix population models, and such models provide a natural link connecting multi-stage mark-recapture methods and population dynamics. This paper explores some of those connections, with examples taken from an ongoing analysis of the endangered North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis. Formulating problems in terms of a matrix population model provides an easy way to compute the likelihood of capture histories. It extends the list of demographic parameters for which maximum likelihood estimates can be obtained to include population growth rate, the sensitivity and elasticity of population growth rate, the net reproductive rate, generation time, measures of transient dynamics. In the future, multi-stage mark-recapture methods, linked to matrix population models, will become an increasingly important part of demography.

  7. Competitive Lotka-Volterra Population Dynamics with Jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Jianhai; Yin, Geroge; Yuan, Chenggui

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers competitive Lotka-Volterra population dynamics with jumps. The contributions of this paper are as follows. (a) We show stochastic differential equation (SDE) with jumps associated with the model has a unique global positive solution; (b) We discuss the uniform boundedness of $p$th moment with $p>0$ and reveal the sample Lyapunov exponents; (c) Using a variation-of-constants formula for a class of SDEs with jumps, we provide explicit solution for 1-dimensional competitive Lotka-Volterra population dynamics with jumps, and investigate the sample Lyapunov exponent for each component and the extinction of our $n$-dimensional model.

  8. An age-structured population balance model for microbial dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte M.V.E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an age-structured population balance model (ASPBM for a bioprocess in a continuous stirred-tank fermentor. It relates the macroscopic properties and dynamic behavior of biomass to the operational parameters and microscopic properties of cells. Population dynamics is governed by two time- and age-dependent density functions for living and dead cells, accounting for the influence of substrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations on cell division, aging and death processes. The ASPBM described biomass and substrate oscillations in aerobic continuous cultures as experimentally observed. It is noteworthy that a small data set consisting of nonsegregated measurements was sufficient to adjust a complex segregated mathematical model.

  9. Locally dispersing populations in heterogeneous dynamic landscapes with spatiotemporal correlations. II. Habitat driven by voter dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebeler, David E; Hill, Jack L

    2016-10-21

    We examine a spatially explicit population model on a dynamic landscape with suitable and unsuitable habitat driven by voter or contagion dynamics. We consider four cases, consisting of all combinations of local and global interactions for both population dispersal and habitat dynamics. For both local and global population dispersal, using local habitat dynamics always increases population density relative to the case with global habitat dynamics, due to the resulting segregation of habitat turnover, decrease in effective habitat turnover rate, and presence of stable habitat corridors. With global habitat dynamics, a population using local dispersal exhibits lower density than one with global dispersal due to local crowding as well as frequent disturbance due to habitat transitions. On the other hand, with local habitat dynamics, a population using local dispersal can exploit suitable habitat patches and use dynamic corridors to colonize new regions. The latter effect is not seen with static landscapes, where clustered habitat can lead to the isolation of suitable patches due to surrounding unsuitable habitat.

  10. Locally dispersing populations in heterogeneous dynamic landscapes with spatiotemporal correlations. II. Habitat driven by voter dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebeler, David E; Hill, Jack L

    2016-10-21

    We examine a spatially explicit population model on a dynamic landscape with suitable and unsuitable habitat driven by voter or contagion dynamics. We consider four cases, consisting of all combinations of local and global interactions for both population dispersal and habitat dynamics. For both local and global population dispersal, using local habitat dynamics always increases population density relative to the case with global habitat dynamics, due to the resulting segregation of habitat turnover, decrease in effective habitat turnover rate, and presence of stable habitat corridors. With global habitat dynamics, a population using local dispersal exhibits lower density than one with global dispersal due to local crowding as well as frequent disturbance due to habitat transitions. On the other hand, with local habitat dynamics, a population using local dispersal can exploit suitable habitat patches and use dynamic corridors to colonize new regions. The latter effect is not seen with static landscapes, where clustered habitat can lead to the isolation of suitable patches due to surrounding unsuitable habitat. PMID:27457095

  11. Stochastic population dynamics in populations of western terrestrial garter snakes with divergent life histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David A.; Clark, W.R.; Arnold, S.J.; Bronikowski, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative evaluations of population dynamics in species with temporal and spatial variation in life-history traits are rare because they require long-term demographic time series from multiple populations. We present such an analysis using demographic data collected during the interval 1978-1996 for six populations of western terrestrial garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans) from two evolutionarily divergent ecotypes. Three replicate populations from a slow-living ecotype, found in mountain meadows of northeastern California, were characterized by individuals that develop slowly, mature late, reproduce infrequently with small reproductive effort, and live longer than individuals of three populations of a fast-living ecotype found at lakeshore locales. We constructed matrix population models for each of the populations based on 8-13 years of data per population and analyzed both deterministic dynamics based on mean annual vital rates and stochastic dynamics incorporating annual variation in vital rates. (1) Contributions of highly variable vital rates to fitness (??s) were buffered against the negative effects of stochastic variation, and this relationship was consistent with differences between the meadow (M-slow) and lakeshore (L-fast) ecotypes. (2) Annual variation in the proportion of gravid females had the greatest negative effect among all vital rates on ?? s. The magnitude of variation in the proportion of gravid females and its effect on ??s was greater in M-slow than L-fast populations. (3) Variation in the proportion of gravid females, in turn, depended on annual variation in prey availability, and its effect on ??s was 4- 23 times greater in M-slow than L-fast populations. In addition to differences in stochastic dynamics between ecotypes, we also found higher mean mortality rates across all age classes in the L-fast populations. Our results suggest that both deterministic and stochastic selective forces have affected the evolution of divergent life

  12. Population dynamics in the capitalist world-economy

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Danna

    2014-01-01

    World-systems analysis has given scant attention to population dynamics. Overlooked are large-scale macrohistorical population trends and their microhistorical foundation on procreative decisions-decisions which are taken by a historically changing subject of procreation: local elders or other authorities, head(s) of the household, couples, and women. The discipline of demography is also not as helpful as it could be, given its basis in modernization theory, which fails to recognize intention...

  13. Dynamic noise, chaos and parameter estimation in population biology

    OpenAIRE

    Stollenwerk, N.; Aguiar, M; Ballesteros, S.; Boto, J.; Kooi, B. W.; Mateus, L.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the parameter estimation framework for population biological dynamical systems, and apply it to calibrate various models in epidemiology with empirical time series, namely influenza and dengue fever. When it comes to more complex models such as multi-strain dynamics to describe the virus–host interaction in dengue fever, even the most recently developed parameter estimation techniques, such as maximum likelihood iterated filtering, reach their computational limits. However, the fir...

  14. Early life dynamics of the human gut virome and bacterial microbiome in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Efrem S; Zhou, Yanjiao; Zhao, Guoyan; Bauer, Irma K; Droit, Lindsay; Ndao, I Malick; Warner, Barbara B; Tarr, Phillip I; Wang, David; Holtz, Lori R

    2015-10-01

    The early years of life are important for immune development and influence health in adulthood. Although it has been established that the gut bacterial microbiome is rapidly acquired after birth, less is known about the viral microbiome (or 'virome'), consisting of bacteriophages and eukaryotic RNA and DNA viruses, during the first years of life. Here, we characterized the gut virome and bacterial microbiome in a longitudinal cohort of healthy infant twins. The virome and bacterial microbiome were more similar between co-twins than between unrelated infants. From birth to 2 years of age, the eukaryotic virome and the bacterial microbiome expanded, but this was accompanied by a contraction of and shift in the bacteriophage virome composition. The bacteriophage-bacteria relationship begins from birth with a high predator-low prey dynamic, consistent with the Lotka-Volterra prey model. Thus, in contrast to the stable microbiome observed in adults, the infant microbiome is highly dynamic and associated with early life changes in the composition of bacteria, viruses and bacteriophages with age. PMID:26366711

  15. The dynamic nature and territory of transcriptional machinery in the bacterial chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Jun Jin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of the regulation of genes involved in bacterial growth and stress responses is extensive; however, we have only recently begun to understand how environmental cues influence the dynamic, three-dimensional distribution of RNA polymerase (RNAP in Escherichia coli on the level of single cell, using wide-field fluorescence microscopy and state-of-the-art imaging techniques. Live-cell imaging using either an agarose-embedding procedure or a microfluidic system further underscores the dynamic nature of the distribution of RNAP in response to changes in the environment. A general agreement between live-cell and fixed-cell images has validated the formaldehyde-fixing procedure, which is a technical breakthrough in the study of the cell biology of RNAP. In this review we use a systems biology perspective to summarize the advances in the cell biology of RNAP in E. coli, including the discoveries of the bacterial nucleolus, the spatial compartmentalization of the transcription machinery at the periphery of the nucleoid, and the segregation of the chromosome territories for the two major cellular functions of transcription and replication in fast-growing cells. Our understanding of the coupling of transcription and bacterial chromosome (or nucleoid structure is also summarized. Using E. coli as a simple model system, co-imaging of RNAP with DNA and other factors during growth and stress responses will continue to be a useful tool for studying bacterial growth and adaptation in changing environment.

  16. Predicting population dynamics with analytical, simulation and supercomputer models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onstad, D.W.

    1987-07-01

    A set of epizootiological models describing the influence of a microsporidian disease on the population dynamics of an herbivorous insect demonstrate the similarities and differences between the three major approaches now available for ecological modeling. Simulation modeling allows the incorporation of randomness or the timing of discrete events in the temporal dynamics. More complex models incorporating both temporal and spatial dynamics in variable and heterogeneous environments require the use of supercomputers. Under a number of realistic circumstances, the qualitative predictions of the approaches may differ.

  17. Life history correlates of fecal bacterial species richness in a wild population of the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benskin, Clare McW H; Rhodes, Glenn; Pickup, Roger W; Mainwaring, Mark C; Wilson, Kenneth; Hartley, Ian R

    2015-02-01

    Very little is known about the normal gastrointestinal flora of wild birds, or how it might affect or reflect the host's life-history traits. The aim of this study was to survey the species richness of bacteria in the feces of a wild population of blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus and to explore the relationships between bacterial species richness and various life-history traits, such as age, sex, and reproductive success. Using PCR-TGGE, 55 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified in blue tit feces. DNA sequencing revealed that the 16S rRNA gene was amplified from a diverse range of bacteria, including those that shared closest homology with Bacillus licheniformis, Campylobacter lari, Pseudomonas spp., and Salmonella spp. For adults, there was a significant negative relationship between bacterial species richness and the likelihood of being detected alive the following breeding season; bacterial richness was consistent across years but declined through the breeding season; and breeding pairs had significantly more similar bacterial richness than expected by chance alone. Reduced adult survival was correlated with the presence of an OTU most closely resembling C. lari; enhanced adult survival was associated with an OTU most similar to Arthrobacter spp. For nestlings, there was no significant change in bacterial species richness between the first and second week after hatching, and nestlings sharing the same nest had significantly more similar bacterial richness. Collectively, these results provide compelling evidence that bacterial species richness was associated with several aspects of the life history of their hosts.

  18. Dandruff is associated with disequilibrium in the proportion of the major bacterial and fungal populations colonizing the scalp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Clavaud

    Full Text Available The bacterial and fungal communities associated with dandruff were investigated using culture-independent methodologies in the French subjects. The major bacterial and fungal species inhabiting the scalp subject's were identified by cloning and sequencing of the conserved ribosomal unit regions (16S for bacterial and 28S-ITS for fungal and were further quantified by quantitative PCR. The two main bacterial species found on the scalp surface were Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis, while Malassezia restricta was the main fungal inhabitant. Dandruff was correlated with a higher incidence of M. restricta and S. epidermidis and a lower incidence of P. acnes compared to the control population (p<0.05. These results suggested for the first time using molecular methods, that dandruff is linked to the balance between bacteria and fungi of the host scalp surface.

  19. Dynamics of Two Populations with Different Birth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Julia; Pekalski, Andrzej

    We propose a simple model describing the dynamics of a system of two populations — more numerous natives and less numerous immigrants. The immigrants' birth rate is higher than that of the natives. Several modifications of this model taking into account changes of the birth rates due to external factors and/or possibility of contacts between the populations, are also introduced. The model is studied within two approaches — by solving a set of differential equations and through a Monte Carlo simulations. We show that the question of which population will eventually dominate depends on such factors as the probability of producing offsprings of mixed origin, assimilation of the immigrants, the ratio of the birth rates, initial numbers of the populations and the average age of an individual. In all, but two extreme cases, both populations will survive.

  20. Bacterial dynamics during yearlong spontaneous fermentation for production of ngari, a dry fermented fish product of Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Khunjamayum Romapati; Deka, Manab; Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy

    2015-04-16

    Ngari is the most popular traditionally processed non-salted fish product, prepared from sun-dried small cyprinid fish Puntius sophore (Ham.) in Manipur state of Northeast India. The microbial involvement in ngari production remained uncertain due to its low moisture content and yearlong incubation in anaerobically sealed earthen pots without any significant change in total microbial count. The culture-independent PCR-DGGE analysis used during this study confirmed a drastic bacterial community structural change in comparison to its raw material. To understand the bacterial dynamics during this dry fermentation, time series samples collected over a period of nine months through destructive sampling from two indigenous ngari production centres were analysed by using both culture-dependent and culture-independent molecular methods. A total of 210 bacteria isolated from the samples were identified by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) based grouping and 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis. The dominant bacteria were Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. cohnii (38.0%), Tetragenococcus halophilus subsp. flandriensis (16.8%), a novel phylotype related to Lactobacillus pobuzihii (7.2%), Enterococcus faecium (7.2%), Bacillus indicus (6.3%) and Staphylococcus carnosus (3.8%). Distinct bacterial dynamics with the emergence of T. halophilus at third month (10(6)CFU/g), L. pobuzihii at sixth month (10(6)CFU/g), S. carnosus at three to six months (10(4)CFU/g) and B. indicus at six to nine months (10(5)CFU/g) in both the production centres was observed during ngari fermentation. However, the other two dominant bacteria S. cohnii and E. faecium were isolated throughout the fermentation with the population of 10(6)CFU/g and 10(4)CFU/g respectively. Culture-independent PCR-DGGE analysis further showed the presence of additional species, in which Kocuria halotolerans and Macrococcus caseolyticus disappeared during fermentation while Clostridium irregulare and

  1. Bacterial-biota dynamics of eight bryophyte species from different ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Koua, Faisal Hammad Mekky; Kimbara, Kazuhide; Tani, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of bryophyte-associated microorganisms in various ecological aspects including their crucial roles in the soil-enrichment of organic mass and N2 fixation, nonetheless, little is known about the microbial diversity of the bryophyte phyllospheres (epi-/endophytes). To get insights into bacterial community structures and their dynamics on the bryophyte habitats in different ecosystems and their potential biological roles, we utilized the 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE and subseque...

  2. Population Receptive Field Dynamics in Human Visual Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haak, Koen V.; Cornelissen, Frans W.; Morland, Antony B.

    2012-01-01

    Seminal work in the early nineties revealed that the visual receptive field of neurons in cat primary visual cortex can change in location and size when artificial scotomas are applied. Recent work now suggests that these single neuron receptive field dynamics also pertain to the neuronal population

  3. Binary populations and stellar dynamics in young clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Vanbeveren, D; Van Bever, J; Mennekens, N

    2008-01-01

    We first summarize work that has been done on the effects of binaries on theoretical population synthesis of stars and stellar phenomena. Next, we highlight the influence of stellar dynamics in young clusters by discussing a few candidate UFOs (unconventionally formed objects) like intermediate mass black holes, Eta Carinae, Zeta Puppis, Gamma Velorum and WR 140.

  4. Neuronal population dynamic model:An analytic approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wentao Huang; Licheng Jiao; Yuelei Xu; Shiping Ma; Jianhua Jia

    2009-01-01

    rom this,the stationary solution and the firing rate of the stationary states are given.Last,by the Fourier transform,the time dependent solution is also obtained.This method can be used to analyze the various dynamic behaviors of neuronal populations.

  5. Population dynamics of light-limited phytoplankton : Microcosm experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Jef

    1999-01-01

    This paper investigates the extent to which the predictions of an elementary model for light-limited growth are matched by laboratory experiments with light-limited phytoplankton. The model and experiments link the population dynamics of phytoplankton species with changes in the light gradient cause

  6. COMPARISON OF SAMPLING TECHNIQUES USED IN STUDYING LEPIDOPTERA POPULATION DYNAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four methods (light traps, foliage samples, canvas bands, and gypsy moth egg mass surveys) that are used to study the population dynamics of foliage-feeding Lepidoptera were compared for 10 species, including gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar L. Samples were collected weekly at 12 sit...

  7. Binary Populations and Stellar Dynamics in Young Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbeveren, D.; Belkus, H.; Van Bever, J.; Mennekens, N.

    2008-06-01

    We first summarize work that has been done on the effects of binaries on theoretical population synthesis of stars and stellar phenomena. Next, we highlight the influence of stellar dynamics in young clusters by discussing a few candidate UFOs (unconventionally formed objects) like intermediate mass black holes, η Car, ζ Pup, γ2 Velorum and WR 140.

  8. Predicting population and community dynamics: the type of aggregation matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, K.; Schiffers, T.; Münkemüller, T.; Schädler, M.; Calabrese, J.; Basset, A.; Breulmann, M.; Duquesne, S.; Hidding, B.; Huth, A.; Schöb, C.; Voorde, van de T.F.J.

    2010-01-01

    When investigating complex ecological dynamics at the population or community level, we necessarily need to abstract and aggregate ecological information. The way in which information is aggregated may be crucial for the outcome of the study. In this paper, we suggest that in addition to the traditi

  9. THE DYNAMICS OF REINTRODUCING, SUPPLEMENTING AND CONTROLLING ENDANGERED PREDATOR POPULATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Rondeau, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    A dynamic model is developed to analyze the reintroduction of endangered predators. Non-convexities and the conditions under which reintroduction is sub-optimal are studied. Following reintroduction, costly population control should be initiated before marginal animals impose net costs, providing an economic interpretation to changes in the sign of the shadow price.

  10. Individual based model of slug population and spatial dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Y.H.; Bohan, D.A.; Potting, R.P.J.; Semenov, M.A.; Glen, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    The slug, Deroceras reticulatum, is one of the most important pests of agricultural and horticultural crops in UK and Europe. In this paper, a spatially explicit individual based model (IbM) is developed to study the dynamics of a population of D. reticulatum. The IbM establishes a virtual field wit

  11. A population-level model from the microscopic dynamics in Escherichia coli chemotaxis via Langevin approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhuo-Ran; Wu Tai-Lin; Ouyang Qi; Tu Yu-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Recent extensive studies of Escherichia coli (E.coli) chemotaxis have achieved a deep understanding of its microscopic control dynamics.As a result,various quantitatively predictive models have been developed to describe the chemotactic behavior of E.coli motion.However,a population-level partial differential equation (PDE) that rationally incorporates such microscopic dynamics is still insufficient.Apart from the traditional Keller-Segel (K-S) equation,many existing population-level models developed from the microscopic dynamics are integro-PDEs.The difficulty comes mainly from cell tumbles which yield a velocity jumping process.Here,we propose a Langevin approximation method that avoids such a difficulty without appreciable loss of precision.The resulting model not only quantitatively reproduces the results of pathway-based single-cell simulators,but also provides new inside information on the mechanism of E.coli chemotaxis.Our study demonstrates a possible alternative in establishing a simple population-level model that allows for the complex microscopic mechanisms in bacterial chemotaxis.

  12. Development of polyvinyl chloride biofilms for succession of selected marine bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, V; Palanichamy, S; Subramanian, G; Rajaram, R

    2012-01-01

    Present investigation was made to bring out the pattern of biofilm formation by heterotrophic bacteria on nontoxic material, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) sheet fitted wooden rack that was immersed in seawater and the study was conducted in Tuticorin coast. Samplings were made over a period of 7 days with the following time period intervals: 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 and 144 hr. Bacterial enumeration was made by spread plate method on nutrient agar medium and characterization of bacterial isolates up to generic level was done. Gram-negative bacteria like Pseudomonas sp., Enterobacter sp., Aeromonas sp., Cytophaga sp. and Flavobacterium sp. were found to be the pioneer in colonizing the surface within 30 min and seven genera were represented in the biofilm. Among them two genera were found belonging to Gram-positive groups which included Micrococcus and Bacillus sp. The early stage biofilm i.e. up to 24th hr was wholly constituted by Gram-negative groups. However, the population density of Pseudomonas sp. was found to be higher (315 CFU) when compared to other Gram-negative forms. Occurrence of Gram-positive group was noted only at 48th hr old biofilm (28 to 150 CFU). The period between 48 and 96th hr was the transition where both the Gram-negative and Gram-positive groups co- existed. After 96th hr, the biofilm was found constituted only by Gram-positive groups. The isolates of early stage biofilm were found to produce allelopathic substance like bacteriocin.

  13. An individual-based model of Zebrafish population dynamics accounting for energy dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaudouin, Remy; Goussen, Benoit; Piccini, Benjamin;

    2015-01-01

    Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model......) was coupled to an individual based model of zebrafish population dynamics (IBM model). Next, we fitted the DEB model to new experimental data on zebrafish growth and reproduction thus improving existing models. We further analysed the DEB-model and DEB-IBM using a sensitivity analysis. Finally......, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding), it can...

  14. Dynamic laser speckle to detect motile bacterial response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendra, H [Laboratorio de Laser. Facultad de Ingenieria. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302. (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Murialdo, S [Grupo de Ingenieria BioquImica. Departamento de Quimica. Facultad de Ingenieria. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302. (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Passoni, L [Laboratorio de BioingenierIa. Facultad de Ingenieria. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302. (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    This proposal deals with the technique for detection of motile response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using dynamic laser speckle or biospeckle as an alternative method. The study of bacterial displacement plays an essential role in biocatalysts processes and biodegradation. Hence, some biodegrading enzymes are benign catalytic that could be used for the production of industrially useful compounds as well as in wastewater treatments. This work presents an experimental set up and a computational process using frame sequences of dynamic laser speckle as a novel application. The objective was the detection of different levels of motility in bacteria. The encouraging results were achieved through a direct and non invasive observation method of the phenomenon.

  15. Estimating spatio-temporal dynamics of size-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Andersen, Ken Haste;

    2014-01-01

    Spatial distributions of structured populations are usually estimated by fitting abundance surfaces for each stage and at each point of time separately, ignoring correlations that emerge from growth of individuals. Here, we present a statistical model that combines spatio-temporal correlations...... of individuals with similar size. The model estimates growth, mortality and reproduction, after which any aspect of size-structure, spatio-temporal population dynamics, as well as the sampling process can be probed. This is illustrated by two applications: 1) tracking the spatial movements of a single cohort...... with simple stock dynamics, to estimate simultaneously how size distributions and spatial distributions develop in time. We demonstrate the method for a cod population sampled by trawl surveys. Particular attention is paid to correlation between size classes within each trawl haul due to clustering...

  16. Evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on structured populations: A review

    CERN Document Server

    Perc, Matjaz; Szolnoki, Attila; Floría, Luis M; Moreno, Yamir; 10.1098/rsif.2012.0997

    2013-01-01

    Interactions among living organisms, from bacteria colonies to human societies, are inherently more complex than interactions among particles and nonliving matter. Group interactions are a particularly important and widespread class, representative of which is the public goods game. In addition, methods of statistical physics have proven valuable for studying pattern formation, equilibrium selection, and self-organisation in evolutionary games. Here we review recent advances in the study of evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on structured populations, including lattices, complex networks and coevolutionary models. We also compare these results with those obtained on well-mixed populations. The review particularly highlights that the study of the dynamics of group interactions, like several other important equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamical processes in biological, economical and social sciences, benefits from the synergy between statistical physics, network science and evolutionary game theory...

  17. Nonequilibrium population dynamics of phenotype conversion of cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Xu Zhou

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is a dynamic biological process that involves distinct cancer cell subpopulations proliferating at different rates and interconverting between them. In this paper we proposed a mathematical framework of population dynamics that considers both distinctive growth rates and intercellular transitions between cancer cell populations. Our mathematical framework showed that both growth and transition influence the ratio of cancer cell subpopulations but the latter is more significant. We derived the condition that different cancer cell types can maintain distinctive subpopulations and we also explain why there always exists a stable fixed ratio after cell sorting based on putative surface markers. The cell fraction ratio can be shifted by changing either the growth rates of the subpopulations (Darwinism selection or by environment-instructed transitions (Lamarckism induction. This insight can help us to understand the dynamics of the heterogeneity of cancer cells and lead us to new strategies to overcome cancer drug resistance.

  18. Arsenic oxidation capabilities of a chemoautotrophic bacterial population: Use for the treatment of an arsenic contaminated wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dictor, M.-C.; Battaglia-Brunet, F.; Garrido, F.; Baranger, P.

    2003-05-01

    An autotrophic bacterial population, named CAsOl, able to oxidise arsenic has been isolated from a former gold mine (Saint-Yrieix, France). This bacterial population was composed of two microorganisms: a bacterial strain close to Ralstonia picketii and the second one related to Thiomonas genus (identification by 16S rDNA sequencing). This microbial consortium was able to oxidise arsenic with CO2 as the carbon source, arsenite as electron donor and oxygen as electron accepter. A significant oxidising activity was observed in a pH range comprised between 3 to 8 (pH optimum 5 7). A laboratory experiment for the biological treatment of a synthetic effluent containing 100 mg.L^{-1} of arsenic has been carried out. A mineral support, pouzzolana, has been colonised by the population CAsOl and the column was fed continuously with a synthetic medium in order to determine the maximal arsenic oxidation rate and the optimal residence time. In our experimental conditions, the maximum arsenic oxidation rate was 3,9 g As(Ill). L^{-1}.day^{-1} with a residence time of 1 hour after 55 days of continuous running. The performance of our bacterial population for arsenite oxidation in arsenic contaminated wastewater are especially important in the case of a treatment of arsenious wastewater as it presents advantages compared to physico-chemical treatments (consumption and cost of chemicals, potential toxic by-products generation...).

  19. Emergence of Competitive Dominant Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Populations in a Full-Scale Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, Alice C.; Dionisi, Hebe; Kuo, H.-W.; Robinson, Kevin G.; Garrett, Victoria M.; Meyers, Arthur; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial populations in an industrial wastewater treatment plant were investigated with amoA and 16S rRNA gene real-time PCR assays. Nitrosomonas nitrosa initially dominated, but over time RI-27-type ammonia oxidizers, also within the Nitrosomonas communis lineage, increased from below detection to codominance. This shift occurred even though nitrification remained constant.

  20. Association mapping of common bacterial blight resistance QTL in Ontario bean breeding populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navabi Alireza

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common bacterial blight (CBB, incited by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap, is a major yield-limiting factor of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. production around the world. Host resistance is practically the most effective and environmentally-sound approach to control CBB. Unlike conventional QTL discovery strategies, in which bi-parental populations (F2, RIL, or DH need to be developed, association mapping-based strategies can use plant breeding populations to synchronize QTL discovery and cultivar development. Results A population of 469 dry bean lines of different market classes representing plant materials routinely developed in a bean breeding program were used. Of them, 395 lines were evaluated for CBB resistance at 14 and 21 DAI (Days After Inoculation in the summer of 2009 in an artificially inoculated CBB nursery in south-western Ontario. All lines were genotyped using 132 SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms evenly distributed across the genome. Of the 132 SNPs, 26 SNPs had more than 20% missing data, 12 SNPs were monomorphic, and 17 SNPs had a MAF (Minor Allelic Frequency of less than 0.20, therefore only 75 SNPs were used for association study, based on one SNP per locus. The best possible population structure was to assign 36% and 64% of the lines into Andean and Mesoamerican subgroups, respectively. Kinship analysis also revealed complex familial relationships among all lines, which corresponds with the known pedigree history. MLM (Mixed Linear Model analysis, including population structure and kinship, was used to discover marker-trait associations. Eighteen and 22 markers were significantly associated with CBB rating at 14 and 21 DAI, respectively. Fourteen markers were significant for both dates and the markers UBC420, SU91, g321, g471, and g796 were highly significant (p ≤ 0.001. Furthermore, 12 significant SNP markers were co-localized with or close to the CBB-QTLs identified previously in bi

  1. Metamodels for transdisciplinary analysis of wildlife population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Lacy

    Full Text Available Wildlife population models have been criticized for their narrow disciplinary perspective when analyzing complexity in coupled biological - physical - human systems. We describe a "metamodel" approach to species risk assessment when diverse threats act at different spatiotemporal scales, interact in non-linear ways, and are addressed by distinct disciplines. A metamodel links discrete, individual models that depict components of a complex system, governing the flow of information among models and the sequence of simulated events. Each model simulates processes specific to its disciplinary realm while being informed of changes in other metamodel components by accessing common descriptors of the system, populations, and individuals. Interactions among models are revealed as emergent properties of the system. We introduce a new metamodel platform, both to further explain key elements of the metamodel approach and as an example that we hope will facilitate the development of other platforms for implementing metamodels in population biology, species risk assessments, and conservation planning. We present two examples - one exploring the interactions of dispersal in metapopulations and the spread of infectious disease, the other examining predator-prey dynamics - to illustrate how metamodels can reveal complex processes and unexpected patterns when population dynamics are linked to additional extrinsic factors. Metamodels provide a flexible, extensible method for expanding population viability analyses beyond models of isolated population demographics into more complete representations of the external and intrinsic threats that must be understood and managed for species conservation.

  2. Metamodels for transdisciplinary analysis of wildlife population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Robert C; Miller, Philip S; Nyhus, Philip J; Pollak, J P; Raboy, Becky E; Zeigler, Sara L

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife population models have been criticized for their narrow disciplinary perspective when analyzing complexity in coupled biological - physical - human systems. We describe a "metamodel" approach to species risk assessment when diverse threats act at different spatiotemporal scales, interact in non-linear ways, and are addressed by distinct disciplines. A metamodel links discrete, individual models that depict components of a complex system, governing the flow of information among models and the sequence of simulated events. Each model simulates processes specific to its disciplinary realm while being informed of changes in other metamodel components by accessing common descriptors of the system, populations, and individuals. Interactions among models are revealed as emergent properties of the system. We introduce a new metamodel platform, both to further explain key elements of the metamodel approach and as an example that we hope will facilitate the development of other platforms for implementing metamodels in population biology, species risk assessments, and conservation planning. We present two examples - one exploring the interactions of dispersal in metapopulations and the spread of infectious disease, the other examining predator-prey dynamics - to illustrate how metamodels can reveal complex processes and unexpected patterns when population dynamics are linked to additional extrinsic factors. Metamodels provide a flexible, extensible method for expanding population viability analyses beyond models of isolated population demographics into more complete representations of the external and intrinsic threats that must be understood and managed for species conservation. PMID:24349567

  3. An age structured model for obesity prevalence dynamics in populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto González Parra

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Modeling the correlation of the development of obesity in a population with age and time and predict the dynamics of the correlation of the development of obesity in a population with age and time under different scenarios in Valencia (Spain. Materials and methods. An age structured mathematical model is used to describe the future dynamics of obesity prevalence for different ages in human population with excess weight. Simulation of the model with parameters estimated using the Health Survey of the Region of Valencia 2000 (4.319 interviews and Health Survey of the Region of Valencia 2005 (4.012 interviews. The model considers only overweight and obese populations since these subpopulations are the most relevant on obesity health concern. Results. The model allows predicting and studying the prevalence of obesity for each age. Results showed an increasing trend of obesity in the following years in well accordance with the trend observed in several countries. Conclusions. Based on the numerical simulations it is possible to conclude that the age structured mathematical model is suitable to forecast the obesity epidemic in each age group in different countries. Additionally, this type of models may be applied to study other characteristics of other populations such animal populations.

  4. Diversity Waves in Collapse-Driven Population Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Maslov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe reduction in size of the population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is characterized by cyclic ''diversity waves'' triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances have bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak--species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies.

  5. Diversity Waves in Collapse-Driven Population Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-09-01

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe reduction in size of the population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is characterized by cyclic ''diversity waves'' triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances have bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak--species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies. PMID:26367172

  6. The population dynamics of an endemic collectible cactus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandujano, María C.; Bravo, Yolotzin; Verhulst, Johannes; Carrillo-Angeles, Israel; Golubov, Jordan

    2015-02-01

    Astrophytum is one of most collected genera in the cactus family. Around the world several species are maintained in collections and yearly, several plants are taken from their natural habitats. Populations of Astorphytum capricorne are found in the northern Chihuahuan desert, Mexico, and as many endemic cactus species, it has a highly restricted habitat. We conducted a demographic study from 2008 to 2010 of the northern populations found at Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. We applied matrix population models, included simulations, life table response experiments and descriptions of the population dynamics to evaluate the current status of the species, and detect key life table stages and demographic processes. Population growth rate decreased in both years and only 4% individual mortality can be attributed to looting, and a massive effort is needed to increase seedling recruitment and reduce adult mortality. The fate of individuals differed between years even having the same annual rainfall mainly in accentuated stasis, retrogression and high mortality in all size classes, which coupled with low seed production, no recruitment and collection of plants are the causes contributing to population decline, and hence, increase the risk in which A. capricorne populations are found. Reintroduction of seedlings and lowering adult mortality are urgently needed to revert the alarming demographic condition of A. capricorne populations.

  7. Impact of Bioreactor Environment and Recovery Method on the Profile of Bacterial Populations from Water Distribution Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xia; Jellison, Kristen L; Huynh, Kevin; Widmer, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Multiple rotating annular reactors were seeded with biofilms flushed from water distribution systems to assess (1) whether biofilms grown in bioreactors are representative of biofilms flushed from the water distribution system in terms of bacterial composition and diversity, and (2) whether the biofilm sampling method affects the population profile of the attached bacterial community. Biofilms were grown in bioreactors until thickness stabilized (9 to 11 weeks) and harvested from reactor coupons by sonication, stomaching, bead-beating, and manual scraping. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons was used to profile bacterial populations from flushed biofilms seeded into bioreactors as well as biofilms recovered from bioreactor coupons by different methods. β diversity between flushed and reactor biofilms was compared to β diversity between (i) biofilms harvested from different reactors and (ii) biofilms harvested by different methods from the same reactor. These analyses showed that average diversity between flushed and bioreactor biofilms was double the diversity between biofilms from different reactors operated in parallel. The diversity between bioreactors was larger than the diversity associated with different biofilm recovery methods. Compared to other experimental variables, the method used to recover biofilms had a negligible impact on the outcome of water biofilm analyses based on 16S amplicon sequencing. Results from this study show that biofilms grown in reactors over 9 to 11 weeks are not representative models of the microbial populations flushed from a distribution system. Furthermore, the bacterial population profile of biofilms grown in replicate reactors from the same flushed water are likely to diverge. However, four common sampling protocols, which differ with respect to disruption of bacterial cells, provide similar information with respect to the 16S rRNA population profile of the biofilm community.

  8. How Predation and Landscape Fragmentation Affect Vole Population Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalkvist, Trine; Sibly, Richard M.; Topping, Chris J.

    2011-01-01

    population cycles. Because these factors covary along the gradient it is difficult to distinguish their effects experimentally in the field. The distinction is here attempted using realistic agent-based modelling. Methodology/Principal Findings: By using a spatially explicit computer simulation model based...... on behavioural and ecological data from the field vole (Microtus agrestis), we generated a number of repeated time series of vole densities whose mean population size and amplitude were measured. Subsequently, these time series were subjected to statistical autoregressive modelling, to investigate the effects...... on vole population dynamics of making predators more specialised, of altering the breeding season, and increasing the level of habitat fragmentation. We found that fragmentation as well as the presence of specialist predators are necessary for the occurrence of population cycles. Habitat fragmentation...

  9. Biogeochemical controls on the bacterial populations in the eastern Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Neogi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about bacterial dynamics in the oligotrophic ocean, particularly about cultivable bacteria. We examined the abundance of total and cultivable bacteria in relation to changes in biogeochemical conditions in the eastern Atlantic Ocean with special regard to Vibrio spp., a group of bacteria that can cause diseases in human and aquatic organisms. Surface, deep water and plankton (<20 μm, 20–55 μm and >55 μm samples were collected between 50° N and 24° S. Chlorophyll-a was very low (<0.3 μg l−1 in most areas of the nutrient-poor Atlantic, except at a few locations near upwelling regions. In surface water, dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrogen (DON concentrations were 64–95 μM C and 2–10 μM N accounting for ≥90 % and ≥76 % of total organic C and N, respectively. DOC and DON gradually decreased to ~45 μM C and <5 μM N in the bottom water. In the surface layer, culture independent total bacteria and other prokaryotes represented by 4´-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI counts, ranged mostly between 107 and 108 cells l−1, while cultivable bacterial counts (CBC and Vibrio spp. were found at concentrations of 104–107 and 102–105 colony forming units (CFU l−1, respectively. Most bacteria (>99 % were found in the nanoplankton fraction (<20 μm, however, bacterial abundance did not correlate with suspended particulates (chlorophyll-a, particulate organic C [POC] and N [PON]. Instead, we found a highly significant correlation between bacterial abundance and temperature (p < 0.001 and a significant correlation with DOC and DON (p < 0.005 and <0.01, respectively. In comparison to CBC and DAPI-stained prokaryotes, cultivable Vibrio showed a stronger and highly significant correlation with DOC and DON (p < 0.0005 and p < 0.005, respectively. In cold waters

  10. Bacterial community dynamics in surface flow constructed wetlands for the treatment of swine waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, A M; Ma, J; Murinda, Shelton; Reddy, G B

    2016-02-15

    Constructed wetlands are generally used for the removal of waste from contaminated water. In the swine production system, wastes are traditionally flushed into an anaerobic lagoon which is then sprayed on agricultural fields. However, continuous spraying of lagoon wastewater on fields can lead to high N and P accumulations in soil or lead to runoff which may contaminate surface or ground water with pathogens and nutrients. In this study, continuous marsh constructed wetland was used for the removal of contaminants from swine waste. Using pyrosequencing, we assessed bacterial composition within the wetland using principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) which showed that bacterial composition from manure influent and lagoon water were significantly different (P=0.001) from the storage pond to the final effluent. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that different bacterial populations were significantly impacted by ammonium--NH4 (P=0.035), phosphate--PO4(3-) (P=0.010), chemical oxygen demand--COD (P=0.0165), total solids--TS (P=0.030), and dissolved solids--DS (P=0.030) removal, with 54% of the removal rate explained by NH4+PO4(3-) according to a partial CCA. Our results showed that different bacterial groups were responsible for the composition of different wetland nutrients and decomposition process. This may be the major reason why most wetlands are very efficient in waste decomposition. PMID:26657250

  11. Bacterial community dynamics in surface flow constructed wetlands for the treatment of swine waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, A M; Ma, J; Murinda, Shelton; Reddy, G B

    2016-02-15

    Constructed wetlands are generally used for the removal of waste from contaminated water. In the swine production system, wastes are traditionally flushed into an anaerobic lagoon which is then sprayed on agricultural fields. However, continuous spraying of lagoon wastewater on fields can lead to high N and P accumulations in soil or lead to runoff which may contaminate surface or ground water with pathogens and nutrients. In this study, continuous marsh constructed wetland was used for the removal of contaminants from swine waste. Using pyrosequencing, we assessed bacterial composition within the wetland using principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) which showed that bacterial composition from manure influent and lagoon water were significantly different (P=0.001) from the storage pond to the final effluent. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that different bacterial populations were significantly impacted by ammonium--NH4 (P=0.035), phosphate--PO4(3-) (P=0.010), chemical oxygen demand--COD (P=0.0165), total solids--TS (P=0.030), and dissolved solids--DS (P=0.030) removal, with 54% of the removal rate explained by NH4+PO4(3-) according to a partial CCA. Our results showed that different bacterial groups were responsible for the composition of different wetland nutrients and decomposition process. This may be the major reason why most wetlands are very efficient in waste decomposition.

  12. Population dynamics in Er3+-doped fluoride glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, V. K.; Booth, D. J.; Gibbs, W. E.; Javorniczky, J. S.; Newman, P. J.; Macfarlane, D. R.

    2001-05-01

    A detailed study of the energy-transfer processes in Er3+: flouride glasses with doping concentrations of 0.2-18 mol % is presented. Fluorescence wave forms for 11 erbium transitions were measured under 802-nm, 1.5-μm, 975-nm, 520-nm, and 403-nm excitation from a high-energy short-pulse source. The analysis of these data provided a physical understanding of the processes responsible for the temporal behavior of the populations of a large number of energy levels. A comprehensive nine-level rate-equation model of the Er3+ population dynamics in these fluoride glasses is developed. The model performs well in predicting the observed fluorescence behavior of the main fluorescing lines under all pumping conditions. The modeling process allowed 14 ion-ion energy-transfer processes that are important for the population dynamics in these fluoride glasses to be identified and their rate constants obtained. Noticeably, the inclusion of seven three-ion processes was found necessary in order to obtain good fits to the experimental fluorescence wave forms. It was also found that some three-ion processes have a significant effect on the population dynamics of the levels even in lower doping concentrations.

  13. Association between Toll-like receptor 9 gene polymorphisms and risk of bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X H; Shi, H P; Li, F J

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether two common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Toll-like receptor 9 gene (TLR9) (TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836) influenced susceptibility to bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population. The study comprised 126 patients with bacterial meningitis and 252 control subjects, all of whom were recruited from the Tuberculosis Hospital of Shanxi Province. Genotyping of TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836 was performed by polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that individuals with the AA genotype were associated with an increased risk of bacterial meningitis compared with those with the GG genotype (OR = 0.43, 95%CI = 0.19-0.95; P = 0.03). In a recessive model, the AA genotype was correlated with an elevated risk of bacterial meningitis compared with the GG+GA genotype (OR = 0.49, 95%CI = 0.22-0.99; P = 0.04). However, no significant differences were observed in the association between the TLR9-1237 rs5743836 polymorphism and the risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant, dominant, or recessive models. In conclusion, the results of our study suggest an association between the TLR9+2848 polymorphism and a reduced risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant and recessive models. PMID:27525854

  14. Assessing tiger population dynamics using photographic capture-recapture sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, K.U.; Nichols, J.D.; Kumar, N.S.; Hines, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Although wide-ranging, elusive, large carnivore species, such as the tiger, are of scientific and conservation interest, rigorous inferences about their population dynamics are scarce because of methodological problems of sampling populations at the required spatial and temporal scales. We report the application of a rigorous, noninvasive method for assessing tiger population dynamics to test model-based predictions about population viability. We obtained photographic capture histories for 74 individual tigers during a nine-year study involving 5725 trap-nights of effort. These data were modeled under a likelihood-based, ?robust design? capture?recapture analytic framework. We explicitly modeled and estimated ecological parameters such as time-specific abundance, density, survival, recruitment, temporary emigration, and transience, using models that incorporated effects of factors such as individual heterogeneity, trap-response, and time on probabilities of photo-capturing tigers. The model estimated a random temporary emigration parameter of =K' =Y' 0.10 ? 0.069 (values are estimated mean ? SE). When scaled to an annual basis, tiger survival rates were estimated at S = 0.77 ? 0.051, and the estimated probability that a newly caught animal was a transient was = 0.18 ? 0.11. During the period when the sampled area was of constant size, the estimated population size Nt varied from 17 ? 1.7 to 31 ? 2.1 tigers, with a geometric mean rate of annual population change estimated as = 1.03 ? 0.020, representing a 3% annual increase. The estimated recruitment of new animals, Bt, varied from 0 ? 3.0 to 14 ? 2.9 tigers. Population density estimates, D, ranged from 7.33 ? 0.8 tigers/100 km2 to 21.73 ? 1.7 tigers/100 km2 during the study. Thus, despite substantial annual losses and temporal variation in recruitment, the tiger density remained at relatively high levels in Nagarahole. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that protected wild tiger populations can remain

  15. Airborne bacterial populations above desert soils of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottos, Eric M; Woo, Anthony C; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Pointing, Stephen B; Cary, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria are assumed to disperse widely via aerosolized transport due to their small size and resilience. The question of microbial endemicity in isolated populations is directly related to the level of airborne exogenous inputs, yet this has proven hard to identify. The ice-free terrestrial ecosystem of Antarctica, a geographically and climatically isolated continent, was used to interrogate microbial bio-aerosols in relation to the surrounding ecology and climate. High-throughput sequencing of bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes was combined with analyses of climate patterns during an austral summer. In general terms, the aerosols were dominated by Firmicutes, whereas surrounding soils supported Actinobacteria-dominated communities. The most abundant taxa were also common to aerosols from other continents, suggesting that a distinct bio-aerosol community is widely dispersed. No evidence for significant marine input to bioaerosols was found at this maritime valley site, instead local influence was largely from nearby volcanic sources. Back trajectory analysis revealed transport of incoming regional air masses across the Antarctic Plateau, and this is envisaged as a strong selective force. It is postulated that local soil microbial dispersal occurs largely via stochastic mobilization of mineral soil particulates. PMID:24121801

  16. Integrating population dynamics into mapping human exposure to seismic hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Freire

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Disaster risk is not fully characterized without taking into account vulnerability and population exposure. Assessment of earthquake risk in urban areas would benefit from considering the variation of population distribution at more detailed spatial and temporal scales, and from a more explicit integration of this improved demographic data with existing seismic hazard maps. In the present work, "intelligent" dasymetric mapping is used to model population dynamics at high spatial resolution in order to benefit the analysis of spatio-temporal exposure to earthquake hazard in a metropolitan area. These night- and daytime-specific population densities are then classified and combined with seismic intensity levels to derive new spatially-explicit four-class-composite maps of human exposure. The presented approach enables a more thorough assessment of population exposure to earthquake hazard. Results show that there are significantly more people potentially at risk in the daytime period, demonstrating the shifting nature of population exposure in the daily cycle and the need to move beyond conventional residence-based demographic data sources to improve risk analyses. The proposed fine-scale maps of human exposure to seismic intensity are mainly aimed at benefiting visualization and communication of earthquake risk, but can be valuable in all phases of the disaster management process where knowledge of population densities is relevant for decision-making.

  17. The effects of a probiotic yeast on the bacterial diversity and population structure in the rumen of cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Pinloche; Neil McEwan; Jean-Philippe Marden; Corinne Bayourthe; Eric Auclair; C Jamie Newbold

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the ability of live yeast to improve milk yield and weight gain in cattle is because the yeast stimulates bacterial activity within the rumen. However it remains unclear if this is a general stimulation of all species or a specific stimulation of certain species. Here we characterised the change in the bacterial population within the rumen of cattle fed supplemental live yeast. Three cannulated lactating cows received a daily ration (24 kg/d) of corn silage (61% of ...

  18. Paths and patterns: the biology and physics of swimming bacterial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, J. O.; Strittmatter, R. P.; Swartz, D. L.; Wiseley, D. A.; Wojciechowski, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    The velocity distribution of swimming micro-organisms depends on directional cues supplied by the environment. Directional swimming within a bounded space results in the accumulation of organisms near one or more surfaces. Gravity, gradients of chemical concentration and illumination affect the motile behaviour of individual swimmers. Concentrated populations of organisms scatter and absorb light or consume molecules, such as oxygen. When supply is one-sided, consumption creates gradients; the presence of the population alters the intensity and the symmetry of the environmental cues. Patterns of cues interact dynamically with patterns of the consumer population. In suspensions, spatial variations in the concentration of organisms are equivalent to variations of mean mass density of the fluid. When organisms accumulate in one region whilst moving away from another region, the force of gravity causes convection that translocates both organisms and dissolved substances. The geometry of the resulting concentration-convection patterns has features that are remarkably reproducible. Of interest for biology are (1) the long-range organisation achieved by organisms that do not communicate, and (2) that the entire system, consisting of fluid, cells, directional supply of consumables, boundaries and gravity, generates a dynamic that improves the organisms' habitat by enhancing transport and mixing. Velocity distributions of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis have been measured within the milieu of the spatially and temporally varying oxygen concentration which they themselves create. These distributions of swimming speed and direction are the fundamental ingredients required for a quantitative mathematical treatment of the patterns. The quantitative measurement of swimming behaviour also contributes to our understanding of aerotaxis of individual cells.

  19. Bacterial dynamics in model cheese systems, aiming at safety and quality of Portuguese-style traditional ewe's cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cláudia I; Graça, João A; Ogando, Natacha S; Gomes, Ana M P; Malcata, F Xavier

    2009-11-01

    An experiment using model ewe's milk cheeses was designed to characterize microbial interactions that arise in actual raw milk cheese environments. These model cheeses were manufactured according to Portuguese artisanal practices, except that the microbial load and biodiversity were fully controlled: single potential pathogens and spoilage bacteria, or a combination thereof, were combined at various initial inoculum levels in sterilized raw ewe's milk with several lactic acid bacteria (LAB) normally found in traditional cheeses. Viable microbial counts were monitored throughout a 60-day ripening period. Two alternative mathematical approaches were used to fit the experimental data generated in terms of population dynamics: percent of inhibition and D-values. These were able to explain the complex competitive interactions between the contaminant microorganisms and the LAB adventitious populations. In general, the tested LAB were less able to inhibit contaminants present in combination and in higher concentrations. Lactococcus lactis, with its strong acidifying potential, was the most effective factor in controlling the unwanted bacterial population, especially single Staphylococcus aureus. The two lactobacilli studied, especially Lactobacillus brevis, were shown to be less effective; Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua were the contaminants least inhibited by the LAB.

  20. Effect of temperature on the population dynamics of Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Nuraini; Tokachil, Mohd Najir

    2015-10-01

    Aedes aegypti is one of the main vectors in the transmission of dengue fever. Its abundance may cause the spread of the disease to be more intense. In the study of its biological life cycle, temperature was found to increase the development rate of each stage of this species and thus, accelerate the process of the development from egg to adult. In this paper, a Lefkovitch matrix model will be used to study the stage-structured population dynamics of Aedes aegypti. In constructing the transition matrix, temperature will be taken into account. As a case study, temperature recorded at the Subang Meteorological Station for year 2006 until 2010 will be used. Population dynamics of Aedes aegypti at maximum, average and minimum temperature for each year will be simulated and compared. It is expected that the higher the temperature, the faster the mosquito will breed. The result will be compared to the number of dengue fever incidences to see their relationship.

  1. STOCHASTIC WEALTH DYNAMICS AND RISK MANAGEMENT AMONG A POOR POPULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Lybbert, Travis J.; Barrett, Christopher B.; Desta, Solomon; Coppock, D. Layne

    2002-01-01

    The literature on economic growth and development has focused considerable attention on questions of risk management and the possibility of multiple equilibria associated with poverty traps. We use herd history data collected among pastoralists in southern Ethiopia to study stochastic wealth dynamics among a very poor population. These data yield several novel findings. Although covariate rainfall shocks plainly matter, household-specific factors, including own herd size, account for most obs...

  2. Seasonal Population Dynamics of Three Potato Pests in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, Elizabeth M; Wohleb, Carrie H; Waters, Timothy D; Crowder, David W

    2016-08-01

    Pest phenology models allow producers to anticipate pest outbreaks and deploy integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. Phenology models are particularly useful for cropping systems with multiple economically damaging pests throughout a season. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) crops of Washington State, USA, are attacked by many insect pests including the potato tuberworm (Phthorimaea operculella Zeller), the beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus Baker), and the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer). Each of these pests directly damages potato foliage or tubers; C. tenellus and M. persicae also transmit pathogens that can drastically reduce potato yields. We monitored the seasonal population dynamics of these pests by conducting weekly sampling on a network of commercial farms from 2007 to 2014. Using these data, we developed phenology models to characterize the seasonal population dynamics of each pest based on accumulated degree-days (DD). All three pests exhibited consistent population dynamics across seasons that were mediated by temperature. Of the three pests, C. tenellus was generally the first detected in potato crops, with 90% of adults captured by 936 DD. In contrast, populations of P. operculella and M. persicae built up more slowly over the course of the season, with 90% cumulative catch by 1,590 and 2,634 DD, respectively. Understanding these seasonal patterns could help potato producers plan their IPM strategies while allowing them to move away from calendar-based applications of insecticides. More broadly, our results show how long-term monitoring studies that explore dynamics of multiple pest species can aid in developing IPM strategies in crop systems.

  3. Nonlinear modeling of neural population dynamics for hippocampal prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Dong; Chan, Rosa H.M.; Vasilis Z Marmarelis; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.; Berger, Theodore W.

    2009-01-01

    Developing a neural prosthesis for the damaged hippocampus requires restoring the transformation of population neural activities performed by the hippocampal circuitry. To bypass a damaged region, output spike trains need to be predicted from the input spike trains and then reinstated through stimulation. We formulate a multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) nonlinear dynamic model for the input–output transformation of spike trains. In this approach, a MIMO model comprises a series of physio...

  4. On a New Mechanism of Pattern Formation in Population Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Génieys, Stéphane; Volpert, Vitaly; Auger, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    We study a reaction-diffusion equation with an integral term describing nonlocal consumption of resources. We show that a homogeneous equilibrium can lose its stability resulting in appearance of stationary spatial structures. It is a new mechanism of pattern formation in population dynamics that can explain emergence of biological species due to intra-specific competition and random mutations.Travelling waves connecting an unstable homogeneous equilibrium and a periodic in space stationary s...

  5. Central-marginal population dynamics in species invasions

    OpenAIRE

    Qinfeng eGuo

    2014-01-01

    The species’ range limits and associated central-marginal (C-M; i.e., from species range center to margin) population dynamics continue to draw increasing attention because of their importance for current emerging issues such as biotic invasions and epidemic diseases under global change. Previous studies have mainly focused on species borders and C-M process in natural settings for native species. More recently, growing efforts are devoted to examine the C-M patterns and process for invasiv...

  6. Development of paradigms for the dynamics of structured populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This is a technical progress report on the dynamics of predator-prey systems in a patchy environment. A new phenomenon that might contribute to outbreaks in systems of discrete patches has been determined using a discrete time model with both spatial and age structure. A model for a single species in a patchy environment with migration, local population growth and disasters with in patches has been formulated and a brief description is included.

  7. Learning to Estimate Dynamical State with Probabilistic Population Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, Joseph G; Dichter, Benjamin K; Sabes, Philip N

    2015-11-01

    Tracking moving objects, including one's own body, is a fundamental ability of higher organisms, playing a central role in many perceptual and motor tasks. While it is unknown how the brain learns to follow and predict the dynamics of objects, it is known that this process of state estimation can be learned purely from the statistics of noisy observations. When the dynamics are simply linear with additive Gaussian noise, the optimal solution is the well known Kalman filter (KF), the parameters of which can be learned via latent-variable density estimation (the EM algorithm). The brain does not, however, directly manipulate matrices and vectors, but instead appears to represent probability distributions with the firing rates of population of neurons, "probabilistic population codes." We show that a recurrent neural network-a modified form of an exponential family harmonium (EFH)-that takes a linear probabilistic population code as input can learn, without supervision, to estimate the state of a linear dynamical system. After observing a series of population responses (spike counts) to the position of a moving object, the network learns to represent the velocity of the object and forms nearly optimal predictions about the position at the next time-step. This result builds on our previous work showing that a similar network can learn to perform multisensory integration and coordinate transformations for static stimuli. The receptive fields of the trained network also make qualitative predictions about the developing and learning brain: tuning gradually emerges for higher-order dynamical states not explicitly present in the inputs, appearing as delayed tuning for the lower-order states. PMID:26540152

  8. Age structure and dynamics of Zoysia japonica module population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAIBao-qing; WANGYan

    2005-01-01

    The age structure of the natural Zoysia japonica clonal population at Qipan Mountain in Huishan Scenic Spot of Shenyang,Liaoning Province, China was studied using the morphological method in 2003 and 2004. The dynamics of leaves were recorded and the dynamics of tiller and rhizome in the growing season were observed. The results indicated that the rhizomes formed in different years changed in color and rigidity. Its internodes produced in autumn became shorter. The number of naked nodes changed with the tiller age.Rhizome and tiller characters were used as a foundation for judging the ages of modules in this study. The longevity of tiller and rhizome was 3 years at most. At the beginning of the growing season, 2-year-old tillers and rhizomes predominated. Then I -year-old tillers and rhizomes increased rapidly and became dominant in July. The proportion of buds to tillers on quantity was stable at about 30% in the mid-phase of the growing season and rose to about 50% in autumn. The seasonal dynamics of tiller, rhizome and bud was very important to guarantee the sustained existence of the Zoysia japonica population. The turnover of modules was the mechanism of sustaining the rejuvenation of the Zoysia japonica clonal population.

  9. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Bargiela, Rafael

    2015-06-29

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills.

  10. Pattern formation and coexistence domains for a nonlocal population dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    da Cunha, J A R; Oliveira, F A

    2011-01-01

    In this communication we propose a most general equation to study pattern formation for one-species population and their limit domains in systems of length L. To accomplish this we include non-locality in the growth and competition terms where the integral kernels are now depend on characteristic length parameters alpha and beta. Therefore, we derived a parameter space (alpha,beta) where it is possible to analyze a coexistence curve alpha*=alpha*(\\beta) which delimits domains for the existence (or not) of pattern formation in population dynamics systems. We show that this curve has an analogy with coexistence curve in classical thermodynamics and critical phenomena physics. We have successfully compared this model with experimental data for diffusion of Escherichia coli populations.

  11. Connection between dynamically derived IMF normalisation and stellar populations

    CERN Document Server

    McDermid, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    In this contributed talk I present recent results on the connection between stellar population properties and the normalisation of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) measured using stellar dynamics, based on a large sample of 260 early-type galaxies observed as part of the Atlas3D project. This measure of the IMF normalisation is found to vary non-uniformly with age- and metallicity-sensitive absorption line strengths. Applying single stellar population models, there are weak but measurable trends of the IMF with age and abundance ratio. Accounting for the dependence of stellar population parameters on velocity dispersion effectively removes these trends, but subsequently introduces a trend with metallicity, such that `heavy' IMFs favour lower metallicities. The correlations are weaker than those found from previous studies directly detecting low-mass stars, suggesting some degree of tension between the different approaches of measuring the IMF. Resolving these discrepancies will be the focus of future w...

  12. Fish population dynamics in a seasonally varying wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Donald L.; Trexler, Joel C.; Cosner, Chris; Obaza, Adam; Jopp, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Small fishes in seasonally flooded environments such as the Everglades are capable of spreading into newly flooded areas and building up substantial biomass. Passive drift cannot account for the rapidity of observed population expansions. To test the reaction-diffusion mechanism for spread of the fish, we estimated their diffusion coefficient and applied a reaction-diffusion model. This mechanism was also too weak to account for the spatial dynamics. Two other hypotheses were tested through modeling. The first--the 'refuge mechanism--hypothesizes that small remnant populations of small fishes survive the dry season in small permanent bodies of water (refugia), sites where the water level is otherwise below the surface. The second mechanism, which we call the 'dynamic ideal free distribution mechanism' is that consumption by the fish creates a prey density gradient and that fish taxis along this gradient can lead to rapid population expansion in space. We examined the two alternatives and concluded that although refugia may play an important role in recolonization by the fish population during reflooding, only the second, taxis in the direction of the flooding front, seems capable of matching empirical observations. This study has important implications for management of wetlands, as fish biomass is an essential support of higher trophic levels.

  13. Drivers of waterfowl population dynamics: from teal to swans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koons, David N.; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Schmutz, Joel A.; Rotella, Jay J.

    2014-01-01

    Waterfowl are among the best studied and most extensively monitored species in the world. Given their global importance for sport and subsistence hunting, viewing and ecosystem functioning, great effort has been devoted since the middle part of the 20th century to understanding both the environmental and demographic mechanisms that influence waterfowl population and community dynamics. Here we use comparative approaches to summarise and contrast our understanding ofwaterfowl population dynamics across species as short-lived as the teal Anas discors and A.crecca to those such as the swans Cygnus sp. which have long life-spans. Specifically, we focus on population responses to vital rate perturbations across life history strategies, discuss bottom-up and top-down responses of waterfowlpopulations to global change, and summarise our current understanding of density dependence across waterfowl species. We close by identifying research needs and highlight ways to overcome the challenges of sustainably managing waterfowl populations in the 21st century.

  14. IMF shape constraints from stellar populations and dynamics from CALIFA

    CERN Document Server

    Lyubenova, M; van de Ven, G; Falcón-Barroso, J; Galbany, L; Gallazzi, A; García-Benito, R; Delgado, R González; Husemann, B; La Barbera, F; Marino, R A; Mast, D; Mendez-Abreu, J; Peletier, R F P; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Sánchez, S F; Trager, S C; Bosch, R C E van den; Vazdekis, A; Walcher, C J; Zhu, L; Zibetti, S; Ziegler, B; Bland-Hawthorn, J

    2016-01-01

    In this letter we describe how we use stellar dynamics information to constrain the shape of the stellar IMF in a sample of 27 early-type galaxies from the CALIFA survey. We obtain dynamical and stellar mass-to-light ratios, $\\Upsilon_\\mathrm{dyn}$ and $\\Upsilon_{\\ast}$, over a homogenous aperture of 0.5~$R_{e}$. We use the constraint $\\Upsilon_\\mathrm{dyn} \\ge \\Upsilon_{\\ast}$ to test two IMF shapes within the framework of the extended MILES stellar population models. We rule out a single power law IMF shape for 75% of the galaxies in our sample. Conversely, we find that a double power law IMF shape with a varying high-mass end slope is compatible (within 1$\\sigma$) with 95% of the galaxies. We also show that dynamical and stellar IMF mismatch factors give consistent results for the systematic variation of the IMF in these galaxies.

  15. Border Collision Bifurcations in a Generalized Model of Population Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia M. Ladino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the dynamics of a generalized discrete time population model of a two-stage species with recruitment and capture. This generalization, which is inspired by other approaches and real data that one can find in literature, consists in considering no restriction for the value of the two key parameters appearing in the model, that is, the natural death rate and the mortality rate due to fishing activity. In the more general case the feasibility of the system has been preserved by posing opportune formulas for the piecewise map defining the model. The resulting two-dimensional nonlinear map is not smooth, though continuous, as its definition changes as any border is crossed in the phase plane. Hence, techniques from the mathematical theory of piecewise smooth dynamical systems must be applied to show that, due to the existence of borders, abrupt changes in the dynamic behavior of population sizes and multistability emerge. The main novelty of the present contribution with respect to the previous ones is that, while using real data, richer dynamics are produced, such as fluctuations and multistability. Such new evidences are of great interest in biology since new strategies to preserve the survival of the species can be suggested.

  16. Dynamics of bacterial communities before and after distribution in a full-scale drinking water network

    KAUST Repository

    El-Chakhtoura, Joline

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the biological stability of drinking water distribution systems is imperative in the framework of process control and risk management. The objective of this research was to examine the dynamics of the bacterial community during drinking water distribution at high temporal resolution. Water samples (156 in total) were collected over short time-scales (minutes/hours/days) from the outlet of a treatment plant and a location in its corresponding distribution network. The drinking water is treated by biofiltration and disinfectant residuals are absent during distribution. The community was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and flow cytometry as well as conventional, culture-based methods. Despite a random dramatic event (detected with pyrosequencing and flow cytometry but not with plate counts), the bacterial community profile at the two locations did not vary significantly over time. A diverse core microbiome was shared between the two locations (58-65% of the taxa and 86-91% of the sequences) and found to be dependent on the treatment strategy. The bacterial community structure changed during distribution, with greater richness detected in the network and phyla such as Acidobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes becoming abundant. The rare taxa displayed the highest dynamicity, causing the major change during water distribution. This change did not have hygienic implications and is contingent on the sensitivity of the applied methods. The concept of biological stability therefore needs to be revised. Biostability is generally desired in drinking water guidelines but may be difficult to achieve in large-scale complex distribution systems that are inherently dynamic.

  17. Bacterial enteropathogens associated with diarrhea in a rural population of Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson JC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available John C Jackson, Anthony L Farone, Mary B Farone Biology Department, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, USA Purpose: Diarrheal disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity in developing countries. To further understand the epidemiology of diarrheal disease among a rural population surrounding Robillard, Haiti, fecal swabs from patients with diarrhea were screened for the presence of enteropathogenic bacteria. Patients and methods: Fecal swabs were collected from 34 patients with signs and symptoms of diarrhea and stored in BBLTM Cary-Blair transport medium (Becton, Dickinson and Company, Sparks, MD until transit to the USA. Swab material was inoculated on to different enrichment and selective agars for incubation. Fermenting and nonfermenting bacteria that grew on the enteric selection media were identified by the BBLTM CrystalTM Enteric/Nonferementing Identification system (Becton, Dickinson and Company. Organisms identified as Escherichia coli were further screened for the presence of virulence factors by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: Of 34 patients, no Campylobacter, Shigella, Salmonella, or Vibrio spp. were isolated from swabs transported to the USA for culture. Of 73 E. coli isolates cultured from the swabs, one enteropathogenic strain of E. coli was identified by multiplex PCR. Escherichia fergusonii and Cronobacter sakazakii, both potential gastrointestinal pathogens, were also isolated from patient stools. Conclusion: This study was undertaken to determine if bacterial enteropathogens could be detected in the stools of patients suffering from diarrhea or dysentery and, in the absence of sufficient facilities, rectal swabs could be transported to the USA for culture. Although several genera of overt enteropathogens were not detected, one enteropathogenic E. coli and other pathogenic enterobacteriaceae were successfully cultured and identified. Keywords: Escherichia, Cronobacter, diarrheagenic, stool

  18. Management Practices Affect Soil Nutrients and Bacterial Populations in Backgrounding Beef Feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netthisinghe, A M P; Cook, K L; Gilfillen, R A; Sistani, K R; Woosley, P B

    2015-11-01

    Contaminants associated with manure in animal production sites are of significant concern. Unless properly managed, manure-derived soil nutrients in livestock production sites can deteriorate soil and water quality. This 3-yr study evaluated a soil nutrient management strategy with four sequentially imposed management practices: 12-mo backgrounding (BG), manure removal from the feeder area (FD), 12-mo destocking (DS), and 12-mo grass hay harvesting (H) in a small backgrounding feedlot. Resulting soil nutrient levels, total (), and N cycling bacterial ( and ) populations after each management practice in feedlot feeder and grazing (GR) areas and in crop grown at the control location (CT) were measured. Irrespective of management practice, FD contained greater soil nutrient concentrations than the GR and CT. Regardless of management practice, total bacteria cells (1.4 × 10 cells g soil) and nitrate reducers (5.2 × 10 cells g soil) were an order of magnitude higher in the FD than in the GR and CT, whereas nitrifying bacteria concentrations (1.4 × 10 cells g soil) were higher in the GR. Manure removal from the feeder area reduced M3-P (39%), total C (21%), total N (23%), NH-N (47%), and NO-N (93%) levels established in the FD during BG. Destocking lowered total C and N (45%) in the FD and NH-N (47%), NO-N (76%), and Zn (16%) in the GR. Hay harvesting reduced all soil nutrients in the FD and GR marginally. The management strategy has potential to lower soil nutrient concentrations, control soil nutrient buildup, and limit nutrient spread within the feedlot. PMID:26641341

  19. Computing with bacterial constituents, cells and populations: from bioputing to bactoputing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Vic; Zemirline, Abdallah; Amar, Patrick; Audinot, Jean Nicolas; Ballet, Pascal; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Bernot, Gilles; Beslon, Guillaume; Cabin, Armelle; Fanchon, Eric; Giavitto, Jean-Louis; Glade, Nicolas; Greussay, Patrick; Grondin, Yohann; Foster, James A; Hutzler, Guillaume; Jost, Jürgen; Kepes, Francois; Michel, Olivier; Molina, Franck; Signorini, Jacqueline; Stano, Pasquale; Thierry, Alain R

    2011-09-01

    The relevance of biological materials and processes to computing-alias bioputing-has been explored for decades. These materials include DNA, RNA and proteins, while the processes include transcription, translation, signal transduction and regulation. Recently, the use of bacteria themselves as living computers has been explored but this use generally falls within the classical paradigm of computing. Computer scientists, however, have a variety of problems to which they seek solutions, while microbiologists are having new insights into the problems bacteria are solving and how they are solving them. Here, we envisage that bacteria might be used for new sorts of computing. These could be based on the capacity of bacteria to grow, move and adapt to a myriad different fickle environments both as individuals and as populations of bacteria plus bacteriophage. New principles might be based on the way that bacteria explore phenotype space via hyperstructure dynamics and the fundamental nature of the cell cycle. This computing might even extend to developing a high level language appropriate to using populations of bacteria and bacteriophage. Here, we offer a speculative tour of what we term bactoputing, namely the use of the natural behaviour of bacteria for calculating. PMID:21384168

  20. Dynamic distributions and population declines of Golden-winged Warblers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Kenneth V.; Will, Tom; Buehler, David A.; Barker Swarthout, Sara; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Chandler, Richard

    2016-01-01

    With an estimated breeding population in 2010 of 383,000 pairs, the Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) is among the most vulnerable and steeply declining of North American passerines. This species also has exhibited among the most dynamic breeding distributions, with populations expanding and then contracting over the past 150 years in response to regional habitat changes, interactions with closely related Blue-winged Warblers (V. cyanoptera), and possibly climate change. Since 1966, the rangewide population has declined by >70% (-2.3% per year; latest North American Breeding Bird Survey data), with much steeper declines in the Appalachian Mountains bird conservation region (-8.3% per year, 98% overall decline). Despite apparently stable or increasing populations in the northwestern part of the range (Minnesota, Manitoba), population estimates for Golden-winged Warbler have continued to decline by 18% from the decade of the 1990s to the 2000s. Population modeling predicts a further decline to roughly 37,000 individuals by 2100, with the species likely to persist only in Manitoba, Minnesota, and possibly Ontario. To delineate the present-day distribution and to identify population concentrations that could serve as conservation focus areas, we compiled rangewide survey data collected in 2000-2006 in 21 states and 3 Canadian provinces, as part of the Golden-winged Warbler Atlas Project (GOWAP), supplemented by state and provincial Breeding Bird Atlas data and more recent observations in eBird. Based on >8,000 GOWAP surveys for Golden-winged and Blue-winged warblers and their hybrids, we mapped occurrence of phenotypically pure and mixed populations in a roughly 0.5-degree grid across the species’ ranges. Hybrids and mixed Golden-winged-Blue-winged populations occurred in a relatively narrow zone across Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, southern Ontario, and northern New York. Phenotypically pure Golden-winged Warbler populations occurred north of this

  1. Structure and dynamics of a polysaccharide matrix: aqueous solutions of bacterial levan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigar, Elizabeta; Dogsa, Iztok; Stopar, David; Jamnik, Andrej; Kralj Cigić, Irena; Tomšič, Matija

    2014-04-15

    The polysaccharide levan is a homopolymer of fructose and appears in nature as an important structural component of some bacterial biofilms. This paper reports the structural and dynamic properties of aqueous solutions of levan of various origin obtained from dynamic rheological, small-angle X-ray scattering, static and dynamic light scattering, as well as density and sound velocity measurements, determination of polymer branching after per-O-methylation, and microscopy. Besides samples of commercially available levan from Zymomonas mobilis and Erwinia herbicola, we also isolated, purified, and studied a levan sample from the biofilm of Bacillus subtilis. The results of dynamic rheological and light scattering measurements revealed very interesting viscoelastic properties of levan solutions even at very low polymer concentrations. The findings were complemented by small-angle X-ray scattering data that revealed some important differences in the structure of the aqueous levan solutions at the molecular level. Besides presenting detailed dynamic and structural results on the polysaccharide systems of various levans, one of the essential goals of this work was to point out the level of structural information that may be obtained for such polymer systems by combining basic physicochemical, rheological, and various light scattering techniques. PMID:24654746

  2. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Siddhartha

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re<<1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this letter, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such "viscous liquid" state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand an external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions.

  3. Population Dynamics of the Giant Clam, Tridacna maxima, at Rose Atoll

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — There is a paucity of knowledge on the population dynamics of the giant clams of the family Tridacnidae. Such information on population dynamics is necessary for...

  4. A bacterial population analysis of granular sludge from an anaerobic digester treating a maize-processing waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howgrave-Graham, A.R.; Wallis, F.M. (Natal Univ., Pietermaritzburg (ZA). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Pathology); Steyn, P.L. (Pretoria Univ. (South Africa))

    1991-01-01

    Microbial population studies were conducted on a dense granular sludge, with excellent settling, thickening and nutrient removal properties, from a South African clarigester treating effluent from a factory producing glucose and other carbohydrates from maize. The bacterial population comprised a heterogeneous group including acetogens, enterobacteria, sulphate-reducers, spirochaetes, heterofermentative lactobacilli and methanogens. The presence of these bacteria and lack of propionic acid and butyric acid bacteria suggests that the microbial activity of this anaerobic digester involved acetate and lactate metabolism rather than propionate or butyrate catabolism as a source of precursors for methane production. (author).

  5. Bacterial populations on brewery filling hall surfaces as revealed by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priha, Outi; Raulio, Mari; Maukonen, Johanna; Vehviläinen, Anna-Kaisa; Storgårds, Erna

    2016-01-01

    Due to the presence of moisture and nutrients, brewery filling line surfaces are susceptible to unwanted microbial attachment. Knowledge of the attaching microbes will aid in designing hygienic control of the process. In this study the bacterial diversity present on brewery filling line surfaces was revealed by next generation sequencing. The two filling lines studied maintained their characteristic bacterial community throughout three sampling times (13-163 days). On the glass bottle line, γ-proteobacteria dominated (35-82% of all OTUs), whereas on the canning line α-, β- and γ-proteobacteria and actinobacteria were most common. The most frequently detected genera were Acinetobacter, Propinobacterium and Pseudomonas. The halophilic genus Halomonas was commonly detected, which might be due to its tolerance to alkaline foam cleaners. This study has revealed a detailed overall picture of the bacterial groups present on filling line surfaces. Further effort should be given to determine the efficacy of washing procedures on different bacterial groups. PMID:27064426

  6. Dynamical population synthesis: Constructing the stellar single and binary contents of galactic field populations

    CERN Document Server

    Marks, Michael

    2011-01-01

    [abridged] The galactic field's late-type stellar single and binary population is calculated on the supposition that all stars form as binaries in embedded star clusters. A recently developed tool (Marks, Kroupa & Oh) is used to evolve the binary star distributions in star clusters for a few Myr so that a particular mixture of single and binary stars is achieved. On cluster dissolution the population enters the galactic field with these characteristics. The different contributions of single stars and binaries from individual star clusters which are selected from a power-law embedded star cluster mass function are then added up. This gives rise to integrated galactic field binary distribution functions (IGBDFs) resembling a galactic field's stellar content (Dynamical Population Synthesis). It is found that the binary proportion in the galactic field of a galaxy is larger the lower the minimum cluster mass, the lower the star formation rate, the steeper the embedded star cluster mass function and the larger...

  7. THE STUDY OF BACTERIAL POPULATION IN AIR SAMPLES OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Sarathi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The bacterial load in different air samples from environment of most hospitals remained undetermined. Any direct correlation between such bacterial load and the nosocomial infection are also lacking. Only higher bacterial load in air of a particular hospital environment may indicate higher risk of airborne cross infections. AIMS: The study is to determine the bacterial presence per unit volume of air, and the factors influencing the bioload. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The air samples were collected from different locations of our tertiary care hospital, during Jul 2011 to June 2012 with information like room space per patient, number of daily average visitors, system of air circulation and house-keeping quality. METHODS: A specific volume of air was impacted on a plastic strips containing nutrient agar by air sampler La200, Hi-Media. Following incubation for 24 hour bacterial colonies were counted and organisms were identified up to genus level. RESULTS: Mostly Gram positive cocci followed by Gram positive and a few Gram negative bacilli were detected. The highest bacterial load was found in general outdoor premises (2456 CFU/cm, followed by some extremely crowded general wards (573 CFU/cm. The lowest count of such was found in nursery area (94 CFU/cm, where special emphasis was given on cleanliness, room ventilation and visitor’s restriction. Similarly variations in bacterial loads were also noted in different times in a day and in different seasons in a year. The bioload in all tested samples were within permissible limits. CONCLUSIONS: By appropriate measures the aerobic bacterial load in hospital environment can be restricted within optimal level

  8. Large-scale genomic analysis suggests a neutral punctuated dynamics of transposable elements in bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Jaime; Gómez, Manuel J; López de Saro, Francisco J; Manrubia, Susanna

    2014-06-01

    Insertion sequences (IS) are the simplest and most abundant form of transposable DNA found in bacterial genomes. When present in multiple copies, it is thought that they can promote genomic plasticity and genetic exchange, thus being a major force of evolutionary change. The main processes that determine IS content in genomes are, though, a matter of debate. In this work, we take advantage of the large amount of genomic data currently available and study the abundance distributions of 33 IS families in 1811 bacterial chromosomes. This allows us to test simple models of IS dynamics and estimate their key parameters by means of a maximum likelihood approach. We evaluate the roles played by duplication, lateral gene transfer, deletion and purifying selection. We find that the observed IS abundances are compatible with a neutral scenario where IS proliferation is controlled by deletions instead of purifying selection. Even if there may be some cases driven by selection, neutral behavior dominates over large evolutionary scales. According to this view, IS and hosts tend to coexist in a dynamic equilibrium state for most of the time. Our approach also allows for a detection of recent IS expansions, and supports the hypothesis that rapid expansions constitute transient events-punctuations-during which the state of coexistence of IS and host becomes perturbated. PMID:24967627

  9. Large-scale genomic analysis suggests a neutral punctuated dynamics of transposable elements in bacterial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Iranzo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Insertion sequences (IS are the simplest and most abundant form of transposable DNA found in bacterial genomes. When present in multiple copies, it is thought that they can promote genomic plasticity and genetic exchange, thus being a major force of evolutionary change. The main processes that determine IS content in genomes are, though, a matter of debate. In this work, we take advantage of the large amount of genomic data currently available and study the abundance distributions of 33 IS families in 1811 bacterial chromosomes. This allows us to test simple models of IS dynamics and estimate their key parameters by means of a maximum likelihood approach. We evaluate the roles played by duplication, lateral gene transfer, deletion and purifying selection. We find that the observed IS abundances are compatible with a neutral scenario where IS proliferation is controlled by deletions instead of purifying selection. Even if there may be some cases driven by selection, neutral behavior dominates over large evolutionary scales. According to this view, IS and hosts tend to coexist in a dynamic equilibrium state for most of the time. Our approach also allows for a detection of recent IS expansions, and supports the hypothesis that rapid expansions constitute transient events-punctuations-during which the state of coexistence of IS and host becomes perturbated.

  10. DMPD: Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12106784 Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Carof...html) (.csml) Show Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. PubmedID 12106784 Title Structural and functi...onal analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Authors

  11. Population Dynamics in the Capitalist World-Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Danna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available World-systems analysis has given scant attention to population dynamics. Overlooked are large-scale macrohistorical population trends and their microhistorical foundation on procreative decisions-decisions which are taken by a historically changing subject of procreation: local elders or other authorities, head(s of the household, couples, and women. The discipline of demography is also not as helpful as it could be, given its basis in modernization theory, which fails to recognize intentionality in reproduction in pre-capitalist societies. It assumes a model of "demographic transition" from a state of "natural fertility" to a state of conscious family planning, while also treating mortality as independent of fertility Marxism recognized the importance of population as a source of labor for profit and capital accumulation. With its tools Sydney Coontz developed a demand for labor theory explaining in particular the decrease in the birth rate in England and the United States at the turn of the century This theory was f urther developed by anthropologists of the "mode of product ion and population pat terns " who, with other authors, offer useful theories and insights to advance world-historical research on population. This article explores connections between population dy namics and world-systems analysis. I explore six key questions at different levels of analysis, including: 1 Are there world-systems ' imperatives concerning human reproduction?; 2 Do human reproduction imperatives differ across world-systems.'?; 3 How do the (eventual systems requirements get transmitted to households and individuals'?; 4 Why do people have children.'?; 5 Who is the subject of procreation decisions'?; and 6 How is the number of offspring chosen? Finally, I offer guidelines for applying the six questions to the capitalist world-economy.

  12. Spatial and temporal dynamics of infected populations: the Mexican epidemic

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Meza, Mario A

    2012-01-01

    Recently the A/H1N1-2009 virus pandemic appeared in Mexico and in other nations. We present a study of this pandemic in the Mexican case using the SIR model to describe epidemics. This model is one of the simplest models but it has been a successful description of some epidemics of closed populations. We consider the data for the Mexican case and use the SIR model to make some predictions. Then, we generalize the SIR model in order to describe the spatial dynamics of the disease. We make a study of the spatial and temporal spread of the infected population with model parameters that are consistent with temporal SIR model parameters obtained by fitting to the Mexican case.

  13. Linking animal population dynamics to alterations in foraging behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Sibly, Richard; Tougaard, Jakob;

    that are increasingly exposed to noise from ships, wind turbines, etc. In the present study we investigate how the dynamics of the harbor porpoise population (Phocoena phocoena) in the inner Danish waters is influenced by disturbances using an agent- based simulation model. In the model animal movement, and hence...... the animals’ ability to forage efficiently and to sustain their energy intake, is influenced by noise emitted from wind turbines and ships. The energy levels in turn affect their survival. The fine-scale movements of the simulated animals was governed by a spatial memory, which allowed the model to produce...... realistic movement patterns in scenarios where animals were not exposed to noise. Results/Conclusions The main results of the study were that the effects of disturbances were highly dependent on how fast the food recovered after being eaten, but that the long-term survival of the population...

  14. Mosquito population dynamics from cellular automata-based simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafarina, Inna; Sadikin, Rifki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present an innovative model for simulating mosquito-vector population dynamics. The simulation consist of two stages: demography and dispersal dynamics. For demography simulation, we follow the existing model for modeling a mosquito life cycles. Moreover, we use cellular automata-based model for simulating dispersal of the vector. In simulation, each individual vector is able to move to other grid based on a random walk. Our model is also capable to represent immunity factor for each grid. We simulate the model to evaluate its correctness. Based on the simulations, we can conclude that our model is correct. However, our model need to be improved to find a realistic parameters to match real data.

  15. Knowledge epidemics and population dynamics models for describing idea diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Vitanov, Nikolay K

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of ideas is often closely connected to the creation and diffusion of knowledge and to the technological evolution of society. Because of this, knowledge creation, exchange and its subsequent transformation into innovations for improved welfare and economic growth is briefly described from a historical point of view. Next, three approaches are discussed for modeling the diffusion of ideas in the areas of science and technology, through (i) deterministic, (ii) stochastic, and (iii) statistical approaches. These are illustrated through their corresponding population dynamics and epidemic models relative to the spreading of ideas, knowledge and innovations. The deterministic dynamical models are considered to be appropriate for analyzing the evolution of large and small societal, scientific and technological systems when the influence of fluctuations is insignificant. Stochastic models are appropriate when the system of interest is small but when the fluctuations become significant for its evolution...

  16. Do farming practices influence population dynamics of rodents?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massawe, A W; Rwamugira, W; Leirs, Herwig;

    2007-01-01

    A capture-mark-recapture study was conducted in crop fields in Morogoro, Tanzania, to investigate how the population dynamics of multimammate field rats, Mastomys natalensis, was influenced by the commonly practised land preparation methods and cropping systems. Two land preparation methods (trac...... practices. In maize fields in Tanzania, the crop is most susceptible to damage by M. natalensis in the first 2 weeks after planting, and therefore, lower densities of rodents will result into lower crop damage in tractor ploughed fields....

  17. Spatio-Temporal Population Density and Spatial Dynamic Spectrum Allocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A realistic population density distribution scenario in conjunction with the spatial dynamic spectrum allocation (DSA) is taken into account to mitigate the spectrum wastage in terms of extra guard bands. For the insertion of the extra guard bands, an efficient strategy based on self-assessment is applied to each victim cell individually and independently. Consequently, it is no more required to spread the extra guard band over the whole DSA region. Simulation results show an improvement of 3% -4% in percentage of satisfied users for Universal Mobile Telecommunications System ( UMTS ) network and 4% -5% for Digital Video Broadcasting Terrestrial (DVB-T) network.

  18. Border Collision Bifurcations in a Generalized Model of Population Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Lilia M. Ladino; Cristiana Mammana; Elisabetta Michetti; Jose C. Valverde

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a generalized discrete time population model of a two-stage species with recruitment and capture. This generalization, which is inspired by other approaches and real data that one can find in literature, consists in considering no restriction for the value of the two key parameters appearing in the model, that is, the natural death rate and the mortality rate due to fishing activity. In the more general case the feasibility of the system has been preserved by posing...

  19. Study on lipid droplet dynamics in live cells and fluidity changes in model bacterial membranes using optical microscopy techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Christine Shiang Yee

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis optical microscopy techniques are used to consider aspects of viral and bacterial infections. In part 1, the physical effects of cytomegalovirus on lipid droplet dynamics in live cells are studied; in part 2, the effects of an antimicrobial peptide on the fluidity of model bacterial membranes are studied. The optical microscopy techniques used to study the effects of murine-cytomegalovirus (mCMV) on lipid droplets in live NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells in real-time are...

  20. Hydrogeochemistry and coal-associated bacterial populations from a methanogenic coal bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Elliott P.; Weeks, Edwin P.; Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Ritter, Daniel J.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Clark, Arthur C.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Vinson, David S.; Orem, William H.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic coalbed methane (CBM), a microbially-generated source of natural gas trapped within coal beds, is an important energy resource in many countries. Specific bacterial populations and enzymes involved in coal degradation, the potential rate-limiting step of CBM formation, are relatively unknown. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has established a field site, (Birney test site), in an undeveloped area of the Powder River Basin (PRB), with four wells completed in the Flowers-Goodale coal bed, one in the overlying sandstone formation, and four in overlying and underlying coal beds (Knoblach, Nance, and Terret). The nine wells were positioned to characterize the hydraulic conductivity of the Flowers-Goodale coal bed and were selectively cored to investigate the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology associated with CBM production at the Birney test site. Aquifer-test results indicated the Flowers-Goodale coal bed, in a zone from about 112 to 120 m below land surface at the test site, had very low hydraulic conductivity (0.005 m/d) compared to other PRB coal beds examined. Consistent with microbial methanogenesis, groundwater in the coal bed and overlying sandstone contain dissolved methane (46 mg/L average) with low δ13C values (−67‰ average), high alkalinity values (22 meq/kg average), relatively positive δ13C-DIC values (4‰ average), and no detectable higher chain hydrocarbons, NO3−, or SO42−. Bioassay methane production was greatest at the upper interface of the Flowers-Goodale coal bed near the overlying sandstone. Pyrotag analysis identified Aeribacillus as a dominant in situbacterial community member in the coal near the sandstone and statistical analysis indicated Actinobacteria predominated coal core samples compared to claystone or sandstone cores. These bacteria, which previously have been correlated with hydrocarbon-containing environments such as oil reservoirs, have demonstrated the ability to produce biosurfactants to break down

  1. Population dynamics of minimally cognitive individuals. Part I: Introducing knowledge into the dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieder, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    The author presents a new approach for modeling the dynamics of collections of objects with internal structure. Based on the fact that the behavior of an individual in a population is modified by its knowledge of other individuals, a procedure for accounting for knowledge in a population of interacting objects is presented. It is assumed that each object has partial (or complete) knowledge of some (or all) other objects in the population. The dynamical equations for the objects are then modified to include the effects of this pairwise knowledge. This procedure has the effect of projecting out what the population will do from the much larger space of what it could do, i.e., filtering or smoothing the dynamics by replacing the complex detailed physical model with an effective model that produces the behavior of interest. The procedure therefore provides a minimalist approach for obtaining emergent collective behavior. The use of knowledge as a dynamical quantity, and its relationship to statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, information theory, and cognition microstructure are discussed.

  2. Changes in the bacterial populations of the highly alkaline saline soil of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico) following flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Neria-González, Isabel; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J; Estrada-Alvarado, Isabel; Zavala-Díaz de la Serna, Francisco Javier; Dendooven, Luc; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2009-07-01

    Flooding an extreme alkaline-saline soil decreased alkalinity and salinity, which will change the bacterial populations. Bacterial 16S rDNA libraries were generated of three soils with different electrolytic conductivity (EC), i.e. soil with EC 1.7 dS m(-1) and pH 7.80 (LOW soil), with EC 56 dS m(-1) and pH 10.11 (MEDIUM soil) and with EC 159 dS m(-1) and pH 10.02 (HIGH soil), using universal bacterial oligonucleotide primers, and 463 clone 16S rDNA sequences were analyzed phylogenetically. Library proportions and clone identification of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Cloroflexi showed that the bacterial communities were different. Species and genera of the Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales and Xanthomonadales orders of the alpha- and gamma-subdivision of Proteobacteria were found at the three sites. Species and genera of the Rhodospirillales, Sphingobacteriales, Clostridiales, Oscillatoriales and Caldilineales were found only in the HIGH soil, Sphingomonadales, Burkholderiales and Pseudomonadales in the MEDIUM soil, Myxococcales in the LOW soil, and Actinomycetales in the MEDIUM and LOW soils. It was found that the largest diversity at the order and species level was found in the MEDIUM soil as bacteria of both the HIGH and LOW soils were found in it.

  3. Evaluation and characterization of bacterial metabolic dynamics with a novel profiling technique, real-time metabolotyping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Fukuda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental processes in ecosystems are dynamically altered by several metabolic responses in microorganisms, including intracellular sensing and pumping, battle for survival, and supply of or competition for nutrients. Notably, intestinal bacteria maintain homeostatic balance in mammals via multiple dynamic biochemical reactions to produce several metabolites from undigested food, and those metabolites exert various effects on mammalian cells in a time-dependent manner. We have established a method for the analysis of bacterial metabolic dynamics in real time and used it in combination with statistical NMR procedures. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a novel method called real-time metabolotyping (RT-MT, which performs sequential (1H-NMR profiling and two-dimensional (2D (1H, (13C-HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence profiling during bacterial growth in an NMR tube. The profiles were evaluated with such statistical methods as Z-score analysis, principal components analysis, and time series of statistical TOtal Correlation SpectroScopY (TOCSY. In addition, using 2D (1H, (13C-HSQC with the stable isotope labeling technique, we observed the metabolic kinetics of specific biochemical reactions based on time-dependent 2D kinetic profiles. Using these methods, we clarified the pathway for linolenic acid hydrogenation by a gastrointestinal bacterium, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens. We identified trans11, cis13 conjugated linoleic acid as the intermediate of linolenic acid hydrogenation by B. fibrisolvens, based on the results of (13C-labeling RT-MT experiments. In addition, we showed that the biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids serves as a defense mechanism against their toxic effects. CONCLUSIONS: RT-MT is useful for the characterization of beneficial bacterium that shows potential for use as probiotic by producing bioactive compounds.

  4. Population dynamics of two antilisterial cheese surface consortia revealed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasler Madlen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surface contamination of smear cheese by Listeria spp. is of major concern for the industry. Complex smear ecosystems have been shown to harbor antilisterial potential but the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in the inhibition mostly remain unclear, and are likely related to complex interactions than to production of single antimicrobial compounds. Bacterial biodiversity and population dynamics of complex smear ecosystems exhibiting antilisterial properties in situ were investigated by Temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE, a culture independent technique, for two microbial consortia isolated from commercial Raclette type cheeses inoculated with defined commercial ripening cultures (F or produced with an old-young smearing process (M. Results TTGE revealed nine bacterial species common to both F and M consortia, but consortium F exhibited a higher diversity than consortium M, with thirteen and ten species, respectively. Population dynamics were studied after application of the consortia on fresh-produced Raclette cheeses. TTGE analyses revealed a similar sequential development of the nine species common to both consortia. Beside common cheese surface bacteria (Staphylococcus equorum, Corynebacterium spp., Brevibacterium linens, Microbacterium gubbeenense, Agrococcus casei, the two consortia contained marine lactic acid bacteria (Alkalibacterium kapii, Marinilactibacillus psychrotolerans that developed early in ripening (day 14 to 20, shortly after the growth of staphylococci (day 7. A decrease of Listeria counts was observed on cheese surface inoculated at day 7 with 0.1-1 × 102 CFU cm-2, when cheeses were smeared with consortium F or M. Listeria counts went below the detection limit of the method between day 14 and 28 and no subsequent regrowth was detected over 60 to 80 ripening days. In contrast, Listeria grew to high counts (105 CFU cm-2 on cheeses smeared with a defined surface culture

  5. The model of fungal population dynamics affected by nystatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voychuk, Sergei I.; Gromozova, Elena N.; Sadovskiy, Mikhail G.

    Fungal diseases are acute problems of the up-to-day medicine. Significant increase of resistance of microorganisms to the medically used antibiotics and a lack of new effective drugs follows in a growth of dosage of existing chemicals to solve the problem. Quite often such approach results in side effects on humans. Detailed study of fungi-antibiotic dynamics can identify new mechanisms and bring new ideas to overcome the microbial resistance with a lower dosage of antibiotics. In this study, the dynamics of the microbial population under antibiotic treatment was investigated. The effects of nystatin on the population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts were used as a model system. Nystatin effects were investigated both in liquid and solid media by viability tests. Dependence of nystatin action on osmotic gradient was evaluated in NaCl solutions. Influences of glucose and yeast extract were additionally analyzed. A "stepwise" pattern of the cell death caused by nystatin was the most intriguing. This pattern manifested in periodical changes of the stages of cell death against stages of resistance to the antibiotic. The mathematical model was proposed to describe cell-antibiotic interactions and nystatin viability effects in the liquid medium. The model implies that antibiotic ability to cause a cells death is significantly affected by the intracellular compounds, which came out of cells after their osmotic barriers were damaged

  6. Representation of dynamical stimuli in populations of threshold neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Tchumatchenko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Many sensory or cognitive events are associated with dynamic current modulations in cortical neurons. This raises an urgent demand for tractable model approaches addressing the merits and limits of potential encoding strategies. Yet, current theoretical approaches addressing the response to mean- and variance-encoded stimuli rarely provide complete response functions for both modes of encoding in the presence of correlated noise. Here, we investigate the neuronal population response to dynamical modifications of the mean or variance of the synaptic bombardment using an alternative threshold model framework. In the variance and mean channel, we provide explicit expressions for the linear and non-linear frequency response functions in the presence of correlated noise and use them to derive population rate response to step-like stimuli. For mean-encoded signals, we find that the complete response function depends only on the temporal width of the input correlation function, but not on other functional specifics. Furthermore, we show that both mean- and variance-encoded signals can relay high-frequency inputs, and in both schemes step-like changes can be detected instantaneously. Finally, we obtain the pairwise spike correlation function and the spike triggered average from the linear mean-evoked response function. These results provide a maximally tractable limiting case that complements and extends previous results obtained in the integrate and fire framework.

  7. Population Dynamics and Ecology of Arcobacter in Sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny C Fisher

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Arcobacter species are highly abundant in sewage where they often comprise approximately 5-11% of the bacterial community. Oligotyping of sequences amplified from the V4V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene revealed Arcobacter populations from different cities were similar and dominated by one to three members, with extremely high microdiversity in the minor members. Overall, nine subgroups within the Arcobacter genus accounted for >80% of the total Arcobacter sequences in all samples analyzed. The distribution of oligotypes varied by both sample site and temperature, with samples from the same site generally being more similar to each other than other sites. Seven oligotypes matched with 100% identity to characterized Arcobacter species, but the remaining 19 abundant oligotypes appear to be unknown species. Sequences representing the two most abundant oligotypes matched exactly to the type strains for A. cryaerophilus group 1B (CCUG 17802 and group 1A (CCUG17801, respectively. Oligotype 1 showed generally lower relative abundance in colder samples and higher relative abundance in warmer samples; the converse was true for Oligotype 2. Ten other oligotypes had significant positive or negative correlations between temperature and proportion in samples as well. The oligotype that corresponded to A. butzleri, the Arcobacter species most commonly isolated by culturing in sewage studies, was only the eleventh most abundant oligotype. This work suggests that Arcobacter populations occupy unique niches in sewer infrastructure and are modulated by temperature. Furthermore, current culturing methods used for identification of Arcobacter fail to identify some abundant members of the community and may underestimate the presence of species with affinities for growth at lower temperatures. Understanding the ecological factors that affect the survival and growth of Arcobacter spp. in sewer infrastructure may better inform the risks associated with these emerging

  8. Population dynamics and spatial distribution of microbial species in multispecies biofilms under the action of direct electric current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Hongbin; LI Xingang; WU Jinchuan; ZHONG Fangli; ZHANG Yi

    2003-01-01

    The metabolism, population dynamics and spatial distribution of nitrifying bacteria and heterotrophs in biofilms under the action of direct electric current were investigated by using the micro-slicing technique. The nitrification rate of nitrifying bacteria was severely inhibited by a current over 10 Am-2 at lower C/N ratios. Compared to heterotrophs, the nitrifying bacteria in the surface biofilms were severely inhibited, resulting in a significant decrease in bacterial density. An increase in current density narrowed the less current-sensitive inner biofilm region, and in addition the density of NO2-oxidizers decreased more significantly than that of NH4-oxidizers in the surface biofilms probably due to electrochemical reactions at the anode. However, the effect of current on both the population dynamics and the spatial distribution of the microbial species was less significant at larger C/N ratios.

  9. Risk factors for bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: a population-based study on Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Poul; Vogel, Ida; Molsted, Kirsten;

    2006-01-01

    at conception (1.59 [1.29-1.93]), previous genital infection with Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae (1.39 [1.07-1.79]), and consuming 2 or more drinks per week (1.33 [1.02-1.74]) after control for confounding factors. Conclusion. In pregnancy, women who have daily coitus, are single, smokers......, with a previous sexually transmitted disease, or with high alcohol consumption in pregnancy are at increased risk for bacterial vaginosis. Information on these risk factors may be important when planning preventive and treatment strategies of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy....

  10. Daily dynamics of bacterial numbers, CO2 emissions from soil and relationships between their wavelike fluctuations and succession of the microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, A. M.; Bubnov, I. A.; Semenov, V. M.; Semenova, E. V.; Zelenev, V. V.; Semenova, N. A.

    2013-08-01

    The daily dynamics of the number of copiotrophic and oligotrophic bacteria (in colony-forming units) and CO2 emissions from cultivated soils after short- and long-term disturbances were studied for 25-27 days in a microfield experiment. The relationship of the wavelike fluctuations of the bacterial number and CO2 emission with the succession of the soil microbial community was determined by the polymerase chain reaction method—denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Short-term disturbances involved the application of organic or mineral fertilizers, pesticides, and plant residues to the soils of different plots. The long-term effect was a result of using biological and intensive farming systems for three years. The short-term disturbances resulted in increased peaks of the bacterial number, the significance of which was confirmed by harmonics analysis. The daily dynamics of the structure of the soil microbial community, which was studied for 27 days by the DGGE method, also had an oscillatory pattern. Statistical processing of the data (principal components analysis, harmonics and cross-correlation analyses) has revealed significant fluctuations in the structure of microbial communities coinciding with those of the bacterial populations. The structure of the microbial community changed within each peak of the dynamics of the bacterial number (but not from peak to peak), pointing to the cyclical character of the short-term succession. The long-term effects resulted in a less intense response of the microbiota—a lower rate of CO2 emission from the soil cultivated according to the organic farming system.

  11. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses of substrate-dependent bacterial temporal dynamics in microbial fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husen Zhang

    Full Text Available Understanding the microbial community structure and genetic potential of anode biofilms is key to improve extracellular electron transfers in microbial fuel cells. We investigated effect of substrate and temporal dynamics of anodic biofilm communities using phylogenetic and metagenomic approaches in parallel with electrochemical characterizations. The startup non-steady state anodic bacterial structures were compared for a simple substrate, acetate, and for a complex substrate, landfill leachate, using a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell. Principal coordinate analysis showed that distinct community structures were formed with each substrate type. The bacterial diversity measured as Shannon index decreased with time in acetate cycles, and was restored with the introduction of leachate. The change of diversity was accompanied by an opposite trend in the relative abundance of Geobacter-affiliated phylotypes, which were acclimated to over 40% of total Bacteria at the end of acetate-fed conditions then declined in the leachate cycles. The transition from acetate to leachate caused a decrease in output power density from 243±13 mW/m2 to 140±11 mW/m2, accompanied by a decrease in Coulombic electron recovery from 18±3% to 9±3%. The leachate cycles selected protein-degrading phylotypes within phylum Synergistetes. Metagenomic shotgun sequencing showed that leachate-fed communities had higher cell motility genes including bacterial chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, and increased gene abundance related to metal resistance, antibiotic resistance, and quorum sensing. These differentially represented genes suggested an altered anodic biofilm community in response to additional substrates and stress from the complex landfill leachate.

  12. Femtosecond dynamics of electronic populations in silver nano-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the dynamic of relaxation of hot electrons in silver nano-particles in a transparency matrix. Using laser impulses of a few hundred femtosecond, out equilibrium electronic populations are created and their relaxation is studied by the energy transfer to the crystalline network. The size and the geometry of these nano-particles lead to great optical non-linearities and electric confinement effects. This confinement leads then to a collective mode, named surface plasmon. Thanks to its structure, the silver owns a surface plasmon resonance far from the interband transitions, which allows the study of this collective mode. Differential measures, in degenerated pump-probe configuration and on silver nano-particles, show a slowing of the dynamic at the surface plasmon resonance. In a non degenerated pump-probe configuration, the differential transmission spectra show an asymmetrical first derivative behavior of the absorption ray. The author shows also that the relaxation dynamics depends of the nano-particles size and of the host matrix. (A.L.B.)

  13. Fed-Batch Production of Bacterial Ghosts Using Dielectric Spectroscopy for Dynamic Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitz, Andrea; Sagmeister, Patrick; Lubitz, Werner; Herwig, Christoph; Langemann, Timo

    2016-03-24

    The Bacterial Ghost (BG) platform technology evolved from a microbiological expression system incorporating the ϕX174 lysis gene E. E-lysis generates empty but structurally intact cell envelopes (BGs) from Gram-negative bacteria which have been suggested as candidate vaccines, immunotherapeutic agents or drug delivery vehicles. E-lysis is a highly dynamic and complex biological process that puts exceptional demands towards process understanding and control. The development of a both economic and robust fed-batch production process for BGs required a toolset capable of dealing with rapidly changing concentrations of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. This challenge was addressed using a transfer function combining dielectric spectroscopy and soft-sensor based biomass estimation for monitoring the rapid decline of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. The transfer function was implemented to a feed-controller, which followed the permittivity signal closely and was capable of maintaining a constant specific substrate uptake rate during lysis phase. With the described toolset, we were able to increase the yield of BG production processes by a factor of 8-10 when compared to currently used batch procedures reaching lysis efficiencies >98%. This provides elevated potentials for commercial application of the Bacterial Ghost platform technology.

  14. Hydrocarbon biodegradation and dynamic laser speckle for detecting chemotactic responses at low bacterial concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Melina Nisenbaum; Gonzalo Hernán Sendra; Gastón Alfredo Cerdá Gilbert; Marcelo Scagliola; Jorge Froilán González; Silvia Elena Murialdo

    2013-01-01

    We report on the biodegradation of pure hydrocarbons and chemotaxis towards these compounds by an isolated chlorophenol degrader,Pseudomonas strain H.The biochemical and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence identified Pseudomonas strain H as having 99.56% similarity with P.aeruginosa PA01.This strain was able to degrade n-hexadecane,1-undecene,1-nonene,1-decene,1-dodecene and kerosene.It grew in the presence of 1-octene,while this hydrocarbons is toxic to other hydrocarbons degraders.Pseudomonas strain H was also chemotactic towards n-hexadecane,kerosene,1-undecene and 1-dodecene.These results show that this Pseudomonas strain H is an attractive candidate for hydrocarbon-containing wastewater bioremediation in controlled environments.Since the classical standard techniques for detecting chemotaxis are not efficient at low bacterial concentrations,we demonstrate the use of the dynamic speckle laser method,which is simple and inexpensive,to confirm bacterial chemotaxis at low cell concentrations (less than 105 colony-forming unit per millilitre (CFU/mL)) when hydrocarbons are the attractants.

  15. Fed-Batch Production of Bacterial Ghosts Using Dielectric Spectroscopy for Dynamic Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitz, Andrea; Sagmeister, Patrick; Lubitz, Werner; Herwig, Christoph; Langemann, Timo

    2016-01-01

    The Bacterial Ghost (BG) platform technology evolved from a microbiological expression system incorporating the ϕX174 lysis gene E. E-lysis generates empty but structurally intact cell envelopes (BGs) from Gram-negative bacteria which have been suggested as candidate vaccines, immunotherapeutic agents or drug delivery vehicles. E-lysis is a highly dynamic and complex biological process that puts exceptional demands towards process understanding and control. The development of a both economic and robust fed-batch production process for BGs required a toolset capable of dealing with rapidly changing concentrations of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. This challenge was addressed using a transfer function combining dielectric spectroscopy and soft-sensor based biomass estimation for monitoring the rapid decline of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. The transfer function was implemented to a feed-controller, which followed the permittivity signal closely and was capable of maintaining a constant specific substrate uptake rate during lysis phase. With the described toolset, we were able to increase the yield of BG production processes by a factor of 8–10 when compared to currently used batch procedures reaching lysis efficiencies >98%. This provides elevated potentials for commercial application of the Bacterial Ghost platform technology.

  16. Fed-Batch Production of Bacterial Ghosts Using Dielectric Spectroscopy for Dynamic Process Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Meitz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Bacterial Ghost (BG platform technology evolved from a microbiological expression system incorporating the ϕX174 lysis gene E. E-lysis generates empty but structurally intact cell envelopes (BGs from Gram-negative bacteria which have been suggested as candidate vaccines, immunotherapeutic agents or drug delivery vehicles. E-lysis is a highly dynamic and complex biological process that puts exceptional demands towards process understanding and control. The development of a both economic and robust fed-batch production process for BGs required a toolset capable of dealing with rapidly changing concentrations of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. This challenge was addressed using a transfer function combining dielectric spectroscopy and soft-sensor based biomass estimation for monitoring the rapid decline of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. The transfer function was implemented to a feed-controller, which followed the permittivity signal closely and was capable of maintaining a constant specific substrate uptake rate during lysis phase. With the described toolset, we were able to increase the yield of BG production processes by a factor of 8–10 when compared to currently used batch procedures reaching lysis efficiencies >98%. This provides elevated potentials for commercial application of the Bacterial Ghost platform technology.

  17. Diversity of endophytic bacterial populations and their interaction with Xylella fastidiosa in citrus plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araujo, W.L.; Marcon, J.; Maccheroni, jr. W.; Elsas, van J.D.; Vuurde, van J.W.L.; Azevedo, de J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) is caused by Xylella fastidiosa, a phytopathogenic bacterium that can infect all Citrus sinensis cultivars. The endophytic bacterial communities of healthy, resistant, and CVC-affected citrus plants were studied by using cultivation as well as cultivation-independen

  18. Large interdomain rearrangement triggered by suppression of micro- to millisecond dynamics in bacterial Enzyme I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Vincenzo; Tugarinov, Vitali; Schwieters, Charles D.; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G. Marius

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme I (EI), the first component of the bacterial phosphotransfer signal transduction system, undergoes one of the largest substrate-induced interdomain rearrangements documented to date. Here we characterize the perturbations generated by two small molecules, the natural substrate phosphoenolpyruvate and the inhibitor α-ketoglutarate, on the structure and dynamics of EI using NMR, small-angle X-ray scattering and biochemical techniques. The results indicate unambiguously that the open-to-closed conformational switch of EI is triggered by complete suppression of micro- to millisecond dynamics within the C-terminal domain of EI. Indeed, we show that a ligand-induced transition from a dynamic to a more rigid conformational state of the C-terminal domain stabilizes the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains observed in the structure of the closed state, thereby promoting the resulting conformational switch and autophosphorylation of EI. The mechanisms described here may be common to several other multidomain proteins and allosteric systems.

  19. Isolation, Characterization and Application of Bacterial Population From Agricultural Soil at Sohag Province, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahig, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty soil samples of agriculture soil were collected from two different sites in Sohag province, Egypt, during hot and cold seasons. Twenty samples were from soil irrigated with canal water (site A and twenty samples were from soil irrigated with wastewater (site B. This study aimed to compare the incidence of plasmids in bacteria isolated from soil and to investigate the occurrence of metal and antibiotic resistance bacteria, and consequently to select the potential application of these bacteria in bioremediation. The total bacterial count (CFU/gm in site (B was higher than that in site (A. Moreover, the CFU values in summer were higher than those values in winter at both sites. A total of 771 bacterial isolates were characterized as Bacillus, Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Eschershia, Shigella, Xanthomonas, Acetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Moraxella and Methylococcus. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of Pb+2, Cu+2, Zn+2, Hg+2, Co+2, Cd+2, Cr+3, Te+2, As+2 and Ni+2 for plasmid-possessed bacteria were determined and the highest MICs were 1200 µg/mL for lead, 800 µg/mL for both Cobalt and Arsenate, 1200 µg/mL for Nickel, 1000 µg/ml for Copper and less than 600 µg/mL for other metals. Bacterial isolates from both sites A and B showed multiple heavy metal resistance. A total of 337 bacterial isolates contained plasmids and the incidence of plasmids was approximately 25-50% higher in bacteria isolated from site (B than that from site (A. These isolates were resistance to different antibiotics. Approximately, 61% of the bacterial isolates were able to assimilate insecticide, carbaryl, as a sole source of carbon and energy. However, the Citrobacter AA101 showed the best growth on carbaryl.

  20. Modelling food and population dynamics in honey bee colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Khoury

    Full Text Available Honey bees (Apis mellifera are increasingly in demand as pollinators for various key agricultural food crops, but globally honey bee populations are in decline, and honey bee colony failure rates have increased. This scenario highlights a need to understand the conditions in which colonies flourish and in which colonies fail. To aid this investigation we present a compartment model of bee population dynamics to explore how food availability and bee death rates interact to determine colony growth and development. Our model uses simple differential equations to represent the transitions of eggs laid by the queen to brood, then hive bees and finally forager bees, and the process of social inhibition that regulates the rate at which hive bees begin to forage. We assume that food availability can influence both the number of brood successfully reared to adulthood and the rate at which bees transition from hive duties to foraging. The model predicts complex interactions between food availability and forager death rates in shaping colony fate. Low death rates and high food availability results in stable bee populations at equilibrium (with population size strongly determined by forager death rate but consistently increasing food reserves. At higher death rates food stores in a colony settle at a finite equilibrium reflecting the balance of food collection and food use. When forager death rates exceed a critical threshold the colony fails but residual food remains. Our model presents a simple mathematical framework for exploring the interactions of food and forager mortality on colony fate, and provides the mathematical basis for more involved simulation models of hive performance.

  1. Characterization of methanotrophic bacterial populations in natural and agricultural aerobic soils of the European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Kizilova, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric methane contributes to about 20% of the total radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases, and microbial methane oxidation in upland soils is the only biological sink of methane. Microbial methane oxidation in aerated upland soils is estimated as 15 - 45 Tg yr-1 or 3-9% of the annual sink. Therefore there is need of extensive research to characterize methanotrophic activity in various ecosystems for possible application to reduce atmospheric methane fluxes and to minimize global climate change. The vast majority of known aerobic methanotrophs belongs to the Proteobacteria and placed in the families Methylococcaceae in the Gammaproteobacteria, and Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae in the Alphaproteobacteria. Known exceptions include the phylum Verrucomicrobia and uncultured methanotrophs such as Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera' affiliated with the 'NC10' phylum. Plenty of studies of aerobic methane oxidation and key players of the process have been performed on various types of soils, and it was found that Methylocystis spp and uncultivated methanotrophs are abundant in upland soils. Two of the uncultured groups are upland soil cluster alphaproteobacteria (USCa) and gammaproteobacteria (USCg), as revealed by cultivation-independent surveys of pmoA diversity. Russia is extremely rich in soil types due to its vast territories, and most of these soils have never been investigated from the aspect of methanotrophy. This study addresses methane oxidation activity and diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in eight types of natural aerobic soils, four of which also had been under agricultural use. Methane fluxes have been measured by in situ static chamber method and methane oxidation rates in soil samples - by radioisotope tracer (14CH4) technique. Changes in methanotroph diversity and abundance were assessed by cloning and Sanger sequencing, and quantitative real-time PCR of pmoA genes. Methanotrophic population of unmanaged soils turned

  2. Effect of dietary probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic supplementation on performance, immune responses, intestinal morphology and bacterial populations in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehimanesh, A; Mohammadi, M; Roostaei-Ali Mehr, M

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of probiotic (Primalac), prebiotic (TechnoMos) and synbiotic (Primalac + TechnoMos) supplementation on performance, immune responses, intestinal morphology and bacterial populations of ileum in broilers. A total of 240 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into four treatment groups which included 60 birds. Control group did not receive any treatment. The chicks in the second, third and fourth groups were fed probiotic (0.9 g/kg), prebiotic (0.9 g/kg) and probiotic (0.9 g/kg) plus probiotic (0.9 g/kg; synbiotic), respectively, at entire period. Daily feed intake, daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio were evaluated. The birds were immunized by sheep red blood cell (SRBC) on days 12 and 29 of age and serum antibody titres were measured on days 28, 35 and 42. Newcastle vaccines administered on days 9, 18 and 27 to chicks and blood samples were collected on day 42. Intestinal morphometric assessment and enumeration of intestinal bacterial populations were performed on day 42. The results indicated that consumption of probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic had no significant effect on daily feed intake, daily body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, carcass traits, intestinal morphology and bacterial populations of ileum (p > 0.05). Consumption of prebiotic increased total and IgM anti-SRBC titres on days 28 and 42 and antibody titre against Newcastle virus disease on day 42 (p < 0.05). Synbiotic increased only total anti-SRBC on day 28 (p < 0.05). It is concluded that consumption of prebiotic increased humoral immunity in broilers. Therefore, supplementation of diet with prebiotic for improvement of humoral immune responses is superior to synbiotic supplementation. PMID:26847817

  3. A new method for determining the metabolic activity of specific bacterial populations in soil using tritiated leucine and immunomagnetic separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, Gitte; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Frette, Lone;

    2000-01-01

    A new assay, using immunomagnetic separation and uptake of tritiated leucine ([3H]-Leu), was developed for measuring the in situ metabolic activity of specific bacterial populations in soil. Such assays are needed to assess the role individual species play in diverse microbial soil communities...... reduced this unspecific binding, resulting in metabolic activity of the target cells. As expected, a linear relationship...... between activity and temperature was observed, demonstrating the sensitivity of the assay. The method was applied to compare activities of the target strain in bulk soil and in the rhizosphere of barley. Contrary to what was anticipated, no significant difference in metabolic activity was observed....

  4. Richards-like two species population dynamics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fabiano; Cabella, Brenno Caetano Troca; Martinez, Alexandre Souto

    2014-12-01

    The two-species population dynamics model is the simplest paradigm of inter- and intra-species interaction. Here, we present a generalized Lotka-Volterra model with intraspecific competition, which retrieves as particular cases, some well-known models. The generalization parameter is related to the species habitat dimensionality and their interaction range. Contrary to standard models, the species coupling parameters are general, not restricted to non-negative values. Therefore, they may represent different ecological regimes, which are derived from the asymptotic solution stability analysis and are represented in a phase diagram. In this diagram, we have identified a forbidden region in the mutualism regime, and a survival/extinction transition with dependence on initial conditions for the competition regime. Also, we shed light on two types of predation and competition: weak, if there are species coexistence, or strong, if at least one species is extinguished. PMID:25112794

  5. Mean-field games with logistic population dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2013-12-01

    In its standard form, a mean-field game can be defined by coupled system of equations, a Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the value function of agents and a Fokker-Planck equation for the density of agents. Traditionally, the latter equation is adjoint to the linearization of the former. Since the Fokker-Planck equation models a population dynamic, we introduce natural features such as seeding and birth, and nonlinear death rates. In this paper we analyze a stationary meanfield game in one dimension, illustrating various techniques to obtain regularity of solutions in this class of systems. In particular we consider a logistic-type model for birth and death of the agents which is natural in problems where crowding affects the death rate of the agents. The introduction of these new terms requires a number of new ideas to obtain wellposedness. In a forthcoming publication we will address higher dimensional models. ©2013 IEEE.

  6. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc{sub 1} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V., E-mail: dmitrym@asu.edu [Department of Physics and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc{sub 1} bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ∼0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  7. Molecular characterization of bacterial populations of different soils Caracterização molecular de populações bacterianas de diferentes solos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Matheus Pereira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, few studies were carried out in Brazil about diversity of bacterial soil communities. Aiming to characterize the bacterial population in the soil through 16S rRNA analysis, two types of soil have been analyzed: one of them characterized by intensive use where tomato, beans and corn were cultivated (CS; the other analyzed soil was under forest (FS, unchanged by man; both located in Guaíra, São Paulo State, Brazil. Using specific primers, 16S rRNA genes from metagenomic DNA in both soils were amplified by PCR, amplicons were cloned and 139 clones from two libraries were partially sequenced. The use of 16S rRNA analysis allowed identification of several bacterial populations in the soil belonging to the following phyla: Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria Verrucomicrobia in addition to the others that were not classified, beyond Archaea domain. Differences between FS and CS libraries were observed in size phyla. A larger number of phyla and, consequently, a greater bacterial diversity were found in the under-forest soil. These data were confirmed by the analyses of genetic diversity that have been carried out. The characterization of bacterial communities of soil has made its contribution by providing facts for further studies on the dynamics of bacterial populations in different soil conditions in Brazil.Até o momento poucos estudos foram realizados no Brasil a respeito da diversidade de comunidades bacterianas no solo. Com o objetivo de caracterizar as populações bacterianas presentes no solo através da análise do gene 16S rRNA, foram analisados dois solos: um caracterizado pelo uso intensivo, principalmente para a produção de tomate, feijão e milho (CS; e outro sob floresta (FS, não modificado pelo homem, ambos do município de Guaíra, no estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Usando oligonucleotídeos específicos, de genes 16S rRNA do DNA metagenomico de ambos os solos foram amplificados

  8. Comparison of Diversities and Compositions of Bacterial Populations Inhabiting Natural Forest Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Evelyn; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Bodrossy, Levente; Sessitsch, Angela

    2004-01-01

    The diversity and composition of soil bacterial communities were compared among six Austrian natural forests, including oak-hornbeam, spruce-fir-beech, and Austrian pine forests, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP, or TRF) analysis and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. The forests studied differ greatly in soil chemical characteristics, microbial biomass, and nutrient turnover rates. The aim of this study was to relate these differences to the composition of th...

  9. Haemophilus influenzae Type b Carriage and Novel Bacterial Population Structure among Children in Urban Kathmandu, Nepal▿

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, E. J.; Lewis, J.; John, T.; Hoe, J. C.; Yu, L.; Dongol, S.; Kelly, D. F.; Griffiths, D. T.; Shah, A; Limbu, B.; Pradhan, R.; Mawas, F.; Shrestha, S.; Thorson, S.; Werno, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is a major cause of invasive bacterial infection in children that can be prevented by a vaccine, but there is still uncertainty about its relative importance in Asia. This study investigated the age-specific prevalence of Hib carriage and its molecular epidemiology in carriage and disease in Nepal. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from children in Kathmandu, Nepal, from 3 different settings: a hospital outpatient department (OPD), schools, and children's ...

  10. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A.; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang; Zhang, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days o...

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial populations in waters of the former Texcoco Lake, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan-Roblero, Janet; Magos, Xochitl; Fernández, Luis; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Le Borgne, Sylvie

    2004-12-01

    Molecular techniques were used to compare the compositions of the bacterial communities of the 2 following lagoons from the former soda Texcoco Lake, Mexico: the restored Facultativa lagoon and the Nabor Carrillo lagoon. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) revealed that bacterial communities of the 2 lagoons were different and presented a relatively low diversity. Clone libraries of 16S rDNA genes were constructed, and significant phylotypes were distinguished by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). A representative clone from each phylotype was partially sequenced. Molecular identification and phylogenetic analyses based on ribosomal sequences revealed that the Facultativa lagoon harbored mainly gamma- and beta-Proteobacteria, low G+C Gram-positive bacteria, and several members of the Halobacteriaceae family of archaea. The Nabor Carrillo lagoon mainly included typical halophilic and alkaliphilic low G+C Gram-positive bacteria, gamma-Proteobacteria, and beta-Proteobacteria similar to those found in other soda lakes. Several probably noncultured new bacterial species were detected. Three strains were isolated from the Nabor Carrillo lagoon, their partial 16S rDNA sequences were obtained. On this basis, they were identified as Halomonas magadiensis (H1), Halomonas eurihalina (H2), and Staphylococcus sciuri (H3). This is the first study that uses molecular techniques to investigate potential genetic diversity in the Texcoco lakes. In this preliminary evaluation, we infer the presence of alkalophilic, halophilic, or haloalkaliphilic bacteria potentially useful for biotechnology.

  12. Population dynamics in a metastable neon magneto-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, R. D.; Calvert, J. E.; Sang, R. T.

    2013-02-01

    We observe the population dynamics within a metastable neon magneto-optical trap (MOT) through the measurement of the average squared Clebsch-Gordan coefficient C2 over a range of laser detunings. The magnitude of C2 is dependent on the internal quantum state of an atom interacting with the light field and is found to show a strong dependence on the applied laser detuning. Previously it has been reported [Townsend , Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.52.1423 52, 1423 (1995)] that trapped atoms in a MOT are pumped towards the states that interact most strongly with the local field and therefore the measured value of C2 is larger than the average over all possible transitions. For the 3P2-to-3D3 cooling transition in metastable neon the average C2 value is equal to 0.46; however, we have measured 0.29±0.03populations are measured via fluorescence in a MOT.

  13. Far from random: dynamical groupings among the NEO population

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, C de la Fuente

    2016-01-01

    Among the near-Earth object (NEO) population there are comets and active asteroids which are sources of fragments that initially move together; in addition, some NEOs follow orbits temporarily trapped in a web of secular resonances. These facts contribute to increasing the risk of meteoroid strikes on Earth, making its proper quantification difficult. The identification and subsequent study of groups of small NEOs that appear to move in similar trajectories are necessary steps in improving our understanding of the impact risk associated with meteoroids. Here, we present results of a search for statistically significant dynamical groupings among the NEO population. Our Monte Carlo-based methodology recovers well-documented groupings like the Taurid Complex or the one resulting from the split comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3, and new ones that may have been the source of past impacts. Among the most conspicuous are the Mjolnir and Ptah groups, perhaps the source of recent impact events like Almahata Sitta and C...

  14. Far from random: dynamical groupings among the NEO population

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2016-03-01

    Among the near-Earth object (NEO) population, there are comets and active asteroids which are sources of fragments that initially move together; in addition, some NEOs follow orbits temporarily trapped in a web of secular resonances. These facts contribute to increasing the risk of meteoroid strikes on Earth, making its proper quantification difficult. The identification and subsequent study of groups of small NEOs that appear to move in similar trajectories are necessary steps in improving our understanding of the impact risk associated with meteoroids. Here, we present results of a search for statistically significant dynamical groupings among the NEO population. Our Monte Carlo-based methodology recovers well-documented groupings like the Taurid Complex or the one resulting from the split comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3, and new ones that may have been the source of past impacts. Among the most conspicuous are the Mjolnir and Ptah groups, perhaps the source of recent impact events like Almahata Sitta and Chelyabinsk, respectively. Meteoroid 2014 AA, that hit the Earth on 2014 January 2, could have its origin in a marginally significant grouping associated with Bennu. We find that most of the substructure present within the orbital domain of the NEOs is of resonant nature, probably induced by secular resonances and the Kozai mechanism that confine these objects into specific paths with well-defined perihelia.

  15. Sensory dynamics of visual hallucinations in the normal population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Joel; Chiou, Rocco; Rogers, Sebastian; Wicken, Marcus; Heitmann, Stewart; Ermentrout, Bard

    2016-01-01

    Hallucinations occur in both normal and clinical populations. Due to their unpredictability and complexity, the mechanisms underlying hallucinations remain largely untested. Here we show that visual hallucinations can be induced in the normal population by visual flicker, limited to an annulus that constricts content complexity to simple moving grey blobs, allowing objective mechanistic investigation. Hallucination strength peaked at ~11 Hz flicker and was dependent on cortical processing. Hallucinated motion speed increased with flicker rate, when mapped onto visual cortex it was independent of eccentricity, underwent local sensory adaptation and showed the same bistable and mnemonic dynamics as sensory perception. A neural field model with motion selectivity provides a mechanism for both hallucinations and perception. Our results demonstrate that hallucinations can be studied objectively, and they share multiple mechanisms with sensory perception. We anticipate that this assay will be critical to test theories of human consciousness and clinical models of hallucination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17072.001 PMID:27726845

  16. Replication, Communication, and the Population Dynamics of Scientific Discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard McElreath

    Full Text Available Many published research results are false (Ioannidis, 2005, and controversy continues over the roles of replication and publication policy in improving the reliability of research. Addressing these problems is frustrated by the lack of a formal framework that jointly represents hypothesis formation, replication, publication bias, and variation in research quality. We develop a mathematical model of scientific discovery that combines all of these elements. This model provides both a dynamic model of research as well as a formal framework for reasoning about the normative structure of science. We show that replication may serve as a ratchet that gradually separates true hypotheses from false, but the same factors that make initial findings unreliable also make replications unreliable. The most important factors in improving the reliability of research are the rate of false positives and the base rate of true hypotheses, and we offer suggestions for addressing each. Our results also bring clarity to verbal debates about the communication of research. Surprisingly, publication bias is not always an obstacle, but instead may have positive impacts-suppression of negative novel findings is often beneficial. We also find that communication of negative replications may aid true discovery even when attempts to replicate have diminished power. The model speaks constructively to ongoing debates about the design and conduct of science, focusing analysis and discussion on precise, internally consistent models, as well as highlighting the importance of population dynamics.

  17. Shedding light on microbial predator-prey population dynamics using a quantitative bioluminescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hansol; Kim, Dasol; Ghim, Cheol-Min; Mitchell, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the dynamics of predation by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD 100. Predation tests with two different bioluminescent strains of Escherichia coli, one expressing a heat-labile bacterial luciferase and the other a heat-stable form, showed near identical losses from both, indicating that protein expression and stability are not responsible for the "shutting-off" of the prey bioluminescence (BL). Furthermore, it was found that the loss in the prey BL was not proportional with the predator-to-prey ratio (PPR), with significantly greater losses seen as this value was increased. This suggests that other factors also play a role in lowering the prey BL. The loss in BL, however, was very consistent within nine independent experiments to the point that we were able to reliably estimate the predator numbers within only 1 h when present at a PPR of 6 or higher, Using a fluorescent prey, we found that premature lysis of the prey occurs at a significant level and was more prominent as the PPR ratio increased. Based upon the supernatant fluorescent signal, even a relatively low PPR of 10-20 led to approximately 5% of the prey population being prematurely lysed within 1 h, while a PPR of 90 led to nearly 15% lysis. Consequently, we developed a modified Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model that accounted for this lysis and is able to reliably estimate the prey and bdelloplast populations for a wide range of PPRs. PMID:24272279

  18. Public good dynamics drive evolution of iron acquisition strategies in natural bacterioplankton populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Otto X; Ventouras, Laure-Anne; DeLong, Edward F; Polz, Martin F

    2012-12-01

    A common strategy among microbes living in iron-limited environments is the secretion of siderophores, which can bind poorly soluble iron and make it available to cells via active transport mechanisms. Such siderophore-iron complexes can be thought of as public goods that can be exploited by local communities and drive diversification, for example by the evolution of "cheating." However, it is unclear whether bacterial populations in the environment form stable enough communities such that social interactions significantly impact evolutionary dynamics. Here we show that public good games drive the evolution of iron acquisition strategies in wild populations of marine bacteria. We found that within nonclonal but ecologically cohesive genotypic clusters of closely related Vibrionaceae, only an intermediate percentage of genotypes are able to produce siderophores. Nonproducers within these clusters exhibited selective loss of siderophore biosynthetic pathways, whereas siderophore transport mechanisms were retained, suggesting that these nonproducers can act as cheaters that benefit from siderophore producers in their local environment. In support of this hypothesis, these nonproducers in iron-limited media suffer a significant decrease in growth, which can be alleviated by siderophores, presumably owing to the retention of transport mechanisms. Moreover, using ecological data of resource partitioning, we found that cheating coevolves with the ecological specialization toward association with larger particles in the water column, suggesting that these can harbor stable enough communities for dependencies among organisms to evolve.

  19. Modelling multi-pulse population dynamics from ultrafast spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luuk J G W van Wilderen

    Full Text Available Current advanced laser, optics and electronics technology allows sensitive recording of molecular dynamics, from single resonance to multi-colour and multi-pulse experiments. Extracting the occurring (bio- physical relevant pathways via global analysis of experimental data requires a systematic investigation of connectivity schemes. Here we present a Matlab-based toolbox for this purpose. The toolbox has a graphical user interface which facilitates the application of different reaction models to the data to generate the coupled differential equations. Any time-dependent dataset can be analysed to extract time-independent correlations of the observables by using gradient or direct search methods. Specific capabilities (i.e. chirp and instrument response function for the analysis of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopic data are included. The inclusion of an extra pulse that interacts with a transient phase can help to disentangle complex interdependent pathways. The modelling of pathways is therefore extended by new theory (which is included in the toolbox that describes the finite bleach (orientation effect of single and multiple intense polarised femtosecond pulses on an ensemble of randomly oriented particles in the presence of population decay. For instance, the generally assumed flat-top multimode beam profile is adapted to a more realistic Gaussian shape, exposing the need for several corrections for accurate anisotropy measurements. In addition, the (selective excitation (photoselection and anisotropy of populations that interact with single or multiple intense polarised laser pulses is demonstrated as function of power density and beam profile. Using example values of real world experiments it is calculated to what extent this effectively orients the ensemble of particles. Finally, the implementation includes the interaction with multiple pulses in addition to depth averaging in optically dense samples. In summary, we show that mathematical

  20. Improved Statistical Analysis of Low Abundance Phenomena in Bimodal Bacterial Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich Reinhard; Jan Roelof van der Meer

    2013-01-01

    Accurate detection of subpopulation size determinations in bimodal populations remains problematic yet it represents a powerful way by which cellular heterogeneity under different environmental conditions can be compared. So far, most studies have relied on qualitative descriptions of population distribution patterns, on population-independent descriptors, or on arbitrary placement of thresholds distinguishing biological ON from OFF states. We found that all these methods fall short of accura...

  1. Bacterial Genetic Signatures of Human Social Phenomena among M. tuberculosis from an Aboriginal Canadian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Pepperell, Caitlin; Hoeppner, Vernon H.; Lipatov, Mikhail; Wobeser, Wendy; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite a widespread global distribution and highly variable disease phenotype, there is little DNA sequence diversity among isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, many regional population genetic surveys have revealed a stereotypical structure in which a single clone, lineage, or clade makes up the majority of the population. It is often assumed that dominant clones are highly adapted, that is, the overall structure of M. tuberculosis populations is the result of positive selec...

  2. Coral population dynamics across consecutive mass mortality events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegl, Bernhard; Purkis, Sam

    2015-11-01

    Annual coral mortality events due to increased atmospheric heat may occur regularly from the middle of the century and are considered apocalyptic for coral reefs. In the Arabian/Persian Gulf, this situation has already occurred and population dynamics of four widespread corals (Acropora downingi, Porites harrisoni, Dipsastrea pallida, Cyphastrea micropthalma) were examined across the first-ever occurrence of four back-to-back mass mortality events (2009-2012). Mortality was driven by diseases in 2009, bleaching and subsequent diseases in 2010/2011/2012. 2009 reduced P. harrisoni cover and size, the other events increasingly reduced overall cover (2009: -10%; 2010: -20%; 2011: -20%; 2012: -15%) and affected all examined species. Regeneration was only observed after the first disturbance. P. harrisoni and A. downingi severely declined from 2010 due to bleaching and subsequent white syndromes, while D. pallida and P. daedalea declined from 2011 due to bleaching and black-band disease. C. microphthalma cover was not affected. In all species, most large corals were lost while fission due to partial tissue mortality bolstered small size classes. This general shrinkage led to a decrease of coral cover and a dramatic reduction of fecundity. Transition matrices for disturbed and undisturbed conditions were evaluated as Life Table Response Experiment and showed that C. microphthalma changed the least in size-class dynamics and fecundity, suggesting they were 'winners'. In an ordered 'degradation cascade', impacts decreased from the most common to the least common species, leading to step-wise removal of previously dominant species. A potentially permanent shift from high- to low-coral cover with different coral community and size structure can be expected due to the demographic dynamics resultant from the disturbances. Similarities to degradation of other Caribbean and Pacific reefs are discussed. As comparable environmental conditions and mortality patterns must be

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of the bacterial ABC transporter SAV1866 in the closed form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Jean-François; Bunker, Alex; Róg, Tomasz; Karttunen, Mikko; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-03-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family of proteins contains members involved in ATP-mediated import or export of ligands at the cell membrane. For the case of exporters, the translocation mechanism involves a large-scale conformational change that involves a clothespin-like motion from an inward-facing open state, able to bind ligands and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to an outward-facing closed state. Our work focuses on SAV1866, a bacterial member of the ABC transporter family for which the structure is known for the closed state. To evaluate the ability of this protein to undergo conformational changes at physiological temperature, we first performed conventional molecular dynamics (MD) on the cocrystallized adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound structure and on a nucleotide-free structure. With this assessment of SAV1866's stability, conformational changes were induced by steered molecular dynamics (SMD), in which the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) were pushed apart, simulating the ATP hydrolysis energy expenditure. We found that the transmembrane domain is not easily perturbed by large-scale motions of the NBDs. PMID:22339391

  4. Dynamics of the bacterial intermediate filament crescentin in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osigwe Esue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crescentin, the recently discovered bacterial intermediate filament protein, organizes into an extended filamentous structure that spans the length of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and plays a critical role in defining its curvature. The mechanism by which crescentin mediates cell curvature and whether crescentin filamentous structures are dynamic and/or polar are not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using light microscopy, electron microscopy and quantitative rheology, we investigated the mechanics and dynamics of crescentin structures. Live-cell microscopy reveals that crescentin forms structures in vivo that undergo slow remodeling. The exchange of subunits between these structures and a pool of unassembled subunits is slow during the life cycle of the cell however; in vitro assembly and gelation of C. crescentus crescentin structures are rapid. Moreover, crescentin forms filamentous structures that are elastic, solid-like, and, like other intermediate filaments, can recover a significant portion of their network elasticity after shear. The assembly efficiency of crescentin is largely unaffected by monovalent cations (K(+, Na(+, but is enhanced by divalent cations (Mg(2+, Ca(2+, suggesting that the assembly kinetics and micromechanics of crescentin depend on the valence of the ions present in solution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that crescentin forms filamentous structures that are elastic, labile, and stiff, and that their low dissociation rate from established structures controls the slow remodeling of crescentin in C. crescentus.

  5. Distribution and dynamics of OXPHOS complexes in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalon, Axel; Alberge, François

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is an essential process for most living organisms mostly sustained by protein complexes embedded in the cell membrane. In order to thrive, cells need to quickly respond to changes in the metabolic demand or in their environment. An overview of the strategies that can be employed by bacterial cells to adjust the OXPHOS outcome is provided. Regulation at the level of gene expression can only provide a means to adjust the OXPHOS outcome to long-term trends in the environment. In addition, the actual view is that bioenergetic membranes are highly compartmentalized structures. This review discusses what is known about the spatial organization of OXPHOS complexes and the timescales at which they occur. As exemplified with the commensal gut bacterium Escherichia coli, three levels of spatial organization are at play: supercomplexes, membrane microdomains and polar assemblies. This review provides a particular focus on whether dynamic spatial organization can fine-tune the OXPHOS through the definition of specialized functional membrane microdomains. Putative mechanisms responsible for spatio-temporal regulation of the OXPHOS complexes are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26545610

  6. Dynamics of Populations of Planetary Systems (IAU C197)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Zoran; Milani, Andrea

    2005-05-01

    population of asteroids in the 2:1 mean motion resonance with Jupiter revised Miroslav Broz, D. Vokrouhlicky, F. Roig, D. Nesvorny, W. F. Bottke and A. Morbidelli; 22. On the reliability of computation of maximum Lyapunov Characteristic Exponents for asteroids Zoran Knezevic and Slobodan Ninkovic; 23. Nekhoroshev stability estimates for different models of the Trojan asteroids Christos Efthymiopoulos; 24. The role of the resonant 'stickiness' in the dynamical evolution of Jupiter family comets A. Alvarez-Canda and F. Roig; 25. Regimes of stability and scaling relations for the removal time in the asteroid belt: a simple kinetic model and numerical tests Mihailo Cubrovic; 26. Virtual asteroids and virtual impactors Andrea Milani; 27. Asteroid population models Alessandro Morbidelli; 28. Linking Very Large Telescope asteroid observations M. Granvik, K. Muinonen, J. Virtanen, M. Delbó, L. Saba, G. De Sanctis, R. Morbidelli, A. Cellino and E. Tedesco; 29. Collision orbits and phase transition for 2004 AS1 at discovery Jenni Virtanen, K. Muinonen, M. Granvik and T. Laakso; 30. The size of collision solutions in orbital elements space G. B. Valsecchi, A. Rossi, A. Milani and S. R. Chesley; 31. Very short arc orbit determination: the case of asteroid 2004 FU162 Steven R. Chesley; 32. Nonlinear impact monitoring: 2-dimensional sampling Giacomo Tommei; 33. Searching for gravity assisted trajectories to accessible near-Earth asteroids Stefan Berinde; 34. KLENOT - Near Earth and other unusual objects observations Michal Kocer, Jana Tichá and M. Tichy; 35. Transport of comets to the Inner Solar System Hans Rickman; 36. Nongravitational Accelerations on Comets Steven R. Chesley and Donald K. Yeomans; 37. Interaction of planetesimals with the giant planets and the shaping of the trans-Neptunian belt Harold F. Levison and Alessandro Morbidelli; 38. Transport of comets to the outer p

  7. Differential stress resistance and metabolic traits underlie coexistence in a sympatrically evolved bacterial population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puentes Tellez, Pilar; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Following intermittent batch growth in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth for about 1000 generations, differentially evolved forms were found in a population of Escherichia coli cells. Studies on this population revealed the emergence of key polymorphisms, as evidenced by analysis of both whole genome sequenc

  8. Evolution in an Afternoon: Rapid Natural Selection and Adaptation of Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, Roger

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, rapid and low-cost technique for growing bacteria (or other microbes) in an environmental gradient, in order to determine the tolerance of the microbial population to varying concentrations of sodium chloride ions, and suggests how the evolutionary response of a microbial population to the selection pressure of the…

  9. Sampling bacterial biodiversity from a highly contaminated stream flowing through a densely populated urban area in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few studies have attempted to understand the complexity of microbial populations in Pakistan where infectious diseases are prevalent. This study was undertaken to assess bacterial biodiversity in Nehr-e-Khayyam a heavily polluted stream connected to the Arabian Gulf, which runs through a densely populated urban area in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods: Employing a universal pair of oligonucleotides capable of amplifying species-specific segments of 16S rRNA gene from all Eubacteria, we generated a library of PCR products using total DNA purified from the collected sample, cloned the amplifers into pGEM-T-Easy and sequenced each recombinant clone. The obtained DNA sequences were subjected to bio-informatic analyses. Results: A total of 71 recombinant clones were obtained from the amplified 16S rDNA products and sequenced. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that 54 (out of 71) were unique sequences from which 42 shared >97% and 12 shared <97% homology to their database counterparts. One sequence originated from the plastid DNA of eukaryote Pyramimonas disomata. From the remaining 53 sequences, 45 were Proteo-bacteria and 8 Fermicute in origin. Among 71 sequences, Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria species constituted 86% of Proteo-bacteria identified in the sample while only 13% were Fermicutes. Conclusions: The microbial niche in Nehr-e-Khayyam is occupied predominantly by heterotrophic Proteo-bacterial and Firmicute strains, some of which are known human pathogens. (author)

  10. DMPD: Targeting bacterial endotoxin: two sides of a coin. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17405910 Targeting bacterial endotoxin: two sides of a coin. Bosshart H, Heinzelman...n M. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007 Jan;1096:1-17. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Targeting bacterial endotoxin:... two sides of a coin. PubmedID 17405910 Title Targeting bacterial endotoxin: two sides of a coin. Authors Bo

  11. DMPD: Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16885502 Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review. Bu...(.csml) Show Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review. PubmedID 16885502 Title... Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review. Authors

  12. DMPD: The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534106 The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. Sester DP, Stacey KJ, ...Sweet MJ, Beasley SJ, Cronau SL, Hume DA. J Leukoc Biol. 1999 Oct;66(4):542-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The action...s of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. PubmedID 10534106 Title The actions of bacterial D

  13. Improved statistical analysis of low abundance phenomena in bimodal bacterial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Reinhard

    Full Text Available Accurate detection of subpopulation size determinations in bimodal populations remains problematic yet it represents a powerful way by which cellular heterogeneity under different environmental conditions can be compared. So far, most studies have relied on qualitative descriptions of population distribution patterns, on population-independent descriptors, or on arbitrary placement of thresholds distinguishing biological ON from OFF states. We found that all these methods fall short of accurately describing small population sizes in bimodal populations. Here we propose a simple, statistics-based method for the analysis of small subpopulation sizes for use in the free software environment R and test this method on real as well as simulated data. Four so-called population splitting methods were designed with different algorithms that can estimate subpopulation sizes from bimodal populations. All four methods proved more precise than previously used methods when analyzing subpopulation sizes of transfer competent cells arising in populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas knackmussii B13. The methods' resolving powers were further explored by bootstrapping and simulations. Two of the methods were not severely limited by the proportions of subpopulations they could estimate correctly, but the two others only allowed accurate subpopulation quantification when this amounted to less than 25% of the total population. In contrast, only one method was still sufficiently accurate with subpopulations smaller than 1% of the total population. This study proposes a number of rational approximations to quantifying small subpopulations and offers an easy-to-use protocol for their implementation in the open source statistical software environment R.

  14. Improved statistical analysis of low abundance phenomena in bimodal bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Friedrich; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2013-01-01

    Accurate detection of subpopulation size determinations in bimodal populations remains problematic yet it represents a powerful way by which cellular heterogeneity under different environmental conditions can be compared. So far, most studies have relied on qualitative descriptions of population distribution patterns, on population-independent descriptors, or on arbitrary placement of thresholds distinguishing biological ON from OFF states. We found that all these methods fall short of accurately describing small population sizes in bimodal populations. Here we propose a simple, statistics-based method for the analysis of small subpopulation sizes for use in the free software environment R and test this method on real as well as simulated data. Four so-called population splitting methods were designed with different algorithms that can estimate subpopulation sizes from bimodal populations. All four methods proved more precise than previously used methods when analyzing subpopulation sizes of transfer competent cells arising in populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas knackmussii B13. The methods' resolving powers were further explored by bootstrapping and simulations. Two of the methods were not severely limited by the proportions of subpopulations they could estimate correctly, but the two others only allowed accurate subpopulation quantification when this amounted to less than 25% of the total population. In contrast, only one method was still sufficiently accurate with subpopulations smaller than 1% of the total population. This study proposes a number of rational approximations to quantifying small subpopulations and offers an easy-to-use protocol for their implementation in the open source statistical software environment R. PMID:24205184

  15. DBIO Best Thesis Award: Mechanics, Dynamics, and Organization of the Bacterial Cytoskeleton and Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria come in a variety of shapes. While the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall serves as an exoskeleton that defines the static cell shape, the internal bacterial cytoskeleton mediates cell shape by recruiting PG synthesis machinery and thus defining the pattern of cell-wall synthesis. While much is known about the chemistry and biology of the cytoskeleton and cell wall, much of their biophysics, including essential aspects of the functionality, dynamics, and organization, remain unknown. This dissertation aims to elucidate the detailed biophysical mechanisms of cytoskeleton guided wall synthesis. First, I find that the bacterial cytoskeleton MreB contributes nearly as much to the rigidity of an Escherichia coli cell as the cell wall. This conclusion implies that the cytoskeletal polymer MreB applies meaningful force to the cell wall, an idea favored by theoretical modeling of wall growth, and suggests an evolutionary origin of cytoskeleton-governed cell rigidity. Second, I observe that MreB rotates around the long axis of E. coli, and the motion depends on wall synthesis. This is the first discovery of a cell-wall assembly driven molecular motor in bacteria. Third, I prove that both cell-wall synthesis and the PG network have chiral ordering, which is established by the spatial pattern of MreB. This work links the molecular structure of the cytoskeleton and of the cell wall with organismal-scale behavior. Finally, I develop a mathematical model of cytoskeleton-cell membrane interactions, which explains the preferential orientation of different cytoskeleton components in bacteria.

  16. Impact of ionic liquids in aqueous solution on bacterial plasma membranes studied with molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Geraldine S; Zidar, Jernej; Cheong, Daniel W; Jaenicke, Stephan; Klähn, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The impact of five different imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) diluted in water on the properties of a bacterial plasma membrane is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Cations considered are 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium (OMIM), 1-octyloxymethyl-3-methylimidazolium (OXMIM), and 1-tetradecyl-3-methylimidazolium (TDMIM), as well as the anions chloride and lactate. The atomistic model of the membrane bilayer is designed to reproduce the lipid composition of the plasma membrane of Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Spontaneous insertion of cations into the membrane is observed in all ILs. Substantially more insertions of OMIM than of OXMIM occur and the presence of chloride reduces cation insertions compared to lactate. In contrast, anions do not adsorb onto the membrane surface nor diffuse into the bilayer. Once inserted, cations are oriented in parallel to membrane lipids with cation alkyl tails embedded into the hydrophobic membrane core, while the imidazolium-ring remains mostly exposed to the solvent. Such inserted cations are strongly associated with one to two phospholipids in the membrane. The overall order of lipids decreased after OMIM and OXMIM insertions, while on the contrary the order of lipids in the vicinity of TDMIM increased. The short alkyl tails of OMIM and OXMIM generate voids in the bilayer that are filled by curling lipids. This cation induced lipid disorder also reduces the average membrane thickness. This effect is not observed after TDMIM insertions due to the similar length of cation alkyl chain and the fatty acids of the lipids. This lipid-mimicking behavior of inserted TDMIM indicates a high membrane affinity of this cation that could lead to an enhanced accumulation of cations in the membrane over time. Overall, the simulations reveal how cations are inserted into the bacterial membrane and how such insertions change its properties. Moreover, the different roles of cations and anions are highlighted and the fundamental

  17. Dynamic changes of bacterial community under bioremediation with Sphingobium sp. LY-6 in buprofezin-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Hou, Qianqian; Liu, Wanru; Meng, Yawen; Wang, Guangli

    2015-08-01

    Buprofezin is a commonly used chemical with satisfactory biological activity against sucking insect pests, but its disposal can cause serious environmental problems. To study the feasibility of remedying contamination by buprofezin, microcosm experiments were carried out to study the effects of various concentrations of buprofezin and Sphingobium sp. LY-6 on soil bacterial communities in soils collected from vegetable fields. In this experiment, the results showed that buprofezin was effectively degraded by Sphingobium sp. LY-6 in incubation soils. Comparing to non-incubated soils, the cumulative degradation ratio of buprofezin was significantly increased, up to the extent of 85 and 51%, in the initial concentration of 10 and 100 mg kg(-1). The abundance and community structure of the bacterial communities were analysed by real-time PCR (qPCR) and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The findings suggest that buprofezin had a negative effect on soil bacterial community, and decreases in bacterial abundance were observed in the later part of the incubation period. The bacterial community structure and diversity shifted significantly at each sampling time. In conclusion, the buprofezin-degrading strain LY-6 played a major role in the bioremediation of the buprofezin-contaminated soil and influenced the dynamics and structure of the bacterial community, demonstrating the great potential of exogenous microorganisms for soil remediation.

  18. Population dynamics and monitoring applied to decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conroy, M. J.

    2004-06-01

    influence diagrams to capture the stochastic, temporal processes of managing cheetah population in Kenya. The model predicts likely anagement decisions made by various actors within these countries, (e.g., the President, the Environmental Protection Agency, and rural residents and the resulting probability of cheetah extinction following these decisions. By approaching the problem in both its political and ecological contexts one avoids consideration of decisions that, while beneficial from a purely conservation point of view, are unlikely to be implemented because of conflicting political objectives. Haas’s analysis demonstrates both the promise and challenges of this type of modeling, and he offers suggestions for overcoming inherent technical difficulties such as model calibration. The second paper, by Simon Hoyle and Mark Maunder (Hoyle & Maunder, 2004, uses a Bayesian approach to model population dynamics and the effects of commercial fishing bycatch for the eastern Pacific Ocean spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata. Their paper provides a good example of why Bayesian analysis is particularly suited to many management problems. Namely, because it allows the integration of disparate pieces of monitoring data in the simultaneous estimation of population parameters; allows forincorporation of expert judgment and data from other systems and species; and provides for explicit consideration of uncertainty in decision–making. Alternative management scenarios can then be explored via forward simulations. In the third paper, Chris Fonnesbeck and Mike Conroy (Fonnesbeck & Conroy, 2004 present an integrated approach for estimating parameters and predicting abundance of American black duck (Anas rubripes populations. They also employ a ayesian approach and overcome some of the computational challenges by using Markov chain–Monte Carlo methods. Ring–recovery and harvest data are used to estimate fall age ratios under alternative reproductive models. These in turn are used to

  19. Population structure of the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa among street trees in Washington D.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Lee Harris

    Full Text Available Bacterial leaf scorch, associated with the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, is a widely established and problematic disease of landscape ornamentals in Washington D.C. A multi-locus sequence typing analysis was performed using 10 housekeeping loci for X. fastidiosa strains in order to better understand the epidemiology of leaf scorch disease in this municipal environment. Samples were collected from 7 different tree species located throughout the District of Columbia, consisting of 101 samples of symptomatic and asymptomatic foliage from 84 different trees. Five strains of the bacteria were identified. Consistent with prior data, these strains were host specific, with only one strain associated with members of the red oak family, one strain associated with American elm, one strain associated with American sycamore, and two strains associated with mulberry. Strains found for asymptomatic foliage were the same as strains from the symptomatic foliage on individual trees. Cross transmission of the strains was not observed at sites with multiple species of infected trees within an approx. 25 m radius of one another. X. fastidiosa strain specificity observed for each genus of tree suggests a highly specialized host-pathogen relationship.

  20. Population structure of the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa among street trees in Washington D.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jordan Lee; Balci, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial leaf scorch, associated with the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, is a widely established and problematic disease of landscape ornamentals in Washington D.C. A multi-locus sequence typing analysis was performed using 10 housekeeping loci for X. fastidiosa strains in order to better understand the epidemiology of leaf scorch disease in this municipal environment. Samples were collected from 7 different tree species located throughout the District of Columbia, consisting of 101 samples of symptomatic and asymptomatic foliage from 84 different trees. Five strains of the bacteria were identified. Consistent with prior data, these strains were host specific, with only one strain associated with members of the red oak family, one strain associated with American elm, one strain associated with American sycamore, and two strains associated with mulberry. Strains found for asymptomatic foliage were the same as strains from the symptomatic foliage on individual trees. Cross transmission of the strains was not observed at sites with multiple species of infected trees within an approx. 25 m radius of one another. X. fastidiosa strain specificity observed for each genus of tree suggests a highly specialized host-pathogen relationship. PMID:25815838

  1. Magnesium aminoclay enhances lipid production of mixotrophic Chlorella sp. KR-1 while reducing bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bohwa; Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Lee, Jiye; Nam, Bora; Kim, Dong-Myung; Lee, Kyubock; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Improving lipid productivity and preventing overgrowth of contaminating bacteria are critical issues relevant to the commercialization of the mixotrophic microalgae cultivation process. In this paper, we report the use of magnesium aminoclay (MgAC) nanoparticles for enhanced lipid production from oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 with simultaneous control of KR-1-associated bacterial growth in mixotrophic cultures with glucose as the model substrate. Addition of 0.01-0.1g/L MgAC promoted microalgal biomass production better than the MgAC-less control, via differential biocidal effects on microalgal and bacterial cells (the latter being more sensitive to MgAC's bio-toxicity than the former). The inhibition effect of MgAC on co-existing bacteria was, as based on density-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, largely dosage-dependent and species-specific. MgAC also, by inducing an oxidative stress environment, increased both the cell size and lipid content of KR-1, resulting in a considerable, ∼25% improvement of mixotrophic algal lipid productivity (to ∼410mgFAME/L/d) compared with the untreated control. PMID:27543952

  2. Magnesium aminoclay enhances lipid production of mixotrophic Chlorella sp. KR-1 while reducing bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bohwa; Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Lee, Jiye; Nam, Bora; Kim, Dong-Myung; Lee, Kyubock; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Improving lipid productivity and preventing overgrowth of contaminating bacteria are critical issues relevant to the commercialization of the mixotrophic microalgae cultivation process. In this paper, we report the use of magnesium aminoclay (MgAC) nanoparticles for enhanced lipid production from oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 with simultaneous control of KR-1-associated bacterial growth in mixotrophic cultures with glucose as the model substrate. Addition of 0.01-0.1g/L MgAC promoted microalgal biomass production better than the MgAC-less control, via differential biocidal effects on microalgal and bacterial cells (the latter being more sensitive to MgAC's bio-toxicity than the former). The inhibition effect of MgAC on co-existing bacteria was, as based on density-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, largely dosage-dependent and species-specific. MgAC also, by inducing an oxidative stress environment, increased both the cell size and lipid content of KR-1, resulting in a considerable, ∼25% improvement of mixotrophic algal lipid productivity (to ∼410mgFAME/L/d) compared with the untreated control.

  3. Characterization of culturable bacterial populations associating with Pinus sylvestris--Suillus bovinus mycorrhizospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Sari; Hurek, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Bacterial isolations were carried out on Pinus sylvestris--Suillus bovinus mycorrhizospheres obtained directly from boreal pine forest. When samples were taken during dry weather, the numbers of bacterial colony-forming units were significantly higher in uncolonized short roots and external mycelia than in mycorrhizal roots and soil outside the mycorrhizosphere. In contrast, the colony-forming unit counts were similar in all hypogeous samples after rainy weather. Culturable bacteria were absent from most Suillus bovinus sporocarps. The bacteria isolated from all types of mycorr hizo sphere samples, i.e. short roots, mycorrhizal roots, and external mycelia, consisted primarily of Burkholderia spp., whereas most isolates from soil outside the mycorrhizosphere were identified as Paenibacillus spp. This study shows that mycorrhizal external mycelia can expand the habitat favourable for common rhizosphere bacteria into the soil far from the immediate rhizosphere. Some of these bacteria may help the trees with nitrogen acquisition, since potentially diazotrophic bacteria harbouring nitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes were isolated from mycorrhizal root tips. PMID:16917536

  4. Diversity and dynamics of dominant and rare bacterial taxa in replicate sequencing batch reactors operated under different solids retention time

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik

    2014-10-19

    In this study, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was applied in order to provide a better insight on the diversity and dynamics of total, dominant, and rare bacterial taxa in replicate lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) operated at different solids retention time (SRT). Rank-abundance curves showed few dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a long tail of rare OTUs in all reactors. Results revealed that there was no detectable effect of SRT (2 vs. 10 days) on Shannon diversity index and OTU richness of both dominant and rare taxa. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis showed that the total, dominant, and rare bacterial taxa were highly dynamic during the entire period of stable reactor performance. Also, the rare taxa were more dynamic than the dominant taxa despite expected low invasion rates because of the use of sterile synthetic media.

  5. Soil Bacteria Population Dynamics Following Stimulation for Ureolytic Microbial-Induced CaCO3 Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, Daniella; Ronen, Zeev; Tsesarsky, Michael

    2016-01-19

    Microbial-induced CaCO3 precipitation (MICP) via urea-hydrolysis (ureolysis) is an emerging soil improvement technique for various civil engineering and environmental applications. In-situ application of MICP in soils is performed either by augmenting the site with ureolytic bacteria or by stimulating indigenous ureolytic bacteria. Both of these approaches may lead to changes in the indigenous bacterial population composition and to the accumulation of large quantities of ammonium. In this batch study, effective ureolysis was stimulated in coastal sand from a semiarid environment, with low initial ureolytic bacteria abundance. Two different carbon sources were used: yeast-extract and molasses. No ureolysis was observed in their absence. Ureolysis was achieved using both carbon sources, with a higher rate in the yeast-extract enrichment resulting from increased bacterial growth. The changes to the indigenous bacterial population following biostimulation of ureolysis were significant: Bacilli class abundancy increased from 5% in the native sand up to 99% in the yeast-extract treatment. The sand was also enriched with ammonium-chloride, where ammonia-oxidation was observed after 27 days, but was not reflected in the bacterial population composition. These results suggest that biostimulation of ureolytic bacteria can be applied even in a semiarid and nutrient-poor environment using a simple carbon source, that is, molasses. The significant changes to bacterial population composition following ureolysis stimulation could result in a decrease in trophic activity and diversity in the treated site, thus they require further attention. PMID:26689904

  6. Dynamics of Betula ermanni population in subalpine vegetation in Changbai Mountain, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zou Chunjing; Han Shijie; Wang Xiaochun

    1999-01-01

    Betula ermanni population was divided into three groups: the upper population (2 000~2 200 m), the middle population (1 700~2000 m), and the down population (1 400~1 700 m) in Changbai Mountain. The dynamics of Betula ermanni populations in subalpine vegetation are studied and the population life table,fecundity schedule, survival curves, age structure, and fecundity curves were established. The results showed that the middle population is obviously the transition from the upper population to the down population.

  7. Analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis Population Dynamics and Its Interaction With Pseudomonas fluorescens in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Ruiz, Norma Elena; Sansinenea-Royano, Estibaliz; Cedillo-Ramirez, Maria Lilia; Marsch-Moreno, Rodolfo; Sanchez-Alonso, Patricia; Vazquez-Cruz, Candelario

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent, however, studies so far have shown that B. thuringiensis is very sensitive to environmental factors such as soil moisture and pH. Ultraviolet light from the sun had been considered as the main limiting factor for its persistence in soil and it has recently been shown that the antagonism exerted by other native soil organisms, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens, is a determining factor in the persistence of this bacterium under in vitro culture conditions. Objectives: The aim of the present investigation was to analyze the population dynamics of B. thuringiensis and its interaction with P. fluorescens using microbiological and molecular methods in soil, under different conditions, and to determinate the effect of nutrients and moisture on its interaction. Materials and Methods: The monitoring was performed by microbiological methods, such as viable count of bacteria, and molecular methods such as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and hybridization, using the direct extraction of DNA from populations of inoculated soil. Results: The analysis of the interaction between B. thuringiensis and P. fluorescens in soil indicated that the disappearance of B. thuringiensis IPS82 is not dependent on the moisture but the composition of nutrients that may be affecting the secretion of toxic compounds in the environment of P. fluorescens. The results showed that the recovered cells were mostly spores and not vegetative cells in all proved treatments. The molecular methods were effective for monitoring bacterial population inoculated in soil. Conclusions: Bacillus thuringiensis is very sensitive to the interaction of P. fluorescens, however is capable to survive in soil due to its capacity of sporulate. Some of the cells in the form of spores germinated and folded slightly and remained in a constant cycle of sporulation and germination. This confirms that B. thuringiensis IPS82 can germinate, grow and

  8. Spatiotemporal dynamics of insect pest population under viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Suma; Bhattacharyya, Samit

    2013-07-01

    The interrelationship between pathogen infection and host mobility is of great importance for successful spread of disease in spatial pest population. As spread of infection depends on horizontal transmission of pathogen, there are numerous factors like susceptibility, latent period, host movement that influence overall effectiveness of the control policy. Initiation of new infection cycle depends on density of infected inoculum in the site. So, spatial movement of infected hosts during the course of infection influence the dynamics. Also, infected individuals are more vulnerable to predators and hence production of virus particles in the site depends on predation to some extent. We derive a four dimensional delayed reaction-diffusion model in one spatial dimension and compute the minimum travelling speed of transmission of infection. We show that the minimum speed is sensitive to several parameters of the system. For example, the minimum speed decreases only with increase in delay in lysis process, but otherwise it increases with increase in force of infection, diffusivity of infectives or per capita virus production. A concluding discussion with numerical simulation is presented in the end. PMID:23562890

  9. The ecological proportion of indigenous bacterial populations in saliva is correlated with oral health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Toru; Nakano, Yoshio; Kumagai, Takashi; Yasui, Masaki; Kamio, Noriaki; Shibata, Yukie; Shiota, Susumu; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2009-01-01

    To obtain deeper insights into the etiology of oral disease, an understanding of the composition of the surrounding bacterial environments that lead to health or disease is required, which is attracting increasing attention. In this study, the bacterial compositions in the saliva of 200 subjects aged 15-40 years were depicted as peak patterns by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes. The subjects were classified into three clusters by partitioning around medoids clustering based on their T-RFLP profiles, and the clinical oral health parameters of the clusters were compared. The clustering of the T-RFLP profiles in this study was mainly based on differences in the abundance distribution of the dominant terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) detected in most of the subjects. Predicted from the sizes of the TRFs, the characteristically more predominant members of each were Prevotella and Veillonella species in cluster I; Streptococcus species in cluster II and Neisseria, Haemophilus or Aggregatibacter species and Porphyromonas species in cluster III. The parameters associated with periodontal disease were significantly different among the clusters. Clusters I and II had a higher percentage of sites of periodontal pockets greater than 4 mm than cluster III, and cluster I contained sites exhibiting bleeding on probing more often than cluster II or III; no significant differences were observed in other parameters. These results suggest that the abundance distribution of commensal bacteria in saliva is correlated with periodontal health, and might be involved in the susceptibility of an individual to periodontal disease. PMID:18830275

  10. Investigating bacterial populations in styrene-degrading biofilters by 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portune, Kevin J; Pérez, M Carmen; Álvarez-Hornos, F Javier; Gabaldón, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are essential components in the elimination of pollutants within biofilters, yet still little is known regarding the complex relationships between microbial community structure and biodegradation function within these engineered ecosystems. To further explore this relationship, 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing was applied to samples taken at four time points from a styrene-degrading biofilter undergoing variable operating conditions. Changes in microbial structure were observed between different stages of biofilter operation, and the level of styrene concentration was revealed to be a critical factor affecting these changes. Bacterial genera Azoarcus and Pseudomonas were among the dominant classified genera in the biofilter. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and correlation analysis revealed that the genera Brevundimonas, Hydrogenophaga, and Achromobacter may play important roles in styrene degradation under increasing styrene concentrations. No significant correlations (P > 0.05) could be detected between biofilter operational/functional parameters and biodiversity measurements, although biological heterogeneity within biofilms and/or technical variability within pyrosequencing may have considerably affected these results. Percentages of selected bacterial taxonomic groups detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were compared to results from pyrosequencing in order to assess the effectiveness and limitations of each method for identifying each microbial taxon. Comparison of results revealed discrepancies between the two methods in the detected percentages of numerous taxonomic groups. Biases and technical limitations of both FISH and pyrosequencing, such as the binding of FISH probes to non-target microbial groups and lack of classification of sequences for defined taxonomic groups from pyrosequencing, may partially explain some differences between the two methods.

  11. Studies on fungal and bacterial population of air-conditioned environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ross

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In tropical countries such as Brazil, there is not enough information about microbial contaminants in indoor environments with air conditioning systems. Microbial monitoring of such environments is important for the quality of human life. The aim of this work was to assess the fungal genera and bacterial morphotypes occurring in such environments. Air samples were taken indoors and outdoors from a public auditorium, a hospital, a company and a shopping center during the 2001 winter by using a six-stage impactor Millipore M air T® . Twenty-one fungal genera were identified. Bacterial morphological groups found were Gram positive and negative rods and Gram positive coccus.Em países tropicais como o Brasil, não há informação suficiente sobre contaminantes microbianos em ambientes internos com sistemas de ar condicionado. Monitoramento microbiano em tais ambientes é importante para a qualidade de vida humana. O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar os gêneros de fungos e morfotipos de bactérias que ocorrem em tais ambientes. Amostras de ar foram coletadas dentro e fora de um auditório público, um hospital, uma empresa e um shopping center durante o inverno de 2001 utilizando um impactador de ar de seis estágios Millipore M air T® . Vinte e um gêneros de fungos foram identificados. Foram encontrados grupos morfológicos de bactérias bastonetes Gram positivos e negativos e cocos Gram positivos.

  12. Phage mutations in response to CRISPR diversification in a bacterial population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christine L; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Thomas, Brian C; Horvath, Philippe; Fremaux, Christophe; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Interactions between bacteria and their coexisting phage populations impact evolution and can strongly influence biogeochemical processes in natural ecosystems. Periodically, mutation or migration results in exposure of a host to a phage to which it has no immunity; alternatively, a phage may be exposed to a host it cannot infect. To explore the processes by which coexisting, co-evolving hosts and phage populations establish, we cultured Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 with phage 2972 and tracked CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) diversification and host-phage co-evolution in a population derived from a colony that acquired initial CRISPR-encoded immunity. After 1 week of co-culturing, the coexisting host-phage populations were metagenomically characterized using 454 FLX Titanium sequencing. The evolved genomes were compared with reference genomes to identify newly incorporated spacers in S. thermophilus DGCC7710 and recently acquired single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in phage 2972. Following phage exposure, acquisition of immune elements (spacers) led to a genetically diverse population with multiple subdominant strain lineages. Phage mutations that circumvented three early immunization events were localized in the proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM) or near the PAM end of the proto-spacer, suggesting a strong selective advantage for the phage that mutated in this region. The sequential fixation or near fixation of these single mutations indicates selection events so severe that single phage genotypes ultimately gave rise to all surviving lineages and potentially carried traits unrelated to immunity to fixation.

  13. Phage mutations in response to CRISPR diversification in a bacterial population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christine L; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Thomas, Brian C; Horvath, Philippe; Fremaux, Christophe; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Interactions between bacteria and their coexisting phage populations impact evolution and can strongly influence biogeochemical processes in natural ecosystems. Periodically, mutation or migration results in exposure of a host to a phage to which it has no immunity; alternatively, a phage may be exposed to a host it cannot infect. To explore the processes by which coexisting, co-evolving hosts and phage populations establish, we cultured Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 with phage 2972 and tracked CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) diversification and host-phage co-evolution in a population derived from a colony that acquired initial CRISPR-encoded immunity. After 1 week of co-culturing, the coexisting host-phage populations were metagenomically characterized using 454 FLX Titanium sequencing. The evolved genomes were compared with reference genomes to identify newly incorporated spacers in S. thermophilus DGCC7710 and recently acquired single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in phage 2972. Following phage exposure, acquisition of immune elements (spacers) led to a genetically diverse population with multiple subdominant strain lineages. Phage mutations that circumvented three early immunization events were localized in the proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM) or near the PAM end of the proto-spacer, suggesting a strong selective advantage for the phage that mutated in this region. The sequential fixation or near fixation of these single mutations indicates selection events so severe that single phage genotypes ultimately gave rise to all surviving lineages and potentially carried traits unrelated to immunity to fixation. PMID:23057534

  14. Lesser Scaup population dynamics: what can belearned from available data?

    OpenAIRE

    Koons, David N.; Rotella, J. J.; Willey, D. W.; Taper, M.; Clark, R.G.; Slattery, S.; Brook, R. W.; Corcoran, R. M.; Lovvorn, J.R

    2006-01-01

    Populations of Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) have declined markedly in North America since the early 1980s. When considering alternatives for achieving population recovery, it would be useful to understand how the rate of population growth is functionally related to the underlying vital rates and which vital rates affect population growth rate the most if changed (which need not be those that influenced historical population declines). To establish a more quantitative basis for learning about...

  15. Few microorganisms associated with bacterial vaginosis may constitute the pathologic core: a population-based microbiologic study among 3596 pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, P; Jensen, I P; Jeune, B;

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between various microorganisms isolated from the genital tract in pregnant women with bacterial vaginosis. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional population-based study among pregnant women addressed at their first antenatal visit before 24 full gestational weeks f...... interaction in which the microorganisms G. vaginalis, anaerobic bacteria, and M. hominis are dominating, indicating that these constitute the pathologic core of bacterial vaginosis....

  16. In vivo compaction dynamics of bacterial DNA: A fingerprint of DNA/RNA demixing ?

    CERN Document Server

    Joyeux, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The volume occupied by unconstrained bacterial DNA in physiological solutions exceeds 1000 times the volume of the cell. Still, it is confined to a well defined region of the cell called the nucleoid, which occupies only a fraction of the cell volume. There is still no general agreement on the mechanism leading to the compaction of the DNA and the formation of the nucleoid. However, advances in in vivo sub-wavelength resolution microscopy techniques have recently allowed the observation of the nucleoid at an unprecedented level of detail. In particular, these observations show that the compaction of the nucleoid is not static but is instead a highly dynamic feature, which depends on several factors, like the richness of the nutrient, the cell cycle stage, temperature, the action of an osmotic shock or antibiotics, etc. After a short description of the electrolyte content of the cytosol and a brief overview of the different mechanisms that may lead to the formation of the nucleoid, this paper reviews some of t...

  17. EVOLUTIONARY DYNAMIC MODEL OF POPULATION WITH NICHE CONSTRUCTION AND ITS APPLICATION RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theories and approaches in biomechanics, the mechanism and pattern of niche construction were discussed systematically. Through establishing the spatial pattern of niche and its measuring-fitness formula, and the dynamic system models of single- and two-population with niche construction, including corresponding theoretical analysis and numerical simulation on their evolutionary dynamics of population and the mechanism of competitive coexistence, the co-evolutionary relationship between organisms and their environments was revealed. The results indicate that population dynamics is governed by positive feedback between primary ecological factors and resource content.Niche construction generates an evolutionary effect in system by influencing the fitness of population. A threshold effect exists in single population dynamic system. In dynamic system of two competitive populations, niche construction can lead to alternative competitive consequences, which may be a potential mechanism to explain the competitive coexistence of species.

  18. Identification and characterization of metabolic properties of bacterial populations recovered from arsenic contaminated ground water of North East India (Assam).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soma; Sar, Pinaki

    2013-12-01

    Diversity of culturable bacterial populations within the Arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater of North Eastern state (Assam) of India is studied. From nine As contaminated samples 89 bacterial strains are isolated. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis reveals predominance of Brevundimonas (35%) and Acidovorax (23%) along with Acinetobacter (10%), Pseudomonas (9%) and relatively less abundant (<5%) Undibacterium, Herbaspirillum, Rhodococcus, Staphylococcus, Bosea, Bacillus, Ralstonia, Caulobacter and Rhizobiales members. High As(III) resistance (MTC 10-50 mM) is observed for the isolates obtained from As(III) enrichment, particularly for 3 isolates of genus Brevundimonas (MTC 50 mM). In contrast, high resistance to As(V) (MTC as high as 550 mM) is present as a ubiquitous property, irrespective of isolates' enrichment condition. Bacterial genera affiliated to other groups showed relatively lower degree of As resistance [MTCs of 15-20 mM As(III) and 250-350 mM As(V)]. As(V) reductase activity is detected in strains with high As(V) as well as As(III) resistance. A strong correlation could be established among isolates capable of reductase activity and siderophore production as well as As(III) tolerance. A large number of isolates (nearly 50%) is capable of anaerobic respiration using alternate inorganic electron acceptors [As(V), Se(VI), Fe(III), [NO(3)(2), SO(4)(2), S(2)O(3)(2). Ability to utilize different carbon sources ranging from C2-C6 compounds along with some complex sugars is also observed. Particularly, a number of strains is found to possess ability to grow chemolithotrophically using As(III) as the electron donor. The study reports for the first time the identity and metabolic abilities of bacteria in As contaminated ground water of North East India, useful to elucidate the microbial role in influencing mobilization of As in the region. PMID:24210546

  19. The effects of a probiotic yeast on the bacterial diversity and population structure in the rumen of cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Pinloche

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that the ability of live yeast to improve milk yield and weight gain in cattle is because the yeast stimulates bacterial activity within the rumen. However it remains unclear if this is a general stimulation of all species or a specific stimulation of certain species. Here we characterised the change in the bacterial population within the rumen of cattle fed supplemental live yeast. Three cannulated lactating cows received a daily ration (24 kg/d of corn silage (61% of DM, concentrates (30% of DM, dehydrated alfalfa (9% of DM and a minerals and vitamins mix (1% of DM. The effect of yeast (BIOSAF SC 47, Lesaffre Feed Additives, France; 0.5 or 5 g/d was compared to a control (no additive in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. The variation in the rumen bacterial community between treatments was assessed using Serial Analysis of V1 Ribosomal Sequence Tag (SARST-V1 and 454 pyrosequencing based on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Compared to the control diet supplementation of probiotic yeast maintained a healthy fermentation in the rumen of lactating cattle (higher VFA concentration [high yeast dose only], higher rumen pH, and lower Eh and lactate. These improvements were accompanied with a shift in the main fibrolytic group (Fibrobacter and Ruminococcus and lactate utilising bacteria (Megasphaera and Selenomonas. In addition we have shown that the analysis of short V1 region of 16s rRNA gene (50-60 bp could give as much phylogenetic information as a longer read (454 pyrosequencing of 250 bp. This study also highlights the difficulty of drawing conclusions on composition and diversity of complex microbiota because of the variation caused by the use of different methods (sequencing technology and/or analysis.

  20. Bacterial populations within copper mine tailings: long-term effects of amendment with Class A biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates the effect of surface application of dried Class A biosolids on microbial populations within copper mine tailings. Methods and Results: Mine tailing sites were established at ASARCO Mission Mine close to Sahuarita, Arizona. Site 1 (Dec. 1998) was amended with 248 tons ha-1 of C...

  1. Effects of gamma-irradiation before and after cooking on bacterial population and sensory quality of Dakgalbi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of gamma irradiation on the total bacterial population and the sensory quality of Dakgalbi irradiated before and after cooking. Fresh chicken meat was cut into small pieces and used to prepare Dakgalbi. For the preparation of Dakgalbi cooked with gamma-irradiated chicken meat and sauce (IBC), raw chicken meat and Dakgalbi sauce were irradiated and then stir-fried. For the preparation of Dakgalbi irradiated after cooking with raw chicken meat and sauce (IAC), raw chicken meat and Dakgalbi sauce were first cooked and subsequently irradiated. Under the accelerated storage condition of 35 °C for 7 days, bacteria in IBC were below the detection limit (1 log CFU/g) on day 1 but were detected on day 2 and gradually increased hereafter. In IAC, on the other hand, bacteria were not detected at all. Evaluation of sensory quality also decreased on both samples. However, IAC showed a better trend. Our results indicate that IAC protocol was a more effective method for reducing bacterial growth in Dakgalbi. - Highlights: ► We compared the microbial safety and sensory property of Dakgalbi irradiated before and after cooking. ► Dakgalbi irradiated after cooking can be more effective processing method on microbial safety. ► Sensory property decreased on both Dakgalbis by irradiation-induced off-flavor. ► Dakgalbi irradiated after cooking showed a better tendency on the sensory evaluation.

  2. [Population dynamics and control techniques of aphids on honeysuckle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Zhao, Hai-Peng; Li, Zhao-Xia

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study is to define the population dynamics of Semiaphis heraclei in the main-producing district of Lonicera japonica in Shandong, and screen for highly efficient, safety control technique. Through fixed field investigation, we tested the toxicity of eight kinds of insecticides by using dipping methods, and carried out the field experiment. The results showed that the aphids' emergence peak appeared in May. The aphids on the Sijihua variety of L. japonica was more susceptible and the peak was also seven days earlier than Damao variety of L. japonica. The aphid populations on Sijihua were 1 fold than those on the Daomao in happened peak. Comparing the eight kinds of insecticides, the LC50 of lambda-cyhaothrin, abamectin, imidacloprid and pyrethrin to wingless aphids were 1.494, 1.690, 2.840, 2.861 mg x L(-1), respectively, whose toxicity were higher, the toxicity of matrine, pymetrozine and azadirachtin were also high. The field efficacy trials indicated that during the period of aphids occurred, 25% imidacloprid wettable powder, 1.8% abamectin missible oil, 2.5% lambda-cyhaothrin missible oil, 25% pymetrozine wettable powder, 5% pyrethrin missible oil, 1% matrine water aqua were sprayed at concentrations of 20,000, 2,000, 2,500, 5,000, 500 and 50 times, respectively,the control effect achieved 91.69%, 98.90%, 96.18%, 95.06%, 99.24%, 90.10%, respectively, after 5 days. During the growing period of L. japonica in spring, application of thiamethoxam, thiacloprid, pymetrozine and imidacloprid, all of the control effect against aphids achieved above 98.88% after 50 days. The result indicated that May was the S. heraclei Takahashi's emergence peak in Pingyi, Shandong. The efficient safety and environmentally friendly insecticides by spraying and systemic insecticide of pymetrozine and imidacloprid by root application were all efficient controlled aphids. These insecticides were long for controlling S. heraclei Takahashi and worthy of being widely

  3. Mosquito population dynamic (Diptera: Culicidae) in a eutrophised dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermelinger, E D; Benigno, C V; Machado, R N M; Cabello, P H; Meira, A M; Ferreira, A P; Zanuncio, J C

    2012-11-01

    This study observed the mosquito population in a rural eutrophised dam. Larvae of L3 and L4 stages and pupae were dipped out during twelve month collections and the reared to the adult stage for identification. The collections were done along nine metres from the edge of the dam divided in three parts (P1, P2 and P3), each part being 3 m long. P1 did not have vegetation (grass) along its edge,which would reach or sink into the water to promote some shade on the marginal water. A total of 217 adults of four species was identified with the following constancies and frequencies: Culex quinquefasciatus (Say, 1823) (83% and 40.6%), Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) evansae (Brèthes, 1926) (92% and 26.7%), Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) rangeli (Gabaldon, Cova Garcia and Lopez, 1940) (83% and 14.3%) and Culex nigripalpus (Theobald, 1901) (33% and 18.4%). C. quinquefasciatus, A. evansae, A. rangeli and C. nigripalpus were more frequent in the quarters Nov./Dec./Jan. (85.7%), May/June/July (75%), Aug./Sept./Oct. (29.4%) and Aug./Sept./Oct. (23.5%) particularly in the months of December (88.4%) Sept.tember (48.94), (38.3) and August (47.62) respectively. The presence of C. quinquefasciatus and the high incidence of Daphinia sp. and also the levels of Organic Nitrogen (0.28 mg/L) and of total Phosphorus (0.02 mg/L) are indications of the eutrophication of the dam. There was a difference regarding the total of Anopheles (A. avansae + A. rangeli) and Culex species (C. quinquefasciatus + C. nigripalpis) between P1 and P2 (χ(2) = 0.0097), P1 and P3 (χ(2) = 0.0005), but not between P2 and P3 (χ(2) = 0.2045).The high C. quinquefasciatus constancy and frequency were confirmed to be a good biological indicator for a eutrophised environment and A. evansae showed a good potential for this environment. Vegetation can be an important factor for anopheline population dynamic also in eutrophic breeding sites.

  4. Bacterial community dynamics over successional stages of Australian biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Angela; Woodhouse, Jason; Neilan, Brett

    2015-04-01

    A key aspect for successful ecological rehabilitation is understanding the naturally occurring ecosystem and landscape function which is to be restored. This allows for recovery indicators to be identified and criteria to be developed to assess progress and outcomes. In arid rangelands, environmental stresses result in characteristically heterogeneous landscapes where biological soil crusts (BSCs) cover large expanses of inter-plant areas. Here, BSCs perform crucial roles in nutrient cycling and re-distribution, affect hydrological patterns and stabilise the soil surface. They also serve as a large reservoir of microbial and avascular plant biodiversity. The recognition of these important roles has resulted in increased global arid rehabilitation efforts employing BSCs. Within Australia, research has focused on the macro components of BSCs including lichens and mosses, however, there have been insufficient studies examining the BSC bacterial communities and their dynamics over different successional stages. This project surveyed the bacterial community of crust-free soil and three successional stages of undisturbed BSCs from New South Wales (NSW), Australia, in order to provide reference standards of naturally occurring Australian BSCs. Visual assessments were conducted and BSCs were categorised as Early, Mid or Late stage depending on colour, thickness, topography and presence of lichens and mosses. The crust-free soil and different stages were sampled within three 50 m2 plots of the same edaphic conditions near the town of Cobar, NSW. High throughput sequencing using the Illumina MiSeq platform was performed targeting the V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Preliminary analysis has revealed a clear distinction between the crust-free and crusted soil while Canonical Analysis of Principal Co-ordinates (CAP) suggests the presence of two distinct BSC microbial communities despite three stages being sampled. Across all sample types, the dominant phyla were Actinobacteria

  5. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang; Zhang, Zhijian

    2015-11-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days of full-scale manure vermicomposting. On day 6, the abundances of genes encoding tetracycline resistance [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)] were reduced (P vermicomposting, accompanied by a 100 times increase in the relative abundance of Flavobacteriaceae spp. Variations in the abundances of ARGs were correlated with the changing microbial community structure and the relative abundances of the family Ruminococcaceae, class Bacilli, or phylum Proteobacteria. Vermicomposting, as a waste management practice, can reduce the overall abundance of ARGs. More research is warranted to assess the use of this waste management practice as a measure to attenuate the dissemination of antimicrobial residues and ARGs from livestock production before vermicompost can be safely used as biofertilizer in agroecosystems. PMID:26296728

  6. Bacterial populations and metabolites in the feces of free roaming and captive grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Clarissa; Cristescu, Bogdan; Boyce, Mark S; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Gänzle, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Gut physiology, host phylogeny, and diet determine the composition of the intestinal microbiota. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) belong to the Order Carnivora, yet feed on an omnivorous diet. The role of intestinal microflora in grizzly bear digestion has not been investigated. Microbiota and microbial activity were analysed from the feces of wild and captive grizzly bears. Bacterial composition was determined using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The feces of wild and captive grizzly bears contained log 9.1 +/- 0.5 and log 9.2 +/- 0.3 gene copies x g(-1), respectively. Facultative anaerobes Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci were dominant in wild bear feces. Among the strict anaerobes, the Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas group was most prominent. Enterobacteriaceae were predominant in the feces of captive grizzly bears, at log 8.9 +/- 0.5 gene copies x g(-1). Strict anaerobes of the Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas group and the Clostridium coccoides cluster were present at log 6.7 +/- 0.9 and log 6.8 +/- 0.8 gene copies x g(-1), respectively. The presence of lactate and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) verified microbial activity. Total SCFA content and composition was affected by diet. SCFA composition in the feces of captive grizzly bears resembled the SCFA composition of prey-consuming wild animals. A consistent data set was obtained that associated fecal microbiota and metabolites with the distinctive gut physiology and diet of grizzly bears.

  7. Second Cancers After Fractionated Radiotherapy: Stochastic Population Dynamics Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Rainer K.; Shuryak, Igor; Brenner, David; Fakir, Hatim; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2007-01-01

    When ionizing radiation is used in cancer therapy it can induce second cancers in nearby organs. Mainly due to longer patient survival times, these second cancers have become of increasing concern. Estimating the risk of solid second cancers involves modeling: because of long latency times, available data is usually for older, obsolescent treatment regimens. Moreover, modeling second cancers gives unique insights into human carcinogenesis, since the therapy involves administering well characterized doses of a well studied carcinogen, followed by long-term monitoring. In addition to putative radiation initiation that produces pre-malignant cells, inactivation (i.e. cell killing), and subsequent cell repopulation by proliferation can be important at the doses relevant to second cancer situations. A recent initiation/inactivation/proliferation (IIP) model characterized quantitatively the observed occurrence of second breast and lung cancers, using a deterministic cell population dynamics approach. To analyze ifradiation-initiated pre-malignant clones become extinct before full repopulation can occur, we here give a stochastic version of this I I model. Combining Monte Carlo simulations with standard solutions for time-inhomogeneous birth-death equations, we show that repeated cycles of inactivation and repopulation, as occur during fractionated radiation therapy, can lead to distributions of pre-malignant cells per patient with variance >> mean, even when pre-malignant clones are Poisson-distributed. Thus fewer patients would be affected, but with a higher probability, than a deterministic model, tracking average pre-malignant cell numbers, would predict. Our results are applied to data on breast cancers after radiotherapy for Hodgkin disease. The stochastic IIP analysis, unlike the deterministic one, indicates: a) initiated, pre-malignant cells can have a growth advantage during repopulation, not just during the longer tumor latency period that follows; b) weekend

  8. Finite-size effects on bacterial population expansion under controlled fow conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Tesser, Francesca; Clercx, Herman J H; Brunsveld, Luc; Toschi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of biological species in natural environments is usually described as the combined effect of individual spatial dispersal and growth. In the case of aquatic ecosystems flow transport can also be extremely relevant as an extra, advection induced, dispersal factor. There is a lack of reproducible experimental studies on biological fronts of living organisms in controlled streaming habitats. It is thus not clear if, and to which extent, the current theoretical and experimental knowledge on advective-reactive-diffusive fronts for chemical reactions can also apply to the expansion of biological populations. We designed and assembled a dedicated microfluidic device to control and quantify the expansion of populations of $E.coli$ bacteria under both co-flowing and counter-flowing conditions, measuring the front speed at varying intensity of the imposed flow. At variance with respect to the case of autocatalytic reactions, we measure that almost irrespective of the counter-flow velocity, the front speed...

  9. Divergent evolution peaks under intermediate population bottlenecks during bacterial experimental evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Robyn L.; Gifford, Danna R.; MacLean, R. Craig

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that parallel molecular evolution is common, but its causes remain poorly understood. Demographic parameters such as population bottlenecks are predicted to be major determinants of parallelism. Here, we test the hypothesis that bottleneck intensity shapes parallel evolution by elucidating the genomic basis of adaptation to antibiotic-supplemented media in hundreds of populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. As expected, bottlenecking decreased the rate of phenotypic and molecular adaptation. Surprisingly, bottlenecking had no impact on the likelihood of parallel adaptive molecular evolution at a genome-wide scale. However, bottlenecking had a profound impact on the genes involved in antibiotic resistance. Specifically, under either intense or weak bottlenecking, resistance predominantly evolved by strongly beneficial mutations which provide high levels of antibiotic resistance. In contrast with intermediate bottlenecking regimes, resistance evolved by a greater diversity of genetic mechanisms, significantly reducing the observed levels of parallel genetic evolution. Our results demonstrate that population bottlenecking can be a major predictor of parallel evolution, but precisely how may be more complex than many simple theoretical predictions. PMID:27466449

  10. Divergent evolution peaks under intermediate population bottlenecks during bacterial experimental evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogwill, Tom; Phillips, Robyn L; Gifford, Danna R; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-07-27

    There is growing evidence that parallel molecular evolution is common, but its causes remain poorly understood. Demographic parameters such as population bottlenecks are predicted to be major determinants of parallelism. Here, we test the hypothesis that bottleneck intensity shapes parallel evolution by elucidating the genomic basis of adaptation to antibiotic-supplemented media in hundreds of populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. As expected, bottlenecking decreased the rate of phenotypic and molecular adaptation. Surprisingly, bottlenecking had no impact on the likelihood of parallel adaptive molecular evolution at a genome-wide scale. However, bottlenecking had a profound impact on the genes involved in antibiotic resistance. Specifically, under either intense or weak bottlenecking, resistance predominantly evolved by strongly beneficial mutations which provide high levels of antibiotic resistance. In contrast with intermediate bottlenecking regimes, resistance evolved by a greater diversity of genetic mechanisms, significantly reducing the observed levels of parallel genetic evolution. Our results demonstrate that population bottlenecking can be a major predictor of parallel evolution, but precisely how may be more complex than many simple theoretical predictions. PMID:27466449

  11. DYNAMICS OF NEMATODE POPULATIONS IN CACAO GROWN UNDER TRADIONALLY SYSTEM OF MANAGEMENT IN PERUVIAN AMAZON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nature of crops and management systems greatly influences population dynamics of parasitic and nonparasitic nematodes in soil. An experiment was undertaken at Tropical Crop Research institute (ICT), Tarapoto, Peru to assess the population dynamics of nematodes in a Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.)-Banana ...

  12. Species-specific earthworm population responses in relation to flooding dynamics in a Dutch floodplain soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zorn, M.I.; Gestel, van C.A.M.; Eijsackers, H.J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Earthworms dominate the animal biomass in moist floodplain soils. They are known to survive long periods in aerated water, but little is known about earthworm population dynamics in floodplain systems with changing inundation frequencies. This study determined earthworm population dynamics in a floo

  13. Geographic coupling of juvenile and adult habitat shapes spatial population dynamics of a coral reef fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbers, C.M.; Nagelekerken, I.; Debrot, A.O.; Jongejans, E.

    2013-01-01

    Marine spatial population dynamics are often addressed with a focus on larval dispersal, without taking into account movement behavior of individuals in later life stages. Processes occurring during demersal life stages may also drive spatial population dynamics if habitat quality is perceived diffe

  14. Entrainment and Control of Bacterial Populations: An in Silico Study over a Spatially Extended Agent Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Petros; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Bernardo, Mario di

    2016-07-15

    We extend a spatially explicit agent based model (ABM) developed previously to investigate entrainment and control of the emergent behavior of a population of synchronized oscillating cells in a microfluidic chamber. Unlike most of the work in models of control of cellular systems which focus on temporal changes, we model individual cells with spatial dependencies which may contribute to certain behavioral responses. We use the model to investigate the response of both open loop and closed loop strategies, such as proportional control (P-control), proportional-integral control (PI-control) and proportional-integral-derivative control (PID-control), to heterogeinities and growth in the cell population, variations of the control parameters and spatial effects such as diffusion in the spatially explicit setting of a microfluidic chamber setup. We show that, as expected from the theory of phase locking in dynamical systems, open loop control can only entrain the cell population in a subset of forcing periods, with a wide variety of dynamical behaviors obtained outside these regions of entrainment. Closed-loop control is shown instead to guarantee entrainment in a much wider region of control parameter space although presenting limitations when the population size increases over a certain threshold. In silico tracking experiments are also performed to validate the ability of classical control approaches to achieve other reference behaviors such as a desired constant output or a linearly varying one. All simulations are carried out in BSim, an advanced agent-based simulator of microbial population which is here extended ad hoc to include the effects of control strategies acting onto the population. PMID:27110835

  15. In situ spatial patterns of soil bacterial populations, mapped at multiple scales, in an arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, N; Wu, K; Young, I M; Crawford, J W; Ritz, K

    2002-11-01

    Very little is known about the spatial organization of soil microbes across scales that are relevant both to microbial function and to field-based processes. The spatial distributions of microbes and microbially mediated activity have a high intrinsic variability. This can present problems when trying to quantify the effects of disturbance, management practices, or climate change on soil microbial systems and attendant function. A spatial sampling regime was implemented in an arable field. Cores of undisturbed soil were sampled from a 3 x 3 x 0.9 m volume of soil (topsoil and subsoil) and a biological thin section, in which the in situ distribution of bacteria could be quantified, prepared from each core. Geostatistical analysis was used to quantify the nature of spatial structure from micrometers to meters and spatial point pattern analysis to test for deviations from complete spatial randomness of mapped bacteria. Spatial structure in the topsoil was only found at the microscale (micrometers), whereas evidence for nested scales of spatial structure was found in the subsoil (at the microscale, and at the centimeter to meter scale). Geostatistical ranges of spatial structure at the micro scale were greater in the topsoil and tended to decrease with depth in the subsoil. Evidence for spatial aggregation in bacteria was stronger in the topsoil and also decreased with depth in the subsoil, though extremely high degrees of aggregation were found at very short distances in the deep subsoil. The data suggest that factors that regulate the distribution of bacteria in the subsoil operate at two scales, in contrast to one scale in the topsoil, and that bacterial patches are larger and more prevalent in the topsoil.

  16. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang; Zhang, Zhijian

    2015-11-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days of full-scale manure vermicomposting. On day 6, the abundances of genes encoding tetracycline resistance [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)] were reduced (P < 0.05), while those of genes encoding sulfonamide resistance (sul1 and sul2) were increased (P < 0.05) when normalized to 16S rRNA. The abundances of tetracycline resistance genes were correlated (P < 0.05) with the changing concentrations of tetracyclines in the manure. The overall diversity and richness of the bacteria significantly decreased during vermicomposting, accompanied by a 100 times increase in the relative abundance of Flavobacteriaceae spp. Variations in the abundances of ARGs were correlated with the changing microbial community structure and the relative abundances of the family Ruminococcaceae, class Bacilli, or phylum Proteobacteria. Vermicomposting, as a waste management practice, can reduce the overall abundance of ARGs. More research is warranted to assess the use of this waste management practice as a measure to attenuate the dissemination of antimicrobial residues and ARGs from livestock production before vermicompost can be safely used as biofertilizer in agroecosystems.

  17. Specialized peptidoglycan hydrolases sculpt the intra-bacterial niche of predatory Bdellovibrio and increase population fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Lerner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio are predatory bacteria that have evolved to invade virtually all gram-negative bacteria, including many prominent pathogens. Upon invasion, prey bacteria become rounded up into an osmotically stable niche for the Bdellovibrio, preventing further superinfection and allowing Bdellovibrio to replicate inside without competition, killing the prey bacterium and degrading its contents. Historically, prey rounding was hypothesized to be associated with peptidoglycan (PG metabolism; we found two Bdellovibrio genes, bd0816 and bd3459, expressed at prey entry and encoding proteins with limited homologies to conventional dacB/PBP4 DD-endo/carboxypeptidases (responsible for peptidoglycan maintenance during growth and division. We tested possible links between Bd0816/3459 activity and predation. Bd3459, but not an active site serine mutant protein, bound β-lactam, exhibited DD-endo/carboxypeptidase activity against purified peptidoglycan and, importantly, rounded up E. coli cells upon periplasmic expression. A ΔBd0816 ΔBd3459 double mutant invaded prey more slowly than the wild type (with negligible prey cell rounding and double invasions of single prey by more than one Bdellovibrio became more frequent. We solved the crystal structure of Bd3459 to 1.45 Å and this revealed predation-associated domain differences to conventional PBP4 housekeeping enzymes (loss of the regulatory domain III, alteration of domain II and a more exposed active site. The Bd3459 active site (and by similarity the Bd0816 active site can thus accommodate and remodel the various bacterial PGs that Bdellovibrio may encounter across its diverse prey range, compared to the more closed active site that "regular" PBP4s have for self cell wall maintenance. Therefore, during evolution, Bdellovibrio peptidoglycan endopeptidases have adapted into secreted predation-specific proteins, preventing wasteful double invasion, and allowing activity upon the diverse prey peptidoglycan

  18. Metagenomics Reveals Pervasive Bacterial Populations and Reduced Community Diversity across the Alaska Tundra Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Eric R; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Luo, Chengwei; Yuan, Mengting M; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Schuur, Edward A G; Luo, Yiqi; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2016-01-01

    How soil microbial communities contrast with respect to taxonomic and functional composition within and between ecosystems remains an unresolved question that is central to predicting how global anthropogenic change will affect soil functioning and services. In particular, it remains unclear how small-scale observations of soil communities based on the typical volume sampled (1-2 g) are generalizable to ecosystem-scale responses and processes. This is especially relevant for remote, northern latitude soils, which are challenging to sample and are also thought to be more vulnerable to climate change compared to temperate soils. Here, we employed well-replicated shotgun metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to characterize community composition and metabolic potential in Alaskan tundra soils, combining our own datasets with those publically available from distant tundra and temperate grassland and agriculture habitats. We found that the abundance of many taxa and metabolic functions differed substantially between tundra soil metagenomes relative to those from temperate soils, and that a high degree of OTU-sharing exists between tundra locations. Tundra soils were an order of magnitude less complex than their temperate counterparts, allowing for near-complete coverage of microbial community richness (~92% breadth) by sequencing, and the recovery of 27 high-quality, almost complete (>80% completeness) population bins. These population bins, collectively, made up to ~10% of the metagenomic datasets, and represented diverse taxonomic groups and metabolic lifestyles tuned toward sulfur cycling, hydrogen metabolism, methanotrophy, and organic matter oxidation. Several population bins, including members of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were also present in geographically distant (~100-530 km apart) tundra habitats (full genome representation and up to 99.6% genome-derived average nucleotide identity). Collectively, our results revealed that

  19. Metagenomics reveals pervasive bacterial populations and reduced community diversity across the Alaska tundra ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Robert Johnston

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available How soil microbial communities contrast with respect to taxonomic and functional composition within and between ecosystems remains an unresolved question that is central to predicting how global anthropogenic change will affect soil functioning and services. In particular, it remains unclear how small-scale observations of soil communities based on the typical volume sampled (1-2 grams are generalizable to ecosystem-scale responses and processes. This is especially relevant for remote, northern latitude soils, which are challenging to sample and are also thought to be more vulnerable to climate change compared to temperate soils. Here, we employed well-replicated shotgun metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to characterize community composition and metabolic potential in Alaskan tundra soils, combining our own datasets with those publically available from distant tundra and temperate grassland and agriculture habitats. We found that the abundance of many taxa and metabolic functions differed substantially between tundra soil metagenomes relative to those from temperate soils, and that a high degree of OTU-sharing exists between tundra locations. Tundra soils were an order of magnitude less complex than their temperate counterparts, allowing for near-complete coverage of microbial community richness (~92% breadth by sequencing, and the recovery of twenty-seven high-quality, almost complete (>80% completeness population bins. These population bins, collectively, made up to ~10% of the metagenomic datasets, and represented diverse taxonomic groups and metabolic lifestyles tuned toward sulfur cycling, hydrogen metabolism, methanotrophy, and organic matter oxidation. Several population bins, including members of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were also present in geographically distant (~100-530 km apart tundra habitats (full genome representation and up to 99.6% genome-derived average nucleotide identity. Collectively

  20. Transmembrane helix dynamics of bacterial chemoreceptors supports a piston model of signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Hall

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane α-helices play a key role in many receptors, transmitting a signal from one side to the other of the lipid bilayer membrane. Bacterial chemoreceptors are one of the best studied such systems, with a wealth of biophysical and mutational data indicating a key role for the TM2 helix in signalling. In particular, aromatic (Trp and Tyr and basic (Arg residues help to lock α-helices into a membrane. Mutants in TM2 of E. coli Tar and related chemoreceptors involving these residues implicate changes in helix location and/or orientation in signalling. We have investigated the detailed structural basis of this via high throughput coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD of Tar TM2 and its mutants in lipid bilayers. We focus on the position (shift and orientation (tilt, rotation of TM2 relative to the bilayer and how these are perturbed in mutants relative to the wildtype. The simulations reveal a clear correlation between small (ca. 1.5 Å shift in position of TM2 along the bilayer normal and downstream changes in signalling activity. Weaker correlations are seen with helix tilt, and little/none between signalling and helix twist. This analysis of relatively subtle changes was only possible because the high throughput simulation method allowed us to run large (n = 100 ensembles for substantial numbers of different helix sequences, amounting to ca. 2000 simulations in total. Overall, this analysis supports a swinging-piston model of transmembrane signalling by Tar and related chemoreceptors.

  1. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan

  2. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia amin.oroji@siswa.um.edu.my, mohd@um.edu.my (Malaysia); Yarahmadian, Shantia [Mathematics Department Mississippi State University, USA Syarahmadian@math.msstate.edu (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  3. Data Driven Approach for High Resolution Population Distribution and Dynamics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Stewart, Robert N [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    High resolution population distribution data are vital for successfully addressing critical issues ranging from energy and socio-environmental research to public health to human security. Commonly available population data from Census is constrained both in space and time and does not capture population dynamics as functions of space and time. This imposes a significant limitation on the fidelity of event-based simulation models with sensitive space-time resolution. This paper describes ongoing development of high-resolution population distribution and dynamics models, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, through spatial data integration and modeling with behavioral or activity-based mobility datasets for representing temporal dynamics of population. The model is resolved at 1 km resolution globally and describes the U.S. population for nighttime and daytime at 90m. Integration of such population data provides the opportunity to develop simulations and applications in critical infrastructure management from local to global scales.

  4. Short and Long Range Population Dynamics of the Monarch

    OpenAIRE

    Messan, Komi; Smith, Kyle; Tsosie, Shawn; Zhu, Shuchen; Suslov, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    The monarch butterfly annually migrates from central Mexico to southern Canada. During recent decades, its population has been reduced due to human interaction with their habitat. We examine the effect of herbicide usage on the monarch butterfly's population by creating a system of linear and non-linear ordinary differential equations that describe the interaction between the monarch's population and its environment at various stages of migration: spring migration, summer loitering, and fall ...

  5. Intraspecific Competition and Population Dynamics of Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, C. A.; Charret, I. C.; Lima, R. R.

    2012-04-01

    We report computational simulations for the evolution of the population of the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The results suggest that controlling the mosquito population, on the basis of intraspecific competition at the larval stage, can be an efficient mechanism for controlling the spread of the epidemic. The results also show the presence of a kind of genetic evolution in vector population, which results mainly in increasing the average lifespan of individuals in adulthood.

  6. Using a common commensal bacterium in endangered Takahe as a model to explore pathogen dynamics in isolated wildlife populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Zoe L; Gartrell, Brett D; Biggs, Patrick J; Nelson, Nicola J; Marshall, Jonathan C; Howe, Laryssa; Balm, Matthew G M; French, Nigel P

    2015-10-01

    Predicting and preventing outbreaks of infectious disease in endangered wildlife is problematic without an understanding of the biotic and abiotic factors that influence pathogen transmission and the genetic variation of microorganisms within and between these highly modified host communities. We used a common commensal bacterium, Campylobacter spp., in endangered Takahe (Porphyrio hochstetteri) populations to develop a model with which to study pathogen dynamics in isolated wildlife populations connected through ongoing translocations. Takahe are endemic to New Zealand, where their total population is approximately 230 individuals. Takahe were translocated from a single remnant wild population to multiple offshore and mainland reserves. Several fragmented subpopulations are maintained and connected through regular translocations. We tested 118 Takahe from 8 locations for fecal Campylobacter spp. via culture and DNA extraction and used PCR for species assignment. Factors relating to population connectivity and host life history were explored using multivariate analytical methods to determine associations between host variables and bacterial prevalence. The apparent prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in Takahe was 99%, one of the highest reported in avian populations. Variation in prevalence was evident among Campylobacter species identified. C. sp. nova 1 (90%) colonized the majority of Takahe tested. Prevalence of C. jejuni (38%) and C. coli (24%) was different between Takahe subpopulations, and this difference was associated with factors related to population management, captivity, rearing environment, and the presence of agricultural practices in the location in which birds were sampled. Modeling results of Campylobacter spp. in Takahe metapopulations suggest that anthropogenic management of endangered species within altered environments may have unforeseen effects on microbial exposure, carriage, and disease risk. Translocation of wildlife between locations could

  7. Structure and activity of multiple nitrifying bacterial populations co-existing in a biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gieseke, A.; Friis-Holm, Lotte Bjerrum; Wagner, M.;

    2003-01-01

    ) by free ammonia under HA conditions. Diversity, spatial distribution, and abundance of nitrifying bacteria as analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed six different nitrifying populations with heterogeneous distributions. Nitrosococcus mobilis formed conspicuous microcolonies locally......A biofilm from a nitrifying pilot-scale sequencing batch reactor was investigated for effects of varying process conditions on its microscale activity and structure. Microsensor measurements of oxygen, substrates and products of nitrification were applied under incubation at different ammonium...... and oxygen concentrations which reflected various situations during a treatment cycle. A high net N loss was observed under high ammonium (HA) concentrations in contrast to low ones. Additionally, results indicated inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), but not of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB...

  8. Stress and the microbiome: linking glucocorticoids to bacterial community dynamics in wild red squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothart, Mason R; Bobbie, Colleen B; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I; Boonstra, Rudy; Palme, Rupert; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Newman, Amy E M

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial diversity within animals is emerging as an essential component of health, but it is unknown how stress may influence the microbiome. We quantify a proximate link between the oral microbiome and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity using faecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGM) in wild red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). Not only was bacterial diversity lower at higher levels of FGM, but also between capture periods a change in bacterial relative abundance was related to an increase in FGM. These linkages between the HPA axis and microbiome communities represent a powerful capacity for stress to have multi-dimensional effects on health. PMID:26740566

  9. Dandruff Is Associated with Disequilibrium in the Proportion of the Major Bacterial and Fungal Populations Colonizing the Scalp

    OpenAIRE

    Cécile Clavaud; Roland Jourdain; Avner Bar-Hen; Magali Tichit; Christiane Bouchier; Florence Pouradier; Charles El Rawadi; Jacques Guillot; Florence Ménard-Szczebara; Lionel Breton; Jean-Paul Latgé; Isabelle Mouyna

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial and fungal communities associated with dandruff were investigated using culture-independent methodologies in the French subjects. The major bacterial and fungal species inhabiting the scalp subject's were identified by cloning and sequencing of the conserved ribosomal unit regions (16S for bacterial and 28S-ITS for fungal) and were further quantified by quantitative PCR. The two main bacterial species found on the scalp surface were Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epi...

  10. Critical mass of bacterial populations in a generalized Keller Segel model. Analogy with the Chandrasekhar limiting mass of white dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Sire, Clément

    2008-03-01

    We point out a remarkable analogy between the limiting mass of relativistic white dwarf stars (Chandrasekhar’s limit) and the critical mass of bacterial populations in a generalized Keller Segel model of chemotaxis [P.H. Chavanis, C. Sire, Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 016116]. This model is based on generalized stochastic processes leading to the Tsallis statistics. The equilibrium states correspond to polytropic configurations similar to gaseous polytropes in astrophysics. For the critical index n3=d/(d-2) (where d≥2 is the dimension of space), the theory of polytropes leads to a unique value of the mass M that we interpret as a limiting mass. In d=3, we find M=202.8956… and in d=2, we recover the well-known result M=8π (in suitable units). For MM, the system collapses and forms a Dirac peak containing a mass M surrounded by a halo. This paper exposes the model and shows, by simple considerations, the origin of the critical mass. A detailed description of the critical dynamics of the generalized Keller Segel model will be given in a forthcoming paper.

  11. Confidence interval for number of population in dynamical stochastic exponential population growth models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Khodabin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the confidence interval for the solution of stochastic exponential population growth model where the so-called parameter, population growth rate is not completely definite and it depends on some random environmental effects is obtained. We use Iran population data in the period 1921-2006 as an example.

  12. Dynamic of population-dynamics in a medically important snail species Lymnaea (Radix Luteola (Lamarck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Misra

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available The life-cycle parameters of the snail Lymnaea (Radix luteola and the factors influencing the same have been studied under laboratory conditions. Ins each month, from July 1990 to June 1991, a batch of 100 zero-day old individual were considered for studies. The snails of April batch survived for 19.42 days while those in December batch survived for 87.45 days. The May batch individual though survived for 65.67 days gained maximum shell size (15.84 mm in length and body weight (419.87 mg. All individuals of April batch died prior to attainment of sexual maturity. In the remaining 11 batches the snails became sexually mature between 32 and 53 days. At this stage, they were with varying shell lengths, 9.3 mm to 13,11 mm in respect to batches. The reproduction period varied from 1-67 days. An individual laid, on an average, 0,25 (March batch to 443.67 (May batch eggs in its life-span. A batch of such snails would leave 24312, 22520, 720268, 80408, 76067, 418165, 214, 9202, 0, 0, 2459386 and 127894 individuals at the end of 352nd day. Since the environmental conditions were almost similar the 'dynamic' of population dynamics seems to be involved with the 'strain' of the snail individuals of the batches concerned.

  13. Population dynamics of some coccids (Coccoidea: Hemiptera) infesting sandal (Santalum album) in Bangalore, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramachandran Sundararaj; Raja Muthukrishnan

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the population dynamics of four important coccids viz., Aonidiella orientalis (Newstead), Ceroplastes actiniformis Green, Cardiococcus bivalvata (Green) and Parasaissetia nigra (Nietner) infesting sandal in Bangalore, India. Meteorological data viz., monthly mean maximum and minimum temperatures,morning and evening relative humidity and total rainfall were also collected during the experimental period for statistical analysis to ascertain their influence on the population of ceccids. The results show that all the four coccids are infesting sandal throughout the year. Maximum temperature exhibited significantly negative correlation with the population dynamics of A.orientalis, while other weather parameters did not show much influence on its incidence. In case of C. bivalvata, minimum temperature and morning relative humidity exhibited significant positive correlation with its population dynamics while other weather parameters had less significant effect on its population dynamics. For C.actiniformis and P. nigra, none of the weather factors seem to have influence on their incidences.

  14. Responses of heterotrophic bacterial populations to pH changes in coal ash effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, R.K. (Univ. of Texas, Houston); Cherry, D.S.; Singleton, F.L.

    1978-08-01

    Total culturable heterotrophic bacteria in a coal ash basin and drainage system were monitored over a period of two years. In the first year heavy (bottom) ash was sluiced to the basin resulting in a pH of 6.5. During the second year fly ash was precipitated and added to the sluice lowering the basin pH to 4.6. Sulfate concentrations during 1975 ranged from 16 to 73 ppM (mean 33) and in 1976 from 44 to 88 ppM (mean 72). Mean annual basin temperatures were 28.8 and 26.0/sup 0/C, respectively. Approximately 1500 m in the receiving swamp below the basin, mean pH and temperature were 6.8 and 22.2/sup 0/C for the first year, and 5.4 and 22.1/sup 0/C for the second. Total culturable bacteria and diversity (colony types) were reduced at all sampling stations by 44 and 30%, respectively, whereas the percentage of the population comprised of chromagenic bacteria increased by 51% at the lower pH. Data indicated the pH had a greater effect than did water temperature when temperature was within the range of 15 to 25/sup 0/C. The predominant genera within the system in the first year were Bacillus, Sarcina, Achromobacter, Flavobacterium, and Pseudomonas. In the second year, at the lower pH, predominant genera were Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Chromobacterium, Bacillus, and Brevibacterium.

  15. Effect of bacterial association on the phenotype and genotype of an Entamoeba histolytica clonal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Menezes, L F; Rodríguez, M A; Vargas, M A; Salgado, L M; Orozco, E

    1997-01-01

    A several-times-cloned population of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites (clone MAVIII) was cultured under axenic (MAVIIIax), monoxenic (MAVIIImx) and polyxenic (MAVIIIpx) conditions. Clones MAVIIIax and MAVIIImx presented similar virulence in vitro, but differed in their virulence in vivo, whereas MAVIIIpx trophozoites were neither virulent in vitro or in vivo. The MAVIII clones maintained their zymodeme and exhibited three unusual glucose phosphate isomerase bands, absent in other E. histolytica strains studied. Similar patterns were shown by the three MAVIII clones in the signature of a 482-bp DNA fragment from the M17 gene (which encodes for a variable immunodominant antigen), obtained by low stringency single specific primer PCR technique. However, MAVIII clones displayed genotypic variability in the patterns obtained by the random amplified polymorphic DNA technique using total DNA as template. Results suggest that monomorphism is kept in certain regions of the genome, mainly in those carrying protein encoding genes, but a high polymorphism is present in total DNA of cloned trophozoites cultured under different conditions, confirming the plasticity of the E. histolytica genome.

  16. Temporal dynamics of sediment bacterial communities in monospecific stands of Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, D F R; Polónia, A R M; Sousa, A I; Lillebø, A I; Queiroga, H; Gomes, N C M

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we used 16S rRNA barcoded pyrosequencing to investigate to what extent monospecific stands of different salt marsh plant species (Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima), sampling site and temporal variation affect sediment bacterial communities. We also used a bioinformatics tool, PICRUSt, to predict metagenome gene functional content. Our results showed that bacterial community composition from monospecific stands of both plant species varied temporally, but both host plant species maintained compositionally distinct communities of bacteria. Juncus sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Alphaproteobacteria, Myxococcales, Rhodospirillales, NB1-j and Ignavibacteriales, while Spartina sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Anaerolineae, Synechococcophycidae, Desulfobacterales, SHA-20 and Rhodobacterales. The differences in composition and higher taxon abundance between the sediment bacterial communities of stands of both plant species may be expected to affect overall metabolic diversity. In line with this expectation, there were also differences in the predicted enrichment of selected metabolic pathways. In particular, bacterial communities of Juncus sediment were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the degradation of various (xenobiotic) compounds. Bacterial communities of Spartina sediment in turn were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the biosynthesis of various bioactive compounds. Our study highlights the differences in composition and predicted functions of sediment-associated bacterial communities from two different salt marsh plant species. Loss of salt marsh habitat may thus be expected to both adversely affect microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning and have consequences for environmental processes such as nutrient cycling and pollutant remediation. PMID:27061465

  17. A mechanistic analysis of density dependence in algal population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eBorlestean

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Population density regulation is a fundamental principle in ecology, but the specific process underlying functional expression of density dependence remains to be fully elucidated. One view contends that patterns of density dependence are largely fixed across a species irrespective of environmental conditions, whereas another is that the strength and expression of density dependence are fundamentally variable depending on the nature of exogenous or endogenous constraints acting on the population. We conducted a study investigating the expression of density dependence in Chlamydomonas spp. grown under a gradient from low to high nutrient density. We predicted that the relationship between per capita growth rate (pgr and population density would vary from concave up to concave down as nutrient density became less limiting and populations experienced weaker density regulation. Contrary to prediction, we found that the relationship between pgr and density became increasingly concave-up as nutrient levels increased. We also found that variation in pgr increased, and pgr levels reached higher maxima in nutrient-limited environments. Most likely, these results are attributable to population growth suppression in environments with high intraspecific competition due to limited nutrient resources. Our results suggest that density regulation is strongly variable depending on exogenous and endogenous processes acting on the population, implying that expression of density dependence depends extensively on local conditions. Additional experimental work should reveal the mechanisms influencing how the expression of density dependence varies across populations through space and time.

  18. From individual behavior to metapopulation dynamics: unifying the patchy population and classic metapopulation models.

    OpenAIRE

    Ovaskainen, Otso; Hanski, Ilkka

    2004-01-01

    Spatially structured populations in patchy habitats show much variation in migration rate, from patchy populations in which individuals move repeatedly among habitat patches to classic metapopulations with infrequent migration among discrete populations. To establish a common framework for population dynamics in patchy habitats, we describe an individual-based model (IBM) involving a diffusion approximation of correlated random walk of individual movements. As an example, we apply the model t...

  19. Spatial and temporal dynamics of fucoid populations (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus serratus): a comparison between central and range edge populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Rita M; Serrão, Ester A; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel; Åberg, Per

    2014-01-01

    Persistence of populations at range edges relies on local population dynamics and fitness, in the case of geographically isolated populations of species with low dispersal potential. Focusing on spatial variations in demography helps to predict the long-term capability for persistence of populations across the geographical range of species' distribution. The demography of two ecological and phylogenetically close macroalgal species with different life history characteristics was investigated by using stochastic, stage-based matrix models. Populations of Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus serratus were sampled for up to 4 years at central locations in France and at their southern range limits in Portugal. The stochastic population growth rate (λ(s)) of A. nodosum was lower and more variable in central than in southern sites whilst for F. serratus this trend was reversed with λ(s) much lower and more variable in southern than in central populations. Individuals were larger in central than in southern populations for both species, which was reflected in the lower transition probabilities of individuals to larger size classes and higher probability of shrinkage in the southern populations. In both central and southern populations elasticity analysis (proportional sensitivity) of population growth rate showed that fertility elements had a small contribution to λ(s) that was more sensitive to changes in matrix transitions corresponding to survival. The highest elasticities were found for loop transitions in A. nodosum and for growth to larger size classes in F. serratus. Sensitivity analysis showed high selective pressure on individual growth for both species at both locations. The results of this study highlight the deterministic role of species-specific life-history traits in population demography across the geographical range of species. Additionally, this study demonstrates that individuals' life-transitions differ in vulnerability to environmental variability and

  20. Spatial and temporal dynamics of fucoid populations (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus serratus: a comparison between central and range edge populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita M Araújo

    Full Text Available Persistence of populations at range edges relies on local population dynamics and fitness, in the case of geographically isolated populations of species with low dispersal potential. Focusing on spatial variations in demography helps to predict the long-term capability for persistence of populations across the geographical range of species' distribution. The demography of two ecological and phylogenetically close macroalgal species with different life history characteristics was investigated by using stochastic, stage-based matrix models. Populations of Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus serratus were sampled for up to 4 years at central locations in France and at their southern range limits in Portugal. The stochastic population growth rate (λ(s of A. nodosum was lower and more variable in central than in southern sites whilst for F. serratus this trend was reversed with λ(s much lower and more variable in southern than in central populations. Individuals were larger in central than in southern populations for both species, which was reflected in the lower transition probabilities of individuals to larger size classes and higher probability of shrinkage in the southern populations. In both central and southern populations elasticity analysis (proportional sensitivity of population growth rate showed that fertility elements had a small contribution to λ(s that was more sensitive to changes in matrix transitions corresponding to survival. The highest elasticities were found for loop transitions in A. nodosum and for growth to larger size classes in F. serratus. Sensitivity analysis showed high selective pressure on individual growth for both species at both locations. The results of this study highlight the deterministic role of species-specific life-history traits in population demography across the geographical range of species. Additionally, this study demonstrates that individuals' life-transitions differ in vulnerability to environmental

  1. Chaos and order in stateless societies: Intercommunity exchange as a factor impacting the population dynamical patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvinsky, Alexander B., E-mail: medvinsky@iteb.ru [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino 142290, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Rusakov, Alexey V. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino 142290, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > We model community dynamics in stateless societies. > Intercommunity barter is shown to be a factor impacting the societies dynamics. > Increase in the human population growth rate can lead to appearance of chaos. > Secular and millennial cycles are found to arise as a result of the barter. - Abstract: The once abstract notions of dynamical chaos now appear naturally in various systems [Kaplan D, Glass L. Understanding nonlinear dynamics. New York: Springer; 1995]. As a result, future trajectories of the systems may be difficult to predict. In this paper, we demonstrate the appearance of chaotic dynamics in model human communities, which consist of producers of agricultural product and producers of agricultural equipment. In the case of a solitary community, the horizon of predictability of the human population dynamics is shown to be dependent on both intrinsic instability of the dynamics and the chaotic attractor sizes. Since a separate community is usually a part of a larger commonality, we study the dynamics of social systems consisting of two interacting communities. We show that intercommunity barter can lead to stabilization of the dynamics in one of the communities, which implies persistence of stable equilibrium under changes of the maximum value of the human population growth rate. However, in the neighboring community, the equilibrium turns into a stable limit cycle as the maximum value of the human population growth rate increases. Following an increase in the maximum value of the human population growth rate leads to period-doubling bifurcations resulting in chaotic dynamics. The horizon of predictability of the chaotic oscillations is found to be limited by 5 years. We demonstrate that the intercommunity interaction can lead to the appearance of long-period harmonics in the chaotic time series. The period of the harmonics is of order 100 and 1000 years. Hence the long-period changes in the population size may be considered as an

  2. Population dynamics and angler exploitation of the unique muskellunge population in Shoepack Lake, Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohnauer, N.K.; Pierce, C.L.; Kallemeyn, L.W.

    2007-01-01

    A unique population of muskellunge Esox masquinongy inhabits Shoepack Lake in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. Little is known about its status, dynamics, and angler exploitation, and there is concern for the long-term viability of this population. We used intensive sampling and mark-recapture methods to quantify abundance, survival, growth, condition, age at maturity and fecundity and angler surveys to quantify angler pressure, catch rates, and exploitation. During our study, heavy rain washed out a dam constructed by beavers Castor canadensis which regulates the water level at the lake outlet, resulting in a nearly 50% reduction in surface area. We estimated a population size of 1,120 adult fish at the beginning of the study. No immediate reduction in population size was detected in response to the loss of lake area, although there was a gradual, but significant, decline in population size over the 2-year study. Adults grew less than 50 mm per year, and relative weight (W r) averaged roughly 80. Anglers were successful in catching, on average, two fish during a full day of angling, but harvest was negligible. Shoepack Lake muskellunge exhibit much slower growth rates and lower condition, but much higher densities and angler catch per unit effort (CPUE), than other muskellunge populations. The unique nature, limited distribution, and location of this population in a national park require special consideration for management. The results of this study provide the basis for assessing the long-term viability of the Shoepack Lake muskellunge population through simulations of long-term population dynamics and genetically effective population size. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  3. Development and validation of an individual based Daphnia magna population model: The influence of crowding on population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preuss, T.G.; Hammers-Wirtz, M.; Hommen, U.; Rubach, M.N.; Ratte, H.T.

    2009-01-01

    An individual-based model was developed to predict the population dynamics of Daphnia magna at laboratory conditions from individual life-history traits observed in experiments with different feeding conditions. Within the model, each daphnid passes its individual life cycle including feeding on alg

  4. Population Dynamics of Banteng, Buffalo and Deer in Bekol Savannah, Baluran National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUHADI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Baluran National Park give contribution at regional development to draw tourist and fascination provided is savannah in area. Savannah circumstance, forest, landscape, climate, vegetation and wild animal is represent experienced attraction. Research method use population dynamics perception of banteng, buffalo and deer in savannah of Bekol year 2004 and year 2005 as primary data, while secondary data year population dynamics 2003, 2004, and year 2005 outside savannah of Bekol, year population dynamics 2003 in savannah of Bekol. Secondary data obtained from daily report of Controller ecosystem Forest Worker animal discovery Baluran National Park from Section Bekol. Research location of outside savannah Bekol were Balanan, Perengan, Bitakol, Karangtekok, Pandean, Pondok jaran, Bama, Curah uling, Gunung Montor, Lempuyang, Bilik, Batangan, Labuhan Merak, Kramat, Semiang, Sirokoh, Lemah bang, Gunung Krasak, and Glengseran. The populations of banteng and buffalo in the savannah is unstable compared to the populations of them outside Bekol savannah. The populations of banteng and buffalo in Bekol savannah decrease, whereas the populations of them outside the Bekol savannah increase. The population of deer in Bekol savannah in 2004 is better than population of 2003, 2005, and 2006, whereas the population of deer outside Bekol savannah in 2006 increase significantly. The populations of banteng, buffalo, and deer decrease from year to year, in which the reductions of banteng and buffalo populations are obviously significant.

  5. Population dynamics of aquatic snails in Pampulha reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Freitas

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt was made to determine more accurately the density of molluskan populations in the Pampulha reservoir, using the quadrate method, intending to detect the fluctuation of the populations density, the habitat conditions and the possible competitive interactions among Biomphalaria tenagophila, Melanoides tuberculata, Pomacea haustrum and Biomphalaria glabrata, through the analysis of populational parameters. Among the most significative facts observed in the reservoir it has to be mentioned: the almost disappearance of B. glabrata; the invasion, colonization, fixation and fast growing of M. tuberculata population until reaching about 11,000 individuals/[square metre]; the density fluctuations of B. tenagophila, P. haustrum and M. tuberculata alives and deads; differences on the habitat preference of these three molluskan species at the edge (at the limit earth-water, at 0.70m and 1.40m from the shore line; monthly mortality rates and reproduction seasons of the species.

  6. Identity and functional analysis of bacterial populations involved in reductive acetogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    as metagenomic (fosmid) libraries. Results from the 16S rDNA analyses identified several bacteria of interest in the methanogen inhibited cultures (Actinomyces ruminicola, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Ruminobacillus xylanolyticum, Succiniclasticum ruminis Treponema bryantii, Ruminococcus productus and Enerococcus avium). FTHFS sequence analysis from fermentations and cattle rumen samples supplemented with bromochloromethane (BCM) show clustering of sequences with the known homoacetogens. Putative CODH and ACS sequences were also generated from DNA obtained from a mixed enrichment culture of homoacetogens, from the rumen of cattle. An extensive set of primers has been developed from the numerous phylogenetic and functional gene databases. These primers and probes are being used in targeting key enzymatic steps in hydrogen sequestering pathways for use in probing the metagenomic fosmid libraries and monitoring populations of hydrogen-utilising microorganisms in the rumen. (author)

  7. Causes and consequences of complex population dynamics in an annual plant, Cardamine pensylvanica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crone, E.E.

    1995-11-08

    The relative importance of density-dependent and density-independent factors in determining the population dynamics of plants has been widely debated with little resolution. In this thesis, the author explores the effects of density-dependent population regulation on population dynamics in Cardamine pensylvanica, an annual plant. In the first chapter, she shows that experimental populations of C. pensylvanica cycled from high to low density in controlled constant-environment conditions. These cycles could not be explained by external environmental changes or simple models of direct density dependence (N{sub t+1} = f[N{sub t}]), but they could be explained by delayed density dependence (N{sub t+1} = f[N{sub t}, N{sub t+1}]). In the second chapter, she shows that the difference in the stability properties of population growth models with and without delayed density dependence is due to the presence of Hopf as well as slip bifurcations from stable to chaotic population dynamics. She also measures delayed density dependence due to effects of parental density on offspring quality in C. pensylvanica and shows that this is large enough to be the cause of the population dynamics observed in C. pensylvanica. In the third chapter, the author extends her analyses of density-dependent population growth models to include interactions between competing species. In the final chapter, she compares the effects of fixed spatial environmental variation and variation in population size on the evolutionary response of C. pensylvanica populations.

  8. The significance of clean and dirty animals for bacterial dynamics along the beef chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Sigrun J; Nesbakken, Truls; Moen, Birgitte; Røtterud, Ole-Johan; Dommersnes, Sissel; Nesteng, Ole; Østensvik, Øyvin; Alvseike, Ole

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the bacterial dynamics along the beef chain for clean and dirty cattle in the slaughter and processing lines, using classic quantitative methods and molecular analyses. In addition, the Norwegian national guidelines for Good Hygiene Practices in Norway were evaluated. In these guidelines, cattle presented for slaughter are categorised according to hide cleanliness, resulting in separate processing lines for meat from very dirty animals and reduced prices to farmers. The study was conducted in two commercial abattoirs in Norway. Two groups were compared; 40 visually clean cattle and 40 visually dirty cattle presented for slaughter, with 20 from each group at each abattoir. The same animals were sampled at five sampling sites: hides, carcass surfaces after dehiding, just before chilling, after chilling, and meat trimmings. Meat trimmings were sampled in only one abattoir. Three hundred and sixty samples were collected by swabbing 100 cm(2) of the brisket area at the first four sampling sites, and sampling 200 g of meat trimmings at the fifth site. The results showed that the hides of dirty cattle had more Enterobacteriaceae and higher Aerobic Plate Counts (APC) than visually clean cattle (Pclean group. An effect of chilling/drying of the carcass surfaces was demonstrated by the significant reduction in the number of carcasses on which E. coli and Enterobacteriaceae were detected; from 11% and 39% before chilling to 1% and 16% after chilling, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae and E. coli were detected in only three and one of the meat trimming samples, respectively. Amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from 643 Enterobacteriaceae colonies derived from 107 samples demonstrated that Escherichia/Shigella were dominant within this family on the hides. However, after dehiding, after grading, and after chilling, the genera Citrobacter and Enterobacter dominated. The meat trimmings were dominated by the genera Kluyvera, Hafnia, and

  9. Population dynamics of the spionid polychaete Pygospio elegans in Isefjord and Roskilde Fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thonig, Anne; Banta, Gary Thomas; Kesäniemi, Jenni;

    We sampled populations of Pygospio elegans at four locations (Lynæs, Lammefjord, Vellerup, Herslev) in the Isefjord - Roskilde Fjord estuary complex with approximately monthly intervals from March to November 2014. The goal of this study is to compare the population dynamics, with special focus...... on reproduction and development, for P. elegans populations exposed to differing environmental factors and that have, based on previous work, different genetic compositions. We wanted to examine to what extent environmental versus genetic factors determine the population dynamics and reproductive mode...

  10. Mucosa-associated bacterial microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract of weaned pigs and dynamics linked to dietary calcium-phosphorus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Mann

    Full Text Available Dietary composition largely influences pig's gastrointestinal microbiota and represents a useful prophylactic tool against enteric disturbances in young pigs. Despite the importance for host-microbe interactions and bacterial colonization, dietary responses of the mucosa-associated bacterial communities are less well investigated. In the present study, we characterized the mucosa-associated bacterial communities at the Pars non-glandularis of the stomach, ileum and colon, and identified shifts in these communities in response to different dietary calcium-phosphorus (Ca-P contents (100% versus 190% of the Ca and P requirements in combination with two basal diets (wheat-barley- or corn-based in weaned pigs. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from 93 mucosal samples yielded 447,849 sequences, clustering into 997 operational taxonomic units (OTUs at 97% similarity level. OTUs were assigned to 198 genera belonging to 14 different phyla. Correlation-based networks revealed strong interactions among OTUs at the various gastrointestinal sites. Our data describe a previously not reported high diversity and species richness at the Pars non-glandularis of the stomach in weaned pigs. Moreover, high versus adequate Ca-P content significantly promoted Lactobacillus by 14.9% units (1.4 fold change at the gastric Pars non-glandularis (P = 0.035. Discriminant analysis revealed dynamic changes in OTU composition in response to dietary cereals and Ca-P contents at all gastrointestinal sites which were less distinguishable at higher taxonomic levels. Overall, this study revealed a distinct mucosa-associated bacterial community at the different gut sites, and a strong effect of high Ca-P diets on the gastric community, thereby markedly expanding our comprehension on mucosa-associated microbiota and their diet-related dynamics in weaned pigs.

  11. Acidic Conditions in the NHE2-/- Mouse Intestine Result in an Altered Mucosa-Associated Bacterial Population with Changes in Mucus Oligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda A. Engevik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms bacteria use to proliferate and alter the normal bacterial composition remain unknown. The ability to link changes in the intestinal micro-environment, such as ion composition and pH, to bacterial proliferation is clinically advantageous for diseases that involve an altered gut microbiota, such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease, obesity and diabetes. In human and mouse intestine, the apical Na+/H+ exchangers NHE2 and NHE3 affect luminal Na+, water, and pH. Loss of NHE2 results in acidic luminal pH. Since acid resistance systems in gram-positive bacteria are well documented, we hypothesize that gram-positive bacteria would increase in representation in the acidic NHE2-/- intestine. Methods: Intestinal ion composition was measured by fame photometry and chloridometry and pH measured electrochemically. DNA extracted from intestinal flushes or from mucosal scrapings was analyzed by qRT-PCR to examine luminal and mucosa-associated bacterial populations. Epithelial mucus oligosaccharide patterns were examined by histology with FIT-C labeled lectins. Results: Although total luminal and mucosa-associated bacteria were unchanged in NHE2-/- intestine, gram-positive bacterial phyla were increased in the mucosa-associated bacterial population in a region-specific manner. The genera Clostridium and Lactobacillus were increased in the cecum and colon which corresponded to changes in NHE2-/- mucus oligosaccharide composition of mannose, N-acetyglucosamine, N-acetygalactosamine and galactose. Conclusions: Together these data indicate that changes in ion transport induce region-specific bacterial changes, which alter host mucus oligosaccharide patterns. These host-bacterial interactions provide a possible mechanism of niche-development and shed insight on how certain groups proliferate in changing environments and maintain their proliferation by altering the host.

  12. Modelling population dynamics model formulation, fitting and assessment using state-space methods

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, K B; Morgan, B J T; King, R; Borchers, D L; Cole, D J; Besbeas, P; Gimenez, O; Thomas, L

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a unifying framework for estimating the abundance of open populations: populations subject to births, deaths and movement, given imperfect measurements or samples of the populations.  The focus is primarily on populations of vertebrates for which dynamics are typically modelled within the framework of an annual cycle, and for which stochastic variability in the demographic processes is usually modest. Discrete-time models are developed in which animals can be assigned to discrete states such as age class, gender, maturity,  population (within a metapopulation), or species (for multi-species models). The book goes well beyond estimation of abundance, allowing inference on underlying population processes such as birth or recruitment, survival and movement. This requires the formulation and fitting of population dynamics models.  The resulting fitted models yield both estimates of abundance and estimates of parameters characterizing the underlying processes.  

  13. Dynamics of bacterial communities in soils of rainforest fragments under restoration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Rafael; Zucchi, Tiago; Taketani, Rodrigo; Andreote, Fernando; Cardoso, Elke

    2014-05-01

    The Brazilian Atlantic Forest ("Mata Atlântica") has been largely studied due to its valuable and unique biodiversity. Unfortunately, this priceless ecosystem has been widely deforested and only 10% of its original area still remains. Many projects have been successfully implemented to restore its fauna and flora but there is a lack of information on how the soil bacterial communities respond to this process. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the influence of soil attributes and seasonality on soil bacterial communities of rainforest fragments under restoration processes. Soil samples from a native site and two ongoing restoration fragments with different ages of implementation (10 and 20 years) were collected and assayed by using culture-independent approaches. Our findings demonstrate that seasonality barely altered the bacterial distribution whereas soil chemical attributes and plant diversity highly influenced the bacterial community structure during the restoration process. Moreover, the strict relationship observed for two bacterial groups, Solibacteriaceae and Verrucomicrobia, one with the youngest (10 years) and the other with the oldest (native) site suggests their use as bioindicators of soil quality and soil recovery of forest fragments under restoration.

  14. Effective population size and evolutionary dynamics in outbred laboratory populations of Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laurence D. Mueller; Amitabh Joshi; Marta Santos; Michael R. Rose

    2013-12-01

    Census population size, sex-ratio and female reproductive success were monitored in 10 laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster selected for different ages of reproduction. With this demographic information, we estimated eigenvalue, variance and probability of allele loss effective population sizes. We conclude that estimates of effective size based on genefrequency change at a few loci are biased downwards. We analysed the relative roles of selection and genetic drift in maintaining genetic variation in laboratory populations of Drosophila. We suggest that rare, favourable genetic variants in our laboratory populations have a high chance of being lost if their fitness effect is weak, e.g. 1% or less. However, if the fitness effect of this variation is 10% or greater, these rare variants are likely to increase to high frequency. The demographic information developed in this study suggests that some of our laboratory populations harbour more genetic variation than expected. One explanation for this finding is that part of the genetic variation in these outbred laboratory Drosophila populations may be maintained by some form of balancing selection. We suggest that, unlike bacteria, medium-term adaptation of laboratory populations of fruit flies is not primarily driven by new mutations, but rather by changes in the frequency of preexisting alleles.

  15. Ecological change, group territoriality, and population dynamics in Serengeti lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Craig; Hilborn, Ray; Mosser, Anna; Kissui, Bernard; Borner, Markus; Hopcraft, Grant; Wilmshurst, John; Mduma, Simon; Sinclair, Anthony R E

    2005-01-21

    Territorial behavior is expected to buffer populations against short-term environmental perturbations, but we have found that group living in African lions causes a complex response to long-term ecological change. Despite numerous gradual changes in prey availability and vegetative cover, regional populations of Serengeti lions remained stable for 10- to 20-year periods and only shifted to new equilibria in sudden leaps. Although gradually improving environmental conditions provided sufficient resources to permit the subdivision of preexisting territories, regional lion populations did not expand until short-term conditions supplied enough prey to generate large cohorts of surviving young. The results of a simulation model show that the observed pattern of "saltatory equilibria" results from the lions' grouping behavior.

  16. Multiple populations in globular clusters: constraints from kinematics and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hénault-Brunet, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We discuss constraints on the formation of multiple populations in globular clusters (GCs) imposed by their present-day kinematics (velocity dispersion and anisotropy) and spatial distribution. We argue that the observational evidence collected so far in the outer parts of clusters is generally consistent with an enriched population forming more centrally concentrated compared to the primordial population, in agreement with all the scenarios proposed to date (in some cases by design), but not sufficient to favour a particular scenario. We highlight that the differential rotation of subpopulations is a signature that may provide crucial new constraints and allow us to distinguish between various scenarios. Finally, we discuss the spatial distribution of subpopulations in the central regions of GCs and speculate that mass segregation between subpopulations may be due to a difference in their binary fraction.

  17. Phenotypic resistance and the dynamics of bacterial escape from phage control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, James J.; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Schmerer, Matthew;

    2014-01-01

    The canonical view of phage - bacterial interactions in dense, liquid cultures is that the phage will eliminate most of the sensitive cells; genetic resistance will then ascend to restore high bacterial densities. Yet there are various mechanisms by which bacteria may remain sensitive to phages...... but still attain high densities in their presence - because bacteria enter a transient state of reduced adsorption. Importantly, these mechanisms may be cryptic and inapparent prior to the addition of phage yet result in a rapid rebound of bacterial density after phage are introduced. We describe...... mathematical models of these processes and suggest how different types of this 'phenotypic' resistance may be elucidated. We offer preliminary in vitro studies of a previously characterized E. coli model system and Campylobacter jejuni illustrating apparent phenotypic resistance. As phenotypic resistance may...

  18. Molecular characterization of bacterial populations of different soils Caracterização molecular de populações bacterianas de diferentes solos

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Matheus Pereira; Érico Leandro da Silveira; Denilson César Scaquitto; Eliamar Aparecida Nascimbém Pedrinho; Silvana Pompéia Val-Moraes; Ester Wickert; Lúcia Maria Carareto-Alves; Eliana Gertrudes de Macedo Lemos

    2006-01-01

    Until recently, few studies were carried out in Brazil about diversity of bacterial soil communities. Aiming to characterize the bacterial population in the soil through 16S rRNA analysis, two types of soil have been analyzed: one of them characterized by intensive use where tomato, beans and corn were cultivated (CS); the other analyzed soil was under forest (FS), unchanged by man; both located in Guaíra, São Paulo State, Brazil. Using specific primers, 16S rRNA genes from metagenomic DNA in...

  19. The population dynamical implications of male-biased parasitism in different mating systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R Miller

    Full Text Available Although there is growing evidence that males tend to suffer higher levels of parasitism than females, the implications of this for the population dynamics of the host population are not yet understood. Here we build on an established 'two-sex' model and investigate how increased susceptibility to infection in males affects the dynamics, under different mating systems. We investigate the effect of pathogenic disease at different case mortalities, under both monogamous and polygynous mating systems. If the case mortality is low, then male-biased parasitism appears similar to unbiased parasitism in terms of its effect on the population dynamics. At higher case mortalities, we identified significant differences between male-biased and unbiased parasitism. A host population may therefore be differentially affected by male-biased and unbiased parasitism. The dynamical outcome is likely to depend on a complex interaction between the host's mating system and demography, and the parasite virulence.

  20. Dynamic complexities in a single-species discrete population model with stage structure and birth pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Shujing E-mail: gaosjmath@tom.com; Chen Lansun

    2005-01-01

    Natural population, whose population numbers are small and generations are non-overlapping, can be modelled by difference equations that describe how the population evolve in discrete time-steps. This paper investigates a recent study on the dynamics complexities in a single-species discrete population model with stage structure and birth pulses. Using the stroboscopic map, we obtain an exact cycle of system, and obtain the threshold conditions for its stability. Above this, there is a characteristic sequence of bifurcations, leading to chaotic dynamics, which implies that this the dynamical behaviors of the single-species discrete model with birth pulses are very complex, including (a) non-unique dynamics, meaning that several attractors and chaos coexist; (b) small-amplitude annual oscillations; (c) large-amplitude multi-annual cycles; (d) chaos. Some interesting results are obtained and they showed that pulsing provides a natural period or cyclicity that allows for a period-doubling route to chaos.

  1. Dynamic complexities in a single-species discrete population model with stage structure and birth pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural population, whose population numbers are small and generations are non-overlapping, can be modelled by difference equations that describe how the population evolve in discrete time-steps. This paper investigates a recent study on the dynamics complexities in a single-species discrete population model with stage structure and birth pulses. Using the stroboscopic map, we obtain an exact cycle of system, and obtain the threshold conditions for its stability. Above this, there is a characteristic sequence of bifurcations, leading to chaotic dynamics, which implies that this the dynamical behaviors of the single-species discrete model with birth pulses are very complex, including (a) non-unique dynamics, meaning that several attractors and chaos coexist; (b) small-amplitude annual oscillations; (c) large-amplitude multi-annual cycles; (d) chaos. Some interesting results are obtained and they showed that pulsing provides a natural period or cyclicity that allows for a period-doubling route to chaos

  2. Population dynamics and distribution of muskoxen in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the population dynamics and distribution of muskoxen in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. Numbers of muskoxen in the Arctic National...

  3. Approximation of solutions to retarded differential equations with applications to population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bahuguna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a retarded differential equation with applications to population dynamics. We establish the convergence of a finite-dimensional approximations of a unique solution, the existence and uniqueness of which are also proved in the process.

  4. How Predation and Landscape Fragmentation Affect Vole Population Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalkvist, Trine; Sibly, Richard M.; Topping, Chris J.

    2011-01-01

    population cycles. Because these factors covary along the gradient it is difficult to distinguish their effects experimentally in the field. The distinction is here attempted using realistic agent-based modelling. Methodology/Principal Findings: By using a spatially explicit computer simulation model based...... on behavioural and ecological data from the field vole (Microtus agrestis), we generated a number of repeated time series of vole densities whose mean population size and amplitude were measured. Subsequently, these time series were subjected to statistical autoregressive modelling, to investigate the effects...

  5. The dynamics of discrete populations and series of events

    CERN Document Server

    Hopcraft, Keith Iain; Ridley, Kevin D

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionReferencesStatistical PreliminariesIntroductionProbability DistributionsMoment-Generating FunctionsDiscrete ProcessesSeries of EventsSummaryFurther ReadingMarkovian Population ProcessesIntroductionBirths and DeathsImmigration and the Poisson ProcessThe Effect of MeasurementCorrelation of CountsSummaryFurther ReadingThe Birth-Death-Immigration ProcessIntroductionRate Equations for the ProcessEquation for the Generating FunctionGeneral Time-Dependent SolutionFluctuation Characteristics of a Birth-Death-Immigration PopulationSampling and Measurement ProcessesCorrelation of CountsSumma

  6. Effect of Nonhost Cultivars on Heterodera schachtii Population Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, G. D.

    1980-01-01

    Broadcast plantings of nonhost cultivars (alfalfa, barley, bean, onion, potato, and wheat) in soil in redwood boxes (4.2 × 30 × 14 cm) infested with Heterodera schachtii reduced the initial nematode populations (P = 0.05). The reduction was greater with sugarbeets, a host, than with all other cropping treatments except onion, bean, and fallow (P = 0.05). After 80 days, when the root growth of all treatments had completely penetrated the soil, the nematode population was lower under onion than...

  7. A dynamic urban air pollution population exposure assessment study using model and population density data derived by mobile phone traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariazzo, Claudio; Pelliccioni, Armando; Bolignano, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    A dynamic city-wide air pollution exposure assessment study has been carried out for the urban population of Rome, Italy, by using time resolved population distribution maps, derived by mobile phone traffic data, and modelled air pollutants (NO2, O3 and PM2.5) concentrations obtained by an integrated air dispersion modelling system. More than a million of persons were tracked during two months (March and April 2015) for their position within the city and its surroundings areas, with a time resolution of 15 min and mapped over an irregular grid system with a minimum resolution of 0.26 × 0.34 Km2. In addition, demographics information (as gender and age ranges) were available in a separated dataset not connected with the total population one. Such BigData were matched in time and space with air pollution model results and then used to produce hourly and daily resolved cumulative population exposures during the studied period. A significant mobility of population was identified with higher population densities in downtown areas during daytime increasing of up to 1000 people/Km2 with respect to nigh-time one, likely produced by commuters, tourists and working age population. Strong variability (up to ±50% for NO2) of population exposures were detected as an effect of both mobility and time/spatial changing in pollutants concentrations. A comparison with the correspondent stationary approach based on National Census data, allows detecting the inability of latter in estimating the actual variability of population exposure. Significant underestimations of the amount of population exposed to daily PM2.5 WHO guideline was identified for the Census approach. Very small differences (up to a few μg/m3) on exposure were detected for gender and age ranges population classes.

  8. Modeling complex spatial dynamics of two-population interaction in urbanization process

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2013-01-01

    This paper is mainly devoted to lay an empirical foundation for further research on complex spatial dynamics of two-population interaction. Based on the US population census data, a rural and urban population interaction model is developed. Subsequently a logistic equation on percentage urban is derived from the urbanization model so that spatial interaction can be connected mathematically with logistic growth. The numerical experiment by using the discretized urban-rural population interaction model of urbanization shows a period-doubling bifurcation and chaotic behavior, which is identical in patterns to those from the simple mathematical models of logistic growth in ecology. This suggests that the complicated dynamics of logistic growth may come from some kind of the nonlinear interaction. The results from this study help to understand urbanization, urban-rural population interaction, chaotic dynamics, and spatial complexity of geographical systems.

  9. Individual movement behavior, matrix heterogeneity, and the dynamics of spatially structured populations

    OpenAIRE

    Revilla, Eloy; Wiegand, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of spatially structured populations is characterized by within- and between-patch processes. The available theory describes the latter with simple distance-dependent functions that depend on landscape properties such as interpatch distance or patch size. Despite its potential role, we lack a good mechanistic understanding of how the movement of individuals between patches affects the dynamics of these populations. We used the theoretical framework provided by movement ecology to ...

  10. About a dynamic model of interaction of insect population with food plant

    OpenAIRE

    L.V. Nedorezov

    2011-01-01

    In present paper there is the consideration of mathematical model of food plant (resource) - consumer (insect population) - pathogen system dynamics which is constructed as a system of ordinary differential equations. The dynamic regimes of model are analyzed and, in particular, with the help of numerical methods it is shown that trigger regimes (regimes with two stable attractors) can be realized in model under very simple assumptions about ecological and intra-population processes functioni...

  11. How predation and landscape fragmentation affect vole population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalkvist, Trine; Sibly, Richard; Topping, Christopher John

    2011-01-01

    Background: Microtine species in Fennoscandia display a distinct north-south gradient from regular cycles to stable populations. The gradient has often been attributed to changes in the interactions between microtines and their predators. Although the spatial structure of the environment is known...

  12. Food-dependent individual growth and population dynamics in fishes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Persson; A.M. de Roos

    2006-01-01

    It is long since well established that growth and development in fish individuals are heavily dependent on food intake. Yet, this dependence of individual development on food levels has only to a limited extent been taken into consideration when studying fish population and community processes. Usin

  13. A stage-based model of manatee population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, M.C.; Langtimm, C.A.; Kendall, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    A stage-structured population model for the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) was developed that explicitly incorporates uncertainty in parameter estimates. The growth rates calculated with this model reflect the status of the regional populations over the most recent 10-yr period. The Northwest and Upper St. Johns River regions have growth rates (8) of 1.037 (95% interval, 1.016?1.056) and 1.062 (1.037?1.081), respectively. The Southwest region has a growth rate of 0.989 (0.946?1.024), suggesting this population has been declining at about 1.1% per year. The estimated growth rate in the Atlantic region is 1.010 (0.988?1.029), but there is some uncertainty about whether adult survival rates have been constant over the last 10 yr; using the mean survival rates from the most recent 5-yr period, the estimated growth rate in this region is 0.970 (0.938?0.998). Elasticity analysis indicates that the most effective management actions should seek to increase adult survival rates. Decomposition of the uncertainty in the growth rates indicates that uncertainty about population status can best be reduced through increased monitoring of adult survival rate.

  14. Stochastic population dynamics in astrochemistry and aerosol science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losert-Valiente Kroon, C. M.

    Classical, non-equilibrium systems of diffusing species or entities undergoing depletion, evaporation and reaction processes are at the heart of many problems in Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Financial Mathematics. It is well known that fluctuations and correlations in statistical systems can have a profound influence on the macroscopic properties of the system. However, the traditional rate equations that describe the evolution of mean populations in time and space do not incorporate statistical fluctuations. This becomes an issue of great importance when population densities are low. In order to develop a stochastic description of birth-and-death processes beyond the mean field approximation I employ techniques in classical many-body Physics in a manner analogous to the treatment of quantum systems. I obtain promising results to understand and quantify the exact circumstances of the failure of the mean-field approximation in specific problems in Astrophysics, namely heterogeneous chemical reactions in interstellar clouds, and in Aerosol Science, namely heterogeneous nucleation processes, and deliver the means to manipulate the alternative stochastic framework according to the Doi-Peliti formalism. In this framework the mean population of a species is given by the average of a solution to a set of constraint equations over all realisations of the stochastic noise. The constraint equations are inhomogeneous stochastic partial differential equations with multiplicative real or complex Gaussian noise. In general, these equations cannot be solved analytically. Therefore I resort to the numerical implementation of the Doi-Peliti formalism. The main code is written in the GNU C language, some algebraic calculations are performed by means of the MapleV package. In the case of large population densities the stochastic framework renders the same results as the mean field approximation whereas for low population densities its predictions differ substantially from the

  15. Reconstructing local population dynamics in noisy metapopulations--the role of random catastrophes and Allee effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Edmund M; Avilés, Leticia

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructing the dynamics of populations is complicated by the different types of stochasticity experienced by populations, in particular if some forms of stochasticity introduce bias in parameter estimation in addition to error. Identification of systematic biases is critical when determining whether the intrinsic dynamics of populations are stable or unstable and whether or not populations exhibit an Allee effect, i.e., a minimum size below which deterministic extinction should follow. Using a simulation model that allows for Allee effects and a range of intrinsic dynamics, we investigated how three types of stochasticity--demographic, environmental, and random catastrophes--affect our ability to reconstruct the intrinsic dynamics of populations. Demographic stochasticity aside, which is only problematic in small populations, we find that environmental stochasticity--positive and negative environmental fluctuations--caused increased error in parameter estimation, but bias was rarely problematic, except at the highest levels of noise. Random catastrophes, events causing large-scale mortality and likely to be more common than usually recognized, caused immediate bias in parameter estimates, in particular when Allee effects were large. In the latter case, population stability was predicted when endogenous dynamics were actually unstable and the minimum viable population size was overestimated in populations with small or non-existent Allee effects. Catastrophes also generally increased extinction risk, in particular when endogenous Allee effects were large. We propose a method for identifying data points likely resulting from catastrophic events when such events have not been recorded. Using social spider colonies (Anelosimus spp.) as models for populations, we show that after known or suspected catastrophes are accounted for, reconstructed growth parameters are consistent with intrinsic dynamical instability and substantial Allee effects. Our results are

  16. Reconstructing local population dynamics in noisy metapopulations--the role of random catastrophes and Allee effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund M Hart

    Full Text Available Reconstructing the dynamics of populations is complicated by the different types of stochasticity experienced by populations, in particular if some forms of stochasticity introduce bias in parameter estimation in addition to error. Identification of systematic biases is critical when determining whether the intrinsic dynamics of populations are stable or unstable and whether or not populations exhibit an Allee effect, i.e., a minimum size below which deterministic extinction should follow. Using a simulation model that allows for Allee effects and a range of intrinsic dynamics, we investigated how three types of stochasticity--demographic, environmental, and random catastrophes--affect our ability to reconstruct the intrinsic dynamics of populations. Demographic stochasticity aside, which is only problematic in small populations, we find that environmental stochasticity--positive and negative environmental fluctuations--caused increased error in parameter estimation, but bias was rarely problematic, except at the highest levels of noise. Random catastrophes, events causing large-scale mortality and likely to be more common than usually recognized, caused immediate bias in parameter estimates, in particular when Allee effects were large. In the latter case, population stability was predicted when endogenous dynamics were actually unstable and the minimum viable population size was overestimated in populations with small or non-existent Allee effects. Catastrophes also generally increased extinction risk, in particular when endogenous Allee effects were large. We propose a method for identifying data points likely resulting from catastrophic events when such events have not been recorded. Using social spider colonies (Anelosimus spp. as models for populations, we show that after known or suspected catastrophes are accounted for, reconstructed growth parameters are consistent with intrinsic dynamical instability and substantial Allee effects. Our

  17. Long-Term Trends and Role of Climate in the Population Dynamics of Eurasian Reindeer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstkotte, Tim; Kaarlejärvi, Elina; Sévêque, Anthony; Stammler, Florian; Olofsson, Johan; Forbes, Bruce C.; Moen, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is increasing in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions at a higher rate than anywhere else in the world. The frequency and nature of precipitation events are also predicted to change in the future. These changes in climate are expected, together with increasing human pressures, to have significant impacts on Arctic and sub-Arctic species and ecosystems. Due to the key role that reindeer play in those ecosystems, it is essential to understand how climate will affect the region’s most important species. Our study assesses the role of climate on the dynamics of fourteen Eurasian reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) populations, using for the first time data on reindeer abundance collected over a 70-year period, including both wild and semi-domesticated reindeer, and covering more than half of the species’ total range. We analyzed trends in population dynamics, investigated synchrony among population growth rates, and assessed the effects of climate on population growth rates. Trends in the population dynamics were remarkably heterogeneous. Synchrony was apparent only among some populations and was not correlated with distance among population ranges. Proxies of climate variability mostly failed to explain population growth rates and synchrony. For both wild and semi-domesticated populations, local weather, biotic pressures, loss of habitat and human disturbances appear to have been more important drivers of reindeer population dynamics than climate. In semi-domesticated populations, management strategies may have masked the effects of climate. Conservation efforts should aim to mitigate human disturbances, which could exacerbate the potentially negative effects of climate change on reindeer populations in the future. Special protection and support should be granted to those semi-domesticated populations that suffered the most because of the collapse of the Soviet Union, in order to protect the livelihood of indigenous peoples that depend on the species, and the multi

  18. Long-Term Trends and Role of Climate in the Population Dynamics of Eurasian Reindeer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uboni, Alessia; Horstkotte, Tim; Kaarlejärvi, Elina; Sévêque, Anthony; Stammler, Florian; Olofsson, Johan; Forbes, Bruce C; Moen, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is increasing in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions at a higher rate than anywhere else in the world. The frequency and nature of precipitation events are also predicted to change in the future. These changes in climate are expected, together with increasing human pressures, to have significant impacts on Arctic and sub-Arctic species and ecosystems. Due to the key role that reindeer play in those ecosystems, it is essential to understand how climate will affect the region's most important species. Our study assesses the role of climate on the dynamics of fourteen Eurasian reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) populations, using for the first time data on reindeer abundance collected over a 70-year period, including both wild and semi-domesticated reindeer, and covering more than half of the species' total range. We analyzed trends in population dynamics, investigated synchrony among population growth rates, and assessed the effects of climate on population growth rates. Trends in the population dynamics were remarkably heterogeneous. Synchrony was apparent only among some populations and was not correlated with distance among population ranges. Proxies of climate variability mostly failed to explain population growth rates and synchrony. For both wild and semi-domesticated populations, local weather, biotic pressures, loss of habitat and human disturbances appear to have been more important drivers of reindeer population dynamics than climate. In semi-domesticated populations, management strategies may have masked the effects of climate. Conservation efforts should aim to mitigate human disturbances, which could exacerbate the potentially negative effects of climate change on reindeer populations in the future. Special protection and support should be granted to those semi-domesticated populations that suffered the most because of the collapse of the Soviet Union, in order to protect the livelihood of indigenous peoples that depend on the species, and the multi

  19. Long-Term Trends and Role of Climate in the Population Dynamics of Eurasian Reindeer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Uboni

    Full Text Available Temperature is increasing in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions at a higher rate than anywhere else in the world. The frequency and nature of precipitation events are also predicted to change in the future. These changes in climate are expected, together with increasing human pressures, to have significant impacts on Arctic and sub-Arctic species and ecosystems. Due to the key role that reindeer play in those ecosystems, it is essential to understand how climate will affect the region's most important species. Our study assesses the role of climate on the dynamics of fourteen Eurasian reindeer (Rangifer tarandus populations, using for the first time data on reindeer abundance collected over a 70-year period, including both wild and semi-domesticated reindeer, and covering more than half of the species' total range. We analyzed trends in population dynamics, investigated synchrony among population growth rates, and assessed the effects of climate on population growth rates. Trends in the population dynamics were remarkably heterogeneous. Synchrony was apparent only among some populations and was not correlated with distance among population ranges. Proxies of climate variability mostly failed to explain population growth rates and synchrony. For both wild and semi-domesticated populations, local weather, biotic pressures, loss of habitat and human disturbances appear to have been more important drivers of reindeer population dynamics than climate. In semi-domesticated populations, management strategies may have masked the effects of climate. Conservation efforts should aim to mitigate human disturbances, which could exacerbate the potentially negative effects of climate change on reindeer populations in the future. Special protection and support should be granted to those semi-domesticated populations that suffered the most because of the collapse of the Soviet Union, in order to protect the livelihood of indigenous peoples that depend on the species

  20. Breeding site heterogeneity reduces variability in frog recruitment and population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffery, Rebecca M.; Eby, Lisa A.; Maxell, Bryce A.; Corn, Paul Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Environmental stochasticity can have profound effects on the dynamics and viability of wild populations, and habitat heterogeneity provides one mechanism by which populations may be buffered against the negative effects of environmental fluctuations. Heterogeneity in breeding pond hydroperiod across the landscape may allow amphibian populations to persist despite variable interannual precipitation. We examined recruitment dynamics over 10 yr in a high-elevation Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) population that breeds in ponds with a variety of hydroperiods. We combined these data with matrix population models to quantify the consequences of heterogeneity in pond hydroperiod on net recruitment (i.e. number of metamorphs produced) and population growth rates. We compared our heterogeneous system to hypothetical homogeneous environments with only ephemeral ponds, only semi-permanent ponds, and only permanent ponds. We also examined the effects of breeding pond habitat loss on population growth rates. Most eggs were laid in permanent ponds each year, but survival to metamorphosis was highest in the semi-permanent ponds. Recruitment success varied by both year and pond type. Net recruitment and stochastic population growth rate were highest under a scenario with homogeneous semi-permanent ponds, but variability in recruitment was lowest in the scenario with the observed heterogeneity in hydroperiods. Loss of pond habitat decreased population growth rate, with greater decreases associated with loss of permanent and semi-permanent habitat. The presence of a diversity of pond hydroperiods on the landscape will influence population dynamics, including reducing variability in recruitment in an uncertain climatic future.

  1. Molecular assessment of bacterial community dynamics and functional endpoints during sediment bioaccumulation test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepens, N.J.; Dimitrov, M.R.; Koelmans, A.A.; Smidt, H.

    2015-01-01

    Whole sediment toxicity tests play an important role in environmental risk assessment of organic chemicals. It is not clear, however, to what extent changing microbial community composition and associated functions affect sediment test results. We assessed the development of bacterial communities in

  2. Population dynamics of bowfin in a south Georgia reservoir: latitudinal comparisons of population structure, growth, and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Nicholas J.; Bonvechio, Timothy F.; McCormick, Joshua L.; Quist, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the population dynamics of bowfin (Amia calva) in Lake Lindsay Grace, Georgia, and to compare those dynamics to other bowfin populations. Relative abundance of bowfin sampled in 2010 in Lake Lindsay Grace was low and variable (mean±SD; 2.7±4.7 fish per hour of electrofishing). Total length (TL) of bowfin collected in Lake Lindsay Grace varied from 233–683 mm. Age of bowfin in Lake Lindsay Grace varied from 0–5 yr. Total annual mortality (A) was estimated at 68%. Both sexes appeared to be fully mature by age 2 with gonadosomatic index values above 8 for females and close to 1 for males. The majority of females were older, longer, and heavier than males. Bowfin in Lake Lindsay Grace had fast growth up to age 4 and higher total annual mortality than the other populations examined in this study. A chi-square test indicated that size structure of bowfin from Lake Lindsay Grace was different than those of a Louisiana population and two bowfin populations from the upper Mississippi River. To further assess bowfin size structure, we proposed standard length (i.e., TL) categories: stock (200 mm, 8 inches), quality (350 mm, 14 inches), preferred (460 mm, 18 inches), memorable (560 mm, 22, inches), and trophy (710 mm, 28 inches). Because our knowledge of bowfin ecology is limited, additional understanding of bowfin population dynamics provides important insight that can be used in management of bowfin across their distribution.

  3. demoniche – an R-package for simulating spatially-explicit population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nenzén, Hedvig K.; Swab, Rebecca Marie; Keith, David A.;

    2012-01-01

    demoniche is a freely available R-package which simulates stochastic population dynamics in multiple populations of a species. A demographic model projects population sizes utilizing several transition matrices that can represent impacts on species growth. The demoniche model offers options...... for setting demographic stochasticity, carrying capacity, and dispersal. The demographic projection in each population is linked to spatially-explicit niche values, which affect the species growth. With the demoniche package it is possible to compare the influence of scenarios of environmental changes...... on future population sizes, extinction probabilities, and range shifts of species....

  4. A life-history perspective on the demographic drivers of structured population dynamics in changing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koons, David N; Iles, David T; Schaub, Michael; Caswell, Hal

    2016-09-01

    Current understanding of life-history evolution and how demographic parameters contribute to population dynamics across species is largely based on assumptions of either constant environments or stationary environmental variation. Meanwhile, species are faced with non-stationary environmental conditions (changing mean, variance, or both) created by climate and landscape change. To close the gap between contemporary reality and demographic theory, we develop a set of transient life table response experiments (LTREs) for decomposing realised population growth rates into contributions from specific vital rates and components of population structure. Using transient LTREs in a theoretical framework, we reveal that established concepts in population biology will require revision because of reliance on approaches that do not address the influence of unstable population structure on population growth and mean fitness. Going forward, transient LTREs will enhance understanding of demography and improve the explanatory power of models used to understand ecological and evolutionary dynamics. PMID:27401966

  5. Modelling of population dynamics of red king crab using Bayesian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakanev Sergey ...

    2012-10-01

    Modeling population dynamics based on the Bayesian approach enables to successfully resolve the above issues. The integration of the data from various studies into a unified model based on Bayesian parameter estimation method provides a much more detailed description of the processes occurring in the population.

  6. Disentangling the effects of climate, density dependence, and harvest on an iconic large herbivore's population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koons, David; Colchero, Fernando; Hersey, Kent;

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relative effects of climate, harvest, and density dependence on population dynamics is critical for guiding sound population management, especially for ungulates in arid and semi-arid environments experiencing climate change. To address these issues for bison in southern Utah, w...

  7. Population dynamics under increasing environmental variability: implications of climate change for ecological network design criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verboom, J.; Schippers, P.; Cormont, A.; Sterk, M.; Vos, C.C.; Opdam, P.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence that climate change causes an increase in variation in conditions for plant and animal populations. This increase in variation, e.g. amplified inter-annual variability in temperature and rainfall has population dynamical consequences because it raises the variation in vital

  8. Eel population dynamic and habitat relationships in the European southern tip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon José De Miguel

    2015-11-01

    According to our previous results, the eel population in the most southern region in Europe shows similar averages in dynamic population indicators compared to other European areas. On the other hand, no environmental predictors showed major influence on catchability, except for, those related to previous abundant rainfalls.

  9. Weed populations and crop rotations: exploring dynamics of a structured periodic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, S.K.; Bosch, F. van den; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2002-01-01

    The periodic growing of a certain set of crops in a prescribed order, called a crop rotation, is considered to be an important tool for managing weed populations. Nevertheless, the effects of crop rotations on weed population dynamics are not well understood. Explanations for rotation effects on wee

  10. Effects of climate change and variability on population dynamics in a long-lived shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, Martijn; Vindenes, Yngvild; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Engen, Steinar; Ens, Bruno J.; Oosterbeek, Kees; Tinbergen, Joost M.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change affects both the mean and variability of climatic variables, but their relative impact on the dynamics of populations is still largely unexplored. Based on a long-term study of the demography of a declining Eurasian Oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus) population, we quantify the eff

  11. Combining a weed traits database with a population dynamics model predicts shifts in weed communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storkey, Jonathan; Holst, Niels; Bøjer, Ole Mission;

    2015-01-01

    , populated and analysed, initially using data for 19 common European weeds, to begin to consolidate trait data in a single repository. The initial choice of traits was driven by the requirements of empirical models of weed population dynamics to identify correlations between traits and model parameters...

  12. The dynamics of endemic malaria in populations of varying size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model for endemic malaria involving variable human and mosquito populations is analysed. A threshold parameter R0 exists and the disease can persist if and only if R0 exceeds 1. R0 is seen to be a generalisation of the basic reproduction ratio associated with the Ross-Macdonald model for malaria transmission. The disease free equilibrium always exist and is globally stable when R0 is below 1. A perturbation analysis is used to approximate the endemic equilibrium in the important case where the disease related death rate is nonzero. A diffusion approximation is used to approximate the quasi-stationary distribution of the associated stochastic model. Numerical simulations show that when R0 is distinctly greater than 1, the endemic deterministic equilibrium is globally stable. Furthermore, in quasi-stationarity, the stochastic process undergoes oscillations about a mean population whose size can be approximated by the stable endemic deterministic equilibrium. (author)

  13. Two-Population Dynamics in a Growing Network Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, Kristinka

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a growing network evolution model with nodal attributes. The model describes the interactions between potentially violent V and non-violent N agents who have different affinities in establishing connections within their own population versus between the populations. The model is able to generate all stable triads observed in real social systems. In the framework of rate equations theory, we employ the mean-field approximation to derive analytical expressions of the degree distribution and the local clustering coefficient for each type of nodes. Analytical derivations agree well with numerical simulation results. The assortativity of the potentially violent network qualitatively resembles the connectivity pattern in terrorist networks that was recently reported. The assortativity of the network driven by aggression shows clearly different behavior than the assortativity of the networks with connections of non-aggressive nature in agreement with recent empirical results of an online social system.

  14. A DYNAMICAL SIGNATURE OF MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN 47 TUCANAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richer, Harvey B.; Heyl, Jeremy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Anderson, Jay; Kalirai, Jason S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Shara, Michael M. [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Dotter, Aaron [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Fahlman, Gregory G. [National Research Council, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Rich, R. Michael, E-mail: richer@astro.ubc.ca, E-mail: heyl@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu, E-mail: jkalarai@stsci.edu, E-mail: mshara@amnh.org, E-mail: aaron.dotter@gmail.com, E-mail: greg.fahlman@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Based on the width of its main sequence, and an actual observed split when viewed through particular filters, it is widely accepted that 47 Tucanae contains multiple stellar populations. In this contribution, we divide the main sequence of 47 Tuc into four color groups, which presumably represent stars of various chemical compositions. The kinematic properties of each of these groups are explored via proper motions, and a strong signal emerges of differing proper-motion anisotropies with differing main-sequence color; the bluest main-sequence stars exhibit the largest proper-motion anisotropy which becomes undetectable for the reddest stars. In addition, the bluest stars are also the most centrally concentrated. A similar analysis for Small Magellanic Cloud stars, which are located in the background of 47 Tuc on our frames, yields none of the anisotropy exhibited by the 47 Tuc stars. We discuss implications of these results for possible formation scenarios of the various populations.

  15. Modelling the effects of climate change on weed population dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    García de León Hernández, David

    2014-01-01

    As the human population continues to increase –it will have surpassed 9 billion people by 2050- food supply must rise in order to sustain people. Climate change represents a threat in the provision of sufficient, secure and nutritious nourishment for everyone. Possible consequences of climate change include a reduction in global agro-ecosystem production, with Spain as one of the most affected countries in Europe. Accordingly, little is known about the possible effects on weed ...

  16. The role of competition and clustering in population dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Brännström, Å; Sumpter, D. J. T.

    2005-01-01

    A simple argument based on the distribution of individuals amongst discrete resource sites is used to show how the form of single species population models depends on the type of competition between, and the spatial clustering of, the individuals. For scramble competition between individuals, we confirm earlier demonstrations that the Ricker model is a direct consequence of a uniform random distribution of individuals across resources. By introducing spatial clustering of individuals accordin...

  17. Quantification of Dynamic Excitation Potential of Pedestrian Population Crossing Footbridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stana Žcaronivanović

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their slenderness, many modern footbridges may vibrate significantly under pedestrian traffic. Consequently, the vibration serviceability of these structures under human-induced dynamic loading is becoming their governing design criterion. Many current vibration serviceability design guidelines, concerned with prediction of the vibration in the vertical direction, estimate a single response level that corresponds to an "average" person crossing the bridge with the step frequency that matches a footbridge natural frequency. However, different pedestrians have different dynamic excitation potential, and therefore could generate significantly different vibration response of the bridge structure. This paper aims to quantify this potential by estimating the range of structural vibrations (in the vertical direction that could be induced by different individuals and the probability of occurrence of any particular vibration level. This is done by introducing the inter- and intra-subject variability in the walking force modelling. The former term refers to inability of a pedestrian to induce an exactly the same force with each step while the latter refers to different forces (in terms of their magnitude, frequency and crossing speed induced by different people. Both types of variability are modelled using the appropriate probability density functions. The probability distributions were then implemented into a framework procedure for vibration response prediction under a single person excitation. Instead of a single response value obtained using currently available design guidelines, this new framework yields a range of possible acceleration responses induced by different people and a distribution function for these responses. The acceleration ranges estimated are then compared with experimental data from two real-life footbridges. The substantial differences in the dynamic response induced by different people are obtained in both the numerical and

  18. Evolutionary dynamics of fluctuating populations with strong mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David

    2013-03-01

    Evolutionary game theory with finite interacting populations is receiving increased attention, including subtle phenomena associated with number fluctuations, i.e., ``genetic drift.'' Models of cooperation and competition often utilize a simplified Moran model, with a strictly fixed total population size. We explore a more general evolutionary model with independent fluctuations in the numbers of two distinct species, in a regime characterized by ``strong mutualism.'' The model has two absorbing states, each corresponding to fixation of one of the two species, and allows exploration of the interplay between growth, competition, and mutualism. When mutualism is favored, number fluctuations eventually drive the system away from a stable fixed point, characterized by cooperation, to one of the absorbing states. Well-mixed populations will thus be taken over by a single species in a finite time, despite the bias towards cooperation. We calculate both the fixation probability and the mean fixation time as a function of the initial conditions and carrying capacities in the strong mutualism regime, using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. Our results are compared to computer simulations.

  19. Population Dynamics of Soil Pseudomonads in the Rhizosphere of Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Loper, Joyce E.; Haack, Caryn; Schroth, Milton N.

    1985-01-01

    Rhizosphere population dynamics of seven Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida strains isolated from rhizospheres of various agricultural plants were studied on potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in field soil under controlled environmental conditions. Rhizosphere populations of two strains (B10 and B4) were quantitatively related to initial seed piece inoculum levels when plants were grown at −0.3 bar matric potential. At a given inoculum level, rhizosphere populations of strain B4 were ...

  20. Population dynamics and spatial distribution of Griffon Vultures (Gyps fulvus) Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Beest, van, I.; Bremer, van den, L.; Boer; Heitkonig, I.M.A.; Monteiro, A.E.

    2008-01-01

    The global decrease of vulture populations has been attributed to several factors, such as food availability, poisoning, human disturbance, or habitat suitability. We studied the effect of factors that vary both spatially and temporally on the nest site distribution of the Griffon Vulture Gyps fulvus in northeast Portugal, and influence the population dynamics of these cliff-dwelling birds. Several demographic parameters were studied in the field, and the age structure of the population was d...